Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE RESPECTING THE PRISONS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, FOR THE YEAR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1892

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0065830.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0065830.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0065830-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0065830-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0065830-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0065830-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0065830-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0065830-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0065830-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0065830.ris

Full Text

 ANNUAL   REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE
respecting the
PRISONS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,
for the
YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER,
1891.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty. 55 Vict.
Prisons Report.
661
REPORT
Victoria, B. 0., 23rd April, 1892.
The Honourable
the Attorney-General, Victoria.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my second annual report on the condition
and management of the principal gaols of this Province, together with an account of the
outlying prisons or lock-ups.
Victoria Gaol.
This gaol is a substantial brick building, containing 78 cells, capable of holding 127
prisoners.
New Westminster Gaol.
This is also a brick structure, containing 77 cells, which will accommodate 156 prisoners.
Nanaimo Gaol.
This gaol is built of logs and heavy timber. It contains 14 cells, with accommodation for
42 prisoners.
Kamloops Gaol.
This prison is built of heavy scantling and lumber. There are altogether 11 cells, which
are capable of holding 22 prisoners.
Suitable Lock-ups
Have been established at the undermentioned points :—
1. Ainsworth,
2. Alert Bay,
3. Ashcroft,
4. Barkerville,
5. Oowichan,
6. Comox,
7. Clinton,
8. Cassiar (Laketon),
9. Donald,
10. Esquimalt,
11. Fort Simpson,
12. Fort Steele,
13. Granite Creek,
14. Golden,
15. Hazleton,
16. Hope,
17. Kamloops,
19. Lytton
20. Metlakatlah,
21. Moodyville,
22. Nicola Lake,
23. Nanaimo,
24. Nelson,
25. Okanagan Mission,
26. Osoyoos (Krugers),
27. Port Moody,
28. Quesnelle,
29. Rock Creek,
30. Revelstoke,
31. Spence's Bridge,
32. Vernon,
33. Vancouver,
34. Wellington,
35 Yale
36! 150-Mile House,
18. Lillooet,
all of which are in good order and answer present requirements.
The following rules for prison discipline are in force throughout this Province,  and have
been found sufficient for the order and conduct of prisons and lock-ups ; 662 Prisons Report. 1892
RULES TO BE OBSERVED IN ALL PROVINCIAL GAOLS AND LOCK-UPS.
1. All Prisoners upon being admitted to the Gaol must be thoroughly searched in the
presence of a Constable and Officer of the Gaol.
2. Prisoners must be searched every evening before being locked up in their cells, and the
cells and beds must also be searched.
3. The cells ill use must be scrubbed and whitewashed every week, and the passages
every day.
4. Prisoners shall have clean underclothing and a bath when required, not less than once
a week. All male Prisoners shall, on conviction and sentence, have their hair cut as close as
may be necessary for the purposes of health and cleanliness.
5. Strict silence must be observed in the cells, and no shouting or loud talking shall be
allowed in the Gaol yard.
6. No lights will be allowed in any of the cells. All lights and fires in the Debtors' room
must be extinguished at 8 o'clock, p. m.
7. No Visitor shall be allowed in the Gaol, or to speak with Prisoners, except by permission
of the Officer in charge, and some Officer must be present at all interviews with Prisoners,
unless otherwise ordered.
8. The Prisoners shall rise at 6:30 o'clock a. m„ from April 1st to September 30th, and
at 7 o'clock a. m., from October 1st to March 31st, and will be allowed half an hour to wash
and dress themselves. In Victoria, New Westminster, and Nanaimo Gaols a Guard must be
on the balcony before the cells are opened.
9. The Gaoler may allow such Prisoners as he thinks fit to be out in the Gaol yard an
hour and a half in the morning, and the same time in the afternoon. On Sundays and holidays
all Prisoners, except those in solitary confinement, are to be allowed this privilege.
10. The chain-gang shall leave the prison for work at 7:30 o'clock a. m. in the summer
time (vide Rule 8), returning at 5:30 o'clock p. m. ; and in the winter time at 8 o'clock a. m.,
returning before dark.    One hour shall be allowed at noon for dinner.
11. All Prisoners must obey the orders of any of the Prison Officers; those in the chain-
gang, while outside the Gaol, must obey the orders of any of the Guards.
12 The Gaoler may place such irons on any Prisoner, other than a debtor, as he may deem
necessary for the prevention of escape, subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Police.
The Senior Convict Guard may refuse to allow any Prisoner to go out in the chain-gang until
he is ironed to his satisfaction, subject to approval as above.
13. Prisoners' irons must be examined daily ; those of the chain-gang, on leaving for work,
by the Senior Convict Guard, and on return by the Officer in charge of the Gaol at the time.
14. While the chain-gang are outside the Gaol, the Senior Guard shall have charge of the
Guards and Convicts.
15. The Assistant Gaolers and Guards, while inside the Gaol, shall be under the orders of
the Gaoler, or the Officer in charge of the Gaol at the time.
16. The Gaoler will be held responsible for the good order, cleanliness, and neatness of
the Prison.
17. Any Prisoner who shall be proved guilty of wilfully disobeying the orders of the
Officer in charge of the Gaol, or of fighting in the Gaol or chain-gang, or of refusing to work,
or of making an unnecessary noise in the Prison, or of destroying clothing or other property of
the Prison, or of refusing to keep himself clean, or of refusing or neglecting to clean his cell 1892 Prisons Report. 663
when necessary or when ordered to do so, or of breaking any of the Prison rules, may be
punished by order of the Superintendent of Police, or, in his absence, by order of any Police or
Stipendiary Magistrate, or of any Justice of the Peace when there is no such Magistrate.
18. The punishment to be inflicted upon Prisoners for any disobedience of the Prison rules
shall not be other than the following :—
(1.) Solitary confinement in dark cell, with or without bedding,  not to exceed six days
for any one offence, nor three days at any one time.
(2.) Bread and water diet, full or half rations, combined or not with No. 1.
(3.) Cold water punishment, with the approval of the visiting Physician.
19. In the absence of the Superintendent of Police, the Gaoler or Officer in charge of the
Gaol shall have authority summarily to confine any Prisoner, for misconduct, in a solitary cell,
or to place irons upon his hands and feet should he find it necessary; such a restraint not to
extend over a longer time than is necessary to bring the matter before the Superintendent of
Police, or, in his absence, before a Police or Stipendiary Magistrate, or of any Justice of the
Peace when there is no such Magistrate.
20. Any person who may be found interfering with the discipline of the Prison shall be
excluded from the Prison as a visitor.
21. A book will be kept by the Gaoler, in which the conduct of Prisoners shall be registered
daily, with a view of obtaining a mitigation of punishment from the proper authorities in cases
meriting reward.
By order,
Frederick S. Hussey,
Provincial Superintendent of Police and Warden of Gaols.
It is satisfactory to be able to report that the clauses in the above rules which refer to
the punishment of convicts for breach of prison discipline are more seldom required than was
formerly the case when no remission of sentence was allowed.
Under present regulations all prisoners under sentence may obtain a remission of five
days in each month for good behaviour and, with a few exceptions, they do avail themselves of
this privilege.
The objectionable practice of marching prisoners through the streets and working them
in irons on public highways has been, I am pleased to say, wholly discontinued at Victoria,
and it is to be hoped that in the near future it will be entirely abolished in all parts of British
Columbia, as the effect on white prisoners in particular is most degrading.
The anexed statements compiled from prison records furnish information as to the number of offences for which prisoners were convicted and sentenced during the year, and the
expenditure connected with the management of the gaols therein referred to.
The Victoria Juvenile Reformatory.
The Reformatory building was completed early in the year 1890 and formally occupied by
the present superintendent and three lads, two under sentence for larceny to 18 months'
imprisonment, and one to six months for vagrancy, in July of the same year.
The building is good and strong and is finished externally and internally to correspond
with the gaol, and contains an office or general room in front, a reformatory ward in the rear,
with nine cells, arranged in three tiers, one above the other, which are approached by stairs
and balconies.
From the upper balcony the bath-room and lavatory, &c, <fec, are reached ; there is also a
room nine feet by thirteen feet, which is used as a shoe shop. The building is heated by
stoves and is quite comfortable.
The Reformatory is arranged to accommodate 18 prisoners, and will fully answer the
purpose for which it is intended for a number of years to come, or until such time as a larger 664 Prisons Report. 1892
and  better institution is required, according to the increase of juvenile depravity, which may
be anticipated with an increase of population.
The Reformatory is connected with the gaol kitchen by an enclosed and covered passage,
secured by strong doors, by means of which food is supplied to the inmates.
The Reformatory being in close connection with the gaol enables the administration of
the establishment to be conducted at a minimum cost.
There is an enclosed yard at the rear of the Reformatory where the lads are allowed out
for exercise.
It is a fact much to be deplored that ever since the construction of this Reformatory up
to the present date its history has been one of a series of escapes, due entirely to carelessness
and inexperience in its management.
On the 19th October, 1890, all three lads escaped and have not been recaptured, since
which time, up to the 14th day of January, 1892, there have been no inmates.
At present there are two boys in confinement, both for larceny, under sentences of three
months each, one of whom has managed to escape twice within one month, but, unlike the
former cases, he has been re-arrested on each occasion and returned to custody.
Instruction is daily given to juvenile offenders under sentence, but very little progress is
made by those undergoing short terms of imprisonment.
Annexed to this Report is a list of all boys who have been sentenced to this Reformatory,
with the particulars of each.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. S. Hussey,
Superintendent of Provincial Police. 55 Vict.
Prisons Report.
665
Statement showing the  offences  for which prisoners   were sentenced during the year ending
31st October, 1891.
Offences.
Abusive and obscene language.
Arson	
Assault	
Assault, felonious .
Attempted suicide.
Bigamy	
Breaches of the peace.
Burg"
rglary .
Contempt of Court	
Carrying unlawful weapons	
Cruelty to animals	
Cutting, wounding, and attempting same	
Deserting employment	
Destroying and injuring property	
Drunk and disorderly	
Embezzlement	
Escaping from and obstructing constable	
Escaping from prison	
Forgery	
Fraud or obtaining money under false pretenses. .
Gambling	
Giving liquor to Indians and unlawful possession.
Horse, cattle, and sheep stealing	
House-breaking and robbery	
Highway robbery	
Indecent assault and exposure    	
Inmates and frequenters of houses of ill-fame	
Larceny	
Manslaughter	
Murder	
Attempt to commit murder	
Rape, and assault with intent	
Shooting with intent	
Sodomy	
Threatening and seditious language	
Vagrancy	
Other offences not above enumerated,	
10
Total.
52
1
3
3
3
55
40
2
14
32
222
is
<v
n
i
i
l
3
1
2
18
19
49
2
2
31
1
I
13
2
173
o
I
a
I
18
2
1
29
2
3
3
247
91
"i
10
1
1
15
1
449
M
36
14
2
7
4
80 666 Prisons Report. 1892
VICTORIA   GAOL.
Victoria Gaol, B. G, November 10th, 1891.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my fourth annual statistical report of the
Victoria Gaol for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
During the prison year 285 prisoners were brought to gaol, being 48 more than the preceding year. On the 31st October, 1890, there were remaining in custody 26 prisoners, and
at the end of the present year 53, being 27 more than last year.
It will be observed on looking over the list of crimes, that a number of prisoners were
charged with the most serious offences against the law, from that of the common drunk to the
gravest of crimes, that of murder. I am pleased to state that each officer connected with the
gaol fully recognizes the responsibility of his position and that each has invariably discharged
his duties to my satisfaction.
Strict economy has been observed in connection with all gaol expenditures, nevertheless
the cost of keep, including all expenses for each prisoner, is 12J cents more than that of the
year previous. I can only account for increase from the fact that the daily average of
prisoners was 9 J less than in 1890. On the other hand, the actual cost of keep for each
prisoner per diem for food and clothing is about one cent per day less. The total cost of food
and clothing amounted to $1,469.68, whilst the total sum received for keep of prisoners from
all sources was $2,856.51, and if the sum of $369.90 for the sale of gaol produce is included,
the amount would be $3,226.41, leaving a balance in favour of the gaol on the food and clothing account of $1,756.73.
All articles supplied to the gaol by contract are fully up to the requirement, and of good
quality, with the exception of the bread, which has been on different occasions of poor quality;
but since I have called the attention of the contractor to the matter there has been a decided
improvement in that most important article of gaol diet.
The health of prisoners generally during the year, with few exceptions, has been good, no
deaths having occurred. The sanitary appointments and the drainage of the gaol are carefully
attended to.
Prisoners sentenced to hard labour have been mostly employed on the gaol premises,
clearing and grubbing new land, improving the grounds generally, and the usual garden work.
A shed has been constructed at the rear of the gaol, at a slight expense, for the use of
prisoners during the wet winter months, when employed breaking stone for roads, of which
material there is a considerable quantity on hand ready for use.
The discipline of prisoners confined in gaol on the whole has been good, more especially
considering the fact that all male prisoners, good, bad, and indifferent, are confined in the
same ward, and have more or less intercourse with each other. However, this cannot be
avoided, as there is no means of classifying prisoners according to their behaviour or crime.
It having been proved to my satisfaction that the wickets in the cell doors were large
enough to admit of prisoners tampering with the locks and of a medium-size prisoner to pass
through, I had the wickets of 44 cells strengthened and the size reduced by the placing of iron
bars across the wicket, so that in future there need be no apprehension of trouble from this
source. 55 Vict. Prisons Report. 667
During the year there has been one escape from custody. A prisoner sentenced to one year
at hard labour for robbery managed to elude the vigilance of the guard when working at the
rear of the gaol, and near the fence. The prisoner managed to get into the city during the
night and was ably assisted by his friends (a number of longshoremen) to make good his escape
to the United States. This man was known as a "tough," and the province loses nothing by
his absence; but it is very undesirable that any criminal should obtain his liberty by escape,
since it encourages attempts by others, and no effort or reasonable expense should be spared to
secure a recapture should an escape occur again.
Religious service is held for the benefit and improvement of prisoners every Sunday. The
Rev. M. C. Brown, M.A., of the Church of England, has inaugurated a service in the morning,
and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union continue, as in the past, a service in the
afternoon, both services being well attended ; so that from a spiritual point of view the
religious requirements of prisoners are by no means neglected.
In my last annual report attention was called to several needed improvements, the
principal one being the insecurity of the high gaol-yard fence, which is liable to be blown down
at any time during the strong winds of winter. It is very desirable that an appropriation of
$300.00 be made in the estimates for this very necessary work.
I have again compiled a complete list of crimes, nationalities, occupations, religious
denominations, habits, social condition, and ages, in as concise a form as possible, and which,
for some unaccountable reason, was not included in the published report of last year.
I have the honour to be Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. F. John,
Warden.
F. S. Hussey, Esq.,
Superintendent Provincial Police, &c, &c, Victoria. 668
Prisons Report.
1892
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT VICTORIA, B, C.
Report for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salabt per Annum.
R. F. John	
$1,200 00
960 00
Wm. Muldoon 	
2nd     ,,     	
R. Liddell	
840 00
3rd     ,	
840 00
960 00
2nd    ,,       	
C. H. F. Blake	
Jos. Mellon	
840 00
3rd    ,,       	
720 00
Dr. J. S. Helmeken	
400 00
$6,760 00
2—.Statement " A."
Number of Prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1890    26
Number of Prisoners received during the year      285
 311
3.—Statement " B."
A Return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners who died in Gaol during
the year ending 31st October, 1891    None.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence 133
„ ,,     Supreme Court    37
,, ,,     County Court Judge's Criminal Court	
„ ,,     Provincial Police Court    19
„ on payment of fine    28
„ temporarily insane      5
Transferred to Penitentiary      7
„ Lunatic Asylum   ,      2
„ Nanaimo Gaol      2
„ Naval authorities    21
Out on bail      3
Escaped from custody      1
  258
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1891  53
311 55 Vict. Prisons Report. fj6d
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year    None.
6.—Statement "E."
Average number of Prisoners per month  990
,, ,, per day  32£
Number of Prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1890  26
1891   53
Total number received during the year  285
7.—Statement "F."—Receipts and Expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
Amount received for keep of Prisoners, Victoria City $1,783 86
Naval      855 25
„ „ „ Provincial       217 40
  $2,856 51
Cash received for sale of Gaol produce and paid to Sergt. Langley     369 90
Provincial fines received and paid to Sergt. Langley and Supt. Hussey  163 50
Victoria City Police Court fines received and paid over to Clerk, C. P. Court  285 00
Expenditure.
Bread    $478 78
Meat       384 56
Groceries, soap, brooms, and brushes      422 24
Clothing, bedding, and repairing material         184 10
  1,469 68
Coal and coke  455 40
Light (gas)    225 95
Water  107 28
Medicine and disinfectants  36 81
Lime, paint, oil, and tar   30 13
Household and kitchen utensils    39 50
Works and buildings, including tools  291   18
Repairs to locks and cell doors ;     145 00
Sundry accounts, as per vouchers  83 37
2,884 30
Salaries, including 8 months to ex-Guard Workman, disabled  7,120 00
Total $10,004 30
Keep of each Prisoner for food and clothing, per diem 12| cents.
„ „      including salaries and all expenses, per diem 84^     ,,
Crimes.—Abduction,   1; attempt to rob, 1; assault, 10; assault with intent to rob, 3
accessory to murder, 1 ; attempt to murder, 1; bigamy, 1 ; breach Naval Discipline Act, 16
breach Military   Act, 7 ; breach Merchants' Shipping Act,   13;   breaking and entering, 1,
breaking gaol, 1; broaching cargo, 2; cattle stealing,  1; conspiracy, 16; carrying concealed
weapon, 1; creating disturbances, 3; debtors, 1; drunkeness and disorderly, 53; embezzlement, 670
Prisons Report.
1892
3 ; gambling 5 ; housebreaking, 2 ; indecent exposure, 2 ; infraction Indian Liquor Act, 56 ;
larceny, 41; murder, 2; necessary witness, 1; obtaining money by false pretences, 6; obstructing passengers, 1; possessing stolen property, 1 ; prejury, 2 ; robbery, 2 ; rescuing prisoner, 1 ;
rape, 2 ; refusing to pay fare, 2 ; sheep stealing, 1 ; sodomy, 2 ; unsound mind, 7 ; vagrancy,
14.    Total, 285.
Nationalities.—England, 69; Ireland, 24; Scotland, 16; Wales, 7; Canada, 20; British
Columbia, 57; United States, 39; China, 20; Norway and Sweden, 11; Germany, 5; France,
3 ; Italy, 3; Australia, 4 ; other countries, 7.    Total, 285.
Occupations.—Bartenders, 2 ; bricklayers, 1 ; boot-blacks, 1 ; boiler-makers, 1 ; C Battery
men, 7; carpenters, 11 ; cooks, 11; clerks, 3; farmers, 9; fishermen, 19; hostlers, 1; hunters,
1 ; inn-keepers, 2 ; labourers, 61 ; longshoremen, 9 ; musicians, 1 ; marines, 4 ; moulders, 1 ;
machinists, 4; miners, 21; painters, 3; seamen, 44; shoemakers, 1; stokers, 13; stonemasons, 1 ; tailors, 1 ; teamsters, 5 ; traders, 6 ; tinsmiths, 2 ; no occupation, 39.    Total, 285.
Religious Denominations.—Church of England, 71; Roman Catholic, 5iS ; Presbyterians,
31 ; Methodist, 25; Lutheran, 14; Baptist, 3; Unitarian, 1; religion not defined, 82. Total,
285.
Educational.—Read and write, 180; read only, 13; no education, 92.    Total, 285.
Social Condition.—Single, 205; married, 74; widowers, 5; widows, 1.    Total, 285.
Habits.—Temperate, 58 ; intemperate, 227.    Total, 285.
Ages from 17 to 20    24
„ 20 to 30 129
30 to 40   69
40 to 50    39
50 to 60    19
60 to 70     5
Total 285
1891.
Return showing how Prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October,
.a
'o
60
.g
T3
CD
a
CS
a
60
«3
a
o
o
Amount
Month.
o
<D
3   bO
■3 w>
CD
Chaingang—where and how
received for
u
CD
X>
s
fl
a
(D
Pi
60
fl   Sh
fl    fa
•fl   <U
a
CD
-*>
a
CD
employed.
prison labour,
if any.
m
£
&J?
o r^
0
0)
U
"3 =g
■go
47
T3
42
'3
is
<
5
"ptis
13
Hi?
S
53
J4
00
(3
c3
to
9
1—1
fl
Nov.,         1890
8
4
1
1
1 Improving grounds, clearing
Nil.
Dec,           „
58
48
2
17
14
4
9
1
new   land,   blasting   and
\ O fl <v *°
Jan.,           1891
58
50
3
12
15
2
9
1
breaking   rock for roads.
JP <o "^
Feb.,
36
33
2
13
7
1
7
2
In very wet weather pris
*>-S n^
March,        ,,
50
27
20
12
7
1
5
2
oners are employed pick
g 2 ° g ^j
April,          „
43
37
5
11
14
3
5
1
ing    oakum    inside   the
Ii   S   M           *
May,           ,,
39
38
3
9
12
4
1
1
[    Gaol.    Prison labour has
l   "rid     <!><4HT3
June,           ,,
57
39
4
10
12
2
7
2
been utilized on Govern
•2^'s s„l
July;            >>
57
45
5
12
17
3
4
1
ment House grounds and
QJ     »    rL    r*    02
August        „
61
47
7
14
17
2
4
1
the Government Buildings
Sept.,           ,,
66
48
12
16
14
5
5
2
during the early part of
Oct.,
76
55
15
18
22
4
3
3
j     the year. 55 Vict. Prisons Report. 671
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Bread G. T. Demaine.
Meat John Parker.
Groceries, soap, brooms, and brushes H. Saunders.
Clothing H. B. Co.
Coal  Hall, Goepel & Co.
9.—Statement " H." —Value of Prison Property.
Real Estate and Buildings, estimated value $65,000 00
Stores and tools, &c, „       2,500 00
Total $67,500 00
Certified correct.
R F. John,
Warden.
31st October, 1891. 672
Prisons Report.
1892
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NEW WESTMINSTER, B, C.
Report for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
2nd    „     	
W. Moresby	
$1,200 00
912 00
3rd     „      	
4th     „      	
720 00
720 00
W. H. Edwards	
960 00
2nd             ,,              	
720 00
3rd              „            	
Richard B. Lister 	
720 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of Prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1890    41
„ ,, received during the year  . 224
3.—Statement " B."—A Return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners
who died in Gaol during the year ending 31st October, 1891    None.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence  118
„              „     Supreme Court  12
,,             „     County Court Judge's Criminal Court  13
,,             „     Provincial Police Court  20
,,          on payment of fine  31
,,          temporarily insane  2
Transferred to Penitentiary  12
,,            Lunatic Asylum  13
,, Reformatory	
„ Naval authorities	
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1891  41
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year
6.—Statement "E."
Average number of Prisoners per month  1,304|
»                             ,,              day  43
Number of Prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1890  41
1891  41
Total number received during the year  224 55 Vicf.
Prisons Report.
673
7.—Statement " F."—Receipts and expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
Amount received for keep of Prisoners     $2,781  50
Amount of Fines, Forfeitures, and Cash received (full particulars in detail, showing
how money has been disposed of):—
De. Or.
cos"ofc-ourt::::::::::::::::::$ 9(S>SS!PaidMunioipalCourt'N-w -f 92005
New Westminster Corporation ....   2,292 00 1
Vancouver Corporation        153 00 | Paid to C. Warwick, Gov't. Agent.   2,781  50
Keep of sailors       336 50 )
$3,702 05                                                                  $3,702 05
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1891   Ail.
Expenditure :—
Food $1,412
Bedding  78
Clothing  380
Hospital Stores  128
Salaries of Officers  5,592
Fuel and Light  781
For the erection of new buildings and repairs (sundries) . . . 424
84
00
12
42
00
33
99
3,797 70
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day    91/   cents.
,, ,,        including salaries and all expenses, per diem    623/5     ,,
1891.
Return showing how Prisoners have been employed  during the year ending 31st October,
g
&o
4
^3
CD
fl
c3
a
so
3
)
to
a
o
fl
•a
q
3
Amount
Month.
o
CD
3
m
c
1      Chain-gang—where and how
received for
CU
5
.5
03
fl
a
S
<
employed.
prison labour
a
4^
CD
^
-a
4
(
^
(if any).
fl^
S-
sfl
S>>
o
CD
CD           |
|6
fl
cS
is
a
s
M
o
a
H
u>
16
290
138
2
33
M         H
)
Nov.,         1890
66
50
18
1   ..
.. Gaol yard and Court House ..
Nil.
75
56
59
49
16
7
310
310
164
203
2
1
25
14
3
1
1            „          ,	
Jan.,          1891
1    Corporation and Gaol yard ...
Feb.,
56
49
7
280
136
2
12
• • •
March,         ,,
58
48
10
310
282
4
16
1   ..
April,           ,,
61
49
12
300
274
3
16
2    ..
May,            „
62
49
13
310
308
2
17
1   ..
»)
June,           ,,
73
56
17
300
334
2
4
1   ..
..
July,
56
49
7
310
542
1
10
2    ..
August,       ,,
56
50
6
191
527
1
9
2
..          ,,
Sept.,           ,,
Oct.,            ,,
78
69
9
?70
534
6
1    ..
52
43
9
310
257
6
1
i 	 674 Prisons Report. 1892
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
W. Dickinson Meat and vegetables    T. J. Rae Groceries.
A. Tennasse Bread. Do.         Clothing.
Wm. H. Vianan Fish. J. E. Wise Fuel.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings $100,000 00
Stores and tools, &c        2,000 00
Certified correct.
W   Moresby,
Gaoler.
81st October, 1891. 55 Vict.
Prisons Report.
675
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NANAIMO, B, C.
Report for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
$1,080 00
Constable and Assistant Gaoler ....
Samuel Drake	
Alexander F. McKinnon	
960 00
720 00
720 00
2nd           „            	
Moses H. Mclndoo	
720 00
Louis T. Davis, M. D	
240 00
2.—Statement "A."
Number of Prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1891        32
„ ,,       received during the year    553
Total
585
3.—Statement " B."
A Return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners who died in Gaol during
the year ending 31st October, 1891  Nil.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence      99
„ ,,     Supreme Court        4
,, ,,     County Court Judge's Criminal Court        2
„ ,,     Provincial Police Court, a number paying costs    220
„ on payment of fine    310
,, temporary insane        1
Transferred to Penitentiary        6
„ Lunatic Asylum        2
,, Reformatory	
,, Naval authorities	
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1891      32
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year Nil.
6.—Statement " E."
Average number of Prisoners per month 927B/ 6
day        30|
Number of Prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1890    27
»        1891    32
Total number received during the year ,,,,....,,.,,, ,..,...,,. 585 676
Prisons Report.
1892
7.—Statement "F."—Receipts and expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
Amount received for keep of Prisoners Nil.
Amount of fines, forfeitures, and cash received (full particulars in detail, showing how
money has been disposed of) :—
Revenue—Fines and Fees    $3,629 50
Justices' Fees       560 00
Constables' Fees     1,329 00
Expenditure :—
Food , $1,189 09
Bedding  244 35
Clothing  528 05
Sundries  204 60
Salaries of Officers  4,440 00
Water    ,  60 00
Fuel and Light ,  200 69
Tools and repairs  28 40
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  53 15
$6,948 33
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day 15J
„ „      including salaries and all expenses, per diem 624/ii
Return showing how Prisoners have been employed  during the year ending 31st October,
1891.
a
bo
-fl
13
CD
fl
cfl
fl
5
fl
&o
CD
o
C4-I
O
Amount
Month.
u
CD
a
CD*
O
a
CD
""3
3
0
J3
CD
o
a
Chain-gang—where and how
employed.
received for
prison labour
fl
CD
4J
&0
ni
T3
fl
CD
(if any).
H
>,
>>
-go
id
a
R
ft
fl
a
M
o
a
H
S3
<H
ft
ft
233
ft
16
cc
23
I-H
1
U
Nov.,         1890
781
28
4
121
■y
"\
Dec,           „
839
25
2
127
109
10
15
1
Jan.,           1891
853
28
1
123
262
20
15
Feb.,
789
31
2
102
214
3
53
March,        ,,
862
29
4
125
282
21
IT
/
Grading Departure Bay Road,
April,          „
921
30
4
147
294
8
52
repairing Comox Road, and
•Nil.
May,
978
30
6
174
347
27
11
1
clearing various streets in
June,            ,,
1024
32
6
155
340
17
19
the Municipality, &c., &c.
July,         »
941
32
179
355
21
34
August,       ,,
899
32
156
348
43
21
Sept.,           ,,
814
31
99
315
49
27
Oct.,
990
37
85
357
70
27
J
J 55 Vict. Prisons Report. 677
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Bread    Black & Malcolm.
Meat and vegetables E. Quennell.
Groceries, <fec Hirst Bros.
Clothing, &c  ,,
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings $11,300 00
Stores and tools, &c      1,722 00
Total $13,022 00
Certified correct.
W. Stewart,
Gaoler.
81st October, 1891. 678
Prisons Report.
1892
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT KAMLOOPS,
Report for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name,
Salary per Annum.
Gaoler    	
J. C. McLearn	
$840 00
720 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of Prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1890        13
„ „       received during the year 113
3.—Statement "B."
A Return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners who died in  Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1891.
Name.
Age.
Country.
Calling.
Residence.
Crime.
Date of Death.
Donald Matheson....
37
Scotland.. .
Labourer ..
Kamloops....
Drunkenness .
28th February.
4.—Statement "C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence    51
,,    Supreme Court    	
,,    County Court Judge's Criminal Court ,      1
„    Provincial Police Court      8
on payment of fine    21
temporarily insane         6
Transferred to Penitentiary -.      7
„ Lunatic Asylum      3
,, Reformatory	
„ Naval authorities	
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1891     12
5.—Statement "D."
Offenders pardoned during the year    Nil, 55 Vict.
Prisons Report.
679
6.—Statement "E."
Average number of prisoners per month  21
day  16.3
Number of prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1890  13
1891   12
Total number received during the year  113
7.—Statement  " F."—Receipts and expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1891.
Amount received for keep of prisoners    $
Amount of fines, forfeitures, and cash received (full particulars in detail, showing how
money has been disposed of) :—Paid to Government Agent at Kamloops      320 00
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1891    Nil.
Expenditure:—
Food $   317 04
Bedding  11 55
Clothing  132 98
Hospital stores  58 35
Salaries of officers ,  1,480 00
Fuel and light  181 55
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  9 00
Total $2,190 47
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing, per day        7J cents.
„ ,, including salaries and all expenses, per diem    36f     „
Return showing how Prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October, 1891
,a
tin
rd
^3
OS
CD
fl
tfl
fl
O
o
cS
60
B
'3
Amount
Month.
O
CD
CD
3
'fl
3
fl
rfl
O
o
a
Chain-gang—where and how
employed.
received for
prison labour
a
ti
r^
T3
fl
(if any).
a>
a^
a
>*
^>
m
13
fl
'3
f
"El
Fi
ni
s
02
a)
fl
H
14
13
<
1
ft
5
ft
8
ft
1
in
4
A
t3
Nov.,          1890
Grading streets, Kamloops.
Dec.,           ,,
17
16
1
5
9
1
1
i
Jan..            1891
15
19
14
15
1
4
5
5
9
9
1
2
Feb.,
3
March,        ,
19
15
4
6
9
2
2
April,          ,
27
23
4
6
17
2
1
i
May,            ,
vw
'«
3
7
13
3
3 awaiting transport to Westminster.
June,           ,
26
21
24
19
2
2
6
8
17
10
4
4
July,        ■
1
i
August,      ,
25
24
1
7
11
5
1
l
Sept.,          ,
22
18
4
9
7
4
2
Oct.,           ,
21
19
2
9
7
4
1 680
Prisons Report.
1892
8.—Statement "G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Wood & Tunstall Clothing.
H. B. Company    Groceries.
T. Hornby Wood.
L. J. Edwards    Coal.
J. S. Smith Bread.
Hull Bros. & Co Meat.
W. H. Buse   Vegetables.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings    $7,000 00
Stores and tools, etc         436 78
Total    $7,436 78
Certified correct,
J. A. Sinclaih,
Gaoler
31st October, 1891.
JUVENILE   REFORMATORY.
Return of all Lads sentenced to confinement in the Victoria Juvenile Reformatory.
name.
AGE.
OFFENCE.
SENTENCE.
COUNTRY.
REMARKS.
David Caffire....
Charles Caffire. . .
13
11
15
14
16
13
Larceny..
Larceny..
Vagrancy
Larceny..
Larceny..
Larceny..
18 mos. imprisonment
18    „
6     „
3     „
1      „
3     „
British Columbia
British Columbia
Escaped from the Reformatory
during August, 1890, and recaptured ; made a final escape
October 19, 1890.
Escaped from the Reformatory
October 19, 1890.
Escaped from the Reformatory
19th October, 1890.
Escaped from the Reformatory
twice in one month, but now in
custody.
Discharged; time expired
March 19, 1892.
In custody.
George VanHorst
George Brown. ..
Jeff Nibby
Britisli Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
VICTORIA  B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfkndex, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0065830/manifest

Comment

Related Items