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FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1884-85. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1886

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 FOURTEENTH  ANNUAL REPORT
ON   THE
PUBLIC    SCHOOLS
OP   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH    COLUMBIA.
1884-85.
BY   THE   SUPERINTENDENT   OF   EDUCATION
UtttJt %wm&lm.
lO&IA : Printed by Hiciiard Wolfenden, Government Printer.,
ai the Government Printing' Office. James' Bay.
194206  49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 303
Public  Schools  Report,
1884-85.
To His Honor Clement Francis Cornwall, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British
Columbia.
May it Please Your Honor :
I  beg  herewith  respectfully to present  the   Fourteenth Annual   Report on  the  Public
Schools of the Province.
JNO. ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
27th January, 1886  49 Vic Public Schools Report. 305
PART   I.
GENERAL  REPORT.  49 Vic
Public Schools Report.
307
ANNUAL   REPORT
Superintendent  of  Education,
1884-85.
Education Office,
December 22nd, 1885.
To the Honorable John Robson,
Provincial Secretary.
I beg to submit, for the information of His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Fourteenth Annual Report on the condition and progress of the Public Schools during the past
year.
There has been a very marked increase in both enrolment and average attendance, and at
no time in the history of the Province has such general interest been exhibited in educational
matters.
The number of schools has been increased by the addition of one High School and seven
Common Schools.
The aggregate number of pupils registered was 4,027, an increase of 607 over that of the
previous year, and the average daily attendance has increased from 1,808.6 to 2,130.82.
The total expenditure for education proper was $71,151.52, and, while being an increase of
$4,496.37 over that of the previous year, still shows an unexpended balance of $5,165.37 of
the amount voted for education at the last Session of the Legislature.
The outlays made by the Lands and Works Department in construction and improvement of school property have been very much in excess of those of previous years. These expenditures were in a very great majority of cases necessitated by neglect in the past of proper
attention to requisite repairs.
The following is an exhibit of expenditures during the year for education proper:—
Amount paid for teachers' salaries   $62,203 54
Do. for incidental expenses, including rent      6,085 43
Do. for expenditures of Education Office      2,862 55
Total $71,151  52
The gradual growth of our schools, as well as the cost of maintaining the same, is fully
exemplified by the record of attendance and expenditures shown in the following exhibit:—
Year.
Number of
School Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average Daily
Attendance.
Expenditure for
Education Proper.
1875-76	
41
42
45
45
47
48
50
59
67
76
1,685
1,998
2,198
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
2,693
3,420
4,027
984
1,260
1,395.5
1,315.9
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383
1,808.6
2,130.82
$44,506.11
47,129.63
1876-77	
1877-78	
1878-79	
43,334.01
*22,110.70
1879-80	
47,006.10
1880-81	
46,960.69
49,268 63
50,850.63
66,655.15
71,151.52
1881-82	
1882-83	
1883-84	
1884-85	
*Half year. 308 Public Schools Report. 1885
It is apparent from the above that there has been a very marked increase in enrolment
during the past two years. This is chiefly attributable to the large increase of population, and
the prospects are that the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway will cause an influx of
immigrants greater than ever before experienced in the history of the Province; and as a resultant, demands for educational facilities will be greatly increased.
Statistical Abstract of Attendance.
Number of pupils enrolled during the year    4,027
Increase for the year  .  607
Number of boys enrolled  2,178
Increase for the year  228
Number of girls enrolled    1,849
Increase for the year  379
Average daily attendance  2,089.74
Increase for the year  281.14
Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools  134
Increase for the year  50
Average daily attendance in High Schools  78.11
Average daily attendance in Common Schools  2,011.33
Number of School Districts at close of year  76
Increase for the year     9
The annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools of the Province, commenced on July 5th, 1885, in the Legislative Hall, Victoria.
The examiners appointed to act with the Superintendent of Education were Rev. Donald
Fraser, M. A., and Frederick G. Walker, Esq., B. A., Cantab.
In the British Columbia Gazette of July 23rd 1885, appeared the list of successful candidates, as follows:—
Public School Teachers' Examination, July, 1885.—Certificates Awarded.
First Class—Grade A.
Stainburn, George, B. A., Cantab Renewal
Williams, E. A '.	
Johnston, J. P         "
Muir, John N., B. A	
Stramberg, Hector M., B. A •.        "
First Class—Grade B.
Kaye, James Renewal
Halliday, James A	
Offerhaus,  R	
Lewis, S. G	
Reid, Mrs. Lizzie	
Carmichael, Francis A	
Forrest,   Christina	
Bannerman, W. S	
Gillies, D. W	
Lyons, Ormond	
Rabbett,  Daniel	
Anderson, Robert	
Sluggett, George H	
Bell, Emelene    .     	
Phelps, William H	
Irwin,  William H	
Jonas, David	
Thain, Joseph H	
Shaw, Alexander	 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 309
First Class--Grade A.
Wilson, David, B. A., University of New Brunswick.
Campbell, Henry J., B. A., Trinity College, Toronto.
Pitblado, Colin, B. A., Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia.
Walker, Frederick G., B. A., Cantab.
Marks
Howay, Frederic W  2,519
Reid, Robie L  2,416
First Class—Grade B.
Wright, Frederic G  1,915
Wood, E. Stuart  1,833
Fraser, Roderick L  1,772
McLellan, John 0  1,704
Gardiner, Abbie F  1,663
Gilchrist, Alexander  1,641
Wood, William M  1,608
McLeod, John A  1,557
Kinney, William T '.  1,553
Palmer, Joseph W  1,552
Bryant,  Maria  1,536
Second Class—Grade A.
Williams, Mary  1,100
Shaw, Ella B  1,092
Armstrong,  F.  Ella  1,089
Kirkland, Maud  1,087
Second Class—Grade B.
Gardiner, Emily J  1,041
Barron, Lizzie A  1,024
McDonald, Donald J  1,005
Tomlinson, William  987
Mufford, William J  978
Bannerman, Alexander M  969
McCartey, Augusta  967
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M  954
Campbell, James M  946
Dockrill, Melrose  945
Third Class—Grade A.
Dougan, James  865
Campbell, Eli J  861
Scott, John R  858
Jennings, Maggie  857
Cook, Fairie  856
Barron,  Isabel  830
Murchie, Margaret J     *    821
Blair, Jeanie W *    809
Robinson, Sarah A  800
Todd, Katie  793
Bailey, Adelaide S  791
Stephenson, Frederic L  785
Andrews,  Helen  784
Ramsay, Jennie  782
Gray, James  780
Purdy, Raffles A. R  779
Sinclair, William J  777
Coghlan, Ella  777 310 Public Schools Report. 1885
Third Class—Grade B.
Carmichael, Elinor M  768
Metcalf, James C. F  742
Doran, Edward F  712
Scott, Jean A  702
Shaw, Alexander, jr  691
Norris, Mary E . . .'  686
Grant,   Bertha  658
Mebius, Lucy A  656
McDonald, Boswell R  625
Certificates of Standing.
Boyd, John C : 778
Scott, Robert  256
Recommended for Temporary Certificates.
Mundell, John.
Monk, Mrs. Annie.
Norris, Martha J.
Reynard, Eva M.
Thomson, James W.
S. D. Pope, B. A., Supt. of Education, \     „       ,    ,
Fred. G. Walker, B. A., Cantab, }   „       .'   ■'
_. _, ,',   . Lxammers.
Donald Eraser, M. A. )
Temporary Certificates have been granted to those recommended by the Board of Examiners.
John Robson,
Provincial Secretary's Office, Provincial Secretary.
22nd July, 1885.
The number of applicants for certificates at this examination was largely in excess of that
on any previous occasion. The standing obtained in the different grades in many cases shewed
that the applicants had either studiously prepared themselves for the ordeal, or had received a
proper foundation of an English education.
Four graduates of British Universities and two by examination obtained First Class,
Grade A, Certificates; eleven, First Class, Grade B; four, Second Class, Grade A; eight, Second
Class, Grade B; eighteen, Third Class, Grade A; nine, Third Class, Grade B.
Eight failed to obtain certificates of any kind.
Certificates are merely assurances of standing in the subjects of examination, and not of ability
to impart instruction. Hence the teacher is not to be judged entirely by the certificate which
he holds. It may, however, be taken for granted that, as a rule, holders of the higher certificates will prove more successful instructors.
Teachers should not rely on their certificates for promotion. The present age demands
action, and those who neglect to arm themselves with a knowledge of the advancing ideas of
the day in regard to the best methods of instruction, and theories of school management, will
assuredly reap the reward of the drone.
School Districts.
The number of additional Districts created during the year is proof of the rapidly increasing population of the Province.
School-houses have been erected in Cadboro, Hall's Prairie, Oyster, Port Moody, Quamichan,
Somenos, and Stave River.
From representations made by the Trustees of Nanaimo School District, as to dangers
incident from proximity of railway of the Vancouver Coal Company, as well as the very
limited extent of grounds attached, the school property that has for many years been occupied
by the Boys' School has been exchanged for a site that is not only a commanding one but 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 311
affords ample play-ground. A handsome and commodious school-house has been erected,
containing four large rooms, which will not only meet the requirements of the three divisions
of the school, but will, in case of necessity, afford temporary accommodation for a High School,
the establishment of which would very materially promote the educational interests of this
thriving city.
The school reserve of New Westminster occupies one of the most eligible sites in the city.
Having, during the past year, been graded, fenced and cleared, the property now presents an
appearance of neatness not excelled by that of any other school district. The Trustees cannot
be too highly complimented for their exertions towards securing these very great improvements.
Doubtless the addition of ornamental trees will be made in the near future.
On account of the dilapidated condition of the Old High School building in Victoria City
School District (for a considerable time used by the two lowest divisions of the Boys' School),
recommendation for additional accommodation was made in the last annual report, and a
handsome two-story brick building has been erected on the reserve, to provide for present
requirements. The new building will be occupied by the four highest divisions of the Girls'
School, thus affording, in a great measure, separate buildings for boys and girls. The apartments thus vacated in the central building will provide more ample accommodation for the
Boys' School, as well as for the lower divisions of the Girls' School.
The thorough interest displayed by parents and others in the welfare of the schools of this
city, is in accord with the zealous efforts of the Trustees in the performance of their duties.
The exertions made by the Board of Trustees towards securing the establishment of a Provincial University are highly commendable, as evincing a deep interest in the expansion of the
educational system of the Province.
In Wellington District, the damage done to the school property during the past year
is not only a disgrace to the perpetrators, but has been a great annoyance to both Trustees and
parents. Renovations and repairs,, thereby necessitated, have been made during the present
year, and the premises now present a very considerably improved appearance.
Teachers.
It is not only a pleasant but an official duty to state that the teachers on the permanent
staff are, as a rule, faithful in the performance of duty.
While to their charge has been committed the intellectual culture of our boys and girls,
it is of the utmost importance that physical training will not be neglected nor the daily opportunities for impressing moral truths be overlooked. Irreverent or flippant remarks by the
teacher, in or out of school, are a sure index of a shallow mind and of ignorance assuming
superiority. The especial care of the teacher should be to inculcate courtesy, fidelity, truthfulness, integrity, and thoroughness of work, together with the duty incumbent of showing
reverence to all to whom it is due.
The Province demands of its teachers that these requirements be fulfilled. The old Latin
adage maxima pueris debetur reverentia (the greatest respect is due to our boys), should
awaken every teacher to the responsibilities of his position, as the pupil is certain to partake
more or less of the personal character of his instructor. The thoroughly enthusiastic and
conscientious teacher whose experience has enabled him to understand the nature of the gradual
expansion of the youthful mind, is one whose labors are for the best interests of education,
and cannot be repaid by salary. A school in charge of such a teacher is fortunate indeed.
There are many such teachers in the Province, and their services should be more fully
appreciated.
The conclusion is too often formed that the teacher's labours end with the close of school;
whereas, as a rule, his duties compel him to devote nearly an equal number of hours outside
of the school-room in order to the proper performance of his official task.
Trustees in the selection of a teacher should weigh well the following considerations:—
1. Moral worth.
2. Grade of certificate.
3. Experience.
4. Adaptability. 312
Public Schools Report.
1885
As the power of appointment and dismissal of teacher rests entirely with the Trustees,
they should see that the person is not only competent for the position, but worthy of the
esteem of the community.
The reciprocal interests between trustees and teachers should be a basis of cordiality and
mutual respect.
While it is the teacher's duty to report to the trustees on all matters connected with the
workings of the school, the respect due to the profession demands that he should not act the
part of a sycophant.
From the many additions of experienced teachers from the older Provinces to the permanent staff of teachers, made during the past two years, it is but a natural inference that these
will be followed by many others; hence necessity on the part of the present staff to be fully
alive to their interests.
High Schools and Graded Schools.
Nanaimo.
Boys' school and girls' school.
Teachers, 5.
Enrolled during the year, 322.
Average monthly attendance, 230.
Average daily attendance, 175.50.
Expenditure, $4,200.69.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.05.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance,
3.94.
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Jones; salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, J. Shaw; salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss L. Mebius; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected Sept. 18th, 1884; present, 109.    May 20th, 1885; present, 105.
Examined May 21st, 1885; present, 110.
Enrolled during the year, 175.
Average monthly attendance, 135.
Average daily attendance, 107.16.
At the midsummer examination held in June the following pupils passed the standard
required for entrance to a High School:—James S. Harvey, Vernon W. S. Stewart.
The bronze medal presented for competition between the schools of Nanaimo and New
Westminster, by His Excellency the Governor-General, was awarded to Master James Galloway, a pupil of this school.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, B. 0., Sept. 7th, 1885.
" S. D. Pope, Esq.,
"Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C.
" Dear Sir,—In accordance with the requirements of Article 9, Appendix A, Public
School Rules and Regulations, I beg to submit the following report of Nanaimo Boys' Public
School for the year ending June 30th, 1885 :—
"Number of pupils enrolled, 175; average monthly attendance, 135; average daily
attendance, 107.16 ; inspections and visits, 132. For further details please refer to the tabulated statistics already forwarded. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 313
" By comparing the report for this year with that of the previous year, it will be found
that the average daily attendance is less than that of last year. The reason is that the attendance was swelled by the children of those families who came to Nanaimo from Wellington
during the late miners' strike.
" The classification of the school for this year was as follows :—
" Senior Division—Fifth Reader and Fourth Reader.
"Junior Division—Third Reader and Second Reader.
" Primary or Third Division—First Reader, viz.: Part I. and Part II.
" Since the Third Division was instituted, the numbers in the different divisions have been
more evenly balanced ; hence no drafting of pupils from one division to another has occurred
from over-crowding, as was instanced in former years. Therefore no promotions were made
this year, as it was deemed that before such took place the pupils should be farther advanced
in their studies than has been customary. But I anticipate, from the efficient and faithful
manner in which the teachers have performed their duties, that a number of pupils will be
promoted after the Christmas holidays. The last government inspection was held in May.
Of those examined in the A papers for entrance to a High School, two passed, viz.: James
Harvey and Vernon Stewart. At the same time the Governor-General's bronze medal, for
competition between the public schools of New Westminster and Nanaimo, was won by James
Galloway, the Nanaimo pupil. All the various classes underwent an oral examination. It
might not be out of place for me to remark here that the closing of the school for six weeks
during the month of March and part of April, owing to the presence of small-pox in the city,
was a serious drawback to the progress of the pupils.
" I would state also that it is desirable that the inspections be held as near the end of the
sessions as possible; and I would suggest that the examinations at New Westminster and
Nanaimo be held at the end of the sessions alternately.
" At present there are only two boys attending this school who have passed for a High
School, viz.: James Harvey and Vernon Stewart. The other successful pupils have gone to
work.
" It will be seen by the annual reports that the attendance at the Nanaimo Boys' School
is much larger than that at New Westminster Boys' School, and, consequently, the duties and
responsibilities are correspondingly heavier. And while calling the attention of the Education
Department to the above comparison, I think it cannot be considered presumptuous on my
part to humbly request that the salary of the Principal of Nanaimo Boys' School be raised to
the same level with that of the Principal of the New Westminster Boys' School. Referring
to the school furniture and apparatus, I may state that the desks, from long usage, present a
rather worn-out appearance. The senior division is well supplied with maps, but I think it is
necessary that the junior division should be provided with maps of the continents also. The
globe which serves for both senior and junior divisions is out of repair, and I would suggest
that it be replaced by two new ones. The lavatory would be improved by the addition of a
wash-basin, and a larger sideboard for holding it and the drinking-cups.
" I have, &c,
(Signed)        " David Jones,
" Principal Nanaimo Boys' School."
Girls' School.
Principal, Mrs. L. A. Berkeley, until Oct. 6th, 1884; Miss A. S. Bailey until June 30th,
1885 ; present principal, Miss Emeline Bell; salary, $70 per month.
.Assistant, Miss Eva M. Reynard; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 18th, 1884; present, 80.
Examined, May 21st, 1885; present, 78.
Enrolled during the year, 147.
Average monthly attendance, 95.
Average daily attendance, 68.34.
Mrs. Berkeley resigned in October, 1884. This lady, who for several years filled the
position very creditably, was compelled, on account of ill health, to retire from active duty.
Miss A. S. Bailey received the appointment as successor, and proved her ability in a very
satisfactory manner. The present principal is the holder of a high certificate, and has had
considerable experience.    The school is at present in good working order. 314
Public Schools Report.
1885
Report of the Principal.
"Cadboro Bay, Sept. 13th, 1885.
" Dear Sir,—In accordance with Article 9 of the Rules and Regulations, I hereby
forward the special report required therein of the Girls' Public School, Nanaimo. The total
attendance for the year was 147—48 senior division, and 99 junior division.
" As I held the position of principal for only nine months, I am not in a position to make
a lengthened report upon the condition and progress of the school. But I would suggest that
the classroom which is now occupied by the junior division of the boys' school is needed for
the largely increased attendance in the lower department. Owing to this account, in April the
trustees deemed it advisable to deny children admittance not being of school age.
" Another topic of importance is the great need of a shed, or other suitable building, in
the play-ground, to shelter the pupils from inclement winds, the sun's rays, etc. A few shade
trees would add greatly to comfort, and also help to beautify the ground ; and the addition of
poles, bars and ropes might be an incentive to encourage gymnastic exercise. In any case, a
stove should be in the lobby, so as to render it more comfortable for the pupils during luncheon
hour in winter; for, in my opinion, pupils should not be allowed in the class-rooms during
recess.
" In conclusion, it is gratifying to me to be able to say that I found the trustees of
Nanaimo most enthusiastic in the performance of their duties, and evinced manifold interest
in the workings and success of the school.
" I remain, &c,
(Signed)     :  " A. S. Bailey.
"S. D. Pope, Esq.,
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
That there has been an increased interest on the part of the pupils is evidenced by the
fact that while the aggregate attendance was less than that of the previous year, yet the percentage of average attendance has increased.
In most of the divisions order and discipline have been very good, and, as a consequence,
progress in these divisions has been creditable alike to teachers and pupils.
The following tabular exhibit is a history of attendance at the public schools of this
district since the year 1872 :—
Total number
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average attendance.
1872
No returns.
1873-74
125
59
66
81
1874-75
153
75
78
112
1875-76
147
83
64
105
1876-77
184
93
91
112.5
1877-78
248
133
115
154
1878-79
241
135
106
136.89
1879-80
228
121
107
131.87
1880-81
265
148
117
136.95
1881-82
238
131
107
118.73
1882-83
210
131
79
108.03
1883 84
374
224
150
192.53
1884-85
322
175
147
180.54
At the last session of the Legislature provision was made in the  Estimates  for a  High
School in this city.    As yet the number of pupils who have passed the entrance examination,
as required by Statute before the school can be opened, has not been obtained.    Every effort
is being made by both trustees and parents towards securing the establishment of this institu
tion, and the prospects are that their wishes will ere long be realized. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 315
New Westminster.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School.
Teachers, 5.
Enrolled during the year, 329.
Average monthly attendance, 185.
Average daily attendance, 145.93.
Expenditure, $5,057.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.37.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.64.
High School.
Principal, H. M. Stramberg, B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
Inspections, October 23rd, 1884, November 19th, 1884, and May 13th, 1885.
Examined, November 20th and 21st, 1884, and June 2nd and 3rd, 1885.
Enrolled during the year, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average daily attendance, 21.77.
Report of the Principal.
" New Westminster, B. C,
"August 31st, 1885.
"Sir,—Acting on your instructions received last week, and in accordance with the
regulations therein referred to, 1 have the honor to report on the condition and progress of
the New Westminster High School, for the year ending June 30th, 1885.
"Althoughthe daily attendance was never at any time very large, yet the great diversity
of attainments among the pupils, necessitating a very large number of classes, rendered it
impossible to use to advantage the best methods in teaching, and thereby to show a very marked
degree of progress. Still, however, taking all things into account, the advancement made by
the school is quite satisfactory.
" It is gratifying to me to be able to report that during the past year a great interest was
manifested by parents and trustees in the matter of higher education, and it was owing to the
kindly aid of the latter—to their desire and readiness to do whatever lay in their power to
make the teacher's work effectual—that the school was in a good condition, whether viewed
from an intellectual or a moral standpoint.
" As I believe it to be of great advantage in teaching Classics and Ancient History to
have maps of Greece and Italy, I would suggest that such maps be procured for use in our
High School. " I have, &c,
(Signed)        "Hector Mackenzie Stramberg.
" S. D. Pope, Esq.,
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Wilson, B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
Assistant, Miss E. A. Jamieson; salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, October 23rd, 1884, and May 13th, 1885.
Examined, November 20th and 21st, 1884, and June 2nd and 3rd, 1885.
Enrolled during the year, 140.
Average monthly attendance, 77.
Average daily attendance, 65..55
At the Christmas examination the following pupils passed the standard required for admission to a High School:—James Davidson, David Galbraith, William Johnston, James Rankin.
At the close of the school year 1883-84, H. M. Stramberg, Esq., B. A., resigned his
position as principal of this school to accept the charge of the High School just established in
this city. The progress of the school under the care of this gentleman was very marked, and
satisfactory in every way to both trustees and parents.
His successor is a gentleman of energy and experience. The school is at present in a very
prosperous condition, 316 Public Schools Report. 1885
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, August 31st, 1885.
" Sir,—In accordance with the 9th Regulation of the Rules and Regulations for the
government of the Public Schools of British Columbia, I have the honor to submit the
following report of the Boys' Public School of New Westminster.
" The school has, as you are well aware, two departments, and is one of the feeders of the
New Westminster High School. This being the case its course of study must necessarily
conform to the requirements for entrance to that school. On entering upon my duties as
Principal in August, 1884, I endeavoured to follow a more liberal course of study, but soon
abandoned it, as I was made to feel that my work was to pass pupils into the High School,
and that my success in doing so would form the basis of the popular judgment as to my fitness
for the position I held.
"The names of fifty-two pupils appear on the register of the advance department, but the
average daily attendance for the year was only twenty-four. Five pupils were promoted to
the high school, and fourteen received from the junior department.
" The following subjects were taught in the advance department during the past year:—
Reading, Spelling, Writing, Arithmetic, Mental Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History,
Composition, Physics and Industrial Drawing. Fair progress was made by all pupils in most
of these branches of study. The value of drawing as a school study cannot be over-estimated,
and it is proposed to introduce it next year into all the departments of the public school.
" The junior department, with 89 as its highest register number, was often in an overcrowded condition, and had at times to be relieved by passing unprepared pupils into the
advanced departments, thereby reducing their efficiency. It is to be regretted that this
department was in charge of a young, inexperienced and untrained teacher. While this lady
was most anxious to discharge her duty as a teacher, she was not at all times able to do so,
from her inability to control her pupils. With such a state of affairs little attempt was made
to teach more than the three R's, with a little geography and grammar to the advanced classes.
As most of the unruly element will be removed from this department next year, it is to be hoped
that more progress will be made and better order secured.
"I have, &c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., A. B., (Signed) "D. Wilson,
"Superintendent of Education. "Principal of Boys' School."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss M. R. Davidson; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant until June 30th, 1885, MissS. J. White; preser,; sistant, Miss E. A. Davidson,
salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 24th, 1884, and May 13th, 1885.
Examined, November 20th and 21st, 1884, and June 2nd and 3rd, 1885.
Enrolled during the year, 149.
Average monthly attendance, 82.
Average daily attendance, 63.87.
At the close of the school year 1883-84, Miss M. Williams resigned as principal of this
school and received appointment to a position in the Girls' Public School, Victoria. She was
succeeded by the present principal, whose experience and ability are guarantees of the continued
successful career of this school.
At the Christmas examination the following passed the standard required for admission
to a high school: Misses Mary Cunningham, Sophia Jamieson, Rebecca Johnston, Mabel L.
Millard.
Miss Katie Draper obtained at the mid-summer examination the percentage necessary for
admission to a high school.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, August, 1885.
"I beg to state that good work is being done in both departments of the New Westminster
Girls' Public School.
" I find in my assistant, Miss E. Bell, an excellent teacher, and one who discharges her 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
317
duties in a very satisfactory manner.    Although her room is over-crowded she has out of a
school of 101 passed into Miss Jamieson's department 35 pupils,
" Speaking of the Senior Girls' Department, which is under my own care, I wish to say
that owing to the establishing of a high school, the best pupils were withdrawn to make it up.
Consequently there was rather poor material left on which to work; however, I have endeavoured
in every way to do my duty, and have worked hard to further the interests of the pupils in
particular, and the school in general. Out of 48 pupils enrolled I have an average of 24, and
have passed into the high school 7 pupils during the year. Owing to the breaking out of
scarlet fever our schools were closed during the greater part of March, and consequently the
pupils fell behind in their work. I find it a very bad plan to close the schools during a
term.     It tends to make the pupils very careless, and they certainly lose their lessons.
" Last Christmas the intermediate department being over-crowded I took five pupils from
the second highest class, there being no girls in the more advanced; I was, therefore, compelled
to form an extra grade in my room, giving myself seventeen (17) classes daily, which, I hold,
are quite too many for one teacher to clo justice to; however, it was the best that could be done
under the circumstances. I would, therefore, suggest that it would be advisable to have, should
the Government think well of it, another teacher, as in an over-crowded school the pupils are
not properly attended to, and the teachers, as well as the children, are very liable to lose their
health.
"The school and grounds are well kept, but the apparatus might be improved. The maps
are in a very dilapidated condition, and I would suggest that it would be well to provide each room
with a few, say half a dozen, chairs, as when examination time comes around we are compelled
to borrow seats for our visitors. One feature I notice is that the parents of this country do
not, as a rule, visit our schools. Surely they should take an interest in the welfare of their
children. Many of the parents think that when they send their children that they are all
right, and that they themselves are doing their duty. Speaking of myself, there are many
parents I have never met, and, as far as I know, have never seen.
" They, I hold, should surely know to what sort of a person they entrust the education,
not only intellectual, but moral, of their children. If the parents could be awakened and
induced to work in harmony with the teacher, and visit say, at least, once a month, the school,
how much more pleasant and profitable it would be to the teacher, as well as the pupils.
" Alice C. Clute obtained a silver medal for being head in spelling.
" Respectfully yours,
" Mary R. Davidson,
" Principal N.  W. Girls' Public School."
The record of the schools of this city as to progress of pupils has been satisfactory in
every way.
Notwithstanding the existence of several private schools, there has been a uniform increase
in attendance since the inception of the present school system, as the following table will
show:—
Total number
Average
daily attendance.
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
1872
No returns.
1873-74
87
50
37
73
1874-75
65
32
33
37
1875-76
101
63
38
65
1876-77
121
73
48
67.25
1877-78
132
75
57
90
1878-79
200
102
98
99.03
1879-80
204
115
89
109.53
1880-81
202
116
86
103.63
1881-82
212
131
81
97.29
1882-83
255
150
105
121
1883-84
287
168
119
129 27
1884-85
329
184
145
151.19 318
Public Schools Report.
1885
The number of pupils attending the junior divisions of the boys' school and girls' school
would now justify the separation of the sexes in these divisions.
The success of the schools is mainly attributable to the zealous efforts of the teachers and
trustees, together with a thorough appreciation on the part of the citizens of the educational
facilities afforded them.
The people of this part of the Province are to be congratulated upon the establishment of
a high school, which has terminated its first year with marked success. No better proof
could be adduced of the need of this institution than the fact that the number of intrants has
been largely augmented by pupils from other districts, and that at the close of the year the
number on its register nearly trebled that which it had on commencement.
At the written examination held in November, 1884, the average percentage obtained by
the pupils in the various subjects of study prescribed was creditable, and resulted in Frederic
W. Howay being declared head of the school.
Of the 31 pupils present at the midsummer examination, * Master Thomas Mclnnes obtained
the highest rank, and was awarded the Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-
General for competition in this school.
At the teachers' examination held in July, 1885, several of the pupils were successful
candidates for certificates, one obtaining the highest number of marks awarded to applicants
for First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and another securing a First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
From the large attendance at this school the prospects are that a second master will ere
long be required.
*The name of Master Thomas Mclnnes, winner of the Bronze Medal, was accidentally omitted from
1 ist of medallists on page xlvi.
Victoria.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School, James' Bay Ward School, Johnson Street Ward
School.
Teachers, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 1,343,
Average monthly attendance, 853.
Average daily attendance, 698.91.
Expenditure, $16,103.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.99.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $23.04.
The steady growth of the schools of this city as to enrolment, has never been more marked
than during the past year. The following tabular statement will not only prove the truth of
this assertion, but will doubtless be of general interest : —
Total number
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
daily attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
346
176
170
113.50
1874-75
465
Not given.'
Not given.
272
1875-76
545
,,
302
1876-77
617
366
251
374
1877-78
734
455
279
450.15
1878-79
726
395
331
398.99
1879-80
790
436
354
398.78
1880-81
720
391
329
410.09
1881-82
765
440
325
433.45
1882-83
770
423
347
414.55
1883-84
1,012
579
433
679.65
1884-85
1,343
702
641
710.70 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 319
From the above it will be seen that the enrolment during the past year exceeds that of the
previous year by 331, an increase of over 32 per cent.,— attributable to the growing popularity
of our public school system as well as to the rapidly increasing school population of the city.
Seventeen teachers have been on the permanent staff during the year, and while the
average daily attendance has been nearly 42 for each teacher, no division has been over-crowded
for any lengthened period of time.
The progress of the pupils in the different divisions has on the whole been very satisfactory, and many of the teachers show unmistakably that their hearts are in their work. Order
and discipline in most of the divisions have been good.
With so large a number of children in daily attendance it must be expected that for misconduct or infraction of rules, punishments other than reprimand, loss of deportment marks,
or detention after the exercises of the day have ended, must be resorted to; still it is noteworthy that the necessity for the application of the penalties provided by statute, such as
corporal punishment, suspension, and expulsion, has by no means equalled that which those
conversant with urban schools would look for.
The large increase in the enrolment during the past year will doubtless necessitate additional accomodation for the coming year. The erection of another Ward School building is
a very necessary provision. A site should be selected with a view to lessening the attendance
at Johnson Street Ward School, and thereby do away with the necessity of the employment of
a monitor for this school. Owing to the fact that there is but one room in the building, the
teachers have been greatly inconvenienced, and have been debarred from accomplishing that
which they would have done had they been in separate rooms.
High  School.
Principal, J. N. Muir, B. A.; salary $110 per month.
Second Master, R. Offerhaus; salary $100 per month.
Examined, December 3rd, 4th, 5th, 8th, 1884, and June 10th, 11th, 12th, and 17th, 1885.
Inspections and visits, 56.
Enrolled during the year, 94.
Average monthly attendance, 62.
Average daily attendance, 56 . 34.
At the Christmas examination, 1884, Miss Abbie F. Gardiner stood head of the school.
A similar honor was achieved by this young lady at the mid-summer examination, 1885, thereby
winning the silver medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition
among the pupils of this school. The presentation was made by the Hon. Mr. Duck, Minister
of Finance, who complimented the young lady on the achievement of so high an honor, and, in
pointed language that found an echo in the hearts of all present, counselled the pupils as to
their duties in the life just opening to them.
To the able and zealous efforts of the principal and second master are attributable the usefulness and success of this very important school, and it is gratifying to be able to state, that
of the thirty-one candidates for First Class, Grade B, Certificates, a pupil of this school obtained
first rank. This is all the more creditable from the fact that very many of the applicants had
had experience as teachers in the eastern provinces. Another pupil also was successful in
securing a certificate of the same grade. Several other pupils obtained certificates of a lower
grade.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, July 14th, 1885.
"Dear Sir,—In accordance with section 9 of the duties of teachers, I send you the following report of the Victoria High School. A report in detail will be found in the printed
forms furnished by you which I have filled up and forwarded to you.
"The total number enrolled for the year was 94; consisting of 57 girls and 37 boys, being
an increase of 10 over the number enrolled last year.
"Two bright and promising scholars were removed by death during the year—a
boy and a girl, the children of Mr. Chas. Hayward. One, the son of the Rev. Mr. Percival,
has gone to attend one of the eastern colleges.
" Several have entered situations in the city and are giving satisfaction to their several
employers, 320 Public Schools Report. 1885
"Two public examinations were held during the year. One on the 18th December, 1884,
and the other on the 26th June, T885, at each of which there was a large attendance of
parents and others interested in the cause of education, and all seemed pleased and satisfied
with the progress and interest shown by the pupils. Two new subjects, viz., botany and
elements of music, were taught during the present year.
"I feel satisfied that greater progress will be made during the next year, as it takes some
time after a change of teachers to get the school organized and all into regular working order.
I believe it is the intention of the Government to erect a separate building for the High
School, which will be a step in the right direction and will be of great assistance, to us in carrying on the work of the High School.
"We will require about four more desks to accommodate those who are expected to attend
next year.
" I have, &c,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed) "J. N. Muir.
"Superintendent of Education."
Boys' School.
Principal, J. A. Halliday; salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, J. H. Thain ; salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, A. Dods; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. C. Gowen; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss E. J. Gardiner; salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss L. Horton; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss C. Forrest; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 9th, 1884, and June 17th, 1885.
Inspections and visits, 94.
Enrolled during the year, 533.
Average monthly attendance, 354.
Average daily attendance, 296.71.
Report of the Priucipal.
"Victoria, June 28th, 1885.
"Sir,—In compliance with the requirements of the Rules and Regulations for the government of the Public Schools of British Columbia, I beg leave to report:—
"That I find it impossible to give as much time to the supervision of the different divisions as they require, without neglecting my own class. I may say that with the exception of
two hours I spent in the fourth division, and the same length of time in the
fifth division, I have not been in their room, to supervise or inspect, except when
called upon in the administering of punishment. In the short time I refer to,
I was pleased with what I saw, and had no occasion to suggest any changes in the modes pursued. I am sure the Government would be repaid by having an inspector for the city
schools, or at least a supernumerary teacher to take the Principal's class while engaged in attending to the other classes. A more just and satisfactory examination for promotion could be
given if all the classes were inspected and results valued by one person.
"The advancement made by pupils is on the whole satisfactory. There are a few exceptions, but when the circumstances of the cases are examined, I clo not think the teachers are
to blame for the length of time they have been in one department. A few have been five
terms in the same class; many pass out in two terms, and occasionally in one.
"It is observable that pupils coming from other schools are in no way superior to our
own in the same class. I do not wish to burden you with a long report. The frequency of
your visits to the school will have enabled you to see all that I could possibly write about.
Yours, etc.,
"To S. D. Pope, B. A., (Signed)        "J. A. Halliday.
"Superintendent of Education." "Principal of Boys' School.
At the Christmas examination, the following passed the standard required for admission
to a High School:—
William H. Dalby Frank Gowdy,
William Steele, Frederick John Stephen. 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
321
At the midsummer examination,  the following attained the percentage necessary for
admission to a High School:—
Randolph Murray Collier,
William Alexander Lorimer,
Arthur Albert Humber,
William Alexander Lawson,
George Allen Gardiner,
Joseph Robert Pierre,
James Allan Aikman,
William Robert Savage.
At no time in the history of the school has it been in better working order. In discipline and
school management, the Principal certainly shows practical knowledge and executive ability.
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss E. A Williams until June 30th, 1885; present Principal, Miss F. E.
Armstrong ; salary $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Reid; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. D. Cameron; salary $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss M. Williams; salary $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss L. A. Barron; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 9th, 1884, and June 17th, 1885.
Inspections and visits, 90.
Enrolled during the year, 502.
Average monthly attendance, 303.
Average daily attendance, 249.03.
Report of the Principal.
"To S. D. Pope, Esq.,
" Supt. of Education.
" Sir,—I herewith submit my report of the Victoria Girls' School, for the year ending
June 30th, 1885.
" There are 435 pupils enrolled at this date, showing an increase of 64 over those of last
year. The average daily attendance was 246; the highest number present any day being 283,
and the lowest 205. During the year 177 new pupils, including those who had returned after
an absence of a term or longer, have been enrolled.
" The usual public examinations were held at Christmas and at midsummer, and were
well attended by the parents of the pupils and others interested in education. Owing to the
smallness of the school-rooms, many were unable to gain admittance. . The numbers promoted
were—
Midsummer.
24 from 6th to 5th Division.
24     "    5th to 4th
20     "    4th to 3rd
16      "    3rd to 2nd
15     "    2nd to 1st
12      "    1st to High School.
" These promotions were determined by written examinations. Each new pupil on enter-
ing the school was examined and placed in the class for which she was best fitted; and any
pupil who presented a satisfactory excuse for absence during the written examination was, if
thought by her teacher to be likely to pass, allowed to undergo the examination missed. If
parents would make an effort to send their children to the written examinations it would save
a large amount of unnecessary trouble and be  more satisfactory to both parents and teachers.
" After the Christmas holidays, it was thought advisable to increase the limit tables of all
the grades, as the standard for admission to the High School has been raised. Extra work
thus devolved upon the teachers; the results, however, were very satisfactory, for I can say
with confidence that the progress made by the pupils during this last term has exceeded that
made in any other for a number of years.    The improvement in reading may be partly due to
Christmas
10 from 6th to 5th
Division.
12      "    5th to 4th
a
14      "    4th to 3rd
a
13      "    3rd to 2nd
a
10      "    2nd to 1st
it
7      "1st to High School. 322 Public Schools Report. 1885
the new Gage's Readers, which are interesting and attractive.    The new globe and set of maps
are also much appreciated.
" There are still a few things needed. Gage's Reading Charts for the 6th Division would
be of great assistance to the teacher, and charts of Natural History, Plants, and Color would
be useful for object lessons, and in the higher classes as subjects for composition. A large
shed in the play-ground for the girls in rainy weather would prove a great boon. Most of the
blackboards need repainting. We all miss the large assembly room which was divided into two
class rooms last summer, and in which the whole school used to meet on Friday afternoons for
singing and recitations. But the greatest wants of all are larger rooms for the 5th and 6th
Divisions, which are so crowded that there are not seats enough for the children, and the air
of the rooms becomes so close as to be positively unhealthy. It is to be hoped that the
Government will soon take this matter into consideration.
" Fifteen dollars at Christmas, and thirty dollars at Midsummer, were given by the Trustees
towards purchasing prizes, which money was afterwards supplemented by a concert given on
the 25th of June last by the pupils of the Public and High Schools. Several kind friends
also sent prizes, and the W. C. T. U. offered a prize of $10 at Christmas for the best essay on
'Temperance,' and $10, 1st prize, and $5, 2nd prize, at Midsummer, for the best essay on
' Alcohol, a Cause of Disease.' Such prizes tend to awaken an interest in the temperance
cause, but it would be better if the subject of the essay were announced at the beginning of
the term, and longer time thus afforded for reading up the subject.
" As with this brief report, my connection with the Victoria Schools closes, I desire to
thank you, and the teachers who have been associated with me, for the assistance and good
feeling with which you have always met me in the discharge of my duties and my efforts for
the welfare of the school.
" I have, &c,
(Signed)        " E. A. Williams,
" Principal Victoria Girls' School,"
At the Christmas examination, the following obtained the percentage required for admission to a High School:—
Annie Helen Hicks, Corinthia S. E. Pierre,
Sarah Kermode, Evangeline V. Steele,
Alice Louise Mansell, Frances A. Smith.
At the Midsummer examination, the following passed the standard required for admission
to a High School:—
Annie C. Christie, Nicoline S. Becker,
Eleanor W. Brodrick, Annie E. Spencer,
Annie R. Robertson, Lily Swan,
Elizabeth E. Carr, Isabel B. Christie,
Jeannette Mebius, Christina Lorimer,
Josephine G. Hill, Esther M. Johnston.
The Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor for competition
between the pupils of this school and the Boys' School, was won by Miss Annie 0. Christie.
The Honorable Mr. Duck, Minister of Finance, in making the presentation, gave a brief
account of the history of the school, and, in an impressive manner, called the attention of the
pupils to the high honor achieved in the winning of this medal.
The increased attendance demands the appointment of a  Sixth Assistant in this school.
Miss E. A. Williams (Mrs. Taylor), who for several years was principal of this school,
and in addition to earnest labor in her own division gave very apparant proof of executive
ability, terminated her connection with the, same, June 30th, 1885, to the regret of Trustees
and parents.
As a manifestation of the kindly feeling entertained towards Miss Williams by the teachers
of the City Schools, as well as by the pupils, an address accompanied with a silver tea service
was presented to the lady on her retirement.
Miss F. E. Armstrong has received the appointment as successor, and ability and energy
displayed thus far are assurances of the continued success of this very important school. 49*Vic. Public Schools Report. 323
James' Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss M. V. Storey.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, December 10th, 1884, and June 19th, 1885.
Inspections and visits, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 96.
Average monthly attendance, 61.
Average daily attendance, 50.22.
There is every prospect that the very large attendance at this school during the past year
will not decrease during the present year. The number of promotions made to the Central
School at the close of each half-year has been creditable to the teacher, and in addition has
tended to promote ambition among the pupils as well as to relieve any over-crowded condition
of the school.
Johnson Street Ward School.
Teacher, Miss H. Jackson; salary, $70 per month.
Examined, December 10th, 1884, and June 18th, 1885.
Inspections and visits, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 118.
Average monthly attendance, 73.
Average daily attendance, 58.40.
This school has completed its first year with an average attendance that is very high.
The number of promotions made to the Central School during the year are creditable to the
teacher.
The enrolment so increased that the services of a monitor were found to be requisite.
Mr. F. G. Wright, a pupil of the High School of this City, was appointed to the position.
Wellington.
Principal, G. Stainburn, B. A., Cantab; salary, $75 per month.
Assistant, Miss J. W. Blair; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 22nd, 1885.
Enrolled during the year, 142.
Average monthly attendance, 96.
Average daily attendance, 73.26.
Expenditure, $1,622.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.43.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $23.13.
Report of the Principal.
" Wellington, B. C,
"June 30th, 1885.
" The Wellington public school was closed for the holidays on the 26th inst., the last three
days of the term having been occupied in examining the pupils.
"Miss Wall, Miss Ramsay and Mr. R. Scott, Jr., have sent in their names as candidates
in the approaching examination of teachers at Victoria. In the Superintendent's examination
for admission to a high school, which took place in May, nine pupils were examined. Of these
several had passed previously. The class obtained an average of 49 per cent, of the possible
marks, and a certificate was awarded to Miss Wall.
"In the senior department the average daily attendance during the year has been 28.12,
compared with 17 last year—an increase of 65.4 per cent. It is also larger now than in any
previous year. In the junior department the attendance has likewise increased; that is, it is
more than it was last year, but not quite, so large as it was in the years immediately preceding
the strike; it is greater, however, in comparison with the number of names on the roll. 324
Public Schools Report.
1885
" The attendance, however, would have been considerably larger but for the sickness that
was so prevalent among the children during the winter months; and this sickness, I am convinced,
was much aggravated by the wretched state of the school-house. For a long time the destruction
of the school property has been a favorite amusement with the hoodlums of Wellington. The
school has been repeatedly disturbed by them while in session; a large proportion of the windows
have been broken; a number of panes have been entirely cut out; the locks were broken or
wrenched off the doors; the outhouses were destroyed; the stoves were broken to pieces, and
the stovepipe stolen, ifcc, ifec. In consequence of these proceedings, the school-house became
in cold weather unfit for habitation. Every year the school-house, and its appurtenances, are
renovated and restored; but immediately after these repairs the work of wanton destruction
begins anew, and by the end of the fiscal year (indeed, long before that time) there is again
little left but the bare walls.
" What is greatly needed in this district is a residence for the teachers. Of course, in
places where the house accommodation is ample, this need is not felt; but at Wellington the
buildings are usually so crowded that it is often difficult to get a single room, or even half a
one. If any teacher should chance to be married, then he, obviously, could not reside here,
because all the houses are required for the employes of the collieries. This, indeed, happened
in the case of my predecessor, Mr. Mundell, who, not being able to get a cottage at Wellington,
was obliged to live seven miles away at Nanaimo.
"During the winter, it was proposed to use the school-house for evening classes, and a young
gentleman from the University of Glasgow, who was residing here at the time, volunteered to
act as teacher, but pupils could not be obtained for the intended night-school, and so the
project fell through.
" All our demands for increased appropriations, to make repairs and to meet incidental
expenses, have been promptly attended to; and we certainly clo not blame the authorities of
the Province for the dilapidated appearance that the school has sometimes presented.
" G. Stainburn,
" Principal of Wellington Public School.'
Total Number
Year.
of
Pupils Enrolled
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily Attendance.
1874-75
34
14
20
24.75
1875-76
46
13
33
23.33
1876-77
53
19
34
23.78
1877-78
44
18
26
38
1878-79
50
25
25
29.82
1879-80
79
40
39
37.14
1880-81
89
52
37
42.50
18S1-82
123
66
57
52.61
1882-83
146
90
56
73.70
1883-84
156
87
69
55.85
1884-85
142
76
66
73.26
The above table is an e.xhibit of the attendance since the organization of the school, and
undoubtedly will be of interest.
That the results of the labors of teachers during the year have been successful, has been
quite apparent.    The school is in good working order.
At the examination held May 22nd, 1885, Miss Edna Wall obtained the percentage
required for admission to a high school.
Miss Jennie Ramsay, a pupil of this school, was a successful candidate at the last teachers'
examination, and is at present in charge of a school. 49 Vic. Public Schools* Report. 325
Common Schools.
Barkerville.
Teacher, W. S. Bannerman.
Salary, $83.33 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled, 16 boys, 15 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average daily attendance, 22.50.
Expenditure, $1,194.96.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.54.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $53.11.
There has been quite a marked increase in the average attendance in proportion to the
number enrolled. The results of written examination held by the teacher on questions
forwarded from this department prove conclusively that the pupils are diligent, and that the
teacher is alive to his work. It is very noticeable that there has been an increase of 140 in
the number of visits made to the school.
Big Bar.
Teacher, J. Gallagher, until June 30th, 1885 ; present teacher, Miss M. A. Grinder.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled, 9 boys, 3 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average daily attendance, 9.52.
Expenditure, $400.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.02.
This school was opened in January, 1885, and notwithstanding the difficulties incident to
sparsely settled districts, trustees and parents have put forth every effort to comply with the
demands of the School Act as to attendance.
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, B. H. Smith, M.A., until Sept. 8th, 1884; A. Shaw until Dec. 31st, 1884 ; A.
Shaw, Jr., until June 30th, 1885 ; present teacher, W. T. Kinney.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 20th, 1885; present, 9 boys, 10 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled, 22 boys, 14 girls; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 19.07.
Expenditure, $627.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.43.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $32.91.
There has been a perceptible increase in both the aggregate and average attendance
<luring the past year.    The prospects of the school are good.
Burton's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Katheriue Todd.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 8th, 1885; present, 8 boys, 7 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 10 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average daily attendance, 17.58.
Expenditure, $634.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.51.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $36.11. 32 G Public Schools Report. 1885
This school, organized in 1883, has steadily increased in attendance, and the progress of
the pupils reflects great credit on the teacher.
The trustees of this district have displayed very considerable taste in the arrangement of
the school premises. Everything inside and outside of the school-room presents a neat
appearance.
Cache Creek (Boarding-School).
Teacher, R. M. Clemitson.
Matron, Mrs. R. M. Clemitson.
Salary of teacher, $75 per month.
Salary of matron, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 22 girls; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average daily attendance, 25.46.
Expenditure, $1,700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $44.74.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $66.78.
The average attendance has increased from 19.87 to 25.46. This is doubtless due, in a
great measure, to the energy of the teacher,
At written examination on questions sent from this department, William Uren passed the
standard required for admission to a High School.
Canoe Pass.
Teacher, F. W. Howay.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average daily attendance, 11.21.
Expenditure, $383.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.99.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.24.
This school opened in December, 1884, and reports received justify the statement that the
school is in good condition.
Cedar (North).
Teacher, Ernest E. Kaye.
Salary, $50 per month to. December 31st, 1884; $55 per month from January 1st, 1885.
Examined, September 18th, 1884 ; present, 10 boys, 6 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 18 girls; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 28.
Average daily attendance, 21.80.
Expenditure, $669.40.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.59.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $30.70.
The average daily attendance has increased from 18.03 in 1883-84, to 21.80, doubtless
due to exertions made by the teacher, whose salary has been raised to $55 per month.
Cedar (South).
Teacher, Miss M. Lawrence until September 30th, 1885; present teacher, J. S. Kaye.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 13 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 13.76.
Expenditure, $631.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.88. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 327
The average daily attendance does not equal that which would be expected from the
enrolment. The number of visits made by both trustees and parents has more than doubled
that of the previous year.
Cedar Hill.
Teacher, R. A. Anderson.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, October 13th, 1884; present, 6 boys, 7 girls; total, 13.
" February  20th, 1885; present, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17.
Examined, April 14th, 1885; present, 15 boys, 15 girls; total, 30.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 22 girls; total, 44.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance. 19.05.
Expenditure, $874.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.86.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.89.
While the attendance during the last half of the school year increased in more than
ordinary ratio, the average attendance was 3.01 in excess of that of the previous year. There
is every prospect that the attendance of former years will soon be attained.
The number of visits made by trustees and parents lias doubled that of 1883-84.
At written examination held, Master Charles King obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School.
Cheam.
Teacher, Miss Helen Andrews.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 11th, 1885; present, 21 boys, 10 girls; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 13 girls ; total, 37.
Average monthly attendance, 28.
Average daily attendance, 21.61.
Expenduture, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29.62.
The average attendance has increased from 15.07 to 21.61. That the teacher has held
the position for so long a period is alike creditable to herself and to the trustees and parents.
This accounts in a very great measure for the manifest progress of the pupils.
Chemainus.
Teacher, S. G. Lewis.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 17th, 1884; present, 7 boys, 3 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average dailv attendance, 10.61.
Expenditure," $633.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.46.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $59.71.
Luring the year 1883-84 the average attendance was 7.95. By the exertions of trustees
and parents the average required by statute has been fully maintained during the past year.
Centreville.
Teacher, Ormond O. Lyons until November 12th, 1885; present teacher, J. P. Johnston.
Salary, $80 per month.
Examined, May 11th, 1885; present, 22 boys, 23 girls; total, 45.
Enrolled during the year, 37 boys, 34 girls; total, 71.
Average monthly attendance, 46.
Average daily attendance, 36.22.
Expenditure, $1,039.70. 328 Public Schools Report. 1885
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.71.
The enrolment of this school is larger than in any other of the rural schools of the
Province. While the attendance has slightly decreased the interest felt by trustees and
parents in the welfare of their school has not abated.
The district is fortunate in having secured the services of an able and experienced teacher,
to whose labours in former years the standing of the school, both as to enrolment and
advancement, is in a very great measure due.
Chilliwhack.
Teacher, A. H. Gillanders.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 11th, 1885; present, 10 boys, 13 girls; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average daily attendance, 18.03.
Expenditure, $615.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.65.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.11.
There has been a small increase in attendance. The teacher is faithful in the discharge
of his duties.
Clinton.
Teacher, J. F. Smith.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 6 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average daily attendance, 10.55.
Expenditure, $755.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $39.74.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $71.56.
While the attendance required by the Act has been maintained, the interest shown by
the number of visits made by trustees and parents has not been indicative of a pi'oper
appreciation of school facilities.
Clover Valley.
Teacher, Miss Martha J. Norris until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, Robie L. Reid.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 6th, 1885; present, 11 boys, 3 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 10 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 11.28.
Expenditure," $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $56.74.
There has been a small increase in both aggregate and average attendance, as well as in
the number of visits made by both trustees and parents. The planting of a few ornamental
trees would materially add to the present very neat appearance of the school property.
Colwood.
Teacher, J. A. McLeod until June 30th, 1885; present teacher A. M. Bannerman.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 8th, 1884; present, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17.
" September 24th, 1884; present, 6 boys, 8 girls; total, 14.
" February 19th, 1885; present, 7 boys, 9 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 329
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 15.13.
Expenditure, $635.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.90.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.02.
While there was a slight advance in attendance during the past year, the number of visits
made by trustees and parents very noticeably decreased. The school property presents a neat
appearance in every way, and the present prospects of the school are good
Cowichan.
Teacher, E. J. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 15th, 1884; present 2 boys, 6 girls; total 8.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 10.33.
Expenditure, $696.92.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.04
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $67.47.
The very largely increased number of visits made by trustees and parents is a sure index
of a thorough interest in the welfare of the school.    The prospects of the school are good.
Craigflower.
Teacher, John Mundell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, September 8th, 1884; present, 14 boys, 6 girls; total, 20.
„ September 24th, 1884; present, 12 boys, 6 girls; total, 18.
Examined, April 15th, 1885; present, 13 boys, 7 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 14 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average daily attendance, 18.66.
Expenditure, $740.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.69.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.70.
At examination, Miss Mary Caroline Austin passed the standard required for admission
to a High School. The progress of the school has been very satisfactory. The teacher is faithful in the discharge of his duties.
The number of visits by the trustees has not been such as 'the interests of this old established school demands.    The salary of the teacher has been raised to $65 per month.
Comox,   North.
Teacher, Miss Marie F. Halliday.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 16 girls; total, 33.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 13.93.
Expenditure, $639.99.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, .$19.39.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, -$45.94.
The average attendance has increased, and from reports sent in of written examinations
held by the teacher the inference is justifiable that not only are the pupils progressing in
their studies, but that the teacher is faithful in the performance of her duties.
Comox, South.
Teacher, Miss Mary Heard.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection. 330 Public Schools Report. 1885
Enrolled during the year 14 boys, 9 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average daily attendance, 13.05.
Expenditure, $683.74.
Cost of each pupil, on enrolment, $29.73.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52 39.
This school was opened in August, 1884, and the average attendance more than meets
with the requirement of statute. That both parents and trustees take an interest in the
school is shown by the number of visits made during the year.
Cadboro.
This school was opened at the commencement of the present school year.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey.
Salary, $50 per month.
The school in this newly created district was opened in August, 1885. Tha building and
site present an appearance equal to that of any rural district.
Courtenay.
The school in this newly organized district began in August of the present school year,
under the charge of Colin Pidblado, B. A., M. D.
Present teacher, J. I). McMillan.
Salary, $50 per month.
The erection of a school-house in this district is a necessity.
Denman Island.
This school has not been opened during the year, as there was not a sufficient number of
pupils to maintain the average attendance required by statute.
Esquimalt.
Teacher, W. H. Phelps until Dec. 31st, 1884 ; A. 0. Steele until April 30th, 1885 ; Miss
N. Wolfenden until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, Miss N. Wolfenden.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected Oct. 15th, 1884; present, 20 boys, 8 girls; total, 28.
"        March 13th, 1885; present, 25 boys, 15 girls; total, 40.
Examined, April 27th, 1885 ; present, 22 boys, 13 girls ; total, 35.
Enrolled during the year, 37 boys, 22 girls ; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average daily attendance, 29.25.
Expenditure, $900.74.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.27.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $30.79.
This school has experienced several changes of teachers during the year On the resignation of Mr. Phelps, Mr. A. C. Steele, a zealous educationist received appointment as successor,
and gave every satisfaction to those interested. This gentleman resigned in April, 1885, and
was succeeded by Miss N. Wolfenden, who for several years has been on the permanent staff of
teachers, and has thus far shown very commendable zeal in the discharge of her duties. Order
and descipline maintained are very praiseworthy.
The number of visits made during the year by the trustees is a guarantee that the interests
of education are not neglected in this district.
On examination, Master Alfred S. Cartmel obtained the percentage required for admission
to a High School.
Gabriola (North).
Teacher, Miss M. J. Sweet until June 30th, 1885 ; present teacher, Miss Jennie Ramsay,
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1884; present 8 boys, 11 girls; total, 19, Enrolled during the year, 8 boys; 12 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 13.24.
Expenditure, $644.74
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.24.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.70.
The success of this school is assured from the average attendance thus far maintained.
The number of visits made by trustees and parents is an assurance that the teacher's labors
were appreciated.
Gabriola (South).
Teacher, Alex. Shaw until September, 1884; Alex. Shaw, Jr., until January, 1885; present
teacher, Alex. Shaw.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1885; present, 3 boys, 7 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 11 girls ; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 11.92.
Expenditure, $645.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $40.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.13.
There has been a slight decrease in the attendance during the past year. With a teacher
of so many years' experience, the progress of the pupils is assured.
Granville.
Teacher, W. H. Irwin until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, J. W. Palmer.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined, October 27th and 28th, 1884; present, 16 boys, 17 girls; total, 33.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 29 girls; total, 58.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average daily attendance, 29.16.
Expenditure, $710.47.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, .$12.25,
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $24,36.
There has been a marked increase in the average attendance during the year. The very
large addition to the enrolment of the school during the present.year demands the provision
of more ample accommodation.
The present requirements of this district can only be met by the immediate erection of a
building of sufficient capacity for the convenience of 80 pupils.
The number of visits made by trustees has not been equal to the demands of so important
a school.
At examinations held, Miss Alice Miller and Ernest Miller passed the standard required
for admission to a High School.
Hope.
Teacher, Miss C P. Smith.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 17 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 10.90.
Expenditure, $623.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.98.
Cost of each on average attendance, $57.20.
There has been a slight decrease in attendance during the year. The teacher is quite
popular and is giving every satisfaction. 332 Public Schools Report. 1885
Hall's Prairie.
Teacher, J. C. McLennan.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 7 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average daily attendance, 16.32.
Expenditure, $137.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $8.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $8.41.
This school was opened April, 1885, and the prospects for the present are very good.
Lake.
Teacher, R. L. Fraser until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, W. M. Wood.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 26th, 1884; present, 6 boys, 4 girls; total, 10.
,, March 18th, 1885; present, 8 boys, 5 girls; total, 13.
„        April 14th, 1885; present, 9 boys, 5 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the  year, 19 boys, 13 girls; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 13.12.
Expenditure, $690.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.59.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.65.
The attendance of the school has kept apace with that of the previous year. While the
trustees are fully alive to their duty, the number of children of school age is very limited;
hence the necessity of every parent in the district using all the means in his power towards
regaining the attendance that this old-established school had in the past. Everything that
could be done by the Government has been done in furtherance of the iuterests of education in
this district.
Langley.
Teacher, J. W. Sinclair until September 30th, 1885; present teacher, Miss Ellen Dockrill.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, May 7th, 1885; present, 15 boys, 5 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 11 girls; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance,- 22.
Average daily attendance, 13.58.
Expenditure, $695.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.82.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $51.17.
There has been a decrease in attendance.    Change of teacher occurred in November, 1885.
Lillooet.
Teacher James M. Campbell.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 10 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 11.74.
Expenditure, $762.37.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $31.77.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $64.94.
There has been quite a decrease in the attendance during the past year.
Lytton.
Teacher, D. W. Gillies.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 333
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 12 girls; total,  23.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 15.31.
Expenditure, $747.82.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.51.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48 85.
There has been a decrease not only in the attendance but also in the number of visits
made by parents and others interested in the welfare of the school.
Maple Bay.
Teacher, W. J. Mufford.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, September 16th, 1884; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
,,        May 18th, 1885; present, 3 boys, 6 girls; total, 9.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 12 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 10.47.
Expenditure, $712.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.92.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $68.05.
On examination held, Master Charles Beaumont passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
It is to be regretted that as the average attendance required by statute has not been
maintained during the present year, this school was, in compliance with the provisions
of the School Act, closed at the commencement of the new year, Doubtless with the exertions of trustees and parents it will be re-opened at an early date.
Maple Ridge.
Teacher, Paul Murray.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, May 7th, 1885.
Enrolled during the year, 34 boys, 33 girls; total, 67.
Average monthly attendance, 36.
Average daily attendance,  28.20.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.34.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $26.95.
Of the rural schools, this ranks among the first in enrolment and advancement. The
progress made by the pupils has been in every way creditable to the teacher. The prospects
of the school for the present year are very good. The largely increased number of visits made
by trustees during the past year is indicative of deep interest in the welfare of the school.
At examination held in May, 1885, Miss Harriet Isaac and Master Frank B. Harris passed
the standard required for admission to a High School.
The salary of the teacher has been increased to $70 per month.
Mayne Island.
Teacher, Miss A. McCartey until February 15th, 1885; present teacher, W. H. Phelps.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 10 girls; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average daily attendance, 16.16.
Expenditure, $638.20.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.79.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.49.
There has been a slight decrease in average attendance during the past year. The school
is at present in good working order. 334 Public Schools Report. 1885
Metchosin (Including Rocky Point).
Teacher, C. E. Clarke until December 31st, 1884; F. L. Stephenson until August 31st,
1885; present teacher, J. Gillies; salary, $50 per month; raised to $55 per month in 1884.
Inspected September 8th, 1884; present, 8 boys,  1 girl; total, 9.
,, September 24th, 1884, present, 8 boys, 2 girls; total, 10.
„ February 19th, 1885, present, 7 boys, 4 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 8 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 15.31.
Expenditure, $688.07.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $31.28.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $44.95.
It became necessary during the year to open a school at Rocky Point, which, in conjunction
with this school, has not only enabled this district to comply with'the requirements of the
School Act as to average attendance, but has extended school facilities to a number of children
who had previously been deprived of the same.
As the teacher was required to teach three days in one school, and the remaining three
days of the week in the other, the salary was raised to $60 per month.
Mud Bay.
Teacher, Miss A. J. McDougall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 5th, 1885; present, 7 boys, 7 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 15 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 13 03.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.12.
There has been a slight increase in attendance. The progress of the school has been in
every way satisfactory.
Moodyville.
Teacher, Miss Maud Kirkland.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, October 29th, 1884; present, 8 boys, 14 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 21 girls; total, 37.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 17.85.
Expenditure, $734.31.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.85.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $41.14.
While there has been a small decrease in the average attendance, the number of visits
made by trustees and parents proves that the educational facilities afforded are appreciated.
The young lady in charge is deservedly held in the highest esteem.
Mount Lehman.
Teacher, Miss Ella Coghlan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 8th, 1885; present, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 14.13.
Expenditure, $492.58.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.24.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.86.
The school in this newly created district has maintained a very fair average attendance.
The teacher is assiduous in the discharge of her duties. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 335
North Arm.
Teacher, Miss M. L. Harding.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 28th, 1884; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 15 girls; total 28.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 11.90.
Expenditure, $715.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.56.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $60.15.
There has been a slight decrease in attendance.    The district is much in need of a school-
house.
Not only the progress of the pupils, but the exertions made by the teacher towards securing
increased attendance, proves that the lacly in charge is faithful in the discharge of her duties.
Nicola Lake.
Teacher, John McNish until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, Miss Annie Carmichael.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average daily attendance, 9.78.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $77.71.
If all the parents of this district would  clo  their duty  by  acting in unison in advancing
the interests of the school, the teacher would have less trouble in securing the necessary
average attendance.
Nicola Valley.
Teacher, D. J. McDonald.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 8 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average daily attendance, 9.86.
Expenditure, $749.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $39.46.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $76.04.
The average attendance has increased  very considerably.    The  number of visits to the
school proves an enlivened interest.
Okanagan.
Teacher, R. S. Hanna, until March 30th, 1885; present teacher, Thomas Leduc.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 7 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 11.90.
Expenditure, $576.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.43.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.40.
The attendance has slightly decreased.    It is noticeable that the number of visits made
is very much less than that of the previous year. 336 Public Schools Report. 1885
Prairie.
Teacher, Miss E. A. Davidson until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, Miss A. McCartey.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 6th, 1885; present, 8 boys, 3 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 17 girls; total, 41.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average daily attendance, 13.09.
Expenditure, $561.89.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.93.
The attendance has increased, and the number of visits made by both trustees and parents
has more than doubled that of the previous year.
The prospects are that this district will ere long be provided with a more commodious
school building, and that the discord of the past will give place to harmony in the future.
The school is it at present in charge of an experienced and conscientious instructor.
Priest's Valley.
Teacher, Mrs. S. C. Ellison until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, R. S. Hanna.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 11.49.
Expenditure, $567.73.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.88. .
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.41.
This school was opened in August, 1884, and has thus far more than maintained the average
required. The number of visits made by the trustees is certainly indicative of a lively interest
in the welfare of the school.
As the newly erected school-house in this district was destroyed by fire, it will be necessary
to replace the same at an early date.
Port Moody.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Howay.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 17 girls; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average daily attendance, 19.98.
Expenditure, $826.95.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.20.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $41.39.
The attendance has largely increased during the past year. The number of visits made is
a proof of the estimation in which the school is held. The young lady in charge has given
every satisfaction.
The salary of the teacher has been increased to $55 per month.
Quamichan.
Teacher, Mrs. A. Monk.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, September 16th, 1884; present, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Inspected, May 19th, 1885; present, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 18 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average daily attendance, 21.08.
Expenditure, $663.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.58, Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.46.
There has been an increase in attendance, as well as in the number of visits made by
trustees and parents.
Miss Lilly Monk, on examination, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
The lacly in charge is an experienced and painstaking teacher.
Quesnellemouth.
Teacher, Miss A. Northcote.
Salary, $75 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 10 girls;-total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average daily attendance, 9.89.
Expenditure, $923.19.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $31.83.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $93.35.
The large number of visits made by trustees and parents is a proof that the educational
facilities provided are duly appreciated.
Saanich (North).
Teacher, J. W. Thomson.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, October 16th, 1884; present, 8 boys, 9 girls; total, 17.
Examined, April 23rd, 1885; present, 12 boys, 15 girls; total, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 30 girls; total, 52.
Average monthly attendance, 34.
Average daily attendance, 24.40.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.92.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $36.07.
The average attendance has been very nearly the same as that of the previous year, but
the number of visits made by trustees and parents has very noticeably decreased.
On examination, Miss Annie Maria Downey obtained the percentage necessary for admission to a High School.
The teacher of this school has had many years of successful experience. The salary of the
teacher has been raised to $55 per month.
Saanich (South).
Teacher, J. P. Johnston until June 30th, 1885 ; present teacher, R. L. Fraser.
Salary, $80 per month.
Inspected, October 16th, 1884; present, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Examined, April 21st, 1885; present, 16 boys, 16 girls; total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 18 girls ; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 35.
Average daily attendance, 27.95.
Expenditure, $999.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $35.76.
The average attendance has very considerably decreased, and the number of visits made
by trustees and parents has by no means been in proportion to that of the previous year, nor
in accord with the appreciative spirit usually shown in educational matters by the people of
this district. From a knowledge of the deep interest taken in the welfare of the school in
past years by the residents, there is every assurance that no effort will be spared towards
sustaining the reputation for high standing which the school has had for many years.
On examination, Miss Julia A. Spotts passed the standard required for admission to a
High School. Erratum.
The following words, "The salary of the teacher has been raised to.$55 per month," inserted
in the closing remarks on North Saanich School, should have appeared under Quamichan
School. 338 Public Schools Report. 1885
Saanich (West).
Teacher, G. H. Sluggett.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 18th, 1885; present, 18 boys, 10 girls; total, 28.
Examined, April 28th, 1885; present, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 30 boys, 13 girls; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average daily attendance, 24.74.
Expenditure, $644.24
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.98.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $26.04.
The attendance has increased from 19.91 in 1883-84, to 24.74 in 1884-85.
The visits to the school by both trustees and parents are an assurance that the school
facilities provided are appreciated, and are doubtless clue in a great measure to the very satisfactory manner in which the school is being conducted.
On examination, Miss Elizabeth Thomson passed the standard required for admission to
a High School.
Shawnigan (including Bench Branch).
Teacher, James A. Hoy.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 22nd, 1885; present (in Shawnigan School) 13 boys, 4 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 38 boys, 16 girls; total 54.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average daily attendance, 28.78.
Expenditure, $715.62.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.25.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $24.86.
The teacher having been required to teach two schools alternately, his salary was increased
to $60 per month.
There has been a great lack of interest shown by both trustees and parents in visits made,
and it is to be hoped that improvement will be shown in this respect during the present year,
thereby aiding the teacher in his efforts towards the elevation of the school.
Both the schools have been so largely attended that during the present year it was found
necessary to divide the district, creating Bench Branch a school district under the name of
South Cowichan.
The salary of the teacher is now $50 per month.
Shuswap Prairie.
Teacher, J. C. F. Metcalfe.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 4 boys, 13 girls ; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 13.76.
Expenditure, $505.20.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.72.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $36.71.
The school was opened in November, 1884, and has more than maintained the average
demanded by the Act.
The prospects for the present year are encouraging.
Somenos.
Teacher, E. S. Wood.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 17, 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 339
Average daily attendance, 12.88.
Expenditure, $200.01.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.53.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $15.53.
This school was opened in May, 1884, and has maintained a good average attendance.
Doubtless every effort will be made by both trustees and parents in seconding the exertions of
the teacher in the advancement of the interests of this newly-created school.
Sooke.
Teacher, Miss N. Wolfenden until Dec. 31st, 1884; present teacher, Miss M. Jennings.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 16 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 11.81.
Expenditure, $618.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.74.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.37.
The average attendance has increased during the year. While the parents of the district have shown their interest in the welfare of the school by the number of visits made, the
trustees have certainly been remiss in duty in this regard.
The young lady in charge has had experience and is giving every satisfaction.
Spallumcheen.
Teacher. D. Rabbitt.
Salary $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 15.98.
Expenditure, $496.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.18.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.02.
The school in this district was opened in August, 1884, and continued in operation until
the close of February, 1885, when it was closed for the want of the average attendance demanded by statute. It has been re-opened, and under the able management of the teacher
will doubtless prove a success in the future.
Sumas.
Teacher, Miss S. J. White until September  30th, 1885; present teacher, J.  A. McLeod.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 12th, 1885; present, 9 boys, 11 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 22 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average daily attendance, 22.27.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.74.
While the average attendance has very perceptibly increased, the number of visits made
by parents and others has decreased. The trustees are certainly alive to the interests of the
school. The progress of the pupils during the past year has been very commendable. The
school is at present in charge of a very efficient teacher.
Trenant.
Teacher, John R. Scott until June 30th, 1885; present teacher, Alex. Gilchrist.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 4th and 5th, 1885; present on the former occasion, 7 boys, 7 girls; total,
14; on the latter occasion, 10 boys, 8 girls; total, 18. 340 Public Schools Report. 1885
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 13 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average daily attendance, 14.98.
Expenditure, $640.13.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.29,
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.73.
The average attendance has increased. Trustees and parents by their visits have not only
animated the pupils, but materially assisted the teacher in his efforts to arouse the susceptibilities of those under his charge.    The progress of the school has been satisfactory.
On examination, Master Paul Ladner obtained the percentage necessary for admission
to a High School.
Vesuvius.
Teacher, Miss A. Pollard until October 31st, 1884; A. C. Steele until December 31st,
1884; E. S. Wood until February 28th, 1885; present teacher, R. A. Purdy.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 5 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 10.64.
Expenditure, $673.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.93.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $63.26.
There has been an increase in attendance, and it is gratifying to record that seventeen
visits were made by the trustees during the past year, thereby showing an awakened spirit in
the interests of the school.
The number of changes of teachers was certainly detrimental to the progress of the pupils;
nevertheless, the school is at present in good working order.
Williams Lake.
Teacher, William Manson.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 5 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 12.20.
Expenditure, $552.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.50.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.29.
This school was not opened during the school year until January, 1885. The average
attendance has been large in proportion to the aggregate number enrolled.
The frequent visits made by the trustees are very creditable. The school is in charge of
a gentleman of experience.
Yale.
Teacher, J. Irwin.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 32 girls; total, 65.
Average monthly attendance, 35.
Average daily attendance, 27.73.
Expenditure, $784.65.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.30.
The attendance has considerably decreased, and the number of visits made to the school has
been very much less than that of 1883-84. 49 Vic Public Schools Report. 341
Reports of examinations held by the teacher jnstifies the statement that the progress of
the pupils has in every way been satisfactory.
With a thoroughly competent teacher and a board of trustees alive to their duties, this
school cannot fail to subserve the interests of education in this important district.
York.
Teacher, Miss A. C. Dallas.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 13.
Expenditure, $550.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.35.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.30.
This school, which for several years has not been in operation, was re-opened at the commencement of the present school-year, and during the same has maintained a very fair average.
The number of visits made by trustees and parents is very praiseworthy.
Teachers' Institutes.
The knowledge that the other professions band themselves together for mutual protection
and elevation, should certainly arouse the spirit of our teachers to do likewise. Professional
pride should animate those who are licensed by the Educational Department to assume the
responsibilities of instructors of the rising generation, to guard zealously not only the interests
but the honor of the profession which they have entered, as well as to improve its intellectual
and social tone.
In every Province of the Dominion Teachers' Institutes have been carried on with acknowledged profit to the profession, inasmuch as they have corrected defects, suggested improved
methods of teaching, disseminated information, and have aroused more general interest in
educational work. If in the older Provinces, possessing Model Schools, Normal Schools, and
Universities, they are considered so important a factor in their systems of education, how very
essential must such institutions be in a Province affording none of these facilities to those
desirous of becoming instructors of youth.
Our teachers as a rule have no opportunity of improving themselves professionally, other
than by daily experience and pedagogic literature. Interchange of thought on subjects pertaining to the philosophy and history of education, cannot but prove of great value to those
whose calling demands a thorough knowledge of the science of teaching and art of training.
In order to provide the, opportunity for discussion and inquiry on all scholastic matters, the
organization of a Teachers' Institute was recommended in the last Annual Report.
It is very gratifying to note that the suggestion met with the warm approval of the
teachers, and the result has been that an institute has already been formed, with a membership
of nearly one hundred.
Many friends of popular education became members and gave the teachers every encouragement.
The following is the report of the meetings held thus far :—
"Victoria, B. C, October 1st, 1885.
" Recognizing the necessity in the Province of an organization of teachers and others
interested in education, a preliminary meeting was held in April last, when the project took
definite shape by appointing the Superintendent of Education as Chairman and J. A. Halliday
Secretary.
" The following Committees were selected :—
" On Constitution and By-Laws—Miss Williams, Messrs. Wilson, Offerhaus, and Mundell.
" Programme—Mrs. Reid, Miss Bailey, Messrs. Stramberg, Halliday, and .Anderson.
" Music—Messrs. Offerhaus and Dods, Misses Cameron and Gardiner.
"It was resolved that the next meeting should take place during the month of July. 342 Public Schools Report. 188t
"Accordingly, on the evening of Wednesday, July 15th, a second meeting took place in
the Temperance Hall, Pandora Street, Victoria.
" In the unavoidable absence of the Superintendent of Education, the Rev. D. Fraser,
M.A., was appointed Chairman pro. tern.
" The minutes of the previous meeting having been read and adopted, a large number
came forward and enrolled themselves.
" The report of the Committee on Organization was read by D. Wilson, B.A.
" Resolved that the report be taken up and discussed clause by clause.
" The following as amended were adopted :—
" 1.  This organization shall be called 'The British Columbia Teachers' Institute.'
" 2. The object of this Institute is to discuss all matters connected with education and with
the interests of teachers.
" 3. All qualified teachers of this Province shall become members of the Teachers' Institute on enrolment and annual payment of one dollar.
" 4. All persons who are not teachers but are desirous of becoming members of the Institute shall be proposed by a member, and on motion may be elected by a majority of votes at
any regular meeting.    On enrolment these members shall pay the usual fee.
" 5. The Teachers' Institute shall annually elect from among its members a President,
a Vice-President, a Secretary-Treasurer, and a Corresponding Secretary. These officers, together with two other members annually chosen, shall constitute a Committee of Management.
" 6. The Institute shall meet annually, at such place and time as the members shall from
year to year determine.     The sessions of Institute shall continue through at least two days.
"7. The President shall preside at all meetings of the Institute The Vice-President shall
assist the President in all his duties, and in his absence take the Chair, and have the same
powers as the President.
" 8. The Secretary-Treasurer shall keep a record of the proceedings of the meetings,
notifying all the teachers of the Province of the time and jnace of the next annual meeting;
furnish each teacher with a copy of the programme of such meeting as early as convenient, and
not later than one month before the time of meeting ; and disburse the funds of the Institute
as it may determine. The Corresponding Secretary shall assist the Secretary-Treasurer in the
performance of his duties.
" 9. The Committee of Management, composed as already described of the President,
Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, and two other members annually
chosen, shall determine the exercises for each meeting and the order of business.
" 10. All papers read at the meetings of the Institute shall be handed over to the
Secretary-Treasurer, and shall become the property of the Institute.
" 11. All meetings of the Institute shall open with prayer.
" 12. This constitution may be amended or added to at any regular meeting by a three-
fourths vote of members in good standing.
"The officers were elected :—President, S. D. Pope, Esq., B.A., Superintendent of Education ; Vice-President, J. N. Muir, Esq., B.A.; Secretary-Treasurer, R. A Anderson; Corresponding Secretary, Miss Agnes D. Cameron; Management Committee—President, Vice-
President, Secretary-Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, Miss M. V. Storey, and D. Wilson,
Esq., B.A.
" The Vice-President took the chair.
,"The reports of the Musical and Programme Committees were read and adopted.
" The meeting then closed by singing the National Anthem.
" Thursday—Forenoon Session.
"At 10 o'clock the Vice-President took the chair, and opened the meeting with the Lord's
Prayer.
" Moved by D. Wilson, seconded by T. Kinney, that those interested in education who
have their names enrolled be permitted to become members by paying the required fee.
Carried.
"J. N. Muir, Esq., read his paper on 'How Reading should be Taught.' Reading could
be divided into three classes—mechanical, intellectual and rhetorical. The first merely treated
of the form or mechanical part; the second was the science of understanding thoroughly what
was read ; and the third was the science of reading in such a manner as to properly express
the feeling indicated by the matter read.    One of the principal objects of a teacher should be 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. 343
to teach the pupils the sense or meaning of the words read by them. One lesson should be
thoroughly learned before another was commenced, and the reading should be done slowly
Reading could not be done according to a set of rules. The sense of the extract must, to a
great extent, be the guide in reading. Different meanings could be taken from the same words
when read with emphasis on different words. In order that a teacher may be successful as a
teacher of reading, he must show the pupils how to read— that is, he must give examples before
them.    (Several examples were given to illustrate the remarks made.)
"Mr. Dods had listened with interest and profit to the address. In his own school, he
had adopted a system of simultaneous reading and had found the plan to work well. Would
like to hear others express their opinion on the subject.
" Mr. Kinney thought simultaneous reading could be adopted profitably at times, but was
open to objections if relied on too much.
" Mr. Gilchrist agreed with the last speaker.
" Mr. Wilson referred to some of the faults of readers. He agreed with the principal
ideas contained in the address. Children should not he allowed to pronounce words separately,
but should be taught to speak them as phrases.
" Miss McCarty had considerable experience in simultaneous reading. She approved of
it in preparing lessons, but if depended upon too much the. class was liable to get into a singsong style.
" JVlr Mundell thought the system could be adopted advantageously, with a class of thirty
or forty, occasionally, as it would impart novelty and some stimulus to a class.
"Mr. Muir closed the session by a reading,—'The Last Chord,' which was heartily
applauded.
"Afternoon Session.
"The proceedings of the Convention opened at 2 o'clock.
" Moved by Mr. Mundell, seconded by Mrs. Reid, that the time and meeting of the next
Convention be left to the Managing Committee Carried. It was resolved that the next
place of meeting of the Convention should be Victoria.
" On motion of Messrs. Wilson and Mundell, it was resolved that the Managing Committee be delegated to wait upon the Government with the view of having a week set apart at
Easter, for holding the Convention.
" R. A. Anderson was called upon to read his paper on 'How we should Teach English
Grammar.'
" Reference was first made to the system formerly adopted in teaching grammar.
" Many of the essentials for a correct knowledge of grammar are learned in connection
with the lessons. Answers to questions may be made profitable in improving the art of speaking
and writing correctly, if the pupils are trained to give answers, which, in themselves are complete sentences.    This is the natural way of teaching them to know a sentence.
" Advantage may be taken of oral and object lessons for this purpose. The rules of
syntax, and principles of etymology should be taught the pupils in connection with the exercise
of framing sentences.
" Improper or incorrect forms of speech should be corrected in the school-room, and thus
the habit of detecting errors will be formed by the pupils. Teachers are hampered in teaching-
grammar, by the fact that examinations very largely consist in definitions and rules, and the
people are apt to judge of the pupils' knowledge by their ability in answering such questions.
" Mr. Mundell said there was liable to be confusion in the school, owing to the several
text books in use.
" Mr. Wilson said the tendency now in teaching grammar, is to discard rules and definitions,
and teach the pupils to express themselves correctly. A trouble is, that examinations are
conducted on definitions or analysis far too difficult for the children.
" Mi1. Kinney thought the textbook was only a guide for the teacher. More instruction
can be conveyed to the pupils by living examples, presented to them by the teacher.
" Mr. Gilchrist thought there was very little use in teaching grammar to young pupils in
schools. In teaching composition good models should be furnished them, and they would be
thus enabled to use the language correctly.
" Mr. Thain came forward, and explained his system of teaching writing, and answered
many questions on the subject. 344 Public Schools Report. 1885
" ' Daily Marking' was taken up, and discussed by several, who considered the results
were, not commensurate with the time and labour expended.
" The Session closed at 4.30, P. M.
" In the evening, a Free Public Entertainment was held in the Theatre Comique, Fort
Street, under the auspices of the Institute, at which over three hundred were present. Addresses were delivered by D. W. Higgins, Esq., and Rev. D. Fraser, M. A., and an able and
practical paper read by D. Wilson, Esq., B. A., on ' Elementary Sciences in Our Schools.'
" Between the addresses were instrumental and vocal music, readings and recitations,
which added greatly to the enjoyment of the evening.
"The entertainment was brought to a close, by the singing of 'God Save the Queen.'
"R. A. Anderson,
" Sec-Treasurer.
"To S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A.,
"Superintendent of Education,"
The presentation of a Provincial Roll of Honor in every school, to each of the three pupils
who have been accredited by their teacher with first rank during the year in—
1. Deportment;
2. Punctuality and Regularity ;
3   Proficiency ;
has given entire satisfaction. Very gratifying reports have been received from all the teachers,
certifying to the excellent effects resulting during the past year from the introduction of these
merit cards.
The thanks of this department are due to Noah Shakespeare, Esq., M.P., for the gift of
maps and geological charts for the use of the schools of Victoria City and adjacent districts.
The necessity for the establishment of a Normal School is daily becoming more apparent,
and the creation of such an institution cannot be much longer delayed without serious loss.
It is pleasing to observe that the subject of higher education is receiving increased attention, and it is to be hoped the discussion of the question will lead to practical measures.
Private, munificence has done a great deal for university education in the older Provinces of
the Dominion as well as in the States of the American Union. It is surely not too much to
anticipate that a portion of the wealth of British Columbia will flow into the same channel.
People of means have it in their power in this way to confer a lasting benefit on our fair Province.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. POPE, B. A.,
Superintendent of Education. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report.
PART   II.
STATISTICAL  RETURNS. 11.
Public Schools Report.
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"A 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
IX.
Yates Street Ward :—
Chas. Hayward, Sec. (2); John Braden (1).
>• Johnson Street Ward :—
D. W. Higgins (2); H. F. Heisterman (1).
James' Bav Ward :~
D. R. Harris, Chairman (1); R. B. McMicking (2).
■J. Green, Sec. (3): W. Pringle (2); C. McCarrigle (1).
[enry Bird, Sec. ( ); J. H. Coon ( ); Fred. Rose ( ).
. Fraser, Sec. (1); Thos. Michell (2); L. Oppenheim (3).
on the part of the Secretary to send in Report
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Miss F. E. Armstror
Mrs. L. M. Caldwel
Mrs. L. M. Reid ..
Miss A. D. Cameroi
Miss L. A. Barron.
Miss L. Horton ...
Miss M. V. Storey.
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Do.             5th     „
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Girls' School, Principal..
Do.            1st Asst...
Do.            2nd    „
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Johnson Street Ward ...
Wellington, 1st Division ..
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Public Schools Report.
TABLE F.—Exhibit of Expenditures for Education Proper, during the year 1884-85.
School Districts.
Barkerville 	
Big Bar	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burton's Prairie	
Cache Creek—Boarding School
Canoe Pass	
Cedar, North  	
Cedar, South  	
Cedar Hill	
Cheam  	
Chemainus  	
Centreville	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Colwood	
Comox, North	
Comox, South	
Cowichan	
Craigflower 	
Clover Valley 	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola, North	
Gabriola, South	
Granville 	
Hope	
Hall's Prairie	
Lake 	
Langley 	
Lillooet	
Lytton 	
Maple Bay 	
Maple Ridge 	
Mayne Island 	
Metchosin	
Mud Bay 	
Moodyville   	
Mount Lehman	
North Arm 	
Nicola Lake	
Nicola Valley 	
Nanaimo  	
New Westminster	
Okanagan 	
Prairie 	
Priest's A7alley	
Port Moody	
Quamichan 	
Quesnellemouth	
Somenos	
Sooke	
Saanich, North  	
Saanich, South	
Saanich, West	
Shuswap Prairie	
Shawnigan   	
Spallumcheen	
Sumas	
Trenant	
Vesuvius 	
Victoria	
Wellington  	
Williams Lake 	
Yale	
York 	
Total	
Amount paid
for Teachers'
Salaries.
360 00
587 50
600 00
,500 00
350 00
630 00
600 00
840 00
600 00
600 00
960 00
600 00
720 00
600 00
600 00
550 00
660 00
720 00
600 00
840 00
600 00
600 00
660 00
600 00
125 00
600 00
660 00
720 00
720 00
670 00
720 00
598 20
653 70
600 00
660 00
422 58
600 00
720 00
720 00
,840 00
,460 00
540 00
550 00
499 35
600 00
600 00
825 00
150 00
582 25
840 00
960 00
600 00
460 00
680 00
420 00
600 00
600 00
630 00
,340 00
,500 00
490 00
720 00
550 00
$62,203 54
Amount paid
for Incidental
Expenses,
including Bent.
$ 195 00
40 00
40 00
34 75
200 00
33 87
39 40
31 25
34 25
40 00
33 50
79 70
15 00
36 00
35 75
39 99
133 74
36 92
20 75
40 00
60 74
44 74
45 25
50 47
23 50
12 25
90 75
35 00
42 37
27 82
42 50
40 00
40 00
34 37
40 00
74 31
70 00
115 75
40 00
29 75
360 69
597 77
36 00
11 89
68 38
226 96
63 25
98 19
50 01
36 26
40 00
39 50
44 24
45 20
35 62
76 00
40 00
40 13
43 25
1,763 77
122 75
62 50
64 65
$6,085 43
Amount paid
for Education
Proper in
each District.
$ 1,194 96
400 00
627 50
634 75
1,700 00
383 87
669 40
631 25
874 25
640 00
633 50
1,039 70
615 00
755 00
635 75
639 99
683 74
696 92
740 75
640 00
900 74
644 74
645 25
710 47
623 50
137 25
690 75
695 00
762 37
747 82
712 50
760 00
638 20
688 07
640 00
734 31
492 58
715 75
760 00
749 75
4,200 69
5,057 77
576 00
561 89
567 73
826 95
663 25
923 19
200 01
618 50
880 00
999 50
644 24
505 20
715 62
496 00
640 00.
640 13
673 25
16,103 77
1,622 75
552 50
784 65
550 00
§68,288 97
Cost of each
pupil, based on
aggregate
attendance.
l 38 52
33 33
17 43
23 51
44 74
15 99
18 59
26 30
19 86
17 30
23 46
14 64
23 65
39 74
28 90
19 39
29 73
29 04
24 69
22 07
15 27
32 24
40 33
12 25
23 98
8 07
21 59
17 82
31 77
32 51
33 92
11 34
22 79
31 28
22 07
19 85
18 24
25 56
38 00
39 46
13 05
15 37
27 43
13 70
29 88
21 20
16 58
31 83
10 53
24 74
16 92
19 60
14 98
29 72
13 25
29 18
16 00
18 29
26 93
11 99
11 43
32 50
12 07
32 35
Cost of each
pupil, based on
average daily
attendance.
! 53 11
42 02
32 91
36 11
66 78
34 24
30 70
45 88
45 89
29 62
59 71
28 71
34 11
71 56
42 02
45 94
52 39
67 47
39 70
66 74
30 79
48 70
54 13
24 36
57 20
8 41
52 65
51 17
64 94
48 85
68 05
26 95
39 49
44 95
49 12
41 14
34 86
60 15
77 71
76 04
23 94
34 64
48 40
42 93
49 41
41 39
31 46
93 35
15 53
52 37
36 07
35 76
26 04
36 71
24 86
31 02
28 74
42 73
63 26
23 04
23 13
45 29
28 30
42 30
Education Office.
Salary of Superintendent of Education $ 1,500 00
Examiners of Public School Teachers        300 00
Travelling Expenses of Superintendent of Education        262 10
Maps, Globes, and Incidental Expenses        800 45
2,862 65
Amount paid for Teachers' Salaries  62,203 54
„ Incidental Expenses of Schools     6,085 43
Total $71,151 52 Public Schools Report.
1885
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TABLE H.— DISTRICTS;  DATES OF CREATION;  BOUNDARIES.
Barkerville—28th June, 1871:—
Circle within radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
Beaver Point—18th August, 1885:—
Commencing at the point in which the western boundary of Section 88, Salt Spring Island, reaches
the sea ; thence due south to Fulford Harbour ; thence easterly and along the sea-shore to the point of
commencement; and including Russell, Portland, and Moresby Islands.
Bio Bar—27th October, 1884.    Re-defined 11th December, 1884 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the mouth
of Big Bar Creek, and whose radius shall be a distance of 20 miles from such centre.
Burgoyne Bay—3rd October, 1873.    Re-defined 18th August, 1885:—
Commencing at the north-west corner of "Beaver Point School District"; thence due west to the
sea-shore; thence southerly and along the sea-shore to Fulford Harbour ; thence north, along the,
western boundary line of "Beaver Point School District," to the point of commencement.
Burton's Prairie—26th April, 1882 :—
Commencing at a point where the line between Sections 22 and 23, Township No. 17, intersects the
right bank of Fraser River ; thence due north for a distance of two miles 33 chains, more or less, to a
point on the First Correction Line, being the north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 17 ; thence
east along said Correction Line for a distance of seven chains and forty links, more or less, to the southwest corner of Section 2, Township No. 18; thence due north for a distance of three miles, to the northwest corner of Section 14, Township No. 18; thence true east for a distance of six miles; thence true
south for a distance of three miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township No. 21 ; thence due
west along the First Correction Line for a distance of seven chains sixty-three links, more or less, to the
north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 20; thence due south for a distance of four miles ; thence
due west for a distance of six miles, to the south-west corner of Section 14, Township No. 17 ; thence
due north, along the line between Sections 14, 15, 22, and 23, Township No. 17, for a distance of one
mile, twenty-five chains, more or less, to its intersection with the left bank of Fraser River.
Cache Creek—Not defined.
Cadboro—7th April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 2, Oak Bay ; thence north-westerly and following
the boundary line of "Victoria City School District" to the south-west corner of Section 25 ; thence
north to the north-west corner of Section 26 ; thence east to the north-east corner of said Section ;
thence north along the western boundary of Section 31, to the north-east corner of Section 37 ; thence
in a right line to the north-west corner of Section 44; thence along the northern boundary of Section 44
to the sea-shore ; thence southerly along the coast line to the point of commencement.
Canoe Pass—8th May, 1884 :—
All that tract of land lying west of a line commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 96, Group 2, and
extending due south to the Gulf of Georgia, and including Westham Island.
Cedar, South—27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the south-west corner of Cranberry District; thence east along the southern boundary of Cranberry and Cedar District, to the coast line ; thence north-west along the coast line, to the
north-east corner of Section 12, Range 5, Cedar District; thence west along the section line, to the
north-west corner of Section 12, Range 1, Cranberry District; thence south along the western boundary
of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Cedar, North—11th February, 1874.    Name changed from Cedar and re-defined, 27th May, 1880 :—
Commmencing at the north-west corner of South Cedar School District; thence east along the
northern boundary of said District, to the shore line ; thence north-west along the shore line, to the
mouth of Chase River ; thence south to the north-east corner of Section 20, Range 4, Cranberry
District; thence west along the northern boundary of Cranberry District, to its north-west corner;
thence south along the western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Cedar Hill—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 1st June, 1878, 27th May, 1880, and
7th April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence northerly along the
eastern boundary of Sections 10, 81, 14, and 50, to the southern boundary of Section 82; thence easterly
along the northern boundary of Sections 49 and 64, to the Saanich Road ; thence in a northerly direction along said road to the boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts ; thence following said
boundary in a north-easterly direction, to the sea-shore at Cordova Bay ; thence following the shore line in
an easterly and southerly direction to the north-west corner of Section 44 ; thence south-westerly and
westerly following the western boundary of "Cadboro School District," and the northern boundary of
" Victoria City School District," to the point of commencement, 49 Vic Public Schools Report. xvii.
Centreville—10th August, 1874.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from Upper Chilliwhack to Centreville :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of the "Chilliwhack School District"; thence true
east two miles ; thence true north nine miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser River ; thence
in a westerly and south-westerly direction, following the meanderings of Fraser River, to the mouth of
Chilliwhack River ; thence following the right bank of Chilliwhack River to its intersection with the
northern boundary of the "Lower Chilliwhack School District"; thence true east along the northern
boundary of said School District, to its north-east corner; thence true south four miles, to the point of
commencement.
Cheam—26th November, 1874.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883 :—
Commencing at a point on the eastern boundary of the " Centreville School District"; thence
true east eight miles ; thence true north five and a half miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser
River ; thence in a westerly direction, following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the north-east
corner of "Centreville School District"; thence true south along the eastern boundary of said
School District for a distance of five and a half miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Chemainus—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as the District of Chemainus.
Chilliwhack—19th July, 1883.    Name changed October 27th,  1884, from Lower Chilliwhack to Chilliwhack :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Township 26, New Westminster District;
thence true south along the section line for a distance of four miles ; thence true west following Township line for a distance of four miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township 23 ; thence true
north along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 23, Township 23 ; thence true east along the section lino for a distance of four miles, to the point of commencement.
Clinton—25th June, 1869.    Not defined.
Clover Valley—28th July, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name changed from "Surrey"
to "Clover Valley," 23rd May, 1883 :—
Commencing at a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-west corner of Section
3, Township 7, New Westminster District; thence true north along the section line for a distance of
ten miles, to the north-west corner of Section 21, Township 8 ; thence true west along the section line
four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 24 ; thence south along the eastern boundary of Mud
Bay School District, to its intersection with the north shore of Semiahmoo Bay ; thence south-easterly
along the shore of Semiahmoo Bay to a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-east
corner of Section 1, Township 1; thence true east along the said parallel a distance of three miles, to
the point of commencement.
Colwood—3rd October, 1873 :—
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the north end of Parsons' Bridge; thence following Rowe Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and 98 ; thence in a northerly direction
along the eastern boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts ;
thence westerly along said boundary line, to the north-west corner of Section 14; thence south-westerly
to the south-east corner of Section 100; thence in a south-easterly direction to the south-west corner of
Section 51; thence along the section line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at Royal Bay; thence
north-easterly along the shore line to the southern end of Parsons' bridge; thence along the said bridge
to the point of commencement.
Comox, North—SOth July, 1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined May 8th, 1884, and April 7th, 1885:—
All that portion of Comox District between the western boundary of South Comox School District
and the eastern boundary of Courtenay School District.
Comox, South—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-defined July 21st, 1884:—
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 9 ; thence magnetic north, to the Gulf of Georgia;
thence along the shore to the point of commencement.
Cowichan—16th June, 1869.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from "South Cowichan" to "Cowichan,"
and re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
That portion of Quamichan District situate to the south of Cowichan River, and that portion of
Cowichan District south of Cowichan River and Cowichan Harbour, and not included in the Shawnigan
School District.
Cowichan, South—November 3rd, 1885 :—
•   All that portion of Shawnigan District north of the line separating Sections 15 and 16 and east of
the Kokasailah River, and that portion of Cowichan District east of the line dividing Ranges III. and
Courtenay—7th April, 1885:—
All that portion of Comox District west of Lots 50, 29, and 64 xviii. Public Schools Report. 1885
Craigplower—23rd July, 1870.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878:—
Commencing at the south-west extremity of Cedar Hill School District, and following the western
boundary of said district to where it strikes the southern boundary of Lake School District; thence
along the boundary of said district to the north-west corner of Section 116 ; thence along section line
between 116 and 117, west, to the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0 W., south, to the boundary line
between Lake and Esquimalt Districts ; thence west to the north-east corner of Section 98, marked on
the Official Map as "Government Reserve;" thence along the east line of said Reserve and Mill River
to Parsons' Bridge; thence along the water-line of Esquimalt Harbour, south-easterly, to the southwestern corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District; thence in a straight line to the south-western
extremity of Section 10; thence along the southern boundary line of said section, to Victoria Arm ;
thence north to point of commencement.
Denman Island—17th August, 1877 :—
All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
Departure Bay—25th July, 1885 :—
That tract of land bounded on the south by the Nanaimo School District, on the west by the Wellington School District, on the north by a line running from the north-eastern point of the Wellington
School District to Neck Point on the Gulf of Georgia, and on the east by the Gulf of Georgia, together
with Newcastle, Jesse, and other islands in and about Departure Bay.
Esquimalt—22nd October, 1870 :—
All that piece of land included within the following limits, viz.:—Commencing at the western
extremity of the south boundary line of the Craigflower School District; thence southerly and easterly
along the shore line of Esquimalt Harbour and Fuca Straits, and northerly along the water-line of
Victoria Harbour to the south-eastern extremity of the said Craigflower School District; thence along
the southern boundary line of the said District to the point of-commencement.
Gabriola, North—23rd May 1883.    Re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying to the west of the division line between Sections 9, 10, 14,
15, 18, and 31.
Gabriola, South—10th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined May 23rd, 1883.    Name changed
to "South Gabriola."    Re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying east of North Gabriola School District, and including
Mudge Island.
Granville—12th February, 1873 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
school-house on the south side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from
such school-house ; excej^ting always any land on the north side of said Inlet.    .
Hall's Prairie—9th January, 1885 :—
Commencing at the Iron Post, International Boundary Line, Semiahmoo Bay; thence east, along
said boundary line, to the eastern boundary of Surrey; thence north, along the eastern boundary line of
Surrey, a distance of three miles; thence west, to Semiahmoo Bay; thence south, along the shore line
of Semiahmoo Bay, to the point of commencement.
Hope—25th February, 1871 :—
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a radius of three miles from the Court
House.
Lake—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Cedar Hill School District, being the point where the
boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts intersects the sea-shore at Cordova Bay; thence in
a south-westerly direction, following the northern boundary of Cedar Hill School District, to the northeast corner of Section 50, Victoria District; thence westerly along the southern boundary of Section 82,
to Colquitz Stream ; thence following said stream, in a northerly direction, to its intersection with the
northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District; thence westerly along the northern boundary of Section 1,
to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern boundary of Section 22 ; thence in a north-westerly
direction across Section 22, to the north-east boundary of Section 116; thence westerly along the
northern boundary of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake District; thence north along said
boundary, to the south-west corner of Section 127; thence east along the southern boundary of Sections
127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53; thence north along the western boundary of
Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of South Saanich District; thence east along said
boundary, to the sea-shore; thence following the sea-shore in a south-easterly direction, to the point of
commencement.
Lake La Hache—30th July, 1875—
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from the school-house, situate at the 114-Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, as the centre of such
circle. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report.      - xix.
Langley—30th April, 1871.    Boundaries altered and re-defined August 18th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 126, Township 9, New Westminster District; thence
south to the centre of the eastern boundary line of Section 24, Township 8, of said district; thence due
east, to the western boundary of East Langley School District; thence in a right line, north, to the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, of said district; thence west, to the western boundary
line of said township ; thence due south, to point of commencement.
Langley, East—May 28th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 1, Township 11 (eleven), New Westminster District ; thence due west to the south-west corner of Section 3 of said township ; thence true north to
Fraser river ; thence easterly, up said river, to the western boundary of Stave River School District;
thence south, along said boundary, to point of commencement.
Lillooet—22nd October, 1870 :—
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
Lytton—20th November, 1869 :—
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
Maple Bay—16th June, 1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name changed from "North Cowichan" to " Maple Bay."    Re-defined February 2nd, 1885 :—
All that tract of land known on the official map as Comiaken District.
Maple Ridge—31st July, 1874 :—
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing at the south-west corner of Section 3,
Township No. 9, New Westminster District; thence in a northerly direction to the north-west corner
of Section 34, Township No. 9 aforesaid ; thence in an easterly direction to the north-east corner of
Section 32, Township No. 12, New Westminster District; thence in a southerly direction to .the point
of intersection with the Langley School District; thence following the western boundary of the Langley
School District to the northern boundary line of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster District; thence
westerly to the point of commencement.
Matsqui—Not defined.
Mayne Island—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land known as Mayne Island, and that portion of Galiano Island lying west of
Active Pass and east of a line running north across the island from the south-west corner of Lot 2.
Metchosin—8th April, 1871 :—
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the official map, together with that portion of
Esquimalt District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the boundary of the Craigflower School
District.
Moodyville—27th June, 1870 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
school-house on the north side of said Irjet, and whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from
such school-house ; excepting always any of the land on the south side of the Inlet.
Mount Lehman—8th May, 1884 :—
Commencing at a point on Fraser River, being the north-west corner of Section 27, Township 14,
New Westminster District; thence due south along the section line, for a distance of seven and a
quarter miles, more or less, to the Yale Waggon Road ; thence easterly along the Yale Waggon Road,
to a point being the intersection of the Yale Waggon Road with the dividing line separating Sections
19 and 20, Township 16 ; thence northerly along said section line, for a distance of four miles, more or
less, to Fraser River ; thence north-westerly following the bank of the river, to the point of commencement.
Mud Bay—23rd May, 1883 :—
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 26, Block 1 North, Range 1 West; thence true
north along the section line to the north-east corner of Section 23, Township 2, New Westminster
District; thence true west along the section line five miles, to the north-west corner of Section 19,
Township 2; thence true south along the township line, for a distance of three miles seventy chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Mud Bay; thence in a southerly direction and south-easterly direction along the shores of Mud Bay and Semiahmoo Bay to the point of commencement.
Nanaimo—30th July, 1870.    Boundaries re-defined March 20th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the mouth of Chase River, thence due west to the boundary line of the Nanaimo
and Mountain Districts ; thence north, on the said boundary line, to the north-east corner of Mountain
District; thence east, to coast line ; thence along the coast line to point of commencement—subdivided
into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north of a line drawn due west from the end of Bastion and Fitzwilliam
Streets to the boundary line of Mountain District, shall be known as the North Ward.
2. All that portion of land south of Bastion and Fitzwilliam Streets, and west of the old Victoria
Road, shall be known as the Middle Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either the North Ward or the Middle Ward, shall be
known as the South Ward. Public Schools Report. 1885
New Westminster—4th June, 1870 :—
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster—subdivided into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north-east of Clement Street, extended in a right line in both directions
to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. Patrick's Ward.
2. All that portion of land lying between St. Patrick's Ward and Douglas Street, extended in a
right line in both directions to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. George's Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either St. Patrick's Ward or St. George's Ward shall
be known as St. Andrew's Ward.
Nicola Lake—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land known as Townships 95, 96, 97, 99, and 100, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Nicola Valley—31st July, 1874 :—
Bounded on the east by a line drawn north and south from the residence of William Charters in
Nicola Valley, and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola
Valley; on the west by a line drawn north and south from the residence of Byron Earnshaw, and
extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said
western boundary being about nine miles distant from the eastern boundary; and on the north and
south by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
North Arm—17th August, 1877 :—
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 314, Group 1 ; thence due north to the southern
boundary of Lot 320 ; thence north-westerly along the northern boundary of Musquiam Indian Reserve,
to western boundary of Lot 320, Group 1 ; thence due north to north-west corner of Lot 320 ; thence
following southern boundary of the Hastings Saw-Mill timber lease to north-west corner of Lot 336,
Group 1; thence due west along the northern boundary of Lots 336 and 337, to the north-east corner of
Lot 337 ; thence due south to the northern boundary of Lot 330 ; thence due west to the north-east
corner of Lot 258, Group 1 ; thence due south along eastern boundary of Lot 258 to North Arm of
Fraser River. Then commencing at north-east corner of Section 15, Block 5 north, Range 5 west, due
south, to range line between Blocks 4 and 5 north ; thence following said range line, due west, to North
Arm, Fraser River, including Sea Island.
North Thompson—25th August, 1884 —
That portion of the valley on each side of the North Thompson River, which extends a distance of
five miles above and five miles below the north-east corner of Section 24, Township 112.
Okanagan—31st July, 1874 :—
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek ; thence northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a distance of five miles ; thence easterly a distance of five miles; thence southerly to Mission
Creek ; thence westerly to point of commencement.
Oyster—7th April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the point where the boundary line between Sections 15 and 16, Range VI.,
Chemainus District, intersects the sea-shore ; thence west along- said line to a point due south of the
south-west corner of Oyster District; thence due north to the said south-west corner of said District;
thence following the western boundary of said District to its nortb-west corner ; thence east to the
sea-shore ; thence southerly along the coast line to point of commencement.
Port Moody—April 26th, 1884 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
central point of the crossings of Clarke and Douglas Streets, on the Clarke Survey, and whose radius
shall be a distance of 3J miles from such central point.
Prairie—26th November, 1874.    Boundaries altered and re-defined August 18th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Langley School District; thence due west to the eastern
boundary line of Section 21, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence south, in a right line, to
the south-west corner of Section 27, Township 7, of said district; thence due east, to the south-east
corner of Section 28, Township 10, of said district; thence north, in a right line, to point of commencement.
Priest's Valley—23rd May, 1883 :—
All of Townships 6, 8, and 9, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Quamichan—23rd May, 1883.    Altered and re-defined February 2nd, 1885 :—
All those portions of the Districts known on the official map as the Quamichan and Cowichan
Districts lying north of the Cowichan River, and north of the Cowichan Harbour, and not included in
the Somenos School District.
Quesnellemouth—14th April, 1881 :—
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the Fraser and Quesnelle Rivers ; and running
thence due west a distance of one mile; thence due north six miles; thence due east three miles; thence
due south six miles; thence due west two miles, to the point of commencement, 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxi.
Saanich, North—30th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 3rd October, 1873, and 27th May,
1880 :—
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula lying to the north of South Saanich District, as shown on
the Official Map, and known as the "North Saanich District."
Saanich, South—30th August, 1872:—Boundaries altered and re-defined 3rd October, 1873, and 27th May,
1880.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from "East-South Saanich" to "South Saanich" :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of the Lake School District; thence west, along the southern
boundary of South Saanich District, to the south-west corner of Section 18, Range 3 E.; thence north
along the said range line, to the south-east corner of Section 12, Range 2 E.; thence west, along the
southern boundary of Section 12, Range 2 E., to its south-west corner; thence north, along the range
line, to the south-west corner of Section 4, Range 2 E.; thence west, along the southern boundary of
Section 4, Range 1 E., to its south-west corner; thence north, along the range line, to the north-west
corner of Section 1, Range 1 E.; thence east, along the southern boundary of North Saanich, to the seashore ; thence following the sea-shore, in a south-easterly direction, to the point of commencement.
Saanich, West—27th May,  1880.    Name changed October 27th, 1884,  from "West-South Saanich" to
"West Saanich" :—
Commencing at the north-west corner of the Lake School District; thence east, along the southern
boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53, Lake District; thence
north, along the western boundaries of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of the South
Saanich School District; thence west, to the north-west corner of Section 56, Lake District; thence
north, following the western boundary of the South Saanich School District, to its intersection with the
southern boundary of North Saanich District; thence west, along said southern boundary, to the seashore at Saanich Inlet; thence southerly, along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod Creek, to the
south-west corner of South Saanich District; thence south, along the western boundary of Sections 122,
123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to the point of commencement.
Shawnigan—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered August 21st, 1885 :—
All that portion of Shawnigan District lying south of the line separating Ranges 15 and 16.
Shuswap Prairie—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the school-
house, and whose radius shall be a distance of six miles from such school-house.
Somenos—2nd February, 1885 :—;
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Range VI. ; thence south, to the south-east
corner of (Section 18 of said Range; thence west, to the south-west corner of Section 18, Range I. ;
thence north, to the north-west corner of Section 20 of said Range; and thence following the boundary
lines of the tract of land known on the official map as the District of Somenos to the point of commencement.
Sooke—23rd May, 1872 :—
The same as those defined on the official map of the District of Sooke.
Spallumcheen—8th May, 1884:—
The tract of land known as Townships 4, 7, 34, 35, and 38, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Stanley-—17th August, 1877 : —
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of three miles in
length from the Court House, Stanley.
St.Mary's Mission—7th April, 1885 :—
All that portion of Section 17, New Westminster District, not included in either Burton's Prairie
School District or in Mount Lehman School District.
Stave River—5th June, 1884 :—
The tract of land contained in the south half of Township 15, and those portions of Township 14 not
included in Mount Lehman School District.
Stuart's Lake—17th August, 1877 :—
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from Fort St. James on Stuart's Lake.
Sumas—13th October, 1871.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883 :—    ■
Commencing at a point where the northern boundary of Chilliwhack School District intersects the
Chilliwhack River; thence in a northerly and north-westerly direction, following the meanderings of
the Chilliwhack River to its confluence with the Fraser River ; thence in a south-westerly direction,
following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the mouth of Sumas River; thence in a southerly and
south-easterly direction, along the eastern bank of the Sumas River and Sumas Lake, to its intersection
with the southern boundary of Section 31, Township 22 ; thence true east to the south-east corner of
Section 34, Township 22; thence true north, five miles, to the north-west corner of the Chilliwhack
School District; thence true east, along the northern boundary of said School District, to the point of
commencement. xxii. Public Schools Report. 1885
Trenant—3rd October, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th May, 1884 :—
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the southern bank of the Fraser River, opposite
Tilbury Island ; thence running due south in prolongation of the dividing line of Ranges 4 and 5 West,
Blocks 4 and 5 North, New Westminster District, to the sea-shore at Boundary Bay ; thence southwesterly, along the shore line, to the 49th parallel of latitude ; thence along said 49th parallel to the
sea-shore at Roberts' Bay; thence along the shore line, northerly, to the eastern boundary of Canoe
Pass School District; thence due north, along said boundary, to the Fraser River; thence northeasterly, along the left bank of Fraser River, to the point of commencement.
Vesuvius—August 18th, 1885 :—
All that portion of Salt Spring Island situated north of the northern boundary line of Burgoyne
Bay School District.
Victoria—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence easterly, along the
shore line, to the north-west corner of Section 5 ; thence east, along the northern boundary of Section
5, to the north-east corner of said section ; thence south-easterly, in a direct line to the north-west
corner of Section 75; thence easterly, along the northern boundary of Sections 75 and 76 to the northeast corner of Section 76 ; thence north, along the eastern boundary of Sections 25 and 26, to the northwest corner of Section 28; thence east, along the northern boundary of Sections 28 and 11 to the
north-east corner of Section 11 ; thence south-easterly, along the eastern boundary of Section 11, to the
sea-shore at Oak Bay; thence following the shore line, in a southerly, westerly, and northerly direction,
to the north-west corner of Section 5—subdivided into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land south of the centre of Fort Street, and south and east of the centre of
Cadboro Bay Road to the northern boundary of Section 2, shall be known as James' Bay Ward.
2. All that portion of land north of the centre of Fort Street, and south of the centre of Johnson
.Street extended in a right line to the Cadboro Bay Road, shall be known as Yates Street Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either .lames' Bay Ward or Yates Street Ward shall
be known as Johnson Street Ward.
Wellington—2nd May, 1874 :—
All that tract of land included within the lines, eoinmenciug at a point at the north-west corner of
Wellington District, on the shore line; thence in a southerly direction along the western boundaries of
Wellington and Mountain Districts, to the section post between Sections 8 and 9, Range 1, Mountain
District; thence easterly, along said section line, to the south-east corner of Section 9, Range 7; thence
northerly, to the boundary Ime of Mountain District; thence easterly, along the northern boundary of
Mountain District, to the sea-shore at Departure Bay; thence northerly and westerly, along the shore
line, to the point of commencement.
Williams Lake—27th May, 1880 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the 150-
Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, and wdiose radius shall be a distance of seven miles from such mile post.
Yale—25th June, 1869 :—Not defined.
York—31st July, 1874 :—
Township No. 19, New Westminster District. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxiii,
PART   III.
APPENDICES.  49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxy.
APPENDIX A.
Rules and Regulations for the Government of Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
from April to September, inclusive; and from 9:30 a.m., to 12 m,, and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,
from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work during
the whole year, and a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's work in the six
months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion
Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer vacation shall include the
time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter Vacation
shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after the new year.
5. Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries during the vacations and holidays ordered
in Rules 3 and 4 only.
6. Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany teachers
or pupils.
7. Pupils enrolled in Ward Schools shall not be permitted to attend the Central Schools,
except by promotion at examination held by the Superintendent of Education; and pupils of
the Central Schools shall not be admitted into Ward Schools.
8. It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning
the regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of
times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment, his progress
in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and five
minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school, to
observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow
recesses to exceed the specified time—that is, from the time study ceases and
commences again.
5. To keep a Visitors' Book ("which he shall ask the trustees to provide*), and to
enter therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so chooses
to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information.
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book, and
to deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by them.
8. At the end of each half-year to hold a public examination of his school, of which
notice shall be given to the trustees, and to the parents through the pupils,
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education monthly, or when desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected
with the operations of his school, or in anywise affecting its interest or character. xxvi. Public Schools Report. 1885
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious parent
in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear to him to
be imperatively necessary; and then a record of the offence and the punishment
shall be made in the school register for the inspection of trustees and visitors.
13. No teacher shall compel the services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
14. For gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be expelled without
the authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless,
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to expel
sucli pupil from the school; but any pupil under public censure who shall express
to the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and explicitly as
the case may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees and teacher,
be re-admitted to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-
house is kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating, and ventilation,
and especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least
fifteen minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To daily inspect the yards and outhouses, and report to the Trustees, and to see
that the school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus,
books, &c, so that they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt
notice in writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a time-table, showing the
order of exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per day.
19. Not to be absent from the school without the permission of the Board of Trustees,
unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported
to the Secretary. N. B.--A11 absences, with reasons for the same, shall be reported
monthly to the Superintendent of Education.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings of
the teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the, duty of the Principal of a
school to convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once a
month, for conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To make a statutory declaration when required, as to the correctness of the
statistical and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. Previous to leaving the school to dismiss pupils detained for punishment.
25. To make himself familiar with the Rules that relate to his school duties.
26. Teachers of Ward Schools shall admit as pupils only those who are not farther
advanced than the second reader.
9. The Principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the time-tables,
exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades, and shall, on or before
the 15th day of July in each year, send to the Superintendent of Education a report of the
condition and progress of the school, with any suggestions he may deem expedient respecting
its requirements. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxvii.
10. Assistant teachers shall, when required by their Principal, report to him in writing
any and all matters connected with the workings of their division.
11. Principals must report in writing to the Secretary of the Board of Trustees every
violation by teachers of the Rules and Regulations prescribed for the government of the Public
Schools, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees to immediately
report the same to the Superintendent of Education.
12. No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
13. No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he is
afflicted with, or has been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion
shall have passed away, as certilied in writing by a medical man, or other authority satisfactory to the teacher.
14. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil is to be
made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
15-  It is required of each and every pupil—
1. That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that he be kind
and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his studies; and
that he conform to the rules of the school.
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for tardiness
or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory
excuse for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed
for closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises, or
in going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites; but
in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under special
circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but every such case must
be forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
16. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be
taught. The Lord's Prayer may be used in opening and closing school upon the permission of
the Board of Trustees. XXV111.
Public Schools Report.
1885
APPENDIX B.
 o	
Regulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers in the Province
of British Columbia for the Year 1885.
[Approved by His Honoitr the Lieutenant-Governor, 10th December, 1885.~\
 o	
1.—Time and Place of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of  qualification to teach  in  the Public
Schools shall commence on Monday, July 5th, 1886, at 10 a.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted accordiny; to the following schedule:—
Date.
July 5, Monday....
,, 6, Tuesday...
,, 7, Wednesday
„ 8, Thursday..
„ 9, Friday	
,, 10, Saturday..
,, 12,  Monday..
,, 13, Tuesday..
,, 14, Wednesday
Subject.
Optional Subjects	
Practical Mathematics	
Algebra  	
Euclid	
Natural Philosophy	
Arithmt tic	
Grammar	
Education and Art of Teachin
Spelling    	
Forenoon.
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.
12.301
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
.30 |
10 to 12
10 to 12.30
10 to 11
Subject.
Latin	
English Literature.
Ancient History...
Book-keeping	
Mensuration	
English History...
Geography	
Mental Arithmetic
Composition	
Writing	
Reading	
Afternoon
2 to 4.30
2 to 3.30
3.30 to 5
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 2.30
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
11 to
3. The examination shall take place in Victoria, and such other place or places as the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education, ten
days before the examination, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for which he is
a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20,
21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by such
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate as
shall be satisfactory to the Examiners.
III.—Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the
issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted
to return during the examination of the subject then in hand. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour, from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination-
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room any book, or paper, or slate, or anything else
from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper.
Detection in the breach of these Rules will render the candidate liable not only to the loss of
the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the discovery be then made that these Rules have been
broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write the subject of the examination paper on the
outside sheet, and his distinguishing number.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate less than eighteen years of age, and no.female candidate less than
sixteen, shall be granted a certificate to teach, but such persons may be allowed to undergo
the examination and obtain a certificate of standing.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates:—
1. Temporary certificate.
2. Third Class,  Grade B, certificate.
3. Third Class, Grade A, ,,
4. Second Class, Grade B, ,,
5. Second Class, Grade A, „
6. Eirst  Class, Grade B, ,,
7. First Class, Grade A, „
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1 A Temporary Certificate, valid until the next examination of teachers, shall entitle the
holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach in any
Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which more than
one is employed.
3. A Second Class Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold any
position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public School, or to act as an assistant in a High School,
5. A First Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public or High School, VIT.—Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.—To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing.—To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
3. Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic.—To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to be able to work
problems in the various rules.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in mental
arithmetic.
6. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the geography of the world.
7. Grammar.—To show a thorough knowledge of grammar, and to analyze and parse any
English sentence.
8. History.—To have a good knowledge of the history of the British Empire.
9. Composition.—To be familiar with the forms of letter writing, and to be able to write
a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling, and punctuation.
10. Education.—To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching the
various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquainted with school management—
including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils, formation of time-tables,
and modes of discipline, and to be familiar with the School Act and regulations, especially
respecting the office of teacher.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.—To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.—To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of surfaces.
13 Algebra.—To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic equations,
and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Euclid.—Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy.—To be acquainted with the properties of matter, and with the
elementary principles of statics.
IX.—First Class, Grade A, Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.—To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration — To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.—To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid.—Books I., IL, III., IV., Defs. of V, and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy.—To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
16. English Literature.
17. Ancient History.—To have a general knowledge of Ancient History from the Creation
to the fall of Rome. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxi.
18. Practical Mathematics.--To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry, and
to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin.—To be able to translate and parse the following:—Cpesar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., II., and III.; Horace, Odes, Book I., Ars Poetica: Virgil, .ZEneid, Books I., IL,
and III.
20. Greek.—To be able to translate and parse the following:—Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., IL, and III.; Homer, Iliad, Books I.,  II., and III.
21. French.—To be able to translate and parse the following:—Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII, Books I., II. and III.; Corneille, Le Cid.
22. Natural Sciences.—To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in which to
be examined.
X.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a Temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certiiicates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certiiicates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the
subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade.
7. For a First Class, Grade A, Certificates, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to all
the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade, provided always that he obtain at
least 40 per cent, of the marks attached to the Latin paper: or he must be a graduate of some
British University, who has proceeded regularly to his degree, and must satisfy the Examiners
of his knowledge of the art of teaching and school discipline and management.
8. Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate,
about to expire, shall be renewed from year to year by the Examiners, on the application of
the holder of any such expiring certificate, provided such certificate shall in the range and
scope of each subject and of all subjects fully satisfy the conditions of the examination in
progress at the time of such application for renewal. Provided also, that the applicant produce
satisfactory proof of success as a teacher during the time his certificate has been in force, if he
has been engaged in teaching during that period.
9. Whenever it shall be deemed necessary to raise the standard of examination, at least
twelve months' notice of such intention shall be given. xxxii. Public Schools Report. 1885
XL—Fixed Standard Marks of Value Attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Reading      50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling  100
4. Arithmetic  200
5. Mental Arithmetic  100
6. Geography  200
7. Grammar  200
8. History (English)  200
9. Composition ■  200
10. Education  200
11. Book-keeping  200
12. Mensuration  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature  200
17. Ancient History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin  200
20. 21, 22.    Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences  200
XII.  Candidates who fail to obtain First Class Certificates shall not  be  awarded  marks
for answers to the papers set for those certificates.
APPENDIX C.
Chapter I.
School Meetings in, School Districts.
1.—Notice of Meetings.
1. The notice calling an annual or special meeting may be signed by the secretary by
direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the trustees themselves. Copies of such notices
shall be put up in at least three of the most public places in the district, at least ten clays
before the time of holding the meeting.
II.—Proceedings at Annual Meetings in Rural Districts.
Meetings how organized.
1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (11 o'clock), call the
meeting to order, and request the voters present to appoint a chairman and secretary from
among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall preserve order and
decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be limited to the casting vote. In case of an equality of votes,
the chairman must give the casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of the meeting.
Order of business at Annual Meetings.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting:—
(1.) Calling the meeting to order.
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Reading of trustees' annual report, including statement of receipts and expenditure, 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report
Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year.
Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
Any other business of which due notice has been given.
(4-
(5.
(6.
(7-
3. The
(1-
Rules of Order to be observed at Annual Meetings.
ollowing rules of order should be observed at the meetings :—-
Addressing  Chairman.—Every  voter   shall   rise  previously   to   speaking,   and
address himself to the chairman.
(2.)  Order of Speaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the chairman shall
name the voter who shall speak first, when the other voter or voters  shall next
,   have the right to address the meeting in the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion under discussion
to be read for his information at any time, but not so as to interrupt a voter
who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking Twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the same question
or amendment without leave of the meeting, except in explanation of something
which may have been misunderstood, or until every one choosing to .speak shall
have spoken.
(5.) Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the names of all voters
who may present themselves shall be recorded; such poll to remain open till
three o'clock, when the chairman shall declare the result.
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to vote, the chairman
shall require the person whose vote is questioned to make the declaration provided by law; after making it the vote must be received and recorded without
further question; but if such person refuses to make such declaration, his vote is
to be rejected.
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings of the meeting
shall be received by the chairman. All protests must be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty days at least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall always be in order,
provided that no second motion to the same effect shall be made until some intermediate proceedings shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if required) and seconded.—A motion cannot be
put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be in writing (if required by the
chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or read by the
chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the meeting; but may be
withdrawn at any time before decision by the consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of Motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate no other motion
shall be received, unless to amend it, or to postpone it, or for adjournment.
(12.) Order of putting Motion.—All questions shall be put in the order in which they
are moved. Amendments shall all be put before the main motion, the last amendment first, and so on.
(13.) Reconsidering Motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be made by any
voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration shall be taken more
than once at the same meeting.
Close of Meeting.
4. The poll at every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after three o'clock in the
afternoon. xxxiv. Public Schools Report. 1885
_ Transmission of Minutes.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should sign the minutes,
as entered by the secretary in the minute book; and the secretary of the board of trustees
must forthwith transmit a correct copy of such minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of Education.
Special School Meeting.
6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in the same way as
annual school meetings.
III.—Registration of Voters in City Districts.
[Extracts from " Public School Act, 1885.,"]
" Sec. 23. Any person registered as a voter, as hereinafter provided, shall be eligible to
vote at any school meeting held in such District, and in the ward in which he is registered, for
the election of Trustees; provided, always, that it shall not be lawful for any person to vote
for Trustees in more than one ward in any City School District.
" Sec. 24. In the City School Districts a register of voters for the registration of voters
shall be opened on the first day of July in each year, and shall be closed after the 31st day of
May, in the following year. Such register shall be kept in the City of Victoria by the Superintendent of Education; in the Cities of New Westminster and Nanaimo by the Government
Agents. Provided always that for the year 1885 the register shall be opened on the passage
of this Act, and closed after the 31st day of May, 1885.
" Sec. 25. Any householder or freeholder resident in any ward of any City School District
for a period of six months previous to the application to register, and the wife of any such
householder or freeholder, shall be entitled to be registered as a voter for the election of
Trustees in the ward in which he or she resides. Provided Chinese and Indians shall not be
registered."
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
(These are defined in the "Public School Act, 1885."
The following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of trustees :—
Appointment of Teacher.
1. Notice of the appointment of a teacher to a school should be given him in writing, such
notice specifying the day on which his duties as teacher commence. Trustees cannot appoint
as teacher a person who does not hold a certificate from the Educational Department of this
Province.
Dismissal of Teacher.
2. Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in writing, at least thirty
days before such dismissal is to take place.
Superintendent of Education to be notified of appointment or dismissal of Teacher.
3. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher must be forthwith transmitted
to the Superintendent of Education, with the date on which the appointment or dismissal takes
effect.
Care of School-house.
4. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should be to see that the
school-house is kept in good repair. He should see that the windows are properly filled with
glass; that at the proper season the stove and pipe or fireplace are in good condition, and that
suitable wood or coal is provided; that the desks and seats are in good repair; that the outhouses are properly provided with doors and kept clean; that the blackboards are kept painted,
the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided necessary for the comfort of the
pupils and the success of the school. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxv.
Use of School-house.
5. No public school-house or school-plot, or any building, furniture, or other thing pertaining thereto, should be used or occupied for any other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of the district, without the express permission of the trustees as
a corporation, and then only after school hours and on condition that all damages be made
good, and cleaning and sweeping properly done.
The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees. He has no authority
to use the school-house other than as directed by them, or to make use of it at any other time
than during school-hours without their sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at
once deliver up the school-house key to them.
Expenses of School.
6. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses they shall incur for
their school, but they are required to submit such matters (Public School Act, 1885, sec. 7,
sub-sec. 3; Revenue Act, 1879, sec. 36), to the Government for approval.
Extract from "Revenue Act, 1879."
" 36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy-Treasurer, or finally placed to the credit of a Sub-
Accountant, or any other person, in repayment of an advance, or in accounting for any portion of revenue by
charging the amount to the head of service, the Auditor must e.xamine the account and endorse thereon the
head of service, number of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been issued."
June, 1879.
The annual reports required of trustees must be received at Education Office before
vouchers for the incidental expenses of schools will be certified.
APPENDIX D.
 o	
Chapter I.
Course of Study prescribed for Graded and Common Schools.
Reading, Writing, Spelling, Dictation, Mental Arithmetic, Written Arithmetic, Geography
English Grammar, English History, Composition, and Letter Writing.
The following subjects may be taught:—
Book-keeping;  Anatomy,  Physiology, and   Hygiene;   Drawing;  Mensuration; Algebra;
and Euclid.
Chapter II.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to a High School.
1 Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly the ordinary words in the Fourth Reader and
Spelling Book.
2. Reading.—To read correctly and intelligently any.passage in the Fourth Reader.
3. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
4. Arithmetic.—To have a good general knowledge of numeration, notation, the four simple
and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple interest and
percentage, compound interest and discount.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To be able to solve, mentally, any ordinary problems. xxxvi. Public Schools Report. 1885
6. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions, and to be able
to analyze and parse any ordinary sentence.
7. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, of the general
principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe, Asia, Africa,
America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of that of the Dominion
of Canada.
8. History.—To know the different periods and the outlines of English History, as
contained in Collier's History of the British Empire (Junior Class Book).
9. Composition.—To be able to write a letter correctly as to form and punctuation, and to
write a brief composition on any simple subject.
Chapter III.
Course of Study in High Schools.
English Course.—All subjects prescribed for Graded and Common Schools—Anatomy,
Physiology, and Hygiene.
Commercial Course.—Book-keeping—Single and Double Entry—including Banking,
Commercial Correspondence, Commercial Law, <fcc., together with all subjects prescribed for
the English Course.
Classical Course.—Latin, Greek, French, together with all subjects in which Candidates
for First Class Certificates are examined.
Course of Study in the Victoria High School—Junior Division.
English Language.—Review of elementary work in orthography, etymology, syntax, and
analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose; composition, including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and abstracts of passages in
readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style; reading; dictation; and
elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation of selected passages from standard
authors.
2. Mathematics.
(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound  rules,   vulgar and  decimal fractions,
proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications, and square root.
(6.) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring,  greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one,  two,  and
three unknown quantities,
(c.) Euclid, Book I., with easy exercises.
(d.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures,
(e.) Natural Philosophy, including proportions of matter, composition and resolution of
forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises, and elementary reader.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a.) Latin—grammar and exercises.
(b.) Greek—grammar and exercises (optional).
5. History.
(a.) Leading events of English History to Stuart Period.
(b.) Roman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire more
particularly.
7. Book-keeping and, Writing.
(a.) Single Entry and principles of Double Entry. 49 Vic Public Schools Report. xxxvii.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained  in Payson,   Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.
(a.) Elementary Botany.
(b.) Elementary Physiology.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition,
rendering of poetry into prose, abstract of selected passages, critical reading of portions of the
works of standard authors, themes,, and generally the formation of a good English style.
2. Mathematics.
(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(b.) Algebra, quadratics, equations, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and
combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers,
(c ) Euclid, Books I., IL, III., IV.; definitions of Book V, and Book VI., with exercises.
(d.) Trigonometry, plane trigonometry
(e.) Mensuration, volumes and areas of surfaces of solids and surveying.
(fi) Natural philosophy, pressure of liquids, specific gravity and modes of  determining
it; the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing  pump,   air pump,
statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics.
3. Modern Languages.—French—Grammar and exercises; Voltaire, Histoire de Charles
XII., Corneille, Le Cid.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a.) Latin—Csesar, De Bello Gallico, Book I.; Virgil, .iEneid, Book I.; Horace, Odes,
Book I.
(b.) Greek—Grammar; Xenophon, Book I.; Homer, Iliad, Book I. (optional).
5. History.
(a.) English History—the special study of the Stuart and Brunswick periods.
(b.) Roman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the reign of
Romulus Augustulus.
(c.) Grecian History, especially from the Persian War to the  death of Alexander the
Great, both inclusive.
6. Geography—Ancient and modern.
7. Book-keeping and Writing.
(a.) Single and double entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in  Payson,  Dunton,   and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science,
(a.) Geology.
(b.) Astronomy.
Chapter IV.
1. The course of study in the New Westminster High School shall be the same as in the
Victoria High School.
Chapter V.
Regulations for Admission, etc., into a High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers, may
be admitted to enter a High School as pupils without being required to pass the usual entrance
examination. xxxviii. Public Schools Report. 1885
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to a High School, the aggregate of his
marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the subjects of
examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject. Candidates will not
be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected to
additional viva, voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Pupils ofi Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from a Public School to a
High School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
5. Pupils on entering a High School may for the first six months receive instruction in the
English Course only, but after that period must take either the Commercial Course or the
Classical Course.
6. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with reference
to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may have been in such
class or division.
7. The regulations, respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils in a
High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
8. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any portion of
such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into a High School except by the authority
of the Trustees, given in writing; and the names of all such absentees shall be forwarded by
the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination at the
close of each half-year.
APPENDIX E.
Books Authorized for Use in Public and High Schools.
Gage's First Reader, Part I.
Gage's First Reader, Part II.
Gage's Second Reader.
Gage's Third Reader.
Gage's Fourth Reader.
Gage's Fifth Reader.
Gage's Sixth Reader.
Gage's Practical Speller.
Payson, Dunton, & Scribner's Copy-books.
Gage's Copy-books.
Copy-books without headlines.
Elementary Arithmetic (Kirkland & Scott).
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy).
Mental Arithmetic (J. A. McLellan).
Lovell's First Steps in Geography.
School Geography and Atlas.
Swinton's New Language Lessons (Campbell).
Lennie's Grammar.
English Grammar—by Dr. Wm.- Smith and T. D. Hall, M.A. (London)
British History (Collier).
British Empire (Collier).
Outlines of General History (Collier).
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman).
Book-keeping (Beatty & Claire).
Algebra (Hamblin Smith).
Mensuration (Todhunter).   . 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxix.
Pott's Euclid, six books.
Natural Philosophy (Peck's Ganot).
Trigonometry for Beginners, by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics, by Wormell.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
Ancient Geography (Pillans).
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric.
Ancient History (Schmidt).
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
Science   Primers—Introductory,   Chemistry,    Physics,    Physical    Geography,    Geology,
Astronomy, Physiology, Botany.
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam).
Freehand Drawing (Walter Smith).
Smith's Smaller Latin Grammar.
Bryce's First Latin Book.
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold).
Principia Latina, Part I. (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin.
Riddle's Latin Dictionary.
Curtius' Greek Grammar.
Bryce's First Greek Book.
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold).
Initia Grseca (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek.
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon.
Fasquelle's Shorter Course, French.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
Histoire de Charles XII. (Voltaire).
Le Cid, Corneille.
Common School Education, by James Currie (for the use of teachers).
Art of School Management (Baldwin) ,, „
APPENDIX F.
List of Certificated Teachers.
First Class, Grade A
Stainburn, Geo., B.A., Cantab, 1880.    Renewal, 1885.
Newbury, J. C, 1882.
Williams, Miss E. A. (Mrs. Taylor), 1880.    Renewal, 1885.
Johnston, J. P., 1881.    Renewal, 1885.
Howay, Miss Alice, 1882.
Irwin, J., 1882.
Muir, John N, B.A, McGill University, Montreal, 1884.    Renewal, 1885.
Stramberg, Hector M., B A., Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1884.    Renewal, 1885.
Wilson, David, B.A., University of New Brunswick, 1885.
Campbell, Henry J., B.A, Trinity College, Toronto, 1885.
Pitblado, Colin, B.A., M.D., Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, 1885.
Walker, Frederick G., B.A, Cantab, 1885.
Howay, Frederic W., 1885.
Reid, Robie L., 1885. xl.
Public Schools Report.
1885
Kaye, James,
Halliday, James A.,        ,,
Offerhaus, R., „
Lewis, S. G., ,,
Reid, Mrs. L. M. 1881.
Carmichael, Francis A. ,,
Clarke, C. E., 1882.
Murray, Paul, ,,
Smith, Miss Isabella, ,,
Dods, Archibald, 1883.
Irvine, Miss Christina, ,,
Cameron, Miss A. D., „
Horton, Miss Lucretia, „
First Class, Grade B.
1880.    Renewal, 1885.
Forrest, Miss 0.,
Bannerman, W. S.,
Gillies, D. W.
Lyons, Ormond O.,
Rabbett, Daniel,
1883 and 1884.
Renewal, 1885.
1884.
Anderson, Robert A., 1884.
Sluggett, George H., ,,
Bell, Miss Emelene, „
Phelps, William H., ,,
Irwin, William H., ,,
Jones, David, ,,
Thain, Joseph H., ,,
Shaw, Alexander, ,,
Wright, Frederick G, 1885.
Wood, E. Stuart, „
Fraser, Roderick L., ,,
McLennan, John C, „
Gardiner, Miss A. F., ,,
Gilchrist, Alexander, „
Wood, William M., „
McLeod, John A., ,,
Kinney, William T., ,,
Palmer, Joseph W , ,,
Bryant, Miss Maria, ,,
Renewal, 1885.
Second Class, Grade A.
Berkeley, Mrs. L. A., 1881 and 1884.
McDougall, Miss A. J., lf.83.
Harding, Miss M. L., ,,
Jemieson, Miss Eleanor A., 1884.
Storey, Miss Marcella V., „
Davidson, Miss Mary R., ,,
Kaye, Ernest E., ,,
Gowen, Miss Annie C,
Munn, Henry A.,
Williams, Miss Mary,
Shaw, Miss Ella B.,
Armstrong, Miss F. Ella,
Kirkland, Miss Maud,
1884.
1885.
Jackson, Miss Harriet, 1881 and 1884.
Gardiner, Miss E. J.,    1882 ai
White, Miss Sophia J.,
Davidson, Miss Elizabeth A ,
Gardiner, Miss Abbie F.,
Wolfenden, Miss Nellie F. F.,
Northcote, Miss Alice,
Bannerman, Alexander M.,
Michael, Mrs. A. M.,
Gillanders, Albert H.,
Pollard, Miss Annie,
Lawrence, Miss Mary,
Second
Class, Grade B.
1884.
1885.
Shaw, John,
Smith, Miss Clara P.,
1883.
1884.
Halliday, Miss Marie F.,
Hoy, James A.,
Barron, Miss Lizzie A.,
McDonald, Donald, J.,
Tomlinson, William,
„ and 1885.
Mufford, William J.,
)j
McCartey, Miss Augusta
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.
,5
Campbell, James M.,
Dockrill, Miss Melrose,
1884.
1885.
Dougan, James,
Campbell, Eli J.,
Scott, John R.,
Jennings, Miss Maggie,
Cook, Miss Fairie,
Barron, Miss Isabel,
Murchie, Miss Margaret J.,
Blair, Miss Jeanie W.,
Robinson, Miss Sarah A.,
Third Class, Grade A
1885.
Todd, Miss Katherine,
Bailey, Miss Adelaide S.,
Stephenson. Frederic L.,
Andrews, Miss Helen,
Ramsay, Miss Jennie,
Gray, James,
Purdy, Raffles A. R,
Sinclair, William J.,
Coghlan, Miss Ella,
1885. 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
xli.
Carmichael, Miss Elinor M..
Metcalfe, James C. F.,
Doran, Edward F.,
Scott, Miss Jean A.,
Shaw, Alexander, Jr.,
Third Class.
1885.
, Grade B.
Norris, Miss Mary E.,
Grant, Miss Bertha,
Mebius, Miss Lucy A.,
McDonald, Boswell R.,
1885.
Temporary Certificates
Granted on the recommendation of the Board of Examiners.
Mundell, John.
Monk, Mrs. Annie.
Norris, Miss Martha J.
Reynard, Miss Eva M.
Thomson, James W.
Temporary Certificates
Granted on the application of Boards of Trustees.
Armstrong, Miss Ida.
Bailey, Miss Helen,
Carmichael, Miss Annie
Catherwood, John A.
Clemitson, R. M.
Dockrill, Miss Ellen.
Grinder, Miss Mary A.
Gillies, John.
Hanna, B, S.,
Heard, Miss Mary.
Jackson, Miss Margaret.
Kaye, James S.
Leduc, Thomas.
Manson, William.
McMillan, J. D.
Smith, J. F.
APPENDIX G.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to a High School.
Graded Schools.
Christmas Examinations, 1884.
New Westminster Boys' School.
James Davidson,
David Galbraith,
William Johnston,
James Rankin.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Mary Cunningham,
Sophia Jamieson,
William S. Dalby,
Frank Gowdy,
Rebecca Johnston,
Mabel L. Millard.
Victoria Boys' School.
William Steele,
Frederic John Stephen.
Victoria Girls' School.
Annie Helen Hicks,
Sarah Kermode,
Alice Louisa Mansell,
Corinthia S. E. Pierre,
Evangeline V. Steele,
Frances A. Smith. xlii. Public Schools Report. 1885
Common Schools.
Granville.
Alice Miller, Ernest Miller.
Special Examinations,  1884.
Alexandria Booth, Victoria, Gertrude Clarke, New Westminster.
Edith Hayward, ,, Georgina DeBeck, ,,
Herbert A. Percival,   ,,
Midsummer Examinations,  1885.
Graded Schools.
Nanaimo Boys' School.
Vernon W. R. Stewart, James S. Harvey.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Katie Draper.
Victoria Boys' School.
Randolph Murray Collier, George Allen Gardiner,
William Alexander Lorimer, Joseph Robert Pierre,
Arthur Albert Humber, James Allen Aikman,
William Alexander Lawson, William Robert Savage.
Victoria Girls' School.
Annie C. Christie, Nicoline S. Becker,
Eleanor W. Broderick, Annie E. Spencer,
Annie R. Robertson, Lily Swan,
Elizabeth E. Carr, Isabel B. Christie,
Jeannette Mebius, Christina Lorimer,
Josephine G. Hill, Esther M. Johnston.
Wellington.
Edna Wall.
Common Schools.
Cedar Hill  Charles King.
Craigflower  Mary Caroline Austin.
Esquimalt : . Alfred S. Cartmel.
Maple Bay     Charles Beaumont.
Maple Ridge  Frank V. Harris, Harriet Isaac.
Quamichan  Lily Monk.
North Saanich  Annie Maria Downey.
South Saanich    Julia A. Spotts.
West Saanich  Elizabeth Thomson.
Trenant  Paul Ladner.
Special Examinations, 1885.
Minnie Robertson, Victoria. Herbert R. Townsend, New Westminster-
Frederic G. Wright,     „ Emma Augusta DeBeck,
Mrs. Elizabeth Coates,  ,, Charles Dean,
Alexander Allan,          „ Nellie Dockrill,
John Musgrave,            „ Melrose Dockrill,
Robert Musgrave,    .    „ F. Ella Armstrong, 49 Vic
Public Schools Report.
xliii.
PROVINCIAL ROLL OF HONOR, 1884-85.
Pupils Accredited by their Teacher with First Rank.
Schools.
Barkerville ....
Big Bar	
Burgoyne Bay..
Burton's Prairie
Cache Creek ...
Canoe Pass	
Cedar, North...
Cedar, South...
Cedar Hill	
Cheam  	
Chemainus	
Centreville	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Colwood ,
Comox, North...
Comox, South...
Cowichan	
Craigflower	
Clover Valley ...
Esquimalt	
Gabriola, North .
Gabriola, South .
Granville	
Hall's Prairie ...
Hope	
Lake	
Langley	
Lillooet 	
Lytton	
Deportment.
Annie Elizabeth Brown .
Minnie Kostering	
Annie Furness	
Thomas McKamey	
William Wilson	
Eliza Trim	
Margaret McKinlay
Catherine Jane Thomas .
Mary Todd	
Isabella McConnell	
John Windsor	
Alma Kipp	
Ethel May Lapum	
Mary Walker	
Albert E. Wale	
Reginald Pidcock	
Charles Beckinsell	
Susan Amelia Ryan	
Amy Isabella Stewart...
J. Christina McKenzie . .
Charles Bunting	
John W. Penberthy	
Mary Degnen	
Laura Heyward	
William Sinclair Brown.
Lily Gutierrez	
Mary Black	
William Maxwell	
Josephine Ordine	
George Byron Baillie....
Punctuality & Regularity.
James Kelly	
William Haller	
Nellie Wilson	
Annie Burton	
Etta Jane Ingram	
Charles Trim	
Elizabeth Wilkinson . ..
Mary Jane Haslam	
Mary Elizabeth King ..
Margaret Ednadale Ryder
George Walter Lilley ....
Flora Reece	
Christy Ann Chariton....
Ewen Edwin Bell	
John H. Ccssford	
Robert Merle Halliday...
Margaret McDonald	
Margaret Ann Blyth	
Walter Kerr  .  ...
Samuel H. Shannon	
Hugh Logan	
Sarah Hoggan	
Margaret Edgar	
Edith Cordiner	
Isabella S. Brown	
James Yates	
Louis Duval	
Thomas Maxwell	
Uwonna Miller	
Mary Elizabeth Dougherty
Proficiency.
George Walker
Louisa Kostering
Martha Ann Akerman
James Darius Wells
Willie Walter Uren
Sarah Swett
Samuel Fiddick
Frances Mary Thomas
Charles Edward King
Mary Elizabeth Snider
Ellen Thomas
Bertha Reece
Edwin Allen Wells
William Cameron
Alice Jones
Ida Jane Halliday
James Anderton
Isabella Beveridge Blyth
Mary Caroline Austin
Francis J. A. McKenzie
Alfred C. Cartmel
Alice W. Penberthy
Catherine Shaw
Ernest Miller
Ellen Hart
Christina Mattie Yates
Sarah E. Lindsay
Alexander Ovid Morrison
William Lee Dickey
Nellie Lytton Buie xliv.
Public Schools Report.
1885
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Maple Bay	
Maple Ridge	
Mayne Island    	
Metchosin	
Do.       Rocky Point .
Mud Bay	
Moodyville 	
Mount Lehman	
North Arm	
Nicola Lake	
Nicola Valley	
Nanaimo, Boys' 1st Div..
Do.        Boys'2nd Div.
Do.        Boys'3rd Div.
Do.        Girls' 1st Div..
Do. Girls'2nd Div.
New Westm'r High School
Do. Boys' 1st Div.
Do. Boys' 2nd Div.
Do. Girls' 1st Div.
Do.        Girls'2nd Div.
Okanagan	
Prairie	
Priest's Valley	
Port Moody	
Quamichan	
Quesnellemouth	
Saanich, North..   	
Saanich, South	
Saanich, West	
Shawnigan	
Do.      Bench Branch.
Shuswap Prairie 	
Deportment.
Emily May	
Harriet Isaac	
Francis Heck	
Annie Fisher	
Grace Argyle	
Elizabeth Anne Brewster .
Adeline Rivers	
John Merryfield	
Ada Sweet . .......
Bella L. Scott	
Emma Woodward	
Herbert Stewart	
John Augustus Bate	
Louis Erastus Lawrence.
Janet Webb	
Fannie Norris	
Mildred Jane Major	
Frederic Whiteside	
Rosabella Jane Lennie . . .
Christina Ann Morrison..
Peter Allen Grant	
School    closed     March
Laura Michaud	
Helen Tronson	
Emma Luella Annand..
Mary Marriner	
Josephine St. Laurent..
Helen McDonald	
Annie Turgoose	
Geoffrey Butler	
Eliza Agnes Verdier . ..
Maria Dougan	
Philip McBryan	
Punctuality & Regularity.
Frederic Beaumont	
Charles James McDonnell
William Trueworthy	
George Clarke	
Louisa Argyle	
Arthur Dougall Johnson..
Nellie Amelia Randall ...
Abbie McCallum	
Laura Sherman	
Carrie Edwards	
James M. Woodward ....
Richard Lewis	
Charles E. Stewart	
James Samuel Price	
Christina Pool	
Margaret Renwick	
Margaret Jane Murchie ..
Charles Shiles	
Thomas Shanks Rankin ..
Florence Hacker	
Gertrude R. Alexander , .
31st, 1885.
Alexander M. Vannatta..
Christine Anderson	
Edgar David Murchie	
Esther Humphrey	
Carrall St. Laurent	
Amy Elizabeth Williams..
Wesley Heard	
Rosa Sluggett	
Thomas Hollings	
Charles Jones	
Amy Chase ,	
Proficiency.
Charles Joseph Beaumont
Frank V. Harris
William Deacon
William Fisher
Annie Argyle
Agnes McKay
Inez Rebecca Smith
Annie Merryfield
Walter Vermilyea
Gracie M. Scott
Martha Ann Woodward
James Galloway
James R. McKinlay
James Henry Parkin
Elizabeth Galloway
May Harold
Thomas R. E. Mclnnes
Thomas David Guest
Walter Scott Greig
Alice Clare Clute
Henry W. Alexander
Alida Mabel Robinson
Susan McNeill
Wilhelmina Elsie Dockrill
Mary Lomas
Fred. Dexter Duhig
Sarah Adelaide Williams
Julia A. Spotts
Elizabeth Thompson
Henry Hollings
Isaac Dougan
Catherine McKenzie 49 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
dv.
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Maud Helen Muir	
School closed February
Annie Emma Chadsey....
Caroline Agnes H. Green..
Frank Francis Bitancourt
Willie Evans	
John Miller Muir	
28th, 1885.
Alice Esther Muir
Louis Lafayette Chadsey
Paul Henry Ladner
Thomas William Mouat
Chester Wells Wadhams..
Corilla Jane Ellen Gwynne
Victoria :—
High School, Sen. Div..
High School, Jun. Div..
Abbie F. Gardiner
William C. Wilson	
Alice Louise Mansell	
Francis Burgess Gibbs
Boys' 1st Division	
William Robert Savage ..
Randolph Murray Collier
Boys' 2nd Division ....
Joseph Alex. McDowell
Henry Dibben
Albert G. Franklin	
Boys' 4th Division	
Arthur Valentine Davey..
Francis Edward W. Smith
William Russell
Boys' 5th Division	
Stanley Humphreys	
Henry Dalby	
George Askew
Boys' 6th Division	
Boys' 7th Division	
Frederick McConnell	
Charles H. E. Waller
George Van Horst	
Allan Whittet
Gertrude H. Withrow .   .
Girls' 2nd Division	
Julia Marguerite  Bradley
Emily Jane Tyack
Girls' 3rd Division	
Annie Louisa Findley....
Hattie May Mcintosh	
Eliza Jane King
Girls' 4th Division	
Florence Mabel Lettice...
Mary Elizabeth McKenzie
Jennie Grant Fraser
Mary Isabel Preston	
Edna Emma Stannard....
James' Bay Ward School
Katie Walker	
Alice Christine Porter
Johnson St. Ward School
Edward Walter Gray ....
Francis Asa Marrion
Wellington, Sen. Division
Do.         Jun. Division
Edna Wall	
Robert William Pringle ..
Mary Jane Wall	
Jennie Ramsay
Elizabeth Shipley
William Haddon	
Mabel Williams	
Yale	
Norman St. Clair Fraser..
York	
Minnie Lavinia Russell . .
Sarah Moore Campbell xlvi Public Schools Report. 1885
Medalists.
The Medals presented by His E.xcellency the Governor-General were, on result of written
examinations, awarded as follows :—
1. Miss Abbie F. Gardiner, Silver Medal, presented for competition in the Victoria High
School.
2. Miss Annie C. Christie, Bronze Medal presented for competition between the Boys
School and Girls' School, Victoria.
3. James Galloway,   Nanaimo  Boys'  School,  Bronze   Medal   presented  for  competition
between the Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster.
APPENDIX H
MIDSUMMER HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1885.
Mental Arithmetic.
1.  How many grains in lib Troy? Ans	
2.. How many yards of ribbon @ 6-| cents '# yard, can you buy with $2.50?
Ans	
3. What will 35 geese cost @ $30 $ dozen? Ans	
4. What is the simple interest on $250  for   1   year   8  months @ 8%   '§
annum? Ans	
5. A and B can do a piece of work in 5 days; A can  do  it alone  in   12
days; how long will it take B to do it alone? Ans	
6. If I bought 4-0 turkeys at the rate of 5 for $3, and  sold  them  at  the
rate of 8 for $7; what did I gain? Ans	
7. From § of .5 take \ of .75. Ans	
8. What part of an acre is a square yard? Ans	
9. Bought a horse for $62.50; sold him for $75; what  was  the  gain per
cent.? Ans	
10. If | of a yard cost $1.20, what will f of a yard cost? Ans	
Arithmetic.
1. What is the smallest number that can be divided evenly by the first eight figures?
2. Simplify (| of 5/6 of 3f + 8§)-(10J = 7s/i2).
3. Find the value of 7.1 x 82 - (34f ~- 2.5).
4. Divide 1.066 by 13, and 1577 by .19.
5. Express as a vulgar fraction in its lowest terms the sum of 14.4 and  1.44   divided by
their difference.
6. If 6 men can reap 16 acres in 4 days, working 10 hours a day, in how many days will
10 men reap 24 acres, working 12 hours a day?
7. Reduce to acres 21798 square feet.
8. If 3!/6 lbs. cost $84/7 what will 973/10 lbs. cost?
9. Find the cost of 4 bus. 2 pks. 1 gal. of oats @ $.75 per bushel.
10. What is the compound interest on $750 for 3 years @ 8% per annum? 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xlvii.
Geography.
1. Define promontory, polar circles, meridians, and eclipse.
2. Distinguish between a plain and a plateau.
3. Locate 5 rivers that flow into the following:—(a) Pacific Ocean, (b) Mediterranean Sea.
4. Name the principal mountain ranges of Asia.
5. Name 3 cities on each of the following rivers:—(a) St. Lawrence, (b)   Fraser,   (c)  Mississippi, (d) Rhine.
6. What countries of South America and Europe, and what provinces of the Dominion of
Canada have no sea coast?
7. Trace a trip by water from Halifax to Chicago.
8. Define and locate (a) Bothnia,  (b) Khartoom,   (c)  Elba,   (d)  Herat,   (e)  Murray,   (fi)
Mona, (g) Hawaii, (It) Cotopaxi, (i) Chesapeake, (j) Alberni.
9. In which hemisphere is Iceland?    In what zone?
10. What is the capital of the largest insular possession of Spain?    Give  the populations
of Canada, Great Britain, and Europe?
English Grammar.
1.  Define the parts of speech that are not inflected.
2   Write 3 nouns that are used only in the singular, 3 that are used only in the  plural,
and 4 that are the same in both numbers.
3. Give the possessive plural feminine of sheep, he, who, deer, sir.
4. Distinguish between an adjective and an adverb.    Compare fibre,  old,   square,   badly,
early.
5. Write the perfect tense in all moods, active voice, of the verb to go.
6. Oongugate by giving the principal parts, wind, saw, cleave, hang, ought.
7. Write sentences containing,—
(a) A noun in the nominative of address.
(b) A noun in the nominative absolute.
(c) A verb in the infinitive as object of the principal verb.
8. Correct, giving rules for correction,—
(a) Six months' rent are dew.
(b) Says I, boys its awful wicked to throw rocks.
(c) That building is neither a church or school.
9. Analyze,—
'Mid pleasures and palaces where'er we may roam,
Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home!
A charm from the skies seems to hallow us there,
Which, seek through the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere.
10. Parse italicized words in preceding text.
Composition.
1. Make and name all the punctuation marks used in your reader.
2. Explain the following abbreviations:—(a) etc., (b) e.g., (c) A.D., (d) M., (e) LL.D.
3. Why are words put in italics?    How can you italicize a word in writing?
4. Write a letter to a near relative.
5. Write a composition on any one of the following subjects:—(a)   Home,   (b)  War,   (c)
Flowers, (d) Duties of Pupils, (e) British Columbia. xlviii. Public Schools Report. 1885
English History.
1. Name the three principal leaders of the Britons during the Roman period.
2. Between whom, and when, were fought the battles of  Moor  of Ardoch,   Hengsdown
Hill, Ethandune, and Hastings?
3. Name the Danish line with dates.
4. State the chief events of the reign of Henry II.
5. Describe the battles of Nevil's Cross and Agincourt
6. What was the greatest event of the Tudor Period?    Who was Lady Jane Grey?
7. Name the Stuart sovereigns with dates.
8. Give historic reference of (a) Mayflower, (b) Glencoe, (c) The Forty-five, (cl)  Plains of
Abraham, (e) Indian Mutiny.
9   Give dates of birth and marriage of Queen Victoria.
10.  State five leading events of the present century.
APPENDIX I.
MIDSUMMER HIGH SCHOOL EPAMINATION—JUNE, 1885.
Mental Arithmetic.
1. How many square feet in a rod ? Ans	
2. What is the sum of 8 /q and 3^ ? Ans	
3. 8 is 15% of what number ? Ans	
4. If 3-i lbs. cost $1.75, what is the cost of 9| lbs.? Ans	
5. At an election, 480 votes were cast for the  two candidates.
A had 36 majority over B.     How many votes were cast for each ?    Ans A B
6. What is the interest on $250 for 2 years 10 months at 9% per annum ?    Ans	
7. How many revolutions will a wheel  11  feet in  circumference  make  in
going -\ of a mile ? • Ans	
8. An article which cost $7.50 sold for $12.50 ; what was the gain % ? Ans	
9. Simplify (} of |) - (f of | of 8). Ans	
10. What is the amount of the following bill:—
840 feet lumber, @ $15 per M.
750 Bos. oats, @ $30 per ton. Ans	
English History.
1. State in order the five immediate predecessors of William the Conqueror; giving dates
of each reign.
2. What battles were fought in Stephen's reign?    Result of each?
3. Shew that on the death of Elizabeth, James VI. of Scotland  was the rightful heir to
the throne.
4. Give the leading events of the reign of the last King.
5. Give historic reference of—(1) Black Prince, (2) F. D., (3) Roundheads, (4) The Merry
Monarch, (5) Riot Act,  (6) 1509, (7) 1679,  (8) 1707, (9) 1812,  (10) Divine Right. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. xlix.
Geography.
1. How many degrees between the Arctic Circle and the Tropic of Capricorn?
2. Name the Equinoxes and Solstices, stating when each occurs.
3. Write the Provinces of the Dominion in order of population^  placing after each its
chief seaport.
4. Name five mountain ranges in Europe and locate five rivers in South America.
5. Give the five largest peninsulas of Asia, stating a cape in each.
6. Define and locate—(a) Zambesi,  (b) Auckland,  (c) St.John's,  (d) Kong,  (e) Gaspe.
7. Into what river does the Euphrates flow ?
8   What language is spoken in Switzerland?
9, Who are the Ghoorkas?    The Cossacks?
10. What is the population of Canada?   British Columbia?    London (England)?
English Grammar.
1. What is the test of correctness in the use of language?
2. Write the possessive plural masculine of nun, nymph, Mrs., maiden, belle.
3. How many and what participles in each voice ?
4. Correct, stating reasons for correcting,—
(a) It was neither her sister or her which I heard of.
(b) Whom did she marry?
(c) I do not think that John, you or me can answer this question right.
5. What divisions of grammar are used in parsing?
6. Analyze—
The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power,
And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,
Await alike the inevitable hour,—
The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
7. Parse the italicized words in the last question.
Arithmetic.
1. Find the cost, at 30 cents per square yard, of plastering a room 30 feet long, 20 feet
wide, and 16 feet high; wainscoting 4 feet high.
2. If 4 men, each working 8 hours a day, take 11 days to pave a road 220 yards long and
35 feet broad, how many days will 6 men, each working 12 hours a day, take to pave a road
175 yards long and 36 feet broad?
3. Find the present worth of $1,057.50 for 21 years at 7 per cent, per annum, simple
interest.
4. The cost of 8 turkeys and 14 ducks is $11.70, and the cost of 14 turkeys and 8 ducks
is $14.70 : required the cost of a turkey and a duck.
5. A man sells out of the 3J per cents at 93| and realizes £18,700 : if he invest one-fifth
of the produce in the 4 per cents at 96, and the remainder in the 3 per cents at 90, find the
alteration in his income.
6. A bill on London for £960 sterling costs $4,640 ; what is the rate of exchange ?
7. Divide the cube root of 27054.036008 by the square of .1. Public Schools Report. 1885
Mensuration.
1. Find the length of the longest pole that can be placed in a room 30 feet long, 20 feet
wide, and 12 feet high.
2. How much more will it cost, at $1.50 per rod, to fence a five acre lot in the form of a
rectangle whose length is three times its breadth, than to fence a five acre lot in the form of
a square?
3. The side of a square is 18 feet; a circle is described round the square: find the area
between the circle and the square.
4. How many gallons will a cask hold which is 4 feet 2 inches long and whose head and
bung diameters are 30 and 36 inches respectively?
5. Find by duodecimals the volume of a rectangular parallelopiped having the following
dimensions:—7 feet 5 inches, 6 feet 7 inches, 3 feet 10 inches.
Algebra.
1. Divide x4, + (5 + a) x& - (4 - 5« + b) x2 - (4a + 56) x + 4b by a:2 + 5x - 4.
2. Resolve into factors—
(1.) m?-n*.    (2.) a*-8a;+ 7.    (3.) 6a;'2+11*-10.
3. Find the H C. F of—
a;3_ 1xi+lQx- 12, 3a;8-14a,2-rl6a;, and 5.x3 - 1 Ox'2 + 7x - 14.
4. Given 12x+ 5y - 4s = 29 i
13a; - 2y + 5z = 58 > to find the values of x, y, and z.
17*- y - z =15 j
5. Given 1 = 2 9/io to find the value of x,
7 — x       x
6. A labourer dug two trenches, one 6 yards longer than the other, for £17 16s., and the
digging of each cost as many shillings per yard as there were yards in its length: find the
length of each.
Euclid.
1. Write the Postulates.
2. Bisect an obtuse angle.
3. To describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a given triangle and have one of  its
angles equal to a given rectilineal angle.
4. To divide a given straight line into two parts, so that the rectangle  contained  by the
whole, and one of the parts, may be equal to the square on the other part.
5. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure described in a circle are together equal
to two right angles.
6. To describe an isosceles triangle having each of the angles at the  base  double of the
third angle.
Statics.
1. Define tension, weight, and volume.
2. Enunciate the theorem of the Parallelogram of Forces.
3. Of what kind  of  lever  is  each  of  the  following an example:—(a) Wheelbarrow,
(b) Tongs,  (c) Scissors? 49 Vic. Public Schools Report.
4. A straight uniform lever, whose weight is 50 lbs. and length 6 ft., rests in equilibrium
on a fulcrum, when a weight of 10 lbs. is suspended from one extremity. Find the pressure
upon it.
5. A force of 15 lbs., acting horizontally, supports a weight of 20 lbs. on an inclined plane.
What force, acting along the plane, will support the same weight?
6. In a system of 4 pulleys, whose weights, commencing with the highest, are 1, 2, 4 and
8 lbs respectively, and W 160 lbs., find P.
Trigonometry.
1. Find A and B from the equations-
sin A    t/s cos A       1
— —=■ and
cos  B    -j/2 sin  B    1/2
.   _,, , , 4 cos 2A
2. Show that cot2 A - tan2 A = ,
sin2 2A
3. Find the height of a tower whose top appears at an elevation of 30° to an observer 120
feet from the foot of the tower, on a horizontal plane, his eye being 5 feet from the ground.
4. What is the logarithm of a number ?    Who invented logarithms ?
5. The hypothenuse of a right-angled triangle is 580 feet, and the tangent of one of the
angles is 20/2i.    Find the sides of the triangle.
Book-keeping.
1. What is Book-keeping?    Why are the systems of Single Entry and  Double  Entry so
named?
2. What is the rule for journalizing?
3. If a person by accident should lose or destroy a note he holds against  you,  would  you
give him another for the same amount?    Give reasons for answer.
4. Write a negotiable promissory note, duly witnessed and endorsed.
5. Make five entries in the Day Book, journalize, and post.    Balance the Ledger.
Roman History.
1. Which of the Kings passed a gentle and pious reign?    Which one was banished?
2. For what purpose were Decemvirs appointed?    What were the Licinian Rogations?
3. Describe the battles of (1) Heraclea,   (2) Cannae.
4. Who composed the Second Triumvirate?    By whom, why, and when was Constantinople
founded?
5. Name the Twelve Csesars, stating anything   that occurs  to  your  mind  in  connection
with each.
6. Give historic reference of (1) The Caudine Forks, (2) Cornelia, (3) The Ides of March
(4) Zenobia, (5) Odoacer.
Latin.
1. Decline the substantives animal, Dens domus, and meridies.
2. Compare the adjectives acer, juvenis, malus, and fiacilis.
3. Decline the pronouns sui, hie, ipse, and qui. iii. Public Schools Report. 1885
4. Write the second person plural of the perfect subjunctive, passive, of scribo, and all
the participles of punio and fiero.
5. Translate—
(a) We are good men, if we benefit those whom we can benefit.
(b) In the grave the poor are on an equality with the rich.
(c) Esse nonnullos, quorum auctoritas apud plebem plurimum valeat; qui privati plus
possint, quam ipse magistratus.
(d) Quod quum fieret, non irridicule quidam et militibus decimftB legionis dixit: "Plus,
quam pollicitus esset, Osesarem ei facere; pollicitum, se in cohortis prajtorise loco decimam
legionem habiturum, nunc ad equum rescribere."
6. Translate—
Atque ilium, tales jactantem pectore curas,
Tristior et lacrimis oculos suffusa nitentes,
Alloquitur Venus: O qui res hominumque deumque
.•rEternis regis imperiis, et fulmine terres,
Quid meus jEncas in te committere tantum,
Quid Troes potuere? quibus, tot funera passis,
Cunctus ob Italiam terrarum clauditur orbis.
(a.) Parse—-jactantem, oculos, terres, clauditur.
(b.) Scan the first three lines.
French,
1. Write two exceptions to the general rule for forming the plural of nouns.
2. How is the superlative degree formed ?
3. Distinguish between—
cet cette
ne—pas ne—point
un bon homme un homme bon.
4. What words take the auxiliary etre in their compound tenses, and which the auxiliary
avoir ?
5. Write a letter in French.
6. Translate—
Mon cher papa, je vous ecris anjourd'hui, lundi; je donnerai ma lettre au messager, qui
partira demain, mardi; il arrivera apres-demain, mercredi; vous m'enverrez, je vous prie, de
l'argent, jeudi; si je n'en regois point vendredi, je pars samedi, pour etre chez vous dimanche.
7. Give mood, tense, person, number and subject of all the verbs in the preceding extract.
Music.
1. Name half tones in key of G flat major.
2. Name half tones in key of F sharp major ?
3. What is the relative minor to key of E major ?
4. What is the relative minor to key of A flat major ?
5. What is the relative minor to key of G flat major ?
6. What is the meaning of (1) Al segno, (2) Forzando, (3) Allegro ma non troppo
(4) Piu mosso, (5) Piu lento, (6) Bis, (7) Tacet, (8) Diatonic, (9) Chromatic, (10) Gruppo, (11)
Da Capo, (12) Appoggiatura, (13) Appogiato ?
7. Give in their proper positions on the stave, the signs of the Treble, Tenor, and Bass
Clefs.
8. Give the sign for " Pause."
9. What is meant by Syncopation ?    Give example.
10. Transpose the following, naming Rests, &c, &c:— 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. liii.
APPENDIX J.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY, 1885.
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all classes and grades.)
Friday, July 10th ; 2 p.m. to 2.30 p.m.     Total marks, 100.
1. How many more grains in 1 ft> Troy weight than in 1 lb Apothecaries'weight ? Ans.
2. If 12 yards cost $.75, how many yards can be bought with $2.50 ?
Ans.
3. How many yards of carpeting, \-\ yards wide, would be required
to cover a floor 13 ft. 6 in. in width and 20 ft. in length ? Arts.
4. Divide 3/4 of 5/9 of li/6 by .05. Ans.
5. What is the simple interest on $250 for 2 years, 6 mos., @ \ %
per month ? Ans.
6. At what rate per cent, will $60 amount to $75 in 8 months ?
Ans.
7. Bought an article for $17.50 , and sold it for $25; what was the
gain % ? Ans.
8. If 1 lb cost $.99, what will 567 lbs. cost?
Ans.
9. 18 is 40 % of what number?
Ans.
10. From the square of 1.99 take the cube of .1.
Ans.
Writing.    (For all classes and grades.)
Tuesday, July lith ; 2 p.m. to i.30 p.m.     Total marks, 100.
1. How would you organize classes for writing in graded and ungraded schools ?
2. State and illustrate how you would criticise the work of a class so as to point out and
correct mistakes.
3. What are the best positions for the body and arms in writing ?    Give reasons.
4. (a)  State the rules for holding the pen, and give reason for each.
(b) What would you emphasize as critical points in relation to pen-holding 1
5. (a) What are the benefits of counting in writing exercises ?
(b) Illustrate.
6. Give the five elements and the six principles which  enter into the  formation of the
small letters, and the three principles of the capitals.
7. Discuss the propriety of teaching scholars to write a business hand instead of confining
them to standard forms.
8. To what combinations of letters or forms would you direct attention as being specially
difficult ?
9. What difference is there between this branch and the other branches of education
taught in our schools ?
10. Write the following as a specimen of penmanship :—
Peace to the phlegm of sullen elves,
Who if from labour eased,
Extend no care beyond themselves,
Unpleasing and unpleased. liv.                                             Public Schools Report.
1885
Let no low thought suggest the prayer
Oh ! grant, kind Heaven to me,
Long as I draw ethereal air
Sweet Sensibility.
Spelling.    (For all classes and grades.)
Wednesday, July 15th; 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.     Total marks,
100.
Write the following words correctly.     (Two marks will be deducted
for each word incor-
rectly spelled or omitted.)
1. abayanse                  14. enskonse                  27. hemmorrage
39.
eshelong
2. taboo                        15. supersede                 28. spermacetee
40.
o-de-kalone
3. fushshea                   16. tizzic                         29. errysyppelass
41.
idiosyncrasy
4. izayah                        17.  knewralgea               30. remminissence
42.
posthumous
5.  koalless                      18.  wrankkorrus            31. pusillanimity
43.
sighnee dyee
6.  vassillate                   19.  arkkeollogy              32.  sinsinnattee
44.
pommelling
7.  sinnister                    20   wrettorishon             33.  argillaceous
45.
appothem
8. kerosene                   21. ekkleziastez             34. sursingle
46.
farmasutical
9. poinnant                  22. ure (not your)         35. pluro-knumonea
47.
phantazmagorea
-
10. asserbitee                  23. benefited                   36.  phantazea
48.
polyglot
11.  perrifferry                 24.  assephphalyst           37. finale
49.
et setterra
12.  porferry                     25.  vermaselly                38.   wrecoshay
50.
dillettanta
13.  ammythist                26. kneshshense
Composition.    (For all classes and grades.)
Friday, July 10th; 2.30 p.m. to 4-30 p.m.     Total marks,
WO.
1.  Explain the meaning of, and illustrate by an example, each of the
following:—
Allegory,  Antonomasia, Apostrophe,  Paronomasia.
2. Write an essay on one of the following subjects :—
(a) The Chinese question in British Columbia.
(b) England and Russia in Asia.
(c)  Life and character of some great man.
(d) The war in the North-West.
(e) The great inventions of the nineteenth century.
(fi) Novel reading.
(g) The effect of climate on national character.
Arithmetic.    (For all classes and grades.)
Saturday, July 11th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks,
200.
1. A druggist bought 1260 lbs. of alum, avoirdupois, and retailed it by troy weight:  how
many more pounds did he sell than he bought ?
2. Multiply 48.23 by 16.13.
16                         L3              i
3. Add together                     and         27              1
r5of2fi*i           UofSS.       1
9         10       11
and divide result by
3f of b\ of 7\     1      17 x u
63               3|   •      \ 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. Iv.
4. What is the amount of $1535 for 2\ years at 6 per cent, compound interest?
5. If I employ a Broker to buy 55 ($100) shares of Railroad Stock which is 20 per cent,
below par, and pay him \ per cent, brokerage; how much will my stock cost?
6. A man bought a farm for $4,268 cash: how large a note, payable in 4 months, must
be taken to the bank to raise the money at 6 per cent, discount?
7. If 15 men working 12 hours a day can hoe 60 acres in 20 days, how long will it take
30 boys working 10 hours a day to hoe 96 acres, 6 men being equal to 10 boys?
8. Extract the square root of the cube root of 308.915776.
9. Explain fully why you double the quotient for a new divisor in extracting the square
root of a number, and what is the meaning of the numbers 30 and 300 which appear in the
common method of extracting the cube root?
10. A cistern has a receiving and a discharging pipe; when both are running, it takes 18
hours to fill it; if the latter is closed, it requires 15 hours to fill it: if the former is closed,
how long will it take the latter to empty it?
11. A, B, and C can trench a meadow in 12 days; B, C, and D in 14 days; 0, D, and A
in 15 days; and D, B, and A in 18 days: in what time would it be done by all of them
together, and by each of them singly?
12. Transform 345.6273 from the octenary to the ternary scale.
13. A person buys a horse upon borrowed money, upon which he pays 6 per cent, per
annum; the horse earns 70 cents daily, and costs -|- per cent, upon his purchase price for daily
keeping. The owner sells him at the end of a year for $50, and realizes $132.40 upon his
whole transaction.    What did the horse cost?
Geography.    (For all classes and grades.)
Saturday, July 11th; 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Write short notes on the following points relating to the atmosphere :—
(aJ Its composition;   (b) weight;  (c) temperature.    Also (d) twilight; (e) refraction.
2. Explain the causes of (a) the Trade Winds ; (b) monsoons; (c) fog ; (d) hoar-frost.
3. What is a zone ? Why fi ve zones, and why are their boundaries fixed where they are 1
Which is the greater, a degree of longitude on the Equator, or a degree of latitude ? and give
reason.
4. Name the ten largest islands in the world.
5. fa) Name all the cities in the world which have over one million of inhabitants;
(b) Name ten cities of the Dominion of Canada.
6. Name the five largest political divisions of South America, giving the capitals and
chief products of each.
7. Draw a map of the Mississippi River, marking its chief tributaries, and the states and
cities which border upon it.
8. (a) Sailing from Halifax into Lake Superior, state through what waters you would
pass,    (b) Name the cities, rapids, and principal islands on your route.
9. Where are the following straits :—Malacca ?  Macassar ?  Torres ?  Cook ?  Ormuz ?
10. Locate the following capes :—Lopatka, Passaro, Creux, St. Lucas.
11. Locate and define the Wash, the Minch, the Downs, the Solent, Iviga, Cerigo.
12. Describe the Japanese Empire, giving its general physical features, population, religion, and chief towns.
13. (a) British India, how bounded?    (b) Name chief rivers, cities, and productions, lvi. Public Schools Report. 1885
14. Sketch a map of the Mediterranean Sea, marking the countries and chief cities upon
its shores and the principal rivers which flow into it.
15. Draw an outline  map of British  Columbia, showing  the  principal  rivers, mountain
ranges, and straits.
Grammar.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, July 13th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. (a) When is s not used in forming the possessive case ?    Give examples.
(b) Decline in both numbers,
(1) Grouse; (2) penny ; (3) mouse-trap; (4) piano-forte; (5) ignis fatuus.
2. (a) Make a list of co-ordinate conjunctions.
(b) Name ten adjectives that are plural.
(c) When are nouns in the nominative absolute ?    Give an example.
3. (a) When is a verb (1) irregular ? (2) defective ? (3) in the passive voice ?
(b) Write the second person singular perfect potential  active, and the third  person
plural pluperfect subjunctive passive, of the verb to write.
4. What is a participle ?   A participial adjective 1    A participial noun ?   Write sentences
illustrating each.
5. Distinguish between a phrase and a clause.    Name the different kinds, giving an example of each.
6. Write correctly the following sentences, giving rules for changes made:—
(a) I had rather you hadn't told him how to go.
(b) Mankind never can exceed the limit of knowledge nature has provided for it.
(c) The governor's veto was writing while the final vote was taking in the senate.
(d) Your hoop is more circular than mine.
(e) He dare not ask for my opinion about the subject.
7. Write your classification of sentences.    Give an example of each.
8. Discuss the statement, "The infinitive is not a mood, properly speaking."
9. Analyze,
0, woman ! in our hours of ease,
Uncertain, coy, and hard to please,
And variable as the shade
By the light quivering aspen made;
When pain and anguish wring the brow,
A ministering angel thou !—
Scarce were the piteous accents said,
When, with the Baron's casque, the maid
To the nigh streamlet ran:
Forgot were hatred, wrongs, and fears ;
The plaintive voice alone she hears,
Sees but the dying man.
10. Parse the italicized words in the preceding question.
Education and Art op Teaching.    (For all classes and grades.)
Tuesday, July 14th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. What do you understand by the " Art of Teaching " ?
2. (a) Distinguish between School Organization and School Government.
(b) Give the most important rules to be observed in each case.
3. Explain briefly your method of teaching.
(a) Arithmetic,    (b) History. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. lvii.
4. (a) What means would you employ to secure the undivided attention of a class during
recitation ?
(b) State  yoi;r views  as to  the  propriety  of conducting  class exercises  in writing.
Apply your reasoning to the teaching of Geography and Grammar.
(c) Do you approve of recitation in concert ?    Why ?
5. (a) Define rote work.
(b) What are the three principal benefits resulting  from  frequent inspection of your
school ?
6. Make a Time Table and Programme for a school of 30 pupils, of whom five are in the
primer, five in the second reader, eight in the third reader, six in the fourth reader, and six in
i he fifth reader.
7. (a) What constitutes a graded school ?
(b) How can a teacher in a rural district adopt the graded system ?
(c) Si ate the advantages resulting from its adoption.
8. Desci ibe briefly,
(a) Froebel's System ; (b) The Kindergarten System, expressing your views as to
its advantages.
9. Name six rules of politeness with which you should make your pupils familiar.
10. " The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be
taught."    What method would you adopt in order to discharge this duty ?
British History.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, 18th July; 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. fa) What claim did William I. profess to have to the throne of England?
(b) Give a short account of the Battle of Hastings.
2. What do you know of the Constitutions of Clarendon?
3. Write a short account of the Conquest of Ireland in the reign of Henry II.
4. When and under what circumstances where the Commons first fairly represented in
Parliament?
5. (a) Give short account of Rise and Tenets of the Puritans.
(b) What was the Act of Uniformity?   giving date.
6. (a) How were William and Mary connected with the Stuarts?
(b) When and by whom were the Articles of the Scottish Union drawn up?
7. (a) Sketch briefly the rise of Methodism.
(b) Give an outline of the chief events of the reign of Queen Anne.
8. Give historic reference of the following:—
(a) Stephen Langton;   (b) Mile End;   (c) Pinkie Cleugh;   (d) The Cabal;   (e) uqop
Byng.
9. Write all you know of (a) The Union of Ireland Act; (b) The Catholic Relief Bill.
10. (a) Who were the Chartists?    What did they want?
(b) What was the Anti-Oorn-Law League?
11. To whom are we indebted for the following? Give dates:—
(a) Printing;  (b) Railways;   (c) Steamboats;   (d) Electric Telegraph;  (e) Penny
Post; (fi) Overland Route to India. lviii. Public Schools Report. 1885
Mensuration.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 9th; 2 to 4.80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1 A road runs round a circular shrubbery. The outer circumference is 600 feet and the
inner circumference, is 480 feet: find the breadth of the road.
2. A room is 24 feet long, 15 feet broad, and 11 feet high : find the expense of painting
the walls at 3d. the square foot, allowing a fire-place which is 4 ft. 6 in. by 3 ft., a door which
is 7 ft. by 4 ft., and two windows each 6 ft. 6 in. by 5 ft.
3. Each side of a rhombus is 32 feet, and each of the larger angles is equal to twice each
of the smaller angles : find the area.
4. The radius of a circle is 12 feet; two parallel chords are drawn on the same side of the
centre, one subtending an angle of 60° and the other an angle of 90°: find the area of the zone
between the chords.
5. An equilateral triangle and a square have the same perimeter: compare the areas.
6. The sule of a square is 12 feet. The square is divided into three equal parts by two
straight lines parallel to a diagonal: find the perpendicular distance between the parallel
straight lines.
7. The sides of a triangle are 890, 990, and 1000 links : find the area.
8. The perimeter of a semicircle is 100 feet: find the radius.
9   Find the area of a regular hexagon, each side of which is 20 feet.
Mensuration.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th; 2 p.m. to 1/..30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 306 feet, and each of the equal sides is five-
eighths of the third side: find the area.
2. Make a rough sketch and find the area of a field A B C D from the following measures,
taken in links:—
B M the perpendicular from B on A C = 740.
D N the perpendicular from D on A C = 816.
A 0 = 1,220.    AM = 532.    AN = 486.
3. A person has a triangular shaped garden, the base of which measures 200 yards, and
divides it into two equal parts by a hedge parallel to the base: find the length of the hedge.
4. The radius of a circle is 12 feet, two parallel chords are drawn on opposite sides of the
centre, one subtending an angle of 60° at the centre, and the other an angle of 90°: find the
area of the zone between the chords.
5. The external length, breadth, and height of a closed rectangular wooden box are 18
inches, 10 inches, and 6 inches, respectively, and the thickness of the wood is half an inch;
when the box is empty, it weighs 15 lbs., and when filled with sand, 100 lbs.: find the weight
of a cubic inch of wood and of a cubic inch of sand.
6. The base of a prism is a regular hexagon, every edge of the prism measures one foot:
find the volume of the prism.
7. The trunk of a tree is a right circular cylinder 3 feet in diameter and 20 feet high:
find the volume of the timber which remains when the trunk is trimmed just enough to reduce
it to a rectangular parallelopipecl on a square base.
8. The spire of a church is a right pyramid on a regular hexagonal base; each side of the
base is 10 feet and the height is 50 feet. There is a hollow part, which is also a right pyramid
on a regular hexagonal base; the height of the hollow part is 45 feet and each side of the base
is 9 feet: find the number of cubic feet of stone in the spire. 9. Find how many gallons of water can be held in a leathern hose 2 inches in bore and
40 feet long.    A gallon = 277.274 cubic inches.
10. A solid is composed of a cone and a hemisphere on opposite sides of the same circular
base, the diameter of which is two feet, and the vertical angle of the cone is a right angle: the
solid is immersed in a cylinder full of water whose circular section has also a diameter of two
feet, so that the vertex of the cone rests on the centre of the cylindrical base, while the highest
point of the hemisphere just coincides with the surface of the water: find the quantity of
water remaining in the cylinder.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Friday, July 10th;  10 a.m. to 12.80.     Total marks, 200.
1. Find the resultant of two forces whose directions are parallel, acting on a rigid body,
when the forces act towards the same parts.
2. Find the centre of gravity of a triangular plate of uniform density and thickness, and
determine the distance of the centre of gravity from the bisection of one of the sides.
3. Enunciate the principle of virtual velocities. Illustrate from the lever. Define equilibrium, moment.
4. A car weighing a ton stands on a track which is inclined at an angle of 30° to the
horizon and is kept in equilibrium by a cable running parallel to the plane of the track. Find
the tension of the cable, friction being neglected.
5. What is the scientific explanation of the ancient axiom " Nature abhors a vacuum " ?
Describe the experiment of Torricelli, and state the conclusions to which it led.
6. A right-angled triangle whose acute angles are to each other as 1 : 5 is suspended from
the right angle : determine the inclination of the hypothenuse to the vertical.
7. A bent lever of uniform thickness rests with its shorter arm horizontal; but if the
length of this arm were doubled, the lever would rest with the other arm horizontal. Compare
the length of the arms and find their inclination.
8 A beam of oak 30 feet long balances upon a point 10 feet from one end ; but when a
weight of 10 lbs. is suspended from the thin end the prop must be moved 2 feet to preserve
equilibrium.     Find the weight of the oak.
9. Find the mechanical advantage in the endless screw. Let the winch be 10 inches, the
distance of the contiguous threads of the screw 1/5 of an inch, the radius of the wheel 10 inches, and that of the axle one inch : what is the mechanical advantage ?
10. An isosceles triangular lamina weighs 6 lbs., what weight placed at the vertex will
make the triangle balance about the middle point of the perpendicular from the vertex on the
1
Natural Philosophy.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Friday, July 10th ; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total, marks, 200.
1. A line is drawn parallel to the base of an isosceles triangle, bisecting the perpendicular
from the vertex on the base and meeting the sides. Shew that the distance of the centre of
gravity of the quadrilateral figure thus formed from the vertex is seven-ninths of the perpendicular.
2. Two given equal, uniform beams A C, B C, having their lower ends connected by a
string, are placed in a vertical plane, upon a smooth floor, their upper ends leaning against
each other.    Required the tension of the string A B.
3. A bent lever of uniform thickness rests with its shorter arm horizontal; but if the
length of this arm were doubled, the lever would rest with the other arm horizontal. Compare
the length of the arms and find their inclination. lx. Public Schools Report. 1885
4. Describe the working of the Siphon Gauge in an ordinary air-pump and explain how^
the degree of exhaustion of the air in the receiver is determined by it.
5. Define Specific Gravity. A piece of marble of Sp. G. 2.7 weighs half a ton, what is
its size?    1000 ounces of water = 1 cubic foot.
6. How many cubic feet of water will be displaced by a ship and cargo weighing 700 tons
(2240 lbs.) and floating in equilibrium ?
7. If a body is projected vertically upward at a velocity of 160 ft. per second, what height
will it reach ? How long will it continue to ascend ? What will be its velocity on striking
the ground on its return ?
8. A shell moving with a velocity of 50 feet per second bursts in the line of its motion
into two parts which weigh respectively 30 and 62 lbs. The velocity of the larger piece is increased in the direction of motion by 30 feet per second; what is the velocity of the smaller ?
9. Three balls weighing respectively 5 lbs, 7 lbs., and 8 lbs. lie in the same straight line.
The first is made to impinge on the second with a velocity of 60 feet per second, without rebounding. The first and second together impinge in the same way on the third : find the
final velocity.
10. A body in passing over 135 feet, has its velocity increased from 7 to 53 feet per
second : find the whole space described from rest and the acceleration,
Book-Keeping.    (For First-Class, Grade A, and First-Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 8th; 2 p.m. to 4-80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. What books should each of the following use in keeping a record of his business :—
(1) A farmer,  (2) A mechanic,   (3) A merchant.
2. Of what use is a Journal ?    Account for the term Single Entry.
3. Define (a) Insolvent, (6) Bill of Lading, (c) Bill of Entry, (d) Bonded Goods, (e) Stock.
4. Write a non-negotiable promissory note given by John Smith and Richard Jones.
5. What are fictitious accounts ?    Name three.    Into what are they balanced ?
6. (a) Give rules for making debit and credit entries.
(b) Journalize,
(1) The assignee of Reid & Oo. has this day notified us that our claim for
will be paid at the rate of 25c. on the $.
(2) Bought of Jones & Oo. merchandise amounting to $200.
Paid them cash $150.
(3) Sold to Smith Bros. <fe Oo. merchandise amounting to
Received in payment:—
Draft at sight on Bank of British Columbia for I
Draft at 10 days' sight on Bank of British North America for $50;
Their note for balance.
7. Write,
(a) An application for a situation as clerk.
(b) A request for immediate payment of an account.
8. What are the three most important qualifications of a book-keeper.
9. How do you balance Stock Account?
10. Make at least five entries in the Day-Book ; carry the same through the other books,
and present a balance sheet. Algebra.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Define Factor, Coefficient, Square Root,  Simple Expression, L 0. M.
2. Give the rule for dividing one compound expression by another.
Divide (I.)   x* -  5a;3 +  11a:2 -   12a; +  6 by x2 -  3x + 3.
(II.)   -  3xy + xs -  y3 -   1 by  -   1   -  y + x.
3. Find the G. 0. M. of a;2 - xy - 12y2 and x2 + 5xy + <oy2
and the L. 0. M. of (a:2 +  5x +  10), (a;3 -   19a; -  30), and (a:8 -  15a; -  50).
4. Simplify
(1)     3x      x -  1
+
2 3
%'+»-i-H
(2)      r 2x   |     y y2      Wl     |       x
\*x + y     x — y      x2 — y2 J  '  Se + y    x2 — y2
5. Give the rule for solving a simple equation.
Solve,
I. 28 (x + 9) = 27 (46 - x)
II. x - 1     2a; + 7     x + 2
 1--  = 1-9
2 3 9
III. x- a    ii — b
+ J—=0
b a
x + y — b     x-y — a
 + y = 0
a b
6. A man, woman and child could reap a field in 30 hrs, the man doing half as much
again as the woman, and the woman two-thirds as much again as the child : how many hours
would they each take to do it separately ?
7. A and B ran a race which lasted 5 minutes : B had a start of 20 yards; but A ran 3
yards while B was running 2, and won by 30 yards : find the length of the course and the
speed of each.
8. Solve,
(I.)    x       21 „5
7     a; + 5 7
(II.) 1        1    _ 1        1
x    x+b     a    a+b
9. Find the price of eggs per dozen, when two less in a shilling's worth raises the price
one penny per dozen.
10. A person, having to walk 10 miles, finds that by increasing his speed half a mile an
hour, he might reach his journey's end 16| minutes sooner than he otherwise would: what
time will he take, if he only begin to quicken his pace half-way ? xii. Public Schools Report. 1885
Algerra.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Wednesday, July 8th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Give and prove the rule for finding the H. C. F. of two expressions.
2. Solve—
a?     y     36
3. Give the rule for dividing one power of a number by another power of the same ; and
shew its truth for negative and fractional indices.
Explain the meaning of x
4. Prove that a quadratic equation has two, and only two, roots.
5. Shew that the amounts of a sum of money put out at compound interest form a series
in Geometrical Progression.
From this fact find compound interest on  $253, for 4 years, at  5 per cent, compound Interest.
6.  Find the greatest term in the expansion of (x + a) , n being a positive integer.
prove that
7. if«=c     «     R
b     d   J
ace
bdfi    [b + d+fiJ
8. A man rows 30 miles and back in 12 hours, and he  finds that he can row 5 miles with
the stream in the same time as 3 against it: Find the times of rowing up and down.
9. Show that the difference between the square of a number consisting of two digits, and
the square of the number formed by changing the places of the digits, is divisible by 99.
10. A horse-dealer buys a horse, and sells it again for £144, and gains just as many
pounds per cent, as the horse had cost him :   Find what he gave for the horse.
Euclid.    (For First-Olass, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. If one side of a triangle be produced, the exterior angle is greater than either of the
interior opposite angles.
2. If a straight line falling on two other straight lines, make the alternate angles equal to
each other; these two straight lines shall be parallel. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxiii.
3. The straight lines which join the extremities of two equal and parallel straight lines
are also themselves equal and parallel.
4. Parallelograms upon the same base and between the same parallels are equal to one
another.
5. If the square described upon one of the sides of a triangle, be equal to the squares
described upon the other two sides of it; the angle contained by these two sides is a right
angle.
6. If a straight line be divided into two equal and also into two unequal parts ; the squares
on the two unequal parts are together double of the square on half the line and of the square
on the line between the points of section.
7. Bisect a triangle by a line drawn from a given point in one of the sides.
8. One of the acute angles of a right-angled triangle is three times as great as the other :
trisect the smaller of these.
9. The sum of the squares described upon the sides of a rhombus is equal to the squares
described on its diameters.
10. If two opposite sides of a trapezium be parallel to one another, the straight line
joining their bisections bisects the trapezium.
Euclid.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. To a given straight line apply a parallelogram which shall be equal to a given triangle,
and have one of its angles equal to a given rectilineal angle.
2. If a straight line touch a circle, the straight line drawn from the centre to the point
of contact, shall be perpendicular to the line touching the circle.
3. In a circle, the angle in a semicircle is a right angle ; but the angle in a segment
greater than a semicircle is less than a right angle; and the angle in a segment less than a
semicircle is greater than a right angle.
4. Describe an isosceles triangle having each of the angles at the base double of the third
angle.
5. Similar triangles are to one another in the duplicate ratio of their homologous sides.
6. In right-angled triangles, the rectilineal figure described upon the side opposite the
right angle is equal to the similar and similarly described figures upon the sides containing the
right angle.
7. If two sides of a quadrilateral are parallel but not equal, and the other two sides are
equal but not parallel, the opposite angles of the quadrilateral are together equal to two right
angles.
8. If two perpendiculars drawn from two angles of a triangle upon the opposite sides intersect in a point, the line drawn from the third angle through this point will be perpendicular
to the third side.
9. If from a point without a circle two tangents be drawn, the straight line which joins
the points of contact will be bisected at right angles by a line drawn from the centre to the
point without the circle.
10. Two circles cut each other, and through the points of intersection straight lines are
drawn parallel to one another, the portions intercepted by the circumferences are equal. ixiv Public Schools Report. 1885
Ancient History,    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 7th ; 8.30 to 5 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Give a brief sketch of the Legislation of Solon.
2. What were the causes of the first Peloponnesian War?    Enumerate the chief men and
battles in this war.
3. Write a short account of the " Retreat of the Ten Thousand."
4. Sketch  briefly the life  and  character of Demosthenes.    What were the Philippics?
How many were they ?
5. Give   historic  reference  of the following :—Oynoscephalse, Marcus Aurelius, Sejanus,
TftEgusa, Tanagra.
6. When, and under what circumstances, were  Tribunes  of the  Plebs   first appointed?
State what you know of Menenius Agrippa.
7. Write a brief outline of First Punic War.
8. What do you know of the Agrarian Law of Tiberius Gracchus ?
9. Who composed the first Triumvirate ?    Give account of the death of each.
10. Give list of memorable events in the reigns of Augustus and Constantine the Great.
English Literature.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, 7th July ; 2 to 3.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. What are the two subjects with which early English poetry is mainly occupied? What
is the first English poem ?    Give its date and the story of its origin.
2. Sketch the three periods in Chaucer's literary career. Describe briefly the Canterbury
Tales.
3. What were the causes which combined to produce the great literary outburst (as it has
been called) in the days of Elizabeth ?
4. What was the origin of the Drama in England? Describe the Miracle Play, the
Mystery, and the Morality, and trace the transition from these to the regular Drama.
5. Name the three great historical writers of the latter part of the 18th century. Name
and give a brief description of the historical works of Hallam, Macaulay, Grote, Carlyle.
6. Indicate briefly the influence of the French Revolution on the writings of Wordsworth,
Burns, and Sir Walter Scott.    What was Wordsworth's conception of Nature ?
7. Give a sketch of the life of William Cowper. What were the circumstances which led
to the composition of The Task, and John Gilpin ?
8. Name the authors of The Pleasures of Hope, The Seasons, The Course of Time, Don
Juan, Night Thoughts.
9. What is a novel ? What were the special objects of Dickens in writing Pickwick
Papers, Nicholas Nickleby, and Oliver Twist ?
10. Name one work from the pen of each of the following writers :—DeQuincey, Ruskin,
Froude, Norman McLeod, George Macdonald, Edwin Arnold, Gladstone, Spurgeon, Cardinal
Wiseman, Motley.
Practical Mathematics.    (For First-Olass, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 7th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Prove geometrically that
(I.)    Sin. (A 4- B) = sin. A cos. B + cos. A sin. B.
(II.)   Cos. (A + B) = cos. A cos. B - sin. A sin. B. 49 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxv.
2. Define a Logarithm.     Prove that the logarithm of a quotient is equal to the logarithm
of the dividend diminished by that of the divisor—
Ex. log. 2 = .3010300 and log. 3 = .4771213: find log. 60.
3. If A, B, C are the angles and a, b, c the sides of a triangle, prove
b2 +
c'1  -  a2
Cos. A
2bc
Show how this is true when A is a right angle.
4. Show how to solve a triangle, having given
1st.    Two angles and the included side.
2nd. Two angles and the side opposite to one of them.
5. Find the radius of the circle inscribed in the triangle ABC.
6. Define circular measure.    Prove that the circumferences of circles vary as their radii.
7. A ladder 20 feet long, leaning against a column, reaches a point 20 feet from the top.
From the foot of the ladder the angle of elevation of the column is 60° : find the height of the
column.
8. Give a rule for surveying a field with a chain and cross staff Describe a Theodolite
and how to use it.
9. Given the bearing of a headland from a ship at each of two places, and the distance
and direction sailed between them; find the distance of the headland from the ship at the two
places.
10. A staff 2 h feet high placed on the top of a tower subtends an angle a. at a place
whose horizontal distance from the foot of the tower is c feet: find the height of the tower.
Latin.
Monday, July 6th ; 2 to 4-30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Translate,
(a) Salve primus omnium parens patriae appellate !
(b) Meministine me ante diem XII. Kalendas Novembres dicere in Senatu?
(c) It is certain that the world and everything in it was made for man.
(d) Will a wise man be deterred from obeying the laws of virtue ?
(e) Honor thy father and thy mother ; that thy days may be  long in  the land,
which the Lord thy God giveth thee.
Gesar.
2. (a) Translate,
His rebus gestis, omni Gallia pacata, tanta hujus belli acl barbaros opinio perlata est, uti
ab his nationibus, quse trans Rhenum incolerent, mitterentur legati ad Cpesarem, qua? se
obsides daturas, imperata facturas, pollicerentur: quas legationes Csesar, quod in Italiam
Ulyrioumque properabat, inita proxima restate ad se reverti jussit. Ipse in Carnutes, Andes,
Turonesque, qua? civitates propinqua. his locis erant, ubi bellum gesserat, legionibus in hiberna
deductis, in Italiam profectus est, ob easque res, ex literis Ca.saris, dies quindecim supplicatio
decreta est, quod ante id teinpus accidit nulli.
(b) Parse all the participles, and verbs in the passive voice.
3. (a) Translate,
Virgil.
Obstupuit primo adspectu Sidonia Dido,
Casu deinde viri tan to; et sic ore locuta est:
Quis te, nate dea, per tanta pericula casus
Insequitur ? qua? vis immanibus applicat oris ?
Tune ille jftEneas, quern Dardanio Anchisse lxvi Public Schools Report. 1885
Alma Venus Phrygii genuit Simoentis ad undam
Atque equidem Teucrum memini Sidona venire,
Finibus expulsum patriis, nova regna petentem
Auxilio Beli: genitor turn Belus opimam
Vastabat Cyprum, et victor ditione tenebat.
Tempore jam ex illo casus mihi cognitus urbis
Trojana?, nomenque tuum, regesque Pelasgi.
Ipse hostis Teucros insigni laucle ferebat,
Seque ortum antiqua Teucrorum ab stirpe volebat.
Quare agite, 0, tectis, juvenes, succedite nostris.
Me quoque per multos similis fortuna labores .
Jactantam hac demum voluit consistere terra.
Non ignara mali, miseris succurrere disco.
(b) Give references—
(1) nate dea, (2) Anchisse, (3) Sidona, (4) Pelasgi, (5) me.
(c) Name the authentic works of Virgil.
(d) Scan the first 3 lines, using all the marks.
Horace.
4.   (a) Sed omnes una manet nox,
Et calcanda semel via leti.
Dant alios Furiffi torvo spectacula Marti;
Exitio est avidum mare nautis;
Mixta senum ac juvenum densentur funera; nullum
Sseva caput Proserpina fugit.
Me quoque devexi rapidus comes Orionis
Illyricis Notus obruit undis.
At tu nauta, vagse ne parce, malignus arena?
Ossibus et capiti inhumato
Particulam dare: sic, quodcunque minabitur Eurus
Fluctibus Hesperiis, Venusime
Plectantur silva?, te sospite, multaque merces,
Unde potest, tibi defluat a?quo
Ab Jove, Neptunoque sacri custode Tarenti.
Negligis immeritis nocituram
Postmodo te natis fraudem committere?    Fors et
Debita jura vicesque superbte
Te maneant ipsum: precibus non linquar inultis,
Teque piacula nulla resolvent.
Quamquam festinas, non est mora longa, licebit
Injecto ter pulvere curras.
(b) What lesson did Horace wish to inculcate in writing  the poem  of which  the
preceding is an extract ?
(c) Give references of—
(1) Furise, (2) Proserpina, (3) me, (4) Hesperiis, (5) Tarenti.
(d) Name the metre, scan the first 4 lines, using the marks.
Translate and give reference and author of—
(a) 0 passi graviora, dabit Deus his quoque finem.
(b) Si quid vellent, ante diem Idus Apriles reverteren'tur.
(c) Nil mortalibus ardui est
Ocelum ipsum petimus stultitia : neque
Per nostrum patimur scelus
Iracunda Jovem ponere fulmina.
(d) His lacrimis vitam damus, et miserescimus ultro.
(e) Quod si me lyricis vatibus inseris,
Sublimi feriam sidera vertice. 49 Vic: Public Schools Report. lxvii
Chemistry.
Monday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.30p.m.     Total marks, 200.
J.  Distinguish between a chemical element and a compound, giving an example of each.
2. Distinguish between a chemical compound and a mechanical mixture.    Illustrate each
by an example.
3. Give the symbols and atomic weights of 6 metalloids.
4. (a) Describe the different kinds of Thermometers in use
(6) Convert 98.5 Fah. to C. and R.
(c) ,,       42 C. to Fah. and R.
(d) „        10 R to C. and Fah.
5. Give the formula for—
(a) Acid, Sulphuric.
(b) Acid, Nitric.
(c) Laughing Gas.
(d) Ammonia.
(e) Muriatic Acid.
(fi) Potassium Bicarbonate.
(g) Tartaric Acid.
6. Write in full—
(a) Ag. N 03
(b) N 02
(c) Mn. 02
(d) H2 02
(e) F203
7. Name 5 chemical compounds that contain the same elements as air.
8. What Fats and Oils are used in the manufacture of soap ?
9. What takes place when snow is mixed with salt t
10. Under what conditions does fermentation take place ?
French.
Monday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Write the  plurals  of 5  personal pronouns and  the  feminine plurals of 5 indefinite
adjectives.
2. Write the first person singular and plural, imperfect indicative and pluperfect subjunctive, active voice, of the verb aller.
3. Traduisez,
(a) We would help you if we could.
(b) Although the Chinese boast of being the most ancient nation, they are far
from being the most enlightened.
(c) We should blush to commit faults but never blush to acknowledge them.
4. Repondez en frangais:
Par quels deux mots peut-on traduire en francais however ?
Employez les, chacun dans un exemple, devant un adjectif feminin pluriel.
5. Ecrivez un verse d' un poete et donnez son nom. lxviii. Public Schools Report. ■    1885
6. Traduisez,
Ce fut le 8 juillet de l'annee 1709 que se donna cette bataille decisive de Pultava, eutre
les deux plus singuliers monarques que fussent alors dans le monde: Charles XII., illustre par
neuf annees de victoires ; Pierre Alexiowitz par neuf annees de jieines, prises pour former
des troupes egales aux troupes suedoises; 1'un glorieux d'avoir donne des Etats, l'autre d'avoir
civilise les siens; Charles aimant les clangers et ne combattant que pour la gloire; Alexiowitz
ne fuyant point le peril, et ne faisant la guerre que pour ses interets; le moiiarque suedois
liberal par grandeur d'ame, le muscovite ne donnant jamais que par quelqiievue; celui-la d'une
sobriete et d'une continence sans exemple, d'un naturel magnanime, et qui n'avait ete barbare
qu'une fois, celui-ci n'ayant pas depouille la rudesse de son education et de son pays, aussi
terrible a ses sujets qu'admirable aux etrangers, et trop adonne a. des exces qui out meme
abrege ses jours. Charles avait le titre d'invincible, qu'un moment pouvait lui oter; les
nations avaient deja donne a Pierre Alexiowitz le nom de grand, qu'une defaite ne pouvait lui
faire perdre, parce qu'il ne le clevait pas a des victoires.
7. Parse all the adjectives in the preceding.
8. Traduisez,
Vous perdez le respect: mais je pardonne a l'age,
Et j'excuse l'ardeur en un jeune courage.
Un roi clont la prudence a de meilleurs objets
Est meilleur menager du sang de ses sujets:
Je veille pour les miens, mes soucis, les conservent,
Comme le chef a soin des membres qui le servent.
Ainsi votre raison n'est pas ra son pour moi;
Vous parlez en soldat, je dois agir en roi;
Et quoi qu'on veuille dire, et quoi qu'il ose croire,
Le comte a mobeir ne peut perdre sa gloire.
D'ailleurs, l'att'ront me touche; il a perdu d'honneur
Celui que de mon flls j'ai fait le gouverneur;
S'attaquer a mon choix, c'est se prendre a moi-meme,
Et faire un attentat sur le pouvoir supreme.
N'en parlons plus.    Au reste, on a vu dix vaisseaux
De nos vieux ennemis arborer les drapeaux;
Vers la bouche du fleuve ils out ose paraitre.
9. Parse all the verbs in extract.
10.  Dites ce que vous savez de Voltaire.
VICTORIA : Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Government Printer,
E{,t the Government Printing Office. James' Ba,y

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