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SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1886-1887. BY THE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1888

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 SIXTEENTH   ANNUAL   REPORT
ON   THE
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OF the province of
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1886-87,
BY    THE    SUPERINTENDENT    OF     EDUCATION.
WITH   APPENDICES.
VICTORIA : Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay. 50 Vic.                                   Public Schools Report.
187
PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
REPORT.
1886-87.
•
To His Honor Hugh Nelson, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia :
May it please Your Honor
I beg herewith respectfully
io present the Sixteenth
Annual Report
on the Public
Schools of the Province.
•
JNO
ROBSON,
-
s.
Provincial
Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
December, 1887.
*
■  .
• 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 198
PART I.
GENERAL   REPORT 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 191
ANNUAL   REPORT
OF  THE
Superintendent of Education
1886-87.
Education Office,
To the Honorable J no. Robson, Victoria, December, 1887.
Provincial Secretary.
Sir,—In accordance with the provisions of the "Public School Act, 1885," I beg to
submit, for the information of His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Sixteenth Annual
Report on the condition and progress of the Public Schools of the Province for the school-year
ending June 30th, 1887.
The record of the year is certainly a gratifying one, not only in consideration of the largely
increased attendance, but especially on account of the improved condition of the schools, and
the manifest progress made by the pupils.
As the population of the Province is each year rapidly increasing, the demands for schools
must necessitate a proportionately larger annual expenditure for educational purposes. It is
worthy of note, however, that the cost of each pupil on both enrolment and average attendance
is yearly becoming less, having been for the past year $ 16.56 in the former instance, and in
the latter $30.80. The cost of each pupil on enrolment and average attendance for the
previous year was $17.78 and $32.04, respectively.
The wide disparity between these comparative amounts does not present as creditable a
showing as is desirable. It may be proper to remark that the nearer these two amounts
approach to equality, the better the evidence that parents are realizing more fully their duty
by having their children take every possible advantage of the educational privileges provided
for them.
That the percentage of average attendance of pupils at the Common Schools is much less
than that of pupils at the Graded Schools, is readily accounted for by the fact that in most of
the rural districts the population is scattered, and, as a consequence, many of the children have
to travel long distances in all kinds of weather. Nevertheless it is noteworthy that in some
schools, both in civic and rural districts, there has been the appearance of indifference on the
part of parents in sending their children to school with that regularity which the Province has
a right to expect in proper appreciation of the facilities afforded.
The enrolment exceeded that of the previous year by nearly 20 per cent., and the increase
in average actual daily attendance was almost 16 per cent. The percentage of average
attendance for the year was 53.75. 192 Public Schools Report. 1887
The total number of schools in operation during the year was 92, as follows:—
3 High Schools, 3 Ward Schools,
7 Graded    ,, 79 Common Schools.
These were under the charge of 116 teachers and 2 monitors.
Schools were established during the year in the following districts:—
Alberni, Boundary Bay,
Aldergrove, North Arm,
Bonaparte, Round Prairie.
In addition to these, schools were maintained during a part of the year at the following
places:—
Ashcroft,
Revels toke,
Spence's Bridge.
Another ward school was opened in Victoria in the early part of the school-year.
At the present time, schools are in operation in the following newly-created districts:—
Donald, Kensington.
English, Mountain, .  .
Tolmie.
The aggregate number of pupils enrolled was 5,345, an increase of 874, and the average
actual daily attendance was 2,873.38, an increase of 391.90.
This very large increase in enrolment, the largest in any year since the inception of the
present school system, not only materially affected the graded schools, but extended to the
majority of rural schools.
The total number of visits made by trustees, parents, and others was 14,040, an increase
of 1,105.
The expenditure for education proper was as follows:—
Teachers' salaries $78,571  60
Incidental expenses, including rent      6,489 17
Education Office      3,460 31
Total   $88,521 08
This amount shows an excess over the cost for the previous year of $8,993.52.
The advances made to the .Cache Creek Boarding School for supplies during the years
1874-75-76, amounting to $1,968.13, were written off and charged to education for the past
year. This amount cannot, be properly considered to be an expenditure for education for that
year.
The outlay for the salaries of teachers and incidental expenses of the different kinds of
schools was as follows:—
High Schools $ 5,370 00
Graded     „         27,063 29
Common  „    52,627 48
Total   $85,060 77
Of the amount voted in the estimates for education for the past year, $5,883.92 were
unexpended.
The expenditure by the Lands and Works Department for the construction of school-
houses, furniture, repairs, and improvements was as follows:—
School-houses $14,286 20
Furniture, repairs, and improvements      3,419 36
Total $17,705 56
This outlay, compared with that for the previous year, shows a decrease of $1,383.02. 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
193
School-houses were erected in the following districts during the year:—
Alberni, North Thompson (addition),
Bonaparte, Priest's Valley,
Boundary Bay, St. Mary's Mission,
Chilcotin, South Comox,
Kamloops, South Cowichan,
Nicola, Spallumcheen,
North Arm, Vancouver,
North Cedar, Vesuvius,
Victoria (Ward School).
The gradual growth of the schools, as well as the cost of maintaining the same, is fully
shown by the record of attendance and expenditure given in the following exhibit:—
Comparative Statement of Attendance and Cost of Public Schools
from 1872-73 to 1886-87.
Year.
Number of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage
of
Attendance.
Expenditure
for Education
Proper.
1872-73  	
25
37
41
41
42
45
45
47
48
50
59
67
76
86
95
1,028
1,245
1,403
1,685
1,998
2,198
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
2,693
3,420
4,027
4,471
5,345
575
767
863
984
1,260
1,395.50
1,315.90
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383.00
1,808.60
2,089.74
2,481.48
2,873.38
55.93
61.60
61.51
58.39
63.06
63.49
57.19
52.56
53.16
51.21
51.36
52.88
51.89
55.50
53.75
136,763 77
1873-74 	
1874-75	
*   35,287 59
34,822 28
1875-76 	
1876-77	
44,506 11
47,129 63
1877-78	
43,334 01
1878-79....            	
1879-80	
1880-81	
* 22,110 70
47,006 10
46,960 69
1831-82	
49,268 63
50,850 63
66,655 15
1883-84	
1884-85	
71,151 52
1885-86	
79,527 56
1886-87  	
88,521 08
' Half year.
Statistical Abstract of Attendance.
Number of pupils enrolled during the year  5,345
Increase for the year  874
Number of boys enrolled   2,843
Increase for the year  413
Number of girls enrolled     2,502
Increase for the year  461
Average actual daily attendance :     2,873.38
Increase for the year  391. 90
Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools  166
Increase for the year    9
Average actual daily attendance in High Schools  103.27
Average actual daily attendance in Common Schools  2,770.11
Number of School Districts at close of year  91
Increase for the year  5 194
Public Schools Report.
1887
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year 1886-87.
Grade,
Males.
Females.
Total.
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
First Class Grade A	
10
24
1
6
7
10
14
4
10
11
30
7
15
23
5
25
1110
100
70
*75
60
60
*70
$50
50
Second Class ,,      A    	
50
B 	
5
9
1
15
50
Third Class   „      A 	
50
B	
50
50
64
52
116
' In one instance only, and accounted for by location.
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year 1887-8
Grade
First Class Grade A
,.      B
Second Class „ A
.,      B
Third Class ,, A
„      B
Temporary	
Males.
Females.
Total.
10
27
10
36
9
2
9
11
12
14
26
4
15
19
1
2
3
8
11
19
64
60
124+
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
$110
100
75
70
60
60
70
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
50
50
50
50
50
50
tin addition to the above number of teachers, there are at present employed four monitors at a monthly
salary of $25 each. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 195
REMARKS.
There has been a marked improvement in the methods of instruction adopted by the
teachers during the past year. This is chiefly attributable to the mutual exchange of thought
on the practical work of the school-room at the annual meetings of the Provincial Teachers'
Institute, as well as at the more frequent meetings of the several Branch Institutes, and to
the visitations made by the teachers to other schools.
On occasion of inspections, it was noted that order, discipline, and classification were
more thorough, as a rule, than on previous visits.
Every teacher should recognize the fact that the essentials to progress are good order and
c omplete discipline. With these secured, he is in a position so to classify his pupils that the
best results may be obtained,
The success of every school, be it High School or Common School, will be found to be in
proportion to its standing in regard to these three fundamental characteristics.
While it is a matter of regret that in some schools, there is neither good order nor proper
discipline, and poor classification, it is a pleasure to be able to state that the number of such
schools is few, and that each year shows a decrease.
Although, as a body, our teachers are earnest in their work, and show a desire to perform
their prescribed duties, yet it is deemed proper to call their special attention to the following
subjects :—
First—The erect position of the pupil while seated in the school-room, standing in class,
or on the playground, should be a matter of constant care to the teacher. The allowing of
children to contract an improper carriage of the body may engender in them not only
deformity, but disease in maturer age. It has been said that physical uprightness bears a close
relationship to moral rectitude.
Teachers should see that the feet of their pupils, when seated, are at ease on the floor, and that
the resting of the head upon one arm placed on the desk, or the throwing of the shoulders forward
in study, be not allowed. Failure on their part to instil daily into the minds of those intrusted to their care obedience to natural laws may lead to the most serious consequences in
after life.
Too emphatic language cannot be used as to the necessity of teachers being more alive to
their duty in regard to the proper physical training of our youth.
Second—The blackboard should be recognized as a very important help in imparting
instruction.
,     There is not a subject on the prescribed course of study in the teaching of which it
cannot be used to advantage.
In some schools the blackboard might well be termed an arithmetic board, as that is the
only subject for which it is used. It is a pleasure to be able to report that in the majority of
the schools it is used for imparting instruction on every subject.
In grammar, geography, and history, most of our teachers write on the blackboard the
chief outlines of each lesson that must be stored in memory.
The pupil is required to copy these in his note-book for future reference.
Were this method of instruction adopted by every teacher, the task of the pupil would
be lightened, and school-work would be made more attractive.
Third—Every pupil should prepare at home one or more of his studies for recitation in
school. It is the duty of the teacher to prescribe the lessons to be learned, but in doing so
he should not fail to take into consideration the age and ability of the pupil.
In Graded and Common Schools, home lessons on three subjects should be considered
sufficient for the most advanced pupils. 196 Public Schools Report. 1887
While in some schools the exaction of home lessons has been neglected in a measure, care
should be taken not to impose an amount of work that could not be performed in less than
three hours of close application. It is scarcely necessary to say that tasks should not be
assigned for preparation outside of the school-room which will interfere with the sleep of the
pupil, or prevent him from taking that exercise which is necessary for his health.
Manners.
This subject should receive the special attention of the teacher, as without a knowledge
of the ordinary rules of gentle manners, no boy or girl is properly prepared for life's duties.
Although the subject is not on the prescribed course of study, yet it is expected of every
teacher that he will lose no opportunity of inculcating that agreeableness of manner which is
in conformity with the ordinary rules of politeness.
Children should be taught how to be polite to one another, to their parents, to their
teacher, and to all with whom they are brought in contact. There is no one who does not
admire in either boy or girl courteous demeanor. The teacher has it in his power to materially aid
the pupil by daily attention to this subject. It is not enough that the teacher be polite and
possess good manners; he should point out to his pupils the necessity of their possessing the
same accomplishments, as no education is complete without them.
Morals.
Every country which has adopted the Public School System has recognized the necessity
of moral instruction being given in the schools. This Province has never been an exception.
Section 48 of the " Public School Act, 1885," now in force, provides that the highest morality
shall be inculcated in all Public Schools, but that no religious dogma nor creed shall be taught.
It is therefore as incumbent on teachers to endeavor to implant moral principles in the
hearts of their pupils as to carefully guard their physical welfare and intellectual development.
He who does not strive to infuse into the minds of his pupils some germs of goodness,
and a love for truth, honesty, and the other virtues, is a poor teacher indeed.
It is now a recognized fact that moral truths can be taught even in the absence of
sectarian forms, and without referring to any dogma or creed, in regard to which there exists
diversity of opinion.
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' EXAMINATION,  1887.
The annual examination of  candidates for  certificates  of  qualification  to  teach  in  the
Public Schools of the Province commenced on July 4th, 1887, in Agricultural Hall, Victoria.
The examiners appointed to act with  the Superintendent of Education were the Rev.
Donald Eraser, M. A., and Frederick G. Walker, Esq., B. A., Cantab.
In the British Columbia Gazette of July 21st, 1887, appeared the list of successful candidates, as follows:—
Certificates.
First Class—Grade A.
Stainburn, George, B. A., Cantab., 1880 Renewal 1887
Johnston, J. P., 1881  ,,
Berry, Mrs. (Alice Howay), 1882  „
Muir, John N, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1884  „
Stramberg, Hector M., B. A., Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1884  „
Wilson, David, B. A., University of New Brunswick, 1885      „
Howay, Frederick W , 1885  „
Reid, Robie L, 1885  ,,
Paul, Edward B., M. A., University of Aberdeen, Scotland, 1886     „
Hunter, Walter, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1886	
Anderson, John, B. A., University of New Zealand, 1886  „
Rossiter, Henry J., B. A., University of Toronto, 1886   ......  „ Vic. 51
Public Schools Report.
197
First Class—Grade A—Certificates.
Landells, Robert, B. A., Dalhousie University, Halifax.
McKinnon, Michael, M. A., University of Halifax.
(Maximum Marks, 3550.)
Gordon, Robert George
Marks
obtained
..   2281
First Class—Grade B.
Kaye, James, 1880 Renewal 1887
Halliday, James A., 1880	
Offerhaus, R.,  1880	
Lewis, S. G., 1880	
Murray, Paul, 1882	
Dods, Archibald, 1883	
Cameron, Agnes D., 1883	
Horton, Lucretia, 1883	
Forrest, Christina W., 1883 and 1884	
Gillies, Daniel W., 1884	
Rabbitt, Daniel,  1884	
Anderson, Robert A., 1884	
Sluggett, George H., 1884	
Bell, Emelene, 1884	
Phelps, William H., 1884	
Jones, David,  1884	
Thain, Joseph H., 1884	
Wood, E. Stuart, 1885	
Fraser, Roderick L., 1885	
McLennan, John C, 1885	
Gardiner, Abbie F., 1885	
Gilchrist, Alexander, 1885	
Wood, William M., 1885...	
McLeod, John A., 1885	
Kinney, William T., 1885	
Bryant, Maria, 1885	
Coatham, William C, 1886	
Kerr, Daniel E., 1886	
Purdy, Raffles A. R„  1886	
Bannerman, Alexander M., 1886	
Armstrong, Frances Ella, 1886	
Plaxton, Robert J., 1886	
Offerhaus, Mrs. Mary A	
McDonald, Donald J., 1886	
First Class—-Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 2550.) Marks
obtained
Dockrill, George Mahon     2060
Irwin, Joseph  1779
Sylvester, Elizabeth Eula  I753
Pope, Jennie Maria Harcourt  1673
Leduc, Thomas  1652
Rogers, Ellen  1640
Lee, Alice Greenwood  1 633
Nicholson, Thomas  1614
Shaw, John  jgi3
Watson, Frederick James  1 607
McRae, George Wallace  1542
Campbell, Eli J  1541 198 Public Schools Report. 1887
Second Class—Grade A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 1550.)
Tomlinson, William  1207
Dougan, James  1180
Kipp, Mary Louise  1173
Davidson, Elizabeth A  1146
Thompson, Livingstone  1125
Dockrill, Nettie  1092
Hartney, Margaret  1091
Gowen, Annie C  1089
McQueen, Annie Lowden  1087
Second Class—Grade B—Certificates.
Robinson, James W     1071
Beattie, Matthew  1060
Murchie, Margaret J       1058
Catherwood, John A  1051
Scott, John Robert  1047
Ramsay, Jennie    . 1040
Keast, Ada  1038
Butler, Florence  1037
Christie, Alice     1029
Robinson, Sarah A  1016
Hoy, James A  1014
Halliday, Grace  994
Todd, Katherine  993
Bannerman, John J  987
Metcalfe, James C. F  983
Clyde, Thomas  953
Halliday, Marie F  940
Storey,  Marcella V  932
Third Class—Grade A—Certificates.
Levinge, William Augustus  1095
Wolfenden, Nellie F. F  982
Pickard, Millie  966
Charlton, Alice Sophia M  962
Clarke, Gertrude  917
Blair, Jeanie W  912
Workman,  Elizabeth J  911
Mebius, Lucy Aylmer  900
Blair, William  898
Jennings, Margaret         ■  883
Barron, Isabel M. F  863
Sivewright, William  862
Baker, Emily  857
Brown, Isabel  847
Clunas, Mary  846
Coghlan, Ella S  839
Williams, Alice ■  810
Preston, Sara  802
Isaac, Harriet  '99
Lawrence, Mary  795
Lindsay, Sophie E  786
Butler, Rosalie Maud  785
Procter, Arthur Percival  781
McLean, John Angus  776 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 199
Third Class—Grade B—Certificates.
Lettice, Edith  '768
Granger, Edwin  742
Munro, Annie      717
Norris, Martha Jane  692
Lawrence,  Rebecca  662
Kirkpatrick, Edith Jane  639
Certificate of Standing.
Johnston, Alice Leonora  1376
S. D. Pope, B. A., Supt. of Education, )      R       ,    .
Fred. G. Walker, B. A., Cantab., V   Jf. 0j
Donald Eraser, M. A., f  **»»•«•»
In accordance with the recommendation of the Examiners, certificates have been granted.
T. Elwyn,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
21st July, 1887.
Forty-six renewal certificates were granted under the provisions of the School Act.
Of the ninety-three candidates at the  examination, seventy-two succeeded in obtaining
certificates, as follows:—
First Class, Grade A  3
First Class, Grade B  12
Second Class, Grade A  9
Second Class, Grade B  18
Third Class, Grade A  24
Third Class, Grade B  6
Of the 36 candidates for First Class, Grade B, twelve were successful, and of the 45
applicants for Second Class, Grade A, nine succeeded in obtaining that certificate.
That nearly half of those examined obtained First or Second Class Certificates is an
evidence of praiseworthy ambition on the part of the teachers to attain high standing in the
profession.
The addition of the subjects of Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, and Canadian
History, for all classes and grades of certificates, has met with hearty approval.
At the last Session of the Legislature, section 41 of the "Public School Act, 1885,"
relating to the issuance of teachers' certificates, was repealed. The present law on this subject may be found on page ci. of this Report. The principal changes made have reference to
duration of certificates,—Third Class, Grade A, being valid for two years, Second Class, Grade
A, for five years, and First Class Certificates for life or during good behavior. The striking
out of the clause which gave the Board of Examiners authority to issue certificates to graduates
of a British University without examination, was certainly a step in the wrong direction, as it
will prove detrimental to the interests of education in the Province. The effect will be that
trustees will find that a serious obstacle has been placed in the way of their securing the best
talent in the schools. While it is conceded that the graduate fresh from the University should
not on presentation of his credentials proving only degree obtained, be entitled to receive a life
certificate, it must be acknowledged that the graduate who can satisfy the Board of Examiners
as to his knowledge of the art of teaching and school law should be exempt from examination. As this is the only Province of the Dominion that requires graduates to undergo
examination in other than professional subjects, it is to be hoped that this matter will receive
the further consideration of the Legislature. 200
Public Schools Report.
1887
REPORT ON SCHOOLS IN ELECTORAL DISTRICTS.
It has been deemed proper to give statistical information relating to the working of the
schools in each electoral district—considered as a whole,—instead of making separate remarks
in regard to each individual school.
Cariboo.
Three schools were in operation during the year :—Barkerville, Quesnelle, and Williams
Lake.
The number of children enrolled in the schools was 68, and the average daily attendance
maintained was 45.12, being over 66 per cent, of regular attendance, the highest obtained in
any electoral district.
Although there was a decrease of 12 from the enrolment of the previous year, yet the
average attendance increased. This is encouraging, as it shows greater appreciation of school
facilities afforded.
Visits were made to the schools as follows :—
Number of visits by Trustees    25
„ „ others 121
Total .146
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
five years:—
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
Boys.
28
26
47
44
34
Girls.
17
17
30
36
34
Total
Enrolment.
45
43
77
80
68
Average
daily
attendance.
35.90
29.64
44.59
44.54
45.12
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
$47 05
46 04
84 68
41 45
48 27
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
$58 98
66 80
59 89
74 65
72 76
COMOX.
There are four schools in this district:—North Comox, South Comox, Courtenay, and
Denman Island.
The enrolment in 1885-86 was 85, and in the past year it was 102, showing an increase
of 17.    There has also been an increase in average daily attendance.
It'is gratifying to be able to state that only 8 children of school age have been reported
as not attending school, as opposed to 25 reported in the previous year.
As frequent visits to schools are a sure index of a lively interest in their welfare,
trustees and parents have certainly performed their duties in this respect during the past
year.
Number of visits by Trustees    63
„ „ others  150
Total 213 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
201
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil for the past five
years:
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882-83 	
1883-84 	
20
17
31
43
53
17
13
25
42
49
37
30
56
85
102
16.90
12.30
26.98
53.66
54.12
$30 37
20 05
23 63
25 24
24 17
$66 50
48 89
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
49 06
39 98
1886-87 	
45 55
Cowichan.
Eleven schools were in operation in this district during the past year :—
Beaver Point, Maple Bay,
Burgoyne Bay, Mayne Island,
Chemainus, Quamichan,
Cowichan, Shawnigan,
South Cowichan, Somenos,
Vesuvius.
The number of pupils enrolled during the past year was 301, an increase of 29 over that
of the previous year.
The prevalence of epidemics materially affected the attendance at some of the schools.
Every credit is due to trustees and parents for the excellent record as to visitations made
to the schools during the past year. It is worthy of note that in one instance (Mayne
Island) the number of visits made by trustees was 76.
Number of visits by Trustees 256
„ „ others   526
Total 782    .
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and  cost of each  pupil  during the past
five years :—
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882-83	
74
137
168
157
183
45
82
106
114
118
110
219
274
271
301
59.81
113.72
140.02
150.22
150.35
$23 63
20 37
20 29
24 22
23 73
$46 23
1883-84   	
39 24
1884-85 	
1885-86   	
1886-87 	
39 71
43 70
47 52 202
Public Schools Report.
1887
Esquimalt.
The four schools in this district were in operation during tho entire year, viz., Colwood,
Esquimalt, Metchosin, and Sooke.
There was very little change either in enrolment or average attendance as compared with
the previous year.
An additional school has been established in this district at Rocky Point, the attendance
at which has thus far been satisfactory.
The number of visits made by trustees and parents was as follows :—
Number of visits by Trustees   66
„ „ others    179
Total 245
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
five years:—
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
18S2-83 	
05
76
70
70
07
56
53
58
C9
69
121
129
123
139
136
54.63
68.27
71.50
80.18
78.18
$18 27
20 83
22 21
20 74
21 35
$40 47
1883-84 	
39 37
1884-85           	
1885-S6 	
1886-87 	
39 70
35 96
37 14
Kootenay.
During the last half of the past school-year, a school was maintained in Revelstoke, the
attendance at which complied with the requirement of statute.    The school is now closed.
A school was opened in Donald at the beginning of the present school-year. The attendance thus far reported is evidence that the establishment of the school was a necessity.
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
year:—
1886-87.
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
17
Average
daily
attendance.
10.30
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment.
$19 12
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
$31 57
Lillooet.
Four of the schools of this district were open during the whole or a part of the year,—
Big Bar, Bonaparte, Clinton, and Lillooet.
The school in Lac La Hache District has been closed for several years.
The newly-created district of   Chilcotin is now provided  with school facilities.       The
attendance hitherto maintained has been satisfactory.
Visits to the schools were made as follows:—
Number of visits by Trustees      14
Do. do.       others    106
Total   120 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
203
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil for the past five
years:
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment.
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882-83 	
29
34
36
29
25
16
17
19
22
23
45
51
55
51
48
24.10
25.62
31.81
29.44
31.62
$37 02
30 23
34 86
36 87
36 21
$64 93
1883-84 	
60 18
1884-85 	
60 27
1885-86 	
63 87
1886-87  	
54 97
Nanaimo.
This important district contains 12 schools, under the charge of 16 teachers:—
Alberni, Mountain,
North Cedar, Nanaimo High School,
South Cedar, Nanaimo Boys' School,
Departure Bay, Nanaimo Girls' School,
North Gabriola, Oyster,
South Gabriola, Wellington.
The enrolment increased from 649 in 1885-86 to 768 during the past year. The average
attendance also shows an increase from 393.68 to 425.28 during the same period
With the exception of the school at East Wellington (Mountain—newly-created), all
the schools were in session during the past year.
The aggregate attendance in this district was very materially lessened by the closing of
the Nanaimo Schools for a considerable time, rendered necessary by the lamentable explosion
that occurred in the Vancouver Coal Company's Mine on May 3rd, 1887.
The number of visits made to the schools was as follows:—
Number of visits by Trustees      320
„ „ others    1011
Total    1331
The following is a tabular exhibit of the attendance and cost of   each pupil duriDg the
past five years:—
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment.
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882-83 	
1883-84 	
254
349
294
337
384
180
277
266
312
384
434
626
560
649
768
220.90
355.54
306.39
393.68
425.28
$17 14
12 10
15 02
14 42
15 80
$33 68
21 31
27 46
23 78
28 53
1884-85  	
1885-86 	
1886-87 	 204.
Public Schools Report.
1887
New Westminster.
This flourishing district has 23 schools established within its limits:—
Aldergrove, Maple Ridge,
Boundary Bay, Moodyville,
Burton's Prairie, Mount Lehman,
Canoe Pass, Mud Bay,
Cenireville, North Arm,
Cheam, Port Moody,
Chilliwhack, Prairie,
Clover Valley, Stave River,
Hall's Prairie, St. Mary's Mission,
Kensington, Sumas,
Langley, Trenant,
Lulu, Vancouver,
York.
These schools were ill operation during the past year, with the exception of Kensington,
which is a newly-created district.    All of the schools are now in session.
The number of pupils enrolled increased from 649 in 1885-86 to 1.0S0 during the past
year, and the average daily attendance from 393.68 to 589.10 during the same period.
The Graded School in the City of Vancouver.is now under the charge of four teachers.
The Centreville School has been provided with a Monitor for the present school-year.
The number of visits made to the schools was as follows :—
Number of visits by Trustees      270
„ „ others     1,236
Total 1,506
The following is a tabular statement of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
five years:—
Boys.
G:rls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
attendance.
Average C03t
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882-83      	
221
308
377
460
589
197
252
311
368
491
418
560
688
834
1,080
19S.50
271.17
343.42
410.70
589.10
$21 44
16 52
17 52
17 06
14 49
$45 10
18S3-84	
34 13
1884-85	
35 11
1S85-86	
1S86-S7	
34 64
26 57
New Westminster City.
There arc three schools in this district:—New Westminster High School, New Westminster Boys' School, and New Westminster Girls' School.
These schools were under the charge of six teachers. During the present year the
increased attendance rendered it necessary to add another teacher to the staff.
The number of pupils enrolled during the past year was 444—an increase of 91 over that
of the previous year,—and the average daily attendance increased from 187.49 to 212.43 during
the same period.
The number of visits made to the schools was as follows:- -
Number of visits by Trustees      32
„ „ others    384
Total   416 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
205
The following is a tabular statement of attendanc
five years:—
and cost of each pupil during the past
Boys.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of eich pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1S82-83	
150
163
184
192
230
105
119
145
161
214
255
287
329
353
444
121
129.27
151.19
187.49
212.43
$14 05
12 £6
15 37
14 1G
12 80
$29 61
1883-84	
27 90
18S4-S5	
34 04
1885-86	
26 65
1886-87	
20 70
Victoria.
Seven schools in this district were open during the entire year :—
Cadboro, Lake,
Cedar Hill, North Saanich,
Craigflower, South Saanich,
West Saanich.
Another school having been established during the present year—Tolmie,—there are now
eight schools in operation in this district.
The past year shows an increase in both enrolment and average daily attendance.
Visits to the schools were made as follows:—
Number of visits by Trustees
others    649
Total
721
The following is a tabular statement of attendance and cost of each pupil for the past fivo
years:—
•
Boya.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cosi
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
1882 83	
142
128
142
150
151
108
104
110
126
139
250
232
252
270
290
135.48
130.08
127.92
143.G7
157.96
$19 82
20 £0
19 10
19 90
18 90
$30 58
1883-84	
36 51
1884 85	
37 75
1885-86	
38 23
1886-87	
34 IS
Victoria Citt.
Six schools were in operation during the entire year:
Victoria High School,
Victoria Boys' School,
Victoria Girls' School,
During the present year another Ward School has been established at Spring Ridge,
making seven schools now in session in this city.    The number of teachers employed is 21.
The number of pupils on the registers in 1885-86 was 1,427. The enrolment for the past
year—1,675—shows an increase of 248, There was a corresponding increase in average daily
attendance from 807.10 to 894.29.
James' Bay Ward School,
Johnson Street Ward School,
Rock Buy Ward School. 206
Public Schools Report.
1887
Visits were made to the schools as follows:—
Number of visits by Trustees      773
„ „ others 6,736
Total 7.509
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
five years:—
Boya.
Girls.
Total
Enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance.
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
423
579
702
789
899
347
433
641
638
776
770
1,012
1,343
1,427
1,675
414.55
679.65
710.70
807.10
894.29
$23 00
12 87
11 99
11 19
10 66
$42 70
19 17
1883-84	
1884-85	
23 04
1885-86	
1886-87	
19 78
19 76
Yale.
Of the seventeen schools in this district, fifteen were in operation during the past year:—
Ashcroft, Nicola Valley,
Cache Creek (Boarding School), North Thompson,
Coldstream, Okanagan,
Hope, Priest's Valley,
Kamloops, Round Prairie,
Lytton, Shuswap Prairie,
Nicola, Spallumcheen,
Nicola Lake, Spence's Bridge,
Yale.
The  Nicola  Lake  Sehool   was  closed   during  the  past year  on account of inability to
maintain the average daily attendance required by the School Act.    A school has not, as yet,
been opened in the Coldstream District.
The enrolment increased from 306 in 1885-86 to 416 in  the past year, and the average
daily attendance from 180.80 to 224.63 during the same period.
During the present year the school in the town of Kamloops has been changed into a
Graded School by the appointment of an assistant teacher.
Visits were made to the schools as follows:—
Number of visits by Trustees      200
„ „ others      851
Total 1,051
The following is a tabular exhibit of attendance and cost of each pupil during the past
five years:—
18S2-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
Boys.
Ill
128
128
153
219
Girls.
88
103
137
153
197
Total
Enrolment.
199
231
265
306
410
Average
daily
attendance.
101.23
125.48
152.18
180.80
224.63
Average cost
of each pupil
on enrolment
$26 08
25 35
28 34
30 45
24 91
Average cost
of each pupil
on daily
attendance.
$51 26
46 66
49 35
51 55
46 13 51 Vic
Public Schools Report.
207
ATTENDANCE AT GRADED  SCHOOLS,
from 1872 to 1887   (inclusive).
The following tabular exhibits of attendance at the Public Schools in the Cities of
Nanaimo, New Westminster, Vancouver, and Victoria, as well as the Graded School in
Wellington, since the inception of the present school system, will doubtless prove of general
interest :—
Nanaimo.
Total number
Average
daily attendance.
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
125
59
66
81
1874-75
153
75
78
112
1875-76
147
83
64
105
1876-77
184
93
01
112.50
1S77-78
248
133
115
154
1878-79
241
135
106
136.89
1879-80
228
121
107
131.87
1880-81
265
148
117
136.95
1881-82
238
131
107
118.73
1882-81
210
131
79
108.03
1883-84
374
224
150
192.53
1884-85
322
175
147
180.54
1885-86
368
187
181
226.21
18S6-87
414
200
205
244.93
New Westminster.
Total number
Average
daily attendance.
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
87
50
37
73
1874-75
65
32
33
37
1875-76
101
63
38
65
1876-77
121
73
48
67.25
1877-78
132
75
57
90
1878-79
200
102
98
99.03
1879-80
204
115
89
109.53
1880-81
202
116
86
103.63
1881-82
212
131
81
97.29
1882-83
255
150
105
121
1883-84
287
168
119
129.27
1884-85
329
184
145
151.19
1885-86
353
192
161
187.49
1886-87
444
230
214
212.43 208
Public Schools Report.
1887
Vancouver.
Year.
Total number
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
daily attendance.
1886-87
248
138
110
168.40
Victoria.
Total number
Average
daily attendance.
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
346
176
170
113.50
1874-75
465
Not given.
Not given.
272
1875-76
545
Not given.
Not given.
302
1876-77
617
b66
251
374
1877-78
734
455
279
450.15
1878-79
726
395
331
398.99
1879-80
790
436
354
398.78
1880-81
720
391
329
410.09
1881-82
765
440
325
433.45
1882-83
770
423
347
414.55
1883-84
1,012
079
433
679.65
1884-85
1,343
702
G41
710.70
1885-86
1,427
789
038
807.10
1886-87
1,675
899
770
894.29
Wellington.
Total number
Average
daily attendance.-
Year.
of
"pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
1874-75'
34
14
20
24.75
1875-70
46
13
33
23.33
1876-77
53
19
34
23.78
1877-78
44
18
26
38.00
1878-79
50
25
25
29.82
1S79-S0
70
49
39
37.14
1880-81
89
52
37
42.50
1881-82
123
66
57
52.61
1882-83
146
90
56
73.70
1883-84
156
87
09
55.85
1884-S5
142
76
06
73.26
1885-80
135
79
56
77.66
1886-87
151
78
73
79.34 51 Vic Public Schools Report. 209
SPECIAL REPORTS ON HIGH SCHOOLS AND GRADED SCHOOLS
Nanaimo
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School.
Teachers, 7.
Enrolled during the year, 414.
Average monthly attendance, 296.
Average daily attendance, 244.93.
Expenditure, $6,126.05.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.79.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $25.01.
High School.
Principal, E. B. Paul, M. A.
Salary, $100 per month.
Examined November 23rd, 24th, and 26th, 1886; May 30th, 31st; June 1st, 1887.
Enrolled during the year, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 14.15.
The work of this school has been very creditable, but the daily attendance has not been
as large as expected.
It is worthy of note that application was made by the Principal, on behalf of the pupils,
to be permitted to continue ths same hours during the winter session as prescribed for the
summer session (an additional hour each day). This manifestation of zeal in their work on
the part of teacher and pupils is not only commendable but worthy of emulation.
At the last annual examination of teachers, a pupil of this school was successful in
obtaining a certificate of qualification, and now occupies the position of second assistant in the
Girls' School of this city.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, B. C, July 29th, 1887.
" Sir,—In compliance with the 9th Rule for the government of Public Schools in this
Province, I have the honor to submit the following report on the condition and progress of the
Nanaimo High School.
"In my last annual report I stated that the number of pupils enrolled was 12,—6 boys
and 6 girls. Since then the number of names on the register has increased to 21,—-8 boys and
13 girls.
" In addition to the subjects taught by me last year, the study of mensuration, bookkeeping, and hygiene was commenced last August.
"The Roll of Honor for deportment was awarded to Miss Janet Blythe Webb; for
punctuality and regularity to Miss Christina Pool; and for proficiency to Master Herbert
Duncan Reynard Stewart.
" I am pleased to have to report that the pupils of the High School continued, during the
past year, to manifest that diligence, and good conduct, and interest in their studies which
characterised them the year before.
"I have, &c,
" To S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)       "Edward B. Paul,
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria. " Principal." 210 Public Schools Report. 1887
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Jones until June 30th, 1S87; present principal, J. Shaw.
Salary, $90 per month
1st Assistant, J. Shaw until June 30th, 1887; present 1st Assistant, W. Hunter, B. A.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss L. A. Mebius.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined November 23rd and 24th, 1886; present, 121.
May 30th and 31st, 1887; present, 127.
Enrolled during the year, 201.
Average monthly attendance, 149.
Average daily attendance, 128.04.
At the Christmas Examination, 1886, the following obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School:—Walter S. Planta, Charles Van Houten.
Report of the Principal.
" Nanaimo, July 5th, 1887.
" Sir,—I have the honor to submit the following report of the Nanaimo Boys' School for
the year ending June 30th, 1887.
" There has been an increase of about eleven per cent., both in enrolment and daily
attendance, during the past year.
" Of the pupils presented at Christmas, Walter Planta and Archibald Charles Van
Houten passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
" In consequence of the disastrous colliery explosion which happened in Nanaimo, May
2nd, the schools were closed for nearly two weeks. This cessation in school work, coming
immediately before the Midsummer Examination, interfered considerably with the success of
the pupils in their preparation for the same.
" While stating that not any of the boys presented in June passed the High School
Entrance Examination, I wish to point out, 1st, the disparity in the ages of these pupils as
compared with those of the two larger cities of the Province ; 2nd, that the standard appeared
to have been raised, from the fact that none of the pupils from this city or neighboring schools
were successful in the said examination.*
" In reference to the wants of the school I may say that all the blackboards require to be
renovated and re-set; new maps of the continents are needed for the Senior Division; and the
three divisions should be fitted up with lavatories, as, up to the present, no provision whatever
has been made for such a necessity.
" Another subject I would draw attention to, is the relative position of the High School
and the Public School in the same building ; the former occupies the central portion, thus
intercepting communication between the several divisions of the latter. Hence in visiting his
assistants, the Principal has to go through the High School, or accept the alternative of going
outside to get admission to their divisions. Such an inconvenience to both schools could be
easily obviated, with the consent of the Department, by the Principal of the High School and
the Principal of the Public School exchanging rooms.
" In conclusion, I wish to thank the Department and the Board of Trustees for their
courtesy to their teachers, and prompt attention in the management of the affairs of the
school.
"I have &c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)       "David Jones,
" Superintendent of Education, " Principal.
" Victoria, B. C."
*It is my duty to state that a change in the standard was not made during the year. Two or three sets
of papers have invariably been prepared for use in the examining of applicants for entrance to High Schools—
one for winter, another for summer, and a third for use in the autumn. All applicants, whether from civio
or rural districts, are required to pass an examination on the same set of questions. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. £11
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Emelene Bell until December 31st, 1886; present principal, Miss A. F.
Gardiner.
Salary, $70 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss E. M. Reynard until June 30th,  1887; present 1st Assistant, Miss
M. Bryant.
Salary, $55 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss M. Bryant until June 30th, 1887; present 2nd Assistant, Miss Isabel
Brown.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined November 23rd and 24th, 1886; present, 100.
May 30th and 31st, 1887; present, 128.
Enrolled during the year, 192.
Average monthly attendance, 131.
Average daily attendance, 102.74.
At the Christmas examination,  1886, Marion Gordon passed the standard required for
admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, June 20th, 1887.
"Sir,—The following is my report on the condition and progress of the Girls' Public
School, Nanaimo:—There were enrolled during the year 192 pupils—48 in 1st Division, 69 in
2nd, and 75 in the 3rd.
" At the written examination in December last five girls were promoted from the 3rd
division to the 2nd, seven from the 2nd to 1st, and one from the 1st division to the High
School. It is to be regretted that at the examination held on the 30th and 31st of last month
not one pupil obtained the necessary percentage to enable her to enter the High School.
There were no promotions this term in the two lower divisions; but I trust that at the next
examination there will be promoted twice the number that was expected to pass this year.
" It is said that an addition to the school-building will be made during the holidays, and
such enlargement will be fully appreciated by the teachers as well as the children. The
accommodation at present is extremely limited, particularly in Miss Bryant's division, and
* *       I sincerely hope that the report of the building of a new Girls' School is true.
Besides this, some kind of a shed in which the girls can play during recess is necessary, for it
is impossible for them to play their games in the school-room.
" In conclusion, it is gratifying to speak of the harmony in which the trustees and teachers
have performed their several duties during the term that has just closed. I thank them all
for their perfect good-will, and I hope it will continue in the future.
" I have, <&c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Abbie F. Gardiner,
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria. "Principal."
While the general management of the schools of this city has been satisfactory, yet the
results of examinations held in the Graded Schools did not meet expectations. This is mainly
attributable to the fatal explosion that occurred in this city in May, 1887, a date so near to
the closing official examination of the school-year that the effects on the same were clearly
manifested.
Miss Bell having tendered her resignation as principal of the Girls' School, to take effect
at the close of the year 1886, Miss Abbie F. Gardiner received appointment as successor.
On the resignation of Mr. D. Jones in July of the present year Mr. John Shaw was
appointed principal of the Boys' School, and Mr. W. Hunter, B. A., accepted the position of
first assistant.
During the present school-year a two-story wing has been added to the Girls' School
building, thus providing two additional rooms.
The school accommodation in this city meets every present requirement.
The trustees have been faithful in the discharge of their duties, and have shown an active
interest in everything that tends to advance the welfare of their schools. 212 Public Schools Report. 1887
New Westminster.
High School, Boys' School, and Girls' School.
Teachers, 6.
Enrolled during the year, 444.
Average monthly attendance, 303.
Average dailv attendance, 212.43.
Expenditure," $5,686.46.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.80.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $26.76.
High School.
Principal, H. M. Stramberg, B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
Examined, November 30th, December 1st, 2nd, 1886; May 30th, 31st, June 1st 1887.
Enrolled during the year, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 19.25.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, B. C,
" August 27th, 1887.
" Sir,—I herewith respectfully submit my report of the New Westminster High School
for the year ended June 30th, 1887.
" In reviewing the work done, and measuring success, not so much by any great advancement made by the pupils, as by the difficulties overjome, the degree of progress under adverso
circumstances, and the felicitous working of the methods adopted, I am gratified to be able to
say that the school was in a highly satisfactory condition during the year. It is not any
extraordinary cleverness manifested by those in attendance that enables me to report so
favorably, but the knowledge of the fact that the bast was done that could be done with many
unpromising subjects, and the results were the best that could be obtained under somewhat
unfavorable conditions. It would be a mistake, however, to convey the impression that all the
pupils were dull. Since the establishment of the present system of free education, there have
always been some lustrous bodies in the firmament of our school life, nor was the past year
wanting in its star of more than ordinary brilliancy.
" In my last report I referred to the growth here of more enlightened views of the real
nature and object of education, because I have felt it had not a little to do with the teacher's
success. There are still, however, many of our citizens who think that High Schools should
partake more of the character of commercial colleges, and their chief aim should be to furnish
the young with a convenient stock of knowledge that may 1)3 aftarwards turned to profitable
account in the every-day business of life. Children are not slow to accept the opinions of their
parents in educational matters; and I have found that when once a pupil becomes possessed of
these crude and mischievous notions, very little can bo done with him till he is convinced that
many subjects must be studied for the mental discipline they afford, without regard to any
direct or practical use they may be in the matter of earning a livelihood.
" Such was my experience last year. The false ideas some of my pupils entertained
regarding the nature of education led them to doubt the utility of many of the studies in which
they were engaged, and so prevented the full development of that faith and enthusiasm in work
which alone lead to the highest results.
" You will see by referring to the returns already sent, that although the number of pupils
enrolled was equal to that of the preceding year, the average daily attendance was not so great.
This was due to a variety of causes. Perhaps the discipline had something to do with it. The
restraints and tasks inseparable from the successful working of our present system of
education are somewhat irksome and monotonous to young people of ardent temperament, and
many of our youth avail themselves of the facilities our city affords to relieve this monotony
and escape the tcedium vitai by attending, in turn, each of the sectarian colleges we have
here. * * * * * 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 213
" It seems to me that the state of matters might be remedied, for according to sound
educational principles, if a child is properly trained while in the lower grades, he will be
morally prepared, when he enters an academy or a university, to bear restraint and submit to
severer discipline.
" I would, therefore, suggest than an ethical catechism, such as Kant recommended, be
prepared and prescribed for use in our High Schools and in the higher grades of our Common
Schools, and that the boys and girls seeking promotion be required to pass an examination in
practical and theoretical morality.
" I have, &c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        "H. M. Stramberg.
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
The record of this school during the past year has been bery creditable.
At each Annual Teachers' Examination held, several of the pupils have been applicants
for certificates of qualification, and it is a pleasure to state that at the present time quite a
number of them hold responsible positions as instructors.
At the Christmas examination, 1886, Master Richard McBride stood head of the school.
At the Midsummer examination, 1887, Master James Rankin, having obtained the highest
number of marks, was declared winner of the Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the
Governor-General for competition among the pupils of this school.
Boys' School
Principal, D. Wilson, B. A., until June 30th, 1&87; present Principal, W. C. Coatham;
salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, W. C. Coatham, until June 30th, 1887 ; present 1st Assistant, G. M.
Dockrill; salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss G. McBride ; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, November 30th and December 1st, 1886 ; present, 120.
May 30th and 31st, 1S87 ; present, 154.
Enrolled during the year, 276.
Average monthly attendance, 191.
Average daily attendance, 124.03.
At the Christmas examination, 1886, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School:—
William Galbraith,
Henry Edmonds,
Hereward Peele.
At the Midsummer examination, 1887, the following obtained tho percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
John Guest,
Eugene Rousseau,
William Simpson,
John Kennedy.
The Bronze Medal, presented by His Excellency ihe Governor-General for competition
between the Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster, was won by Master John Guest, a
pupil of this school.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, June 30th, 1887.
" Sir,—I have the honor to submit, for your information, the report of the New Westminster Boys' School.
" The number of pupils attending this school has been steadily on the increase, consequent
on the gradual growth of the city, and the end of another school-year brings a further demand 214 Public Schools Report. 1887
for an addition to the teaching staff.    I trust that the rumor of a promise of another teacher
is not unfounded.
" The total number enrolled during the year was 276, and the average attendance 124.
" Grading examinations were held half-yearly. The results of these examinations were
highly creditable to my assistants, Mr. W. C. Coatham and Miss G. McBride—in fact, I
cannot speak too highly of the excellent work done by these teachers during the past year.
" The total number of pupils promoted from the 3rd division was 23 ; from the 2nd
division to the 1st division, 11 ; and from the 1st division to the High School, 7. One of the
latter, Master John Guest, was successful in carrying off the Governor-General's medal,
annually competed for by the Nanaimo and New Westminster Public Schools.
"While the name "Boys' School" is somewhat of a misnomer—the only division composed solely of boys being that in charge of the Principal—yet I trust that no change will be
made in the present arrangement. The prejudice against the mingling of the sexes during
school life is fast dying out, as is clearly shown by the satisfaction with which the existing
state of affairs is viewed by our citizens.
" Judging from the number of visits made to the schools by parents and trustees, the
impression may be given that there is a lack of interest in educational matters among our
citizens. Such, however, is not the case, as I can personally testify. However, it is to be
hoped that trustees and parents will perform their duty in this regard better in the future
than they have done in the past.
"I have, &c,
(Signed)        "D. Wilson,
" & D. Pope, Esq., B. A., " Principal
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
Girls' School.
Principal,  Miss M.  R.  Davidson until  March  31st,  1887; present Principal, Miss E.
Rogers ; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant, Miss E. A. Davidson; salary, $5t per month.
Examined, November 30th and December 1st, 1886 ; present, 69.
May 30th and 31st, 1887 ; present, 80.
Enrolled during the year, 130.
Average monthly attendance, 88.
Average daily attendance, 69.15.
At the Christmas examination,  1886, the following passed  the standard required  for
admission to a High School:—
Jane Sophia McMartin,
Edith May Robinson,
Annie Ellen Bonson,
Helen Homer.
At the midsummer examination, 1887, the following obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School:—
Mary Agnes Murray,
Gertrude Rose Millard.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, June 11th, 1887.
" Sir,—I have the honor to forward herewith the annual report of the Girls' Public
School of New Westminster.
" I succeeded Miss M. R. Davidson in the charge of the first division of this school on the
first of April.
" During the year seven pupils were promoted to the High School.
" The junior department has done excellent work, under the able management of Miss E.
A. Davidson. "I have, &c,
(Signed)        "Ellen Rogers,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Principal of Girls' School
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria." On the resignation of Miss M. R, Davidson, Principal of the Girls' School, Miss E. Rogers
received appointment as successor.
In July of the present year, Mr. W. C. Coatham was appointed Principal of the Boys'
School, vice Mr. D. Wilson, B. A., who had accepted the position of Inspector of Schools.
Mr. G. M. Dockrill has succeeded Mr. Coatham as first assistant.
Since the completion of the Branch Line of the Canadian Pacific Railway to this city, the
population has so increased that the increase to the enrolment in the schools is such as to call
for additional accommodation.
The two rooms in the building occupied by the High School, now used by. the third
divisions of both graded schools, do not meet present requirements.
The erection of a wing to the central building, as contemplated in the original plan,
providing two additional rooms, would be a desirable improvement.
Owing to the increase in attendance, a monitor has been added to the staff of teachers
during the present school-year.
Vancouver.
Principal, J. W. Robinson ; salary, $70 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss A. Christie; salary, $50 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss M. Hartney; salary, $50 per month.
Inspections, 6.
Enrolled during the year, 24S.
Average monthly attendance, 234.
Average daily attendance, 168.40.
Expenditure, $1,172.01.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $4.72.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $6.96.
The increase in enrolment and average daily attendance during the past year very much
exceeded that of any other school district in the Province. While at the commencement of
the year the school was under charge of one teacher, it was soon found that an assistant was
required, and before the close of the year tho appointment of a second assistant became a
matter of necessity.
During the present year a monitor has been added to the staff of teachers: thus the
common school of Granville, 1886, has been transformed during this very short period into
the graded school of Vancouver under the charge of four teachers.
The school-house erected during the past year, although containing four large apartments,
does not afford that accommodation which the rapidly increasing school population of this city
demands.
In order to meet present requirements" another school-house should be erected in the
western part of the city. Should this suggestion receive favorable consideration, the separation
of the sexes would be advisable. The district would then possess a Boys' School and a Girls'
School in separate buildings, which would prove of great advantage to the educational interests
of the city.
Report of the Principal
"Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 13th, 1887.
" Sir,—In compliance with your request, and in accordance with the regulation therein
referred to, I beg to submit my report of the Vancouver Public School for the year ending
June 30th, 1887. I opened school iri the new building January 26th with one assistant, and an
enrolment of 93 pupils, which increased so rapidly that soon the rooms were crowded. In the
early part of April the Government furnished the two upper rooms of the building, and on the
fifteenth of that month they were declared ready for occupation. A second assistant was
then engaged, and the classes were divided to the best advantage. Though this reduced the
number of classes in each division it did not lesson the number of pupils in the various rooms, 216
Public Schools Report.
1887
for many who had been debarred through want of accommodation now came flocking in, till at
the close of the term there was an enrolment of 285 pupils, as shown by reports
" The constant arrival of new pupils greatly interfered with the the general classification,
and materially retarded the progress of the school.
***** *
" It is to be regretted that no play ground has been secured in connection with so large a
school, and as the little plot on which the school stands has not been cleared and levelled, we
have had no convenient place on which to drill or marshal the pupils preparatory to entering
the class-rooms.
" As there were no sheds in which the children could play during the inclement weather,
they had to occupy the class-rooms at recess during the rainy season; but, notwithstanding,
the breakage and defacement of school property was very slight indeed. It is absolutely
necessary that proper sheds be attached to the school. * * * In my opinion
the pupils should not be allowed in the hall or class-rooms during recess, but should enjoy
themselves in the fresh air while the rooms are being ventilated.        * * *
" A large number of ladies and gentlemen were present at the closing examination, and
after examining the classes in the various branches a rather limited number of prizes were
awarded to the most meritorious, and, with a few speeches and the National Anthem, the
school closed for the holidays.
"I have, <fec,
'S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A.,
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria,
(Signed)
■'J. W. Robinson,
' Principal Vancouver Public School."
Victoria.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School, James' Bay Ward School, Johnson Street Ward
School, and Rock Bay Ward School.
Teachers, 19.
Monitors," 2.
Enrolled during the year, 1,675.
Average monthly attendance, 1,083.
Average daily attendance, 894.29.
Expenditure, $17,857.57.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.66.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $19 96.
High School.
Principal, J. N. Muir, B. A., until October 31st, 1887; salary, $110 per month.
R. Offerhaus, Acting Principal.
Second Master, R. Offerhaus; Salary, $100 per month.
Examined December 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th, 1886.
May 30th, 31st, June 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 1887.
Enrolled during the year, 107.
Average monthly attendance, 80.
Average daily attendance, 69.87.
From the following tabular statement of attendance since its establishment an accurate
idea of the number of pupils who have therein received instruction in the different branches of
a higher education may be obtained.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the midsummer and Christmas
examinations held since its commencement are also given:— 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
217
Victoria High School.
Males
enrolled.
Female3
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Averag3
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1876-77
43
47
54
51
37
39
34
45
37
47
44
17
14
22
31
39
35
27
39
57
58
63
60
61
76
82
76
74
61
84
94
105
107
40.00
50.15
43.62
54.60
52.75
45.07
38.00
56.63
56.34
64.27
69.87
1877-78
1878-79
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
Thomas Baker	
Charles Hayward	
Charles Gardiner .
R. Clayton Fawcett	
Abbie F. Gardiner
VV. F. Carey Pope	
No examination.
Herbert C. Carey.
Charles Hayward.
J. B. Carmichael.
Wm. W. Halliday.
Samuel Schultz.
Christina Forrest.
Abbie F. Gardiner.
John C. Boyd.
Arthur E. Haynes.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria High School, July 1st, 1887.
"Sir,—I send you the following Annual Report of the Victoria High School.
"The total number enrolled was 117, viz., 55 in the Senior Division and 62 in the Junior
Division, 8 of whom were re-enrolled in the Senior Division, thus making a total of 109 in
attendance.
" Several pupils this year devoted themselves specially to the work prescribed for the
Teachers' Examination.
" The walls between the Public and the High School have not yet been altered, and the
noise made by the classes in the Public School building is at times so great that it is impossible
for the scholars in the Senior Division to hear what is said in their room.
" I hope that provision will be made this year for an additional assistant, as on account
of the increased number of subjects required to be taught, and the steady increase in the
attendance, an assistant is absolutely necessary to do justice to the subjects and the pupils.
"I have, <fcc.,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        " J. N. Mum,
"Superintendent of Education, "Principal.
" Victoria."
At the Christmas examination, 1886, Master Arthur E. Haynes stood head of the school.
At the Midsummer examination, 1887, Master Arthur E. Haynes again stood head of the
school, thereby winning the silver medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General
for competition among the pupils of this school.
The presentation was made by the Hon. Mr. Robson, Minister of Education, who complimented the young man on the achievement of so high an honor, and in eloquent terms urged
the pupils to so use their present opportunities that when leaving this institution they will be
well equipped for life's battle.
During the present year a change has been made in the headmastership of this school,
Mr. J. N. Muir's resignation having been accepted, to take effect on October 31st.
Until a successor could be secured, the school was placed in charge of the second master
as acting principal.
Mrs. R. Offerhaus, the holder of a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, has been temporarily
appointed as teacher in the Junior Division. It is but justice to state that the lady is discharging the onerous duties of the position in a very creditable manner.
J. P. McLeod, Esq., B. A., has received appointment as Principal. 218
Public Schools Report.
1887
Boys' School.
Principal, J. A. Halliday ; salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, J. H. Thain, until June 30th, 1887 ; present 1st  Assistant, D.   E. Kerr;
salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, James Kaye; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. C.   Gowen, until March 31st, 1887; present 3rd Assistant, Miss
E. J. Gardiner ; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss E.  J.  Gardiner,   until  March  31st,   1887 ; present  4th Assistant,
Edward F. Doran ; salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Fred. G. Wright, until February 28th,  1887 ; present 5th Assistant, Miss
Annie Pollard ; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Annie Pollard, until  February  28th, 1887 ; present  6th Assistant,
Miss K. Todd ; salary, $50 per mouth.
Examined, December 4th and 6th, 1886.
May 30th and 31st, 1887.
Enrolled during the year, 692.
Average monthly attendance, 433.
Average daily attendance, 350.61.
At the Christmas examination the following  passed   the standard required for admission
to a High School :—
Richard Jackson,
William A. Kettle,
William Redmond,
James Hill Lawson,
William N. Lenfesty,
Albert R. Baker,
Joseph W. Wilson,
Joseph Alexander McDowell,
Walter T. De Lacy Hutchinson,
John Henry Austin,
John Edward Kinsman.
At the Midsummer examination the following obtained  the  percentage necessary for
admission to a High School :—
George Partridge, Kenneth Munro,
Allen Francis, Joseph P. Phillips,
Edward King Brown, Albert H. Haynes.
Charles Bunting,
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, 11th July, 1887.
" Sir,—Your constant supervision of the boys' department of the Victoria Public School
makes a report from me merely a matter of form, as I can add nothing in connection with the
working of the institution you do not already know.
" The teachers have, one and all, endeavored to do their best, and the year has terminated
with the best of feelings towards each other.
" Owing to the addition of another teacher to the staff, a new limit table and re-distribution of some of the classes will take place at the beginning of the next school-year, which will
be sure to lead to misunderstanding among parents; but the matter can be best explained by
their calling at the Education Office or at the school.
" The number of pupils is constantly on the increase, and the crowding of the lower
divisions is now fully relieved by the establishment of ward schools, so that a much better
showing may be confidently looked for from these classes.
" I have, &c,
(Signed)        "J. A. Halliday,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B.A., "Principal Victoria Boys' School.
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria." 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 219
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss F. E. Armstrong; salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss A. D. Cameron; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss L. A. Barron; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss L. Horton; salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss C. W. Forrest until September  12th, 1886; present  5th Assistant,
Miss E. M. Carmichael; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss E. M. Carmichael until September  12th, 1886; present 6th Assistant, Miss Ada Keast; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 6th, 1886 ;
May 30th and 31st, 18S7.
Enrolled during the year, 585.
Average monthly attendance, 359.
Average daily attendance, 298.27.
At the Christmas examination, 1886, the following obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School:—
Isabella Cathcart, Jane Armstrong Herd,
Cora Mary Watson, Annie Jane Davey,
Caroline C. Christie, Ellen Amelia Cusack,
Mary Elizabeth Penwill, Kate Denny,
Caroline Jeffrey, Eda Newbury,
Edith Frances Richardson.
At the midsummer examination the following passed the standard required for admission
to a High School:—
Minnie M. McDonald, Elizabeth Horton,
Eliza Jane King, Bessie Sears,
Emma Heinrich, Kate C. Houlihan,
Jessie M. Stephen, Jessie McDonald,
Susan Eckert, Charlotte Cudlip,
Mary Crockford.
The bronze medal, presented by His Excellency the  Governor-General  for  competition
between the pupils of this school and the Boys' School, was won by Miss Minnie M. McDonald.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, August 10th, 1887.
" Sir,—I have the honor herewith to submit my Annual Report of the Girls' School for
the year ending June 30th, 1887.
" The number of pupils in attendance at the close of the year was 360, being an average
of 51.42 for each teacher. The work done in the several divisions of this school during the
past year has been, if possible, more satisfactory than that of the year previous. The teachers
show an unremitting earnestness and ever increasing zeal in their labors for the advancement
of the pupils under their charge. As a result of this honest hard work on the part of both
teachers and pupils, the results of the written examinations at Midsummer and Christmas
have been satisfactory to all, the class percentages being in every case good, and in some
instances excellent.
" Large numbers of parents and friends attended the public examinations held at the close
of each term, thus testifying to their interest in the education of the girls of the city.
"We are still in need of a large building that would answer the purpose of an assembly
hall for public examinations, &c, and as a playroom for the girls during inclement weather.
The necessity for such a room must be apparent to all who attend our public closings.
" The school-rooms are bright and comfortable, and all necessary requirements and repairs
are attended to by the Government and Trustees. But, as yet, no attention has been paid to
beautifying the school grounds either by planting trees, shrubs, or flowers.    Could we not have 220
Public Schools Report.
1887
an Arbor Day ? By the proper use of such day much might be done in a few years with an
unexcelled climate in our favor ; and what are now among the least adorned grounds of our
fair city might, ere long, be among those most to be admired.
" We require a School Library. As it is an important part of the education of the young,
to awaken in them a desire for reading, we should make their associations with books as
pleasant as possible. When this appetite for reading has been excited the difficulty of providing money for the library has been more than half overcome. Parents, friends and pupils
will, when thus interested, readily contribute the means to supply the books.
" We have to thank many friends for most kindly donating special prizes at Midsummer,
as well as the Trustees for supplying a liberal grant from the Prize Fund.
" I have, &c,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        " F. E. Armstrong,
"Superintendent of Education. " Principal Girls' School."
James' Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss M. V. Storey.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, December 8th, 1886 ; present, 60.
June 9th, 1887 ; present, 63.
Enrolled during the year, 93.
Average monthly attendance, 64.
Average daily attendance, 53.91
The attendance at this the oldest of the  ward schools varies but little from year to year.
Were  shade  trees planted around the property, they would certainly prove of benefit to
the pupils, and would add very much to the appearance of the school site.
Johnson Street Ward School.
Teacher, Miss H. Jackson, until March 31st, 1887 ; present teacher, Miss A. C. Go wen.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, December 9th, 1886 ; present, 59.
June 9th, 1887; present, 88.
Enrolled during the year, 108.
Average monthly attendance, 89.
Average daily attendance, 70.25.
On account of the very large attendance at this school, it was found necessary to supply
a monitor for a portion of the year.
The establishment of two schools during the present year, one at Spring Ridge and the
other in Tolmie District, has so relieved this school of its former crowded condition that the
attendance is now no more than is desirable.
Rock Bay   Ward School.
Teacher, Miss C. W. Forrest.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, December 9th, 1886; present, 58.
June 9th, 1887; present, 61.
Enrolled during the year, 90.
Average monthly attendance, 58.
Average daily attendance, 51.38.
The attendance at this school, which was opened in the early part of the past year,
exceeded the most sanguine expectations of all interested, the average daily attendance having
been over 51. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. 221
At the Christmas examination, 1886, a prize was offered for competition among the Ward
Schools of this city by the Hon. Mr. Robson, Minister of Education. Master William E.
Reynolds, a pupil of this school, having obtained the highest number of marks at the semiannual examination in midsummer, and on being declared to be head pupil of the Ward Schools,
was duly presented by that Hon. Gentleman with the promised reward.
Fourth   Ward School
Provision having been made in the Estimates of last Session of the Legislature for the
establishment of a fourth ward school, a very neat and commodious building has been erected
on a most eligible site in the eastern portion of the city, known as Spring Ridge.
The school has been in session since September of the present year, and has maintained
thus far an average daily attendance of more than 55.
The attendance at the schools of this city was much larger during the past year than was
anticipated, hence two additional teachers have been added to the staff for the present year.
It is worthy of note that the enrolment has considerably more than doubled during the
past five years. This high percentage of increase is accounted for by the steady growth of the
city, as well as by the fact that the prejudices which formerly existed against the Public
Schools are gradually giving way to more liberal views.
Frequent inspections made and examinations held enable me to state that marked progress
was made during the year in nearly every division. This gratifying result is attributable not
only to the fact that the schools are in charge of a faithful and energetic staff of teachers,
taken as a whole, but also to the harmony that has existed among them.
The trustees are deserving of every credit for the number of visits made—773,—as well
as for the lively interest shown in everything that appertains to the welfare of the schools.
Wellington.
Principal, G. Stainburn, B. A.; salary, $75 per month.
Assistant, Miss M. Lawrence ; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, November 25th, 1886; present, 88.
Inspections, 4.
Enrolled during the year, 151.
Average monthly attendance, 109,
Average daily attendance, 79.34.
Expenditure, $1,590.60.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.53.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $20.05.
At the Christmas examination, 1886, the following obtained the percentage  required for
admission to a High School:—
Elizabeth J. Moffat,
Sarah Ramsay.
Report of the Principal.
"Wellington, B. C, June 20th, 1887.
"Sir,—The Wellington School was closed for the holidays on the 17th inst. In the
senior division the pupils most successful in the midsummer examination were Edna Wall,
Geo. Green, and W. Jones. 222
Public Schools Report.
1887
" The Provincial certificates were awarded to—
" Charlotte Alice Turner, deportment,
"Jonathan Green, punctuality,
" Edna Wall, proficiency.
" In the junior department the winners of the Provincial prizes were—
"Elizabeth Gillespie, deportment,
" Simon Ivey, punctuality,
" Joanna Dunbar, proficiency.
" In the Superintendent's examination for admission to a High School, which took place
last November, six pupils were examined. Of these two were successful—Elizabeth J. Moffat
and Sarah Ramsay. On this occasion it ought to be noticed that five of the candidates were
girls; therefore, if we should take this case as a criterion, we might conclude that in attaining
the highest proficiency the girls surpass the boys in the ratio of five to one. Certainly if
another examination had been held during the past term the relation would have been partially
reversed, and the sexes equally represented. Still the fact remains that the superiority of the
girls in diligence and acquirement has been usually quite marked. With respect to the boys
it is not difficult to assign reasons for their comparative indolence. At an early age boys are
able to earn in the mines (at employments requiring neither strength nor skill) almost as much
wages as are given to adults in the Atlantic States. There is thus an inducement for parents
to set their boys to work as soon as they are legally entitled to do so. On the other hand, if
a boy distinguishes himself by his proficiency at school there is no immediate prospect that he
will be able to turn his acquirements to account. Suppose, as generally happens here, his
parents are unable to support further expense in fitting him for a profession, then he must be
a clerk or a teacher. In this Province clerkships, if at all valuable, are few and not so easily
obtained. As to teaching, about as much money can be got by ordinary unskilled labor as is
given in most of the schools to the majority of teachers. Under such circumstances is it to be
expected that boys should be inclined to make painful and laborious efforts in the acquisition
of knowledge?
"In the senior division the average daily attendance during the year was 28.30; in the
junior school the average was 53.13.    The total attendance has not varied much from that of
the previous year.    With reference to the demand for increased accommodation, which was
made, I believe, by the trustees, it should be stated that the fluctuations in the attendance have
been considerable.     For months the attendance would be over one hundred; there was at such
times urgent need for enlarged accommodation.    Again, the number attending would suddenly
fall to little more than three-fourths of the former amount.
******
'S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A.,
"Superintendent of Education,  Victoria."
have, &c,
(Signed)
"G. Stainburn,
"Principal.
The results of the year have been satisfactory, and it is a pleasure to be able to state that
the school is in good working order. 51  Vic. Public Schools Report. 223
SPECIAL REPORTS ON COMMON SCHOOLS.
Alberni.
Teacher, Thomas Fletcher, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, Arthur P. Procter.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 20 girls; total, 41.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendanee, 12.02.
Expenditure, $573.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.99.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.74.
Aldergrove.
Teacher, Miss Margaret J. Murchie.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.27.
Expenditure, $112.30.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $5.34.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $7.35.
Ashcroft.
Teacher, J. F. Smith.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.78.
Expenditure, $480.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.08.
Barkerville.
Teacher, W. S. Bannerman, until August 31st, 1886; present teacher, Archibald Dods.
Salary, $100 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 18 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.92.
Expenditure, $1,403.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $46.76.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $61.21. 224.
Public Schools Report.
1887
Beaver Point.
Teacher, William Sivewright.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 16th, 1886; present, 7 boys, 9 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 12 girls ;  total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.06.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.85.
Big Bar.
Teacher, John Gallagher.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 2 girls; total, 7.
Average monthly attendance, 7.
Average actual daily attendance, 5.32.
Expenditure, $201.28.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.75.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $37.83.
The School was closed in October, 1886, on account of inability to maintain the average
attendance required by the School Act.
Bonaparte.
until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss M. J. Norris.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey.
Salary, $60 per month.
Enrolled during the year, 2 boys, 4 girls ; total, 6.
Average monthly attendance, 6.
Average actual daily attendance, 5.98.
Expenditure, $165.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.50.
Cost of each pupil on avarage attendance, $27.59.
During the present year the attendance has considerably increased.
Boundary Bay.
Teacher, F. W. Howay, until June 30th, 18S7 ; present teacher, Miss Florence Butler.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 16th, 1887 ; present 5 boys, 6 girls ; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 12 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.91.
Expenditure, $467.78.
Cost cf each pupil on enrolment, $17.99.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29.40.
A'; examination hold, Miss Annie G. Waller passed tho standard required for admission
to a Hicch School. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. 225
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, W. T. Kinney, until October 24th, 1886; Dixon Irwin, until February 7th, 1887;
present teacher, W. A. Levinge.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected September 15th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 7 girls; total, 17.
„ 16th,    ,, „        11    „     7    „ „    18.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 10 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.97.
Expenditure, $658.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.40.
Cost ef each pupil on average attendance, $38.82.
Burton's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Katherine Todd, until February 28th, 1887; Captain L. Thompson, until
June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss Melrose Dockrill.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 4th 1887; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 11 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.70.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $43.54.
Cache Cheek (Boarding School).
Teacher, R. M. Clemitson, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Joseph Irwin.
Matron, Mrs. R. M. Clemitson, until June 30th, 1887; present matron, Mrs. J. Irwin.
Salary of Teacher, $75 per month.
Salary of Matron, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 19th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 14 girls; total 24.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 15 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.27.
Expenditure, $1,700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $54.84.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $76.33.
At the close of the school-year, the resignation of Mr. R. M. Clemitson was accepted.
The loss of the services of this gentleman, who for so many years proved not only a
successful instructor, but during that time had shown an active interest in the cause of education, is a matter of regret.
Mr. J. Irwin has received appointment as successor.
The affairs of this institution having been for several years managed by but two trustees,
thrpe additional members were appointed at the beginning of the present year, thus constituting a Board of five Trustees. 226
Public Schools Report.
1887
Cadboro.
Teacher, Miss Mary Williams.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 10th, 1886; present, 6 boys, 11 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 23 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 2l.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.37.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $41.64.
Canoe Pass.
Teacher, F. W. Howay, until October 14th, 1886; M. Beattie, until   May  26th,   1887;
present teacher, M. McKinnon, M. A.
Salary $50 per month.
Inspected, May 16th, 1887; present, 4 boys.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 15 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.48.
Expenditure, $451.10.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.71.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $43.04.
Cedar Hill.
Teacher, D. E. Kerr, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Robert Landells, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, September 10th, 1886; present, 14 boys, 12 girls; total, 26.
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 30 girls; total, 56.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.10.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.57.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29 12.
On examination held, Misses Esther Pollock and Mary Todd passed the standard required
for admission to a High School.
Cedar (North).
Teacher, Miss Jennie Ramsay.
Salary, $55 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 21 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.02.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.50.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.79. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 227
Cedar (South).
Teacher, Miss M. F. Halliday, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, J. P. McLeod, B. A.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 13 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.21.
Expenditure, $628.70.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.78.
Centreville.
Teacher, J. P. Johnston.
Salary, $80 per month.
Examined May 2nd, 1887; present, 20 boys, 24 girls; total, 44.
Enrolled during the year, 41 boys, 34 girls; total, 75.
Average monthly attendance, 59.
Average actual daily attendance, 45.54.
Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $21.96.
At examination held, Miss Fannie McCutcheon obtained the percentage necessary for
admission to a High School.
Cheam.
Teacher, Mrs. H. Gillanders, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss M. L. Kipp
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 2nd, 1887; present, 19 boys, 10 girls; total, 29.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 22 girls; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 36.
Average actual daily attendance, 25.43.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.55.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $25.17.
Chemainus.
Teacher, S. G. Lewis.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 17th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 2 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 7 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.06.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.66.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $57.86. 228
Public Schools Report.
1887
Chilliwhack.
Teacher, A. H. Gillanders until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, E. J. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 2nd, 1887; present, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 22 girls; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.81.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.84.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $35.93.
At  examination   held  Master  Edward  Allen  Wells  passed   the  standard required for
admission to a High School.
Clinton.
Teacher, Miss Ella B. Shaw, until November 30th, 1886; Miss Gertrude Clarke, until
June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey.
Salary, $60 per month.
School not in session, on occasion of visit, August 16th, 1886.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 7 girls; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average daily attendance, 8.81.
Expenditure, $612.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $40.80.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $69.46.
Clover Valley.
Teacher, Robie L. Reid, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, J. A. McLean.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 17th, 1887; present, 7 boys, 7 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 13 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.49.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.44.
Colwood.
Teacher, A. M. Bannerman, until August 31st, 1886; present teacher, J. J. Bannerman.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected April 15th, 1887; present, 6 boys, 7 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.21.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.09.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.41. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 229
Comox (North).
Teacher, Miss M. F. Halliday, until August 7th, 1886 ; present teacher, John Mundell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 27th, 1886 ; present, 9 boys, 9 girls; total, 18.
September 28th, 1886 ; present, 11 boys, 10 girls ; total, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 18 girls ; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.26.
Expenditure, $591.30.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15 16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $41.46.
Comox (South).
Teacher, Miss Mary Heard, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, Miss M. Butler.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 24th, 1886 ; present, 3 boys, 6 girls; total,   9.
Sept. 29th, 1886 ; present, 9 boys, 9 girls; total, 18.
Sept. 30th, 1886 ; present, 9 boys, 9 girls; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 13 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.49.
Expenditure, $618.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $37.50.
Courtenay.
Teacher, J. D. McMillan, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss Grace Halliday.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 27th, 1886 ; present, 6 boys, 5 girls; total, 11.
Sept. 28th, 1886; present, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 7 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.80.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.68.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.23.
Cowichan.
Teacher, E. J. Campbell, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss E. E. Sylvester,
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 27th, 1887 ; present, 7 boys, 4 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 10 girls ; total 29.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 9,96
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $64.25. 230
Public Schools Report.
1887
Cowichan (South).
Teacher, John R. Scott, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, Miss Annie Munro.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 26th, 1887 : present, 9 boys, 6 girls ; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 11 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.12.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.K0.
Craigflower.
; present teacher, A. M. Bannerman.
Teacher, John Mundell, until August 31st, 1£
Salary, $65 per month.
Inspected, September 9th, 1886; present, 13 boys, 7 girls; total, 20.
April       13th, 1887 ; present, 15 boys, 5 girls ; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 15 girls ; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.05.
Expenditure, $820.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $35.57.
Denman Island.
Teacher, Miss Mary L. Harding, until December 31st, 1886; present teacher, Miss Ella
Coghlan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected. Sept. 29th, 1886 ; present, 3 boys, 9 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 4 boys, 11 girls; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.57.
Expenditure, $615.80.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $41.05.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $53.22.
Departure  Bay.
Teacher, Miss Sophie E. Lindsay.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 22nd, 1886 ; present, 6 boys, 6 girls ; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 16 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.23.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.37. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 231
Esquimalt.
Teacher, Miss Nellie Wolfenden, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, D. Jones.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, September 9th, 1886 ; present, 28 boys, 21 girls ; total, 49.
Examined, April       14th, 1887 ; present, 21 boys, 15 girls ; total  36.
Enrolled during the year, 37 boys, 30 girls; total, 67.
Average monthly attendance, 48.
Average actual daily attendance, 39.21.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.13.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $22.44.
Gabriola (North).
Teacher, Miss E. S. Bell, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, Miss Mary Clunas.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 21st, 1886 ; present, 8 boys, 6 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 9 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10,68.
Expenditure, $619.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $34.40.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $57.96.
Gabriola (South).
Teacher,  Alexander Shaw,  until  September 30th,   1886 ;   present teacher,  Miss Sara
Preston.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 21st, 1886 : present, 5 boys, 13 girls; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 16 girls ; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.03.
Expenditure, $617.41.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.69.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.38.
Hall's Prairie.
Teacher, J. C. McLennan, until June 30th, 1887 ; present teacher, W. J. Mufford.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 13 girls; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.39.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.86.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.39. 232
Public Schools Report.
1887
Hope.
Teacher, Miss A. J. McDougall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected August 25th, 1886; present, 6 boys, 7 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 25 girls ; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance,  13.78.
Expenditure, $628.38.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.53.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.60.
Kamioops.
Teacher, E. S. Wood.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected August 20th, 1886; present, 8 boys, 11 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 39 boys, 39 girls; total, 78.
Average monthly attendance, 42.
Average actual daily attendance, 32.40.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $8.97.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $21.60.
Lake.
Teacher, William Tomlinson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected October 27th, 1886; present, 8 boys, 5 girls; total, 13.
April 18th, 1887; present, 9 boys, 5 girls; total, 14.
May 13th, 1887; present, 10 boys, 6 girls; total, 16.
Examined February 25th, 1S87; present, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 7 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.12.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.68.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.80.
At examination held, Misses Sarah E. Lindsay and  Helen  Stevens passed the standard
required for admission to a High School.
Langley.
Teacher, Robert J. Plaxton.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected May 18th, 1887; present, 9 boys, 6 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 13 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.90.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $58.91. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 233
Lillooet.
Teacher, Walter Hunter, B.A., until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Robert G. Gordon.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected August 17th, 1886; present, 4 boys, 7 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 10 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.51.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $66.03.
Lulu.
Teacher, O. D. Sweet, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss Lillie Fowler.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 18 girls; total 37.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.34.
Expenditure, $684.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.51.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $51.34.
Lytton.
Teacher, D. W. Gillies, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, John R. Scott.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected August 23rd, 1886; present, 11 boys, 6 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 7 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.56.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.40.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.84.
At examination held, Miss Nellie Lytton Buie passed the standard required for admission
to a High School.
Maple  Bay.
Teacher, H. W. Graves, until August 31st, 1886; present teacher, Miss I. M. F. Barron.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected April 28th, 1887; present, 3 boys, 5 girls; total, 8.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.50.
Expenditure, $606.67.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.57.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $57.78. 234 Public Schools Report. 1887
Maple   Ridge.
Teacher, Paul Murray.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected August 26th, 1886; present, 16 boys, 11 girls; total 27.
May 6th, 1887; present, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 31 boys, 28 girls; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 30.58.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.91.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.77.
Mayne Island.
Teacher, W. H. Phelps.
Salary, $55 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 9 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.38.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.43.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.67.
At a special examination, Master John Doran passed the standard required fer admission
to a High School.
Metchosin (including Rocky Point).
Teacher, J. J. Bannerman, until August 31st,  1886; Fred. J. Amery,  until  June  30th,
1887; present teacher, H. A. Ross.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected April 15th, 1887; present, 7 boys, 2 girls; total 9.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.11.
Expenditure, $744.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $37.20.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.23.
Moodyville.
Teacher, Miss M. Kirkland, until October, 1886; present teacher, Miss A. S. M. Charlton.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined August 27th, 1886; present, 4 boys, 12 girls; total 16.
May 20th, 1887; present, 7 boys, 10 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 16 girls; total, 41.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.52.
Expenditure, $645.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.73.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $33.04.
On examination, Miss Inez Rebecca Smith passed the standard required  for admission to
a High School. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 235
Mount Lehman.
Teacher, Miss Ella Coghlan, until  December 31st,   lfc86;   present teacher,   Miss  M.  L
Harding.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 16 girls; total 34.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.08.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.82.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.44;
Mud Bay
Teacher, R. S. Hanna, until April 16th, 1887;    R.   G. Gordon,  until June,  30th,   1887;
present teacher, J. C. McLennan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 17th, 1887; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 13 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.99.
Expenditure, $634.99.
Cost of each pupil on enrolmeet, $25.40.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.96.
Nicola.
Teacher, Miss J. C. Douglas, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss A. L. McQueen.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 18 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.20.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.92.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $43.21.
Nicola Valley.
Teacher, Miss E. A. Jamieson.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.17.
Expenditure, $747.76
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $46.73.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $66.94 236 Public Schools Report. 1887
North Arm.
Teacher, Miss M. M. Harding.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 15 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.40.
Expenditure, $506.66.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.11.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $32.90.
North Thompson.
Teacher, Miss M. R. Dallas.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected August 21st, 1886; present, 10 boys.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 3 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.58.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $34.54.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $55.96.
Okanagan.
Teacher, Thomas Leduc, until October 17th, 1886; present teacher, Fred. J. Watson.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 9 girls; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.06.
Expenditure, $733.60.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.20.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $60. S3.
Oyster.
Teacher, James Dougan, Jr.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 18th, 1886; present, 12 boys, 5 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.82.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.31. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 237
Port Moody.
Teacher, D. J. McDonald, until April 10th, 1887; G. M. Dockrill, until June 30th, 1887;
present teacher, G. W. McRac.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined August 26th, 1886; present, 14 boys, 11 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 35 boys, 30 girls; total, 65.
Average monthly attendance, 41.
Average actual daily attendance, 30.30.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.77.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $23.10.
On examination, Miss Wilhelmiua Dockrill passed the standard required for admission to
a High School.
Prairie.
Teacher, Mrs. A. McKee.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 17th, 1887; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 13 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.51.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.77.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.76.
Priest's Valley.
Teacher, R. S. Hanna.
Salary $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 5 girls; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.87.
Expenditure, $220.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.66.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $18.53.
Quamichan.
Teacher, Mrs. A. Monk, until Juno 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss M. F. Halliday.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected April 27th, 1S87; present, 2 boys, 13 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 19 girls; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.60.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.88.
Cost of each pupil en average attendance, $47.94. 238 Public Schools Report. 1887
Quesnelle.
Teacher,   Miss Alice  Northcote  until  June  30th,   1887;   present   teacher,   Mis    Nettie
Dockrill.
Salary, $75 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 11 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, i2.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.08.
Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $55.55.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $99.20.
Revelstoke
Teacher, Miss L. M. McAlpine
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.30.
Expenditure, $325.16.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.12.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance $31.57.
The school has not as yet been re-opened during the present year.
Round Prairie
Teacher, Thomas Leduc.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 7 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.46.
Expenditure, $547.10.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.35.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.74.
Saanich (North).
Teacher, H. J. Rossiter, B.A.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected October 28th, 1886 ; present, 9 boys, 14 girls; total, 23.
Examined April 19th, 1887; present, 11 boys, 25 girls; total. 36.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 30 girls; total, 47.
Average monthly attendance, 39.
Average actual daily attendance, 29.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.72.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $30.34. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 239
Saanich (South).
Teacher, Roderick L. Fraser.
Salary, $80 per month.
Inspected October 28th, 1886; present, 20 boys, 16 girls; total, 36.
Examined April 20th, 1887; present, 18 boys, 14 girls: total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 21 girls ; total, 50.
Average monthly attendance, 40.
Average actual daily attendance, 32.84.
Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $30.45.
At examination held,  Misses Alice Haldon, Emma Turgoose, and  Master Marmaduke
Reynard passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Saanich (West).
Teacher, George H. Sluggett.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected October 27th, 1886; present, 12 boys, 9 girls; total, 21.
Examined April 18th, 1887; present, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 13 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average daily attendance, 19.48.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.71.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.01.
Shawnigan.
Teacher, James A. Hoy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected April 26th, 1887; present, 13 boys, 5 girls; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 9 girls; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.67.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on em-olment, $18.82.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $40.84.
Shuswap Prairie.
Teacher, James C. F. Metcalfe, until June 30th, 1887; present teacher, Miss Emily Crease.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 9 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.31.
Expenditure, $747.13.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $43.95.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $72.46. 240 Public Schools Report. 1887
Somenos.
Teacher, Miss Jeanie W. Blair.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected April 28th, 1887; present, 7 hoys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 8 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.94.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.83.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.45.
Sooke
Teacher, Miss Margaret Jennings.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 18 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.65.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.93.
Spallumcheen.
Teacher, Daniel Rabbitt, until April 15th, 1887; present teacher, D. J. McDonald.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 11 girls; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.74
Expenditure, $754.25
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $47.14.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $70.22.
Act.
Spence's Bridge.
Teacher, Thomas Clyde.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 4 boys, 5 girls; total, 9.
Average monthly attendance, 7.
Average actual daily attendance, 6.30.
Expenditure, $90.96.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.10.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $14.43.
This school was opened under authority given by sub-section 5 of section 7 of the School 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 241
Stave River
Teacher, Miss A. S. Howay, until March  31st, 1887; G. W. McRae, until June, 30th,
1887; present teacher, M. Beattie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 4th and 5th, 1887 ; present, 8 boys, 6 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 11 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.77.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $50.11.
St. Mary's Mission,
Teacher, J. A. Catherwood.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 4th, 1887 ; present, 7 boys, 5 girls ; total, 12
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 9 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.55.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $50.99.
Sumas.
Teacher, John A. McLeod.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined May 3rd, 1887; present, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 18 girls; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendanee, 18.73.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.59.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $37.37.
Trenant.
Teacher, Alexander Gilchrist.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 16th, 1887; present, 16 boys, 11 girls; total, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 31 boys, 14 girls; total, 45.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.65.
Expenditure, $624.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.88.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.79. 242 Public Schools Report. 1887
Vesuvius.
Teacher, Raffles A. R. Purdy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 17th, 1886; present, 12 boys, 10 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 11 girls ; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.09.
Expenditure, $640.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.77.
Williams Lake.
Teacher, William Manson.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 5 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.12.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $44.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $72.60.
Yale.
Teacher, Joseph Irwin, until October, 1886; present teacher, W. T. Kinney.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined August 24th, 1886 ; present, 17 boys, 14 girls ; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 30 girls ; total, 58.
Average monthly attendance, 34.
Average actual daily attendance, 27.15.
Expenditure, $795.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29.28.
York.
Teacher, Miss Bertha Grant, until December 31st, 1886; present teacher, William Blair.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 14 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.36.
Expenditure, $555.39.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.21.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $44.93. 51  Vic. Public Schools Report. 243
PROVINCIAL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE.
The third annual meeting of the Provincial Teachers' Institute was held in Victoria in
July, 1887.
The Young Men's Christian Association kindly placed their rooms at the disposal of the
Institute.
The attendance of teachers and others interested in the cause of education was larger
than on any previous occasion.
The practical benefits to be derived from these annual conventions cannot be overestimated.
Although the great majority of our teachers take an active interest in the work of the
Institute, yet it is a matter of regret that some of the staff (among them those who have had
little experience in the art of teaching) neglect the opportunities afforded of improving themselves as instructors by attending these annual meetings.
Trustees may rest assured that the teacher who is not sufficiently alive to the responsibilities of his position as to use every opportunity at his command to add to his knowledge of
the profession, is not only unworthy of the position he holds, but will, without doubt, prove
to be a professional fossil.
The following report was forwarded to this department by D. E. Kerr, Esq., Secretary:—
"Victoria, September, 1887.
" Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the following report of the Third Annual Meeting of
the British Columbia Teachers' Institute.
" I have, <fec,
(Signed)        "D. E. Kerr,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B.A., "Secretary.
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria.
"First Session—Wednesday Afternoon.
"The Vice-President, Mr. D. Wilson, B. A., took the chair at 2:30 p. m. Prayer was
offered by the Rev. D. Fraser, M. A.
" This session was chiefly occupied with the enrolment of members, receiving of reports
and election of officers.
" The Treasurer, Mr. R. L. Fraser, read his report, which showed a balance on hand of
$34.50.
" The following officers were duly elected for the ensuing year :—
"S. D. Pope, B.A., Superintendent of Education President.
" Miss A. D. Cameron, Victoria 1st Vice-President.
" R. L. Fraser, Saanich    2nd ,,
" A. Gilchrist, Trenant 3rd „
" D. E. Kerr, Victoria Secretary.
" Miss C. W. Forrest, Victoria   ; Corresponding Secretary
"J. J. Bannerman, Craigflower Treasurer.
" Miss A. C. Gowen and Mr. D. Wilson, B. A., were elected as additional members of the
Committee of Management.
" It was decided that the next meeting of the Institute should be held shortly after the
close of the school-year. An attempt to change the place of meeting resulted in leaving that
matter to be dealt with by the Executive Committee.
" Meeting adjourned. 244 Public Schools Report. 1887
"Second Session—Wednesday Evening.
" The President, Mr. Pope, took the chair at 7.30 P. M.
"Mr. W. Hunter, B.A., was introduced by the President, and gave a very instructive
address on 'Methods of Teaching Arithmetic' The speaker thought that the work done in
this subject by a large number of the schools was too mechanical, and that teachers hurried
over the subject without sufficient explanation or review.
" After a few remarks on the same subject by Messrs. Sivewright and Levinge, ' The
Requirements and Trials of Teachers' was dealt with by Mr. J. F. Smith, who considered
that the frequent examinations to be undergone by teachers are indeed to be counted among
their trials, and are quite unnecessary. The subject of writing, he considered, should not
receive that attention which was at present given to it.
" Mr. Smith's paper was severely criticised by Mr. Thain and others.
"After a recitation by the Secretary, the Institute adjourned.
"Third Session—Thursday Morning.
"The 1st Vice-President, Miss A. D. Cameron, called the Institute to order at 9.30 a.m.
" Mr. W. C. Coatham, of New Westminster, being introduced, read a very instructive
paper on 'First Steps in Reading,' making particular reference to the value of the Phonic
System.    The blackboard was freely and cleverly used in dealing with the subject.
" Mr. W. T. Kinney urged that a too close adherence to this method would necessitate
the employment of a greater amount of time than is required by the Word Method.
"Mr. Coatham, in reply, showed that the use of the Phonic Method resulted not only in
an actual saving of time, but aided greatly in teaching spelling and proper articulation.
"Mr. D. Wilson, B. A., of New Westminster, then read a paper on 'Vocal and
Physical Training.' The necessity and value of such training were clearly set forth, and a
brief outline given of the salient points in these subjects. Complimentary reference was made
to the fact that our educational authorities had already recognized their value by authorizing
suitable text-books on these branches.
" A humorous recitation by Captain L. Thompson called forth great applause, and on
motion the Institute adjourned.
" Fourth Session—Thursday Afternoon.
"The President took the chair at 2 p. m., and introduced Mr. W. Sivewright, who read
an interesting paper ©n 'Object Lessons.' Their educational value was dwelt upon, and the
outlines of a lesson, very neatly placed on a large chart, served to illustrate the plan on which
such lessons ought to be prepared.
" Messrs. Kinney, Levinge, Jones, and Wilson commented favorably on the paper. Mr.
Wilson showed that object lessons could only bo of educational value when possessing the
element of continuity and steady progress in a definite direction.
" Mr. R. A. Anderson followed with an excellent paper on ' The Teacher's Side of the
Question.' This paper set forth the many duties and responsibilities of the teacher, and
proved that he certainly did not belong to the leisure class.
"Permission having been granted, Mr. Davis, an agent for a physiological chart or
manikin, proceeded to unfold the chart and explain its uses in teaching elementary physiology
and anatomy.
"The chart was highly approved of by the majority of the members, and the wish
expressed that the Educational Department would see fit to introduce these or similar charts
into the schools of the Province.
"Resolutions were passed fixing the membership fee at $1 for the first year, and 50 cents
for each subsequent year; and fixing the time when newly elected officers shall take charge
of the affairs of the Institute. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 245
"A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the following for a very libsral reduction of
fares made to teachers attending the Institute:—Capt. Jno. Irving, Manager of the C. P. N.
Co; J. H. Turner, Esq., of the P. N. Co.; F. Barnard, Esq., of the Stage Line; H. Abbott,
Esq., Manager of the C. P. R. Co.; and Hon. J. A. Mara, M. P.
" A similar vote was given to the proprietors of the Philharmonic Hall and the Y. M. C. A.
for the free use of their respective halls.
"The meeting adjourned after listening to a well rendered recitation by that talented
elocutionist, Miss A. D. Cameron.
"Fifth Session—Thursday Evening.
" Closing Exercises.
"The exercises of the fifth session of the Institute took place in the Philharmonic Hall,
and brought to a close a series of most interesting and profitable meetings. The large hall
was crowded with teachers and citizens.
" The President, Mr. Pope, occupied the chair, and seated with him on the platform were
the Hon. Jno. Robson, Minister of Education; E. C. Baker, Esq., M. P.; Ven. Archdeacon
Scriven, and Rev. D. Fraser, M. A.
" A practical but most interesting lecture on ' Electricity as applied to the Telegraph and
Telephone' was given by R. B. McMicking, Esq.
"A stirring and eloquent address was delivered by the Hon. the Minister of Education,
followed by the Ven. Archdeacon Scriven, Rev. D. Fraser, M.A., and E. C. Baker, Esq., M. P.,
who each spoke of the pleasure it afforded him to observe the interest taken by the teachers in
these meetings with the view to a better knowledge of their profession, which, in the end,
would redound to the educational welfare of the Province.
"An essay, 'Should a young lady be admitted into the teaching profession?' read by Mr.
D. Wilson, B. A., was at once cleverly replied to by Miss A. D. Cameron, in her essay entitled
' Man has no place in the school-room.' Much merriment was indulged in by the audience
over these amusing productions.
" A talented local elocutionist, Mr. Wm. H. Whyte, gave a recitation in his usual finished
style.
" The musical part of the programme was again under the skilful management of R.
Offerhaus, Esq., who was ably assisted by Misses Horton, Dobbs, Forrest, and Gowen.
(Signed)        "D. E. Kerr,
" Secretary."
Branch Institutes.
The Branch Institutes, whose meetings are held in Victoria, New Westminster, and
Nanaimo, have accomplished good work in the past, and there is every reason to believe
that the enthusiasm shown by the teachers at the several meetings held in each city augurs
well for improvement in methods of instruction in the schools.
The following are the present officers of these Institutes:—
Nanaimo :—
E. B. Paul, M.A., President ;
Geo. Stainburn, B.A., Vice-President;
John Shaw, Secretary ;
Miss A. F. Gardiner, Corresponding Secretary.
New Westminster :—
David Wilson, B.A., President;
H. M. Stramberg, B.A., Vice-President;
W. C. Coatham, Secretary ;
Miss E. Rogers, Corresponding Secretary.
Messrs. A. Gilchrist and G.  M.  Dockrill, additional members of Executive
Committee. 246 Public Schools Report. 1887
Victoria :—
R. Ofierhaus, President ;
Miss A. D. Cameron, Vice President
J. A. Halliday, Secretary.
The festivities incident to the celebration of the Jubilee Year occuring in the last week
of June, and the Rules and Regulations requiring that the semi-annual examinations of the
Public schools be held during that week, the following circular was issued :—
" Circular.
'•Education Office,
"Victoria, May 23rd, 1887.
" In view of the fact that the Fiftieth Anniversary of the accession of Her Most Gracious
Majesty the Queen falls within the last week of the school-year, and in order to afford the
opportunity to all children attending the Public Schools of the Province to participate in the
celebration of this auspicious occasion, it is hereby ordered that the semi-annual public
examination be held in each school on Friday, June 17th.
" Provided, however, that in the Cities of Nanaimo, New Westminster, and Victoria the
public examinations shall be held as follows :—
"Wednesday, June 15th, Girls' Schools.
"Thursday, June 16th, Boys' Schools.
" Friday, June 17th, High Schools.
" The examinations of Ward Schools shall be held during the forenoon of each of the
above-mentioned days.
(Signed)        "S. D. Pope,
" Superintendent of Education."
The subject of Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene having been added to the prescribed
course of study, " White's Physiological Manikin" has been supplied to each of the High
Schools and Graded Schools of the Province. This anatomical chart cannot but prove of
valuable assistance to the teacher in imparting instruction in this important branch of
education, but will materially lighten the task of the pupil.
The propriety of placing this subject upon the curriculum of studies to be taught in the
schools was under the consideration of the Department for a considerable time, and it is
gratifying to note that the prescribing of the same as a compulsory study has met with very
general approvaL
The thanks of this Department are due, and are hereby tendered, to the following medical
gentlemen for the valuable services rendered by them to the cause of education in delivering
lectures in the school-room on this subject:—
Dr. G. L. Milne, Victoria;
Dr. W. J. McGuigan, Vancouver ;
Drs. Davis & Prseger, Nanaimo;
Dr. E. Furrer, Kamloops. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. 247
More attention should be given by teachers to the preparation of the monthly reports to
parents required by the School Act. A correct report of the work of the pupil during the
month cannot be made except by the use of daily marking. Results obtained at weekly or
monthly examinations held cannot be said to be a true statement of the progress of the pupil
for the month.
It is scarcely necessary to remark that the utilizing of the services of pupils in preparing
these reports is wholly unwarranted, and would appear to be an attempt at evasion of official
duty.
As a Provincial Roll of Honor is annually given in each school for deportment, it is my
duty to state that in order to secure uniformity in the awarding of these cards of merits, credits
given for the same should be based entirely on tlin pupil's conduct while in attendance, and
that the deducting of deportment marks as a punishment for non-attendance, except in cases
of truancy, is in every way unjustifiable.
At the beginning of the present school-year, D. Wilson, Esq,, B. A., late principal of the
Boys' School, New Westminster, received the appointment of Inspector of Schools.
The gentleman brings to the discharge of his important duties a well-stored mind, as well
as many years of successful experience in the profession.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. POPE, B. A.,
Superintendent of Education. c. Public Schools Report. 1887
property, which has been acquired or given for Public School purposes in such District, and
shall have power to acquire and hold as a Corporation, by any title whatsoever, any land,
movable property, or income for school purposes, and to apply the same according to the terms
on which the same were acquired or received ; to do whatever they shall judge expedient with
regard to the building, repairing, renting, warming, furnishing and keeping in order the District
School-house or houses, and the furniture and appendages belonging thereto, and the School
lands and enclosures held by them; to visit, from time to time, each School under their
charge, and to see that it is conducted according to the authorized regulations, and that such
School is duly provided with a register; to see that no unauthorized books are used in the
School, and that the pupils are duly supplied with a uniform series of authorized text books ;
to exercise all the corporate powers vested in them by this Act; to cause to be prepared and
read at the annual meeting of their District their annual school report for the year then
terminating; and such report shall include, amongst other things, a full and detailed account
of the receipt and expenditure of all School moneys received and expended in behalf of such
district, for any purpose whatever, during such year ; to prepare and transmit annually, on or
before the fifteenth clay of July, a report to the Superintendent of Education, signed by a
majority of the Trustees, and specify therein :
(1.) The whole time the School in their District was kept by a qualified Teacher, during the
year ending the 30th day of June :
(2.) The amount of money received for the School District, and the manner in which such
money has been expended :
(3.) The whole number of children residing in the School District over or under the age of
six years, and under eighteen ; the number of children taught in the school or schools
respectively in such District, distinguishing the sexes, and the average attendance of
pupils during the year :
(4.) The branches of education taught in the school, the number of pupils in each branch,
the text books used, the number of Public School examinations, visits and lectures, and
by whom made or delivered, and such other information as may be required :
(5.) The uses to which the School buildings and lands have been applied during the year,
and the damage arising therefrom or the revenue derived therefrom:
Appointment and Dismissal of Teachers.
37. The Trustees of any School District shall, from time to time, select and appoint (from
amongst those persons properly qualified) the Teacher or Teachers in the School District of such
Trustees, and may remove and dismiss such Teacher or Teachers upon giving at least thirty days'
notice to the Teacher or Teachers cf such intention of removal and dismissal, and the reasons
therefor.
Dismissals to be Reported.
38. The Trustees shall forthwith report to the Superintendent the removal and dismissal of
such Teacher or Teachers, with the reasons for such removal and dismissal.
Selection of Site for School in Rural Districts.
39. No steps shall be taken by the Trustees of any Rural School District for procuring a
site on which to erect a school-house, without calling a special meeting of the voters of their
District to consider the matter; and in case of a difference of opinion, as to the site of the
schocl-house, between a majority of the Trustees and a majority of the voters in such District,
at such special meeting, each party shall choose an arbitrator, and the Superintendent of Education, or, in case of his inability to attend, any person appointed by him to act in his behalf, shall
be a third arbitrator, and such three arbitrators, or a majority of them, shall finally decide the
matter.
Holding School in Scattered Districts.
40. Whenever, from the scattered nature of the population in any School District, the
Trustees shall think it advisable to have the School of such District held part of the day, week,
or year in one part of the District, and during the remainder of the day, week, or year in
another part of such District, they shall have power to order the same to be done by the Teacher
or Teachers in such District; and shall have power, in place of both such schools, to locate one
school in such a central position as shall enable the greatest number of scholars to be benefited
thereby, or to close one of such two schools. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. ci.
Teachers' Certificates.
Teacher to give Proof of Moral Character.
41. No certificate shall be given to any person aa a Teacher who does not furnish satisfactory proof of good moral character.
Rules Regulating the Granting of 1' eachers' Certificates.
Certificates of qualification shall be granted according to the following regulations :—
(1.) For a temporary certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward
an application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher:
(2.) For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 30 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and
40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination
for that class and grade:
(3.) For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and
50 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination
for that class and grade :
(4.) For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of
the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Third Class Certificates,
and not less than 30 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the subjects of
examination peculiar to that class and grade, and 50 per cent, of the total number
of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and grade:
(5.) For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade B.,
Certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the
subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade, and 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and
grade:
(6.) For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of
the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade
A, Certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination
peculiar to that class and grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks
attached to the subjects of examination for that class and grade:
(7.) For a First Class, Grade A., Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for First Class, Grade B,
Certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination
peculiar to that class and grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks
attached to the subjects of examination for that class and grade:
(8.) Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate,
in force on July 1st, 1888, shall be renewable from year to year by the Examiners
until July 1st, 1893, on the application of the holder of any such certificate, provided the applicant has been employed as a teacher during some portion of the twelve
months immediately preceding the date of application for renewal :
(9.) A Third Class, Grade B, Certificate shall be deemed good for one year, a Third
Class, Grade A, for two years, a Second Class, Grade B, for three years, and a Second
Class, Grade A, for five years after their respective dates.
Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate,
issued after July 1st, 1888, shall be valid for life, or during good behavior.
Every certificate of qualification obtained at any examination shall be signed by the
Superintendent of Education and by at least one Examiner, and shall be countersigned by the
Provincial Secretary.
Teacher must hold Certificate.
42. No person shall be appointed as a Teacher in any Public School, unless he shall hold
a First, Second, or Third Class Certificate, or a Temporary Certificate of Qualification. cii. Public schools Report. 1887
Public School Teachers and their Duties.
Defines Duties of Teachers.
43. It shall be the duty of every Teacher of a Public School—
(1.) To teach diligently and faithfully all the branches required to be taught in the School
according to the prescribed rules and regulations.
(2.) To keep the daily, weekly, and monthly registers of the School.
(3.) To maintain proper order and discipline in his School, according to the authorized
forms and regulations; and to send to the parent or guardian of each pupil a monthly
report of the progress, attendance, and punctuality of such pupil.
(4.) To keep a visitors' book (which the Trustees shall provide) and enter therein  the
visits made to his School, and to present such book to such visitor, and  request  him
to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
(5.) At all times, when desired by them, to give to Trustees and  visitors  access  to the
registers and visitors'  book appertaining to the  School,  and upon his leaving the
School to deliver up the same to the order of the Trustees.
(6.) To have at the end of each half-year, public examinations of his School, of which he
shall give clue notice to the Trustees of the School, and through his pupils  to  their
parents and guardians.
(7.) To furnish to the Superintendent  of   Education   monthly,   or  when  desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected with
the operation of his School, or in anywise affecting its interest or character.
(8.) To verify, by affidavit, before any Justice of the Peace, the correctness of such
returns as the Superintendent of Education may, from time to time, require to be so
verified.
(9.) To give at least thirty days' notice to the Trustees of his or her intention of resigning.
Salaries to be paid Monthly.
44. The salaries of all Public and High School Teachers shall be paid monthly, direct
from the Provincial Treasury.
Compulsory Clauses.
Compulsory Education.
45. Every child, from the age of seven to twelve, inclusive, shall attend some School, or
be otherwise educated for six months in every year; and any parent or guardian who does not
provide that every such child under his care shall attend some school or be otherwise educated,
shall be subjected to the penalties hereinafter provided by this Act.
Procedure on non-compliance with 'Section Jf5.
46. It shall be the duty of the Trustees of every Public School, or of the Superintendent
of Education, or any person authorized by them or him, after being notified that the parents
or guardians of any child continue to neglect or violate the provisions of the forty-fifth section
of this Act, to make complaint of such neglect or violation to a Magistrate or Justice of the
Peace. And it shall be competent for the Police Magistrate of any city or town, and for any
Magistrate or Justice of the Peace in any town or School District where there is no Police
Magistrate, to investigate and decide in a summary manner upon any such complaint made by
the Trustees, Superintendent of Education, or any person authorized by them, against any
parent or guardian for violation of said forty-fifth section of this Act, and to impose a fine not
exceeding five dollars for the first wilful offence, and double that penalty for each subsequent
offence ; which fine and penalty shall be enforced as provided in the fifty-third section of this
Act.
Excuses for not attending School.
47. It shall be the duty of the Police Magistrate, or any Magistrate or Justice of the
Peace where there is no Police Magistrate, to ascertain, as far as may be, the circumstances of
any party complained of for not sending his child or children to some school, or otherwise
educating him or them; and he shall accept any of the following as a reasonable excuse :— 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. ciii.
(1.) That the child is under instruction in some other satisfactory manner.
(2.) That the child has been prevented from attending School by sickness, or any una void *
able cause.
(3.) That there is no Public School open, which the child can attend, within such distance
not exceeding three miles measured according to the nearest passable road  from the
residence of such child.
(4.) That such child has reached a standard of   education of   the same or of  a greater
degree than that to be attained in such Public School.
General Provisions.
All Schools Non-sectarian.
48. All Public Schools established under the provisions of this Act shall be conducted on
strictly secular and non-sectarian principles. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no
religious dogma or creed shall be taught. All persons interested in education shall be school
visitors.
Clergymen and Trustees not to be Teachers, &c.
49. No Trustee shall hold the office of Teacher within the District of which he is a
Trustee: Provided always, that no clergyman of any denomination shall be eligible for the
position of Superintendent, Teacher or Trustee.
Control of School Lauds and Buildings.
50. School buildings and school lands shall be under the contr-ol of the Lands and Works
Department. But no Public School Reserve shall be alienated without the consent of the
Trustees of the School District in which such Reserve is situate.
Penal Clauses.
Penalty for making False Declaration.
51. Any person wilfully making a false declaration of his right to vote shall be guilty of
misdemeanor, and, on a summary conviction thereof before any Justice of the Peace, shall be
sentenced therefor to imprisonment for any period not exceeding thres months, or to a fine not
greater than one hundred dollars.
Penalty for disturbing school.
52. Any person who wilfully disturbs, interrupts, or disquiets the proceedings of any school
meeting authorized to be held by this Act, or any school established and conducted under its
authority, or interrupts or disquiets any Public School by rude or indecent behavior, or by making
a noise either within the place where such school is kept or held, or so near thereto as to disturb
the order or exercises of such school, shall, for each offence, on conviction thereof before a Justice
of the Peace, on the oath of one credible witness, forfeit and pay, for Public School purposes, to
the School District within which the offence was committed, such sum not exceeding twenty
dollars, together with the cost3 of conviction, as the said Justice may think fit.
Penalties how recoverable.    May be levied by distress.
53. All fines, penalties, and forfeitures mentioned in this Act may be sued for, recovered,
and enforced, with costs, by and before any Police Magistrate, Stipendiary Magistrate, or Justice
of the Peace having jurisdiction within the School District in which such fine or penalty has been
incurred; and if any such fine or penalty and costs be not forthwith paid, the same shall, by and
under the warrant of the convicting Justice, be enforced, levied, and collected, with costs of
distress, and sale of the goods and chattels of the offender', and shall by such Justice be paid over
to the Treasurer of the School District; and in default of such distress, such Justice shall, by his
warrant, cause the offender to be imprisoned for any time not exceeding thirty days, unless the
fine and costs, and the reasonable expenses of endeavoring to collect the same, be sooner paid.
Public Boarding Schools.
Trustees not to exercise their powers with respect to Boarding Schools.
54. The Trustees of any School District created under this Act shall not have, exercise, or
perform, with respect to any Public Boarding School within their District, any of the rights,
powers, or duties given, conferred, or imposed by this Act. civ. Public Schools Report. 1887
Appointment and designation of Trustees of Boarding Schools.
55. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall, upon the establishment of any Public Boarding School by the Government within the Province, appoint three or more persons to be Trustees
of such Boarding School, and such Trustees shall be a Corporation under the name of " Tho
Trustees of the [naming the title] Boarding School."
Duties of Trustees of Boarding Schools.
56. It shall be the duty of such Trustees to appoint one or more of themselves to be Secretary and Treasurer to the Corporation, who shall give such security as may be required by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, for the correct and safe-keeping and forthcoming, when called
for, of the papers and moneys belonging to the Corporation, and for the correct keeping of a
record of their proceedings in a book procured for that purpose, and for the receiving and accounting for all school moneys which shall come into his hands, and for the disbursing of such moneys
in the manner directed by the majority of the Trustees. It shall be the duty of the Trustees to
take possession and safe custody of the Boarding School buildings, and of the furniture and
grounds belonging thereto, and keep the same in good order and repair when deemed by them
requisite; to furnish and warm the buildings when necessary; to pay the servants or employes
of such school; to visit the school from time to time, and see that no unauthorized books are used
therein, that a register is duly kept, and that the school is conducted according to the regulations
duly prescribed; to see that the pupils are supplied with a uniform series of authorized text books,
sanctioned by the Superintendent of Education; to exercise all the corporate powers vested in
them by this Act; to see that proper and healthful board and lodging are furnished and supplied
for the scholars; to prepare and transmit annually, on or before the 15th day of July, a report to
the Superintendent of Education, signed by a majority of the Trustees, and shall specify therein—
(1.) The amount of money received for such school, and the manner in which such money
shall have been expended :
(2.) The whole number of children residing at such school:
(3.) The branches of education taught in the school, the number of pupils in each branch,
the text books used, the number of Public School examinations, visits, and lectures, and
by whom made or delivered, and such other information as may be required.
Board, &c, of children.
57. Such Trustees shall make by-laws fixing the fees to be paid for the board, lodging, and
other necessaries (if any) of the children, and the manner and time of payment of such fees, and
shall have power to sue for, recover, and receive the same.
Such Trustees to hold office during pleasure.
68. Such Trustees shall hold office at the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
and upon a vacancy occurring by death, resignation, removal, or otherwise, the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council shall, from time to time, as occasion shall require, appoint a person or persons to fill such vacancy or vacancies.
Appointment and dismissal of Teachers and employes,
59. Such Trustees shall, subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Education, have
the power of appointing (from amongst persons properly qualified) the Teicher or Teachers in
such Boarding School, and also of dismissing them, and shall also have the power of appointing
and dismissing the servants or employes engaged or employed at such Boarding School, and of
fixing the amount of salary or wages to be paid to such servants or employes.
Contracts of Trustees.
60. All agreements or contracts made between the Corporation and any person shall be in
writing, and shall be signed by the Secretary of the Corporation as such, and by the other contracting party. Such signature of the Secretary shall be sufficient, and shall have the same legal
effect as if the Seal of the Corporation were attached to any document so signed.
Short Title.
61. This Act may be cited for all purposes as the "Public School Act, 1885," [as amended
in 1887]. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report.
PART II.
STATISTICAL   RETURNS. 11.
Public Schools Report.
1887
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Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
[These are defined in the ''"Public School Act, 1885."]
Tho following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of trustees:—
1. Trustees carmol give authority to teachers to violate tho Rules and Regulations in any-
particular.
Appointment of Teachers.
2. Notice of appointment of a teacher to a school should be given him in writing, such
notice specifying the day on which his duties as teacher commence. Trustees cannot appoint
as teacher a person who does not hold a certificate from the Educational Department of this
Province.
Dismissal of a Teacher.
3. Notico of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in writing, at least thirty
clays before such dismissal is to take place.
Superintendent of Education to be notified of appointment or dismissal of Teacher.
4. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher must be forthwith transmitted to
the Superintendent of Education, with the date on which the appointment or dismissal takes
effect. In case of removal and dismissal of the teacher, the trustees must forthwith report to
the Superintendent the reasons for such removal and dismissal.
Care of School-house.
5. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should be to see that tho
school-house is kept in good repair. He should see that the windows are properly filled with
glass; that at the proper season the stove and pipe, or fireplace, are in good condition, and that
suitable wood or coal is provided; that the desks and seats are in good repair; that the outhouses are properly provided with doors and kept clean; that the blackboards are kept painted,
the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided necessary for the comfort of tho
pupils and the success of the school,
Use of School-house.
6. No public school-house or school-plot, or any building, furniture, or other thing pertaining thereto, should be used or occupied for any other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of the district, without the express permission of tho trustees as
a corporation, and then only after school hours and on condition that all damages be made
good, and cleaning and sweeping properly done.
The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees. He has no authority
to use the school-house other than as directed by them, or to make use of it at any other time
than during school hours without their sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at
once deliver up the school-house key to them.
Expenses of School.
7. It is the duty of tho trustees to decide what incidental expenses they shall incur for
their school, but they are required to submit such matters (Public School Act, 1885, sec. 7,
sub-sec. 3; Revenue Act, 1879, sec. 36), to the Government for approval
Extract from "Revenue Act, 1S7D."
"3G. Before an account is paid by the Deputy Treasurer, or finally placed to the credit of a Sub-
Accountant, or any other person, in repaymi nt of an advance, or in accounting for any portion of revenue by
charging the amount to the head of service, the Auditor must examine the account and endorse thereon the
head of service, number of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initiab
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been issued."
June, 1879.
The annual reports required of Trustees must be received at Education Office before
vouchers for the incidental expenses of schools will be certified. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. Ii
APPENDIX D.
Chapter I.
Course of Study prescribed for Graded and Common Schools.
Reading, Writing, Spelling, Dictation, Mental Arithmetic, Written Arithmetic, Geography,
English Grammar, English History, Canadian History, Composition, and Letter Writing,
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
The following subjects may be taught:
Book-keeping; Drawing; Mensuration; Algebra; and Euclid.
Chapter II.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to a High School.
1. Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly tho ordinary words in the Fifth Reader and
Spelling Book.
2. Reading.—To read correctly and intelligently any passage in the Fifth Reader.
3. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
4. Arithmetic.—To have a good general knowledge of numeration, notation, the four
simple and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple interest
and percentage, compound interest, and discount.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To be able to solve, mentally, any ordinary problems.
6. Gram/mar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions, and to be ablo
to analyze and parse any ordinary sentence.
7. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of tho earth's planetary relations, of the
general principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe, Asia,
Africa, America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of that of the
Dominion of Canada.
8. English History.—To know the different periods and outlines of English History.
9. Canadian History.-—To have a knowledge of the outlines of Canadian History.
10. Composition.—To be able to write a letter correctly as to form and punctuation, and
to write a brief composition on any simple subject.
11. Anatomy, Physiology, aud Hygiene.—To have a general knowledge of the subject.
Chapter III.
Course of Study in HiGn Schools.
English Course.—All subjects prescribed for Graded and Common Schools.
Commercial Course.—Book-keeping—Single and Double Entry—including Banking,
Commercial Correspondence, Commercial Law, &c, together with all subjects prescribed for
the English Course, and other subjects in which candidates for First Class, Grade B, Certificates
are examined.
Classical Course.—Latin, Greek, French, together with all subjects in which Candidates
for First Class, Grade A, Certificates are examined. lii. Public Schools Report. 1887
Course of Study in the Victoria High School—Junior Division.
English Language.—Review of elementary work in orthography, etymology, syntax, and
analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose; composition,
including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and abstracts of passages in
readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style; reading; dictation; and
elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation of selected passages from standard
authors.
2. Mathematics:—
(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound  rules, vulgar and decimal fractions,
proportion, interest, percentage in its various  applications, square root  and cube
root.
(6.) Algebra, including elementary rules,  factoring, greatest common measure, least
common  multiple, square root,  fractions, and  simple  equations of one, two and
three unknown quantities.
(c.) Euclid, Book I., with easy exercises.
(d.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines,'and areas of plane figures.
(«.) Natural Philosophy (Statics), including properties of matter, composition and
resolution of forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers.
3. Modern Languages:—French—grammar and exercises, and elementary reader.
4. Ancient Languages:—
(a.) Latin—Grammar and exercises
(b.) Greek—Grammar and exercises (optional).
5. History:—
(a.) Outlines of Canadian History.
(6.) Leading events of English History.
(c.) Roman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire more
particularly.
7. Book-keeping and Writing :—
(a.) Single Entry and principles of Double Entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. (a.) Drawing (Linear).
(b.) Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition,
rendering of poetry into prose, abstracts of selected passages, critical reading of portions of
the works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style.
2. Mathematics:—
(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(6.) Algebra. Quadratics, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers.
(c.) Euclid. Books I., II., III., IV; definitions of Book V., and Book VI., with
exercises.
(d.) Trigonometry.    Plane Trigonometry.
(e.) Mensuration.     Volumes of solids and areas of surfaces, and surveying. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. liii.
(f.) Natural Philosophy. Pressure of liquids, specific gravity and modes of determining it; the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing pump, air
pump, statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics.
3. Modern Languages.—French—Grammar   and  exercises;  La   Fontaine,  Les  Fables
Livres I. et II.; Voltaire, Historie de Charles XII., Livres I. et II.; Corneille, Le
Cid.
4. Ancient Languages :—
(a.) Latin—Prose composition, Caesar, De Bello Gallico, Books I. & II.; Virgil, -<Eneid,
Books I. & II.; Horace Odes, Books I. and III.
(J.) Greek—Grammar and Prose Composition ;   Xenophon,  Anabasis, Books I. <fc II.;
Homer, Iliad, Books I. & II. (optional).
5. History :—
(a.) Canadian History.
(b.) English History.
(c.) Roman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the reign of
Romulus Augustulus.
(d.) Grecian History.
(«.) Ancient History.
6. Geography—Ancient and Modern.
7. Book-keeping and Writing:—
{a.) Single and double entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music—Elements of Music.
9. Optional Subjects :—
Botany. Astronomy.
Zoology. Rhetoric.
Geology. General History.
Chemistry. English Literature.
Education.
Chapter IV.
1. The course of study outlined for the Victoria High School must be used as a guide in
the High Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster.
Chapter V.
Regulations for Admission, Etc., into a High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers, may
be admitted to enter a High School as pupils without being required to pass the usual entrance
examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to a High School, the aggregate of his
marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the subjects of
examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject. Candidates will not
be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected to
additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper. liv. Public Schools Report. 1887
4. Those passing the entrance examination and failing within one year to avail themselves
of instruction in a High School, shall be required to pass another examination before admission,
and pupils of a High School who have not been in attendance for two years, shall not be
admitted without re-examination.
5. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from a Public School to a
High School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
6. Pupils on entering a High Sshool may for the first six mouths receive instruction in
the English Course only, but after that period must take either the Commercial Course or the
Classical Course.
7. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of pro
ficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with reference
to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may have been in such
class or division.
8. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils in a
High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
9. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any portion of
such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into a High Sshool except by the authority
of the Trustees, given in writing; and the names of all such absentees shall be forwarded by
the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination at the
close of each half-year. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. Ux.
APPENDIX G.
Medalists for 1887.
The medals presented by His Excellency the Governor-General were, on result of written
examinations, awarded as follows :—
1. Arthur E.  Haynes, Silver Medal, presented for competition  in the   Victoria High
School.
2. James Rankin, Bronze Medal,  presented  for competition in the New  Westminster-
High School.
3. Miss Minnie M. McDonald,  Bronze  Medal, presented for competition  between  the
Boys' School and the Girls' School, Victoria.
4. John Guest, New Westminster Boys' School, Bronze Medal, presented for competition
between the graded Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to a High School.
Christmas Examinations, 1886.
Graded Schools.
Nanaimo Boys' School.
Walter S. Planta, Charles Van Houten.
Nanaimo Girls' School.
Marion Gordon.
New Westminster Boys' School.
William Galbraith, Henry Edmonds,
Hereward Peele.
New Westminster Girls' ScnooL.
Jane Sophia McMartin, Edith May Robinson,
Annie Ellen Bonson, Helen Homer.
Victoria Boys' School.
Richard Jackson, William A. Kettle,
William Redmond, James Hill Lawson,
William N. Lenfesty, Albert R. Baker,
Joseph W. Wilson, Joseph Alexander McDowell,
Walter T. DeLacy Hutchinson, John Henry Austin,
John Edward Kinsman.
Victoria Girls' School.
Isabella Cathcart, Cora Mary Watson,
Caroline C. Christie, Mary Elizabeth Penwill,
Caroline Jeffrey, Jane Armstrong Herd,
Annie Jane Davey, Ellen Amelia Cusack,
Kate Denny, Eda Newbury,
Edith Frances Richardson.
Wellington Public School.
Elizabeth J. Moffat, Sarah Ramsay. 51 Vic. Publtc Schools Report. lv.
APPENDIX E,
Books Authorized for Use in Public and High Schools.
Gage's First Primer, Part I.
Gage's First Primer, Part II.
Gage's Second Reader.
Gage's Third Reader.
Gage's Fourth Reader.
Gage's Fifth Reader.
Gage's Sixth Reader.
Gage's Practical Speller.
Payson, Dunton, & Scribner's Copy-books.
Gage's Copy-books.
Copy-books without headlines.
Elementary Arithmetic (Kirkland & Scott).
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy).
Mental Arithmetic (J. A. McLellan).
Lovell's First Steps in Geography.
School Geography and Atlas.
Gage's Map Geography (British Columbia Edition).
Swinton's New Language Lessons (Campbell).
Lennie's Grammar.
English Grammar—by Dr. Wm. Smith and T. D. Hall, M. A. (London).
British History (Collier).
British Empire (Collier).
Outlines of General History (Collier).
Public School History of England and Canada—by G. Mercer Adam and W. J. Robertson.
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman).
Book-keeping (Beatty & Claire).
Algebra (Hamblin Smith).
Mensuration (Todhunter).
Pott's Euclid, six books.
Natural Philosophy (Peck's Ganot).
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene—by Edward Playter.
Manual of Hygiene—by Provincial Board of Health (Ontario).
First Book on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene—Calvin Cutter.
Trigonometry for Beginners—by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics—by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics—by J. Hamblin Smith
Elementary Dynamics—by Wormell.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
Ancient Geography (Pillans).
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric.
The Structure of English Prose—J. G. R. McElroy.
Ancient History (Schmidt).
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
Science   Primers—Introductory,   Chemistry,   Physics,   Physical   Geography,   Geology,
Astronomy, Physiology, Botany.
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam).
Elementary Chemistry—by Thomas Kirkland.
Freehand Drawing (Walter Smith).
Botany—Spotton, Parts I. & II.
Zoology—Handbook of Zoology (Sir J. W. Dawson, F.R.S).
Geology—Introductory Text Book (Dr. David Page). Ivi. Public Schools Report. 1887
Astronomy—Science Primer (J. Norman Lockyer).
,, —Manual of Astronomy (Rev. Sam'l Haughton, D.C.L).
English Literature—History of English Literature (W. F. Collier, LL.D).
Smith's Smaller Latin Grammar.
Bryce's First Latin Book.
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold).
Principia Latina, Part I. (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin.
Riddle's Latin Dictionary.
Curtius' Greek Grammar.
Bryce's First Greek Book.
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold).
Initia Graaca (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek.
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon.
Fasquelle's Shorter Course, French.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
Historie de Charles XII. (Voltaire).
Lc Cid, Corneille.
Physical Culture—by E. B. Houghton.
Common School Education, by James Curric (for the use of Teachers).
Art of School Management (Baldwin). „ „ 51  Vie
Public Schools Report.
Ivii.
APPENDIX F.
 o	
List of Certificated Teachers.
First Class, Grade A.
Stainburn, George, B. A., Cantab, 1880.     Renewal, 1887.
Johnston, J. P., Ic81.    Renewal, 1887.
Berry, Mrs. (Alice Howay), 1882.    Renewal, 1887.
Muir, John N, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1884.    Renewal, 1887.
Stramberg, Hector M., B. A., Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1884.    Renewal, 1887.
Wilson, David, B. A., University of New Brunswick, 1885.    Renewal, 1887.
Howay, Frederick W., 1885.    Renewal, 1887.
Reid, Robie L., 1885.    Renewal, 1887.
Paul, Edward B., M. A., University of Aberdeen, Scotland, 1886.    Renewal, 1887.
Hunter, Walter, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1886.    Renewal, 1887.
Anderson, John, B. A., University of New Zealand, 1886.    Renewal, 1887.
Rossiter, Henry J., H. A., University of Toronto, 1886.    Renewal, 1887.
Landells, Robert, B. A., Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1887.
McKinnon, Michael, M. A., University of Halifax, 1887.
Gordon, Robert George, 1887.
First Class, Grade B.
Kaye, James,
1880.
Renewal, 1887.
Halliday, James A.,
JJ
JJ
Offerhaus, R.,
Lewis, S. G.,
JJ
Murray, Paul,
1882.
JJ
Dods, Archibald,
1883.
Cameron, Miss A. D.
Horton, Miss Lucretia,   „
Forrest, Miss C. W.,
1883 & 1884. .,
Gillies, Daniel W.,
1884.
Babbitt, Daniel
Anderson, Robert A.
Sluggett, George H.,
JJ
Bell, Miss Emelene,
Phelps, William H.,
JJ
JJ
Jones, David,
Thain, Joseph H.,
JJ
JJ
Wood, E. Stuart,
1885.
Fraser, Roderick L.,
McLennan, John C,
Gardiner, Miss Abbie F., „
Gilchrist, Alexander,
Wood, William M.,
)»
JJ
McLeod, John A.,       1885.
Kinney, William T.,        „
Bryant, Miss Maria,        „
Coatham, William C, 1886.
Kerr, Daniel E., „
Purely, Raffles A. R, „
Bannerman, Alex. M., „
Armstrong, Miss F. E. „
Plaxton, Robert J., „
Offerhaus, Mrs. Mary A., „
McDonald, Donald J.,     „
Dockrill, George M.,    1887.
Irwin, Joseph, ,,
Sylvester, Miss E. E., „
Rope, Miss J. M. H., „
Leduc, Thomas, „
Rogers, Miss Ellen, „
Lee, Miss Alice G., „
Nicholson, Thomas, „
Shaw, John, „
Watson, Frederick J., „
McRae, George Wallace, „
Campbell, Eli J., „
Renewal, 1887.
Second Class, Grade A.
Williams, Miss Mary, 1885.
McLellan, Mrs. (Ella B. Shaw),
Armstrong, Miss F. Ella, „
McDonald, Mrs. J. A. (Maud Kirkland), „
McDougall, Miss A. J., 1886.
Harding, Miss Mary L., „
Tomlinson, William, 1887.
Dougan, James, Jr., „
Kipp, Miss Mary L,
Davidson, Miss Elizabeth A.,
Thompson, Livingston,
Dockrill, Miss Nettie,
Hartney, Miss Margaret,
Gowen, Miss Annie C,
McQueen, Miss Annie L.,
1887. lviii.
Public Schools Report.
1887
Second Class, Grade B.
Gardiner, Miss Emily J.,
Bannerman, A. M.
Barron, Miss L. A.,
McDonald, Donald J ,
Tomlinson, William,
Mufford, William J.,
McKee, Mrs. (A. McCartey),
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,
Campbell, James M.,
Dockrill, Miss Melrose,
Mundell, John,
Smith, John F.,
Doran, Edward F.,
Shaw, John,
Robinson, J amen W.,
Beattie, Matthew,
Levinge, William A.,
Wolfenden, Miss Nellie F. F.,
Pickard, Miss Millie,
Charlton, Miss Alice S. M.,
Clarke, Miss Gertrude,
Blair, Miss Jeauie W.,
Workman, Miss Elizabeth J.,
Mebius, Miss Lucy A.,
Blair, William,
Jennings, Miss Margaret,
Barron, Miss Isabel M. F.,
Sivewright, William,
Lettice, Miss Edith,
Granger, Edwin,
Munro, Miss Annie
1SS5.
188G.
1887.
Murchie, Miss Margaret. J.
Catherwood, John A.,
Scott, John R.,
Ramsay, Miss Jennie,
Keast, Miss Ada,
Butler, Miss Florence,
Christie, Miss Alice,
Robinson, Miss Sarah A.,
Hoy, James A.,
Halliday, Miss Grace,
Todd, Miss Katherine,
Bannerman, John J.,
Metcalfe, John C. F.,
Clyde, Thomas,
Halliday, Miss Marie F.,
Storey, Miss Marcella V.,
Third Class, Grade A.
1887.      Baker, Miss Emily,
Brown, Miss Isabel,
Clunas, Miss Mary,
Coghlan, Miss Ella S.,
Williams, Miss Alice,
Preston, Miss Sara,
Isaac, Miss Harriet,
Lawrence, Miss Mary,
Lindsay, Miss Sophie E.,
Butler, Miss Rosalie M.,
Proctor, Arthur P.,
McLean, John A.,
TniRD Class, Grade B.
1887.     Norris, Miss Martha J.,
Lawrence, Miss Rebecca,
Kirkpatrick, Miss Edith, J.,
Temporary Certificates
Granted on the application of Boards of Trustees.
Hanna, R. S.
Crease, Miss Emily.
McBride, Miss Gertrude.
Manson, William.
Sutherland, James.
Pollard, Miss Annie.
McCutcheon, Miss Fannie (Monitor).
Jamieson, Miss Eleanor A.
Dallas, Miss Margaret R.
Carmichael, Miss Elinor M.
Harding, Miss Margaret M.
Ross, H. A.
Homer, Miss May (Monitor).
Bailey, Miss Adelaide S.
Matheson, Malcolm J.
Fowler, Miss Lillie.
McLeod, John P.
Robertson, Duncan.
Smith, Henry E. L.
Sutherland, Donald W.
Gibson, Miss Mary L.
Bishop, Charles F. (Monitor).
18S7.
1SS7.
1887. Ix. Public Schools Report. 1887
Common Schools.
Lakc f Sarah E. Lindsay,
v   j Helen Stevens.
Lytton Nellie Lytton Buie.
Port Moody Wilhelmina Dockrill.
Special Examinations, 1886.
John Doran, Mayne Island. Millie Pickard, Victoria.
John Hay, Victoria. James Hay, Victoria.
Midsummer Examinations, 1887.
Graded Schools.
New Westminster Boys' School.
John Guest, Eugene Rousseau,
William Simpson, John Kennedy.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Mary Agnes Murray, Gertrude Rose Millard.
Victoria Boys' School.
George Partridge, Allen Francis,
Edward King Brown, Charles Bunting,
Kenneth Muuro, Joseph P. Phillips,
Albert H. Haynes.
Victoria Girls' School.
Minnie M. McDonald, Eliza Jane King,
Emma Heinrich, Jessie M. Stephen,
Susan Eckert, . Elizabeth Horton,
Bessie Sears, Kate C. Houlihan,
Jessie McDonald, Charlotte Cudlip,
Mary Crockford.
Common Schools.
Boundary Bay Annie G. Waller.
_,  ,      „.,, ( Esther Pollock,
Cedar Hill...... •} Mary Todd.
Centreville . . .... ...... -.'. . .Fannie McCutcheon.
Chilliwhack   Edward Allen Wells.
Moodyville    . Inez Rebecca Smith.
( Alice Haldon,
Saanich, South ■ ■. - J. Emma Turgoose,
( Marmaduke Reynard.
Special Examinations, 1887.
Margaret Annie Lennie, New Westminster.
Minnie M. French, New Westminster.
Emma Whitsvorth, New Westminster. 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
lxi.
APPENDIX H.
List cf Members of British Columbia Teachers' Institute, 1887.
1 Anderson, R. A.,
2 Armstrong, Miss F. E,
3 Bailey, Miss A. S.,
4 Bannerman, A. M.,
5 Bannerman, J, J.,
6 Barron, Miss L. A.,
7 Bell, Miss E.,
8 Blair, Miss J. W.,
9 Blair, Wm.,
10 Booth, Miss A.,
11 Boyd, J. C,
12 Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,
13 Cameron, Miss A. D.,
14 Campbell, E.J,
15 Campbell, H. J., B A.,
16 Campbell, J. M.,
17 Carmichael, Miss E.,
18 Carmichael, Miss N.,
19 Catherwood, J. A.,
20 Clark, Miss G ,
21 Clunas, Miss M.,
22 Clyde, Thomas,
23 Coatham, W. C,
24 Coghlan, Miss E,
25 Cook, Miss L.,
26 Dallas, Miss M. R.,
27 Davidson, Miss E. A.,
28 Dockrill, Miss M.,
29 Dockrill, G. M.,
30 Dods, A.,
31 Doran, E. F.,
32 Dougan, Jas, Jr.,
33 Ferguson, J. B.,
34 Forrest, Miss C. W.,
35 Fraser, Rev. D., M. A.,
36 Fraser, R. L ,
37 Gardiner, Miss E. J.,
38 Gardiner, Miss A. F.,
39 Gibson, Miss M.,
40 Gilchrist, A,
41 Gillanders, A. H.,
42 Gillanders, Mrs. A. H.,
43 Gillies, D. W.,
44 Gordon, R. G.,
45 Gowen, Miss A. C,
46 Halliday, J. A.,
47 Halliday, Miss M. F,
48 Hanna, R. S,
49 Hartney, Miss M.,
Victoria.
50
Heard, Miss M.,
Saanich.
5,
51
Horton, Miss L.,
Victoria.
Clinton.
52
Hunter, W., B. A.,
Nanaimo.
Craigflower.
53
Irwin, J.,
Cache Creek.
Colwood.
54
Jamieson, Miss E. A.
Nicola Valley.
Victoria.
55
Jennings, Miss M.,
Sooke.
New  Westminster.
56
Johnston, J. P.,
Centreville.
Somenos.
57 Jones, D.,
Esquimalt.
York.
58
Kerr, D. E,
Victoria.
Victoria.
59
Kinney, W. T.,
Yale.
ii
60
Lawrence, Miss M.,
Wellington.
ii
61
Levinge, W. A.,
Burgoyne Bay.
v
62
Lewis, S. G.,
Chemainus.
Chilliwhack.
63
Mebius, Miss L.,
Nanaimo.
Victoria.
64
Metcalfe, J. C ,
Chilcotin.
Lillooet.
65
Mufibrd, W. J.,
Hall's Prairie.
Victoria.
66
Muir, J. N., B. A.,
Victoria.
j,
67
Mundell, John,
North Comox.
St. Mary's Mission.
68
Murchie, Miss M. J.,
Vancouver.
Kamloops.
69
Murray, P.,
Maple Ridge.
North Gabriola.
70
McDougall,Miss A.J.
Hope.
Spence's Bridge.
71
McDonald, D. J.,
Spallumcheen.
New  Westminster.
72
McKee, Mrs. A.,
Prairie.
Denman Island.
73
McKenzie, John,
New  Westminster.
Victoria.
74
McLean, J. A.,
Clover Valley.
North Thompson.
75
McLennan, J. C,
Mud Bay.
New Westminster.
76
McLeod, J. A.,
Sumas.
Burtons Prairie.
77
McQueen, Miss A. L.
, Nicola.
New Westminster.
78
McSwain, Dr. A.,
Victoria.
Barkerville.
79
Norris, Miss M. J.,
Bonaparte.
Victoria.
80
Offerhaus, R.,
Victoria.
Oyster.
81
Paul, E. B., M. A.,
Nanaimo.
Victoria.
82
Pickard, Miss M.,
Victoria.
jj
83
Phelps, W. H.,
Mayne Island.
jj
84
Pope, S. D., B. A.,
Victoria.
Saanich.
85
Pope, Miss J. M. H.,
j»
Victoria.
86
Purely, R. A. R,
Vesuvius.
Nanaimo.
87
Preston, Miss S.,
South Gabriola.
Aldergrove.
88
Rabbitt, D ,
Spallumcheen.
Trenant.
89
Ramsay, Miss J.,
North Cedar.
Cheam.
90
Reid, Mrs. L. M.,
Victoria.               ;
jj
91
lleece, Miss B.,
Chilliwhack.
Kamloops.
92
Robinson, Miss S. A.
, Victoria.
Lillooet.
93
Robinson, J. W.,
Vancouver.
Victoria.
94
Rotors, Miss E.,
New Westminster
jj
95
Scott, Miss J. A.,
Cedar Hill.
Quamichan.
96
Scott, J. R.,
Lytton.
Vernon.
97
Shaw, A.,
Nanaimo.
Vancouver.
98
Shaw, John, lxii
Public Schools Report.
1887
List of Members of
99 Sinclair, J. W.,
100 Sivewright, Wm.,
101 Sluggett, G. H.,
102 Stainburn, Geo., B.A.,
103 Storey, Miss M. V,
104 Stramberg. H.M.,B.A,
105 Taylor, Mrs. E. A.,
106 Thompson, L.,
107 Thompson, Miss F.,
British Columbia
Teachers' Institute,
1887. —Continued.
Port Hammond.
108 Todd, MissK.,
Victoria.
Beaver Point.
109 Tomlinson, Wm.,
Lake.
Saanich.
110 Ure, Miss C.,
Victoria.
Wellington.
111  Walker, F. G., B.
A.
Victoria.
112 Wall, Miss E.,
Wellington.
New Westminster.
113 Williams, Miss M
Cadboro.
Cedar Hill.
114 Wilson, D., B. A.
Victoria.
Burton's Prairie.
115 WTood, E. S.,
Kamloops.
Saanich.
116 Wright, F. G.,
Victoria. 51 Vic
Public Schools Report.
lxiii.
APPENDIX I.
PROVINCIAL ROLL OF HONOR,  1886-87.
Pupils Accredited by their Teachers with First Rank.
Schoob.
Alberni	
Aldergrovo  . 	
Ashcroft	
Barkerville	
Eeaver Point	
Bonaparte 	
Boundary Bay	
Burgoyne Bay.....   	
Burton's Prairie	
Cache Creek—B'ng. School
Cadboro 	
Canoe Pass	
Cedar Hill   	
Cedar, North	
Cedar, South	
Centrcvillo	
Cheam	
Chemainus	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Clover Valley	
Colwood	
Comox, North      ....
Comox, South	
Courtenay 	
Cowichan	
Deportment.
Punctuality & Eegularity.
Augustus Sareault	
William Irvine Vanuetta .
Ida Isabella Kirkpatritk..
Jeanie- Inglis Kelly    	
Clara Paulina MinnioTrage
Mary Walker	
Maria Waller	
Busan Hortl	
Thomas McKamey	
Elizabeth Morgan	
3-eorgo Chapman	
Lottio Williams	
Alice King	
Margaret McKinley	
Louisa Edna Jane Starks .
William Jones	
Mary Matilda Ryder	
William Thomas	
Clarinda E. Stevenson
Henry Koster	
Isabella C. McKenzie
Alice M. M. Wale . ..
Jane Victoria Piercy .
Charles Mathewson .
Louisa Beach	
Susan A. Ryan	
Elizabeth Carter Mollet ..
William Henry Stroebel..
Arthur Webster Haddock.
Mary Amelia Houser	
Alfred Ruckle	
George Walker   ...   	
Minnie Harriet Calhoun ..
Katie Furness	
rrenholmo W. Lyster Fee
Mary Anue Lehman	
Edwin Lee	
Charles Trim  	
Mary King	
William York	
Alexander Stewart	
Alexander Mercer	
Margaret Ednadale Ryder
Mary Windsor	
Catharine Eliza Gibson . ..
James Wesley Hall	
Thomas David Shannon.. .
Ellen G. Williams	
NTellie Milligan	
Emma McDonald	
Kenneth Grieve	
John MearM	
Proficiency.
Alexander John Mollet
Isabella Sophia Vannetta
Ruth Lavinia Haddock
George Walker
George Arthur Elliott
James Veasey
Annie Gordon Waller
Nellie Wilson
Lucinda McKamey
Robert Herbert Clemitson
Edward John Harvey
Sarah Swett
Esther Pollock
Catherine Gordon
Kate Cairns
Fannie McCutcheon
Margaret Banford
John Windsor
Edwin Allen Wells
Florence Chenhall
Francis J. McKenzie
Alice Jones
George Finley
Richard Anderton
j Wc3ley Piercy
I Alexander 0. Blyth lxiv.
Public Schools Report.
1887.
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Robert Alexander Dougan
Louisa Carter	
Harry Helmcken Parker..
Frederick Anthony Porter
Denman Island   	
Mary J. McFarlin	
Isabella Graham
Departure Bay	
Mabel Grace Bunting ....
Elise Le Bceuf	
Edward Dillon	
Laura Cameron
Gabriola, North	
Robert Hoggan	
Sarah Jane Hoggan
Jane Edgar	
Thomas Degnen
George Mo M. Thrift
Bamuel John Ryder	
Ida Hart
Lake              	
Louisa Margaret Yates
Leonard Dodd	
Maud Clarke
Sarah E. Lindsay   	
Charles B. Jone3
Arthur Maxwell .        ....
Millie Eva Plaxton	
William Maxwell
Jefferson Davis Roberts ..
May Vermilyea	
William Les Dickey
James Mellis
Arthur Thomas Seward ..
Rosa May	
Frank Maxwell Stevenson
Harriet Richards	
Arthur Brander Buis
Emily May
Maple Ridge	
Metchosin	
Harriet Isaac
Mary Elizabeth Bennett..
Charles Gibb Field	
James Oscar Heck
Charles E. Whitlaw
A. Whitlaw
,,        Rocky Point...
Not reported.
Alice James	
Lena Elizabeth Randall ..
Eva Alice Springer
Mt. Lehman	
John McCallum	
C. Katie Nicholson
Mud Bay	
Nanaimo :—
Benjamin Johnson	
Agnes Mackay
Janet Blythe "Webb	
Herbert D. R. Stewart
Boys', 1st Division. ..
2nd     „
William Joseph Pollock
Arthur David Morgan	
Alexander Pool
„      3rd      	
Albert George Gartley	
Benjamin Smith
Girls', 1st
„     2nd     „      .   .
Maud McGregor	
Annie J ane Quennell
[sab3lla May McDonald ..
Edith Walkem
„      3rd      „
New Westminster:—
High School	
Lillian Webb
Eva Ellis
Mabel Letitia Millard....
Kathleen Black	
Jair.<» Rankin 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxix.
English History.
1. Who introduced Christianity into England ?    Into Scotland 1    Into Ireland %
2. What was the Heptarchy %
How long did it take to found it %
Who was Vortigern ?
3. Describe the battles fought during the Saxon period.
4. Give date of accession of each Monarch between Richard IT. and Richard III., stating
an important event of each reign.
5. When, where, and between whom was the last battle fought on English ground ?
6. Describe the reign of George III.
7. Give historic reference of—
(a) Long Parliament, (b) Cabal, (c) Worcester, (d) Alma, (e) Plassey.
8. (a) Trace the descent of Queen Victoria from James I.
(6) Give date of her birth, accession, coronation, marriage, and the death of the Prince
Consort. 51 Vic
Public Schools Report.
lxv.
Provincial Roll of Honor.- -Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
New Westminster :—
Boys', 1st Division. . .
Arthur Black	
Charles Shiles	
John Kennedy
„     2nd     „
George Gray 	
Arthur Wellesley Gray.. .
Joseph Greig
3rd     	
Robert Bryce Brown.   .   .
Eugene De Witt
Ella Amy Grant	
Alice May Webster
Marion McMurphy
„     2nd     „
Helen Adeline Ross  ..
S. Estelle Taylor	
Herbert Matthews.
James Malcolm Woodward
May Isabel Magee	
Lctitia Riley
Mary Jane Mitchell   ....
North Arm	
Mayo Lawson
North Thompson    	
John Miller	
Malcolm McAulay
Edmund J. Conway	
Gerald McKee	
Henry A. Porter
Ellen Elizabeth Clarke
Port Moody  	
Gertrude Mary Fales ....
Margaret Jane MeKeo
Edward Houghton
Lucy Kingston
Rebecca McNeill	
Fred Sherman Shepherd..
Quesnelle	
Florence Muriel McAlpine
Margaret Isabella Downey
Saanich, North	
Margaret Maria Brethour.
Nellie Mcllmoyl
Mary Steinberger	
Robert B. Thomson	
David Barry	
Claude H. Butler
Frank Copley
Maria Agnes Cumming ..
Charles Courtney Newhard
Sophie Bethia Ehmcke . , .
Mary Sibyl Brown	
Lucy Marshall Crozier
Laurens Josephine Moren
Spence's Bridge...   	
Stave River	
Robert Oliver	
Noble Oliver	
Sarah Armour
St. Mary's Mission	
Mary Lena Abercrombie..
Hartley Abercrombie	
Ada M. Sollowny
Annie E. Chadsey	
Edna A. Chadsey
Trenant   	
Lincoln McKay	
Chester Wells Wadhams .
■John R. Watson
Vancouver, 1st Division.. I
Isabel McLean	
Hugo Ross.	
Ellen Hart 1 «
lxvi.
Public schools Report.
18S7
Provincial Roll of
Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Vancouver, 2nd Division .
3rd      „
Victoria:—
High School, Sen. Div.
,,           Jun. Div.
Boys', 1st Division...
„     2nd    „
„     3rd     „
„      3rd     ,, (lower]
„     4th      „
„     5th     „
„     Cth     „
„     7th     „      .  .
Girls', 1st     	
„     2nd     „
„     3rd     	
„     4th
„     5th     „
„     Gtb     „      ..
„     7th     	
James' Bay Ward Sch.
Johnson St.        „
Rock Bay          ,,
Wellington, 1st Division .
2nd      „       .
Charlotte Gibson
William H. A. Norton ...
Frank Burgess Gibbs	
Gertrude Hans Withrow .
J. M. Hallio Pope  	
John Campbell McLagan .
iVilliam Cathcart	
Henry Albert McKillican.
Allan John Whittit
Arthur Parker Mansell..
George Frank Van Horst.
Robert Charles Smith	
Arthur Edward Haynes
Richard Brodriek
George Partridgo
Edward D. Carmichael
Alexander T. McPherson
jieorge H. Gall
G:orge Herbert Corder
fames E. Htixtablo
Thomas Douglas Fawcett
Edgar Lionel Fawcett
Minnie M. McDonald
Walter J. Wriglesworth..
Arthur Cox	
Edward Halland Braden .
William H. Coatea	
Stuart Magree Robertson.
Edith Lucy Booth	
Lillian Vance Batnfield ..
Florence Mabel Lettiee...
Alice M. Victoria Askew .
Josephine Jonassen	
Annie Blackbonno   	
May Alberta Giles
Ethel Julia Crockford	
Annie Caldor  	
Caroline Alice Bloomfield
Lillias Edwards
Leilyer Antoinette Felker
Elizabeth Bray
Edna May Turner
Emelita P. Fowler
Pauline Agnes Mansell...
Mary Marmillia Gilchrist.
Will. Hamilton Kinsman.
Charlotte Alice Turner . .
Elizabeth Gillespie	
Hamilton Moffat Hamilton
jeorge Penketh
William Reynolds
Edna Wall
Rae Hamilton	
Gavin Hamilton
Yale	
York 	
Norman S. Fraser
Sarah Moore Campbell.
■
• 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. Ixvii.
APPENDIX J.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION—MIDSUMMER, 1887.
Arithmetic.
1. (a) Simplify
f 5 „* 8*1
Is of Eo)
15       9 J.
(b) Express in Roman Numerals 9897.
2. If 20 horses consume 6 bush. 2 pks. of oats in 8 days, in what time will 32 horses
consume 2| times that quantity ?
3. If 5 men or 7 women can do a piece of work in 37 days, how long will it take 7 men
and 5 women to do a piece of work twice as great?
4. Divide the sum of 476 J, 13f, and 10.375 by .0125.
5. Express .43 of 8s. 3d. as the decimal of .01 of £9.
6. A and B can do a piece of work in 4 hours ; A and C can do it in 33/5 hours ; B and
C in 5x/7 hours.    In what time can A do it alone ?
7. Find the difference between the compound interest and true disccunt on  $5,000  for
2 yrs. 6 inos., @ 8 % per annum.
8. A school rate of 13 mills per dollar produces a tax of $101.40; find the assessed valuo
of tho property.
Mental Arithmetic.
1. How many fathoms in a league? Ans.
2. How many gallons in a pipe? Ans.
3. What will 28 yds. cost @ $2.75 per yard 1 Ans.
4. At $4 per dozen, what will 19 cost? Ans.
5. Divide tho sum of 1| and | by their difference. Ans.
G. If 28 lbs. cost $1.75, what will 8 lbs. cost? Ans.
7. Multiply .001 by 1000 and divide by .01. Ans.
8. What will 890 lbs. of hay cost @ $30 per ton ? Ans.
9. What is the simple interest on $75 for 2 years 11 months @ S %
per annum? Ans.
10. Bought a gold chain 18 carats line, weighing 2 cz. 15 dwts., at
$17.50 per oz.; £nd the cost of the chain ? Ans.
Geocrapiiy.
1. (a) Describe the tropics and polar circles.
(6) How many miles are they apart?
2. Name the principal peak of the highest mountain range in each continent.
3. Locate 5 lakes in Europe, and 5 capes in the Dominion of Canada. 4. (a) Name the 4 largest of the East India Islands.
(6) Give the capitals of the 4 largest of the West India Islands.
5. (a) What separates Russia in Europe from Asia ?
(b) Through what waters would you pass in going from Paris to  Komu '
6. Write the capital of each of the Australian Colonies.
7. Define and locate—
(a) Torres, (/')  Barbadoes,
(6) Taurus, (g) Romania,
(c) Truro, (h) Nassau,
(d) Owen, ' (i) Baikal,
(e) Levant, '       (j) Atacama.
H.   Draw a map of one of the following :—-
Brazil, Arabia, Ireland, or Labrador.
English Grammar.
1.   Write three of each of the following :—-
(a) Abstract Nouns.
(b) Collective Nouns.
(c) Adjective Pronouns.
(d) Adverbs of Time.
2   Write the  possessive singular  and   the  possessive  plural  of   valley,  she,   wife,  thou,
miasma
3. What is an Auxiliary Verb 1    An Irregular Verb ?    A Participle 1    Give examples of
each.
4. Give the principal parts of the verbs sew, strike, drive, fly, knit.
5. (a) Write the 1st person plural of each tense of the indicative mood of the verb "go."
(6) Give the imperative mood and infinitives of the passive voice of the verb " see."
6. Write six rules of syntax, giving a sentence illustrating each.
7. Analyze—
First I would have thee cherish truth,
As leading star in virtue's train;
Folly may pass, nor tarnish youth,
But falsehood leaves a stain.
8. Parse the iirst two lines of extract in preceding question.
Composition.
1. Translate the following into simple English :—
(a) The conflagration extended its devastating career.
(b) They called into requisition the services of a physician.
(c ) Mary was the possessor of a diminutive specimen of the sheep species.
2. What is tautology ? ambiguity ?
3. Distinguish between prose and poetry.
4. Of what use are punctuation marks ?
5. Write a composition on one of the following subjects :—
(a) Agriculture, (d) Honesty,
(6) Mining, (e) Politeness,
(c) Fishing, (f) Victoria. lxx. Public Schools Report. 1837
APPENDIX K.
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATION—MIDSUMMER, 1SS7.
Arithmetic.
1. If *fi of 3/3 of 2| lbs. cost $7 J, what is the cost of 22/n lbs. 1
2. A cistern is filled by two pipes in 18 and 20 minutes respectively, and is emptied by a
tap in 40 minutes; what part of it will be filled in 10 minutes when, all are opened at the
same time ?
3. A and B each lend $248 for 1J years @ 3£ % per annum, one at simple interest, tho
other at compound interest; find the difference in the amount of interest received by them ?
4. What amount of money was invested when the broker's charges ® H % amounted to
$576?
5. Find the alteration in income occasioned by shifting £3,200 stock from the 3 per cents.
@ 86f to 4 per cent, stock @ 114|, brokerage being ^ per cent.
6. Extract the square root of 1.002001, and the cube root of 27054.036008.
7. The sum of two numbers is G5, and the difference of their squares is 975: what aro
the numbers ?
Mental Arithmetic.
1. A has a certain sum of money: B has \\ times as much; both havo
$180.    How much has each? Ans.
2. Four times a number is 15 less than six and a half times the number;
what is the Humbert Ans.
3. If | of a yard cost SO cents, what will | of a yard cost ? Ans.
4. What will 150 yards cost @ $1.49 per yard ? Ans.
5. At 6\ cents for 3 quills, how many can be bought with $2.50 ? Ans
6. What part of a sovereign is 17s. 6o*.? Ans.
7. Bought 1 dozen ducks for $7.50; three dying, I sold the remainder
at the rate of $10.50 per dozen:    What did I gain by the transaction ?        Ans.
8. What is the amount of the following bill:—
50 feet lumber at $25 per M.
80 lbs. hay @ $30 per ton. ? Ans.
9. How many more acres in a mile square than in half a mile square?  Ans.
10. | of 40 is 5/i2"of how many times 10^? Ans.
Mensuration.
1. If a house is 50 feet wide, and the post which supports the ridge pole is 12 feet high
what will be the length of the rafters ?
2. If the bottom of a ladder is placed at a point 14 feet from a house, and the top of the
ladder rests against the house at 48 feet from the ground, and on turning the ladder over to
the other side of the street its top rests at 40 feet from the ground: find the breadth of tho
street. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. lxxi.
3. A room is 22 ft. 6 in. long, 20 ft. 3 in. wide, and 10 ft. 9 in. high: find the cost of
papering the walls, at 20 cents a square yard.
4. A rectangular court measures 63 feet by 36 feet; a path 4 feet 6 inches wide passes
round the court outside of it: find how many bricks measuring 9 inches by 4£ inches will be
required to pave the path.
5. If a cannon ball 3| inches in diameter weigh 6 fts., find the diameter of a ball of the
same metal which weighs 20 lbs.
Algebra.
1. (a) Multiply—
a;2 + 2/s—xy-\-x-\-y- I by-* -J- y — 1.
(5) Divide—
a2-L.a6-L.2ac-262-f-76c-3c  bya-6 + 3c.
2. Resolvo into factors—
(a)a*+ 9ao+20o5
(6)a;2-7a;+44.
(c)3a;2_2a;-5.
(d) 12a;2-14a;+2.
(e) as + 65.
3. Find the G. C. M. or H. C. F. of a1 +67z2+66, and x* -(- 2x' -f 2s=-T-2a:-f 1.
4. Solve the equations—
.     2a:-4    2 - 3x    „
<«> r-7-
(6) l(2x — y)+ 1 = V5(7 + x)
£(3 — 4z) + 3 = A(5</-7).
5. (a) Find the square root of 11 + 6|/2 .
(6) Solve—
a:s-8    „
x = 2,
x* + 5
6. A spent 2s. 60". in oranges, and says that 3 of them cost as much under a shilling as 9
of them cost over a shilling: how many did he buy ?
Geometry.
1. Define postulate, axiom, corollary, perpendicular, and Q. E. F.
2. If at a point in a straight line two other straight lines, upon the opposite sides of it,
make the adjacent angles together equal to two right angles, these two straight lines shall bo
in one and the same straight line.
3. To describe a parallelogram that shall bo equal to a given triangle, and havo ono of its
angles equal to a given angle.
4. If a straight line bo divided into any two parts, the square on the whole line is equal
to the squares on tho two parts, together with twice the rectangle contained by the parts.
5. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure inscribed in a circle are together equal
to two right angles.
6. What is the greatest rectangle that can be inscribed in a circle ? lxxii. Public Schools Report. 1887
Trigonometry.
1. Define trigonometry.
2. Express the tangent of half an angle in terms of the sine and cosine of tho angle.
3. Find A and B from the following equation:—
Sin A + Sin B = 1/2".  )
Sin2 A -f Sin2 B  = 1 J
4. (a) What is a logarithm ?
(6) Show that the tangents of 60°, 45°, and 15° are in arithmetical progression,
5. A man 6 feet high standing at the top of a mast subtends  an angle  whoso tangent
is J/io at a point on the deck 33 feet from the foot of the mast: find the height of the mast.
Natural Philosophy (Statics).
1. (a) What is Matter?
(6) Name the principal properties of matter, giving a short definition of each.
2. (a) What is the rule for finding the velocity acquired by a falling body at the end of
any given time?
(b) How far will a body fall in one minute?
3. Describe the three kinds of levers, giving an example of each.
4. (a) What are the requisites of a good Balance?
(6) What are the methods of testing a Balance?
5. The weights on the extremities of a lever 8 feet long are as 1 to 3.    Find the position
of the fulcrum.
6. If the. radius of the axle be 3 feet, and the radius of the wheel be 9 feet, what power
will be necessary, in order to keep a weight of 12 Bos. in equilibrium?
Book-keeping.
1. Which is the more satisfactory system of keeping accounts,—single entry or double
entry?    Give reasons for answer.
2. Distinguish between real and fictitious accounts.
3. When do you debit the following accounts:- -
(a) Loss and Gain.
(b) Bills Payable.
(c) Stock.
(d) Cash.
(e) Commission.
4. Before closing Merchandise, Real Estate, or other speculative accounts, what must be
first taken into consideration, and what procedure is necessary?
5   Journalize the following:—
Began business with $5,000 cash, of which $500 is borrowed from Bank of British
Columbia on our note @ 60 days.
Brown Bros. & Co. owe us $400 on their note.
Samuel Sims owes us on account $500.
We owe Jones & Cook on our note $200. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. Ixxiii.
Geography.
1. Explain the terms—
(a) Antipodes, (6) Antoeci, (c) Ascii, (d) Solstice, (e) Equinox.
2. In what mountains do the following rivers rise, and into what seas or gulfs do they
flow ?:—
(a) Ebro, (&) Niger, (c) Rhone, (d) Alabama, (e) Fraser.
3. Define and locate—
(a) Guadaloupe, (6) Tokio, (c) Beale, (d) Alsace, (e) Sunda.
4. Name three cities in Japan, and the four largest islands in the South Pacific Ocean.
5. Locate three volcanoes on islands, and three not on islands.
6. If the longitude of Calcutta be 89° east, what is the time in that city when it is noon
with us?
7. Draw a map of the Atlantic Ocean.
English Grammar
1. Write two forms of the plural of each of the following, distinguishing their meanings:
(a) Brother; (6) penny; (c) die; (d) shot; (e) genius.
2. (a) What are abstract nouns?
(b) Form abstract nouns from brief, poor, sheriff, crown, and absolve.
3. Write sentences containing—
(a) A pronoun in the Nominative Absolute.
(b) A noun in apposition.
(c) An adjective modifier of the noun part of the predicate.
4. Correct, giving reasons for corrections—
(a) Every man and boy showed his joy by clapping his hands.
(6) A hot and cold spring were found near each other,
(c) Says I, "To-morrow is Friday."
5. Analyze—
(a) Rich were the sable robes she wore.
(6) Send her victorious,
Long to reign over us,
Happy and glorious,
God save the Queen.
6. Parse selection marked (a) in previous question.
Composition.
1. Explain the following abbreviations:—D.C.L., K.C.B., R.I.P., Mss., Nem. con.
2. In addressing a letter, when is it proper to use Mr., and when Esqr. ?
3. Convert the following sentences into simple, natural English:—
(a) There are some youthful personages whom it always delights you to accompany;
there are others the very aspect of whose facial features superinduces disagreeable
emotion.
(6) Your uncle was evidently laboring under some hallucination.
4. Draw an envelope and address it to the Secretary of your Board of Trustees.
2. Write a composition on one of the following subjects •—
(a) The Advantages of Foreign Travel.
(6) The C. P. R.
(c) The Climate of British Columbia.
(d) The Fatal Explosion in the Coal Mines of Nanaimo.
(e) The Queen's Jubilee. lxxiv.
Public Schools Report.
1887
English History.
1. (a) What was the Witenagemot?
(b) To whom are we indebted for the first outlines of tho House of Commons?
2. Sketch briefly the following:—
(a) The Hundred Years' War.
(b) Tho Thirty Years' War.
(c) The Seven Years' War.
3. In ■whose reign were the most famous discoveries made?   Narno the discoverers.
4. State the most important event in the reign of each of the five Sovereigns who have
reigned the longest.    Give dates of each.
5. Explain, with dates, the following:—
(a) Petition of Right.
(b) Ship Money.
(c) Free Trade.
(d) Chartists.
(e) Septennial Act.
G. Givo historic referenco of—
(a) 1314.
(6) 1416.
(c) 1707.
(d) Bloody Assizo.
(«) Ich Dien.
1.
2.
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
a) What are the essentials of life ?
b) Distinguish between organic and inorganic bodies.
a) What is the difference between bone and cartilage?
b) Name the bones that meet at the elbow and knee.
a) What are the three functions of bones?
6) Name the different kinds of joints.
a) How many muscles in the human body?
o) What is the special function of muscles?
c) What muscle bends your arm at tho elbow?
a) What is digestion?
6) Name the organs of circulation.
c) What are capillaries?
Botany
1. Define root, bud, and leaf.
2. Name the difierent kinds of leaves.
3. (a) Distinguish between petiole and pedum1?,.
(b) Describe the mode of growth of dicotyledonous plants.
4. (a) What are cryptogamous plants?
(6) Name three that your have seen.
5. (a) Analyze a lily.    (Give the names of all its parts.)
(6) Name an aphyllous plant
6. Describe the circulation of sap. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. lxxix.
ENGLisn History.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Friday, July 8th ; 2 to 4.80 p.m.     Total marks, 20'J
1. (a.) Name, with dates, the Tudor Line.
(b.) Give a short account of tho Spanish Armada
2. State the substance of—
(a.) The National Covenant of 1638.
(6.) The Self-Denying Ordinance,
(c.) The Petition of Right.
(d.) What was the duration of the Long Parliament?
Under what circumstances did it come to an end?
3. Why did England quarrel with Holland in the reign of Charles II.?
Describe briefly the war between tho two countries in that reign.
4. What  do  you know   of the relations  between England and Normandy  before tho
Norman Conquest?
5. (a.) What were the Provisions of Oxford ?
(6.) Who was Simon de Montfort, and why is he called tho founder of tho  House of
Commons?
6. What instances are there in our history  of tho deposition of a reigning sovereign?
Give dates.
7. Show genealogically how Queen Victoria inherited the throne of Edward III.
8. Give historic reference of—
(a.) Navarino. (b ) The Lollards.
(c) Hyder AH. (d.) "Killing no murder."
(«.) The Ordainere.
9. (a.) What were the causes of the Crimean War?
(b.) Name the principal battles and opposing generals.
10. (a.) What Sovereigns of England have reigned for 50 years?    Give date3.
(b.) Name ten memorable events in the reign of Victoria.
English Geammar.
Monday, July 11th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. What is the basis of grammar, or the test of correctness in the uso of language ?
2. (a.) State the different ways of distinguishing gender.
(6.) Give the rules for forming the plurals of wharf,  gas, attorney,  ox-cart,  knight-
errant, index, Mr., phenomenon, savant, Mrs.
3   How are pronouns divided 1    Give three examples of each.
4. Name three adjectives that are singular, and three that are plural.
5. Define—
(a.) Conjugation.
(6.) Apposition,
(c.) Defective.
6. (a.) When is the use of the relative that preferable to who or which 1
(b.) Distinguish between a participle and a gerund.
7. (a.) Give the principal parts of cleave, clothe, slit, rive, shear.
(6.) What is the use of the subjunctive mood ? 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxxv.
Roman Histohy.
1. State tho circumstances that led to the First Secession of tho Plebs to the Sacred
Mount (Mons Sacer).
2. Mention two examples of Romans devoting themselves to death for the good of their
country.
3. Givo   historic   reference   of:    (a)   Brutus;   (6) Decemvirs;   (c)  Cineas;   (d)  Cato;
(«) Philippi; (/) Stilicho.
4. State the terms of tho treaty made with the Carthaginians after their defeat at Zama.
5. Briefly sketch the history of Judea under Roman rule.
C. (a) What causes led to tho downfall of the Western Empire?
(6) Assign events to the following:—
509 B. C. 30 A. D.
367    „ 410   „
Vcni: vidi: vici. 476    „
Grecian History.
1. (a) Account for the fact that the Spartans wero a hardy race.
(b) State the advantages that Attica possessed over the other States of Greece.
2. What causes led to the  First and Second Persian Wars respectively?    State battles
and opposing generals in each.
3. What allies supported the Athenians and Spartans respectively in tho Peloponnesian
War?    State the most famous generals on each side.
4. State briefly the character of Socrates, mentioning the charges brought against him
and the manner of his death.
5. (a) What battle brought an end to tho Macedonian Monarchy?
(6) Give historic reference of the following:—
Archons. Retreat cf the Ten Thousand.
480 B. C. 323 B. C
146    „
Music.
1. What is harmony?
2. What is melody?
3. What is the simplest form of harmony?
4. How many intervals are there in an octave?
5. Can intervals be subdivided?
0. What is tho '; Tonic "? (Scale of C.)
7. What is tho " Dominant"? (Scale of C.)
8. If C and E are struck together on Piano (Scale of C) and D and F same key, name tho
minor third.
9. What is the interval from C to D flat called?
10. What is the interval from C to C sharp called?
11. Transpose tho following:— lxxvi. Public Schools Report. 1887
Latin.
1. Give the endings of the genitive and accusative cases, singular and plural, of  the five
declensions.
2. Decline—
(a) liber,  (b) epitome,  (c) poema,  (d) Jupiter,  (e) senatus (us).
3. Compare—
(a) acer, (b) tristis, (c) facilis, (d) inferus, («) malus.
4. Write in full the pluperfect indicative, and subjunctive,  active  and  passive  voices of
audire.
5. Give the principal parts of the following verbs:—
(a) gaudeo, (6) sequor, (c) fero, (d) sum, (e) odi.
6. Translate—
(a) Conscia mens recti famse mendacia ridet.
(6) My country is much dearer to me than life.
(c) Our Father who art in heaven,  hallowed be Thy name.
7. Translate—
(a) Tamen, ut spatium, intercedere posset, dum milites, quos imperaverat, convenirent,
legatis respondit, "diem se ad deliberandum sumpturum ; si quid vellent, ante diem Idus
Apriles reverterentur."
(6) Nee non et varia noctem sermone trahebat
Infelix Dido, longumque bibebat amorem,
Multa super Priamo rogitans, super Hectore multa :
Nunc, quibus Aurora? venisset filius armis;
Nunc, quales Diomedis equi; nunc, quantus Achilles.
Immo age, et a prima die, hospes, origine nobis
Insidias, inquit, Danaum, casusque tuorum,
Erroresque tuos; nam te jam septima portat
Omnibus errantem terris et fluctibus sestas.
8. (a) Parse and scan the first two lines of selection marked (6) in the previous question.
(b) Give reference of Hectore, Filius Auroras, Achilles, Diomedis, Hospes.
French.
1. Write the feminine plural of (a) un, (6) le, (c) ce, (d) mon bon oncle, (e) gras gargon.
2. (a) Write the cardinal numbers between dix and vingt.
(b) Write the ordinals between vingtierne and trentieme.
3. Write the compound tenses, indicative mood, active voice, of chanter.
4. Give the imperative mood and participles, passive voice, oifinir.
5. (a) Corrigez et expliquez—
Ces jeunes et vieux soldats.
(b) Ecrivez cinq lignes sur votre ecole.
6. Traduisez—
Henri VIII., roi d'Angleterre, s'etant brouille avec le roi de France, Frangois Ier,
resolut de lui envoyer un ambassadeur, et de le charger, pour ce prince de paroles fieres et
menacantes: il choisit pour cela un eveque anglais, dans lequel il avait beaucoup de confiance,
et qu'il croyait tres-propre a l'execution de ce dessein. Le pre! at ay ant appiisle sujet de son
ambassade, et craignant pour sa vie, s'il traitait Frangois Ier avec la fierce que son raaitre
exigeait, lui representa le danger auquel il l'exposait, et le pria instamment de ne pas lni donner
cette commission. " Ne craignez rien," lui dit Henri VIII., "si le roi de France vous faisait
mourir, je ferais couper la tete a tous les Frangais qui seraient dans mes etats."—" Je vous
crois, Sire," repondit l'eveque; " mais permettez-moi de vous dire, que de toutes les tetes que
vous auriez fait couper, il n'y en a pas une qui revint si bien sur mon corps que la raienne." 51  Vic.
Public Schools Report.
lxxvi
APPENDIX L.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY,  1887.
Spelling.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Wednesday, July 18th; 9:30 to 11 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. chilblains
2. cajole
3. quoudam
4. caisson
5. plumb-line
6. granary
7. cavalcade
8. cynical
9. creosote
10. hare-brained
11. physique
12. oolite
13. synagogue
14. scintillate
15. supersede
16. exhilarating
17. calomel
18. copperas
19. paralysis
20. parallelism
21. clothes-pins
22. dyspepsia
23. macerate
24. mahogany
25. tyrannize
26. finale
27. intercede'
28. embarrassing
29. empiricism
30. cerements
31. sclerotic
32. eustachian
33. rhetorician
34. vaccination
35. symmetrical
36. chalybeate
37. desiccate
38. reference
39. elucidate
40. Apennines
41. pharmaceutical
42. calcimine
43. sarcophagi
44. celibacy
45. panegyrically
46. pharisaically
47. stalactite
48. vaticinate
49. charivari
50. et cetera (&c.)
Writing.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 12th; 2 to J/, p.m.     Total marks,  100.
1. la.) What are the rules for holding the pen?
(b.) Give tho reasons for these rules.
2. («.) Show the importance of teaching pupils to criticize their own work.
(6.) How would you teach them to do this?
3. Illustrate the benefit of counting in writing exercises.
4. Give the five elements and the six principles of the small letters.
5. Analyze the letters k, p, d, s, also B and Q.
6. What is the proper length of each of the loops and stem letters.
7. What letters and combinations of letters do pupils find special difficulty  in  forming,
and which on this account require, special attention from the teacher?
8. What are the critical points in the formation of the letters f, j, t ? lxxviii. Public Schools Report. 18S7
9. Outline what you would consider a ussful blackboard exersiso on this subject.
10. Write the following as a specimen of penmanship:—
The quality of mercy is not strained;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blessed,
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes;
T'is mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to law and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the fear and dread of kings;
But mercy is above the sceptered sway,
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute of God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likcst God's
When mercy seasons justice.
Geography.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July 9th; 2 to 4-80 p. m     Total mar:s, 200.
1. Define—
(a.) Equinox. (6.) Zone.
(c.) Llanos. (d.) Right Bank of a River.
(e.) Ecliptic.
2. (a.) How much greater is a degree of longitude at the poles than a degree of latitudo
on the equator?    Give reasons for answer.
(b.) Account for the positions of the tropics and polar circles.
3. Locate the following rivers, stating into what salt water oach flows:—
(a.) Irrawady. (b.) Ox us.
(c.) Murrumbidgee. ('/.) Senegal.
(e.) Colorado. (/) San Francisco.
(y) Dal. (/>.) Exploits.
(».) Niemen. (j.) Hamilton.
4   Locate and define—
(a.) Corrie.ntes. (5.) Uppernavik.
(c.) Elburz. (d.) Lepanto.
(e.) Kesho (Hanoi). (/) Christchurch.
((/) Palk. (/*.) Tamatave.
(i.)  Cabes. (j.) Port au Prince.
5. State tho positions of the following, naming them in order from north to south:—
(a.) Kootenai. (b.) Lillooet.
(c.) Port Essington. (d.) Nootka Sound.
(n.) Quesnellemouth.
6. (a.) Name the rivers that flow into Hudson Bay.
(b.) Draw a map of the Pacific Ocean.
7. Name and give the size and population of the largest island.
8. What places have the same longitude as Victoria ?
9. Give the approximate population of the principal cities of British Columbia.
10. State the divisions usually made of mankind, naming two nations belonging to each
division. 8. Define the different kinds of sentences, giving an example of each.
9. Analyze—
They tell us of an Indian tree,
Which, howsoe'er the sun and sky
May tempt its boughs to wander free,
And shoot and blossom, wide and high,
Far better loves to bend its arms
Downward again to that dear earth,
From which the life that fills and warms
Its grateful being first had birth.
'Tis thus, though wooed by flatt'ring friends
And fed with fame (if fame it be),
This heart, my own dear mother, bends,
With love's true instinct, back to thee !
10.  Parse in full, giving rules, the last four lines of the extract in preceding question.
Composition.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 11th; 2.45 to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
Write a Composition on one of the following subjects:—
1. Woman.
2. Man.
3. The Canadian Pacific Railway.
4. Imperial Federation.
5. The Queen's Jubilee.
6. Inventions of The Nineteenth Century.
7. Religion.
8. Dreams.
9. The distinction between man and the lower animals.
Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July 9th ; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1.  (a.) Write in words 15.080400 and 75.2438.
And express in Roman Numerals 19999.
(6.) Find the 29th part of 10 ac.  2 ro. 7 per.  2 yds.
• '  2. What quantity of water must I add to a pipe of wine, which cost $450, to reduce its
price to $2.50 a gallon?
3.  (a.) Simplify—
.75 x. 125 +.90625
2.375-.05
(b.) Find the value in decimals of—
1
3 +
7 +Vi
4. A contractor agreed to make 1000 yards of road in 6 weeks, for which purpose he
hired 60 men, but at the end of 2 weeks he found that he had only 256 yards done: how
many additional men must he employ to finish the work in the stipulated time? 51 Vic Public Schools Report. Ixxxi.
5. A invests $1,830 at Compound interest for 3 years @ 4 % per annum. B invests $1,910
for the same time and at tho same rate, Simple interest. How much does one receive more
than tho other ?
6. If a man receive 4J per cent, interest on his capital by investing In tho 3J per cents.;
what is the price of the stock ?
7. A person invested $50,000 in 3 per cent. Annuities, and the Government offered to
give $550 bearing interest at the rate of 2J per cent, for every $500 of these Annuities, or to
pay the $50,000 in cash on a certain day.
The latter proposal was preferred, and on the money being paid it was re-invested in
Consols at 93.
How much would he have lost in income had he accepted tho first proposal, and what will
he now gain by the new investment ?
8. If I buy 2 tons 3 cwt. 3 qrs. of sugar for £120, and pay £2 10s. for expenses, and then
sell the sugar at four guineas per cwt.; what do I clear per cent.?
9. A & B enter into partnership; A puts in $250 and B puts in $225; at the end of 4
months A withdraws half of his capital, and at the end of 6 months B withdraws one-thirl of
his; C then enters with a capital of $350; at tho end of 12 months their profits are $1,270:
how ought this to bo divided between them ?
10. (a.) By a balance, the arms of which are unequal in length, a parcel weighs 42 lbs. in
one scale, and 38 lbs. in the other : find its true weight.
(b.) A cube contains 56 solid feet, 568 solid inches : find its edge.
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 11th; 2 to 2.45 p. m      Total marks, 100.
1. f of 18 is | of what number? Ans.
2. 7s. 6d. is what part of a sovereign ? Ans.
3. What will 88 yards of silk cost @ $1.87J per yard? Ans.
4. 75 is 33^% less than what number? Ans.
5. If 3.125 lbs   cost $6.25, how many lbs. can bo bought with $9? Ans.
6. At what rate per cent., simple interest, will $12.50 amount to
$22.50 in 5 years? Ans.
7. What will 3,750 lbs. of hay cost @ $25 per ton? Ans.
8. What will it cost to cover the floor of a room 24 ft. by 13J ft.
with carpeting worth $1.25 per yard, and f of a yard wide?        Ans.
9. A pays B $230 as the present value of $300 duo in 5 years.
How much does A gain by the payment, if interest is reckoned
at 5 % per annum? Ans.
10. A man has 5 days' statute labor to perform. Working hours are
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1 hour for noon. A team and plow are
reckoned equal to 2 men, and a team and scraper equal to 3 men.
He commences work with his team on Monday morning, ploughs
the first half day and scrapes the rest of the time. On what
day and at what hour will he be done? Ans. lxxxii. Public Schools Report. 1887
Education and the Art of Teaching.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
7'uesday, July 12th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Distinguish between education and instruction.
(6.) Show that teaching is both a science and an art.
2. (a.) Name some principles relating to class management.
(b.) What should be taken into consideration by the teacher in assigning lessons?
3. (a.) State three objects of school organization.
(6.) Show that Time Tables cannot be stereotyped.
4. (a.) What subjects are considered the proper standards of classification in graded
schools ?
(6.) Is loose classification ever justifiable?
5. State fully how you would explain to a class tho solution of the following:—
(a.) 3003x2050.
(6.) Find the cube root of 10000.
6. (a.) Name the different methods of teaching reading to beginners.
(b.) State which method you prefer, giving reasons.
7. Why should the teacher endeavor to make the school occupations of little children
accord with their natural instincts ?
8. How would you inculcate the following:—
(a.) Respect for superiors.
(b.) High moral principles.
(c.) Patriotism.
9. Name three ways by which you can keep pace with the progress of the times in teaching.
10. (a.) State the conditions for obtaining the certificate for which you have applied.
(b.) What are the qualifications of a voter at School Elections in rural districts and in
city districts.
Book-keeping.
(For First Class, Grade A, and First Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday,  July 6th; 2 to 4-30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Explain tho following terms as used in Book-keeping:—
(a.) Inventory. (b.J Account-Sales.
(c.J Protest. " (d.) Mint.
(e.) Underwriter. (f.) Lloyds.
2. (a.) What is a trial balance ?
(b.) How often should it be taken ?
3. State which terms are preferable, giving reasons for answers:—
(a.) Stock, or Partners' Account.
(b.J Profit and Loss, or Loss and Gain.
(c.) Assets and Liabilities, or Property and Debts.
4. Name the different kinds of liabilities.
5. How should the payee indorse a noto drawn to his order, so as to avoid guarantee of
payment ? 51 Vic Public Schools Report. Ixxxiii.
6. Alfred Smith holds your note, dated February 20th, 18S6, for $500, duo August 23rd,
1887. You pay him to-day $200 with accrued interest @ 8 % per annum, and give him
another note for balance indorsed by Samuel Jone3 and payable at the expiration of sixty days
at the same rate of interest.
Write in full the forms connected with the above.
What becomes of the original note?
7. Show by an example how to average an account.
Trial Balance.
$ 3,000  Stock $11,650
600 Private Account	
7,000, Cash  4,000
4,500 Bank of British Columbia  3,500
978 Bills Receivable       478
564 Bills Payable  964
852 William Potts  252
473 Samuel  Jones  673
10,600   Merchandise  7,600
1,200 B. C. Bank Stock  900
150 Interest  100
290 Commission  190
100 Expense	
$30,307 $30,307
Note.—Merchandise unsold $5,800.
B. C. Bank Stock unsold       500.
Make a Balance Sheet.
Mensuration.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 7th; 2 to 4-30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. The radius of a circle is 25 inches, and the angle subtended by an arc at the centra is
32° 31' 12".4.    Find the length of the arc.
2. The sides of a triangle are 13, 14. and 15 feet. Find the perpendicular from tho
opposite angle on the side of 14 feet.
3. The diagonals of a rhombus are 88 and 234 feet respectively.     Find the area.
4. The radius of a circle is one foot. Find the area of a regular polygon of eight sides
inscribed in the circle.
5. The parallel sides of a trapezoid are respectively 16 and 20 feet, and the perpendicular
distance between them is 5 feet; it is required to divide the trapezoid into two equal trapezoids.
Find the distance of the dividing straight line from the shorter of tho parallel lines.
6. There is a circular fish-pond of 90 feet radius surrounded by a walk 25 feet in breadth.
Find the area of the walk.
7. The sides of a rectangular field containing 27 acres, 1 rood, 8 perches, are as 21 tD 13.
Find the length of the fence which encloses the field.
8. A circle and a regular hexagon have the same perimeter: compare their areas.
9. A field in the form of a parallelogram has a tree planted in the centre. Adjacent sides
14 and 9 perches respectively. Shortest distance from corner to corner across field 8 perches.
Required distance from tree to farthest corner of field.
10. The sides of a triangle are 6, 8, and 10, respectively. Find the differenco between
the diameters of inscribed and circumscribed circles. lxxxiv. Public Schools Report, 1887
Mensuration.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 7th; 2 to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. The radius of a circle is 7 feet; from a point at the distance of 12 feet from the centre
a straight line is drawn to touch the circle : find the length of this straight line.
2. A reservoir is 24 feet 8 inches long by 12 feet 9 inches wide: find how many cubic
feet of water must be drawn off to make the surface sink one foot.
3. A tent is made in the form of a frustrum of a right circular cone surmounted by a
cone : find the number of square yards of canvas required for the tent, supposing the diameters
of the ends of the frustrum to be 28 feet and 16 feet, respectively, the height of the frustrum
8 feet, and the height of the conical part 6 feet.
4. A garden roller of iron is half an inch thick, the length is 30 inches, tho diameter of
the inner surface is 20 inches : find the weight, supposing a cubic inch of iron to weigh 4.562
ounces.
5 Into a conical glass (full of water), whose height is 7 inches and diameter across the
top 6 inches, a sphere of iron is gently let fall, of such a size that the plane of the glass's edge
is tangent to it: how much water will remain in the glass ?
6. The three sides of a triangle are 30, 40, 48: find the segments into which the base is
divided by a perpendicular upon it from the vertical angle.
7. The sides of a rectangle have to each other the ratio of l:j/F; and a perpendicular is
let fall from one of the angles upon the diagonal: find in what ratio the diagonal is divided.
8. The base of a certain prism is a regular hexagon; every edge of the prism measures
one foot: find the volume.
9. A sphere is 90 feet in diameter : find what fraction of tho whole surface will be visible
to an eye placed at a distance of 8 feet from the surface.
10   Supposing the earth to be a perfect sphere, what fraction of its  surface  is  contained
between the equator and the parallel of 60° N. latitude.
Algebra.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) What is the difference between a co-efficient and an exponent?
(b.J What is the reciprocal of a quantity ?
2. If a = 60,   6=10,  c = 6,   and a" = 2, find the  values of—
(a)\/ {Sa - 10 (b - c) d] ;
fi)V {(«-56)2-9(c-a*)}.
3. Divide (a.) 4a63 -4- 51a262 -f 10«4 - 48a36 - 156* by iab - 5a2 + 362
and (b.J ps - q3 + r3 -j- Zpqr by p - q -f- r.
4. Resolve into factors—
(a.) tt2-57i^ + 56.
(b.J c2«"2-Med-180.
(c.J a? + b\
r   a-      vt   ,     i x~a    x~ b (a~l>)2
5. Simplify (a.J  +
x—b    x-a    (x-a)(x-b).
a + b b + c c + a
'       (6 - c)(c - a)+ (c - a)(a - b)+ (a - b){b - c) 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxxxix.
7. Describo Gunter's chain, and Hadley's quadrant or sextant.
8. From the summit of a light-house 85 feet high, standing on a rock, the angle of
depression of a ship was 3° 38', and at the bottom of the light-house the angle of depression
was 2° 43': find the horizontal distance of the vessel and the height of the rock.
9. From a Station 0 near the middle of a field of six sides, ABCDEF, the distances and
angles were measured and found to be respectively as follows:—
AO  . 4315 links, Angle AOB.. 60° 30'
BO.. 2982 „ „ BOC..47°40'
CO..3561 „ „ COD..49° 50'
DO..5010 „ „ DOE..57° 10'
E0..4618 „ „ EOF.. 64° 15'
FO..3606 „ „ FOA    80° 35'
Find the area.
10. Lat. left =^ 20° 40' N., long. left= 178° 14'W.; diff. of lat. 216 miles S., din" of
long. = 420 miles W.    Find tho latitude and longitude arrived at.
Ancient History.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 5th ; 8.30 p. m. to 5 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. With what questions did the Valerio-Horatian Laws,  the Rogations of Terentilius
Arsa, the Canuleian Law, and the Licinian Laws, deal ?
2. Write a brief biography of Fabitis Cunctator, or Pompeius ?
3. Give the dates of the Samnite and Punic wars, and explain why the latter were called
Punic.
4. Give some account of the constitutional changes introduced by Sulla.
5. Name the principal Greek settlements in Italy, and their sites.
6. In what year was Socrates executed, and how, and what were the real causes of his
condemnation ?
7. Give a concise account of the exploits of Agesilaus in Asia.
8. What was the origin of the war between Sparta and Thebes ?
9. How often and when did Epaminondas invade the Peleponnesus ?   What was the
final result of these expeditions ?
10. Give a brief account of the Sacred War and Social War.
11. Show how tho Tyranny of the Four Hundred came to be established at Athens.
English Literature.     (For First Class, Grado A.)
Tuesday, July 5th ; 2 p. m. to 3.80 p. m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Give a brief sketch of the introduction of printing into England.
2. Give a short account of the earliest form of English drama.
3. Whom do you consider the greatest English prose writer ?   Give fully tho reasons for
your answer.
4. Write a short history of the English Bible.
5. Discuss briefly the literary works of Francis Bacon.
6. What effect did Puritanism produce on English literature ? 51 Vic Public Schools Report. lxxxv.
6. Solve the following equations,—
a2c
(a. J   (a + x) (b + x) - a{b + c) = -—■ + x2
b
_ ,    1+x    2 + 3x l+Sx
(b.J = 1-1	
'    '    l-x    2-3*       ^1-3*
(c.J
x-9    x-7    x-9    x—S    x-7    x-S
x — 5    x — 2    ck — 4   x — 5    x—4    x — 2
7. Given (a.J   —      ' =x- y ;—5—- + 2i/=J, to find the values of x & y.
(b.J   abx + cdy = 2; ax — cy = ———- to find the values of x & y.
bd
S. A person after paying an income tax of sixpence in the pound, gave away one-thirteenth
of his remaining income and had £540 left.    What was his original income?
9. A man walks a certain distance; had his rate been half a mile an hour faster, he would
have been 1 \ hours less on the road ; and had it been half a mile an hour slower, he would havo
been 2| hours more on the road.    Find the distance and rate.
10, Fifteen guineas should weigh four ounces ; but a certain parcel of light gold having
been weighed and counted, was found to contain 9 more guineas than was supposed from the
weight, and it appeared that 21 of these coins weighed as much as 20 true guineas. How
many were there altogether?
Algebra.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Wednesday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1.  Simplify—
(a.) 1_ 1 1
1 1     ylxi/z + x + «)'
, i       y
(b.J J5_
abc 3 -a-b - c
I    _L_JL        a + b-c
be    ca    ab
2. (a. J Extract the square root of x°- ix5 + 6k3 + 8x2 + 4*+ 1.
(b.J Extract tho cube root of 1 - 3a + 6a2 - 7a3 + 6a4 - 3a5 + cfi.
3. Solve—
fa)  9      12—lla;      5a:+ 2        8-x       j
£+8z + 20   _12a;-r"30==6a:+15-'3'*   -
(b.J Zx-vly — ixy, 5x + 4y = bxy.
4. Solve—
(a.) x- +1/2 = 68, xy = 16.
(b-) I_i=J_ J _i-l_
x    y    12'aJ"2    2/2 — 144'
(c.J a:*-3a:3 = l-3a;.
5. If I divide a certain number by the sum of its two digits, tho quotient is 6 and tho
remainder 3. If I invert the digits and divide the resulting number by the sum of the digits,
the quotient is 4 and the remainder 9.    Find the number. lxxxvi. Public schools Report 1887
6. A psrson borrows $8,200, and repays it, principal and interest, in two sums of $4,410
at the end of the first and second years; find the rate of interest.
7. From two stations, A and B, 300 miles apart, two trains start at the samo instant;
the train from A reaches B 9 hours after they met, and the train from B reaches A 4 hours
after they met; find the rate of each train.
8. What debt can be discharged in a year by weekly payments in arithmetical progression, the first payment being one shilling and the last £5 3s. ?
9. (a.) What is the sum of the series 1, \, Vi6> <tc, &c, to infinity.
(b.J What is a harmonical progression?
10. On how many nights can a different patrol of 5 men be  drafted  from  a  corps of 36?
On how many of these would any one man be taken (
Euclid.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 7th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Draw a straight line perpendicular to a given straight line of unlimited length, from a
given point without it.
2. If from the ends of one side of a triangle there be drawn two straight lines to a point
within the triangle, these two straight lines shall be less than the other two sides of the
triangle, but shall contain a greater angle.
3. Triangles upon the came base, and between the same parallels, are equal to one another
4. Equal triangles, between the same parallels, aro upon equal bases.
5. Describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a given triangle and have one of its
angles equal to a given rectilineal angle.
G. Describe a triangle that shall be equal to a given rectilineal figure.
7. If a straight line be divided into two equal, and also into two unequal, parts, the
squares on tho two unequal parts are together double of the square on half the line and the
square on the line between the points of section.
8. If a straight line be divided into two equal parts, and also into two unequal parts, the
rectangle contained by the unequal parts together with the squaro on the line between the
points of section is equal to the square on half the line.
9. If two sides of a triangle be produced, the straight lines that bisect the two exterior
angles and the angle contained by the two sides produced pass through the same point.
10. The sum of the perpendiculars drawn from any point within an equilateral triangle
on the three sides is equal to the perpendicular from any of the angular points upon tho
opposite side.
Euclid.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 7th; 10 a.m. to 12.30p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. If at a point in a straight line two other straight lines upon the opposite sides of it
make the adjacent angles together equal to two right angles, these two straight lines shall bo
in one and the same straight line.
2. The complements of the parallelograms which are about the diagonal of any parallelogram arc equal to one another.
3. Describe a squaro that shall be equal to a given rectilineal figure. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. Ixxxvii
4. One circle cannot touch another in more points than one, whether it touches it oxter-
nally or internally.
5. Describe a circle about a given equilateral and equiangular pentagon.
6. Describe a rectilineal figure which shall be similar to one and equal to another given
rectilineal figure.
7. The quadrilateral figure whose diagonals bisect each other is a parallelogram.
8. Half the base of a triangle is greater than, equal to, or less than, the line joining the
middle point of the base and tho vertex, according as tho vertical angle is obtuse, a right
angle, or an acute angle.
9. Given a point and three straight lines, two of which are parallel, to find a point in
each of the parallels that shall be equidistant from the given point, and such that the straight
line joining the points thus found shall be parallel to the other given straight line.
10. To draw a straight line so that the part of it intercepted between one side of a given
isosceles triangle and the other side produced shall be equal to a given straight line, and be
bisected by the base.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Friday, July 8th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.J Define atom and molecule.
(b.J Define and illustrate the following properties of matter:—divisibility, inertia,
elasticity.
2. (a.) Distinguish between adhesion and cohesion.
(b J Define osmose and illustrate the importance of the principla
3. State—
(a.) Newton's three Laws of Motion.
(b.J The Law of Gravitation.
4. (a.J Distinguish a musical sound from a noise.
(b.) What  are  the  laws  which   govern   the production of musical  sounds by the
vibrations of strings?
5. Explain the principle and construction of the dynamos used in electric lighting.
6. Resolve a force of 12 lbs, into two forces, of which one is at right angles to it and the
other makes an angle of 30° with it.
7. A heavy circular disc is suspended from its centre by a string and rests horizontally.
Weights of 3, 3, and 5 lbs. are suspended by strings attached to the middle point of the disc
and passing over its edges.    Show how to arrange them so that the disc may remain horizontal.
8. The arms of a bent lever are 3 and 5 feet. A force of 6 lbs., acting perpendicularly at
the end of the shorter arm, is balanced by a force, acting at an angle of 30° to the longer arm,
at its end.    Find this force.
9. Prove that the centre of gravity of a triangle divides each of the lines drawn from the
angular points of the triangle to the points of bisection of the opposite sides in the ratio of 2 : 1.
10. If a power of 1 lb. describes a revolution of 3 feet whilst the screw moves through \
inch, what pressure will be produced ? lxxxviii. Public Schools Report. 1887
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Friday, July 8th; 10 a.m. to 12.30p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Two uniform beams, each 20 feet long and weighing 100 lbs., rest against each other
in the form of a roof, and are supported on the top of two vertical walls 30 feet apart, to
which they are attached : find the direction and the amount of reaction at the top of each
wall, and the amount of the horizontal force tending to overturn the wall.
2. A ladder rests against a vertical wall, to which it is inclined at an angle of 45°; the
centre of gravity of tho ladder is ^ of the length from the foot; the coefficient of friction for
the ladder and the plane is J, and for the ladder and the wall \. If a man whose weight is
half tho weight of the ladder ascends it, find to what height he will go before tho ladder begins
to slide.
3. What must be the distance between the threads of a screw, so that a power of 28 lbs.
applied at the extremity of a lever 25 inches long may sustain a weight of 10,000 lbs. ?
4. A body has described 54 feet from rest in 3 seconds; find the time it will take to
move the next 120 feet.
5. A stone, A, is let fall from a certain point, and after it has fallen for a second, another
stone, B, is let fall from a point 100 feet lower down: in how many seconds will A overtake B?
6. A steam engine moves a train weighing 60 tons on a level road from rest, and acquires
a speed of 5 miles an hour in 5 minutes. If the same engine move another train and give it a
speed of 7 miles in 10 minutes, find the weight of the second train, supposing the resistance to
amount to the same in both cases.
7. How deep must a cylindrical diving bell be submerged so as to be just half full of
water"
8. Describe the thermometer and show how to graduate one when constructed. Convert
25° Fahrenheit into centigrade.
9. A substance weighs 12 oz. in air; a substance weighing 20 oz. in water is attached to
it, and the two together weigh 18 oz. in water: what is the specific gravity of the former
substance ?
10. At what height docs the water barometer stand when tho mercurial barometer stands
at 28 inches (Sp. G. of mercury = 13.6)?
Practical Mathematics.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 5th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. (a.J What is the unit of measure of an angle?
(b.J The difference of the two acute angles of a right-angled triangle is 40 grades: find
the angles in degrees.
2. When three of the six parts of a triangle are given, the other parts can be determined.
What exception is there to this statement?
3. (a.) Prove that  - — = tan. A. tan. B.
1    ' cot. A -}- cot.  B
(b.J Determine the value of A in the equation,—
2 Sin.2 3 A -f- fein.2 6 A = 2.
4. Describe the two systems of logarithms used in mathematical calculations.
5. The two sides about the right angle of a right-angled triangle are 360 and 270: required
the other parts.
G. In a triangle ABC, the angles A and B are respectively 54° 20' and 62° 36', and the
side AB is 245: required the other parts. 51 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
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7. Give short account of the earliest newspapers published in England.
8. Who were the respective authors of—
Table Talk,
Tristram Shandy,
Tale of a Tub,
The Castle of Otranto,
The Deformed Transformed,
Heroes and Hero Worship ?
9. Give the name of one work by each of the following :—
Hugh Miller,
Matthew Arnold,
Timothy Flint,
Richard Dana,
Sir John Portescuo.
10. Give five instances of remarkable word painting in English  literature,  two at least
being by Sir Walter Scott.
Chemistry.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July Jtth; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. Distinguish between analysis and synthesis, giving an example of each.
2. In crystallography what is meant by isomorphism and dimorphism, giving examples.
3. What is believed to be the nature of light?
How may the compound character of Sun-light bo demonstrated?
4. What is the difference between symbol and formula?    Give examples.
5. Write in full the compounds that are designated by the following formulas:—
(a.) Ca. Co3        (b.) Ca. (P 04)„        (c.) Na. HS04
(d.) H3 B 03      (e.) Na. H B2 04      <f.) Si. F,
6. Give the formula? for the following compounds:- -
(a.J Potassium Iodide.
(b.J Ammonium Carbonate.
(c.J Potassic Cyanate.
(d.J Calcic Hydrate.
(e.J Alcohol.
(f.J Hydric Fluosilicate.
7. Give the different oxides of nitrogen.
8. State fully the steps by which we may ascertain the composition of a molecule of water.
9. What is the difference between a hydrocarbon and a carbohydrate?
.10. Three solutions are placed before you containing respectively silver, lead, and mercury.
How would you distinguish between them? Give the tests used, and state what are the
resulting compounds.
11. A clear solution is placed before you which on the addition of H2 S O4 turn3 black and
increases in bulk, becoming semi-solid.    What is the solution?
12. Describe any chemical experiments you may have seen performed. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. xci.
Latin.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July 4th; 2 p. m. to 4-80 p. m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. Translate—
(a.J When ho had made a three days' journey through their territories, he found out
from the captains that the river Sabis was not more than ten miles distant from
his camp.
(b.J He said it was tho height of folly to propose a law which you did  not intend  to
obey yourself.
(c.J Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India, has, by the
Grace of God, reigned happily for fifty years.    God save our Queen.
2. Translate—
(a.J Ei legationi Ariovistus respondit: " Si quid ipsi a Ca?sare opus esset, sese ad eum
venturum fuisse ; si quid illo so velit, ilium ad se venire oportere. Pra?terea se
neque sine exereitu in eas partes Gallia? venire audere, quas Caesar possideret;
neque exercitum sine magno commeatu atque emolimento in unum locum contra-
here posse: sibi autem minim videri, quid in sua Gallia, quam bello vicisset, aut
Csesari, aut omnino Populo Romano negotii esset."
(b.J Parse—Postularent, utriusque opus, oportere, emolimento, negotii, and se in the
clause "si quid ille se velit."
(c.J When and where were the Commentaries written ?
3. (a.J Translate— Virgil.
Limen crat, caocBeque fores, et pcrvius usus
Tectorum inter se Priami, postesque relicti
A tergo; infelix qua se, dum regna manebant,
Sa?pius Andromache ferre incomitata solebat
Ad soceros, et avo puerum Astyanacta trahebat.
Evado ad summi faseigia culminis, unde
Tela manu miseri jactabant irrita Teucri.
Turrim in prtecipiti stantem, summisque sub astra
Eductam tectis, unde omnis Trqja videri,
Et Danaiim solitie naves, et Achai'a castra,
Aggressi ferro circum, qua suinma labantes
Juncturas tabulata debant, convellimus altis
Sedibus, impulimusque; ea, lapsa repente, ruinam
Cum sonitu trahit, et Danaum super agmina late
Incidit: ast alii subeunt; nee saxa, nee ullum
Telorum interea cessat genus.
(b.J Parse (giving syntax, and derivation when necessary)—Irrita, prascipiti, solitse,
aggressi, convellimus, lapsa, incidit.
(c.J Soceros : Who are meant ?
(d.J Turrim : Mention three other words having this form of the accusative.
(e.J State tho characteristics of hexameter verse.
4. (a.J— Horace.
Mcrcuri, facundo nepos Atlantis,
Qui feros cultus honiinum recentum
Voce formasti catus, et decora?
More pal»stra?,
To canam, magni Jovis et deorum
Nuntium, curvseque lyres parentem ;
Callidum, cjuidquid placuit, jocoso
Conderc furto.
Te, boves olim nisi reddidisses
Per dolum amotas, puerum minaei
Voce dum terret, viduus pharetra
Risit Apollo. xcii Public Schools Report. 1887
Quin et Atridas, duce to, superbos,
Ilio dives Priamus relicto
Thessalosque ignes et iniqua Trojse
Castra fefellit.
Tu pias Isetis animas reponis
Sedibus, virgaque levem coerces
Aurea turbam, superis deorum
Gratus et irnis.
(b.J Parse—Facunde, condere, fefellit, sedibus, coerces.
(c.J Give references—Voce, boves, Priamus.
(d.J Name the metre in this ode.
(c.J Scan the last verse. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. xciii.
APPENDIX M.
H
CHAP-    25.
AN ACT TO CONSOLIDATE THE PUBLIC SOHOOL ACTS.
[9th March, 1885.}
[As Amended in 1887.}
ER MAJESTY, by and with tho advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the
Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
Acts repealed.
1. The "Public School Act, 1879," an Act passed in the 45th year of Her Majesty's reign,
intituled "An Act to amend the Public School Act, 1879," (Ch. 17, 1882), and an Act passed
in the 47th year of Her Majesty's reign, intituled "An Act to amend the Public School Act,
1879," (Ch. 27, 1884), are hereby repealed.
Existing elections and appointments to continue.
2. All Public School Districts, together with all elections and appointments to office when
this Act takes effect, and all rights acquired and penalties incurred shall continue subject to
the provisions of this Act; and each School Trustee who holds office at the time this Act comes
into force shall continue as if such term had commenced by virtue of an election under this
Act.
Public School Fund.
3. There shall be set apart by the Officer in charge of the Treasury for the time being, out
of the General Revenue of the Province, in each year such sum as may be voted by the
Legislative Assembly for Public School purposes, and the said sum of money shall be called
the " Public School Fund."
Appointment of Superintendent of Education.
4. It shall be lawful for the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to appoint a Superintendent
of Education for the Province of British Columbia.
High Schools.
5. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may establish a High School in any District
where it may bo expedient so to do, wherein the higher branches may be taught, and every
such High School shall be under the control of the local Board of Trustees for the District
wherein such High School is situate: Provided, however, that no High School shall be
established in any School District in which there are less than twenty persons duly qualified
to be admitted as High School pupils.
Existing School Districts to continue.
6. All School Districts existing at the date when this Act shall come into operation shall
continue until altered as hereinafter provided.
7. It shall be lawful for the Lieutenant-Governor in Council from time to time—
New School Districts.
(1.) To create School Districts, in addition to those already existing, and to define the
boundaries thereof, and from time to time to alter the boundaries of existing, or
hereafter created, Districts: Provided that no School District shall be created wherein
there shall not be at least fifteen children of school age, between six and sixteen
years of age.
Division of Districts.
(2.) To divide City School Districts into wards, and to define the boundaries thereof. xciv. Public Schools Report. 1887
Waste lands.
(3.) To set apart in every School District such a quantity of the waste lands of tho Crown
as in his opinion may be necessary for school purposes in such District.
Money grants.
(4.) To grant, on the application of the School Trustees of any such School District,
endorsed by the Superintendent of Education, or, in his absence, by such person as
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may appoint, such sum or sums of money as may
be required by him to pay the salary of tho Teacher in such School District; to defray
the cost of erecting a school-house or providing a house or room within which the
Public School of such district may be held; the cost of all furniture and apparatus
necessary for the use of any such school, and the current expenses connected therewith.
(5.) To grant such sum as he shall think proper in aid of the establishment of a school in
any part of the Province not being a School District, and not having less than seven,
and not more than fourteen children, between the age of six and sixteen years,
resident therein.
Appointment of Examiners and Teachers.
(6.) To appoint two or more Examiners at such remuneration as he shall think fit, who,
together with the Superintendent of Education, shall examine teachers and grant
certificates of qualification. Such certificates shall be of three classes, viz.: A first
class certificate, a second class certificate, and a third class certificate.
Inspector of Schools.
(7.) To temporarily appoint, at a reasonable remuneration, an Inspector to visit any Public
School, and to require such Inspector to enquire into and report his observations to
the Superintendent of Education in relation to tho progress and average attendance
of the pupils, the discipline and management of the School, the system of education
pursued, the mode of keeping the school registers, the condition of the buildings and
premises, and such other matters as he may deem advisable in furtherance of the
interests of the school.
Duties of Superintendent.
8.  It shall be the duty of the Superintendent—
Selection of Text Books.
(1.) With the sanction of tho Lieutenant-Governor in Council, to select, adopt, and prescribe
a uniform series of text books to be used in the Public Schools of tho Province, and
to authorize the purchase and distribution thereof among the different Public Schools,
at such prices as may be fixed upon from time to time:
Rulesf&c.
(2.) To make and establish rules and regulations for the conduct of tho Public Schools:
Apparatus.
(3.) To take charge of and'safely keep all apparatus that may be procured for school
purposes, and to furnish, at his discretion, on the application of the Trustees of any
District, such apparatus as may be required for the Schools in such District:
Girls' Schools.
(4.) To establish a separate school for females in any District where he may deem it
expedient so to do; and such school, when so established, may be presided over by a
female Teacher or Teachers, but otherwise shall be subject to the same obligations
and regulations as Public Schools generally under this Act:
To visit Schools.
(5.) To visit each Public School within his jurisdiction when required by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council: . - 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xcix.
Voting at Annual School Meetings.
29. If any person offering to vote at an annual or other school meeting (other than an
election) in a City School District is challenged as unqualified by any legal voter, the Chairman
presiding at such meeting shall require the person so offering to make the following declaration.
"I declare that I am the person whose name is entered on the Register of Voters for
ward of City School District now shewn to me."
And every person making such declaration shall be permitted to vote on all questions
proposed at such meeting; but if any person refuse to make such declaration his vote shall be
rejected.
Trustees—Their Powers and Duties.
Qualification of School Trustees.
30. Any person being a male householder or freeholder in the School District of the full
age of 21 years, and otherwise qualified by this Act to vote at an election of School Trustees
in the said School District, shall be eligible to be elected or to serve as a School Trustee in a
School District.
Occasional vacancies how filled.
31. Any Trustee elected to fill an occasional vacancy shall hold office only for th6 unexpired term of the person in whose place he has been elected.
Designation of Trustee Boards.
32. The Trustees of any School District duly elected, shall be a Corporation under the
name of " The Trustees of the [naming the title] School District."
Trustees to appoint Places J or holding Meetings and Elections, &c.    Notices thereof.
33. It shall be the duty of the Trustees of each School District to appoint the place of
each annual School meeting of the voters of the District, and of elections and of a special
meeting for the filling up of any vacancy in the Trustee Corporation occasioned by death,
removal, or other cause, and to cause notices of the time and place to be posted in three or
more public places of such district, one of which shall be upon the School-house, at least ten
days before the holding of such meeting, and to specify in such notices the object of such
meeting. They shall also call and give like notices of any special meeting, for any School
purpose which they may think proper: Provided, that if any newspaper be published in any
School District the notices shall also be published in such newspaper.
Provisions in case of Irregularities.
34. In case, from the want of proper notices, or from any other cause, any annual school
meeting, required to be held for the election of Trustees, or any special meeting or election,
shall not be held at the proper time, any two voters in such District may, within twenty days
after the time at which such meeting should have been held, call a meeting by giving ten days'
notice, to be posted in at least three public places in such School District, and in a newspaper
if any published in the District, and the meeting then called shall possess all the powers and
perform all the duties of the meeting in the place of which it is called.
Resignation of Trustee.
35. Any person chosen as Trustee may resign, by giving written notice of such intention
to his colleagues in office.
Defines Duties of Trustees.
36. It shall be the duty of the Trustees of each School District to appoint one of themselves to be Secretary and Treasurer to the Corporation, who shall give such security as may
be required by a majority of the Trustees, for the correct and safe-keeping and forthcoming,
when called for, of the papers and moneys belonging to the Corporation, and for the correct
keeping of a record of their proceedings in a book procured for that purpose, and for the
receiving and accounting for all School moneys which shall come into his hands, and for the
disbursing of such moneys, in the manner directed by a majority of the Trustees. The
Trustees shall take possession, and have the custody of and safe-keeping of all Public School 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xcv.
Supervision of various matters.
(6.) To examine and enquire into, from time to time, the progress of the pupils in learning,
the order and discipline observed, tho system of instruction pursued, tho mode of
keeping the school registers, the average attendance of pupils, the character and
condition of tho buildings and premises, and to give such advice as he may judge
proper:
To advance efficiency of Schools.
(7.) To do all in his power to persuade and animate parents, guardians, trustees, and
teachers to improve the character and efficiency of the Public Schools, and to secure
the sound education of the young generally:
Supervision of Schools.
(8.) To see that the schools are managed and conducted according to law, to prevent the
use of unauthorized, and to insist upon t\v; use of authorized, books in each school:
Suspension of Certificates.
(9.) To suspend for cause the certificate of qualification of any Teacher until the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council shall confirm or disallow his action in suspending such Teacher;
and the cancellation or suspension of a Teacher's certificate, when confirmed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, shall release the School Trustees of the District in
which such Teacher may be employed from any obligation to continue to employ him
as such Teacher:
Temporary Certificates.
(10.) To grant temporary certificates of qualification, countersigned by the Provincial
Secretary; which temporary certificates shall be valid till the next examination of
teachers:
Annual Report.
(11.) To make annually, on or before the first day of October, a report of the actual state
of the Public Schools throughout the Province, showing the number of pupils taught
in each School District, under the age of six years and over the age of sixteen, the
branches taught and average attendance, the amount of moneys expended in connection with each school, the number of visits made by him, the salaries of Teachers,
the number of qualified Teachers, their standing and sex, together with any other
information that he may possess respecting the educational state and wants and
advantages of each School and District in the Province, and such statements and
suggestions for improving the Public Schools and School Laws, and promoting education generally, as he may deem useful and expedient:
To give  Security.
(12.) To be responsible for all moneys paid through him on behalf of the Public Schools,
and to give such security as the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may require :
Forms, &c.
(13.) To prepare suitable forms and to give such instructions as ho may judge necessary
and proper for making all reports and conducting all proceedings under this Act, and
to cause the same, with such general regulations as may be approved of by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council for the better organization and government of Public
Schools, to be transmitted to the officers required to execute the provisions of this
Act:
Investigation of Complaints.
(14.) Within twenty days after any complaint shall have been made to him respecting
the mode of conducting any election of Trustees (as hereinafter provided for), to
investigate such complaint and report the facts to the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, who shall confirm or set aside such election; and in the latter case he shall
appoint the time and place for a new election in such District: xcvi. Public Schools Report. 1887
Closing Schools.
(15.) To close schools where the average attendance falls below ten.
Appointment of Returning Officers.
(16.) To appoint a Returning Officer to act at tho election of Trustees for each ward in
the City School Districts.
New School Districts.
9. Immediately after the formation of any new School District or Districts, pursuant to
the provisions of this Act, the Superintendent of Education shall prepare notices in writing
describing such District or Districts respectively, and appoint a time and place for the first
school meeting for the election of Trustees, and shall cause copies of such notices to be posted
in at least three public places in each of such school districts at least ten days before the time
of holding the meeting; and the Trustees elected at any such meeting shall respectively hold
office as hereinafter provided. At such meeting the voters present shall elect one of their
own number to preside over the proceedings of such meeting, and shall also appoint a Secretary.
Rural Districts.—Election or Trustees, and School Meetings.
Number of Trustees.
10. For each Rural District there shall be three Trustees.
Annual Meeting.
11. An annual meeting for the election of School Trustees shall be held in all Rural
School Districts on the third Monday in June in every year, commencing at 11 o'clock in tho
forenoon, the nomination closing at 12 noon, and the voting (if any) at 3 o'clock in the afternoon of the same day.
Chairman.
12. At such annual meeting, or at any meeting called under section 11 of this Act, the
voters present shall elect one of their own number to preside over the proceedings of such
meeting, and shall also appoint a Secretary.
His Powers.
13. The Chairman of such meeting shall decide all questions of order, subject to an
appeal to the meeting, and in case of an equality of votes shall give the casting vote; but he
shall have no vote except as Chairman.
Voting by Poll.
14. The Chairman shall take tho votes by a poll; and the names of all voters who may
present themselves shall be recorded by the Secretary; such poll to remain open from noon till
3 o'clock p.m., when the Chairman shall declare the result.
Duration of Office of Trustees.
15. The Trustees so elected at the first annual school meeting in any district, shall
respectively hold office as follows:—
(1.) The person receiving the largest number of votes shall continue in office for two
years, to be reckoned from the annual school meeting next after his election, and
from that time onward till his successor shall have been elected:
(2.) The person receiving the next greatest number of votes shall continue in office one
year, to be reckoned from the same period, and until his successor shall have been
elected:
(3.) The person receiving tho next greatest number of votes shall continue in office until
the next ensuing annual school meeting in such district, and until his successor shall
have been elected. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xcvii.
Proceedings at Meetings.
16. A correct copy of the proceedings of such first, and of every annual, and of every
special School District meeting in such district, signed by the Chairman and Secretary, shall
be forthwith transmitted by the Secretary in such School District to the Superintendent of
Education.
Trustees to be Elected Annually.
17. A Trustee shall be elected to office at each ensuing annual school meeting, in place of
any Trustee whose term of office is about to expire; and the same individual, if willing, may
be re-elected ; but no School Trustee shall be re-elected, except by his own consent, during the
four years next after his going out of office.
Report of Trustees.
18. At every annual meeting held for the election of Trustees under this Act, the report
of the Trustees, as required by the 36th section of this Act, shall be submitted and dealt with.
Voters.
19. Any householder or freeholder resident in any School District for a period of six
months previous to the election, and the wife of any such householder or freeholder, shall be
entitled to vote at any school meeting held in such district, and for the election of Trustees:
Provided Chinese and Indians shall not vote.
Declaration oj Challenged Voter.
20. If any person offering to vote at an annual or other school meeting is challenged as
unqualified by any legal voter, the Chairman presiding at such meeting shall i equire the person
so offering to make the following declaration :—
" I do declare and affirm that I am a resident householder (or freeholder, as the case may
be), in this School District, and that I have been a continuous resident householder
(or freeholder) in this district for the last six months."
Or, " I do declare and affirm that I am the wife of a resident householder (or freeholder)
in this School District, and that my husband has been a continuous resident householder (or freeholder) in this district for the last six months."
And every person making such a declaration shall be permitted to vote on all questions
proposed at such meeting; but if any person refuse to make such declaration his vote shall be
rejected.
City School Districts.—Election of Trustees.
Number of Trustees.
21. For each of the School Districts of the City of Victoria, the City of New Westminster,
and the City of Nanaimo, there shall be six Trustees, each ward in every such city being
entitled to be represented by two Trustees, and after the first annual election held under this
Act each ward in every such city shall elect annually one Trustee.
Duration of Office of Trustees.
22. At the first annual election of School Trustees held after the passing of this Act all
School Trustees shall retire, and there shall be elected two Trustees for each ward. At such
election the Trustee obtaining the highest number of votes shall hold office for two years, and
until the election of his successor, and the Trustee obtaining the next highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year, and until the election of his successor; and henceforth, after such
first election, the tenure of office for School Trustees shall be two years and until the election of
his successor.
Voters.
23. Any person registered as a voter, as hereinafter provided, shall be eligible to vote at
any school meeting held in such District, and in the ward in which he is registered, for the
election of Trustees: Provided, always, that it shall not be lawful for any person to vote for
Trustees in more than one ward in any City School District.
Declaration of Challenged  Voter.
(2.) If any person offering to vote at any election of School Trustees is challenged by any xcviii. Public Schools Report. 1887
legal voter, the Returning Officer or his clerk shall require the person so offering to  make  the
following declaration:—
" I declare that I am the person whose name is entered on  the  Register of Voters for
ward of City School District now shewn to me,
and that I have not voted before at this election, either in this ward  or any other
ward in this School District."
And every person making such declaration shall be permitted to vote at such election;
but if any person refuse to make such declaration his vote shall be rejected.
Registration of Voters.
24. In the City School Districts a register of voters for the registration of voters shall be
opened on the first day of July in each year, and shall be closed after the 31st day of May in
the following year. Such register shall be kept in the City of Victoria by the Superintendent
of Education; in the Cities of New Westminster and Nanaimo by the Government Agents:
Provided, always, that for the year 1885 the register shall be opened on the passage of this
Act, and closed after the 31st day of May, 1885.
Who may be registered as voters.
25. Any householder or freeholder resident in any ward of any City School District for a
period of six months previous to the application to register, and the wife of any such householder or freeholder,. shall be entitled to be registered as a voter for the election of Trustees
in the ward in which he or she resides:    Provided Chinese and Indians shall not be registered.
Declaration of Claimant.
(2.) Every person desiring to be registered as a voter shall be required to make the
following declaration: —
" I do declare and affirm that I am a resident householder (or freeholder, as the case may
be), in ward of City School District, and that
I have been a continuous resident householder (or freeholder) in such ward for the
last six months."
Or, " I do declare and affirm that I am the wife of a resident householder (or freeholder)
in ward of City School District, and that my
husband has been a continuous resident householder (or freeholder) in such ward for
the last six months."
Proceedings at Annual Elections of Trustees.
26. In City School Districts, the annual election of Trustees shall be held on the third
Monday in June in every year, commencing at 11 o'clock a.m., the nomination closing at 12
o'clock noon; and the poll (if any) commencing at 10 o'clock of the next day, and closing at
4 p.m. The Returning Officer for each ward shall preside at the election of the Trustees of the
ward for which he is appointed, and in case of an equality of votes shall give the casting vote.
The Returning Officer shall take the votes by ballot, and the names of all duly qualified voters
who present themselves shall be recorded by the Returning Officer or his Clerk, and at the
close the Returning Officer shall declare the result.
Election Returns to be made.
27. The proceedings of every City School District election shall be forthwith thereafter
transmitted by each Returning Officer, together with a certificate under his hand of the
persons elected, to the Superintendent of Education.
City School Districts—School Meetings.
Annual School Meetings.
28. In City School Districts an annual school meeting shall bo held on the second Monday
in June in each year, commencing at 11 o'clock A.M., at which meeting the Chairman of the
Trustee Board shall preside, and at such meeting the report of the Trustees, as required by the
36th section of this Act, shall be submitted and dealt with. 51  Vic.
Public Schools Report.
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5 Public Schools Report. 1887
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information.
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book, and to
deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by them.
8. On the last day of each half-year (unless otherwise arranged with the Department)
to hold a public examination of his school, of which notice shall be given to the
trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
Provided, however, that in the cities of Nanaimo, New Westminster, and
Victoria, the semi-annual examinations shall be held during the last week of each
session as follows :—
Girls' School    Wednesday.
Boys'     „    Thursday.
High      „         Friday.
The public examination of Ward Schools shall be held alternately during the
forenoon of the above-mentioned days, and, if rendered necessary by the establishment of additional Ward Schools, on the other days of the last week of each
session.
Each teacher in these cities shall be required to attend the other public examinations held after the closing of his school.
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education monthly, or when desired, any infor
mation which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected with
. the operations of his school, or in anywise affecting its interest or charactei'.
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practise such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious parent
in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear to him to
be imperatively necessary ; and then a record of the offence and the punishment
shall be made in the school-register for the inspection of trustees.
13. No teacher shah compel the services of pupils for his  own  private  benefit  or  con
venience.
14. For gross misconduct, or a violent or a wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be expelled without
the authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless,
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to expel
such pupil from the school; but any pupil under public censure who shall express
to the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and explicitly as
the case may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees and teacher, be
re-admitted to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-house is
kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating, and ventilation, and es-
specially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at. least fifteen
minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To daily inspect the yards and outhouses, and report to the trustees, and to see that
the school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus,
books, &c, so that they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt
notice in writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a time-table, showing the order of
exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per day.
19. Not to be absent from the school without permission of the Board of Trustees, unless
in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported to the
Secretary. N.B.—All absences, with reasons for the same, shall he reported
monthly to the Superintendent of Education. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xli.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings  of the
teachers called by the principal. It shall be the duty of the principal of a school
to convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once a month,
for conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To make a statutory declaration, when required, as to the correctness of the statis
tical and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. Previous to leaving the school to dismiss pupils detained for punishment.
25. To make himself familiar with the Rules that relate to his school duties.
26. Teachers of Ward  Schools shall admit  as pupils only those who are not farther
advanced than the second reader.
9. The principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the time-tables, exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades, and shall, on or before the
15th day of July in each year, send to the Superintendent of Education a report of the condition
and progress of the school, with any suggestions he may deem expedient respecting its requirements.
10. Assistant teachers shall, when required by their principal, report to him in writing any
and all matters connected with the workings of their division.
11. Principals must report in writing to the Secretary of the Board of Trustees every
violation by teachers of the Rules and Regulations prescribed for the government of the Public
Schools, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees to immediately report
the same to the Superintendent of Education.
12. No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any school,
unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
13- No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he be afflicted
with, or have been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion shall have
passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man, or other authority satisfactory to the
teacher.
14. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil shall be
made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
15. It is required of each and every pupil—
1. That he come to school clean  and  tidy in his person  and  clothes; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that he be kind
and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his studies; and
that he conform to the rules of the school.
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for tardiness
or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory excuse
for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed for
closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises, or in
going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites; but
in case of his inability to comply with this rule the teacher may, under special circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but authority to supply the
same must be first obtained from the Education Office.
16- The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be taught.
The Lord's prayer may be used in opening and closing school upon the permission of the Board
of Trustees. xlii.
Public Schools Report.
1887
APPENDIX R
Regulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers in the Province
of British Columbia for the Yeajs 1888.
[Approved by His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor November 16th, 1887.]
L—Time and Place of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the Publio
Schools shall commence on Saturday, July 7th, 1888, at 10 a.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule :—
Date.
July 7, Saturday .
,,    9, Monday .. .
„  10, Tuesday . ..
„ 11, Wednesday
„ 12, Thursday . .
„  13, Friday 	
„ 14, Saturday ..
„ 16, Monday . ..
„ 17, Tuesday ...
„ 18, Wednesday
„  19, Thursday ..
Subject.
English History. .
Arithmetic	
English Grammar
Education	
Mental Aritmetic
Spelling	
Mensuration   	
Algebra 	
Geometry  	
Natural Philosophy.
Practical Mathematics .
Latin	
Forenoon.
10 to
10 to
10 to
10 to
10 to
10.45-
10 to
10 to
10 to
10 to
10 to
10 to
12.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
10.45
12.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
Subject.
Geography .
* Reading
Writing....
* Reading
Anatomy, Physiology, & Hygiene
* Reading	
Canadian History
* Reading	
Composition   	
* Reading .       ...
Optional Subjects (2 B.
Book-keeping	
Optional Subjects (2 A.)
* Reading	
Optional Subjects (IB.)
* Reading	
English Literature ....
* Reading	
Ancient History
Reading  	
Greek and French.
Afternoon.
2      to 4.30
4.30 to 5
to
to
to
to
to   4
to   5
1.30 to 3
3 to   5
2   to   4
4 to   5
2   to
4   to
2   to
4   to
2   to   4.30
* As many of the candidates examined as time will permit.
3. The examination shall take place in Victoria, and in such other place or places as the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education, ten
days before the examination, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for which he is
a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 15, 18,
21, and 25), and the description of any certificate he may already possess. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. xliii.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by such testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate as shall be
satisfactory to the Examiners.
III.—Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the issue
of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted to
return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room any book, or paper, or slate, or anything else
from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper.
Detection in the broach of these Rules shall render the candidate liable not only to the loss of
the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the discovery be then made that these Rules have been
broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, shall write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write the subject of the examination paper on the
outside sheet, and his distinguishing number.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate less than
sixteen, shall be granted a certificate to teach ; but such persons may be allowed to undergo
the examination and obtain a certificate of standing.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates :—
1. Temporary Certificate.
2. Third Class, Grade B, Certificate.
3. Third Class, Grade A, „
4. Second Class, Grade B, ,,
5. Second Class, Grade A, „
6. First Class, Grade B, „
7. First Class, Grade A, „ xliv. Public Schools Report. 18S7
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates
1 A Temporary Certificate, valid until the next examination of teachers, shall entitle the
holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach
in any common school, or to fill the position of assistant in .any graded school.
3. A Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for two years, shall entitle the holder to
teach in any common school, or to fill the position of assistant in any graded school.
4. A Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to
teach in any position in a graded school, or in a common school.
5. A Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for five years, shall entitle the holder to
teach in any position in a graded school, or in a common school.
6. A First Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for life or during good behavior, shall
entitle the holder to teach in any position in a graded school or common school, or to act as
an assistant in a high school.
7. A First Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for life or during good behavior, shall
entitle the holder to teach in any position in any public school.
VII. -Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.—To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing.—To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in any standard text-book.
3. Spelling.—To have a good knowledge of orthography and orthoepy.
4. Written Arithmetic. — To be thoroughly familiar with the subject.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems.
6. Geography. — To have a good knowledge of the subject.
7. English Grammar.—To have a thorough knowledge of the subject, and to be able to
analyze and parse any sentence.
8. Canadian History.—To have a good knowledge of the subject.
9. English History.—To have a good knowledge of the subject.
10. Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene. — To have a good general knowledge of the
subject.
11. Composition—To be familiar with the forms of correspondence, and to be able to
write a composition on any simple subject, correct as to spelling, punctuation, and  expression.
12. Education.—To have a thorough knowledge of the approved methods of teaching the
various subjects prescribed for common schools; to be well acquainted with formation of
time-tables, classification of pupils, and modes of discipline; to be familiar with the School
Act, and rules and regulations prescribed for the government of the public schools.
VIII.—Second Class, Grade B, Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 12, as for Third Class Certificates.
13. Mensuration.—To know the rules for the measurement of surfaces.
14. Book-keeping.—To understand the keeping of accounts by single-entry.
15. Music (Theory), Drawing (Linear), Botany.—To have a fair knowledge of one of
these subjects. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xlix.
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to vote, the chairman
shall require the person whose vote is questioned to make the declaration provided by law; after making it the vote must be received and recorded without
further question; but if such person refuses to make such declaration his vote
is to be rejected :
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings of the meeting
shall be received by the chairman. All protests must be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty days at least after tho meeting:
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall always be in order,
provided that no second motion to the same effect shall be made until some intermediate proceedings shall have been had:
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if required J ami seconded.—A motion cannot ba
put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be in writing (if required by tho
chairman), and seconded:
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or read by tho
chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the meeting; but may bo
withdrawn at any time before decision by consent of the meeting:
(11.) Kind of motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate no other motion
shall be received, unless to amend it, or to postpone it, or for adjournment:
(12.) Order of putting Motion —All questions shall be put in the order in which they
are moved. Amendments shall be put before the main motion, the last amendment first, and so on:
(13.) Reconsidering Motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be made by any
voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration shall be taken moro
than once at the same meeting.
Close of Meeting.
4. The poll at every election of a trustee shall not bo kept open after three o'clock in the
afternoon.
Transmission of Minutes.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should sign the minutes,
as entered by the secretary in tho minute book; and the secretary of the board of trustees
must forthwith transmit a correct copy of such minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of Education.
Special School Meetings.
G. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in the same way as annual
school meetings.
III.—Registration of Voters in City Districts.
[Extracts from "Public School Act, 1885."]
" Sec. 23. Any person registered as a voter, as hereinafter provided, shall be eligible to
vote at any school meeting held in such district, and in the ward in which he is registered, for
the election of Trustees: Provided, always, that it shall not be lawful for any person to vote
for Trustees in more than one ward in any City School District.
" Sec. 24. In the City School Districts a register of voters for the registration of voters
shall be opened on the first day of July in each year, and shall be closed after the 31st day of
May in the following year. Such register shall be kept in the City of Victoria by the Superintendent of Education; in the Cities of New Westminster and Nanaimo by the Government
Agents: Provided, always, that for the year 1885 the register shall be opened on the passage
of this Act, and closed after the 31st day of May, 1885.
" Sec. 25. Any householder or freeholder resident in any ward of any City School District
for a period of six months previous to the application to register, and the wife of any such
householder or freeholder, shall be entitled to be registered as a voter for the election of
Trustees in the ward in which he or she resides: Provided Chinese and Indians shall not be
registered." 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xlv.
IX.—Second Class, Grade A, Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 15, as for- Second Class, Grade B, Certificates.
16. Algebra.—To know the rules preceding and including simple equations.
17. Geometry.—Book I.
18. Zoology, Astronomy, Rhetoric—To have a fair knowledge of one of these subjects.
X.—First Class, Grade B, Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 18, as for Second Class, Grade A, Certificates.
13. Mensuration.—To know the rules for thu measurement of volumes
14. Book-keeping.—To understand the keeping of accounts by double-entry,
16. Algebra.—To know the subject.
17. Geometry.—Books II., III., and IV., with problems.
19. Natural Philosophy—To know  the subject,   and   to  be  able  to   work   problems  in
Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
20. English Literature.—To have a good general knowledge of the subject.
21. General History, Chemistry, Geology.—To have  a  good knowledge of owe of  these
subjects.
XL—Fikst Class, Grade A, Certificates
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 21, as for First Class, Grade B, Certificates.
17. Geometry.—Books V. (Definitions) and VI.
22. Practical   Mathematics.—To   be   familiar  with  plane  trigonometry,   including  land
surveying and navigation.
23. Ancient History.—To have a general knowledge of the subject to the Fall of Rome.
24.—Latin.—To have a good knowledge of Prose Composition, and to be able to translate
and parse the following :—
Csesar, DeBello Gallico, Books I. and II.
Virgil, iEneid, Books I. and II.
Horace, Odes, Books I. and III.
25.  Greek or French.—
Greek—To  have  a good  knowledge  of  Prose  Composition,   and  to   be   able   to
translate and parse the following :—
Xenophon, Anabasis, Books I. and II.
Homer, Iliad, Books I. and II.
French—To have a good  knowledge of  Prose Composition, and  to be able to
translate and parse the following :—
La Fontaine, Les Fables, Livres I. et II.
Voltaire, Histoire de Charles XII., Livres I. et II,
Corneille, Le Cid.
XII.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
No Certificate shall be given to any person as a Teacher who does not furnish satisfactory
proof of good moral character.
Certificates of qualification shall be granted according to the following regulations :— xlvi. Public Schools Report. 1887
For a Temporary Certificate. A candidate for a Temporary Certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as Teacher.
For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 30 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and 40 per
cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and
grade.
For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and 50 per
cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and
grade.
For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Third Class Certificates, and not less
than 30 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination peculiar to
that class and grade, and 50 per cent, of the total number of marks attached tj the subjects of
examination for that class and grade.
For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate ,a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade B, Certificates,
and not less than 40 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination
peculiar to that class and grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the
subjects of examination for that class and grade.
For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade A, Certificates, and
not less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and
grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination
for that class and grade.
For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for First Class, Grade B, Certificates, and not
less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade,
and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that
class and grade.
Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate, in
force on July 1st, 1888, shall be renewable from year to year by the Examiners until July 1st,
1893, on the application of the holder of any such Certificate, provided the applicant has been
employed as a teacher during some portion of the twelve months immediately preceding the
date of application for renewal.
Whenever it shall be deemed necessary to raise the standard of examination, at least
twelve months' notice of such intention shall be given.
XIII.—Fixed Standard of Marks of Value Attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Reading  50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling  •  100
4. Written Arithmetic   200
5. Mental Arithmetic •  100
6. Geography  200
7. English Grammar  200
8. Canadian History  200
9. English History  200
10. Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene    200
11. Composition       200
12. Education • 200
 1950 51 Vic Public Schools Report. xlvii.
13. Mensuration    200
14. Book-keeping    200
15. Optional Subjects      200
 2550
16. Algebra      200
17. Geometry    200
18. Optional  Subjects    200
 3150
19. Natural Philosophy    200
20. English Literature    200
21. Optional Subjects    200
 3750
22. Practical Mathematics    200
23. Ancient History    200
24. Latin    200
25. Greek or French    200
 4550
XIV.— A candidate who fails to obtain the Certificate written for shall not be awarded
marks for answers to the papers set in subjects peculiar to that class and grade. xhiii. Public Schools Report. 1887
APPENDIX C.
Chapter I.
School Meetings in School Districts.
F.—Notice of Meetings.
1. The notice calling an annual or special meeting may be signed by the secretary by
direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the trustees themselves. Copies of such notices
shall be put up in at least three of the most public places in the district, at least ten days
before the time of holding the meeting.
II.—Proceedings at Annual Meetings in Rural Districts.
Meetings,  how  Organized.
1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (11 o'clock), call the
meeting to order, and request the voters present to appoint a chairman and secretary from
among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall preserve order and
decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be limited to the casting vote. In case of an equality of votes,
the chairman must give the casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of the meeting.
Order of Business at Annual Meetings.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting:—
(1.) Calling the meeting to order:
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary:
(3.)  Reading of trustees' annual report, including statement of receipts and expenditure:
(4.) Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report:
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year :
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy:
(7.) Any other business of which due notice has been given.
Rides of Order to be observed at Annual Aleetings.
3. The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings:—
(1.) Addressing Chairman.—Every   voter   shall   rise   previously   to   speaking,   and
address himself to the chairman:
(2.) Order of S/xaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the chairman shall
name the voter who shall speak first, when the other voter or voters shall next
have the right to address the meeting in the order named by the chairman :
(3.)  Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion under discussion
to be read for his information at any time, but not so  as  to  interrupt  a voter
who may be speaking:
(4.) Speaking Twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice  on  the same question
or amendment, without leave of the meeting, except in explanation of something
which may have been misunderstood, or until every one choosing to speak  shall
have spoken:
(5.)   Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the names of all voters
who may present themselves shall be recorded; such  poll  to remain open  till
three o'clock, when the chairman shall declare the result: 51 Vic
Public Schools Report.
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Public Schools Report.
XXI.
TABLE E.— Exhibit of Expenditure for Education Proper, during the year 1886-87.
School District!.
Amount paid
for Teachers'
Salaries.
Alberni —	
Aldergrove	
Ashcroft	
Barkerville	
Beaver Point	
Big Bar	
Bonaparte	
Boundary Bay 	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burton's Prairie	
Cache Creek—Boarding School
Cadboro   	
Canoe Pass	
Cedar Hill	
Cedar, North .   	
Cedar, South	
Centreville   	
Cheam	
Chemainus	
Chilliwhack   	
Clinton	
Clover Valley	
Colwood	
Comox, North	
Comox, South	
Courtenay	
Cowichan   	
Cowichan, South	
Craigflower	
Denman Island	
Departure Bay	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola, North 	
Gabriola, South	
Hall's Prairie   	
Hope 	
Kamloops	
Lake	
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lulu	
Lytton	
Maple Bay	
Maple Ridge 	
Mayne Island	
Metchosin and Rocky Point
Moodyville	
Mt. Lehman	
Mud Bay	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster	
Nicola	
Nicola Valley	
North Arm	
North Thompson	
Okanagan 	
Oyster	
Port Moody	
Prairie	
Priest's Valley	
Quamichan	
Quesnelle	
Revelstoke	
Round Prairie	
Saanich, North	
Saanich, South	
Saanich, West	
Shawnigan	
Shuswap Prairie	
Somenos	
Sooke	
Spallumcheen	
Spence's Bridge	
Carried forward      $54,985 80
8 533 87
79 00
480 00
1,200 Oo
600 00
201 28
150 00
427 78
618 75
600 00
1,500 00
600 00
433 47
720 00
660 00
588 70
860 00
600 00
600 00
eno oo
572 00
600 00
600 00
551 30
600 03
600 00
600 00
600 00
780 00
575 8o
600 00
840 00
600 00
577 41
600 00
600 00
660 00
600 00
720 00
720 00
600 00
720 00
666 67
840 00
660 00
704 00
605 00
600 00
694 99
5,650 00
5,110 00
660 00
720 00
466 66
720 00
720 00
600 00
660 00
600 00
200 00
660 00
900 00
325 16
507 10
840 00
960 00
720 00
600 00
720 00
600 00
600 00
716 00
Amount paid for
incidental
Expenses, in
eluding rent.
40 00
33 30
203 00
40 00
"iS 66'
40 00
40 00
40 00
200 00
40 00
17 63
40 03
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
18 60
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
19 00
40 00
40 00
28 38
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
84 87
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
476 65
676 46
40 00
27 76
40 00
40 00
13 60
40 00
40 Oo
40 00
20 00
40 00
100 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
27 13
40 00
40 00
38 25
83,979 53
Amount paid for
Education
Proper in each
District.
$ 573 87
112 30
480 00
1,403 00
640 00
201 28
105 00
467 78
658 75
640 00
1,700 00
640 00
451 10
760 00
700 00
628 70
1,000 00
640 00
640 00
640 00
612 00
64i) 00
640 00
691 30
618 50
640 00
640 00
640 00
820 00
615 80
640 00
SS0 00
619 00
617 41
640 00
628 38
700 00
640 00
760 00
760 00
884 87
760 00
606 67
880 00
700 00
744 00
645 00
640 00
634 99
6,126 65
5,686 46
700 00
747 76
606 66
760 00
733 60
640 00
700 00
640 00
220 00
700 00
1,000 00
325 16
547 10
880 00
1,000 CO
760 CO
640 00
747 13
640 00
640 00
764 25
$58,865 43
Cost of each
pupil, based on
aggregate
attendance.
$ 13 99
5 34
30 00
46 76
25 60
28 75
27 50
17 99
24 40
21 83
54 84
16 00
16 71
13 57
17 60
27 33
13 33
12 55
26 66
16 84
40 80
20 64
29 09
15 16
21 33
33 68
22 07
21 33
19 07
41 05
22 07
13 13
34 40
24 69
22 86
16 53
8 97
33 68
25 33
38 00
18 51
80 40
27 57
14 91
30 43
37 20
15 73
18 82
25 40
14 79
12 80
25 92
46 73
21 11
34 54
26 20
23 70
10 77
17 77
14 66
21 88
65 65
19 12
27 35
18 72
20 00
21 71
18 82
43 95
27 83
23 70
47 14
10 10
Cost of each
pupil, based on
average daily
attendance.
I 47 74
7 35
49 08
61 21
88 85
87 83
27 68
29 40
88 82
48 54
76 3S
41 64
43 04
29 12
81 79
38 78
21 96
25 17
67 86
85 S3
69 46
47 44
52 41
41 46
37 50
54 23
64 26
52 80
85 67
63 22
48 37
22 44
67 98
47 33
51 39
45 60
21 60
52 80
68 91
66 03
61 84
48 84
57 78
28 77
48 67
49 23
53 04
42 44
52 96
25 01
28 76
43 21
66 94
32 90
55 96
60 83
46 31
23 10
88 76
18 68
47 94
99 20
SI 67
47 74
30 34
50 45
89 01
40 84
72 46
49 45
54 93
70 22
14 43 XX11.
Public Schools Report.
1887
-Exhibit of Expenditures for Education Proper, during the year 1886-87.-
Continued.
TABLE E.
School Districts.
Amount paid
for Teachers'
Salaries.
Amount paid for
incidental
Expenses, including rent.
Amount paid for
Education
Proper in each
District.
Cost of each
pupil, based on
aggregate
attendance.
Cost of each
pupil, based on
average daily
attendance.
$54,9S5 90
$   600 00
600 00
660 00
600 00
1,072 01
600 00
15,879 93
1,487 10
840 00
720 00
526 66
$3,979 53
8     40 00
40 00
40 00
24 77
100 00
40 00
1,977 64
103 50
40 03
75 00
28 73
$58,935 43
640 00
640 00
700 00
624 77
1,172 01
640 00
17,857 57
1,590 60
880 00
795 00
555 39
825 60
25 60
20 59
13 88
4 72
20 03
10 66
10 53
44 03
13 70
22 21
$ 50 11
St. Mary's Mission	
50 99
37 87
81 79
6 98
39 77
19 76
20 05
Yale ...  	
York	
72 63
29 28
44 93
$78,571 60
36,489 17
$85,060 77
Education Office.
Salary of Superintendent of Education 	
Expenses of Teachers' Examination :—
Examiners     $300 00
Rent of hall, tables, chairs, &c      49 00
Stationery, &c      47 62
Maps, globes, &c	
Travelling expenses of Superintandent -	
Incidental expenses of Office, stationery for Promotion Examinations, &e	
$ 1,800 00
306 62
462 35
556 47
244 87
3,460 31
78,571 60
6,439 17
Amount paid for Teachers' Salaries   	
Do.        Incidental Expenses of Schools, including rent ..- —
Total cost of Education Proper    $38,521 08 51 Vic
Public Schools Repoet.
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Cedar, North—11th February, 1874.    Name changed from Cedar and re-defined 27th May, 1880:
Commencing at the north-west corner of South Cedar School District; thence east along the
northern boundary of said district, to the shore line; thence north-west along the shore line, to the
mouth of Chase River; thence south to the north-east corner of Section 20, Range 4, Cranberry District;
thence west along the northern boundary of Cranberry District, to its north-west corner; thence south
along the western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Cedar Hill—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 1st June,  1878; 27th May,  1880; 7th
April, 1885, and 14th April, 1887:
Commencing at the eastern extremity of the boundary line between Victoria District and Lake
District, being a point on the sea-shore; thence westerly along said line to the Saanich Road; thence
southerly along said road to its intersection with the central dividing line of Section 64; thence east to
the central point of the eastern boundary line of Section 64; thence south along the western boundary
lines of Sections 32 and 62, to the south-east corner of Section 63; thence in a direct line south-east to
the eastern extremity of the northern boundary line of Victoria City; thence in a line due east to the
western boundary line of Section 26; thence north to the south-west corner of Section 27 ; thence
northerly in a direct line to the north-east corner of Section 38; thence north-easterly in a direct line
to the south-west corner of Section 44; thence along the western boundary of said section to the seashore ; thence northerly, following the shore line, to the point of commencement.
Centreville—10th August,  1874.      Name changed October 27th,  1884,  from  "Upper Chilliwhack" to
" Centreville ":
Commencing at the south-east corner of the "Chilliwhack School District;" thence true east
two miles; thence true north nine miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser River ; thence in a
westerly and south-westerly direction, following the meanderings of Fraser River, to the mouth of
Chilliwhack River; theuce following the right bank of Chilliwhack River, to its intersection with the
northern boundary of the '' Chilliwhack School District;" thence true east along the northern boundary
of said School District, to its north-east corner; thence true south four miles, to the point of commencement.
Cheam—26th November, 1874.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883:
Commencing at a point on the eastern boundary of the "Centreville School District; " thence true
east eight miles; thence true north five and a half miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser
River; thence in a westerly direction, following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the north-east
corner of "Centreville School District;" thence true south along the eastern boundary of said School
District for a distance of five and a half miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Chemainus—23rd May, 1883:
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as the District of Chemainus.
Chilcotin—11th August, 1886:
All that tract of land situated on the Fraser River between "Big Bar School District" and the
mouth of the Chilcotin River, and extending east and west to a distance of five miles on each side of
said Fraser River.
Chilliwhack—19th July,  1883.     Name changed October 27th,   1884, from   "Lower Chilliwhack" to
" Chilliwhack:"
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Township 26, New Westminster District;
thence true south along the section line for a distance of four miles; thence true west following Township line for a distance of four miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township 23; thence true
north along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 23, Town-
ship 23; thence true east along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the point of commenoe
ment.
Clinton—25th June, 1869.    Not defined.
Clover Valley—28th July, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name changed from "Surrey "
to "Clover Valley," 23rd May, 1883:
Commencing at a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-west corner of Section
3, Township 7, New Westminster District; thence true north along the section line for a distance of
ten miles, to the north-west corner of Section 21, Township 8 ; thence true west along the section line
four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 24; thence south along the eastern boundary of " Mud
Bay School District," to its intersection with the north shore of Semiahmoo Bay ; theuce south-easterly
along the shore of Semiahmoo Bay, to a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-east
corner of Section 1, Township 1; theuce true east along the said parallel a distance of three miles, to
the point of commencement.
Coldstream—12th June, 1886 :
All that tract of land known as Township 6, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Colwood—3rd October, 1873:
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the north end of Parson's Bridge ; thence following Rowe Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and 98; thence in a northerly direction
along the eastern boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts;
thence westerly along said boundary line, to the north-west corner of Section 114; thence south-westerly 51 Vic
Public Schools Report.
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TABLE H.—DISTRICTS, DATES OF CREATION, BOUNDARIES.
Alberni—21st April, 1886:
All that tract of land included in Alberni District.
Aldergrove—12th June, 1886 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 34, Township 10, New Westminster District j
thence true east to the north-east corner of Section 33, Township 13; thence south to the Yale Waggon
Road; thence east on said road to the western boundary line of Section 24, Township 13; thence south
to the 49th parallel of latitude; thence west along said parallel to the south-west corner of Section 3,
Township 10; thence true north to the point of commencement.
Barkerville—28th June, 1871:
Circle with a radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
Beaver Point—18th August, 1885:
Commencing at the point in which the western boundary of Section 88, Salt Spring Island, reaches
the sea; thence due south to Fulford Harbour; thence easterly and along the sea-shore to the point of
commencement; and including, Russell, Portland, and Moresby Islands.
Bio Bar—27th October, 1884.    Re-defined 11th December, 1884:
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the mouth
of Big Bar Creek, and whose radius shall be a distance of 20 miles from such centre.
Bonaparte—11th August, 1886:
All that tract of land on the Cariboo Waggon Road situated between the 116-Mile Post and the
126-Mile Post, and extending to a distance of three miles on each side of the centre of said road.
Boundary Bat—4th May, 1886:
All that portion of Township 5 situated between the 49th parallel of latitude and the southern
boundary of " Trenant School District."
Burgoyne Bay—3rd October, 1873.    Re-defined 18th August, 1885:
Commencing at the north-west corner of "Beaver Point School District;" thence due west to the
sea-shore; thence southerly and along the sea-shore to Fulford Harbour; thence north along the
western boundary line of "Beaver Point School District," to the point of commencement.
Burton's Prairie—26th April, 1882:
Commencing at a point where the line between Sections 22 and 23, Township No. 17, intersects the
right bank of Eraser River; thence due north for a distance of two miles 33 chains, more or less, to a
point on the First Correction Line, being the north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 17; thence
east along said Correction Line for a distance of seven chains and forty links, more or less, to the southwest corner of Section 2, Township No. 18; thence due north for a distance of three miles, to the northwest corner of Section 14, Township No. 18; thence true east for a distance of six miles; thence true
south for a distance of three miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township No. 21; thence due
west along the First Correction Line for a distance of seven chains sixty-three links, more or less, to the
north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 20; thence due south for a distance of four miles; thence
due west for a distance of six miles, to the south-west corner of Section 14, Township No. 17 ; thence
due north, along the line between Sections 14, 15, 22, and 23, Township No. 17, for a distance of one
mile twenty-five chains, more or less, to its intersection with the left bank of Fraser River.
Cache Creek—Not defined.
Cadboro—7th April, 1885.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 14th April, 1887:
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 45; thence south-westerly along the eastern boundary
of said section, to the south-west corner of Section 44; thence in a direct line to the north-east corner
of Section 38; thence in a southerly direction, in a direct line, to the south-west corner of Section 27 ;
thence due south to the central point of the western boundary line of Section 76; thence due east to the
sea-shore at Oak Bay; thence northerly, following the sea-shore, to the point of commencement.
Canoe Pass—8th May, 1884:
All that tract of land lying west of a line commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 96, Group 2,
and extending due south to the Gulf of Georgia, and including Westham Island.
Cedar, South—27th May, 1880:
Commencing at the south-west corner of Cranberry District; thence east along the southern boundary of Cranberry and Cedar Districts, to the coast line; thence north-west along the coast line, to the
north-east corner of Section 12, Range 5, Cedar District; thence west along the section line, to the
north-west corner of Section 12, Range 1, Cranberry District; thence south along the western boundary
of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement. xxx. Public Schools Report. 1887
to the south-east corner of Section 100; thence in a south-easterly direction to the south-west corner of
Section 51; thence along the section line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at Royal Bay; thence
north-easterly along the shore line to the southern end of Parson's Bridge; thence along the said bridge
to the point of commencement.
Comox, North—30th July, 1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined May 8th, 1884, and 7th April, 1885:
All that portion of Comox District between the western boundary of " South Comox  School District" and the eastern boundary of "Courtenay School District."
Comox, South—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 21st July, 1884:
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 9; thence magnetic north, to the Gulf of Georgia;
thence along the shore to the point of commencement.
Cowichan—16th June, 1869.    Re-defined 24th April, 1884: named changed 27th October, 18S4, from " South
Cowichan" to "Cowichan."
That portion of Quamichan District situate to the south of Cowichan River, and that portion of
Cowichan District south of Cowichan River and Cowichan Harbour, and not included in the Shawnigan
School District.
Cowichan, South—3rd November, 1885:
All that portion of Shawnigan District north of the line separating Sections 15 and 16 and east of
the Kokasailah River, and that portion of Cowichan District east of the line dividing Ranges III. and IV.
Courtenay—7th April, 1S85:
All that portion of Comox District west of Lots 50, 29 and 64.
Craigflower—23rd July, 1870. Boundaries altered and re-defined 1st June, 1878, and 14th April, 1887 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of section 10 ; thence northerly along the western boundary
of said section to the Burnside Road; thence westerly along said road to the Colquitz River; thence up
said river to the north-east corner of Section 1, Lake District; thence west to the north-west corner of
said section ; thence in a direct line north-west to the north-east corner of Section 116: thence due west
to the north-west corner of said section ; thence in a direct line south to the northern boundary line of
Esquimalt District; thence west to the north-east corner of Section 98 of said District; thence along the
eastern boundary line of said section to Parson's Bridge; thence south-easterly along the water line of
Esquimalt Harbour to the south-west corner of Section 26; thence in a direct line to the south-west
corner of Section 10; thence along the southern boundary line of said section to Victoria Arm; thence
up and across the Arm to the point of commencement.
Denman Island—17th August, 1877:
All that tract, of land known as Denman Island.
Departure Bay—25th July, 1885 :
That tract of land bounded on the south by the Nanaimo School District, on the west by the
Wellington School District, on the north by a line running from the north-eastern point of the
Wellington School District to Neck Point on the Gulf of Georgia, and on the east by the Gulf of
Georgia, together with Newcastle, Jesse, and other islands in and about Departure Bay.
Donald—27th April, 1887:
Commencing at a post marked A or the north bank of the Columbia River, about thirty yards west
of the Canadian Pacific Railway Hospital; thence north forty-one chains seventy-nine links to a post
planted on the south side of the Wait-a-bit River; thence east along said river, about thirty chains, to
a post marked T ; thence due east twenty-two chains thirty-four links to a post planted on north bank
of small creek; thence south to a post planted on the north bank of the Columbia River, marked M;
thence west about ninety chains, following along the north bank of the Columbia River, to the point of
commencement.
English—23rd May, 1887:
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 5, Block 3 North, Range 5 West, New Westminster
District; thence due north to the north-east corner of Section 20, Block 4 North, Range 5 West; thence
due west to the Gulf of Georgia; thence southerly and easterly, following the shore line, to the point of
commencement.
Esquimalt—22nd October, 1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 14th April, 1887 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 32; thence south to Victoria Harbour; thence
southerly, westerly, and easterly, following the shore lines of Victoria Harbour, Juan de Fuca Strait,
and Esquimalt Harbour, to the south-west corner of Section 26 ; thence easterly in a direct line to the
south-west corner of Section 10; thence easterly along the southern boundary line of said section to the
point of commencement.
Gabriola, North- 23rd May, 1883.    Re-defined 24th April, 18S4:
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying to the west of the division line between Sections 9, 10, 14,
15, 18, and 31.
Gabriola, South—10th August, 1S72.   Boundaries altered and re-defined 23rd May, 1883.    Name changed
to "South Gabriola."   Re-defined 24th April, 1884:
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying east of North Gabriola School District, and including
Mudge Island. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxi
Grand Prairie—21st April, 1886:
Commencing at a point forty chains south of the south-west corner of Lot 458, Group 1, Kamloops
Division of Yale District; thence true north four miles; thence true east nine miles, more or less, to
the eastern boundary of Hugh Currie's pre-emption; thence true south four miles; theuce true west
nine miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Hall's Prairie—9th January, 1885:
Commencing at the Iron Post, International Boundary Line, Semiahmoo Bay; thence east, along
said boundary line, to the eastern boundary of Surrey; thence uoith, along the eastern boundary line
of Surrey, a distance of three miles; thence west to Semiahmoo Bay; thence south, along the shore line
of Semiahmoo Bay, to the point of commencement.
Hope—25th February, 1871 :
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a radius of three miles from the Court House.
Kamloops—11th May, 1886 :
All that tract of land included in Lots 231, 232, 233, and 234, Group 1, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Kensington—23rd May, 1887 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 21, Township 7, New Westminster District; thence
due north to the north-east corner of Section 33; theuce due west to the north-west corner of Section
36, Township 1; thence due south to the south-we3t corner of Section 24; thence east to the point of
commencement.
Lake—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880:
Commencing at the north-east corner of Cedar Hill School District, being the point where the
boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts intersects the sea-shore at Cordova Bay; thence in
a south-westerly direction, following the northern boundary of Cedar Hill School District, to the northeast corner of Section 50, Victoria District; thence westerly along the southern boundary of Section 82,
to Colquitz Stream; thenco following said stream, in a northerly direction, to its intersection with the
northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District; thence westerly along the northern boundary of Section
1, to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern boundary of Section 22; thence in a northwesterly direction across Section 22, to the north-east boundary of Section 116; thence westerly along
the northern boundary of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake District; thence north along
said boundary, to the south-west corner of Section 127; thence east along the southern boundary of
Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53; thence north along the western
boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of South Saanich District; thence east
along said boundary to the sea-shore ; thence following the sea-shore, in a south-easterly direction, to
the point of commencement.
Lac La Hache—30th July, 1875 :
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from the school-house, situate at the 114-Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, as the centre of such
circle.
Langley—30th April, 1871.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 18th August, 1885:
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 126, Township 9, New Westminster District; thence
south to the centre of the eastern boundary line of Section 24, Township 8, of said district; thence due
east to the western boundary of East Langley School District; thence in a right line, north, to the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, of said district; thence west, to the western boundary
line of said township ; thence due south to point of commencement.
Langley, East—28th May, 18S5 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 1, Township 11, New Westminster District; thence
due west to the south-west corner of Section 3 of said township ; thence due north to Fraser River ;
thence easterly, up said river, to the western boundary of Stave River School District; thence south,
along said boundary, to point of commencement.
Lillooet—22nd October, 1870 :
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
Lulu—17th August, 1877.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 11th May, 1886:
All of Sea Island, and that portion of Lulu Island north of the First Correction Line, and not
included in the North Arm School District.
Lytton—20th November, 1869 :
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
Maple Bay—16th June, 1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name changed from  " North Cowichan" to "Maple Bay."   Re-defined 2nd February, 1885 :
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as Comiaken District.
Maple Ridge—31st July, 1874 :
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing at the south-west corner of Section 3,
Township No. 9, New Westminster District; thence in a northerly direction to the north-west corner xxxii. Public Schools Report. 1887
of Section 34, Township No. 9, aforesaid; thence in an easterly direction to the north-east corner of
Section 32, Township No. 12, New Westminster District; thence in a southerly direction to the point
of intersection with the Langley School District; thence following the western boundary of the Langley
School District to the northern boundary line of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster District; thence
westerly to the point of commencement.
Matsqui—Not defined.
Mayne Island—23rd May, 1883:
All that tract of land known as Mayne Island, and that portion of Galiano Island lying west of
Active Pass and east of a line running north across the Island from the south-west corner of Lot 2.
Metchosin—8th April, 1871 :
The whole of the District of Metchosin, according to the Official Map, together with that portion of
Esquimalt District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the boundary of the Craigflower School District.
Moodyville—27th June, 1870:
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
school-house on the north side of said Inlet, and whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from
such school-house; excepting always any of the land on the south side of the Inlet.
Mount Lehman—8th May, 1884 :
Commencing at a point on Fr.iser River, being the north-west corner of Section 27, Township 14,
New Westminster District ; thence due south along the section line, for a distance of seven and a
quarter miles, more or less, to the Yale Waggon Road ; thence easterly along the Yale Waggon Road,
to a point being the intersection of the Yale Waggon Road with the dividing line separating Sections
19 and 20, Township 16 ; thence northerly along said section line, for a distance of four miles, more or
less, to Fraser River ; thence north-westerly following the bank of the river, to the point of commencement.
Mountain—6th June, 1887 :
Commencing at corner post between Sections 15 and 16 on the eastern boundary of Mountain
District; thence westerly to the south-west corner of Section 16, Range 5; thence southerly to the
north-west corner of Section 8, Range 5 ; thence easterly on the section line to the limit of Mountain
District; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said district to the place of commencement.
Mud Bay—23rd May, 1883 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 26, Block 1 North, Range 1 West; thence true
north along the section line to the northeast corner of Section 23, Township 2, New Westminster
District; thence true west along the section line five miles, to the north-west corner of Section 19,
Township 2 ; thence true south along the township line, for a distance of three miles seventy chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Mud Bay ; thence in a southerly direction and south-easterly direction along the shores of Mud Bay and Semiahmoo Bay to the point of commencement.
Nanaimo—30th July, 1870.    Boundaries re-defined 20th March, 1885.
Commencing at the mouth of Chase River ; thence due west to the boundary line of the Nanaimo
and Mountain Districts ; thence north, on the said boundary line, to the north-east corner of Mountain
District; thence east to coast line ; thence along the coast line to point of commencement—subdivided
into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north of a line drawn due west from the end of Bastion and Fitzwdliam
Streets to the boundary line of Mountain District, shall be known as the North Ward.
2. All that portion of land south of Bastion and Fitzwilliam Streets, and west of the old Victoria
Road, shall be known as the Middle Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either the North Ward or the Middle Ward, shall be
known as the South Ward.
New Westminster—4th June, 1870:
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster—subdivided into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north-east of Clement Street, extended in a right line in both directions
to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. Patrick's Ward.
2. All that portion of land lying between St. Patrick's Ward and Douglas Street, extended in a
right line in both directions to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. George's Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either St. Patricks Ward or St. George's Ward shall
be known as St. Andrew's Ward.
Nicola—11th August, 1886: m „     , *....,,,
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 25, Township 91, Kamloops Division of Yale
District; thence due north three miles ; thence due east five miles ; thence due south three miles ;
thence west to point of commencement.
Nicola Lake—23rd May, 1883: , ■ • . .   .
All that tract of land known as Townships 95, 96, 97, 99, and 100, Kamloops Division of Yale
District. 51  Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxiii.
Nicola Valley—31st July, 1874 :
Bounded on the east by a line drawn north and south from the residence of William Charters in
Nicola Valley, and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola
Valley ; on the west by a line drawn north and south from the residence of Byron Earnshaw, and
extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said
western boundary being about nine miles distant from the eastern boundary ; and on the north and
south by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
North Arm—11th May, 1886 :
Commencing at the western boundary of Lot 311, Group 1 ; thence east, including all lots on the
North Arm of Fraser River to the eastern boundary of Lot 167, Group 1 ; thence crossing the said Arm
to the north-east corner of Section 36, Block 5 North, Range 4 West; thence south to the First
Correction Line ; thence west along said line to the south-west corner of Section 36, Block 5 North,
Range 6 West; thence north to the north-east corner of Section 24, Block 5 North, Range 6 West;
thence crossing the Ann to point of commencement.
North Thompson—25th August, 18S4 :
That portion of the valley on each side of the North Thompson River, which extends to a distance
of five miles above and five miles below the north-east corner of Section 24, Township 112.
Okanagan—31st July, 1874 :
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek ; thence northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a distance of five miles ; thence easterly a distance of five miles ; thence southerly to Mission
Creek ; thence westerly to point of commencement.
Oyster—7th April, 1885 :
Commencing at the point where the boundary line between Sections 15 and 16, Range 6, Chemainus
District, intersects the sea-shore ; thence west along said line to a point due south of the south-west
corner of Oyster District ; thence due north to the said south-west corner of said district; thence
following the western boundary of said district to its north-west corner ; thence east to the sea-shore ;
thence southerly along the coast line to point of commencement.
Port Moody—26th April, 1884 :
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
central point of the crossings of Clarke and Douglas Streets, on the Clarke Survey, and whose radius
shall be a distance of 3J miles from such central point.
Prairie—26th November, 1874.    Boundaries altered and re-detined 18th August, 1885 :
Commencing at the south-cast corner of Langley School District; thence due west to the eastern
boundary line of Section 21, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence south, in a right line, to
the south-west corner of Section 27, Township 7, of said district; thence due east, to the south-east
corner of Section 28, Township 10, of said district ; thence north, in aright line, to point of commencement.
Priest's Valley—23rd May, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 12th June, 1886 :
All of Townships 8 and 9, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Quamichan—23rd May, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 2nd February, 1885 :
All those portions of the districts known on the official map as the Quamichan and Cowichan
Districts lying north of the Cowichan River, and north of the Cowichan Harbour, and not included in
the Somenos School District.
Quesnelle—14th April, 1881.    Name changed in March, 1886, from " Quesnellemouth " to " Quesnelle " :
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the Fraser and Quesnelle Rivers ; and running
thence due west a distance of one mile ; thence due north six miles ; thence due east three miles j
thence due south six miles ; thence due west two miles to point of commencement.
Round Prairie—4th November, 1886:
All of Townships 34, 35, and 38, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Saanich, North—30th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined3rd October, 1873, and 27th May,
1880:
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula lying to the north of South Saanich District, as shown on
the Official Map, and known as the " North Saanich District."
Saanich, South—30th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 3rd October, 1873, and 27th May,
1880.    Name changed 27th October, 1884, from " East-South Saanich " to " South Saanich:"
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lake School District; thence west, along the southern
boundary of South Saanich District, to the south-west corner of Section 18, Range 3 E.; thence north
along the said range line, to the south-east corner of Section 12, Range 2 E.; thence west, along the
southern boundary of Section 12, Range 2 E., to its south-west corner ; thence north along the range
line, to the south-west corner of Section 4, Range 2 E.; thence west, along the southern boundary of
Section 4, Range 1 E., to its south-west corner; thence north, along the range line to the north-west
corner of Section 1, Range 1 E.; thence east along the southern boundary of North Saanich, to the seashore ; thence following the sea-shore, in a south-easterly direction, to the point of commencement. xxxiv. Public Schools Report. 1887
Saanich, West—27th May, 1880.    Name changed October 27th,  1884, from " West-South Saanich"  to
" West Saanich."
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lake School District; thence east, along the southern
boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of .Section 53, Lake District ; thence
north, along the western boundaries of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of the South
Saanich School District ; thence west, to the north-west corner of Section 56, Lake District; thence
north, following the western boundary of the South Saanich School District, to its intersection with
the southern boundary of North Saanich District; thence west, along said southern boundary, to the
sea-shore at Saanich Inlet; thence southerly, along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod Creek, to
the south-west corner of South Saanich District; thence south, along the western boundary of Sections
122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to the point of commencement.
Shawnigan—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered 21st August, 1885 :
All that portion of Shawnigan District lying south of the Hue separating Ranges 15 and 16.
Shuswap Prairie—23rd May, 1883 :
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the school-
house, and whose radius shall be a distance of six miles from such school-house.
Somenos—2nd February, 1S85 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Range 6; thence south, to the south-east
corner of Section 18 of said range ; thence west to the south-west corner of Section IS, Range 1 ;
thence north, to the north-west corner of Section 20 of said range ; and thence following the boundary
lines of the tract of land known on the Official Map as the District of Somenos to the point of
commencement.
Sooke—23rd May, 1872 :
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the District of Sooke.
Spallumcheen—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 4th November, 1886 :
All of Townships 4 and 7, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Stanley—17th August, 1877 :
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of three miles in
length from the Court House, Stanley.
St. Mary's Mission—7th April, 1885 :
All that portion of Section 17, New Westminster District, not included either in Burton's Prairie
School District or in Mount Lehman School District.
Stave River—5th June, 1884 :
The tract of land contained in the south half of Township 15, and those portions of Township 14
not included in Mount Lehman School District.
Stuart's Lake—17th August, 1877 :
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from Fort St. James on Stuart's Lake.
Sumas—13th October, 1871.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883 :
Commencing at a point where the northern boundary of Chilliwhack School District intersects the
Chilliwhack River; thence in a northerly and north-westerly direction, following the meanderings of
the Chilliwhack River to its confluence with the Fraser River ; thence in a south-westerly direction,
following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the mouth of Sumas River ; thence in a southerly and
south-easterly direction, along the eastern bank of the Sumas River and Sumas Lake, to its intersection
with the southern boundary of Section 31, Township 22 ; thence true east to the south-east corner of
Section 34, Township 22 ; thence true north, five miles, to the north-west corner of the Chilliwhack
School District; thence true east, along the northern boundary of said School District, to the point of
commencement.
Trenant—3rd October, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th May, 1884, and 4th May, 1886 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 96, Township 5 ; thence south on the western boundary
line of " Canoe Pass School District" to the south-west corner of Lot 107; thence east to the south-east
corner of said lot; thence north to the south-west corner of Lot 172 ; thence east to the south-east
corner of Lot 176 : thence north to the south-west corner of Section 25 ; thence east to the south-east
corner of said section ; thence true north to Fraser River; thence south-westerly along the left bank
of said river to the point of commencement.
Tolmie, 14th April, 1887 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence northerly along the
western boundary of said section to the Burnside Road ; thence westerly along said road to the Colquitz
River; thence up said river to the north-west corner of Section 77; thence due east to the central
point of the eastern boundary line of Section 64; thence south along the western boundary lines of
Sections 32 and 62 to the south-east corner of Section 63 ; thence south-east to the eastern extremity
of the northern boundary line of Victoria City; thence in a direct line westerly to the north-east
corner of Section 5 ; thence west along the northern boundary of said section to Victoria Harbour ;
thence west, following the shore line to the point of commencement. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxix.
APPENDIX A.
Rules and Regulations for the Government of Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3.30 p.m., from
April to September, inclusive; and from 9.30 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., from
October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work during
the whole year, and a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's work in the six
months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion
Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4- There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer vacation shall include the time
from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter vacation shall
continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after the new year.
2. Three days shall be allowed to each teacher for the purpose of visiting schools ; he shall
give at least one week's notice to the Superintendent of Education and to the Secretary of the
Board of Trustees of his intention of closing the school for this purpose, and must report without
delay to the Department the names of schools visited and time spent in each. These visiting
days shall not be taken in June or December, and in graded schools must be taken by all the
teachers at the same time, the dates to be agreed upon by a majority of the teachers of each
school; but teachers preferring to continue their classes shall forfeit their rightto these visiting
days for the year.
5- Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries duiing the vacations and holidays ordered in
Rules 3 and 4.
2. Teachers shall not be paid for other vacations or holidays until accounted for to the
satisfaction of the Education Department.
3. Teachers failing to give the thirty days' notice required by the Act on leaving a school
shall forfeit one month's salary, unless satisfactory explanations be given.
4. Teachers, during temporary absence from duty, must provide substitutes satisfactory to
the Board of Trustees, and must satisfy the claims of such substitutes for services rendered.
6. Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany teachers or
pupils.
7. Pupils enrolled in Ward Schools shall not be permitted to attend the Central Schools,
except by promotion at examination held by the Superintendent of Education; and pupils of the
Central Schools shall not be admitted into Ward Schools.
8-  It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning the
regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of
times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment, his progress
in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and five
minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school, to
observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow
recesses to exceed the specified time—that is, from the time study ceases and
commences again.
5. To keep a visitors' book (which he shall ask the Trustees to provide), and to enter
therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so chooses to
enter therein any remarks suggested by his visit. 51 Vic Public Schools Report. xxxv.
Vancouver—12th February, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined and name changed from " Granville"
to  "Vancouver," 4th November, 1886:
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the City of Vancouver.
Vesuvius—18th August, 1885:
All that portion of Salt Spring Island situated north of the northern boundary line of Burgoyne
Bay School District.
Victoria—25th June,  1869.    Boundaries altered  1st June,  1878.    Re-defined 27th May 1880, and 14th
April, 1887 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 5, Victoria District; thence east along the
northern boundary line to the north-east corner of said section ; thence in a direct line south-easterly
; to the eastern extremity of the northern boundary line of Victoria City ; thence due east to the
western boundary line of Section 26; thence south to the central point of the western boundary line
of Section 76 ; thence due east to the sea-shore at Oak Bay ; theuce southerly and westerly, following
the sea shore and crossing Victoria Harbour, to the south-east corner of Section 32, Esquimalt District;
thence north to the north-east corner of said section ; thence easterly along the southern boundary line
of Section 10 of said district to the shore line ; thence across the Arm to the point of commencement—
subdivided into wards as follows:—
1. All that portion of land south of the centre of Fort Street, and south and east of the centre of
Cadboro Bay Road to the northern boundary of Section 2, shall be known as James' Bay Ward.
2. All that portion of land north of the centre of Fort Street, and south of the centre of Johnson
Street extended in a right line to the Cadboro Bay Road, shall be known as Yates Street Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either James' Bay Ward or Yates Street Ward, shall
be known as Johnson Street Ward.
Wellington—2nd May, 1874.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 6th June, 1887 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Wellington District on the shore line ; thence west along
the northern boundary, following the shore line to the north-west corner of said district; thence south
to the south-west corner of said district; thence south along the western boundary line of Mountain
District to the section post between Sections 8 and 9, Range 1, Mountaiu District; thence east to the
north-west corner of Section 8, Range 5 ; thence north to the south-west corner of Section 16, Range 5 j
thence east along said section line to the eastern boundary of Mountain District ; thence northerly to
the point of commencement.
Williams Lake—27th May, 1880:
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the 150-
Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, and whose radius shall be a distance of seven miles from such mile post.
Yale—25th June, 1869—Not defined.
Y0RK~31st July, 1874:
Township No. 19, New Westminster District. 51 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxvii.
PART III
APPENDICES
J

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