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THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1883-84. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1885

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 THIRTEENTH   ANNUAL   REPORT
ON the
PUBLIC    SCHOOLS
OF  THE   PROVINCE  OP
BRITISH   COLUMBIA,
1883-84.
BY THE  SUPERINTENDENT  OE  EDUCATION.
fflffitttfj Stypentitcesf.
v'ICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Government Printer,
at fcho Government Printing Office, James* Bay.
1885.  48 Vie. Public Schools Report. 147
Public Schools Report,
1883-84.
To His Honor Clement Francis Cornwall, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British
Columbia.
May it Please Your Honor:
I beg herewith respectfully to submit the Thirteenth Annual Eeport on the Public Schools
of the Province.
JNO. ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office
8th January 1885  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 149
PART   I.
GENERAL  REPORT.  48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
151
ANNUAL  REPORT
OP  THE
Superintendent of Education,
1883-84.
Education Office, Victoria,
December 16, 1884.
To the Honorable John Robson,
Provincicd Secretary.
I beg to submit, for the information of His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Thirteenth Annual Report on the Public Schools of the Province for the scholastic year 1883-84.
During the year 49 common schools, 7 graded schools, and 1 high school, in all 57 schools,
have been in operation, employing 75 teachers. The whole number of pupils enrolled was
3,420, an increase of 727 over the previous year's enrolment. The average daily attendance,
1,808.6, shows an increase, for the same period, of 425.6. The total expenditure for education
proper during the year was $58,361.24, an increase of $7,510.60. The amounts expended, or
rather invested, by the Lands and "Works Department in the construction of school-houses, &c,
are not included in these figures, as such outlays are considered more as assets of the Government than direct expenditures for the maintenance of schools.
The following is a statement of all expenditures made during the year for educational
purposes:—■
Amount paid for teachers' salaries $50,762 55
Do.       for incidental expenses of schools, including rent      4,610 02
Do.       by Lands and Works Department for buildings, repairs, &c      9,804 38
Do. clo. do. do.      insurance         787  95
Do.       for expenditures of Education Office      2,988 67
Total $68,953 57
Total expenditure for 1882-83    60,758 75
Increase for the year $ 8,194 82
' In the amount expended by the Lands and Works Department for buildings, repairs, &c,
$9,804.38, is included the cost of the erection of James Bay Ward School-house, Victoria,
$2,298.42, which was a portion of the proceeds of sale of part of the school reserve in the city.
Deducting this amount from the total expenditure for the year, the actual outlay for all purposes of education was $66,655.15. The amounts voted in the Estimates for 1883-84 were
$62,565 for education proper, and for construction, &c, $5,850, in all $68,415, thus showing
an unexpended balance for the year of $1,759.85.
Abstract.
Number of pupils enrolled in all the schools during the year  3,420
Increase for the year         727
Number of boys enrolled  1,950
Increase for the year         433
Number of girls enrolled  1,470
Increase for the year        294   ' 152 Public Schools Report. 1884
Average daily attendance  1,808.6
Increase for the year  425.6
Number of pupils enrolled in the High School  84
Increase for the year  23
Number of boys enrolled in High School  45
Increase for the year  11
Number of girls enrolled in High School  39
Increase for the year  12
Average daily attendance in High School  56.63
Increase for the year  18.63
Average daily attendance in Common Schools  1,751.97
Increase for the year  406.97
Number of School Districts at close of year  67
Increase for the year  7
The foregoing statistics are very gratifying evidence that the educational facilities which
the very liberal system of Public Instruction affords are yearly becoming more and more
appreciated. At no time in the history of our Public Schools has there been such general
interest taken in popular education as during the past year. The very large increase in both
enrolment and average attendance, as well as the fact that the total number of visits made to
the schools increased from 2,922 in 1882-83 to 9,486 in 1883-84, are very substantial evidences
of this. It is worthy of note that this lively interest was not confined to the cities, but was
shown in nearly all of the other districts. The coming into operation of the "Act to Amend
the Public School Act, 1879," one section of which extends to the wife of every voter the
privilege of franchise, contributed to the awakening of no little enthusiasm in both civic and
rural districts. Of the many beneficial effects resulting from a manifested interest of the
workings and success of the school, not the least is that it encourages the pupil to study and
arouses the teacher to energy in his work.
Another section of the same Act increased the number of trustees in each of the cities of
Victoria, New Westminster and Nanaimo, from three to six. Thus far the change has given
satisfaction. The securing of the zealous efforts of six prominent citizens to guard the educational welfare of the children, has not only tended to increase the growing popularity in the
Public Schools in these cities, but has inspired greater confidence in their proper management.
Seven School Districts were created during the year, viz.:
Canoe Pass, Shawnigan, ,   -
Mount Lehman, South Comox,
Port Moody, Spallumcheen,
Stave River.
Schools are now in operation in all these districts except Stave River, and the prospects
are that a school in this district will soon be in running order.
School-houses were erected during the past year in the following districts:—
Burton's Prairie, Lake,
Chemainus, Mayne Island,
(South) Cowichan, Mud Bay,
(Lower) Chilliwhack, Nicola Lake,
North Gabriola, Shuswap Prairie.
During the present year school-houses have been built in the following districts:—
Canoe Pass, South Cedar,
Langley, Mount Lehman,
Priest's Valley,
Victoria (Johnson Street Ward).
Petitions for the establishment of schools are being received from different parts of the
Province, caused in a great measure by the rapid accession to the population by immigration.
During the past year schools reporting an average daily attendance of less than ten (10)
for several successive mouths were allowed to be kept open. In every instance during the
present year the teachers of those schools reporting an average daily attendance less than that
required by the School Act have been notified that the law governing such cases must bo 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
153
enforced. It is gratifying to be able to state that the teachers of nearly all these schools,
aided by the trustees in urging parents to send their children with greater regularity, have
succeeded in securing thus far the average daily attendance required by statute.
Statement of the Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance of Pupils
from 1872-73 to 1883-84.
Year.
Aggregate Enrolment.
Average Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
1872-73
1,028
575
55.93
1873-74
1,245
767
61.60
1874-75
1,403
863
61.51
1875-76
1 685
984
58.39
1876-77
l'998
1,260
63.06
1877-78
2,198
1,395.5
63.5
1878-79
2,301
1,315.9
57.2
1879-80
2,462
1,293.93
52.5
1880-81
2,571
1,,366.86
53.2
1881-82
2,653
1,358.68
51.2
1882-83
2,693
1,383
51.4
1883-84
3,420
1,808.6
52.9
The annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools of the Province, commenced on July 5th, 1884, in the Legislative Hall, Victoria.
The examiners appointed to act with the Superintendent of Education were H. M. Stramberg,
Esq., B. A., and P. G. Walker, Esq., B. A., Cantab.
In the British Columbia Gazette of July 24th, 1884, appeared the list of successful
candidates, as follows:—
Public School Teachers' Examination, July, 1884.—Certificates Awarded.
First Class—Grade A.
Smith, B. H, M.A Renewal.
Stainburn, George, B.A., Cantab  ,,
McLaughlin, J. H  „
Williams, Elizabeth  A  ,,
Muir, John N., B.A., McGill University, Montreal.
Stramberg, Hector M., A.B., Dalhousie University, Halifax, N. S.
First Class—Grade B.
Kaye, James Renewal.
Halliday, James A	
Leduc, Thomas	
Offerhaus, R	
Chandler, Mrs. L. D	
Lewis, S. G ,	
Marks.
Bannerman, William S  2,186
Gillies, D. W  2,107
Lyons, Ormond  1,998
Babbitt, Daniel  1,832
Anderson, Robert  1,753
Sluggett, George II  1,748
Bell, Emelene ,  1,736
Phelps, William H  1,693 154 Public Schools Report. 1884
* Forrest, Christina  1,662
Irwin, William H  1,648
Jones, David  1,621
Thain, Joseph H  1,607
Shaw, Alexander  1,546
Second Class—Grade A.
Jamieson, Eleanor A  1,140
Storey, Marcella V  1,100
Davidson, Mary R  1,100
Kaye, Ernest E  1,095
Berkeley, Mrs. L.  A  1,094
Gowen, Annie C „  1,088
Munn, Henry A  1,087
Second Class—Grade B.
Davidson, Elizabeth A  1,063
Gardiner, Abbie  1,037
Wolfenden, Nellie F. F  1,021
Northcote, Alice  1,010
Bannerman, A. M  983
Jackson, Harriet ,  955
Michael, Mrs. A. M  948
Gillanders, Albert  943
Pollard, Annie  941
Lawrence, Mary  941
Shaw, John  940
Smith, Clara P  935
Halliday, Marie F  933
Hoy, James A   932
Third Class—Grade A.
Andrews, Helen  885
Reynard, Eva  883
Heard, Mary  874
Norris, Martha J  863
Sweet, Margaret J  853
Scott, Jean Ann  849
Watson, George A  847
Mufford, William J  843
Bryant, Maria  833
Tod, Katherine  820
Ramsay, Jennie  819
Norris, Mary E  796
McCartey, Augusta  785
Robinson, Sarah A  785
Third Class—Grade B.
Shaw, Alexander, Jr  759
Barron, Isabel M. F  726
The following obtained Certificates of Standing.
Howay, Frederic W. (Equivalent to standard of First Class, Grade A.)  2,620
Smith, Edwin C.  (Equivalent to standard of Third Class, Grade A.)  916
Murchie, J. Maggie (Equivalent to standard of Third Class, Grade A.)  861
* These marks were obtained on First A Papers, 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
155
Recommended for Temporary Certificates.
Caldwell, Mrs. L. A.
Coghlan, Ella.
Sinclair, James W.
Monk, Mrs. Annie.
Mebius, Lucy A.
Dallas, Anna C,
H. M. Stramberg, A.B., )    „      ,   ,.
Fred. G. Walker, B.A., Cantab, V /     . 0J
S. D. Pope, B.A., Supt. of Education, j Mxammer8-
Temporary Certificates have been granted to those recommended by the Board of Examiners.
JNO. ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary's Office, Provincial Secretary.
19th July, 1884.
It will be noted that the number of applicants was not only a marked increase on the
previous year, but that the status of the candidates, in an educational light, has proportionately
improved. The granting to holders of first-class certificates the privilege of renewal without
examination, in a great measure accounts for the apparent desire to reach as high a standard
as possible. This is not only commendable, but politic, as trustees generally show a decided
preference for employing those who hold the higher certificates. Doubtless those fitted by
experience and education, and who aim to excel in the profession, will rightfully surpass those
who are indifferent as to success, or who engage in teaching merely as a resort. The painstaking energetic instructor who strives earnestly for the advancement of all under his charge,
and who uses his every endeavour to build up the reputation of his school cannot but be appreciated. The success of a school under such a teacher is assured. While there are in all professions those who have little or no ambition to excel, yet in none should there be less room
for the drone, than in the profession of teaching.
Teachers on Permanent Staff during the Year 1883-84.
Grade.
Males.
Females,
Total.
Highest
Monthly Salary
Lowest
Monthly Salary
>>       .>           >>    B	
»        »           »    B	
Third    „            „    A.   ...
8
6
3
5
0
4
9
2
3
4
9
4
5
13
10
9
7
14
4
9
22
$110
100
70
90*
60
60
100
$50
50
50
50
50
50
50
Total	
35
40
75
'. In one instance only.
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year 1884-85.
Grade.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Highest
Monthly Salary
Lowest
Monthly Salary
»         ,)       >i      B	
,,      B
Third     „        ,,      A
»       .,      B	
6
17
o
4
1
1
12
2
5
8
12
7
0
8
8
22
10
16
8
1
20
$110
100
70
75
60
50
- 75
$50
50
50
50
50
50
50
Total	
43
42
85 156 Public Schools Report. 1884
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on Permanent Staff during the Year 1883-84.
1 Teacher at $110 per month.
3 „            100
1        „              90
1 »              83£      „
4 „              80
2 »              75       „
9       „              70
14       „      60       „
5 )>       55        „
35 „              50        „
75        „ Average Salary of   $60.64 „
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year 1884-85.
1 Teacher at $110 per month.
4 „           100 „
1 I,           90 „
1 i)  8og ,,
4 ,,           80
3 j)          75 ,,
10 „          70 „
19 „          60 „
6 „           55 „
36 „       50        „
85        ,, Average Salary of    $61.16 „
While the teachers of the Public Schools of this Province, as a body, compare very
favorably with those of the sister Provinces, not only educationally, but in clevotedness to their
work, still quite a number have not had the advantage of professional training, owing to the
want of a Normal School. This defect in our educational system will doubtless be remedied
at no distant date.
The organization of one or more Teachers' Institutes would prove of very great benefit
not only to the inexperienced instructor, but also even to those whose lives have been spent in
the profession, by introducing to them new methods of instruction and by developing ideas
which could afterwards be tested with practical results. In other Provinces of the Dominion,
the benefits derived from such institutions have been very marked, and many teachers who
have risen to high positions in the profession have borne testimony to the fact that they were
in a great measure indebted for their success to the Teachers' Institute. It is very desirable
that the teachers of the Province should heartily co-operate in any effort made towards the
organization of an association for mutual improvement.
The Canadian series of Readers and Speller, being considered unsuitable in every way for
the requirements of the schools, has been discarded, and Gage's series has been authorized in
its stead. The manner of introducing the new series has been prescribed by the following
regulations:—
1. That the new series shall be introduced into all schools organized after June 30th, 1884.
2. That the teacher of each school, having first obtained the written approval of his
trustees, shall gradually introduce the new series as opportunities occur.
3. That after June 30th, 1885, the new series shall alone be used, and the old series shall
cease to be authorized.
The exchange has met with the hearty approval of teachers, trustees and parents. Among
the many advantages gained by the introduction of the new series the following features are
noticeable:—the excellency of the typographical execution; the judicious selection and gradation of the elementary combinations; the association of the written word-sign with the pictorial; 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 157
the copious notes and exercises accompanying each lesson; the careful gradation of the matter
from lesson to lesson and from book to book; the direct elocutionary assistance and general
educational effect; the number of practical and moral lessons given with a view to influence
the pupil's every-day life; the selections which they contain bearing upon the history and
geography of our own country; the excellent mechanical execution, without increase of price
over the old series.
During May and June examinations were held in 22 districts, comprising 27 schools and
employing 44 teachers. In many of the districts visited the deep interest taken by both
trustees and parents in the welfare of their school was very noticeable, and as a necessary
result the school in each of these districts was found to be in a prosperous condition. At
these inspections neglect of proper physical culture was in some cases apparent. To give a
pupil adequate time and freedom in which to romp and play as suits his will, is not giving all
the attention necessary to his physical education. He should be taught to sit, stand and walk
in an erect position, and to preserve this attitude not only when in class, but continually.
That improper posture, such as head down, body contorted, book held awry, &c, materially
detracts from the merits of a good reader, every one will admit; the same is applicable to every
other school exercise.
Another neglect noticed in proper physical training was the want of a quiet, graceful
manner in coming to and going from class. That these defects can and should be remedied, in
the interests of pupils, will readily be conceded.
The advantages to both teacher and pupils of frequent inspection are manifold, but the
schools of the Province are so scattered that it is impossible for the Superintendent to spend
the time necessary in order to visit as frequently as desirable even those schools that are easily
accessible. The increased clerical work of this office, consequent upon the enlarged number of
schools, precludes the possibility of his giving to them that amount of supervision which he
knows to be indispensable to their efficiency. The schools of the City of Victoria, now
employing seventeen teachers, require more frequent and thorough inspection than it has
hitherto been in his power to give to them. The appointment of a practical and thoroughly
competent person, who could not only act as Inspector of schools, but also assist in the clerical
work of the office, would be a great benefit to the interests of education, and in the end prove
a wise economy.
Special Reports on Schools.
The schools inspected prior to the 1st of April were those of Victoria, Nanaimo, New
Westminster, Wellington, and Esquimalt. As your humble servant entered upon his duties
on that date, he was unable, during the remaining three months of the school year, to examine
more than the High School, the seven graded schools, and eighteen of those in the rural
districts.
These being first inspections, it is deemed improper to make any remarks as to order,
discipline, classification, progress, &c, observed at these visits.
Barkerville.
Teacher, J. R. Stirling, until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, W. S. Bannerman.
Salary, $83.33 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled, 13 boys, 14 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average daily attendance, 19.55.
Expenditure, $1,219.96.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $45.18.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $62.40, 158 Public Schools Report. 1884
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, Miss E. J. Gardiner, until December 31st, 1883; B. H. Smith, M. A.   until
September 8th, 1884; present teacher, Alexander Shaw.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled, 17 boys, 14 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average daily attendance, 16.33.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.19
Burton's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Katherine Todd.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 21st, 1884; pupils present, 7 boys, 9 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average daily attendance, 13.72.
Expenditure, $627.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.53.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.76.
Cache Creek (Boarding School).
Teacher, R. M. Clemitson.
Matron, Mrs. R. M. Clemitson.
Salary of teacher, $75 per month.
Salary of matron, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 18 girls; total 34
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 19.91.
Expenditure, $1,828.01.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $53.76.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $91.81.
Cedar (North).
Teacher, Miss L. A. Barron, until March 31st, 1884; present teacher, Ernest E Kaye.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 19 girls; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average daily attendance, 18.24.
Expenditure, $637.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.95.
Cedar (South).
Teacher, until June 30th, 1884, Mrs. Michael (Miss A. M. Russell); present teacher, Miss
Mary Lawrence.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 12 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 12.38.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $37.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $51.69. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 159
Cedar Hill.
Teacher, J. W. Thomson until December 31st, 1883; until June 30th, 1884, W. S. Ban-
nerman; present teacher, R. A. Anderson.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined April 18th, 1884; present 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 14 girls; total 30.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 15.62.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $56.33.
The very marked decrease in the attendance at this school is chiefly attributable to the
fact that as the older pupils arrive at that age when they must leave school, they are not re-
placed by a proportionate number of younger pupils.
Cheam.
Teacher, Miss Helen Andrews.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 19th, 1884; present 13 boys, 4 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 7 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 15.18.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.16.
Chemainus.
Teacher, S. G. Lewis.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 9 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average daily attendance, 7.95.
Expenditure, $620.24.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.67.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $78.01.
Chilliwhack (Lower).
Teach6r, Miss M. Jennings until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, A. H. Gillanders.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 19th, 1884; present 8 boys, 7 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the half-year, 10 boys, 15 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average daily attendance, 17.85.
Expenditure, $337.80.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.51.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $18.92.
The name of this district has been changed to Chilliwhack District.
Chilliwhack (Upper).
Teacher, J. P. Johnston, until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, Ormond Lyons.
Salary, $80 per month.
Examined May 19th, 1884; present 18 boys, 17 girls; total, 35.
Enrolled during the year, 41 boys, 37 girls; total, 78.
Average monthly attendance, 49.
Average daily attendance, 38.75.
Expenditure, $998.55, 160 Public Schools Report. 1884
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12,80.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $25.76.
Two pupils—Bertha J. Reece and Sarah A. Branchflower—passed the standard required
for admission to a High School.
The name of this district has been changed to Centreville.
Clinton.
Teacher, J. F. Smith.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 6 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 11.3.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $34.54.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $67.25.
Colwood.
Teacher, until June 30th, 1884, Miss L. Horton; present teacher, J. A. McLeod.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 8th, 1884; present, 4 boys, 6 girls;  total, 10,
Inspection May 9th, 1884; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 14.76.
Expenditure, $589.58.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.56.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.94.
Clover Valley.
Teacher, Miss M. J. Norris.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 8 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 11.
Expenditure, $639.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.06.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $58.13.
Comox.
Teacher, Miss M. F. Halliday.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 13 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 12.3.
Expenditure, $601.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.05.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.89.
Another school district adjoining this having been created,  and known as South Comox,
the name of this district has been changed to North Comox.
Cowichan (South).
Teachers until June 30th, 1884,  Thomas Clyde, R. A. Anderson, H. A. Munn; present
teacher, E. J. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month,
No inspection.
" Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 8 girls; total, 18. 48 Vic Public Schools Report.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average daily attendance, 10.47.
Expenditure, $703.46.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $39.08.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $67.18.
The creation of Shawnigan District, including in it the Bench School, accounts, in a great
measure for the decreased attendance at this school.
Craigflower.
Teacher, John Mundell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined April 17th, 1884: present, 16 boys, 10 girls; total, 26.
Inspection on June 27th, 1884.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 17 girls; total, 42.
Average monthly attendance 28.
Average daily attendance, 22.94.
Expenditure, $762.60.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.15.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $33.24.
Denman Island.
This school has been closed during the year for want of a sufficient number of pupils to
maintain the average required by the School Act. There is a prospect, however, that it will
be re-opened during the present school-year.
Esquimalt.
Teachers, A. Dods until December 31st, 1883; J. N. Muir, B.A., until March 31st, 1884;
until June 30th, 1884, W.  H. Phelps; present teacher, W. H. Phelps.
Salary, $70 per month-
Examined April 16th, 1884: present, 21 boys, 6 girls; total, 27.
Inspection June 27th, 1884.
Enrolled during the year, 45 boys, 24 girls; total, 69.
Average monthly attendance, 45.
Average daily attendance, 35.51.
Expenditure, $813.97.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.79.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $22.92.
Gabriola (North).
Teacher, Miss Jean A. Scott until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, Miss M. J. Sweet.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 15 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 14.85.
Expenditure, $509.47.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.15.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.30.
Gabriola (South).
Teacher, Alexander Shaw until September 16th, 1884; present teacher, Alex. Shaw, Jr.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 12 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 15.07,
Expenditure, 162 Public Schools Report. 1884
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.46.
Granville.
Teacher, Miss C. Irvine until December 31st, 1883 ; Miss E, J. Gardiner until June 30th,
1884; present teacher, W. H. Irwin.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined May 15th, 1884: present, 8 boys, 8 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 17 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average daily attendance, 21.4.
Expenditure, $617.72.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.86.
At the examination of this school, Catherine Gregory passed the standard required for
admission to a High School.
Hope.
Teacher, until December 31st, 1883, H. Liddell; until June 30th,   1884, Miss Clara P.
Smith; present teacher, Miss Clara P. Smith.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 17 girls; total, 31,
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 13.75.
Expenditure, $477.37.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.39.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.71.
Lake.
Teacher, G. H. Sluggett, until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, R. L. Fraser.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined April 18th, 1884; present 8 boys, 4 girls; total, 12.
Inspection April 23rd, 1884; present 9 boys, 5 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 13 girls; total 27.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 13.18.
Expenditure, $613.50.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.72.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.54.
In this district a school-house has been erected on the site of the one burned in 1883, and
the grounds have been enlarged by the addition of £ of an acre.
Langley.
Teacher, J. W. Sinclair.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined May 22nd, 1884; present 17 boys, 6 girls; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 13 girls; total 46.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average daily attendance, 16.56.
Expenditure, $705.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.34.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $42.62.
As provided for in the Estimates a school-house is in course of erection on a site selected
in accordance with the provisions of the School Act. The new building will certainly prove
more commodious and comfortable in every way than the old structure that has out-worn its
usefulness. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 188
Lillooet.
Teacher, Casper Phair until August 31st, 1884; present teacher, James M. Campbell.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 11 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average daily attendance, 14.84.
Expenditure, $7-81.96.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.96.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.69.
Lytton.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey until June 30th, 1884; present teacher, D. W. Gillies.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 16 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 19.85.
Expenditure, $760.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.52.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.29.
Maple Bay.
Teacher, Miss M. V. Storey, until January 10th, 1884; R. A. Anderson, until June 30th,
1884; present teacher, W. J. Mufford.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average daily attendance, 10.81.
Expenditure, $742.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.91.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $68.64.
Maple Ridge.
Teacher, P. Murray.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined May 22nd, 1884; present 14 boys, 16 girls; total, 30.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 40 girls; total, 73.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average daily attendance, 30.87.
Expenditure, $759.99.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.41.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $24.61.
Several improvements have been made to the school property of this district,  so that the
accommodations more fully meet the requirements of the largely increased attendance.
Mayne Island.
Teacher, Mrs. A. Monk, until Jan. 31st, 1884; A. M. Bannerman, until June 30th, 1884;
present teacher, Miss A. McCartey.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 12 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average daily attendance, 19.38.
Expenditure, $495.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.50.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $25.54, 164 Public Schools Report. 1884
Metchosin.
Teacher, C. E. Clarke.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 7 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average daily attendance, 10.4.
Expenditure, $644.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $35.79.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $61.94.
To provide school facilities for the children residing at Rocky Point, which is distant
about 7 miles from the school-house of this district, the teacher is required to attend to the
two schools alternately, for which extra service an increase has been made to his salary.
Mud Bay.
Teacher, Miss A. J. McDougall.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 14 girls; total 34.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average daily attendance, 13.7.
Expenditure, $530.16.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.59.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.69.
Moodyville.
Teacher, Miss M. Kirkland.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined May 15th, 1884; present 6 boys, 11 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 28.
Average daily attendance, 18.91.
Expenditure, $712.69.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.81.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $37.68.
Nanaimo.
Boys' school and girls' school.
Teachers, 5.
Enrolled during the year, 374.
Average monthly attendance, 244.
Average daily attendance, 192.53.
Expenditure, $3,563.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $9.52.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $18.31.
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Jones; salary, $90 per month.
Assistant, Miss E. E. McDougall, until January 31st, 1884; present assistant, John
Shaw; salary, $60 per month.
Examined December 10th, 1883, and April 30th, 1884; present on latter occasion, 123.
Inspection May 1st, 1884; present, 122.
Enrolled during the year, 224.
Average monthly attendance, 157.
Average daily attendance, 125.87
At the examination held April 30th, 1884, James Galloway obtained the percentage
requisite for admission to a High Sehool. Girls' School.
Principal, Mrs. L. A. Berkeley; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant, Miss Eva M. Reynard; salary, $50 per month.
Examined December 10th, 1883, and April 30th, 1884; present on latter occasion, 77.
Inspection May 1st, 1881; present, 82.
Enrolled during the year, 150.
Average monthly attendance, 87.
Average daily attendance, 66.66.
During the month of May, owing to the largely increased attendance in the junior division
of the boys' school, it was found necessary to employ a second assistant. That this was anticipated is shown by the fact that provision was made in the estimates of the present year for a
third division in this school. The class-room in the girls' school building has been used by
this division, although affording very poor accommodation.
It is still the urgent desire of the trustees that the boys' school should be removed to a
more eligible site. Perhaps a feasible way in which to meet the needs of the district in this
matter would be to erect a building containing four rooms, three of which would be required
for immediate use; the fourth could be used as a class-room until needed by a third assistant.
New Westminster.
Boys' school and girls' school.
Teachers, 4.
Enrolled during the year, 287.
Average monthly attendance, 162.
Average daily attendance, 129.27.
Expenditure, $3,606.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.56.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $27.90.
Boys'  School.
Principal, H. M. Stramberg, B. A., until June 30th, 1884; present principal, D. Wilson,
B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
Assistant,, Miss S. J. White, until June 30th, 1884; present assistant, Miss E. I. Jamie-
son; salary, $60 per month.
Examined December 17th, 1883, and May 13th, 1884; present on latter occasion, 61.
Inspections, May 12th, 14th, and 16th; present, 55, 58, 53, respectively.
Enrolled during the year, 130.
Average monthly attendance, 78.
Average daily attendance, 64.14.
The following passed the standard required for admission to a High School:—James
Ellard, Thomas Cunningham, Charles Keith, and George Wintemute.
The bronze medal presented for competition between the schools of Nanaimo and New
Westminster, by His Excellency the Governor^General, was awarded to Master Frederic W.
Howay, a pupil of this school.
Mr. Howay is now teacher of Canoe Pass School.
Girls' School,
Principal until June 30th, 1884, Miss M. Williams; present principal, Miss M. R. Davidson; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant, until June 30th, 1884, Miss A. S. Howay; present assistant, Miss Emelene
Bell; salary, $50 per month.
Examined December 18th, 1883, and May 13th, 1884; present on latter occasion 82.
Inspections, May 12th, 14th and 16th; present 85, 83, 84, respectively.
Enrolled during the year, 157.
Average monthly attendance, 84.
Average daily attendance, 65.13.
At the examination held on May 13th, 1884, the following passed the standard required
for admission to a High School;—Mary Norris, Bertha Grant, Margaret Homer, and Emily Grant. 166 Public Schools Report. 1881
The establishment of a High School in this important city not only relieves the Boys'
School and the Girls' School of their most advanced pupils, but affords parents in that part of
the Province a bettor opportunity of giving their children a more advanced education than can
be obtained in graded or common schools. Thus far 23 pupils have been enrolled, and the
prospects are that there will be a marked increase during the next session. The school is
under the charge of Mr. H. M. Stramberg, B.A.
Nicola Lake.
Teacher, J. McNish.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average daily attendance,  10.
Expenditure, $548.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $39 14.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.80.
Nicola Valley.
Teacher, D. J. McDonald.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 33.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average daily attendance, 14.88.
Expenditure, $703.13.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.25.
North Arm.
Teacher, Miss M. L. Harding.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 12.73.
Expenditure, $696.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.81.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.74.
Okanagan.
Teacher, R. S. Hanna.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average daily attendance, 14.75.
Expenditure, -$744. 25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.62.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $50.45.
Port Moody.
Teacher until June 30th, 1884, Miss A. C. Dallas; present teacher, Miss A. S. Howay
Salary $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 20.02.
Expenditure, $113.94.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $1.38.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $5,69. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 167
This school, established in May, commenced with an enrolment of 25, which, thus far in
the present year, has increased to 32.    A school-house is much needed.
Prairie.
Teacher until February 29th,  1884, A.  McKenzie; until April 30th, J. M. McDonald;
until June 30th, Miss Ella Coghlan; present teacher, Miss E. A. Davidson.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average daily attendance, 13.21.
Expenditure, $632.33.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.56.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.86.
Priest's Valley.
This school was not opened during the past year, but is now in operation.
Teacher, Miss S. C. Johnson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Quamichan.
Teacher until December, 31st, 1883, Miss M. E. Fry; present teacher, Mrs. A. Monk.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average daily attendance, 20.
Expenditure, $650.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.41.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $32.50.
A school-house is very much needed in this district.
Quesnellemouth.
The school of this district which was closed during the past year, is now in operation with
Miss Alice Northcote as teacher.
Saanich, North.
Teacher until December 31st, 1883, B. H. Smith, M.A.; present teacher J. W.Thomson.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined April 22nd, 1884; present, 12 boys, 18 girls; total, 30.
Enrolled during the year, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 34.
Average daily attendance, 24.70.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.95.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $35.62.
At the examination of this school Mary Heard passed the standard required for admission
to a High School. At the Teachers' Examination in July, Miss Heard obtained a certificate,
and is now teaching.
Saanich, East-South.
Teacher until March 31st, 1884, S. D. Pope ; until June 30th, 1881, R. Offerhaus; present
teacher, J. P. Johnston.
Salary, $80 per month.
Examined April 21st, 1884; preseut, 18 boys, 15 girls; total, 33.
Enrolled during the year, 55.
Average monthly attendance, 42.
Average daily attendance, 35.24.
Expenditure, $1,000.86.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.19.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.40. 168 . Public Schools Report. 1884
At the examination of this school Frederic W. Robson passed the standard required  for
admission to a High School.
Saanich, West-South.
Teacher until June 30th, 1884, G. A. Watson; present teacher, G. H. Sluggett.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined April 23rd, 1884; present, 11 boys, 11 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average daily attendance, 20.
Expenditure, $635.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.89.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.75.
Salt Spring Island (Vesuvius).
Teacher until January 31st, 1884, John Shaw.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 9.17.
Expenditure, $461.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $50.35.
During the last five months of the year, this school remained closed.    It is now in operation under the charge of A. C. Steele.
Siiuswap Prairie.
This school was not opened during the past year.    It is now in running order, under the
charge of James Metcalfe as teacher.
Sooke.
Teacher, Miss N. Wolfenden.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 9th, 1884; present, 3 boys, 6 girls; total, 9.
Enrolled during the year, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average daily attendance, 10.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $35.55.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $64.
At the examination of this school Matilda Muir passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Shawnigan.
This newly-created district (formerly a part  of  South  Cowichan District) includes the
Bench Branch school.    The teacher, James A. Hoy, divides his time between the two schools.
A change in the boundaries of this and adjoining districts will, in time, be necessary.
SUMAS.
Teacher until June 30th, 1884, W. 11. Irwin; present teacher, Miss S. J. White.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined May 20th, 1884; present, 11 boys, 14 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average daily attendance, 21.20.
Expenditure, $642.75.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.85.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $30.31.
At the examination of this school Clara Jane Chadsey passed the standard  required  for
admission to a High School. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 169
Trenant.
Teacher, until June 30th, 1884, Miss Bessie Watson; present teacher, John R. Scott.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average daily attendance, 11.53.
Expenditure, $600.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.14.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $52.03.
Victoria.
High school, boys' school, girls' school, James Bay Ward school.
Teachers, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 1,012.
Average monthly attendance, 743.
Average daily attendance, 679.65.
Expenditure, $13,028.97.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.87.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $19.17.
High School.
Principal until June 30th, 1884, J. H. McLaughlin; present principal, J. N. Muir, B. A;
salary, $110 per month.
2nd Master until March 31st, 1884, R. Offerhaus; until June 30th, 1884, J. N. Muir, B.
A.; present 2nd Master, R. Offerhaus; salary, $100 per month.
Examined December 4th, 5th, 6th, 1883, and June 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 1884.
Inspections and visits, 57.
Enrolled during the year, 84.
Average monthly attendance, 63.
Average daily attendance, 56.63.
At the examination held in December, 1883, Miss Christina Forrest stood head of the
school. This young lady achieved the same honor at the examination held in June, 1884, and
was awarded the silver medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition among the pupils of this school. The questions given at the midsummer examination for
determining who was head of the school will be found in Appendix I. Miss Forrest is at
present 6th Assistant in the Boys' Public School.
This school has done and is doing a good work. Providing for the instruction of pupils
in the higher branches, it enables parents to give their children a liberal education without
sending them away from the social and moral influences of home, not to speak of the expense
connected therewith.
The usefulness of High Schools is not confined to the number of pupils they prepare to
pass the examination for certificates qualifying them to become teachers, nor to the number
who pass the matriculation examination of a university; the quickening impulse to exertion
which they infuse into the graded and common schools is of very material moment, as well as
the fact that they better prepare the boy or girl for the active duties of life.
Boys' School.
Principal until 31st December, 1883, J. McKenzie; present principal, J. A. Halliday;
salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant until December 31st, 1883, J. A. Halliday; present 1st Assistant, J. II.
Thain; salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant until December 31st, 1883, J. II. Thain; present 2nd Assistant, A. Dods;
salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. C. Gowen; Salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant until June 30th, 1884, Mrs. Anderson (Miss. E. E. Holloway); present 4th
Assistant, Miss E. J. Gardiner; salary, $50 per month. 170 Public Schools Report. 1-c84
5th Assistant until March 31st, 1884, Mrs. Maclure; until June 30th,  1884, Miss M. R.
Davidson; present 5th Assistant, Miss L. Horton; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th, 1883, and June 4th, 1884.
Inspections and visits,  164.
Enrolled during the year, 484.
Average monthly attendance, 311.
Average daily attendance, 261.98.
At the examination held in December, 1883, the following passed the standard required
for admission to a High School:— -
George Nelson Bailey, James Henry Penketh,
Frederic Galley, Ernest Alfred Reid,
Robert Henry Johnston, James Wolsey Smith,
Frederic Ernest Mebius, Alfred Bruce Oldershaw.
At the midsummer examination held in June, 1884, the following passed for admission to
a High School:—
Frederic V. Robertson, head of the school,
Frank Burgess Gibbs, RutherWilson,
James Mansell, William C. Wilson,
Alexander Dearberg.
The enrolment for the year, 484, shows an increase of 95 over that of the previous year.
The addition of a 6th assistant to the staff of teachers has no more than met the very urgent
demands of this school for assistance.
The old High School building at present occupied by the 6th and 7th divisions of this
school affords very poor accommodations, in fact, is unfit for occupancy. As it is too old for
repairs, it should be removed, and a building containing apartments for the 4th, 5th, 6th and
and 7th divisions should replace it. The taking of two divisions from the Central School,
would give increased accommodations not only to the other divisions of this school, but also to
those of the Girls' School, and would allow of one large room which, when required, could be
used for convocation purposes.
It would certainly be desirable that a building erected for the pupils of these lower
divisions should be placed at a considerable distance from the Central School.
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss E. A. Williams; salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Reid; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. D. Cameron; salary, $55 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss H. Jackson; salary, $50 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss L. A. Barron; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, Dec. 4th, 1883, and June 4th, 1884.
Inspections and visits, 128.
Enrolled during the year, 371.
Average monthly attendance, 316.
Average daily attendance, 254.06.
At the examination held in Dec. 1883, the following passed the standard lequired for
admission to a High School:—
Alice Leonora Johnston, head of school,
Grace E. Cameron, Clara Clanton,
Edith Lettice, Sarah A. Humber.
At the midsummer examination the following passed for admission to a High School:—
Lizzie Sylvester, head of the school,
Bertha Burgess, Susie Jackson,
Florence Butler, Louisa Richardson,
Florence M. Clarke, Mary Smith,
Gertrude Borthwick, Jennie C. Hutcheson,
Robma Horton, Elizabeth Stannard, The Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition
between the pupils of this school and the boys' school, was awarded to Miss Lizzie Sylvester
on the percentage obtained at the midsummer examination. Miss Bertha Burgess having
obtained the same number of marks as Miss Sylvester, a second examination was held in order
to determine which of the two should receive the medal.
James' Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss M. V. Storey.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined June 17th, 1884.
Inspections and visits, 7.
Enrolled during the year, 50 boys, 23 girls; total, 73.
Average monthly attendance, 53.
Average daily attendance, 46.98.
The attendance at this school fully proves the necessity that existed for its establishment,
Another ward school, called Johnson Street Ward School, was opened on the beginning
of the current school-year, and has already on its register the names of 93 pupils, with an
average daily attendance of over 60.
In these schools pupils are taught reading (in the first and second readers), writing, dictation and spelling, the simple rules of arithmetic, and the outlines of geography and grammar
(oral instruction).
Promotions are made to the Central School by examinations held at the close of each
session, or whenever urgently required by the over-crowded condition of the school.
The rapidly increasing population of the city will doubtless in a short time necessitate the
establishment of another ward school.
Wellington.
Principal, G. Stainburn, B.A., Cantab; salary, $75 per month.
Assistant until June 30th, 1884, Miss M. F. Jones; present assistant, Miss J. W. Blair.
Examined December 11th, 1883 and May 2nd, 1884; present on the latter occasion in the
senior division 9 boys, 11 girls; total, 20; in the junior division 28 boys, 18 girls; total, 46.
Enrolled during the year, 156.
Average monthly attendance, 79.
Average daily attendance, 55.85.
Expenditure, $1,589.11.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.18.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.45.
At the examination of this school held in May, 1884, Helen Constance Jones passed the
standard required for admission to a High School.
Williams Lake.
Teacher, Henry Bird.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average daily attendance, 10.84.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $47.50.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $70.11.
This school has not re-opened as yet during the present school-year, but there is every
prospect that it will be in operation within a few weeks.
Yale.
Teacher, J. Irwin.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 62.
Average monthly attendance, 40.
Average daily attendance, 34.31. 172 Public Schools Report. 1881
Expenditure, $794.82.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.81.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $23.16.
The school property of this district should be fenced.
In several instances teachers have failed to hold the semi-annual public examinations
required by the rules and regulations. As the appointment of the time for holding these
examinations is at the discretion of the teacher (in graded and high schools at the will of the
principal), failure to hold them is not only a neglect of duty, but necessitates the making of
incorrect monthly reports for June and December, as the teacher must certify each month that
the rules and regulations have been, observed by him.
Section 4 of "An Act to Amend the Public School Act, 1879," providing for the election
of Trustees in cities, should be amended in two respects •—
1. Qualified residents should vote only in their respective wards;
2. The system of voting by ballot should be substituted for that now in use.
The grant for incidental expenses of the school in each rural district should be handed
over to the Trustees for disbursement, as soon as their annual reports have been received.
The following circular, sent to each teacher, explains itself:—
" circular.
"Education Office, October 30th, 1884.
" In order to infuse a more lively spirit of competition among the pupils of the Public
Schools, it has been deemed advisable to provide for the annual publication of a Roll of Honor
List, containing the names of three pupils belonging to each Public School in the Province,
to whom their teacher shall award First Rank in—
" (1) Deportment.
" (2) Punctuality and Regularity.
" (3) Proficiency.
" That uniformity in making these awards may be secured, teachers are to observe the
following instructions:—
" (1.) That no pupil shall be eligible to any one of the three honors named unless he shall
have been in attendance during the session or year for more than half the number of
prescribed school days.
" (2.) Credits or discredits recorded prior to January 1st, 1885, are not to be  counted in
determining the awards for this school-year; but thereafter they are to  be counted
for the whole year.
" (3.) The teacher will, at the closing examination in June of each year, present to each
successful competitor, as a certificate of the lienor attained, a Card of Merit, which
will be furnished from this office.
" (4) The names of the three pupils accredited with First Rank shall forthwith be reported
by the teacher to the Superintendent of Education, stating in which of the three
lists of honor each is to be enrolled.
" By using an accurate system of marking credits and discredits,  teachers will the more
readily and justly be able to determine to whom each award belongs.
" It will be observed that the first two of these honors are open to every pupil of your
School, and the third should be contended for by each student of your most advanced class, as
the zealous efforts made will the better prepare for success in the succeeding year those who
fail in the first attempt.
"S. D. Pope,
"Superintendent of Education." 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 173
The highest honor known to this department that pupils of common or graded schools
can achieve, is to pass an examination for admission to a High School. In many instances
pupils on attaining this distinction are withdrawn from further educational privileges.
Hitherto no recognition has been given to those passing the required standard. To supply this
want, as well as to arouse a spirit of ambition in all the schools, Entrance Certificates will
hereafter be presented to each successful applicant. These certificates will doubtless be valued
by each pupil, and especially so by those who are unable to avail themselves of the advantages
of a course of study in a High School.
Pupils on leaving a High School will, on application to the principal, receive a Diploma
in which will be given his standing in each subject of study pursued by him. A duplicate of
this diploma will be kept on file in this office, so that at any time in after life, a copy of the
same can be obtained.
From the progress made by the schools in the past year as well as the prospects for the
current year, the establishment of other High Schools may be looked for in the near future,
and as a necessary result of an increased demand for instruction in the higher branches, we
may confidently trust that the time is not far distant when our system of education will be
crowned by the creation of a Provincial University.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. Pope, B. A,
. Superintendent of Education,  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 175
PART   II.
STATISTICAL  RETURNS. 176
Public Schools Report.
1884
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Public Schools Report.
1884
TABLE F.—Exhibit of Expenditures for Education Proper, during the year 1883-84.
School Districts.
Barkerville 	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burton's Prairie	
Cache Creek	
Cedar, North  	
Cedar, South  	
Cedar Hill	
Cheam   	
Chemainus  	
Chilliwhack, Upper .
Chilliwhack, Lower .
Clinton	
Colwood	
Clover Valley 	
Comox  	
Cowichan, South
Craigflower	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola, North	
Gabriola, South	
Granville 	
Hope	
Lake 	
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lytton 	
Maple Bay	
Maple Ridge	
Mayne Island	
Metchosin	
Moodyville  	
Mud Bay 	
Nanaimo  	
New Westminster ..
Nicola Lake	
Nicola Valley 	
North Arm 	
Okanagan  	
Port Moody	
Prairie 	
Quamichan 	
Saanich, North ....
Saanich, East-South
Saanich, West-South
Salt Spring Island..
Shawnigan   	
Sooke	
Sumas	
Trenant	
Victoria	
Wellington  	
Williams Lake	
Yale 	
Amounts paid
for Teachers'
Salaries.
099 90
600 00
650 00
,500 00
000 00
0(0 Oo
840 00
600 00
550 CO
960 00
275 00
720 GO
550 00
600 CO
600 00
658 83
720 00
770 00
437 10
600 00
,577 75
451 62
650 00
660 00
720 00
720 00
099 50
720 00
425 00
600 00
660 00
401 66
,306 13
,240 00
480 00
690 00
600 00
720 00
75 00
600 00
650 00
840 00
SCO 00
600 00
420 CO
150 00
600 00
000 CO
575 00
,840 00
,500 CO
720 00
720 CO
§60,762 55
Amounts paid
tor Incidental
Expenses,
including Rent.
: 220 00
40 00
77 87
328 01
37 50
40 00
40 00
40 00
70 24
38 65
62 SO
40 00
39 58
39 50
1 60
44 63
42 60
43 97
72 37
40 00
39 97
25 76
63 50
45 87
61 90
40 25
42 50
39 99
70 00
44 25
52 69
68 50
257 12
366 77
63 00
13 13
90 87
24 25
38 94
32 33
100 00
40 00
40 86
35 00
41 75
40 00
42 75
25 00
1,188 97
89 11
40 00
74 82
84,010 02
Amounts paid
for Education
Proper in
each District.
8 1,219 96
640 00
627 87
1,828 01
637 50
640 00
880 00
640 00
620 24
998 55
337 80
700 00
5S9 58
039 50
001 50
703 40
762 60
813 97
509 47
640 CO
617 72
477 37
■ 613 50
705 87
781 96
760 25
742 00
759 99
495 00
644 25
712 69
630 16
3,563 25
3,606 77
548 00
703 13
686 87
744 25
113 94
632 33
650 00
880 00
1,000 86
6S5 00
461 75
160 00
640 00
642 75
600 00
13,02S 97
1,589 11
760 00
794 82
855,372 57
Csst of each
pupil based
on aggregate
attendance.
8 45.18
20.64
28.53
53.76
17.70
37.64
29.33
25.60
20.67
12.80
13.51
34.54
24.66
29. C6
20.05
39.08
18.15
11.79
22.15
32.
17.64
15.89
22.72
15.34
20.96
24.52
30.91
10.41
16.50
35.79
17.81
15.69
9.52
12.56
89.14
21.30
25.81
28.62
43.82
17.56
22.41
17.95
18.19
21.89
24.30
8.97
85.55
17.85
17.14
12.87
10.18
47.50
12.81
Cost of each
pupil based on
average daily
attendance.
8 62.40
39.19
45.76
91.81
34.95
51.69
56.33
42.16
78.01
25.76
18.92
67.25
39.04
58.13
48.89
67.18
33.24
22.92
34.30
42.46
28.86
34.71
46.64
42.62
52.69
88.29
68.64
24.61
25.54
61.94
37.68
38.69
18.31
27.90
54.80
47.25
54.74
50.45
56.91
47.86
32.50
35.62
28.40
31.75
60.35
7.34
64.
30.31
52.03
19.17
28.45
70.11
23 16
Education Office.
Salary of Superintendent of Education  	
Examiners of Public School Teachers	
Travelling Expenses of Superintendent of Education .
Maps and Globes	
Election of Trustees and Incidental Expenses	
1,500 00
300 00
231 42
737 00
220 25
2,988 67
Amount paid for Teachers' Salaries    50,762 55
,, Incidental Expenses, &c., of Public Schools      4,610 02
Total  $58,361 24 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
187
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Public Schools Report.
189
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.
Districts.
Barkerville.
Big Bar	
Burgoyne Bay.
Burton's Prairie.
Date of creation.
28th June, 1871	
27th October,  1884....
Re-defined 11th Dec.
1884.
3rd October, 1873..
26th April, 1882.
Canoe Pass.
Cache Creek .
Cedar   and   Cranberry,
South.
Cedar   and  Cranberry,
North.
8th May, 1884.
27th May, 1880..
11th February, 1874...
Name changed from
Cedar and re-defined,
27th May, 1880.
Boundaries.
Circle within radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of
a circle whose centre shall be the mouth of Big Bar Creek,
and .whose radius shall be a distance of 20 miles from such
centre.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at a point
about midway between the head of Ganges Bay and
Beaver Point, on the south side; thence running westerly,
along the summit of of the Otter Range, to the sea-shore;
thence following the shore line southerly, to the point of
commencement, and including Moresby, Russell, and
Portland Islands.
Commencing at a point where the line between Sections 22
and 23, Township No. 17, intersects the right bank of
Fraser River; thence due north for a distance of two miles
33 chains, more or less, to a point on the First Correction
Line, being the north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 17; thence east along said Correction Line for
a distance of seven chains and forty links, more or less,
to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township No. 18;
thence due north for a distance of three miles, to the
north-west corner of Section 14, Township No. 18; thence
true east for a distance of six miles; thence true south
for a distance of three miles, to the south-west corner of
Section 2, Township No. 21; thence due west along the
First Correction Line for a distance of seven chains sixty-
three links, more or less, to the north-west corner of
Section 35, Township No. 20; thence due south for a
distance of four miles; thence due west for a distance of
six miles, to the south-west corner of Section 14, Township No. 17; thence due north, along the line between
Sections 14, 15, 22, and 23, Township No. 17, for a
distance of one mile, twenty-five chains, more or less, to
its intersection with the left bank of Fraser River.
All that tract of land lying west of a line commencing at
the north-west corner of Lot 96, Group 2, and extending
due south to the Gulf of Georgia, and including Westham
Island.
Not defined.
Commencing at the south-west corner of Cranberry District;
thence east along the southern boundary of Cranberry
and Cedar District, to the coast line; thence north-west
along the coast line, to the north-east corner of Section
12, Range 5, Cedar District; thence west along the
section line, to the north-west corner of Section 12,
Range 1, Cranberry District; thence south along the
western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of
commencement.
Commencing at the north-west corner of South Cedar and
Cranberry School District; thence east along the northern
boundary of said District, to the shore line; thence northwest along the shore line, to the mouth of Chase River;
thence south to the north-east corner of Section 20,
Range 4, Cranberry District; thence west along the
northern boundary of Cranberry District, to its northwest corner; thence south along the western boundary
of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement. 190
Public Schools Report.
1884
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; hoxmA&ries.—Continued.
Districts.
Cedar Hill.
Cheam.
Chemainus	
Chilliwhack, Lower.
Chilliwhack, Upper.,
Clinton	
Clover Valley.,
25th June, 1869.,
Date of creation.
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
26th November, 1874..
Re-defined 19th July,
1883.
23rd May, 1883.,
19th July, 1883	
Name  changed   Oct.
27th, 1884, from Lower
Chilliwhack   to
whack.
Chilli-
10th August, 1874.
Name changed Oct,
27th, 1884, from Upper
Chilliwhack to Centre
ville.
25th June, 1869.,
28th July, 1883.,
Boundaries altered and
re-defined,    and    name
changed from "Surrey
to "Clover Valley, "23rd
May, 1883.
Boundaries.
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria
District; thence northerly along the eastern boundary
of Sections 10, 81, 14, and 50, to the southern boundary
of Section 82; thence easterly along the northern
boundaries of Sections 49 and 64, to the Saanich Road;
thence in a northerly direction along said road, to the
boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts;
thence following said boundary in a north-easterly
direction, to the sea shore at Cordova Bay; thence following the shore line in a southerly and south-easterly
direction, to the south-east corner of Section 11; thence
in a westerly direction following the northern boundary
of Victoria School District, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at a point on the eastern boundary of the
Upper Chilliwhack School District; thence true east
eight miles; thence true north five and a half miles, more
or less, to the south bank of Fraser River; thence in a
westerly direction following the meanderings of the
Fraser River, to the north-east corner of Upper Chilliwhack School District; thence true south along the
eastern boundary of said School District for a distance
of five and a half miles, more or less, to the point of
commencement.
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as the
District of Chemainus.
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Township 26, New Westminster District; thence true south
along the section line for a distance of four miles; thence
true west following Township line for a distance of four
miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township
23; thence true north along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the north-west corner of Section
23, Township 23 ; thence true east along the section line
for a_ distance of four miles, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the south-east corner of the Lower Chilliwhack School District; thence true east two miles;
thence true north nine miles, more or less, to the south
bank of Fraser River; thence in a westerly and southwesterly direction, following the meanderings of Fraser
River, to the mouth of Chilliwhack River; thence following the right bank of Chilliwhack River to its intersection
with the northern boundary of the Lower Chilliwhack
School District; thence true east along the northern
boundary of said School District, to its north-east corner;
thence true south four miles, to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
Commencing at a point on the 49th parallel of north
latitude, being the south-west corner of Section 3, Township 7, New Westminster District; thence true north
along the section line for a distance of ten miles, to the
north-west corner of Section 21, Township 8; thence
true west along the section line four miles, to the northwest corner of Section 24; thence south along the eastern
boundary of Mud Bay School District, to its intersection
with the north shore of Semiahmoo Bay; thence southeasterly along the shore of Semiahmoo Bay to a point on
the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-east
corner of Section 1, Township 1 ; thence true east along
the said parallel a distance of three miles, to the point
of commencement. 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
m
191
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Colwood.
North Comox.
South Comox.
Cowichan, South.
Craigflower.,
Denman Island.
Esquimalt	
Date of creation.
3rd October, 1873.
30thJuly, 1870.,
Boundaries altered and
re-defined May 8th,
1884.
Name changed from
"Comox" to "North
Comox."
8th May, 1884.
Boundaries altered and
re-defined July 21st,
1884.
16th June, 1869.,
Name changed Oct.
27th, 1884, from "South
Cowichan" to "Cowichan," and re-defined
April 24th, 1884.
23rd July, 1870..
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
17th August,  1877..
22nd October, 1870.
Boundaries.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
north end of Parson's Bridge; thence following Rowe
Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and 98;
thence in a northerly direction along the eastern boundary
of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and
Esquimalt Districts; thence westerly along said boundary
line, to the north-west corner of Section 14; thence
south-westerly to the south-east corner of Section 100;
thence in a south-easterly direction to the south-west
corner of Section 51; thence along the section line,
between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at Royal Bay;
thence north-easterly along the shore line to the southern
end of Parson's Bridge; thence along the said bridge to
the point of commencement.
All that portion of Comox District not included in the
" South Comox School District."
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 9; thence
magnetic north, to the Gulf of Georgia; thence along the
shore to the point of commencement.
That portion of Quamichan District situate to the south of
Cowichan River, and that portion of Cowichan District
south of Cowichan River and Cowichan Harbour, and
not included in the Shawnigan School District.
Commencing at the south-west extremity of Cedar Hill
School District, and following the western boundary of
said district to where it strikes the southern boundary
of Lake School District; thence along the boundary of
said district to the north-west corner of Section 116;
thence along section line, between 116 and 117, west, to
the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0 W., south, to the
boundary line between Lake and Esquimalt Districts ;
thence west to the north-east corner of Section 98, marked
on the Official Map as "Government Reserve;" thence
along the east line of said Reserve and Mill River to
Parson's Bridge; thence along the water-line of Esquimalt
Harbour, south-easterly, to the south-western corner of
Section 26, Esquimalt District; thence in a straight line
to the south-western extremity of Section 10; thence
along the southern boundary line of said section, to
Victoria Arm; thence north to point of commencement.
All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
All that piece of land included within the following limits,
viz.:—Commencing at the western extremity of the South
boundary line of the Craigflower School District; thence
southerly and easterly along the shore line of Esquimalt
Harbour and Fuca Straits, and northerly along the water-
line of Victoria Harbour to the south-eastern extremity
of the said Craigflower School District; thence along the
southern boundaryli ne of the said District, to the point
of commencement 192
Public Schools Report.
1884
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Gabriola, North.
Gabriola.
Granville.
Hope.
Lake .
Lake La Hache.
Langley.
Lillooet.
Lytton..
Date of creation.
23rd May, 1883	
Re-defined April 24th.
1884.
10th August, 1872	
Boundaries altered and
re-defined 23rd of May,
1883. Name changed
to "South Gabriola.
Re-defined April 24th,
1884.
12th February, 1873 ...
25th February, 1871....
25th June, 1869..
Boundaries altered   1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined   27th  May,
1880.
30th July, 1875..
30th April, 1871.
22nd October, 1S70....
20th November, 1869..
Boundaries.
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying to the west of the
division line between Sections 9, 10, 14, 15, IS, and 31.
All that portion of Gabriola ^Island lying east of North
Gabriola School District, and including Mudge Island.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of
a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on the
south side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall be
a distance of three miles from such school-house; excepting
always any land on the north side of said Inlet.
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
Commencing at the north-east corner of Cedar Hill School
District, being the point where the boundary line between
Victoria and Lake Districts intersect the sea shore at
Cordova Bay; thence in a south-westerly direction,
following the northern boundary of Cedar Hill School
District, to the north-east corner of Section 50, Victoria
District; thence westerly along the southern boundary
of Section 82, to Colquitz Stream ; thence following said
stream, in a northerly direction, to its intersection with
the northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District;
thence westerly along the northern boundary of Section
1, to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern
boundary of Section 22; thence in a north-westerly
direction across Section 22, to the north-east boundai'y of
Section 116; thence westerly along the northern boundary
of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake District;
thence north along said boundary, to the south-west
corner of Section 127; thence east along the southern
boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the southwest corner of Section 53; thence north along the
western boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the
southern boundary of South Saanich District; thence
east along said boundary, to the sea shore; thence following the sea shore in a south-easterly direction, to the
point of commencement.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from the
school-house, situate at the 114-mile post on the Cariboo
Road, as the centre of such circle.
Starting on the left bank of the Fraser, at the extreme
north-west corner of the town site of Derby ; thence in
a right line southerly four and a half miles; thence easterly
parallel with the river six miles; thence in a right line
back to the river and across the Fraser, and also extending
a distance inward of half a mile; thence down the right
bank of, and parallel with, the river, as far as Kanaka
Creek; thence down said creek to its confluence with
the Fraser, at a point directly opposite the old Government buildings at Derby.
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from the Court House. 48 Vic
Public Schools Report.
19?
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Maple Bay.,
Maple Ridge.
Matsqui	
Mayne Island.
Metchosin ....
Moodyville.
Mount Lehman.
Mud Bay.
Nanaimo ,
Date of creation.
16th June, 1870.,
Boundaries altered and
re-defined, and name
changed from "North
Cowichan" to ' 'Maple
Bay."
31st July, 1874	
23rd May, 1883.,
8th April, 187
27th June, 1870.
8th May,  1884.
23rd May, 1883.
30th July, 1870.
Boundaries.
All those tracts of land known on the Official Map as the
Districts of Somenos and Comiaken,
Airthat tract of land included within the lines commencing
at the south-wesVcorner of Section 3, Township No. 9,
New Westminster District; thence in a northerly
direction to the north-west corner of Section 34, Township No. 9 aforesaid; thence in an easterly direction to
the north-east corner of Section 32, Township No. 12,
New Westminster District; thence in a southerly direction
to the point of intersection with the Langley School
District; thence following the western boundary of the
f Langley School District to the northern boundary line
" of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster District; thence
westerly to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
All that tract of land known as Mayne Island, and that
portion of Galiano Island lying west of Active Pass and
east of a line running north across the Island from the
south-west corner of Lot 2.
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the
Official Map, together with that portion of Esquimalt
District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the
boundary of the Craigflower School District.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the School-house on the
north side of said Inlet, and whose radius shall be a
distance of three miles from such School-house; excepting
always anyof the land on the south side of the Inlet.
Commencing at a point on Fraser River, being the northwest corner of Section 27, Township 14, New Westminster
District; thence due south along the section line, for a
distance of seven and a quarter miles, more or less, to the
Yale Waggon Road; thence easterly along the Yale
Waggon Road, to a point being the intersection of the
Yale Waggon Road with the dividing line separating
Sections 19 and 20, Township 16; thence northerly along
said section line, for a distance of four miles, more or less,
to Fraser River; thence north-westerly following the
bank of the river, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 26, Block
I North, Range I West; thence true north along the
section line to the north-east corner of Section 23, Township 2, New Westminster District; thence true west
along the section line five miles, to the north-west corner
of Section 19, Township 2; thence true south along the
Township line, for a distance of three miles seventy chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Mud Bay; thence in
a southerly direction and south-easterly direction along
the shores of Mud Bay and Semiahmoo Bay to the point
of commencement.
All that piece of land included within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House. 194
Public Schools Report.
1884
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
New Westminster
Nicola L ke	
Nicola Valley....
4th June, 1870.
23rd May, 1883.
31st July, 1874.
North Arm ,
ompson.
Okanogan
Port Moody.
Date of creation.
17th August, 1877.
25th August, 1884.
31st July, 1874.
April 26th, 1884.
Prairie.
Priest's Valley.
Quamichan
26th November, 1874.
23rd May, 1883..
23rd May, 1883 ,
Boundaries,
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster.
All that tract of land known as Townships 95, 96, 97, 99,
and 100, Kamloops Division of Yale District.
Bounded on the east by a line drawn north and south from
the residence of William Charters in Nicola Valley, and
extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural
boundaries of Nicola Valley; on the west by a line drawn
north and south from the residence of Byron Earnshaw,
and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the
natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said
western boundary being about nine miles distant from
the eastern boundary; and on the north and south by the
natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 314, Group 1;
thence due north to the southern boundary of Lot 320;
thence north-westerly along the northern boundary of
Musquiam Indian Reserve, to western boundary of Lot
320, Group 1; thence due north to north-west corner of
Lot 320; thence following southern boundary of the
Hastings Saw Mill timber lease to north-west corner of
Lot 336, Group 1; thence due west along the northern
boundary of Lots 336 and 337, to the north-east corner of
Lot 337; thence due south to the northern boundary of
Lot 330; thence due west to the north-east corner of Lot
258, Group 1; thence due south along eastern boundary
of Lot 258 to North Arm of Fraser River. Then commencing at north-east corner of Section 15, Block 5 north,
Range 5 west, due south, to range line between Blocks 4
and 5 north; thence following said range line, due west,
to North Arm, Fraser River, including Sea Island.
That portion of the valley on each side of the North Thompson River, which extends a distance of five miles above
and five miles below the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 112.
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek;
thence northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a
distance of five miles; thence easterly a distance of five
miles; thence southerly to Mission Creek; thence westerly
to point of commencement.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of
a circle, whose centre shall be the central point of the
crosssings of Clarke and Douglas Streets on the Clarke's
Survey, and whose radius shall be a distance of 3J miles
from such central point.
Commencing at a point on the north-east corner of Section
13, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence in a
westerly direction three miles; thence in a southerly
direction to the 49th parallel; thence in an easterly
direction six miles along said parallel; thence in a northerly direction, about nine miles; thence in a westerly
direction, three miles, to the point of commencement.
All of Townships 6, 8, and 9, Osoyoos Division of Yale
District.
All those portions of the Districts known on the Official
Map as the Quamichan and Cowichan Districts, lying
north of the Cowichan River and of Cowichan Harbor. 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Quesnellemouth.
Saanich, North.
Saanich, East-South.
Saanich, West-South.
Salt Spring Island.
Shawnigan.
Shuswap Prairie.
Spallumcheen.
Sooke	
Date of creation.
14th April, 1881.
Boundaries.
3rd
30th August, 1872.
Boundaries altered
October,   1873.
Re-defined 27th May,'80
30th August, 1872.
Boundaries altered 3rd
October,  1873.
Re-defined 27th May,'80
Name changed Oct
27th, 1884, from "East
SouthSaanieh"to"South
Saanich."
27th May, 1880.
Name changed Oct.
27th, 1884, from "West-
SouthSaanich" to' 'West
Saanich."
30th July, 1870.	
Name changed Oct.
27th, 1884, from "Salt
Spring Island" to "Vesuvius."
8th May, 1884	
23rd May, 1883.
8th May, 1884..,
23rd May, 1872 .
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the Fraser
and Quesnelle Rivers; and running thence due west a
distance of one mile; thence due north six miles; thence
due east three miles; thence due south six miles; thence
due west two miles, to the point of commencement.
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula, lying to the north
of South Saanich District, as shown on the Official Map,
and known as the "North Saanich District."
Commencing at the north-east corner of the Lake School
District; thence west, along the southern boundary of
South Saanich District, to the south-west corner of
Section 18, Range 3 E.; thencenorth along the said range
line, to the south-east corner of Section 12, Range 2 E.;
thence west, along the southern boundary of Section 12,
Range 2 E., to its south-west corner; thence north, along
the range line, to the south-west corner of Section 4,
Range 2 E.; thence west, along the southern boundary of
Section 4, Range 1 E., to its south-west corner; thence
north, along the range line, to the north-west corner of
Section 1, Range 1 E.; thence east, along the southern
boundary of North Saanich, to the sea shore; thence
following the sea shore, in a south-easterly direction, to
the point of commencement.
Commencing at the north-west corner of the Lake School
District; thence east, along the southern boundary of
Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of
Section 53, Lake District; thence north, along the
western boundaries of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the
southern boundary of the South Saanich School
District; thence west, to the north-west corner of Section
56, Lake District; thence north, following the western
boundary of the South Saanich School District, to
its intersection with the southern boundary of North
Saanich District; thence west, along said southern
boundary, to the sea shore at Saanich Inlet; thence
southerly along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod
Creek, to the south-west corner of South Saanich District;
thence south, along the western boundary of Sections
122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to the point o f
commencement.
All that piece of land known on the official Map as Salt
Spring or Admiral Island.
All that portion of land known on the official Map as the
District of Shawnigan; and that portion of the Cowichan
District lying south of Cowichan Harbor and east of the
dividing line separating Ranges 3 and 4.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of
circle whose centre shall be the school-house,  and
whose radius shall
School-house.
be a distance of six miles from such
The tract of land known as Townships 4, 7, 34, 35, and 38,
Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the District
of Sooke. 196
Public Schools Report.
1884
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued
Districts.
Stanley.
Stave River.
Date of creation.
17th August, 1877.
Stuart's Lake..
Sumas.
Trenant,
Victoria.
5th June, 1884.
17th August, 1877.
13th October, 1871.
Re-defined  19th   July,
1883.
3rd October, 1873..
Boundaries altered and
re-defined 8th May, '84
Boundaries.
Wellington.,
25th June, 1869.
Boundaries  altered   1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined   27th  May,
1880.
2nd May, 1874.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of three miles in length from the
Court House, Stanley.
The tract of land contained in the south half of Township
15, and those portions of Township 14 not included in
" Mount Lehman School District."
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from Fort
St. James on Stuart's Lake.
Commencing at a point where the northern boundary of
Chilliwhack School District intersects the Chilliwhack River; thence in a northerly and north-westerly
direction, following the meanderings of the Chilliwhack
River to its confluence with the Fraser River; thence in a
south-westerly direction, following the meanderings of
Fraser River, to the mouth of Sumas River; thence in a
southerly and south-easterly direction, along the eastern
bank of the Sumas River and Sumas Lake, to its intersection with the southern boundary of Section 31, Township 22; thence true east to the south-east corner of
Section 34, Township 22; thence true north, five miles,
to the north-west corner of the Chilliwhack
School District; thence true east, along the northern
boundary of said School District, to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
southern bank of the Fraser River, opposite Tilbury
Island; thence running due south in prolongation of the
dividing line of Ranges 4 and 5 West, Blocks 4 and 5
North, New Westminster District, to the sea shore at
Boundary Bay; thence south-westerly, along the shore
line, to the 49th parallel of latitude; thence along said
49th parallel to the sea shore at Roberts' Bay; thence
along the shore line, northerly, to the eastern boundary
of "Canoe Pass School District;" thence due north,
along said boundary, to the Fraser River; thence northeasterly, along the left bank of Fraser River, to the point
of commencement.
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria
District; thence easterly, along the shore line, to the
north-west corner of Section 5; thence east, along the
northern boundary of Section 5, to the north-east corner
of said section; thence south-easterly, in a direct line to
the north-west corner of Section 75; thence easterly,
along the northern boundary of Sections 75 and 76 to the
north-east corner of Section 76; thence north, along the
eastern boundary of Sections 25 and 26, to the north-west
corner of Section 28; thence east, along the northern
boundary of Sections 28 and 11 to the north-east corner of
Section 11; thence south-easterly, along the eastern boundary of Section 11; to the sea shore at Oak Bay; thence
following the shore line, in a southerly, westerly, and
northerly direction, to the north-west corner of Section 5.
All that tract of land included within the lines, commencing
at a point at the north-west corner of Wellington District,
on the shore line; thence in a southerly direction along
the western boundaries of Wellington and Mountain
Districts, to the section post between Sections 8 and 9,
Range 1, Mountain District; thence easterly, along said
section line, to the south-east corner of Section 9, Range
7; thence northerly, to the boundary line of Mountain 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
197
TABLE H.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Concluded.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Yale	
27th May, 1880	
25th June, 1869	
31st July, 1874	
District; thence easterly along the northern boundary of
Mountain District, to the sea shore at Departure Bay;
thence northerly and westerly, along the shore line, to
the point of commencement.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of
a circle whose centre shall be the 150-Mile Post, on the
Cariboo Road, and whose radius shall be a distance of
seven miles from such mile post.
Not defined.
Township No. 19, New Wetsminster District.  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 199
PART   III.
APPENDICES.  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 201
APPENDIX A.
Rules and Regulations for the Government op Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,
from April to September, inclusive; and from 9:30 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,
from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work during
the whole year, and a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's work in the six
months from April to September, inclusive.
2. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion
Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer Vacation shall include the
time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter Vacation
shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after the new year.
5. Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries during the vacations and holidays ordered
in Rules 3 and 4 only.
6- Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany teachers
or pupils.
7. Pupils enrolled in ward schools shall not be permitted to attend the Central Schools,
except by promotion at examination held by the Superintendent of Education; and pupils of
- the Central Schools shall not be admitted into Ward Schools.
8- It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning the
regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of
times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment, his progress
in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and five
minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school, to
observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow recesses
to exceed the specified time—that is, from the time study ceases and commences
again.
5. To keep a Visitors' Book (which he shall ask the trustees to provide), and to enter
therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so chooses to make
therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information.
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book, and to
deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by them.
8. At the end of each half-year to hold a public examination of his school, of which
notice shall be given to the trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education, monthly or when desired, any information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected with the
operations of his school, or in anywise affecting its interest or character.
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm and judicious parent
in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear to him to
be imperatively necessary; and then a record of the offence and the punishment shall
he made in the school register for the inspection of trustees and visitors, 13. No teacher shall compel the services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
14. For gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be expelled without the
authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless,
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to expel such
pupil from the school; but any pupil under public censure who shall express to the
teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and explicitly as the case
may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees and teacher, be re-admitted
to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of trustees, to see that the school-house
is kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating, and ventilation, and
especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least fifteen
minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To daily inspect the yards and outhouses, and report to the Trustees, and to see
that the school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus, books,
etc., so that they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt notice in
writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a time-table, showing the order
of exercises for each clay in the week, and the time devoted to each per clay.
19. Not to be absent from the school without the permission of the Board of Trustees,
unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported to
the Secretaiy. N. B.—All absences, with reasons for the same, shall be reported
monthly to the Superintendent of Education.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings of the
teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the duty of the Principal of a school to
convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once a month, for
conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To make a statutory declaration when required, as to the correctness of the statistical and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. Previous to leaving the school to dismiss pupils detained for punishment.
25. To make himself familiar with the Rules that relate to his school duties.
26. Teachers of Ward Schools shall admit as pupils only those who are not farther
advanced than the second reader.
9. The Principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the time-tables,
exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades, and shall, on or before
the 15th clay of July in each year, send to the Superintendent of Education a report of the
condition and progress of the school, with any suggestions he may deem expedient respecting
its requirements.
10- No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
] 1. No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he is
afflicted with, or has been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all clanger of contagion
shall have passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man, or other authority satisfactory to the teacher.
12. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil is to be
made good forthwith by his parent or guardian, 48 Via
Public Schools Report.
203
13. It is required of each and every pupil:—
1. That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that he be kind
and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his studies; and
that he conform to the rules of the school.
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for tardiness
or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory
excuse for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed for
closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises, or in
going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites; but,
in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under special
circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but every such case must be
forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
14, The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be
taught. The Lord's Prayer may be used in opening and closing school upon the permission of
the Board of Trustees.
APPENDIX B.
Regulations for the examination of Public  School  Teachers   in   the   Province  of
British Columbia for the Year 1884.
\ Approved by His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, 24th November, 1884.]
I.—Time and Place of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the Public
Schools shall commence on Monday, July 6th, 1885, at 10 a.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule:—
Date.
July 6, Monday	
,, 7, Tuesday...
,, 8, Wednesday
,, 9, Thursday.
,, 10, Friday...
,, 11, Saturday.
„ 13, Monday.
,, 14, Tuesday.
,, 15, Wednesday
Subject.
Optional Subjects	
Practical Mathematics	
Algebra 	
Euclid	
Natural Philosophy	
Arithmetic	
Grammar	
Education and Art of Teaching
Spelling	
Forenoon.
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.301
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.301
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 11
Subject.
Latin	
English Literature
Ancient History..
Book-keeping ....
Mensuration	
Mental Arithmetic
Composition	
Geography	
English History..
Writing	
Reading	
Afternoon
2 to 4.30
2 to 3.30
3.30 to 5
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 2.30
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 204 - Public Schools Report. 1884
3. The examination shall take place in Victoria, and such other place or places as the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education, ten
days before the examination, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for which he is
a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20,
21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by such
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate as
shall be satisfactory to the examiners.
III.—Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the
issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted
to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room any book, or paper, or slate, or anything else
from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper.
Detection in the breach of these Rules will render the candidate liable not only to the loss of
the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the discovery be then made that these Rules have been
broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write the subject of the examination paper on the
outside sheet, and his distinguishing number.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate less than
sixteen, shall be granted a certificate to teach, but such persons may be allowed to undergo
the examination and obtain a certificate of standing.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates:—
1. Temporary certificate.
2. Third Class, Grade B, certificate.
3. Third Class, Grade A,        „
4. Second Class, Grade B,       ,,
5. Second Class, Grade A,      ,,
6. First Class, Grade B, „
7. First Class, Grade A, „ 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 205
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1. A temporary certificate, valid until the next examination of teachers, shall entitle the
holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach in any
Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which more than
one is employed.
3. A Second Class Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold any
position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public School, or to act as an assistant in a High School.
5. A First Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public or High School.
VII.—Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.    To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing. To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
3. Spelling.    To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic. To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to be able to work
problems in the various rules.
5. Mental Arithmetic. To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in mental
arithmetic.
6. Geography.    To have a good knowledge of the geography of the world.
7. Grammar. To show a thorough knowledge of grammar, and to analyze and parse any
English sentence.
8. History.    To have a good knowledge of the history of the British Empire.
9. Composition. To be familiar with the forms of letter writing, and to be able to write
a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling and punctuation.
10. Education. To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching the
various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquainted with school management—
including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils, formation of time-tables,
and modes of discipline, and to be familiar with the School Act and Regulations, especially
respecting the office of teacher.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration,    To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of surfaces.
13. Algebra. To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic equations,
and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Euclid.    Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To be acquainted with the properties of matter, and with the
elementary principles of statics. 206 Public Schools Report. 1884
IX.—First Class, Grade A, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid,    Books I., IL, III., IV, Defs. of V, and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
16. English literature. ,
17. Ancient History. To have a general knowledge of Ancient History from the Creation
to the Fall of Rome.
18. Practical Mathematics. To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry, and
to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin. To be able to translate and parse the following:—Csesar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., IL, and III.; Horace, Odes, Book I., and Ars Poetica; Virgil, iEneid, Books I., IL,
and III.
20. Greek. To be able to translate and parse the following:—Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., IL, and III.; Homer, Iliad, Books I., IL, and HI.
21. French. To be able to translate and parse the following:—Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII., Books I., IL, and III.; Corneille, Le Cid.
22. Natural Sciences.    To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.    .
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in which to
be examined.
X.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a Temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached o the
subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 207
7. For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to all
the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade, provided always that he obtain at
least 40 per cent, of the marks attached to the Latin paper; or he must be a graduate of some
British University, who has proceeded regularly to his degree, and must satisfy the Examiners
of his knowledge of the art of teaching and school discipline and management.
8. Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate,
about to expire, shall be renewed from year to year by the Examiners, on the application of
the holder of any such expiring certificate, provided such certificate shall in the range and
scope of each subject and of all subjects fully satisfy the conditions of the examination in
progress at the time of such application for renewal. Provided also, that the applicant produce
satisfactory proof of success as a teacher during the time his certificate has been in force.
9. Whenever it shall be deemed necessary to raise the standard of examination, at least
twelve months' notice of such intention shall be given. ,
XL—Fixed Standard Marks of Value Attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Reading  50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling  100
4. Arithmetic  200
5. Mental Arithmetic  100
6. Geography  200
7. Grammar  200
8. History (English)  200
9. Composition  200
10. Education  200
11. Book-keeping  200
12. Mensuration  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature  200
17. Ancient   History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin    200
20. 21, 22.    Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences  200
XII. Candidates who fail to obtain First Class Certificates shall not be awarded marks
for answers to the papers set for those certificates. 208
Public Schools Report.
1884
APPENDIX C.
Chapter I.
Order of Business at
Annual Meetings.
School Meetings in School Districts.
1.—Notice of Meetings.
School Meetings. \_ The notice, calling an annual or special meeting, may be signed by the
secretary by direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the trustees themselves. Copies of such notices shall be put up in at least three of the most
public places in the district, at least ten days before the time of holding the
meeting.
II,—Proceedings at Annual Meetings.
Annual School Meetings,     1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (12 o'clock),
how organized. call the meeting to or([er, and request the voters present to appoint a chair
man and secretary from among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall preserve
order and decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal
to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be limited to the
casting vote. "" In case of an equality of votes, the chairman must give the
casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of the
meeting.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting:—
(1.) Calling the meeting to order.
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Reading of trustees' annual report, including statement of receipts
and expenditure.
(4.) Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report.
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year.
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
(7.) Any Other business of which clue notice has been given.
3. The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings:—
(1.) Addressing Chairman.—Every voter shall rise previously to speaking, and address himself to the chairman.
(2.) Order of Speaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the
chairman shall name the voter who shall speak first, when the other
voter or voters shall next have the right to address the meeting in
the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be Read.—A voter may require the question or motion
under discussion to be read for his information at any time, but not
so as to interrupt a voter who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking Twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the
same question or amendment without leave of the meeting, except
in explanation of something which may have been misunderstood, or
until every one choosing to speak shall have spoken.
(5.) Voting.— The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the names
of all voters who may present themselves shall be recorded; such
poll to remain open till four o'clock, when the chairman shall
declare the result,
Rules of Order to be
observed at Annual
Meetings. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 209
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to vote,
the chairman shall require the person whose vote is questioned to
make the declaration provided by law; after making it, the vote
must be received and recorded without further question; but if
such person refuses to make such declaration, his vote is to be
rejected.
(7.) Protests.—No. protest against an election or other proceedings of
the meeting shall be received by the chairman. All protests must
be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty days at
least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall always
be in order, provided that no second motion to the same effect shall
be made until some intermediate proceedings shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if required) and seconded.—A motion
cannot be put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be in
writing (if required by the chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or
read by the chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the
meeting; but may be withdrawn at any time before decision by the
consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of Motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate no
other motion shall be received, unless to amend it, or to postpone
it, or for adjournment.
(12.) Order of putting Motion.—All questions shall be put in the order
in which they are moved. Amendments shall all be put before the
main motion, the last amendment first, and so on.
(13.) Reconsidering Motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be made
by any voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration
shall be taken more than once at the same meeting.
4. The poll at every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after four close of Meeting,
o'clock in the afternoon.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should sign Transmission of Minutes.
the minutes, as entered by the secretary in the minute book; and the secretary of the board of trustees must forthwith transmit a correct copy of such
minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of Education.
6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in the special School Meeting,
same way as annual school meetings.
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
(These are denned in the "Public School Act, 1879.")
The  following  regulations  are  further  prescribed  for  the  guidance of
trustees:—
1. Notice of the appointment of a teacher to a school should be given him Appointment of Teacher.
in writing, such notice specifying the day on which his duties as teacher
commence.
2. Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in writing, Dismissal of Teacher,
at least thirty days before such dismissal is to take place.
3. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher should be forthwith Superintendent of Edu-
transmitted to the Superintendent of Education, with the date on which theappomtme!.tordismtsai
appointment or dismissal takes effect, of Teacher-. 210
Public Schools Report.
1884
Care of School-house.
4. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should be
to see that the school-house is kept in good repair. He should see that the
windows are properly filled with glass; that at the proper season the stove
School-house.
Expenses of School.
and pipe or fireplace are in good condition, and that suitable wood or coal is
provided; that the desks and seats are in good repair; that the outhouses
are properly provided with doors and kept clean; that the blackboards are
kept painted, the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided
necessary for the comfort of the pupils and the success of the school.
5. No public school-house or school plot, or any building, furniture, or
other thing pertaining thereto, should be used or occupied for any other
purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of the district, without the express permission of the trustees as a corporation, and
then only after school hours and on condition that all damages be made good,
and cleaning and sweeping properly done.
(The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees. He
has no authority to use the school-house other than as directed by them, or
to make use of it at any other time than during school-hours without their
sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at once deliver up the
school-house key to them.)
6. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses they
shall incur for their school, but they are required to submit such matters
(Public School Act, 1879, sec. 7,,sub-see. 3; Revenue Act, 1879, sec. 36,) to
the Government for approval.
Extract from "Revenue Act, 1879."
"36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy-Treasurer, or finally placed to the
credit of a Sub-Accountant or any other person, in repayment of an advance, or in
accounting for any portion of revenue by charging the amount to the head of service,
the Auditor must examine the account and endorse thereon the head of service, number
of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been
issued."
June, 1879.
7. The annual reports required of trustees must be received at Education
Office before vouchers for the incidental expenses of schools will be certified.
APPENDIX D.
Chapter I.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to a High School.
1. Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly the ordinary words in the Fourth Reader and
Spelling Book.
2. Reading.-—To read correctly and intelligently any passage in the Fourth Reader.
3. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
4. Arithmetic.—To have a good general knowledge of numeration, notation, the four simple
and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple interest and
percentage, compound interest and discount.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To be able to solve, mentally, any ordinary problems.
6. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions, and to be able to
analyze and parse any ordinary sentence.
7. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, of the general
principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe, Asia, Africa,
America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of that of the Dominion
of Canada, 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 211
8. History.—To know the different periods and the outlines of English History, as
contained in Collier's History of the British Empire (Junior Class Book).
9. Composition.—To be able to write a letter correctly as to form and punctuation, and to
write a brief composition on any simple subject.
Chapter II.
Course of Study in the Victoria High School.—Junior Division.
1. English Language.—Review of elementary work in orthography, etymology, syntax, and
analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose; composition, including
the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and abstracts of passages in readers,
themes, and generally the formation of a good English style; reading; dictation; and elocution,
including the learning by heart and recitation of selected passages from standard authors.
2.—Mathematics.
(a) Arithmetic, including simple and compound rules, vulgar and decimal fractions,
proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications, and square root.
(b) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring, greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one, two, and
three unknown quantities.
(c) Euclid, Book I., with easy exercises.
(d) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures.
(«) Natural Philosophy, including proportions of matter, composition and resolution of
forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises, and elementary reader.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a) Latin—grammar and exercises.
(b) Greek—grammar and exercises (optional).
5. History.
(a) Leading events of English History to Stuart Period.
(5) Roman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical and
political. Map geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire more
particularly.
7. Book-keeping and Writing.
(a) Single Entry and principles of Double Entry.
(b) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.
(a) Elementary Botany.
(6) Elementary Physiology.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition,
rendering of poetry into prose, abstract of selected passages, critical reading of portions of the
works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style.
2. Mathematics.
(a) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(b) Algebra, quadratics, equations, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and
combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers.
(c) Euclid, Books I., IL, III., IV.; definitions of Book V. and Book VI., with exercises.
(d) Trigonometry, plane trigonometry
(e) Mensuration, volumes and areas of surfaces of solids and surveying. 212 Public Schools Report. 1884
(/) Natural philosophy, pressure of liquids, specific gravity and modes of determining
it; the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing pump, air pump,
statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics.
3. Modern Lanquages.—French—Grammar and exercises; Voltaire, Histoire de Charles
XII., Corneille, Le Old.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a) Latin—Caesar, De Bello Gallico, Book I.; Virgil, jEneid, Book I.; Horace, Odes,
Book I.
(b) Greek—Grammar; Xenophon, Book I.; Homer, Iliad, Book I. (optional.)
5. History.
(a) English History—the special study of the Stuart and Brunswick periods.
(b) Roman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the reign of
Romulus Augustulus.
(c) Grecian History, especially from the Persian War to the death of Alexander the
Great, both inclusive.
6. Geography—Ancient and modern.
7. Book-keeping and Writing,
(a) Single and double entry.
(6) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.
(a) Geology.
(6) Astronomy.
Chapter III.
1. The course of study in the New Westminster High School shall be the same as in the
Victoria High School.
Chapter IV.
Regulations for Admission, etc., into a High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers, may
be admitted to enter a High School as pupils without being required to pass the usual entrance
examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to a High School, the aggregate of his
marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the subjects of
examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject. Candidates will not
be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected to
additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from a Public School to a
High School shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
5. Pupils entering a High School must take the prescribed course of studies.
6. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with reference
to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may have been in such
class or division.
7. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils in a
High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
8. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any portion of
such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into a High School except by the authority
of the Trustees, given in writing; and the names of all such absentees shall be forwarded by
the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination at the
close of each half year. 48 Vic
Public Schools Report.
213
APPENDIX E.
Books Authorized for Use in Public and High Schools.
Gage's First Reader, Part I.
Gage's First Reader, Part II.
Gage's Second Reader.
Gage's Third Reader.
Gage's Fourth Reader.
Gage's Fifth Reader.
Gage's Sixth Reader.
Gage's Practical Speller.
Payson, Dunton & Scribner's Copy-Books.
Gage's Copy-Books.
Copy-books without headlines.
Elementary Arithmetic (Kirkland & Scott).
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy)
Mental Arithmetic (J. A. McLellan)
The World (J. B. Calkin).
School Geography and Atlas.
Swinton's New Language Lessons (Campbell).
Lennie's Grammar.
English Grammar—by Dr. Wm. Smith and T. D.
Hall, M.A. (London).
British History (Collier).
British Empire (Collier).
Outlines of General History (Collier).
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman).
Book-keeping (Beatty & Claire)
Algebra (Hamblin Smith).
Mensuration (Todhunter).
Pott's Euclid, six books.
Tyndall's Natural Philosophy.
Trigonometry for Beginners, by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics, by WormelL
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
Ancient Geography (Pillans).
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric.
Ancient History (Schmidt).
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
Science Primers—Introductory, Chemistry, Physics,
Physical Geography, Geology, Astronomy, Physiology, Botany.
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam).
Smith's Smaller Latin Grammar.
Bryce's First Latin Book.
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold).
Principia Latin a, Part I. (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin.
Riddle's Latin Dictionary.
Curtius' Greek Grammar.
Bryce's First Greek Book.
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold).
Initia Grseca (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek.
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon.
Fasquelle's Shorter Course, French.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
Histoire de Charles XII. (Voltaire).
Le Cid, Corneille.
Common School Education, by James Currie (for the
use of teachers).
APPENDIX F.
List of Certificated Teachers.
First Class, Grade A.
Smith, B. H, M.A., University of New Bruns-     Johnston, J. P., 1881
wick, 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Stainburn,   Geo.,   B.A.,  Cantab,   1880.    Renewal, 1884.
McLaughlin, J. H, 1880.    Renewal, 1834.
Newbury, J. C,   1880 and 1882.
Williams, Miss E. A., 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Thomson, J. W., 1881.
Howay, Miss Alice, 1882.
Irwin, J., 1882.
Muir, John N., B. A., McGill University,
Montreal, 1884.
Stramberg, Hector M., A.B., Dalhousie University, Halifax, N. S., 1884.
First Class, Grade B.
Kaye, James, 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Halliday, James A., 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Lecluc, Thomas, 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Offerhaus, R., 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Chandler, Mrs. L. D., 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Lewis, S. G., 1880.    Renewal, 1884.
Reid, Mrs. Lizzie, 1881.
Carmiehael, F. A., 1881.
Titchworth, J. C, 1881.
Hamilton, C. J., 1881.
Clarke, C. E, 1882.
Murray, P., 1882.
Smith, Miss Isabella, 1882.
Dods, Archibald, 1883.
Irvine, Miss Christina, 1883.
Cameron, Miss Agnes Deans, 1883.
Horton, Miss Lucrctia, 1883.
Forrest, Miss Christina, 1883 and 1884.
Bannerman, William S., 1884.
Gillies, D.W., 1884.
Lyons, Ormoncl, 1884.
Babbitt, Daniel, 1884.
Anderson, Robert, 1884.
Sluggett, George H, 1884.
Bell, MissEmelene, 1881
Phelps, William H,
Irwin, William H, 1884.
Jones, David, 1884.
Thain, Joseph H, 1884.
Shaw, Alexander, 1884, 214
Public Schools Report.
1884
Second Class, Grade A.
Berkeley, Mrs. L. A., 1881 and 1884.
Mundell, John, 1882.
Barron, Miss Lizzie A. F., 1882.
McDougall, Miss A. J., 1883.
Harding, Miss M. L, 1883.
Jamieson, Miss Eleanor A., 1884.
Storey, Miss Marcella V., 1884.
Davidson, Miss Mary R., 1884.
Kaye, Ernest E., 1884.
Gowen, Miss Annie C, 1884.
Munn, Henry A., 1884.
Second Class, Grade B.
Jackson, Miss H, 1881 and 1884.
Williams, Miss M., 1882.
Gardiner, Miss Emily J., 1882.
Kirkland, Miss Maude, 1882.
Phair, Caspar, 1882.
Hanna, R. S., 1882.
White, Miss S. J., 1883.
Davidson, Miss Elizabeth A., 1884.
Gardiner, Miss Abbie, 1884.
Wolfenden, Miss Nellie F. F., 1884.
Northcote, Miss Alice, 1884.
Bannerman, A. M., 1884.
Michael, Mrs. A. M., 1884.
Gillanders, Albert, 1884.
Pollard, Miss Annie, 1884.
Lawrence, Miss Mary, 1884.
Shaw, John, 1884.
Smith, Miss Clara P., 1884.
Halliday, Miss Marie F, 1884.
Hoy, James A., 1884.
Third Class, Grade A.
Reynard, Miss Eva Marie, 1884.
Andrews, Miss Helen, 1884.
Heard, Miss Mary, 1884.
Norris, Miss Martha J., 1884.
Sweet, Miss Margaret J., 1884.
Scott, Miss Jean Ann,  1884.
Watson, George A., 1884.
Shaw, Alexander, Jr., 1884.
Mufford, William J., 1884.
Bryant, Miss Maria, 1884.
Tod, Miss Katherine, 1884.
Ramsay, Miss Jennie, 1884.
Norris, Miss Mary E., 1884.
McCartey, Miss Augusta, 1884.
Robinson, Miss Sarah A., 1884.
Third Class, Grade B.
|   Barron, Miss Isabel M. R, 1884.
Temporary Certificates.
Granted on the recommendation of the Board of Examiners.
Caldwell, Mrs. L. A.
Coghlan, Miss Ella.
Sinelair, James W.
Clemitson, R. M.
McDonald, D. J.
Smith, J. F.
McNish, John.
Fraser, Roderick L.
McLeod, John A.
Scott, John R.
Monk, Mrs. Annie.
Mebius, Miss Lucy.
Dallas, Miss Anna C.
Temporary Certificates.
Granted on the application of Boards of Trustees.
Blair, Miss Jeanie W.
Wilson, David, B.A.
Campbell, Eli J.
Campbell, James M.
Bailey, Miss A. S.
Johnson, Miss Sophie C.
Metcalfe, James C. F. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 215
APPENDIX G.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to a High School.
Graded Schools.
Christmas Examinations, 1883.
Victoria Boys' School.
George Nelson Bailey, Alfred Bruce Oldershaw,
Frederic Galley, James Henry Penketh,
Robert Henry Johnston, Ernest Alfred Reid,
Frederic Ernest Mebius, James Wolsey Smith.
Victoria Girls' School.
Alice Leonora Johnston, head of school,
Grace E. Cameron, Sarah A. Humber,
Clara Clanton, Edith Lettice.
Midsummer Examinations, 1884.
Victoria Boys' School.
Frederic Vancouver Robertson, head of school.
Frank Burgess Gibbs, Ruther Wilson,
James Mansell, William C. Wilson.
Alexander Dearberg,
Victoria Girls' School.
Lizzie Sylvester, head of school,
Bertha Burgess, Susie Jackson,
Florence Butler, Louisa Richardson,
Florence M. Clarke, Mary Smith,
Gertrude Borthwick, Jennie C. Hutcheson,
Robina Horton, Elizabeth Stannard.
New Westminster Boys' School.
James Ellard, Charles Keith,
Thomas Cunningham, George Wintemute.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Mary Norris, Margaret Homer,
Bertha Grant, Emily Grant.
Nanaimo Boys' School.
James Galloway.
Wellington.
Helen Constance Jones. 216 Public Schools Report. 1884
Common Schools.
Chilliwhack, Upper (Centreville)    Bertha J. Reece, Sarah A. Branchfiower.
Granville Catherine Gregory.
Saanich, East-South (South)  Frederic W. Robson.
Saanich, North Mary Heard.
Sooke Matilda Muir.
Sumas Clara Jane Chadsey.
Medalists.
The Medals presented by His Excellency the Governor-General were, on result of written
examinations, awarded as follows :—
1. Christina Forrest, Silver Medal, presented for competition in the Victoria High School.
2. Lizzie Sylvester, Bronze Medal, presented for competition between the Boys' School
and Girls' School, Victoria.
3. Frederic W. Howay, New Westminster Boys' School, Bronze  Medal presented for
competition between the Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster.
APPENDIX H.
MIDSUMMER HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION PAPERS, 1884
Mental Arithmetic : Time, 20 minutes.
1. If 9 yds. cost .90, what will 1J yds. cost? Ans.
2. What will 896 sheep cost @ §15 each? Ans.
3. § of 6 is 8-9ths of what number? Ans.
4. If 8 books cost $3, what must each be sold for so as to gain 2| cents
on each? Ans.
5. If 5-8ths of a lb. of tea cost $2, what will 8-5ths lbs. cost? Ans.
6. 6 is 8% of what number? Ans.
7. Multiply 68 by 35. Ans .
8. A person has 17 horses and 12 mules.    How many more horses must
he buy that he may have twice as many horses as mules? Ans.
9. Reduce £ to a decimal. Ans .
10. A person sells cloth at .80 per yard and loses 20% on the cost; required
the cost per yard. Ans.
Arithmetic: Time, 1 hour.
1. Divide 1210 by 1.21, and .0121 by 1.21.
2. If a ship have provisions for 80 men for 3 weeks and 12 days,' but after 8 days 10 of
the men die; how long will the remainder of the provisions last the remainder of the men?
3. Multiply (one hundred and ton) thousandths by (one hundred and one) millionths.
4. Express in Roman notation 1884, 1655, and 766. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 2lT
5. A bankrupt's property amounts to $860, and his creditors lose 30 cents on the dollar;
find the amount of the bankrupt's debts.
6. What will it cost to cover a floor, 10 yards long by 3 yards wide, with carpet f of a
yard wide, at $1.10 per yard?
7. Change 5.2481 to a vulgar fraction expressed in lowest terms.
8. If 3| lbs. of tea cost 212/5 cents, how many lbs. can be bought with $321?
9. A person out of his income paid a tax of 1J cents on the dollar, spent $2 per day in
1864, and saved $1,600; what was his income?
10. Simplify   |of(%-li).f + H|-l
% of (V5 + I-)-   2J + i-j
Geography: Time, 1 hour.
1. Define equator, peninsula, isthmus, zone, and latitude.
2. Name the countries of Europe that border on the Mediterranean, stating capital of each.
3. Trace a trip by water from Victoria to New York, stating the waters over which you
would sail, the islands, straits, bays, etc., that you would pass.
4. Locate capes Blanco, Sable, and Chudleigh; and Lake Champlain and Lake of the Woods.
5. Locate the following rivers:—
(1) Saguenay, (2) Saskatchawan, (3) Magdalena, (4) Thames, (5) Peace.
6. Where are the following seas:—
(1) Black, (2) White, (3) Red, (4) Yellow, (5) North?
7. Define and locate—
(1) Soudan, (2) Falkland, (3) Suez, (4) Australia, (5) Winnipeg.
8. Describe the Nile.
9. Into what waters do the following flow:—
(1) St. Lawrence, (2) Danube, (3) Orinoco, (4) Amoor, (5) Mackenzie?
10. Name the Provinces of the Dominion, with capital and largest seaport city of each.
English Grammar: Time, 1 hour.
1. Decline sheep in both numbers.
2. Compare bad, late, useful, true, and active.
3. Decline the pluperfect potential active, and the pluperfect indicative passive of the
verb to follow.
4. Correct errors in the following sentences, and give reasons for each correction:—
(a.) You was reading them books.
(b.) Him and her is going to set up a pillar between you and I.
5. How do you know when a verb is regular?    When it is transitive?
6. Change into the passive voice—"When the King's horses ran away, they broke his
chariot."
7. Write sentences with the subject modified (1) by an adjective, (2) by a noun in apposition, (3) by a participle, (4) by a participial phrase, (5) by a preposition and its case.
8. Parse the italic words in the following sentence:—
The boys can in all probability parse this sentence correctly, because they remember
what I taught them. 2l6 Public Schools Report. 1884
History: Time, 1 hour.
1. Name the Kingdoms of the Heptarchy, giving the four greatest monarchs of the period.
2. Name the Norman line in order, with dates.
3. What relation was the first Plantagenet to the last Norman Sovereign.
4. Who basely murdered his nephew, Prince Arthur, in order to secure more firmly the
throne to himself?
5. By whom was Britain called Albion?    Why?
6. Name three leaders of the Britons who resisted the Romans in their conquest of Britain.
7. Give the character of King John.
8. Describe "The Field of the Cloth of Gold."
9. Give historic reference of "The Invincible Armada."
10. Give name and date of birth of our present Sovereign, stating three great events of
the reign.
APPENDIX I.
MIDSUMMER HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATION—JUNE, 18S4.
Senior Division.
Geography: Time, 1 hour.
1. Bound the temperate zones.
2. What is the length of a degree of longitude at the poles?    On the equator?
3. Give the capitals of the Australian Colonies.
4. Name three tributaries of (1) Ottawa River,  (2) Baltic Sea,  (3) Gulf of Mexico.
5. Name five peaks of the Rocky Mountains, locating each.
6. In what zones are Iceland, Australia, and Terra del Fuego?
7. Distinguish between Tycoon and Typhoon.
8. Give the area of Vancouver Island, and the population of the Dominion of Canada.
9. Name the three largest cities and three longest rivers on the largest island in Europe.
10   Define and locate (1) Chaleur, (2) Romania, (3) Levant, (4) Lomond, (5) Okanagan.
English Grammar: Time, 1 hour.
1. Of what use is the study of this subject?
2. Distinguish between orthography and orthoepy.
3. Give a paradigm (1st person singular) of the tenses that denote past time of the verb
to sew.
4. Name six conjunctive adverbs, and four correlative conjunctions.
5. What constitute the independent elements of sentences?    Give three examples.
6. Write correctly the following sentences, giving rule for any change made:—
(1.) Please walk in the setting-room and see if she is getting the better of her ailment.
(2.) I'm pretty well, Mam, thank you.
(3.) Which rule, if it had been observed, the student would have found no difficulty
in correcting the sentence. 48 Vio. Public Schools Report. 2l9
7. Analyze—"Tell me not in mournful numbers,
'Life is but an empty dream/
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not whctt they seem."
8. Parse italicized words in above quotation.
English History: Time, 1 hour.
1. In which of the centuries since the Conquest have we had the least number of Monarchs?
2. Give a short account of the Reformation and Restoration.
3. Who was the first Sovereign of Great Britain?
4. Name the Stuart Sovereigns, with dates.
5. Give the principal events of the reign of George II.
6. Who was George III.?    Name four of his sons.
7. State three important historical events of the present year.
Roman History: Time, 1 hour.
1. In what four great battles did Hannibal defeat the Romans?     By whom was he defeated?    When?
2. Give historic reference of "Delenda est Carthago."
3. Give a short sketch of the Great Civil War.
4. Who composed the First Triumvirate?      In what did the popularity of each rest?
What became of each of them?
5. Name some of the clauses of the Agrarian Law proposed by Tiberius Gracchus.
6. Give historic reference of (1) Carbo, (2) Cynocephalse, (3) Optimates, (4) Cataline, (5)
Jugurtha.
Mental Arithmetic: Time, 20 minutes.
1. What will 15 turkeys cost @ $20 per doz.? Ans.
2. How many fathoms in a furlong? Ans.
3. How many yards of carpeting, § of a yard wide, will be required to
cover the floor of a room 18 ft. by 20 ft.? Ans.
4. What is the interest on $150 for 9 months @ 8% per annum? Ans.
5. From . 9 take the cube of -|. Ans.
6. If f of a ton cost $9, what will be the cost of § of a ton? Ans.
7. Sold a horse for $60, thereby losing 331%, what did he cost? Ans.
Arithmetic: Time, 1 hour.
1. If 10 men can reap a field of 7|- acres in 3 days of 12 hours each, how long will it take
8 men to reap 9 acres, working 10 hours a day?
2. What sum of money will amount to $297 in 4 years at 8 p^r cent., simple interest?
3. Find the discount on $250.75, due 1 year 5 months hence, at 8 per cent, per annum;
simple interest. 220 Public Schools Report. 1884
4. A person transfers ($3,000 stock from the 3 per cent, consols at 89§, to the reduced
2>\ per cent, consols at 98-Jj find the alteration in his income.
5. Extract the square root of 53111.8116.
6. Extract the cube root of 219365327791.
Mensuration: Time, 1 hour.
1. The span of a roof is 28 feet; each of its slopes measures 17 feet from the ridge to the
eaves: find the height of the ridge above the eaves.
2. The diagonal of a field in the form of a square is 12 rods: how many trees planted 12
feet apart will it contain?
3. A plank is 18 inches broad;   find what length must be cut off that the area may be a
square yard.
4. The side of a square is 16 feet; a circle is inscribed in the square so as to touch all the
sides: find the area between the circle and the square.
5. How many acres of land in a triangular field whose sides are 20, 24, and 30 chains each?
6. The diameters of two concentric circles are 19 and 43J feet; required the area of the
annulus contained between them.
Algebra: Time, 1 hour.
1. Resolve into elementary factors—
(1.)    afi + a*.        (2.)    3.x2-2*-5. (3.)    x*-yK
2. Find the G. C. M. of 4a;2 + 3x - 10 and 4a;3 + 7a;2 - 3a; + 15.
„   „.       oc +iU     x        4      5a; ,        .        .
3 Given  — - •—■ = — — to find the value of x.
7 2      35a;     14
4 Given — 1 ■ = — to find the value of as.
19       3 + a;    9
5. A, after spending £10 less than a third of his yearly income, found that he  had  £45
more than half of it remaining.    Find his income.
6. Prove that a° = 1.
Euclid: Time, 1 hour.
1. Any two sides of a triangle are together greater than the third side.
2. How many degrees in each angle of an equiangular pentagon?
3. To describe a parallelogram that shall be equal to a given triangle, and have one of its
angles equal to a given rectilineal angle.
4. Prove that the parallelograms about the diameter (or diagonal)  of a square are likewise squares.
5. To inscribe a circle in a given triangle.
Statics: Time, 1 hour.
1. Define Statics, and state of what science it is a branch?
2. Two forces of 10 &s. and 7 lbs. act on a point at an angle of 60°.    Find the magnitude
of the resultant. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 221
3. Name the different states of Equilibrium, and give an example of each.
4. Define each of the Mechanical Powers.
5. Find the horizontal force necessary to support a body whose weight is 12 lbs, upon an
inclined plane whose base is to its length as 4 : 5.
6. Two weights, each equal to 8 Bbs., hanging on a straight lever at points 12 inches and
18 inches from the fulcrum, and on the same side of it, are balanced by a single vertical force
acting at a point 16 inches from the fulcrum.    Find the magnitude of the force.
Trigonometry: Time, 1 hour
1. Distinguish between geometry and trigonometry.
2. Define tangent, cosine, complement of an arc, and supplement of an angle.
3. The base and hypothenuse of a right-angled triangle are 288 and 480.    Find he angles
of the triangle.
4. Two sides of a triangle are respectively 240 and 180, and the contained angle is equal
to 25° 40'; required the parts of the triangle.
5. The three sides of a triangle are AB, AC, BO, and are respectively equal to 457, 368,
and 325.    Find the angles.
Book-keeping: Time, 1 hour.
1. Which one of a set of Books is the most important?    Why?
2. Can a person keep his accounts by Double Entry and not use a Journal?    How?
3. Make out Mr. McLaughlin's account and take his indorsed note for the amount.
4. Journalize—
(1) Bought of Reed & Co., merchandise, for ^ cash and J on time.
(2) Dot & Co. having failed, I sold their note to Sims & Bro., and received for it
2 tons of coal, delivered at my residence.
Face of the note $25.    Coal is worth $5 per ton.
5. Make an entry in the Day Book, carry the same into the Journal and Ledger.
6. How do you balance merchandise account?
Latin: Time, 1 hour.
1. Translate—
" Hac oratione ab Divitiaco habita, omnes, qui aderant, magno fletu auxilium a Caesare
petere coeperunt."
(1.) Parse habita and auxilium.
(2.) Conjugate aderant and coeperunt.
(3.) Decline hac undfletu.
(4.) Who wrote the above quotation?
2. Translate—
" Ipsa sed in somnis inhumati venit imago
Conjugis, ora modis attollens pallida miris;
Crudeles aras, trajectaque pectora ferro
Nudavit, csecumque domus scelus omne retexit."
(1.) Conjugate attollens and retexit.
(2.) To whom do ipsa and conjugis refer?
(3.^ Decline scelus and domus.
(4.) Scan the last two lines. 222 Public Schools Report. 1884
French: Time, 1 hour.
1. Write the days of the week and months of the year, stating gender of each.
2. Write the Preterite Definite Indicative, and Pluperfect Subjunctive (Active) of parler.
3. Distinguish between savoir and connaitre, giving participles of each.
4. Translate—
" Mes enfants, votre pere est cdle dans le ciel; mais vous avez un autre pere, qui est Dieu.
II est ici quoique vous ne le voyiez pas; c'est lui qui nous envois des fruits et des ceufs, et il
aura soin de nous, tant que nous I'aimerons et que nous le sewirons fide'lement."
5. Parse the words in italics.
Music: Time, 1 hour.
1. What is accentuation?
2. Give signatures of the Major keys from 1 to 5 Sharps, naming each.
3. Give signatures of the Major keys from 1 to 5 Flats, naming each.
4. Give signatures of the Minor keys from 1 to 5 Sharps, naming each.
5. Give signatures of the Minor keys from 1 to 5 Flats, naming each.
6. What Major key ends in C Sharp.
7. What Major key whose last Sharp is A Sharp?
8. Give the difference between the Major and Minor Sixths as to formation (i. e., the
numbers of tones and semitones).
9. What does each of the following words indicate:—(1.) Largo, (2.) Adagio, (3.) Andante,
(4.) Allegro, (5.) Presto?
■10. State the meaning of the following signs:—p. . . .pp. . . .f. . . .ff. . . .Dim.. . . Cres. . .
APPENDIX J.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY, 1884.
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, July 7th; 10 a.m. to 10.30 a.m.    Total marks, 100.
I. To three times 19 add 33 and 35, and multiply the sum thus
found by 25. Ans	
II. Find the sum of   | + -g+| Ans	
III. Find the cost of 57 books @ 37| cts. each. Ans	
IV. What number is that of which 28 is |  of ll ? Ans	
V. Find the simple interest on $180 at 5 per cent, per annum,
for 3| years. Ans	
VI. Find the value of 9Ibs. 2oz. of silver @ $1.20 per oz. Ans	
VII. A and B own equal shares of a farm worth $5,000, while
C owns two-fifths of it: they sell the farm for $6,000; what was As
share of the gain? Ans	 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
223
VIII. Reduce y to a decimal. Ans	
IX. If 3 men can reap a field of 5 acres in 2 days;   how long
will it take 9 men to reap a field of 10 acres? Ans days.
X. A man sells two horses, each for $720; on the one he gains
a profit of 12 J per cent, on prime cost; on the other he loses 12^ per
cent, on prime cost;   does he gain or lose by the transactions,  and
how much? Ans. He $	
Writing.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, 7th July; 10. SO a.m., to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
1. What means should a teacher take to interest a class of pupils that he is teaching to
write?
2. Upon what should the amount that pupils write at one lesson depend ?
3. Enumerate the qualities of good penmanship.    What are the characteristics of a good
method of teaching writing;?
4. How can a teacher prevent his pupils from imitating their own writing rather than that
of the model or copy line?
5. How may he help them, when the proper time comes, to exchange their school-hand
for a current or business-hand?
6. Describle Mulhaiiser's system of penmanship, and show how it violates good method.
7. What is meant by analysis in penmanship?    Classify the small letters.
8. Name the principles of the capitals and state the letters in which each of them is found.
9. Analyze the small letters q, 1, m, s, and the capitals M, P, X.
10. Write a specimen of penmanship, using the following lines:—
Know ye the land where the cypress and myrtle
Are emblems of deeds that are done in their clime,
Where the rage of the vulture, the love of the turtle,
Now melt into sorrow, now madden to crime?
Spelling.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, July 7th; 2 to 2.30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
I. Spell the following words correctly,
incorrectly spelled or omitted.):—
(Three marks will be deducted for every word
verdygrys
obaysance
parrallell
vynette
minnionet
annakronysm
instaulment
anyhillate
appokrifa
pherlo
diosesan
fleebottomy
girchin
sillinder
korrollary
gunnel
zooav
pusilanymity
isingglass
kattar
naftha
skollop
steem-gaje
II. Spell correctly and give the meanings of all the words in English pronounced like
"   "dare."   "slav."  "vain."  "indite."  «sefim." *
tocksyn
ocksigen
misschevous
enunciate
counterpaign
farysayikal
noisum
enciclopeedia
pannegerist
kiromancy
intallyo
ensicklikal
eleemosynary
deo volenty
anno domini
apergn
sursyngle
calydoscope
pronunciation
'air," "glare,"  "slay," "vain," "indite," "seem.' 224 Public Schools Report. 1884
Composition.    (For all classes and grades.)
Monday, July 7th; 2.30 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Explain the meaning of, and illustrate by an example, each of the following figures of
speech:—
(a) Simile; (b) Metaphor; (c) Metonymy; (d) Antithesis; (e) Epigram.
II. Write a letter to Messrs. T. H. Jones & Co., shipping agents, advising the dispatch of
goods for shipment to Liverpool.
III. Give the proper forms for the address, commencement, and conclusion of a letter to
the Governor-General of Canada.
IV. Write an Essay on one of the following subjects:—
(a) "Chinese Gordon."
(b) Capital Punishment.
(c) Female Suffrage.
Or write an account of any journey you may have made.
Arithmetic (Written).
For all classes and grades.
Tuesday, 8th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. State clearly the difference between the "solar" year and the "civil" year.
II. (1) Reduce to a vulgar fraction .9285714.
(2) Divide 1.1214 by 53.4, and 50.0 by 2.999.
(3) From a cellar 42ft. 10' long and 12ft. 6" wide were thrown 158 cu. yds. 17 cu. ft. 4'
of earth; how deep was it?
2
III. (1) Simplify]   2f+-ofl-1-f Ll&
\ 3?    2l)
5 2
(2) Multiply .24 by .57, giving answer decimally correct.
IV. If 3 men, working 10 hours a day, can plant a field 150 rods by 240 rods, in 5 clays,
how many men working 12 hours a day can plant a field measuring 192 rods by 300 rods, in 4
days?
V. A person lays by $230 at the end of each year, and employs the money at 7% compound
interest: what will he be worth at the end of 3 years ?
VI. A and B enter into a speculation; A puts in £50 and B puts in £45; at the end of 4
months A withdraws J of his capital, and at the end of 6 months B withdraws J of his; 0
then enters with a capital of £70; at the end of 12 months their profits are £254: How
ought this to be divided between them ?
VII. If I lay out £1,911 in the purchase of 3% consols, when they are at 79-J, at what
price should I sell out my stock again in order to realize on the whole a gain of £150, after
having paid -|% for brokerage on each transaction ?
VIII. An army which has been twice decimated in battle now contains 6,480 men; what
was the original number in the army?
IX. A merchant of Victoria wishes to remit to London, England, £1,620 through the
Bank of British Columbia, exchange being at 109J, brokerage \°/r_, what will he have to pay
in decimal currency for the Bill of Exchange ?
X. Three persons are to share $10,000 in the ratio of 3, 4, and 5, but the first dying, it is
required to divide the whole sum equitably between the other two, What are the shares of
the other two ? 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 225
XI. From the square root of 964.5192360241 take the cube root root of .000003375.
XII. Four persons start from the same point to travel round a circuit of 300 miles in
circumference. A travels 15 miles a clay, B 20 miles, C 25 miles, and D 30 miles a day. How
many days must they travel before they will all come together again at the same point?
Geography.    (For all classes and grades.)
Tuesday, July 8th; 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks. 200.
I. What causes the difference in the length of day and night?
II. How many degrees of latitude and longitude embraced by the North Temperate zone?
III. Illustrate by a diagram the position of the earth when in perihelion and aphelion?
IV. State in degrees, &e„ the latitude and longitude of our antipodes.
V. Describe the three principal ocean currents.
VI. State the chief beneficial effects of these currents.
VII. What causes whirlpools?    Locate two.
VIII. Name the most important cultivated food plant of each zone.
IX. Describe the following rivers, giving city at the mouth of each:—
(1) Columbia, (2) Seine, (3) La Plata, (4) Zambesi, (5) Yang-tse-kiang.
X. In what capes do the only two large peninsulas that point north, terminate?
XL What are the chief causes of the want of prosperity of most of the countries of Asia?
XII. What physical features of Africa account for its occupying the lowest rank among
the great divisions of the earth?
Name 5 towns in Nubia.
XIII. Bound the second largest peninsula of Asia.
The cutting of what canal would make this peninsula an island?
XIV. Name 5 peaks of the Andes, and describe 5 rivers flowing into the Mediterranean
gea.
XV. Give the area and population of (1) Dominion of Canada;  (2) British Columbia.
XVI. Name the chief exports of this Province, stating the market for each.
XVII. Locate 5 Sounds and 5 Mountain ranges of the Dominion.
XVIII. Describe the routeby which you would travel from Kootenay to Cassiar.
XIX. Define and locate, (1) Gozo, (2) Nikosia,   (3) Cheam, (4) Parnassus, (5) Sirocco,
(6) Khedive, (7) Derg, (8) Leith, (9) Scilly, (10) Alberni.
XX. Name the three largest cities in each of the largest insular possessions of (1) Great
Britain, (2) Spain, (3) France, (4) Holland, (5) Denmark.
Grammar.    (For all classes and grades.)
Wednesday, July 9th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Classify the consonants according to the organs of speech by which they are pronounced.
II. Write the nouns corresponding to pacific, merry, grievous;   the adjectives to think,
sequel, people, vein; the verbs to mood, wan, duplicity.
III. Define abstract nouns and adjectives.     Show how these classes of words resemble
each other and how they differ.
IV. Give the plurals of the words—Madam, dwarf, cherub, dilettante, basis, genus, genius,
bandit, larva, miasma. 226 Public Schools Report. 1834
V. Explain and illustrate the restricting and the co-ordinating uses of the relative
pronouns.
VI. Distinguish between (a) May I go? and Can I go? (b) Shall I go? and Will I go?
(c) Were I to go? and Was I to go?    (d) Would I have gone? and Should I have gone?
VII. Write the tenses of the potential mood, active voice, of the verb to take, and give
the past tense and past participle of the verbs—fly, set, swell, slide, light, grow, awake, wring,
ring, shear.
VIII. Correct the errors in the following sentences, and give reasons for each correction:—
It could not have been her. It is the best situation which can be got. It was your duty to
have arrested him. Beware lest he falls. He is not as good a poet as statesman. If the lad
would leave his father he should die. I rely on you coming. She is fairer but not so amiable
as her sister. Money is scarce and times hard. In him were happily blended true dignity
with softness of manners.
IX. Analyze in tabular form:—
And sure no gladlier does the stranded wreck
See thro' the gray skirts of a lifting squall
The boat that bears the hope of life approach
To save the life despaired of, than he saw
Death dawning on him, and the close of all.
X. Parse in tabular form the italicized words in the preceding passage.
Education and the Art of Teaching.    (For all classes and grades.)
Wednesday, Jtdy 9th; 2 p.m. to 4-30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Define education in its limited and extended meanings.
II. Does a thorough knowledge of the science of teaching render its possessor 'an adept in
the art of teaching?    Give reasons for answer given.
III. Show that teaching is a profession and state some of the characteristics of the successful instructor.
IV. Name three methods of primary instruction in reading now in use, pointing out the
merits and demerits (if any) of each.
V. What efforts would you use to make study a pastime and your school-room attractive?
VI. How would you make the study of grammar interesting to beginners?
VII. Give an outline of class-work on the Use of the Globes.
VIII. What changes were made in the "Public School Act, 1879," by  "An Act to
Amend (1884)?"
IX. Should the present standard for obtaining Certificates be raised?    State your reasons
fully for answer given.
X. Distinguish between the inductive and deductive theories of teaching.
XL Should the present school hours be changed?    Give reasons.
XII. State, in detail, the duties of teachers as prescribed for the Government of the
Public Schools of this Province.
XIII. Name the leading educationists of the present century.
XIV. The seeds of what cardinal virtues should be especially sown by teachers in youthful
minds? 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 227
British History.    (For all classes and grades.)
Thursday, 10th .Tidy; 10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Give a brief sketch of the reforms introduced by Alfred, mentioning those which are
often wrongly attributed to him.
II. Write a short account of the Feudal System.
What clo you know of the Lollards?
III. Describe the manners of the Tudor Period.
Sketch briefly the careers and characters of Cardinal Wolsey and Oliver Cromwell.
IY   Show how the Stuarts were connected with the Tudors.
Had Lady Jane Gray any right to the throne of England?    Give reasons for your answer.
V. When was the Act of Settlement passed, and what were its provisions?
VI. Give brief sketch of the British conquest of Canada.
VII. What were the causes of the Revolt of the American Colonies?    Notice the chief
men and events connected with the War of Independence.
VIII. Describe the battles of Trafalgar and Tel-el-Kebir.
IX. Write all you know of the Reform Bill of 1832.
Give an account of the Fenian Conspiracy of 1865.
X. Give historic reference, with dates, of the following:—(1.) Cassibelan; (2.) Seclgemoor;
(3.) Abigail Hill; (4.) Essex; (5.) Blenheim.
XL Give an outline of the chief events of the reign of George IV.
XII. What changes have been made in the Constitution during the Brunswick Period?
Mensuration.    (For First Class Grade B.)
Thursday, July 10th; 2 to 4-30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. The radius of a carriage wheel is 3ft. 6iu.; find how far the carriage will have travelled
while the wheel makes 625 revolutions.
II. Given the length of an arc of a circle, and the radius; show how to find the number
of degrees in the angle subtended by the given arc, at the centre of the circle.
Ex.  Radius = 4,000 miles; Arc = 3,300.    Find the angle.
III. A plot of grass in the shape of a parallelogram is surrounded by a path 3ft. 3in. wide;
one side of the plot is 65 feet; and the height perpendicular to this side is 45 feet: find the
areas of the grass-plot and of the path.
IV. What data must we have in order to find the area of a triangle? Give the rule for
finding the area in each case.
V. A B C D is a quadrilateral; A B = 28 feet; B C = 45 feet; CD = 51 feet; DA = 52
feet; the diagonal A C = 53 feet: find the area of A B C D.
VI. Find the length of the side of a square whose area shall be equal to that of the
rectangle whose sides are 128 feet and 968 feet.
VII. An equilateral triangle and a square have the same perimeter, compare their areas.
VIII. Show how to divide a triangle into 4 equal parts by straight lines parallel to one
of its sides.    Results to be taken to three places of decimals.
IX. Cost of carpeting a room 25 feet long with carpet 27 inches wide @ $2.40 a yard is
$160: find the breadth of the room.
X. A piece of timber is 30 feet long and tapers regularly, one end is a circle 7 feet in
circumference, the other end is a circle 4 feet in circumference; find the volume. 228
Public Schools Report.
1884
Mensuration.    (For First Class Grade A.)
Thursday, 10th July; 2 to 4-30 p. m.    Total marks, 200.
I.  Construct a diagonal scale to measure 1
feet, and show how to use it.
II. Find the expense of papering the walls of a room 25 feet long, 18 feet high, 15 feet
wide, with paper § of a yard wide, @ 62J cents f yard.
III. A box is made of wood 1 inch thick, without a lid; externally the box is 4 ft. 7 in.
long, 2 feet deep, and 3 ft. 6 in. wide; find the internal content.
Suppose the box to be filled with small equal cubes, what is the largest possible size of
the cubes?
IV. Find the radius of a circle so that the area of a segment subtending an angle of 45°
at the centre may be 25 square feet.
V. Find the cost of the Frustum of a right circular cone of marble @ $5 per cubic foot;
the radius of the larger end being 6 feet, and that of the smaller end 2 feet, and the length of
the slant side 10 feet.
VI. Draw a plan and find the area of the field described
in the following notes; the lengths are in links, reduce the
answer to acres, roods, &c.;—
toF.
140
toE.
150
to C.
50
toG.
600
560
480
470
-to D 170
380
100
-to B 150
A to
VII. The cost of a cube of metal @ $15.24 per cubic inch is $975.36; find the cost of
gilding it at 1 cent per square inch.
VIII. What length of wire -08 of an inch in diameter can be made out of one cubic inch
of metal?
IX. The weights of two globes are as 9 :25; the weights of cubic inches of the substances
of which they are made are as 15 : 9; compare the diameters of the globes.
X. The side of a regular hexagonal field ABCDEFis 10 chains; a stream 1 chain
wide passes through the field; its banks are arcs of two concentric circles, which have as their
common centre the point of meeting of the two sides A F and D E produced; one of the banks
of the stream passes through the two adjacent angles E and F, and the other bank cuts the
two sides A F and D E in the points G and H respectively; find the area of the part of the
field not covered by the stream.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class Grade B.)
Friday, Jidy 11th; 10 a.m to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
I. What three elements must be known in order to estimate the effect of a force? Explain
and illustrate the principle of the transmissibility of force.
II. Forces of 6 and 11 lbs. act at a point and their directions are inclined at an angle of
30°; find the magnitude of the resultant. If they acted at an angle of 135°, what would the
resultant be?
III. Show that if a straight line be drawn from any angle of a triangle to the middle
point of the opposite side, the centre of gravity of the triangle lies in this line at a distance
from the angular point equal to two-thirds of the line.
IV. A uniform bar weighs 10 lbs. and is 4 feet long. Weights of 30 and 40 lbs. are suspended from its extremities; on what point will it balance? 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 229
V. Suppose weights of 4, 14, 10, and 6 lbs. to be suspended from a straight rod, at
successive distances of 4, 4, and 26 inches; where must the fulcrum be placed for the rod to
balance?
VI. What are the requisites of a good Balanced One pound is weighed at each end of a
false balance, and the sum of the apparent weights is 2^ His.; what is the ratio of the lengths
of the arms?
VII. State the condition of equilibrium on the wheel and axle. If the radius of the axle
be 3 feet, and the radius of the wheel 9 feet; what power will be necessary in order to keep a
weight of 12 lbs. in equilibrium?
VIII What weight acting horizontally will sustain a weight of 12 lbs. on a plane inclined
at an angle of 60°.
IX. In a system of pulleys, where each cord is attached to the weight, there are two
moveable pulleys, each weighing 2J lbs. What power is required to support a weight of 6 cwt.?
X. A circular table, weight W, is supported on four legs in the circumference which
form a square; show that the least weight which will overturn the table when placed at the
circumference is W (]/ 2 + 1).
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class Grade A.)
Friday, July 11th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Give Newton's Laws of Motion.    Enunciate the proposition called the Parallelogram
of Forces and prove it for the magnitude of the resultant.
II. If P and Q are two component forces, whose directions are inclined at an angle a, the
resultant force is equal to -j/P2 + Q2 + 2 P Q cos a.
III. Find the resultant of six forces, 1, j/2, 2, 3, and j/3 pounds, acting on a point, the
angles taken in order being 45°, 75°, 60°, and 90°.
IV. What are the requisites of a good Balance? One pound is weighed at each end of a
false balance, and the sum of the apparent weights is 2-jt lbs.; what is the ratio of the lengths
of the arms?
V. A circular table, weight W, is supported on. four legs in the circumference which form
a square; show that the'least weight which will overturn the table when placed at the circumference is W (i/ 2 + 1).
VI. Explain the dynamical formula, v = u ±ft; and deduce from the proper sources,
v2 = ui±2fs.
VII. A stone is thrown vertically upwards with a velocity of 150 feet per second, and,
one second after, another stone is projected with a velocity of 200 feet per second. When and
where will the stones meet?
VIII. Describe Atwood's machine. A weight of 2 pounds hangs over the edge of a
smooth table, and draws a weight of 50 pounds laid on the table; what velocity will be acquired
in 2|- seconds?
IX. What is meant by the modulus of elasticity 1   A ball falling from a height of 100 feet
l.
f >
hops four times on the surface of a body, with which its common co-efficient of elasticity is
find the height of the fourth hop.
X. A substance weighs 14 lis. in water and 2,560 oz. in air; what is its specific gravity? 230 Public Schools Report. 1884
Book-keeping.   (For First Class Grades A and B.)
Friday, July 11th; 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. (1) Write a negotiable promissory note, witnessed and indorsed.
(2) Make out an account-current from a Hardware Merchant, or from a Milliner.
(3) Write a Business letter of introduction.
II. What is the inference when the Credit side of each of the following accounts in your
Ledger, is the greater:—
(1) Bills Receivable, (2) Bills Payable, (3) Merchandise, (4) Cash, (5) Real Estate.
III. Explain the process of changing a set of Books from Single Entry to Double Entry
IV. How do you proceed to find an error in the Trial Balance?
V. In what does the proof of the Balance Sheet consist?
VI. Define—(1) Salvage, (2) Exchange, (3) Consols, (4) Solvency, (5) Reclamation, (6)
E. E. or E. & 0. E.
VII. Journalize—
(1) Exchanged Jones & Co.'s note for $250 for Dodds & Bros.' note for $200.
(2) In counting Cash Sales, I found a $20 Bank Bill which I received from an unknown purchaser for a $2 Bank Bill.
(3) Paid in Cash the following bills presented:—Taxes, $10; Pew Rent, $15; Show
Case, $20.
VIII. Show that posting directly from the Day-Book is an intellectual exercise and that
posting from the Journal is a mechanical operation.
IX. Make at least five entries in a Day-Book; journalize and post the same.
X. Balance the Ledger accounts opened by the preceding question.
Algebra.    (For First Class Grade B.)
Saturday, -July 12th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Toted marks 200.
I. Write the rule for dividing one compound algebraic expression by another, explaining
each step in the process.
II. Resolve into elementary factors:—
(1)  9a;2-162/2 (2) a;2-5a;-14 (3)  12a;2-10a;-2 (4) a^-3asx-2a*
(5) 9a%2 - 3xys - 6y*
III. Give rule for solving simple equations of one unknown quantity.
Solve    (1.) 3 (x - 2) + 4 = 4 (3 - x). (2.) i (9x - 10) - I (fix - 7) = §x - | (5 + x).
(3.) f (a - 2x) +1 (2a -x) + i(x-a) = | (a + x).
IV. A father's age is 40, his son's 8; in how many years will the father's age be triple
the son's?
x-7    2a;-15     1
V. Solve  = — - ——; =7
a; + 7     2x- 6        2 (;«+/)■
VI. Give the three usual methods for solving simultaneous equations.
Solve    2 (x - y) = 3z — 2
2a: + 3s = 4 (1 - y).
VII. Find a number of three digits, the last two alike, such that the number formed by
the digits inverted, may exceed twice the original number by 42, and also the number formed
by putting the single figure in the middle by 27, 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 231
VIII. Solve (1) px% + qx + r = 0.
(2) 10a:2 + 17        12a;2 + 2 _  5a;2 - 4
18-      ~ 11a;2 - 8 =       9     '
IX. By selling a horse for $24, I lose as much per cent, as the horse cost: what was the
prime cost?
X. A man dug two trenches, one 6 yards longer than the other for $356; the digging of
each cost as many dollars per yard as there were yards in its length: find the length of each.
Algebra.    (For First Class Grade A.)
Saturday, July 12th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m..    Total marks, 200.
I. If    — = — = — =-■» shew that
b     d   f
■   ai + ci + ei 0i + di+fi
 = ps . —
a+b+c b+d+f
II. Prove that if the co-efficient of a;2 be unity the sum of the roots of a quadratic equation is equal to the co-efficient of x with its sign changed; and their product is equal to the
third term.
III. A boy selling apples, sells half his stock and one more to A; J of what remains and
two more to B, and the 5 that still remain to C: how many apples had he at first?
IV \(2x - 3) - \ (3s - 1) _      f a;2 - fre + 2 )
*X \(x - 1) ~ M     3a - 2       f
V. Given a the 1st term, d the common diff.: find the sum of an arith. series of n terms.
The 7th term of an arith. series is 21, and the 13th is 43: find the sum of the series to 20
terms.
VI. Prove the binomial theorem for a positive integral index.
Expand 4]/(l '+ 4a;) to 5 terms.
VII. How long will it take A, B, and C together to do a piece of work, which A can do
in m and B in n days, and 0 working at half the average rate of B and A together?
VIII. Find the number of variations of n things taken v at a time when all are different.
There are 8 letters of which a certain number are a's, and 336 different words can be made of
them: how many a's are there?
IX. A privateer running at the rate of 10 miles an hour discovers a ship 18 miles off
making away at the rate of 8 miles an hour, and gives chase: how long will the chase last?
X. Solve
(1) x + 1       3a; + 1
—i— +  7 = 4-
4 x   + 4
(2) T/(2a; + 2) -y/lA-x - 3) = 20 - x.
(3) -y/(Zx + 1) - i/(2a - 1) = 1.
Euclid.    (For First Class Grade B.)
Saturday, 12th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
■ I. Distinguish between a direct and an indirect demonstration, and define adjacent angles,
opposite angles, vertical angles, and alternate angles. 232 Public Schools Report. 1884
II. Given a right line of any length; bisect it, and at the point of bisection raise a perpendicular to it.
III. If one side of a triangle be produced, the exterior angle is equal to the two interior
and opposite angles.
IV. Show that the three interior angles of any triangle are equal to two right angles.
V. The complements of the parallelograms that are about the diameter of any parallelogram
are equal to one another.
VI. Show that the perimeter of an isosceles triangle is less than that of any other equal
triangle upon the same base.
VII. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the rectangles contained by the
whole line and each of the parts, are together equal to the square on the whole line.
VIII. If a straight line be bisected and produced to any point, the rectangle contained
by the whole line thus produced and the part of it produced, together with the square on half
the line bisected, is equal to the square on the straight line which is made up of the half and
the part produced.
IX. To describe a square that shall be equal to a given rectilineal figure.
X. If the diagonals of a quadrilateral bisect each other, it is a parallelogram; if the bisecting
lines are equal, it is rectangular; if the lines bisect at right-angles, it is equilateral.
Euclid.    (For First Class Grade A.)
Saturday, July 12th; 2 to 4-30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. In a triangle of any magnitude, show that if two sides be equal the opposite angles are
equal, and conversely.
II. The middle point of the side opposite to the right angle of a right-angled triangle is
equally distant from the three angles,
HI. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the squares on the whole line, and
on one of the parts, are equal to twice the rectangle contained by the whole and that part
together with the square on the other part.
IV. If two opposite sides of a parallelogram be bisected, and two lines be drawn from the
points of bisection to the opposite angles, these two lines trisect the diagonal.
V. If a straight line touch a circle, and from the point of contact a straight line be drawn
meetinn- the circle; the angles which this line makes with the line touching the circle shall be
equal to the angles which are in the alternate segments of the circle.
VI. Inscribe a circle in a given square.
VII. To inscribe an equilateral and equiangular hexagon in a given circle.
VIII. The sides about the equal angles of equiangular triangles are proportionals; and
those which are opposite to the equal angles are homologous sides, that is, are the antecedents
or consequents of the ratios.
IX. To divide a line harmonically.
X. Similar triangles are to one another in the duplicate ratio of their homologous sides.
If the ratio of the triangles be as 1 to 4, what is the ratio of the homologous sides? If the
ratio of the homologous sides be as 1 to 4, what is the ratio of the triangles ? 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 233
Ancient History.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July lith; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Toted marks, 200.
I. To what two great races do all the nations of antiquity belong? Give a short account
of the founding of the Persian and the Assyrian empires.
II. Give the date and state the cause of the Trojan war. Give a brief account of the
constitution and the system of education developed by Lycurgus.
III. State the circumstances that led to the invasions of Greece by the Persian army.
Name the battles fought, with the result of each.
IV Give a summary of the events in the life of Alexander the Great, naming the battles
he fought and the conquests he achieved. What was the fate of the Alexandrian empire after
his death ?
V. What was the object of the Achaean League? Give ten great names in Grecian
literature.
VI. State fully the nature of the political reforms attributed to Servius Tullius What
circumstances led to the appointment of the Decemvirs ?
VII. Give the date and describe the battle of Zama. Relate the circumstances that
attended the fall of Carthage.
VIII. What were the Licinian Rogations ?     Give an account of the Catiline conspiracy.
IX. Why must the reign of Augustus be regarded as the golden age of Roman literature ?
What was the chief event in the reign of Constantine the Great ?
X. Who was Zenobia, and how is she connected with Roman History ? Who was the
last of the Roman Emperors ?
English Literature.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, lith July; 2 to 4.30-p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Describe the poetry of the Anglo-Saxons, and show how it differed from prose. When
did rhyme come into use? Who was the author and what was the origin of The King's
Quhair?
II. Who wrote the first English Sonnets? In what country was this species of verse first
written?    Describe its structure.
III. Write short notes on The Faerie Queene,  Utopia, Toxophihts, Arcadia, and Lycidas.
IV. Give a sketch of Shakspere's life. Name his contemporaries? How is Izaak Walton
connected with English literature?
V. Wherein consists the excellence of Herrick's poetry? Write some remarks on the
merits of Milton's blank verse. Quote from Paradise Lost any remarkable instances of imitative harmony or expression.
VI. How did the Restoration affect our literature? Who were the "Wits of Queen
Anne's reign"?    What was the Dunciad?
VII. What is peculiar in Dr. Samuel Johnson's style? Name some of his works. Who
were his associates?
VIII. Scan and paraphrase the following stanza, and name the author of it:—■
Full many a gem of purest ray serene,
The dark unfathom'd caves of ocean bear;
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air.
IX. In what respects does poetry differ from prose? Name and describe the various
forms it assumes.    What is meant by the terms subjective and objective as applied to poetry? 234 Public Schools Report. 1884
X. Enumerate the great prose writers of the nineteenth century. Compare Wordsworth
with Byron, pointing out the faults and merits of each. How does Tennyson succeed as a
dramatic writer?
Practical Mathematics.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, Jidy 15th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Express in degrees, in grades, and in circular measure the difference between a degree
and a grade.
II. Given cos A = , find the other five functions.
m -{■ n
III. Shew that sin A = sin (180° - A), cos A= - cos (180° - A); also tan (180° - A) =
- tan A, sec (180° - A) = - sec A.
IV. The string of a kite is 250 yards long and the angle of elevation of the kite is 30°.
Find the height of the kite.
V. Find the value of tan 15°; and solve the equation, 3 sin a = 2 cos2 a.
VI. Given the two sides of a triangle, 14 and 9 -j/3, and the included angle 150°; find
the third side without finding the angles.
VII. The sides of a triangle are 5, 7, 8 feet respectively: find the cosine of each angle:
find also the radius of the circle which circumscribes the triangle.
VIII. From the top of a hill I observe two cottages in a straight horizontal line before
me. I find their angles of depression to be 45° and 30° respectively, and know them to be 176
yards apart.    Find the height of the hill.
IX. A rectangular field is 1,250 links long and 320 broad: it is required to cut oft'a part
of it, to contain 1 acre 2 roods 16 poles, by a line parallel to one of its ends. What is the
length of this part?
X. Two ships sail at the same time from the same port, and sail for 5 hours at the
respective rates of 8 and 10 knots an hour in straight lines inclined to each other at an angle
of 60°. They then sail directly towards each other. Find the inclination of their new course
to their original courses.
Having given log 3 = .4771213, L tan 10° 53' 36"= 9.2843180.
Latin.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 15th; 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Write in Latin:—
(a) Many men make a bad use of riches.
(b) Pale Death knocks with equal step at the cottages of the poor and palaces of kings.
(c) (Your name) was born (date) of (month) in the ( ) year of the reign of Queen
Victoria.
CiESAR.
II. Translate—
"Boios, petentibus iEduis, quod egregia virtute erant cogniti, ut in finibus suis colloca-
rent, concessit: quibus illi agros dederunt, quosque postea in parem juris libertatisque condi-
tionem, atque ipsi erant, receperunt."
(1) Decline and compare the adjectives in the above selection.
(2) What words are the direet objects of verbs, stating the verbs.
(3) Parse all predicates in the quotation, giving the gerund of each.
Virgil.
III. Translate—
"Ergo age, care pater, cervici imponere nostrse:
Ipse subibo humeris, nee me labor iste gravabit. 48 Vio. Public Schools Report. 235
Quo res cumque cadent, unum et commune periclum,
Una salus ambobus erit.    Mihi parvus lulus
Sit comes, et longe servet vestigia conjux.
Vos, famuli, quse dicam, animis advertite vestris.
Est urbe egressis tumulus, templumque vetustum
Deserta? Cereris, juxtaque antiqua cupressus,
Religione patrum multos servata per annos:
. Hanc ex diverso sedem veniemus in unam.
Tu, genitor, cape sacra manu, patriosque Penates:
Me, bello e tanto digressum, et csede recenti,
Attrectare nefas, donee me flumine vivo
Abluero."
(a) To whom is reference made in (1) conjux, (2) pater, (3) ipse, (4) Penates
(b) (1) Parse egressis in the seventh line, and me in the twelfth line.
(2) Briefly sketch the life of Virgil.
(3) Scan the first five lines, stating the name of the metre.
Horace.
IV Translate—
"Integer vitse scelerisque purus
Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu,
Nee venenatis gravida sagittis
Fusee, pharetra;
"Sive per Syrtes iter sestuosas,
Sive facturus per inhospitalem
Caucasum, vel qure loca fabulosus
Lambit Hydaspes.
"Namque me silva lupus in Sabina,
Dum meam canto Lalagen, et ultra
Terminum curis vagor expeditis
Fugit inermem."
(a) Give geographical reference in (1) Mauris, (2) Syrtes, (3) Hydaspes.
(b) Parse (1) arcu,  (2) iter,  (3) curis.
(c) Scan the last stanza.
(d) What metre is used?    Why so named?
(e) Name other writings of Horace than the Odes.
V. Translate, and give reference and author of the following extracts:—
(a) Dux foemina facti.
(b) Vulgo totis castris testamenta obsignabantur.
(c) Non Laertiaden, exitium tuaj
Genti, non Pylium Nestora respicis?
(d) Perrupit Acheronta Herculeus labor.
(e) Et vera incessu patuit dea.    Ille, ubi matrem
Agnovit, tali fugientem est voce secutus.
Physiology.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Wednesday, July 16th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Toted marks, 200.
I. Distinguish between an organic and inorganic body.
II. What are tissues?    Name the principal animal tissues, giving functions of each.
III. Name the bones that form by their arrangement the two cavities—thorax and
abdomen.
IV. Name the vital organs, and state how each is protected.
V. What is Nutrition?   State the principal hygienic law governing it. 236 Public Schools Report. 1884
VI. Locate the larynx and pharynx, giving functions of each.
VII. Name the internal parts of the eye, and external parts of the ear.
VIII. What nerves connect the senses with the brain?     Describe the sympathetic nerve.
IX. Define and locate (1) hyoid, (2) hyaloid, (3) arachnoid, (4) scaphoid, (5) pylorus,
(6) follicles, (7) palate, (8) coagulum, (9) labyrinth, (10) asphyxia.
X. Shew that it is the duty of every teacher to encourage his pupils to study this subject
French.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Wednesday, Jidy 16th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
I. Give the feminine plural of—
(1) Le chanteur, (2) L'acteur, (3) La veuf, (4) Le vieillard, (5) L'enfant.
Distinguish between—
(1) beni benit
(2) environ environs
(3) ciseau ciseaux
II. Write a paradigm of all the tenses of the subjunctive mood of the verb courir.
III. Translate—
(1) Give us this day our daily bread.
(2) Our Queen honors literature with that attachment and patronage capable of making
it flourish.
(3) It is through reason, not through fear, that the minds of children ought to be reached.
IV. Traduisez et designez l'auteur:—
(1) Porte, porte plus haut le fruit de ta victoire.
Je t'ai donne la vie, et tu me rends ma gloire;
Et d'autant que l'honneur m'est plus cher que le jour,
D'autant plus maintenant je te dois de retour.
Mais d'un cceur magnanime eloigne ces faiblesses;
Nous n'avons qu'un honneur, il est tant de maitresses!
L'amour n'est qu'un plaisir, l'honneur est un devoir.
(2) "Voila la piece finie, allons souper." Siquier court sur-le-champ avertir le comte
Schwerin. Us resolurent ensemble de derober la connaissance de cette mort aux
soldats jusqu'a ce que le prince de Hesse en put etre informe. On enveloppa le
corps d'un manteau gris: Siquier mit sa perruque et son chapeau sur la tete du roi;
en cet etat on transporta Charles, sous le nom du capitaine Carlsberg, au travers
des troupes, qui voyaient passer leur roi mort sans se douter que cefut lui.
(3) A de phis hauts partis Rodrigue doit pretendre;
Et le nouvel eclat de votre dignite
Lui doit enfler le cceur d'une autre vanite.
Exercez-la, monsieur, et gouvernez le prince;
Montrez-lui comme ilfaut regir une province,
Faire trembler partout Ies peuples sous sa loi,
Remplir Ies bons d'amour, et Ies mechants d'effroi.
Joignez a ces vertus celles d'un capitaine:
Montrez-lui comme il faut s'endurcir a la peine,
Dans le metier de Mars se rendre sans egal,
Passer Ies jours entiers et Ies nuits a cheval,
Reposer tout arme, forcer une muraille,
Et ne devoir qu'a soi le gain d'une bataille:
Instruisez-le d'exemple, et rendez-le parfait,
Expliquant a ses yeux lecons par 1'eff'et.
V. Parse the italicized words in the preceding texts.

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