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The Western Call May 1, 1914

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Full Text

 S    i
Read Dr.
p McKim's
8 Address
.gsesww^F-; -xi^
Published in the Interests of Greater Vancouver and the Western People
tor
lav
■atataB^K^jS^*-'"
vc<;ume V.
VANCOUVER, British Columbia, MAY 1. 1914
5 Cents Per Copy
No. 51
*^—■*
fWEl Ex=Reeve Kerr Succeed Reeve Thos. DiCkil
x>i
South Vancouver Firm Secures a.$250,000 Block Paving Contract from the City of Edmonton, Alta.
[Civil War in Ireland Averted—Ulster Wins Fight for Exclusion
I A • •.+ *
7j*
O'
•/' *V
LARGE CONTRACT FOB SOUTH
VANCOUVER INDUSTRY
Mr. W. H. Harvey, jr., has returned from Ed-
Imonton with a contract for the Dominion Creo-
[soting Company for a quarter of a million, dollars
rwood block paving to-be laid in that growing
[Capital of Alberta.
PETITION TO B. a B, & R. FOR
CABLINE ON 56th AVE. SO VANCOUVER
A petition is being'circulated amongst the
South-enders in Ward I, South Vancouver, for a
carline extension on 5th Avenue from Victoria
road to Kerr street, a distance of about one mile,
Ijwith a 5 cent fare straight. The neighborhood to
[■be served by this carline has, perhaps, the finest
building territory on the whole uplift, and would
very rapidly fill up. The; petition sis being very
largely signed. ;    ^
••- :-: [   PERSONAL ';/
if HE WHITE WINGED DOVE
APPEARS INS. VANCOUVER
The resignation of Reeve Dickie is now looked
pon as an accepted fact although the council
ill not deal with it finally until Monday. Lines
e being quietly drawn by those interested in the
osperity of South Vancouver. It is being felt
verywhere that there has been more than enough'
I fighting, and that an effort should be made for
eace.
This can, many believe, be accomplished by
he election of former Reeve James Kerr by acclamation.   The election of a, new man for Reeve,
wwever good, would retard the. work of the mun-
cipality for at least another three months, for no
an can very well master the situation in less,
here seems no one "in sight who Can so well
control the situation as Mr. James Kerr.   His
heart and soul are in the work, and after all is
said and done it is being recognized on almost
every hand that South Vancouver has.in James
Kerr a good asset of honest capability as a municipal guide and leader.
The Western Call believes that a gross injustice was perpetrated against a most worthy public character, and is glad to note the very marked-
change of sentiment throughout the municipality
in this respect.
The work of paving Main street is now resumed after an interruption' of * four months.
Nothing has been gained by the stupid attempt
o break the contract, and after the most searching investigation of a very bitter antagonist not
ne vestige of proof of dishonesty on the part of
single member of the late council hds come to
ight. ~<     s   -
The complaint that the late council entered
into a contract for nearly half a million dollars
ithout calling for tenders is still heard although
'not from any who have really taken the trouble
jto look into the matter. Undoubtedly this was
the cause- of the late council's overthrow; but
those who have gone^into the facts of the case
horoughly are convinced—that whilst the policy
[of letting the contract was bad—the contract it-
' elf is a fairly good business transaction.
The council had before them the work done
n Kingsway and the prices paid- They had also
he many paving contracts carried out in the City
of Vancouver, and availed themselves amply of
the details laid open to them by the city authorities. They had then the most recent data ana accomplished work "^o guide them, and they made
the fullest use of them. Moreover, the contractors were at the head of the largest industry in
South Vancouver—an industry whose success
will bring orders from every quarter of the globe
•toSouthJVancouver.harbor, and ReeveJCerrJias _
been a* constant fighter for South Vancouver industries. Last of all, the late council recognized
the desperate need of work that was afflicting
not only South Vancouver but the whole agglomeration ,of Greater Vancouver, and took political
lives in their hands in order to provide work for
the men of South Vancouver. For reasons that
we have repeatedly handled without gloves the
late council was thrown out. We believe that
most of us how sincerely regret it, and the time
and opportunity to make amends has come. Much
that has been dorieJ can never be undone, arid
much that has been-said can never be unsaid, but
we can" all now. move forward together to better
things and forget the things that are past.
The Western Call recommends the election of
Reeve Kerr by acclamation as the one happy
solution of a most vexed problem.
Amongst the many Vancouverites who are
[| making up the "Back to the Land Movement,"
is Mr. George Schofield, an old timer in the city
and one of the staunchest supporters of Orange-'
i8m in the West. Brother George Schofield leaves
Vancouver to take up ranching" at Kelowna.
t.
FARMERS, HEAP THIS I
Since 1878 the duty on
agricultural implements has
been reduced from 35 per
cent, to 12J per cent.
Of that reduction Conservative governments have
made
, 20 PER CENT.
and the Liberals ,
Only 2* PER CENT.
Thus the Conservatives have
done eight times .more for the
farmers than the Liberals.
Farmers of Canada,
think this over!
J
j
With all that the Borden Government
has done and is still doing for (he
country, the national debt is many millions lower than under the Grit regime.
EX-REEVE KERR
An Honest Grit
Agreement At Last With the C. N. R.
j,
The agreement with the O. N. R. hat now Veen brought down, and although at tins distance it is lomtwbat difficult to form an exact ogftntyn until fuller details come to hand yet the
general, impression is one of great relief. The Ooajsfsatlve party will, it i* now said, vote solidly
for the agreement, with the exception of Messrs. Bennett and mettle. The Liberal! are still anx-
iousjy scrutinising, but several will probably vote with Mr. Borden.  ~ 0
The agreement gives the 0. N- B- ft guarantee on 143,000,000 more, and in return secures
control to the Dominion Government in oase of default on part of the 0. If. ft.
Jt is fortunate that an agreement has at last been come to—the prolongation of the recent
uncertainty has had ft bad effect in financial circles, and we may now hope for ft clearing of tb«
sky in the business world. It is stated that Messrs. Waokewie and W»nn fought some of the provision^ in the agreement to the last ditch, but they evidently listened to reason at last, and all
hands are to be congratulated that a fair arrangement hfts been arrived at.   Canada has been
going fast—too- fast some people think.  But Canada is developing fast, and all her railroads will
e needed when ready. The world must be fed clothed and housed, and Canada is the world's
greatest storehouse. «
\,     The development of Canada must not be checked.
SEXCENTENARY OF BANNQOKBTJRN
A meeting of representatives of Scots societies
was held in the office of Wm. Thomson, H27
Granville to take steps for the commemoration
of the greatest event in the history of Scotland—
the Pay of Bannockburn, 22nd June, 1314.
_ -The meeting was_ large and enthusiastic,, and
arrangements to begin the carrying out of demonstration and basket picinc on Dominion Pay,
1st July, at some convenient place approaOhable
by rail or steamer. It is expected that the numbers will exceed one thousand. It will be an awe
inspiring spectacle;; the audience; the massed
bands arid pipers,- rendering in united; strains
the martial hymn of independence.
Robert Brace's March to Bannockburn.
"Scots; wha hae wi' Wallace bled,
Scots, wham Bruce has aften led,
Welcome to your gory bed,
'   •   Or to Victorie.
,. No w's the day, and now's the hour;
See the front o* battle lour;
See approach the Tyrant's power;
Chains and Slaverie-      " (
Wha wil be a traitor Knave?
Wha can fill a coward's grave?
Wha sae base as be a Slave?
V Let him turn and flee.
Wha, for Scotland's King and Law,
Freedom's sword will strongly draw,
Free-Man standi!or Free-Man fa',
Let him on wi' me. .
By oppression's woes and pains,
By your Sons in servile chains,
We will drain our dearest veins;
But they shall be free.
Lay the proud usurpers low; A
,   Tyrants fall in every foe -f
Liberty's in evry blow;
Let us do or die.
If there are any Scots societies who have not
yet sent delegates to the committee let them do so
at once, and let the gathering revive the memory
of the great day; the rich bountiful harvest of that
Seed Time; spwn by the heroic labors of Sir William Wallace, as Burns has so vividly depicted
him: .
4'Saviour of his country, mark him well.''
TBB SINGLE TAX ANP OLP
. COUNTRY MUNICIPALITIES
The man Fels, who made a fortune in soap,
latterly took for a pastime a study of the Single
Tax, and has left- a sum of money for the propagation of the-"Doctrine," consequently there are
several who_ are coming to the _west to_study the
Single Tax in operation. Amongst them are
Baillie MacMillan, senior magistrate, and Mr.
Alex Walker, assessor, both of Glasgow. The
new association of members of the Incorporated
Trades of the City of Glasgow, resident in the
Province of British Columbia, have arranged a
reception and dinner in the Stanley park pavilion
on Tuesday, 19th May, at 6 p. m. for the delegates
from Glasgow.
There have been quite a number of enquiries
for tickets; but the acoramodation only permits
of a gathering of forty. The chief object is to
tender a welcome to the Sun-Set City; an evening
at home, from home.
DIED OF LOCKJAW
Mr. Ernest R. Peane, well known young
yachtsman about Vancouver, died at his parent's
home, 1119 Chilco street, on Saturday afternoon,
at the age of 21 years. Mr. Deane contracted
lockjaw from the efects of having his foot jammed
in the fly wheel of a gasoline cruiser anchored in
Coal Harbor last week- At first it was thought
to be merely a bad bruise, but on Thursday his
condition became worse and on Saturday he died.
Mr. Deane, who was a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.
B. Deane, was a member of Deane Brothers &
Company, who operate launches on the Sound and
Inlet. He was born in California, but came to.
Vancouver with his parents when three years old.
He was a popular member of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Clubhand was well known in hockey circles, having played on the Vancouver amateur team for several seasons. He is survived by
his father and mother, one brother and two sisters. ; *
The funeral took place on Monday from the
family residence. '
Big Fruit Crop this Year
"Thepresent year will be the greatest in the history
of the fruit-growing- industry of the Province," says
Provincial Fruit Inspector Cunningham.
Collingwood District; May 1 —"Peaches and plums
have set well. —Apples, pears and cherries have never
looked better to me in an experience of this district for
12 years.
ULSTEB WILL FIGHT AND .' .."f Tr
UL8TEB WILL Bl BI&HT
wft   '*
The historic words of Randolph Churehfli,
' spoken many years ago, are*finding an echo" today
in every true Protestant heart the world over.
The political combinations and tricks that have
been and are, being used to undo Ulster are paralleled only by tjhose;of the days of Richelieu. ^ /.
The Irish Protestant   is   singularly   simple
minded and straightforward.   The lineal descendant of the Scottish covenanter, he has preserved ;-, .,:/
a purity of worship and faith that is found no-' >,'ij\
where else on earth today. -Against him in, the  ^-r
British parliament today are combined:   1st, tbe>   '"'
Irish   Nationalist, entirely Romanist;   2nd,'the
Labor party, entirely indifferent to religion and
wearied that Ireland takes up so much tune'and
money in British affairs; 3rd, the Non-Conformist
Liberal, whose religious convictions are in a state
of flux, and, therefore, entirely subject to present
political expendiency.
The   offer   of   Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill
seems generous, and is a decided advance on anything yet made.' "Why could not Sir Edward
to this Bill which I ask for to safiigunrd the dignity and interests of Protestant Ulster and L in
return, will use an my influence and good will
to make Ireland an integral unit in the federal' ■-
system. *   If Sir   Edward   used   language , of ^
that kind    it    would    go    far   to   transform
the    political    situation-"      Mr.   John - Red-,     '!'.
mond is  reported  as  concurring," and  saying:
"I say now in all sincerity, if Sir Edward Carson]- " w
will do this, I; will try to effect an honorable set- '
tlement." , . ' >
Generous as the offer seems to be it still has  •'
the fatal "if,r in it...^Ireland an integral unit."   /
Ireland is riot an integral unit, and any attempt
to settle the question along Jbat, line—will we> *   i
venture to predict, fail.*     ' " , "      "*/''"'.»
We are glad to see that it has been stated officiality in Parliament "that the-government will
not use force unless force is used against the representatives of law and order in Ulster. If rebellion comes, the government will put it done; if
it comes to civil war the government wil do its _s
best ^o conquer, but there will be no rebellion, no
civil war, unless it be of the making of the opposition" These are fair words and, again, we say,
a very great advance on any governmental utterance yet made. But, unless we are greatly
mistaken, it will be of no avail.
The differences are too great—the modes of
thought too divergent, the deep-seated religious
convictions as far apart as the poles. Centuries
of bitter strife—religious strife—have crystalized
into a deep-seated political distrust. There are
two Irelands and any attempt to unite them except as they are united under the safeguards of
British justice will be futile.   The big "if" still
sticks out in the_ Churchill ofer_of compromise,.	
and we predict that it; like all the others, will
surely fail.
Ulster is today securely folded in the Union
Act of Great Britain, arid Ireland.   There she has;:
by her frugality and[industry made herself fam- MI-
ous in the whole world by her wealth and. enterprise.   The Home Rule Bill proposes to take this    ^j
Ulster out ofthis secure position, and subject her  > C
to a political power that has spelled industrial     ^
weakness if not ruin' for the rest of Ireland;  So
true is this that Ulster, with one-quarter(of Ire-    -
land's population pays nearly three-quarters of
Ireland's taxes.  Ulster does not trust Roman Ireland politically any more than she trusts her religiously or commercially.   Ireland has a population of approximately 5,000,000, of which 3,500,-
000 are Romanists' and    1,500,000    Protestants.
Under the present system of county councils, the
Protestants are entitled to 149 councillors.   They     ^
have onljr 15.   This sample of present treatment
of minorities by the Romanists of Ireland does
not encourage the Protestant Irish to enter into
any closer political relationship, and we believe
that they are right-
Further, the Irish Protestants are intensely    \
loyal to the British Empire.   In Dublin, when the
the late King Edward VII paid his visit, a black
flag was hoisted over the Mansion House.
O'Connor, Redmond and Devlin may talk
loyalty before Britishers in British lands, but it
is notorious that they talk complete separation
from the British Crown when in "the United
States. -'...:-^' .'■''''■#.■...
No!   Ulster is in the Union by constitutional
agreement—they do not wish to go out, and any -
attempt to put them out will call forth the last
resource of a man that believes himself wronged.
Namely, the right to fight.
London. April 30—The British Weekly, leading organ
of Liberal non-conformists, says*. "We may say with
perfect certainty that the Liberal Party will never go to
the country in six or sixty years with the proposal that
Protestant Ulster shall, against its will, go into an Irish
Parliament."
The Northern Whig (BaUut) My>: "Thto ia the time for plain speak-
in*. No matter what the consequence* mar be, our primary objection
to Home Rale is on religion* grounds. The hietory of a thousand rears
baa taught us that whenever the Roman Hierarehr has power, she uses
it for the extermination of heretics, of whom Protestants are the worst.
There can be no compromise that would place the Protestants of Ulster
now or at any faturn time under the rule of Rome. All this talk about
federation is so much rank nonsense. We are prepared to endure anything imther tlian aunmit to the trranny of • Romwsrt parliament.
:   ir Wants to See You
Some of Our Prices
$1.00 Hood's Sarsaparilla 75c
$1.00 Ayer's Sarsaparilla  75c
25c Carter's-Liver Pills 15c
50c Pink Pills  35c
50c Dodd's Pills  35c
50c  Gin Pills  35c
50c and $1.00 Herpicide ....40 and 75c
50c  Hind's Cream  -40c
25c L. 3. Q 15c
$1.00 Eno's Fruit Salt ..J. 65c
50c Zam Buk 35c
35c Cuticurra Soap  25c
75c Cuticurra Ointment 50c
40c Baby's Own Soap Bos 25c
15c Pears' Soap  10c
50c Nestles' Food  .40c
35c Castoria .1 25c
$1.00 and $2.00 Oriental Cream....
 41.75 and 75c
50c and $1.00 Scott's Emulsion ....
 ^..-.40 and 75c
Pinaud's Cosmetic (tube or stick)
 >. 15c
50c Hazeline Snow  35c
$1.00 B. B. B 75c
25c   Calvert's    Tooth    Powder
(small)   .  15c
Calvert's    Tooth    Powder
medium)    j..30c
Calvert's <■ t Tooth    Powder,
50c
75c
(large)    50c
Calvert's    Tooth    Powder    (ex.
large)   $2.00
10, 25 and 50c Cascarets .—10, 20, 40c
' 60c Chases'. Ointment    50c
Chases' Syrup v 25 and 50c
25 and 50c Painkiller 20 and 40c
25c Electric Oil  20c
10, 25, 50c and $1.00 Bromo Selt
zer 10, 20, 40, 85c
$1.00  Ferrol   .'........75c
35c Allan's Foot Ease  25c
25 and 50c Frutatives 20 and 40c
35c Lyon's Tooth Powder 25c
25c Minard's Liniment ~20c
50c Neaves* Food  40c
Pinkham's  Compound     75c
A. and H. Food, No. 1 and 2 L ....80c
A. and H. Food, No. 3 25 and 50c
Java Rice Powder  .40c
Ferroll  ;.......l75c
law the Druggist
Ue twlldlns,'    sfrt*«w*y sM Mais
Phone Farirpont 790   .
PHONP FAWWONT 1892
(At it here since 1600)
(A Trust Company)
combined with
Security
and
Send Your
Business to Us
dosed II MH) O'clock «n Saturdays
Specially insured against burglary.
and hold-ups.   :
NOTARY PUBLIC
Dow, Fraser & Co.
LIMITED
317-321 Cam bie Street
2313 Main Street
Between 7th and 8th Ave*.
McKay Station, Burnaby
Address by Dr. McKim
Rector of Protestant Episcopal Church, Washington, D. C.
"Why We Are Protectants"
Mr. Chairman, Brethren, and Fellow Citizens:
I hail the presence of so many ministers of different Protestant churches and so many leading
•members of different, Protestant churches in this
vast audience as an evidence that the pressure
of the conflict with Rome is drawing us closer together (Applause.) We are finding out, I venture to say, that the things in which we agree are
more important by far than the things in which
we differ.   (Applause.)
A Word of Explanation
Now, sir, no apology is necessary at any time
for setting forth the reasons why we occupy the
position we do; but, as you have already intimated, Mr. Chairman, the time is opportune for this
exposition of the Protestant faith, because of the
Mission to "non-Catholics," as they offensively
call us, recently'held in St. Patrick's church, for
the express purpose of proselyting our Protestant people. Why, my friends and brethren, so
eager were the Paulist Fathers to let us know
all about it that some of them, or one of them, or
some representative of theirs,, came into the vestibule of my church and tacked the notice of the
lectures on my bulletin! Well, I took notice 1
(Applause.)
In the Mission, the doctrines of Protestantism
have been assailed, as usual, and every argument
known to those skillful controversialists has been
employed to seduce Protestants from their allegiance. In these notices and in the public press,
Protestants have, as I have said, been dominated
"non-Catholics." Now we resent that nomenclature. We Protestants are "catholics" in the
true sense of the word. In our creed we say, "I
believe in the Holy Catholic ^church," and we do.
On the other hand, we refuse to yield to the
church of Rome the name "Catholic." It is the
greatest arrogance for that church to appropriate
that great and venerable term. I know of no
church upon earth that has so little claim to be
called Catholic as the church of Rome.        «
Under the circumstances now described, it has
been felt by the ministers at whose invitation I
am here/ that the time is opportune, for a definition and a defense of the Protestant faith.
i
Now', I am not here to attack the Roman
church, but to defend Protestantism from the attacks which have been leveled against it. But in
repelling these attacks, it will become necessary
to expose some of the contradictions and absurdities and inconsistencies that are involved in the
doctrines of that church. I, however, am not responsible for that; but those who by assailing
our faith, and doing everything in their power to
draw our people from their allegiance, have made
it necessary for us to expose what we believe to be
thn unreasonableness of the faith of the Roman
church.
Protestantism Not ft Sories of Negations.
Now, first of all, and before entering particularly upon exhibition of the grounds upon which
we protest against the doctrine and practice of
the Church of Rome, J desire to make two brief
preliminary remarks. The first is that Protest-
ism is not, as commonly represented, a mere series
of negations,—denying error rather than affirming truth; repudiating false doctrine rather than
proclaiming the true. No; we write the word Protestant on our escutcheon in its full.etymological
significance. A Protestant is one that bears witness for any person or thing; and a Protestant
church is one that bears witness for Christ and
his gospel in the world. It is a name not to be
ashamed of, in either its origin or its history.
When our jiord Jesus Christ stood before Pilate,-
he said to himself, "To this end was I born, and
for this cause-eame I into the world, tbat-J ahould -
bear witness unto the truth." Humbly treading
in the footsteps of her divine Lord, the Protestant church goes forth into the world having this
as her aim, that she may "bear witness unto the
truth."
Lot was a Protestant when he stood alone for
God in the midst of wicked Sodom. The Jewish
nation was Protestant, standing among the nations of the earth, a witness for the unity of God;
the supremacy of conscience, and the sancity of
the morallaw. And, supreme instance! let it
never be forgotten that Christ and, his apostles
were Protestants in their day. They were
Protestants for the truth* of God, against
the traditions and corruptions of the
Jewish hierarchy, the established church
of that day. And they not only bore witness for the revelation made in the incarnation
of the Son of God, but they bore witness against
the false doctrines of the scribes and Pharisees,
the chief priests and elders of the church. In
like manner and in fulfillment of the injunction
of the great Head of the church, our Protestant
churches bear witness among men today, not only
positively,; for "the faith which was once delivered unto the saints,'' but negatively, against,
the manifold corruptions of that faith for which
the Church of Rome is responsible. And, therefore, they bear on their escutcheon the glorious
word Protestant,—the witness bearers.
Protestants Are Not Heretics Nor Separatists
The "other introductory remark I have to make
is that though we are Protestants, we" are not
heretics nor separatists.   (Applause.)   - ,"■
In 1868 the late Pope Pius IX. addressed letters
-■" to Protestants and other non-Catholics,'' inviting
them to return to the bosom of the Holy Mother
Church, as the only means of insuring their sal-
■ vation.      •  .
Now, we deny that we have ever separated
from the Catholic Church. One pf the articles of
our faith is, "I believe in the Holy Catholic
Church,'' and in this we claim and enjoy full
membership, by the same Spirit which joins in one
communion and fellowship "the blessed company
Z of all faithful people.^? In fact, the Pope and his
adherents are the innovators and heretics who
have departed from "the faith once delivered,"
who have corrupted the Christian creed; and not
the Protestants, who have rejected Rome's novelties and returned to the creed and the practice of
the primitive ages of Christianity. Yes; it is the
Church of Rome, and not the Protestant churches,
which, by her errors and usurpations has separated herself from the Catholic Church of Christ.
When she departed from the primitive faith, she
became heretical; and when she made the ad
knowledgment of her erroneous and strange doctrines a, condition of membership within her communion, she then forced upon men the alternative
of separating from her or of abandoning the
faith which they Were bound to "contend for."
Luther and Melanchthon, Calvin and Beza, Cran-
mer and Ridley and Latimer,—all that noble
band of reformers in the sixteenth century, chose
the former alternative. They decided to obey God
rather than men." Were they therefore heretics I
Was it heresy to obey Christ and Christ's unchangeable truth rather than abandon these for
the sake of union with a Church which had apostatized from the faith and required all her members to acquiesce in her apostasy f—Nay, was
not she the heretic who, abandoning the Holy
Scriptures as her guide, taught for doctrines the
commandments of menf Let it be remembered,
also, that as far as the Church of England was
concerned, the reformation was a rebellion
against a foreign yoke, and the restoration of the
original ecclesiastical authority. The British
church had existed for centuries in entire independence of Rome. It had produced martyrs to
the faith in the reign of Diocletian. It had sent
bishops'to the Councils of Aries (A.D. 314), Sar-
dica (A.D. 347), and Ariminum (A.D. 359). It
had held numerous synods of its own. As to its
orthodoxy, St. Jerome and St'. Chrysostom had
both borne testimony to it. But it was not until
the seventh century that the Church of Rome
gained a footing on the island. Her pretensions
to exercise authority over the British church were
resisted. The bishops of the native church refused to yield their customs or to receive Augustine as their archbishop. They resisted for more
than a century the attempt of Rome to bring
them into subjection. In short, the Church of
England of that day became Romanised only
after an ineffectual protest and a prolonged resistance on the part of the native episcopate.
. Scripture Versus Tradition
Now, my friends, I come to the substantive
part of my address this afternoon. Why are we
Protestants t ^ reply, First, of all, we are Protestants because we build our faith and hope on the
impregnable rock of Holy Scripture, and not oi
the shifting sands of ecclesiastical tradition. The
Bible, rind the Bible alone, is -the basis of the religion of Protestants; but tradition, interpreting
the Bible, and often superseding it and contradicting it, is the basis of the religion of Romanists.
(Now when J use the term Romanist, I beg you
to observe that I am using a term which has for
authority no less a person than John H. Newman himself, for he published a book: called "Lectures on Romanism and Popular Protestantism."
Therefore, if instead, of calling that church the
Catholic church, I speak of it as Romanism, I am
simply adopting the language of John H. Newman.) We follow the teachings of Jesus Christ
and bis apostles in building,our |aith only on the
revelation of truth contained in the Bible-
''Search the Scriptures." Christ said. The
Scripture cannot be broken.
The Church of Rome, on the contrary, builds
her doctrines upon a double basis,—the Bible and
tradition; but by making tradition the authoritative interpreter of the Bible, she really rests, not
-uponJthe teaching of _the Bible, but uponjthe
teaching of tradition:   '
Now, that is a serious charge. I wish to prove
it. The creed of Pope Pius IV., which was published in A.D. 1564, and has ever since been the
universal symbol of doctrine in the Roman
Church, declares as follows:
1. "I most firmly admit and embrace the
apostolical and ecclesiastical traditions, and all
other observances and constitutions of the said
church.
2. I admit also Holy Scripture, according to
that sense which Holy Mother Church, to whom it
appertains to judge of the true meaning and interpretation of the Sacred Scriptures, hath holden
and still holds."' ^ '
Now compare with this the language of the
Council of Trent: "The Holy Ecumenical and
General Council of Trent ;.'. . . receives and
venerates with equal affection of piety and reverence all the books of the Old and the New Testament, . ". as also the said traditions, as
well those pertaining to faith as to morals, . ■.
preserved in the Catholic Church by a continuous
succession."       ;   :'
A Fundamental Error
Here, then, is the first, as it is the fundamental, error against which! weprotest,—the making
tradition, i. e., the allegedl oral teaching of the
apostles, handed down from their times, of equal
authority with the written word of God; and the
declaration, that the Sacred Scriptures are to be
admitted only in the sense in which the Roman
Church explains them. The sixth article of the
Church of England declares, on the contrary, that
'•Holy Scripture containeth all things necessary
to salvation -so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved therebyy is not to be required of any man that it should be believed as
an article of faitk." When this is denied, the
very foundations of the faith are sapped. Our
feet no longer stand on the rock of God's written
Word, but upon the uncertain and shifting'sands
of tradition. No wonder that the Church of
Rome has been "carried about by every wind of
doctrine,'' since she b as cast anchor upon such
treacherous ground. For, mark you, as if it were
not a sufficient impiety to declare the traditions
(Continus'l on Page 3) ~"
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ot men to be of equal authority with the written
Word^ of God, she really exalts tradition above
the Word, by making that the rule of interprets-
tion.
The False Decretals
Let me give you an example to show how far
the traditions to which the Church of Rome appeals are to be depended on. In the ninth century a tremendous forgery arose, under the name
of the Isidorian decretals, consisting of nearly one
hundred letters, written in the names of-earlier
bishops of Rome, together with certain spurious
writings of other church dignitaries, and acta of
hitherto unknown councils. These documents
were eagerly seized upon by Nicholas I., who was
Pope at that time, and by him and his successors
were made the instrument of completely revolutionizing the constitution of the church, and developing the papal power, from a mere primacy, into
an absolute ecclesiastical despotism. - For centuries these false decretals were accepted as genuine;
but for over three hundred years .their true character has been known, and they have been on all
hands admitted to be a forgery, and a very clumsy
forgery at that- Even' the most extreme partisans of Rome now admit this,—indeed, the popes
themselves have admitted it, yet the radical
changes which they were the instruments of introducing, remain. „
Now, one cannot help asking, What dependence is to be placed on the traditions which the
Church of Rome professes to have preserved since
the time of the apostles, if she thus accepted for
so many centuries this gross forgery, and made it
the support and foundation of doctrines and
usages she has insisted on as vital to the true constitution of the1 church? And this is only one of
numerous examples in which the infallible Church
of Rome has accepted and magnified the authority
of documents which have subsequently been
proved and admitted to be forgeries. But if she
is thus incapable of distinguishing the true from
the false in the writings and documents of her
own bishops and synods, how are we to trust her
when she presents us with alleged traditions
handed down from the age of the apostles f And
how can we do otherwise than protest against her
impiety when we see the plainest declarations of
the Sacred Scriptures made void by her pretended
traditions? In our Saviour's time the Pharisees
appealed to tradition, but our Lord made his ap-
peal ever to the Scriptures. He changed them
with transgressing the commandments Of God by
their traditions. His words to, them are most applicable today to the Church of Rome: "Thus
have ye made the commandment of God of none
effect by your tradition." Matt. 15:6. "In vain
they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the
commandments of men." Verse 9; 'He said to
the Jews, "Search the Scriptures." He never
said, Search your traditions.
There are the, words, and there is, the authority, of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ against
the method which the Church of Rome adopts in
asking us to accept her traditions as the basis of
doctrine. . >
iloman Catholic Interpretation of Scripture
* Rut again, the Roman Catholic" hierarchy
teaches that the Bible is to be accepted only according to the sense which the church puts upon
it. Now, perhaps you would like to have a sample
or two of the interpretations of this infallible
church. Well, here is one of many that might be
given. What do you suppose is the chief passage
relied upon to establish the dogma of papal infallibility? Here it is in our Lord's words to St.
Peter: "Satan hath desired to have you, that he
may sift you as wheat; but I have prayed for
thee, that thy faith fail not; and when thou art
converted, strengthen thy brethren-" Luke 22:
31-32. This, we are told by Romanist interpreters
since Pope Agatho, A.P. 680, contains the grant
of special privilege to the bishops of Rome as successors of St. Peter.- -And this, although not one
of the eighteen Fathers who comment upon this
passage gives any hint of such an interpretation!
I give another precious example of infallible
interpretation. You know the popes have claimed
power to rule the nations, and how do you suppose this is pjroved from Holy Scriptute? How?
Just listen, listen and tremble; it is very simple.
St. Peter walked on the sea! Q. £• D. (quod erat
demonstrandum!)    (Applause.)
This is conclusive evidence that the successors
of St. Peter are entitled to rule the nations! Do
you not see it? If you do not. you must be very
dull. It was declared by Pope Innocent III. in a
letter addressed to the patriarch of Constantinople, in which he claimed that "Christ had committed the government of the whole world to the
popes.''
Such interpretations as these, proceeding from
the supposed infallible popes,—in conflict with
common sense, in conflict with the laws of sound
exegesis, in conflict with the exposition given by
the Fathers of the church,—may serve to show
how deceitfully the Church of Rome deals with
Holy Scripture.
Dr. Preston's Charges
A famous controversialist of the Church of
Rome, some years ago, was the vicar-general Rev.
Dr. Thomas S. Preston. He said that private
interpretation,—that terrible old thing, you know,
private judgment,—"private interpretation has
virtually declared the Bible to be of straw." But
I say that papal and Roman interpretation has
actually used the Bible as a nose of wax, to be
pressed into whatever shape the exigencies of their
case may require.
Again: Dr. Preston says: "Protestantism
has torn the Bible to pieces." Think of it, ye
Protestants, and repent of, your sins! However,
even that is.not so bad as burning it, is it? (Applause.) For the leaves of the torn Bible, borne
by the winds of heaven over the earth, may carry
the.message of life and immortality to mankind ;
—the single verse, "God so loved the world, that
he gave his only begotten Son," once led a poor
Hindu out of his heathen darkness into light;—
but, when it is burned, its power to bless is gone,
Roman Doctrines Not in the Bible
*. \.<
Let, me repeat, then, with emphasis: If any.
man asks why we are Protestants, I answer, Because the doctrines of the Church of Rome which"
we are called upon to accept as necessary to salvation cannot be, found in the" Bible. Do you
think that is a large order to prove? .Well, I'
shall not attempt to prove it; but I shall just
hide myself behind the opinion of a great cardin- <
al. Tou know that is a very safe place to be.,
The late Cardinal Wiseman, in writing about
the way in which Romanists are sometimes converted, or perverted, as he would say, to Protestantism, said this: "The history, in every case
is simply this, that the individual, by some chance
or other . . . became possessed of the Word
of God, of the Bible; that he perused this book;
that he could not find in it transubstantiation or
auricular confession, that he could not discover in
it one word of purgatory, or of worshipping images. He perhaps goes to the priest, and telle
him that he cannot find these doctrines in the
Bible; his priest argues with him, and endeavors
to convince him that he should shut up the book
that is leading him astray; he perseveres, he
abandons the communion of the Church of Rome,
. . and becomes a Protestant* Now, in all
this the man was a Protestant from the beginning;
he started withthe' principle that whatever is not
in that book cannot be true religion, or an article
of faith; and that is the principle of Protestantism.' He took Protestantism, therefore, for granted, before he began to examine the Catholic doctrine. He set out with the supposition that whatever is not in,the Bible is no part of God's truth;
he does not, find certain things in the Bible, and
concludes that, therefore, the religion that holds
these is not the true religion of Christ."—"Lectures on the Principal Doctrines and Practices of.
the Catholic Church," Baltimore, 1846, page 16.
The man who wrote these words was an eminent prince of the church,—a prince who. if he
were here, the Boston Pilot would tell you was entitled to precedence over our senators, over our
representatives, over the judges of the Supreme
Court, over the Vice-President o f the United
States, over the foreign ambassadors, over everybody on the face of this big continent except the
President; and if a ship bearing him should come
into port, it should be welcomed by salvos of artillery suitable to the heir apparent to the throne!
(This was said; not of a dead cardinal, but of a
living cardinal I think his name is O'Connell.)
(Applause.)
Here, then, is a distinct acknowledgment by
an eminent prince of the church, a noted controversialist, -that neither transubstantiation, nor
auricular confession, nor pugatory, nor worshipping of images is found in the Bible. We agree
ex ammo with this illustrious representative of
Rome. The same is true of all the peculiar doctrines of that church. ■
Rome's Teachings Contrary to Hcrtpture and to
the fathers
Once more I say. We are Protestants because
the peculiar doctrines of the Church of Rome are
contrary to Holy Scripture, contrary to the teachings of the Fathers of the church.   We are Protestants because we refuse to believe the Virgin
Mary more merciful than Jesus Christ; or that
she is our mediator with God; or that she is the
mother of God; or that she was born without sin.
We are Protestants because the doctrine of the
mass has no foundation in Holy Scripture; and I
might add, no manner or sort of affiliation   or
association or connection with the great American national Thanksgiving festival-    (Long continued applause.)    We are Protestants because
the invocation of saints has no foundation in Holy
Scripture; because the power of the priest to sit -
in the tribunal of penance and pronounce judicial absolution on the penitent, has no foundation
in Scripture; because the doctrine of papal infallibility finds no support either in the Bil/le, or
in the primitive Fathers of the church.
At to Certainty of Truth
But then, O my friends, it is alleged that there
is no agreement among Protestants as to the doctrines contained in the Bible; and that this results from the principle of private judgment,
which produces endless divisions and differences
among them; and then it is declared triumphantly
that God is not the author of confusiou, and
therefore God cannot be the author of Protestantism ! Q. E. D. (I like these Q. E. D.'s.) One
of the arguments most earnestly pressed in the
recent Misison in this city was that there <;an oe
no certainty of truth in a Protestant church, tint
certainty can be found only in an infallible
church, speaking to the world through an infallible head.
But then, is the Roman Catholic Church a
household free from differences and divisions and
conflicts? That's an interesting question, is it
not? Are its interpretations of Scripture consistent and harmonious.
Take, for example, the controversy about predestination, which Dr. Preston referred to in *U3h
a manner as to leave his audience to suppose that
it was one of the dire results of the Reformation.
He traced the genesis of this doctrine to reformed
theology, and said, "So came the theory of predestination." What a learned man he must have
been!   (Laughter and applause.)
Well, there are one or two facts that we l ight
quote along that line. The first is that more than
a thousand years before the Reformation the
theory of predestination was ably expounded by
St- Augustine, who is by many held to be the
greatest of the Fathers, and is claimed by the
Church of Rome as one of her theologians. The.."'
second fact is that in the ninth century the Ro-'
man Church was convulsed by this controversy in
the well lcnown case of the monk Gottschalk, and
for ten years it raged with great fury. The third
(Continued on Page 6)
St.- Lawrence
> They have
construct trie channel to M6nt*eaJLiiw "V-.K 6V'?^ ^ fc
They have expended $lW,(*jb;0O(f^J■ [&*3&#\
the Quebec. Bridge and the National : -""-* ^'
Transcontinental.  -      " ;-"" ",..*' y^
They have expended ;$50,000,o6o on
the Canadian Northern RaUwayVvf?
' They have expended $40,000,000 oia
our National Ports.
They have expeaded^lO,000,OOp.oaVf'^i;^l'iA€
Ha,
the Hudson's Bay Railway.
'Why was this enormous amount of
money, which is equal to the Nay
tional debt of Canada—$386,000,000
expended, in such great', national 'en-.
terprises? ' \  " :       /.'
It was expended in order that tluV,
Canadian Confederacy   would   fulfil
the hopes and realize, the dreams, of
the men who sacrificed'so .much at'*
the  cradle' of its  infancy-^-that; ;we'
might make trade East and West'poV
sible  to achieve,  that- the  majestic,
St; Lawrence might become the gateway to. the OM World beyond the,.
seas, which nature intended it should''
be. -      < % , -\    --'_
It is this great fabric which we have
builded, the dreams which we'are be-'
ginning to' realize, that the Liberal '
party would today destroy.      .\ ,   '4
Free Trade with the' United States
in natural products, free wheat, would :
make our great national undertakings
colossal failures-7-our  great, Trans-' '
continentals  mere  ribbons of rusty/
steel. _* >   '* I
It would undo the work and shatter
the hopes of the Fathers of' Goafe^dV
eration, make us hewers of wood and:
drawers of water for the people of, the ■
United States.   .    ,
<\i\
1
Uffl
j.ri.
i^
"   H-
< n
1
First Anniversary
OF \        ' <■
BEACIWF1EL8 METBQDUT CIDId
Sunday. May 3rd v
Rev. W. J. Sipprell, D. D„ at
11:00 a.m.
Rev. E. W. Stapleford, a A., at
7:30 p.m.
On Monday, Mty 4th   \
Tea served from 0:30 to 8:00 ».nv
followed by grand concert",,
Tickets 35 cents     t
s.
1  <,
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;; Has been the watchword of Tb« - ;
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£ ganised in 1869 up to the present J
Only those forms of investment
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adopted. v *
The result is an institution that
is among the most stable in the
Canadian Financial World.
Business in force over $87,000,000
Assets over 22,000,000
Surplus over    8,800,000
;i The Mm! life* Canada
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policies issued by
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317-119 ItftrtlKt.   ViKHW,».C.
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South Vaacenver Undertakers '
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Friday, May 1,1914
8WAT THE FLY
One fly lays 120 eggs. The female progeny
lays when 10 days old- The total progeny then
of one fly from may 1st to August 18th, if let
alone will be 72,559,411,200,000,000 flies accord-,
fog to the war correspondent of the Province, and
we know our Province never lies. Flies do not
travel far, but are now reputed amongst the most
deadly of all our pests.
: This '• winter has been very mild, so that multitudes of flies will have hibernated, and are now
concealed somewhere around every house that
was not fly proof last fall. Kill 'em; see that none
escape. The killing of the early fly is a necessity
if we are to escape a fly pest.x The child's in-
stince to kill every fly in sight is a correct one.
Mothers often interfere because they think their
child is developing a bloodthirsty trait. Don't do
it, mothers; encourage it; commend it. Swat the
fly; command it. Swat the fly; the villainous
carrier of microbes deadly. Now is the time to
begin,in this war. Remember'President Wilson
had scruples about war and behold the mess he
has got into now. His policy has armed his foes,
and so will yours if you neglect to swat the fly
and clean up and keep clean your backyard.
Swatthefly!
., BACK TO THE LAW©
;' A great many people are going on the land
this season, driven thereto, doubtless,, by slack
times in our cities. It will be the beginning of
days for this Province, should x this movement
prove enduring, as we believe it will-
' George P. MacKay, Timber Inspector, declares
that he has never known so many people looking
for land as at present—not' timber cruisers or
land stakers, but bona fide settlers looking for
jiomes, where they can bring up their families and
grow cropjs. At Heriot Bay Inspector Smith is
busy looking ofter the new settlers, and at Qual-
4cum Beach another report says the sales of 5-
;and 10-acre patches to families, that are moving
in, is remarkable.
TBACHBPY AT &YTT0N-T1IW!*.       -
jPBVEYOBg PROWygp IN THOMPSON
Thejjark, deep,, swift flowing Thompson just
above Lytton has been the scene of another tragedy. According to reports, E. T. Shaw, Division
JJngineer, son o| Mr. & S. Shaw, 85 James street,
Ottawa) John B^rnston," rodman, of Hutton-
Cranswick, Beverly, England, and B. M-. jjorton,
address unknown, were drowned whilst attempt-,
ing to.cross the Thompson river, 12 miles east of
Ijytton, in a small boat. Evidently the party was
unfamiliar with our rapid flowing^British Columbia rivers, for they lost their lives in attempting
to do that which, though often accomplished, by
those acquainted with our waters, is always ac-
companied by a certain amount of danger.
»>.:«.t'it'i||.}"t"M''K,.H'frfr^^
''     THE WORLD AT WORK
^■t''H"H-M'H'^H"M'1'*'H'4"H"H^
ALASKA BOUNDARY SURVEY—WOK
TO BE FINISHED THIS YEAR
On his way north to take charge of the Dominion Government section of the Alaska boundary survey for the sixth successive year, Mr. Noel
J. Ogilvie 6f Ottawa, chief engineer for the Dominion-Alaska boundary survey, arrived in Vancouver yesterday.
The work this year, which will be done by
nine parties, each under separate leaders, but
under the supervision of A > Ogilvie, will be in
the southeastern section of Alaska, known as the
"Alaska Panhandle."
"We have about 100 miles of surveying to
finish this summer and this will complete the
work as far as the Dominion Government is concerned," said Mr. Ogilvie. "Our work consists,
in addition to surveying' the boundary line, of
the planting of monuments showing where the
boundary lies. We will get under way by May,
and expert to be in the field until well on in October. The work this year will be easier than in
former years, as we are not so far north, and
have, as a consequence, less snow and ice to contend with."
Mr. Ogilvie wil be in Vancouver for some days
making all arrangements to take these parties into
the field. He has not as yet definitely decided
where he will assemble the various units of the
survey, but it is posible that they will be gathered
together here, and will proceed north in a body.
While still a young man, Mr. Ogilvie has been
the chief engineer in charge of this work for six
years, and is looked upon as being a very clever
engineer. When not employed in the north he
does Buryey work for the government in the East-
ULLOET THIS YEAR—PROGRESS ON P. G. E.
Ninety per cent, of the grading on the section
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway between
Squamish, the Pacific terminal at /the head of
Howe sound and Liiloet has been finished, and
more than, half of the grading" on the Lilloet-
Ciinton portion of the new line has also been
done. Bridge building is proceeding at a rapid
rate along the Squamish, and Jwthei.aevu,years..
rate along the Cheakamus river, north of Squam,
ish, and twenty miles of track has been laid beyond the terminal. ^Contractors are now moving
their outfits, preparatory to starting work on the
sections south of Fort George and north of Clinton. . .      , '"   "
The above is a sumary of a report on the progress, of work now proceeding on the P. G, E. .
The P. G. E- plans to have I construction work
on the entire stretch of line between Clinton and
. Fort George under way this year. - This has hitherto been untouched. ' Three contracts were
awarded about five weeks ago for the firstl 1Q0
miles south of the latter point, and it is expected
that more sections will be allotted at an early
date. •    -
Track will likely reach LUloet from the Sqria-
xmish end of the. line before the end of the year.
The Kelly Lake-Fort George section, 280 miles in
length, will be graded this year, according to the
anticipations of the contractors.
Work on the north shore portions of the P.- G.
E. system is being rushed and will be completed
and ready for operation by July 1. The company is now operating between North Vancouver and Dundarave. In order to expedite
operations on the Pundarave-Horseshoe Bay section bridges are being built in advance of the
tracklayers, an unusual course as it entails greater
expense than transporting materials as the line
progresses. Timbers and steel are being floated
to the scene of bridge operations on rafts.
The substructure of the bridge, which is being built over the Fraser river near Liiloet, has
been completed and the trestle approaches and
-abutments- have- been prepared-tor the- upper-
structure which will be erected when the track
has been completed to Liiloet.
BRUSSELS A SEAPORT IN JUNE
The capital of Belgium ,is being connected
with ocean by a canal and in June /next it is expected that ocean going vessels will reach Brussels. ,
N     A
COLD
I^[asteh^
RADIANT
WATCH
U their Utat frodDciioti
A new Watch by a firnuesub-
Ilshed 43 veart. Matters' Radiant watch is an ordinary watch
with the hands and^ficnres ens-
mailed with radium which makes
them laminous.andtheyshbwthe
time clearly in the dark. It is a
day and NIGHT watch, in fact
the darker the night the brighter
the hands and figures. With this
" watch hong up in your bedroom
yen can seethe time any part of
the night. It Is a speciality for
those who prefer a watch different to any other. Masters' Ra
diant watch is a genuine timer
keeper, fully warranted, and fit-
- ted with their famous Veracity
- lever movement and Solid Silver
.Case*,pricegO/-(i2dolfa«0,iree ■
to any part of the world, or on
our special foreign terms, half-
cash, M/-with order and 26/-on
delivery. Order one of these win-
derfulU/-RadiantWstcbesnow.
Solid GoM Dtmi-fluBiing Maicfi.
Another, bargain is Masters' Solid Gold
Demi-Hunting. Watch, a splendid pro-
'(taction, price only 90/-, or 45-with
order, and 45/-. on delivery.    Special
attention is'given to foreign orders. '
WlMpflj Wotchts, Ringt,1rwtlltry, Cut-
Itrj, PUtt, Gramophones, BocU, Clothing,
•tSi.   CATALOGUE will be ttnt fret and
ptst fait t* anJ addtttt in the world.
Cold Radiant Wattha. £t tot: tf£to lot
MASTERS Ltd., RYE, Eng.
C'g^\    WV      ** k^e Ca^h-on-belivery System is in use in your country, then
I   ■    II      you need only send 10/ for either watch you select and pay
» \J % \J a),   balance when you receive the Watch.   iMtirs, Ltd., Ijt, Eagjud
MASTERS'  LTD.
ILLUSTRATED
CATALOGUE
\ ..."
may t>e seen at
203   KINGSWAY
any day:     ^
between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.iti.
Saturday till 1=2
noon.
Orders left with
V, Odium
When You Buy, Great
or Small, Remember B. C.
MADE  IN Y'
B.Ci
By. J. A. G. Hart, Secretary, Maun:-
facturers' Association of B. C.
Use the label, Mr. Manufacturer.
If you make or put up goods in British Columbia use the Made-in-British-Columbia label. Paste it on any
article that you make and never stop
{talking about it. The labels will do
much to draw the attention of everybody in British Columbia to the fact
that there is a Made-in-British-Columbia organization here, and it will
do a great deal more to emphasize
the importance of supporting the products of the home-made goods.
In quality, British Columbia goods
afe the equal of those products made
elsewhere and dumped into the province to the detriment of our ow industrial welfare. "'The policy of buying goods from mail order catalogues
instead of patronizing local firms is
not a good policy.
Many a workingman in British Columbia is today out of a job just because he and his friends did not purchase British Columbia goods when it
was possible to make these purchases.
This does not mean that manufacturers exercise any undue discrimination against those of their employees
whb prefer to buy goods elsewhere
but in their own factory.
It means that every time money
goes east to some big catalogue house
for goods that might just as well be
bought in Vancouver, or in British
Columbia, this province- loses just
that much. One hundred dollars ex-.
pended in Winnipeg or in Toronto for
merchandise there is just one hundred dollars lost to British Columbia.
In labor, perhaps, it means the work
of one or two men for one or two
weeks. And that brings the subject
right back again to the workingman
in British Columbia.
They have the power within themselves to build up a province that
will be big in the industrial field.
The combined purchasing power ofc
the workingmen in* British Columbia
probably has - never been tabulated.
But it.probably goes well over the
million dollar mark-every month! To
say just how much' of this is expended elsewhere but in British Columbia is only to speculate.
But from the prevalence of the
mail order habit in Vancouver alone,
it is safe to" presume that at least
one-third of this is expended on goods
through the mail order channel. And
that means just that corresponding
amount of labor lost to British Columbia.
Labor men would, of course, resent
the statement that they, and they
alone are responsible for the comparatively low development of British
Columbia industries, but they cannot
evade the fact that they are partly
responsible.' They can adjust themselves to the situation and help to
build a bigger British Columbia. Look
for the label. Ask for the label. See
that you get-it.
Trade Record
Ottawa, April 25.—Official .trade
figures for the twelve months of the
fiscal year, ending March 31 last, were
issued by the customs department
yesterday, and show a grand total for
the year of $1,112,562,107, a record in
Canadian history.
-The total trade of the preceding
year, which was up to then the high-
water mark, was $1,068,660,225.
The feature of the year recently
closed is the enormous increase in exports of Canadian products, the total
being $431,589^658, an increase of
eighty millions Over the preceding
year. 'The imports, on the other
hand, which amounted to $618,328,874,
showed a decrease from the preceding
year of a little over fifty millions.
The biggest increase in exports was
in agricultural products, which rose
forty-eight millions over the preceding year; manufactures jumped fourteen millions and fisheries showed
an increase of four; millions. Imports
of coin and bullion amounted to over
fifteen millions and export of coin and
bullion were over twenty-th'reee. millions. . The trade of the month of.
March showed a decline from the
previous year, the total being $92,887,-
i453, as against $106,148,252.  ,
The enemies a man makes by taking a decided stand have more respect
for him than have the friends he
makes by being on the fence. ■'
For one man that will stand prosperity, there are a hundred who will
stand adversity.—Thomas Carlyle.
Happiness  does  not depend upon
where we are,' but upon what we are.
BEACONSFIELt)
METHODIST CHURCH
The anniversary of Beaconsfield
Methodist church will be held"" on
Sunday and Monday, May 3rd and
4th. On Sunday Rev. W. J. Sipprell,
D.D., will conduct the services at 11
a. m., and in the evening the pulpit
will be occupied by Rev. E. W.
Stapleford, B. A.
Monday evening, May 4th, the
Ladies' AM will give a tea from 6:30
to 8 p. m., followed by a grand concert. Beaconsfield Methodist church
has had a very successful year, and
also the pastorate of the Rev. H. A.
Ireland. The Ladies' Aid gives every
person a cordial welcome.
choose
from
All car lines pass our door.
Use our store waiting for a car
or writing a letter. Make it your
stopping place. Just say '' Meet
me at Stanley's. / ''
STANLEY k CO.i
2317 Maio Street
Phone Pair. 99b]
=^
SEED  POTATOES
t*
I
EARLY ROSE/' choice quality, $2.00 per 100
"GRACE darling " (Imported Irish Seed) $1.50 *<
You Can Kelt on the Quality.
WB CARRY SELECTED LAWN SEED AND FERTILIZER ■
Our Mmmomd OMok Food contains all that is required to
rear healthy chicks.
F. r. VERNON
Pfcaai Filraoat 06 Hay, Grain and Feed US IrMtway East
♦<■»»»»»<>»»»»»»»»»»*>»»»**>»»»»»»<'»W*»»»»»|it It U 11 \>lt"1r+
* I  T. S. Baxter
>vPeteb Wright ;;
Complete House
Furnishers
kj..    *•+,>, -.if*
\\
k%tn%* for Qftermoor ami ;
Restanore dattresaea
Davenport Bed
Wove yoo irieU our Easy payia^ot? Come Ib oqa l«IH Ifaver wim w. j;
BAXTER & WRIQHT
(Successors to Hutchings Furniture Co.)
i Phone Seymour 771
416 Main Street ::
'|"{"t"t"t"l"<"{"llll"l"l"|"t"|"l"l"|"("l"l"l"{"l"t"l'    «{m>w{m}>^m{i»{»^»«^ii{ii*h{»i|h(»i}ii{i^^^^m{w{m{i»{h^i.}i
iT
^\
BliGOMFJEfcP'S CAFE
2517 MAIN STREET NJBAB P&OAPWAY
KNOWN AS   THE BEST   AND   OLDE8T
ESTABLISHED CAFE IN KT. PLEASANT
BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCH 26c-U:30 TO 2:00
V.
pinner 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS
J
|"l"|"t"i"H"|"l"l"y'l,ll"t"t,'l"l"t"l"l"I"t"?"tHiMl'      {"{"{"{MiH^MjMjMjMjMJMjMjMjMjMJMjNjMjMjMjMjMjMgMj.
RANK TRIIHpLE REALTY CO.
Real Estate and Insurance Brokers %
CONVEYANCING
RENTS COLLECTED
LOANS NEGOTIATED
i  PHONE Fair. 185 2503 Westminster Rd.
%   ..::-';vN      *;-'       ".; Vancouver,B.-G.■?-:''"
4. ;-       ".'    '   -■■•■■. .-■■'■- "*-'   i>-"-..-. •'■•'.:■■  ■        .-, " '   ',■: ■■; ■   - j
«» 71
* DOMINION WOOD YARD €0.
Cor. front and Ontario Sts.      Phone Fairmont 1554
jEEESE2ESESSirE2E^S^SiE^SE^^^^^^^^^S^^^^S^m*^^^^mmm0^*^^*^^^^*^—^^^^^^^*^*r?—~*~.
I StoredUnder Cover
V Friday, May 1,1914
:■■*}■■
THE WBSTgBN CALL.
PREVENTION OF
! TYPHDIDFEVE8
-   /Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B. C.
Have you paused to consider the
great financial loss caused every year
through Typhoid Fever?
Typhoid fever is a filth disease, although cleanly people often become
affected. It is carried by human excretions and gets into the drinking
water through improperly constructed
wells, defective drains, etc., or on to
food through the agency of flies, and
so on into the mouth and stomach.
" This disease is, far too prevalent,
the deaths in British Columbia for the
last year from this cause alone being
eighty-five.
Apart from this loss of life, the
economic waste is enormous. Dur*
ing the same period about 700 persons
were  ill  with  this  sickness  in  this
—- *
Province. If each of these cases were
laid up for 8 weeks, a short average,
this would mean a total -period of
39,200 days&in hospital, and with hospital expenses at $2 yer day, a total
cost of $78,400.
If each patient required a total of
four months before he regained his
full strength and earning capacity,
this would mean a total loss of 84,000
days. As the majority of these cases
occur in men earning $3 a'dajr and
over, the loss of earning capacity
would be about $252,000. This, together with the hospital expenses,
which do not include doctors' fees
and other items, gives a gross total
of $330,400.   ^side from this, many
"The Choicest
of all Choice
Waters"
<(
Tansan"
A delicious drink, an invigorating drink, a drink that aids
instead of retarding digestion.
Such a drink is .the genuine
Tansan
from the volcanic spring in
Japan.
Doctors recommend Tansan,
because it is the softest and
most digestible of all waters,
as well as on account of its
valuable tonic properties.
This explains why Tansan
drinkers enjoy better
health than those who
habitually use common waters.
Mixes Splendidly with
all Hard Drinks
vj
m iww ur coinw
To be bought of all reliable
liquor dealer*
WW
JfflWTM
I
J
persons never regain their old health,
and this, 'together with the loss of
life, cannot he estimated in dollars.
To prevent this ' disease, besides
cleanliness, a method of immunization
is now available. This consists of
the use of typhoid prophylatic, which
is a sterile solution for hypodermic
injection. It may be used by a doctor or nurse, and will be supplied on
application to the Secretary of the
Provincial Board of Health, Victoria.
After the first dose there is some
slight reaction, the person inoculated
feeling as, if he had an ordinary at-,
tack of la grippe. This passes off in
the course of a very few hours and
does not prevent the person following his usual Work The second dose
is given from seven to ten days after
the first, and from this practically
no reaction occurs. A third dose,
for still more complete protection, is'
given from seven to ten' days after
the second.        r„
That this innoculation does protect
is shown by the following tables
taken from the report of Dr. H. G.
ofacKid, Surgeon-General of the Alberta Division of the Canadian Pacific railway:
To quote further from Dr. H. G.
MacKid:—
"One of the most striking results
was in a gang of about thirty-five
men who were camped within the city
limits, and who absolutely refused to
be treated at first. There were eleven
cases developed in this camp, and
then the men began to ask to be inoculated, which was done, and following that we had only one more
case."
Other statistics-which do not apply
quite so near home are here given:—
(1) Sixty-one thousand six hundred and twenty-two British Soldiers
immunized in India during 1911. Typhoid incidence in the immunized,
1.7 per thousand; in those not immunized, 6.7 per thousand—a case reduction of 75 per cent. Death rate in
immunized, 0.17 per thousand; not
immunized, 1.15 per thousand—a mortality reduction of 85 per cent.
(2) Eighty-two thousand United
States soldiers immunized up to July
1st, 1912., The typhoid rate dropped
from 3.03 per thousand in 1909 to 0.3
per thousand in 1912—a reduction of
90 per cent.
The use of this may save your life,
as it already has saved others. Have
it used on yourself and get your
friends to do likewise.
W. BAPTY,
Acting  Secretary,   Provincial   Board
of Health, Victoria, B. C.
CANADA AHEAD IN FLOUR
Washington, D. C.—Consul-General George E. Anderson, of Hongkong/ reports that increased prices
and decreased gluten content of flour
from " the United States and lower
quotations for flour from Australia
and Canada are factors that combined
to cause a considerable fall in Hongkong's imports of flour from 'the
United States as-compared with what
the imports should have been during
the closing months of 1913. In November flour from Canada was coming into Hongkong in ihcreasing
amounts, and a considerable movement of flour from Australia had also
commenced.
Flour from Australia has had small
part in this market for a number of
years, and usually comes into Hongkong and China only in times of unusually great demand, such as in famine years or when prices in the United
States are unusually high. The high
course of prices of American fluor at
present, prevents any considerable
purchases *rom American mills aside
from the forward .contracts already
made. Comparatively low prices in
Canada have favored trade from that
Dominion at the expense of American mills.
Perhaps the most serious feature of
the situation, however, is that new
flour coming in from the Pacific coast
of the United States is short of gluten, while the flours of similar grade
from Canada at present are particularly strong.
THE
EXPERIMENTAL
FARMS' -REPORT
<'<M'»t<,W'H4'M'*'»»»M'»*'l"M1*^
"§;..
Six Days a Week In
«».
|]wry rooromg 4urmg the week The
Wimgo JDyWy Tribune prints a emir
p^e^i^ PicfrHre iSitarT/ based on
oneof the Moving Picture Plays being
shown in Chicago and in the^dties, towns an<J yiUages
in the vast territory surrounding Chicago.
The Flay selected for each morning's story is the one
which The Tribune's Moving Picture Editor has selected
as the best of all those being shown that day. You can
read the Moving Picture Stories every morning 'and then
as these fascinating plays are exhibited in your locality
your enjoyment of them will be doubled and trebled
BECAUSE YOU HAVE READ THE STORY.
THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
hot only gives you a complete Moving Picture Story
EVERY DAY during the week, but it also gives you
on Sunday; in serial form, the greatest Moving Picture
Story ever written, J * The Adventures of Kathlyn," by
Harold
been produced the famous "KATHLYN" Moving Pic-
tures which all Chicago is standing in line to see.
Read the Daily Moving Picture Story
itf the Chicago Tribune
- ■ -      • .■ •■' .'■-.■' -      ■ ■ ■ : -    '.-./
Read ltThe Adventures of Kathlyn" in The Chicago Sunday Tribune
,,»Mfr^.4..%.I.fr.:..t,.HMH"H-^^
::
♦♦♦I"! Mi.H..M..!..M'*'l"! I'l 1-1 l'l*lf*%*4fjti'4t§**t^**^'je*^'^*»'*¥' ' ^    '*%-?-'''''
L. y t » J        .".^ ■ ,. f*       An v.r   !■ 1      a ""1 A-
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t rr       J " I     ^      / if- KS
':f Z <.  <■> : -'►" / ,
J-'    ■>,..'* '   J
i Mount Pleasant Liyery *
TRANSFER
Furniture and Piano Moving
Baggage, Express and Dray.   Hack* and OarriagM ,
at all hours:
Phone Felrmeni 846
;  Corner Broadway and Main A. F. Mclavish, Prop." \
a\
\h*.
^<1
11 m n i (i h i nun t n i m»#
-r -i
VANCOUVER CUT-KATE FRUIT aad CANDY CO.
2452 Main St. SK.mUiHI
:; J N. Bills. Mgr.
The information contained in the
annual reports of the Experimental
farms of the Dominion Department
of Agriculture is so varied and complete as to render these yearly vol-
mes almost worthy the name of "Encyclopedia of Agriculture." The Experimental farms' system embraces
the Central farm and twenty branch
farms and stations, each manned by a
staff of specialists. At these widespread, well equipped institutions
practically every phase of agriculture, from the study and suppression
of plant diseases to the breeding and
raising of all manner or orchard,
garden and field crops and classes of
farm animals, are taken up. In addition, seven outlying sub-stations
carry on and report upon work of an
agricultural nature.
-TJbe report for the year ending
March 31st, 1913, makes a volume of
nearly 700 pages, crammed with the
meat of what was accomplished and
found out during the year. The information is so classified and treated
as to be readily available to the reader in whatever subject he may chance
to be interested. A large edition has
been printed so as to supply for some
time at least every applicant who will
drop a card for a copy to the Publishers''branch, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
All Fruity
in Seasdn
at
f Largest Stock ef GaDfecHoBery Frait ft Takacco on tUU i
PHONE Fairmont 638   .
i • • '
.' Free delivery to any part of the city.
S.J. f..t^.|,i»,4, l. ImIiI .Infill <, 1, I iMiliil  »»,»..      4»»-t!<lnM I 'I Y H'/M' M I't I'l I' I »»4
s '.J
1 J   »1
'<?.
- >   ''       ^ ,s I
' ■,*-«.*";'i,fc|
**r    . v    1 I
-   .   i   j
f—      j -  >
'" ..".-..'St
When Laurier launched his Transcontinental Railway project he declared that Canadian wheat must be
transported to ocean ports through
Canada in order, to preserve its identity;- Now he wants to send it all to
the United States mills and have no
such^thihg^as" "CaWa^iatr^wheaf^7 or
wheat flour.
CEPAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN
i        ■« oHuacn
Rev. J. O. Madill. Pastor.
Sabbath School and Bible Classes
at 2.30 p.m.
Prayer meeting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday.
Young People's meeting at .8 p.m. on
Monday night.
?
:?
*a
iroaT«T nuwimmAmmom «oa»i>
Tenders tor aortas**.
SEALED TENDERS will be received
by the undersigned at the Harbor Commissioners' Office, Eburne Station, B.
C, up to noon on May 8, (or sinking
test holes In the North Arm of the
Fratser River between the commencement of the estuary at Point Grey and
the westerly boundary of South Vancouver.,        ' .-■■''
Specifications can be seen and full
particulars obtained on application to
Messrs. Davis & Leslie, Harbor Engineers, 502-503 Duncan Building. Vancouver, after April IS.
The Harbor Commlsioners do not bind
themselves to accept the lowest or any
tender.'
•             H. B. A. VOGEL.
1-12-26  8ecVetary.
Just received a large shipment of
O'CEMR
Polishing Mop an4 G'Ceclar
Furniture Polish
^ i
t     r   r
Makes Hard Work Easyl
F^^i i!^r?»T^Sst ^s^SSr^LfiSr^1- ~^&"^ll»farlnff?tfta
3^7, ?W ^"H&.P*^" ******** 'J'lW'i,"**' ssllsfsBlaw fl^wawwar-^*itsj«w# pcedaf
f
The Water,-Mobile
The first 3>passenger WATER-
MOBILE is rapidly nearing completion.-
If you want to get in on this wonderful
invention at the present price of 25
cents per share, you must act quickly
as only a few shares are to be had
before the advance.
THE  WATER-MOBILE
UNDERWRITERS
■P3   Carter-Cotton   Building
Vancouver, British. Columbia
Stocks
«l'l
Investor's Bulletin
A hand-book for successful
investors and speculators, free
on request. Write for your
copy today.
DONALD M. MacCKCOR
Mbr.  Vancouver and Seattle
Stock Exchanges.
Whet* sWikfef        Phoaw Seyssaer 8461
toads. Miae*
CMtaa
Grata Lacal
L
1 Phone us your order.   We driver
promptly.
WRyOwen HVlorrison
The Mt. Pleasant Hardware
Phone Fair. 447 2337Main Street
NATIONS CULTURE AND REFINEMENT   1
Can we measure the value of example in bettering- the social, moral X
and mental condition of home, civic or national life? X
A living example is a powerful factor In leading up to culture and i.
refinement as a national asset. What more so than that of an artis- ....
tieally made borne nestling among; beautiful flowering plants; roaea. X
flowering and evergreen Bhrubbery; shade trees, all encompaased with- X
hedges of holly, laurel or privet. A
Cultivate a habit to epend your time to make such a home, and A
visit our Greenhouses and Nurseries; see our stock, and get expert advice from our capable and courteous employees, which will greatly aid
you in your effort. Our stock was never, better, larger or of greater
variety. In our stock of over $100,000 we have everything that culture
and refinement demands to make a home a credit to the owners and
pleasing and interesting to. the community..
Catalogues mailed free on application.
Royal Nurseries, Limited
-- Office—710 Dominion Bldg^ 207 Xaatisuri St. W.
Phone Seymonr 5656. A
STOBB—3410 Oraavilla St.    Phona Xayvlaw ltae. ->
Greenhouses and Nurserie* at Royal  on  B.  C. Electric Railway, "j*
Eburne Line, about two miles south of the City limits. J,
Phone—Shorn* 43. >|> Friday. May 1,1S14
CALL
Address by Dr. McKim«Why We Are Protestants
(Continued from Page 3)
is that in the seventeenth century the same controversy convulsed the   Roman   Church, maintained by the Jansenists on the one side and the
Jesuits on the other, with a biterness certainly
-never, surpassed by Protestants.    It continued
from 1640 to 1713, a period of seventy-three years.
Why, we cannot help asking, did not the learned
Vicar-General Preston read up a little about all
this"history!   It is true that when a decision   is
reached, the opposition submits.   But such submission is no proof of unity.   The bishops who
denounced, with so much vehemence, the dogma
of papal infallibility at the Vatican Council in
1870, submitted, because the Church of Rome is
an absolute spiritual despotism.   We Protestants
prefer   liberty   of   conscience   and   liberty   of
thought, even at the cost of external uniformity
(Applause.),
Rome's Boasted Unity a Sham
But observe, my friends, that after all, unity is
not secured in the Church of Rome. They tell us
private judgment is a false and dangerous guide.
They reproach us with our divisions. But it may
" be safely affirmed that there is more unity and
agreement among the leading Protestant churches
on this platform this afternoon than there is in
the Roman Catholic Church throughout the world.
(Applause.) Its boasted unity is a sham and a
delusion; it is nominal rather than real, external
rather than vital.
So, too, with the interpretation of Scripture.
Her highest dignitaries contradict one another in
their interpretations of the Bible. Thus, two
popes of Rome declared it to be so indispensable
for infants to receive communion that those in-
1 fants who die without receiving communion go
straight to hell. And yet the Council of Trent
whose decrees Pope Pius IV. proclaimed and
bound upon the whole church, anathematized this
doctrine. Ah 1'they do not agree, then. What did
those Fathers of Trent mean, to anathematize a
doctrine of one of teh popes! Were they modernists three centuries ahead of time! Take another
instance, Pope Pelagjus declared the invocation
of the Trinity necessary to the validity of baptism (A.D. 555-560); but another Pope, Nicholas
I, assured the Bulgarians that baptism in the name
of Christ alone was sufficient. Celestine IJI. declared the marriage tie dissolved if either party
became heretical. Innocent III. annulled this decision, and Adrian VI. called Celestine a heretic
for giving it. And. upon so vital a doctrine as the
divinity of Christ, Liberius, one of the early
bishops of Rome, was himself heretical. Yes, one
of their infallible popes, upon whose interpretations of Scripture the whole world of scholars and
theologians is bidden to wait, actually subscribed
an Arian creed, though Arianism is by that very
church denounced as a most dangerous heresy.
Such facts as these are not exactly suggestive of
unity, consistency, or truth, are they! Applause.)
Testimony of the Fathers on the Sufficieny of the
Scripturei
I have said that we are Protestants because
we build our faith solely upon the revelation of
God in Holy Scripture. Let me say that in taking
this position we stand side by side with the primitive Fathers of the Church. If there is anything
that can be established from the writings of the
Fathers, it is that they held the Bible to be the
full and perfect rule of faith, that it contains the
whole word of God. and that what is outside of
it need not be regarded- For example, St. Basil
says, "It is a most manifest fall from the faith to
introduce anything that is not written in the
Scriptures." He also says that "to detract from
Scripture, or to add to the faith anything that is
>' not there, is most manifestly forbidden by the
, , apostles/' O Paulist Fathers, take note of that!
ybu will get St. Paul after you!   (Laughter.)
"'" Another witness is St. Cyprian, who maintained that to find out what interpretations are
genuine we should not take the words of the
—popes of Rome, but search the Scriptures as the
only trustworthy record of apostolic tradition.
(Good for St. Cyprian! say J.) And St. Jerome-
says, "We accept those things that are written
(in the Bible), we reject those things that are not
written.
((
Bible Beading by the Jrtty
But then, we have not got out Of our difficulties yet,—0, no! We are told that it is dangerous
for the lay people to read the Bible in the vernacular, because they cannot understand it. They
will inevitably err in seeking to understand it.
The Council of Trent says, "It is manifest by experience that if the Holy Bible in the vernacular
be suffered to be read everywhere without distinction, more evil than good arises." More evil
to whom!   (Applause.)
The Council goes on to say that. permisison
may be granted to read translations of the Scriptures made by Catholic prelates, to those whom
they understand are able to receive no harm
from such reading." (Of course if you can persuade the prelates that you will get no harm from
it, you may get a "dispensation"!) "But whosoever shall presume to read these Bibles or have
them in their possession without such faculty,
shall not be capable of receiving absolution of
their sins unless they have first given up their
Bibles to the ordinary!" That does not agree
with Cardinal Gibbons's position, but it makes it
worse for Cardinal Gibbons. He is a big man,
but he is not so big as the Council of Trent.
Now, where do the Fathers of the primitive
church stands on this question as regards reading of the Bible by the lay people! I answer, the
ancient Fathers did not fear that the people
would discover contradictions between the Bible
and their teaching- They never desired to teach
anything that was not in the Bible. St. Chry-
sostom says, "All things are plain and simple in
Holy Scriptures; all things necessary are evident." "The apostles and prophets have made
all things proceeding from them plain and simple
to all, in order that each person, even by himself,
may be able to learn what is said from the mere
reading of it;" and St. Augustine says, "God
hath made the Scripture to stoop to the capacity
of babes and sucklings;" and again St. Chrysos-
tom, "Great is the precipice and deep the gulf
that opens before ignorance of the Scriptures.
It is downright abandonment of salvation to be
ignorant of divine laws. It is this that has caused
heresies; it is this that has led to profligate living ; it is this that has turned things upside down;
for it is impossible for any one to come off .without profit who constantly enjoys such reading
with intelligence."
Of course we do' not pretend that plain and
unlearned people can understand everything in
the Bible. We ministers do not pretend to do
that ourselves, the most learned of us; but we do
.claim that the things which are necessary to
salvation, the things necessary to guide one
through this world unto a better world beyond,
—these things are so plain that "he may run that
readeth" in the Holy Scriptures. '"The wayfaring men, though fools, shall not err therein. (Applause.)
Nevertheless, we are told that the Protestant
principle of the interpretation of the Bible leads
to endless variations and confusion in regard to
its doctrines. The Church of Rome, on the contrary, they tell us, teaches one and the same
doctrine in all parts of the world, and in all ages
of the world.
The Variations of Romanism
Well, to my feeble understanding, it really, appears that no other church in Christendom has
varied so much in the doctrines it has taught
throughout the ages as the Church of Rome. She
' has added article after article to her fatith- The
Creed of Pius IV, A.D. 1564, contains twelve
new articles of faith bound upon the church.
Among these were the doctrines of tradition, the
seven sacraments, the mass, purgatory, invocation and veneration of saints, image veneration,
and indulgences.
Again, in 1854 she added a new article of faith,
—the immaculate conception of the blessed Virgin ; and in 1870 she imposed upon the church the
awful and tremendous doctrine of the infallibility of the Pope.   .
Now let me give you a striking example of the
variations of doctrine in the Roman Church.
That famous orator and controversalist, Bossuet,
wrote a book to prove that Protestantism is false
because Protestants disagree among themselves,
and Romanism is true because its doctrine is
always the same and its children never disagree.
Now Bossuet was the terror of Protestant, and
the most trusted champion of his church. He
was called the "Eagle of Meaux." No writer
of his age in the Roman Church was more illustrious than he. But, mark you, he fought not
only against the Protestants, but against the
theory of the infallibility of the £ope. What
was the result! He is treated by the dominant
Roman Catholic school today as no better than a
Protestant. He is classed with aliens and heretics by no less a man than Cardinal Manning
himself. Another of their popular writers goes'
so far as to class the great Bossuet with devil
worshippers because of his opposition to the doctrine of the infallibility of the Pope.   (Applause.)
Ah! that was dangerous- He did not. know
what -would be the'result. Poor man! What a
fall! It is almost equal to Lucifer's fall. He is
no better than a Protestant; yes, fii only to company with devil worshippers. Just think of it!
Can you say anything worse of a man than that!
Think of it! ^ A man may find himself among
devil worshippers, worse than the swine of Gad-
ara, just because he opposes the infallibility of
the Pope. Poor Bossuet, with all his eloquence
and learning, did not escape. . This is, I think, a
most instructive example of the uncertainty and
the shifting character of the doctrines of the'
Church of Rome.
My dear friends, the doctrine of the Church of
Rome, her creed, is different today from what it
was before Pope Pius IX became Pope. In the
middle of the last century, forty-three years ago,
-it-was notan-article offaith4hat the pope is-in-
fallible. Today it is. Sixty-three years ago it
was not an article of faith that the Virgin was
born without sin.   Today it is.
Now let me give an amusing example of the
uncertainty in which the Romanist finds himself
in regard to the doctrine that he is required to
believe. Keenan's Cathechism was published
with the approval of theScotch Roman Catholic bishops, and also recommended by the Irish
bishops. This catechism contains the following
question and answer:
"Qusetion.—Must not a Catholic believe the
Pope in himself to be infallible!
"Answer.—This is a Protestant invention- It
is no article of the Catholic faith."
This was before the year 1870. After the year
1870 the catechism was republished, but this
question and answer had disappeared. So you see
how they agree!   (Applause.)
The Privilege of Peter
• Well, I would like to' say something about
what the Roman theologians call "the privilege
of Peter," and the alleged transmission of the
same to his successors, the Roman pontiffs. His
Holiness Leo XIII declared: (By the way, I
' wrote him a letter, a long letter, some years ago,
and he never answered it.) (Long continued applause.) "It cannot be doubted from Holy Writ
that the holy church rests on St. Peter as the
building on the foundation." But where in Holy
Writ is there any such statement When our
Lord said,-" Upon this rock I will build my
church," can we possibly believe that he referred to St. Peter, in face of the fact that in the
Old Testament the title of Rock is reserved to
God the Father, and in the New Testament to
Christ himself! To do so, would be to contradict the solemn declaration of the holy apostle,
Paul when he wrote, "Other foundation can no
man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Chrits."
Should we not rather interpret this as St. Chry-
sostom does, and as other ancient Fathers do,
"Ppon this rock I will build my church," that
is, on the faith of his confession, namely, "Thou
art the Christ, the Son of the living God"! To
build on that faith is to build on Christ. Now, is
it not remarkable that in all the records of the
New Testament there is no reference whatever
to this alleged function of St. Peter as the head
and ruler of the church! He was a great man, a
glorious leader- He opened the way for the faith
to the Gentile world. He was a splendid apostle,
but he never discovered that he was the infallible
head of the church. (Laughter.), He never
found it out, and nobody else seems to have discovered it. St. Paul, so far from finding it out,
did not rebuke him to his face on a certain occasion when he acted inconsistently.
Moreover, is it not remarkable that of all the
Fathers who interpret the passage just quoted,
"And upon this rock I will build my church,"
not a single one applies it to the Roman bishops
as successors of St. Peter! Origen, Chrysostom,
Hilary, Augustine, Cyril, Theodoret, and others
have commented upon these words, but "not one
of them has explained the rock or foundation on
which Christ would build his church, of the, office
given to Peter to be transmitted to his successors."
The "Unanimous Consent" Principle
V
Now, here comes a very interesting thing. The
Creed of Pius IV binds every good Catholic not to
interpret the Holy Scripture except "according
to the unanimous consent of the ancient Fathers;"
and if one does so, he is anathema. Now, how do
the ancient Fathers interpret this passage! I
shall not answer the question myself. I am going
to take refuge again behind a great Roman Catholic theologian. I like to do that; then I am safe,
as far as the argument is concerned. I refer to
the Rt. Rev. Dr- Kenrick, Archbishop of St. Louis.
He was one of the prelates who was opposed to
the infallibility of the Pope at the Vatican Council and prepared a speech for the council. Now,
in his speech he stated that he had examined
eighty-five of the Fathers who commented on this
passage, "Upon this rock I' will build my
church;" and he saysthat forty-four out of the
eighty four interpreted the rock to mean, not
Peter, but the confession that Peter made of the
divinity of Christ; and among these forty-four
was one of the infallible popes, Leo the Great;
while only seventen held that Peter was the rock.
Forty-four held that he was not the rock, but that
the faith he confessed was the rock. He also says,
"If we are to follow the greater number of the
Fathers in the iterpretation of this passage, then
we are bound to hold it certain that the rock is
not Peter, but the faith that Peter confessed; and
second, that no argument, or at least no probable
argument, can be derived from the promise to
Peter, 'Upon this rock I will build my church.' "
Now, just see how it stands. We unfortunate
Protestants catch the anathema whichever way
we decide. If we deny the infallibility of the
Pope, we are anathema. If we accept it, we are
anathema by the decree of Pope Pius IV, who requires us never to interpret the Scriptures except according to the unanimous consent of the
Fathers.   So there we are!
PAPAL WPALUWLITV
And now a further word as to this great, tremendous, awfully tremendous doctrine. It asserts that the whole Christian world is bound to
believe "that the Roman pontiff, when he speaks
ex-Cathedra . . . • is possessed of that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer willed
that His church should be endowed f6r defining
doctrine regarding faith and morals-'' Now, when
this dogma is brought to the impartial bar of. history, it completely breaks down. No wonder
Cardinal John H- Newman was so sad at heart
in the anticipation of its promulgation.
He wrote Bishop Ullathorne that "it would
be most difficult to maintain logically in the face
of historical facts." "If," said he, "it is God's
will that the Pope's infallibility be defined, then
is it God's will to throw back the times and moments of that triumph which he lias destined, for
his kingdom, and I shall feel I' have but to bow
my head to his adorable, inscrutable providence."
Poor Newman! In the language of Bishop Stross-
mayer, "History cannot be made over again. It
is there,.and will remain to all eternity to protest-
energetically agaist the dogma of papal infallibility." I shall not0characterize this blasphemous doctrine in language of my own, but I shall
quote the language of an illustrious and holy
Pope, Gregory the Great, who said, "I confidently
say that whoever doth call himself universal bishop, or desires to have himself so called, is the
forerunner of Antichrist, because he proudly doth
set himself before the rest."
What would Pope Gregory say to the titles
now assumed by his successors,—Vicegerent of
God, Vice God, the" Vicar of Christ,—all of whose
teachings should be received as if they were the
Lord's, and whom the whole episcopates must be
subject to, on pain of being considered "a lawless
and disorderly crowd!"
But now, I am going to ask you this: Suppose you could be persuaded—against Scripture,
against reason, against history, against conscience
—to bow to the dogma of papal infallibility,
wherein would you be benefited! Would you
have secured absolute certainty of religious belief? Just as well count the cost before you take
a big jump like that. Will you get certainty of
belief if you do! I say, No; for the question now
is, When does-the Pope speak ex cathedra! (I
have not a chair-here big enough to illustrate ex
cathedra.) Ah, who is to decide!.and until such
decision is authoritatively given, how can we be
sure that we have in reality grasped the certainty
that any particular doctrine is really built upon
infallibility? Take the famous Syllabus of Pius
IX in 1864. This document contains a catalogue
of eighty errors which Pius IX formally condemned. Now here is a big question: Is that
Syllabus an ex cathedra utterance, and hence infallible? That is what I want to know. Well,
here comes Cardinal Manning, who strongly affirms that it certainly is infallible, the whole of it.
Here, on the other hand, comes also Cardinal
Newman, who held a contrary opinion, and says:
"No; it is not infallible." Now, who is right!
Who is to decide! Each man for himself? Then
you are building on private judgment. Just think
of that! Infallibility resting on private judgment! Or is each man's confessor to decide for
him? In that case, infallibility still rests on private judgment, that of a priest instead of a lay
man.   Meanwhile what grave issues are left suspended in mid-air?
American citizens, listen to this: If Manning
was right, then religious liberty is a detestable
error, which good Romanists' are bound to abhor.
If Newman was right, then you may say Amen to
that fine panegyric pronounced last Sunday by
Cardinal Gibbons on religious liberty. In short,
the old uncertainty as to where infallibility reposes has simply given place to uncertainty in a
new form: When is this infallible voice heard?
How may it be recognized? On this question, certainty is unattainable, and the Romanist is unspeakably worse off than his poor Protestant
neighbor, who builds his faith on the infallible
voice that speaks in Holy Scripture.
Rome and Magna Charta
Take another question. A devout and obedient member of the Roman communion desires
to know whether the principles of liberty as embodied in that famous instrument, the Magna
Charta, are in harmony with his faith and with
his church. He hears from his clergy in America
words of approval and praise for free institutions, and naturally concludes that his church is
in sympathy with popular liberty as embodied
in the great English and American political instruments. But suppose he chances to read the
history of the reign of King John, and so learns
that Pope Innocent III declared Magna Charta
null and void, excommunicated the barons who
extorted it from the tyrant,, and forbade King
John to give it effect in his dominions. Suppose
he reads further and finds that when Stephen
Langton, the then Archbishop of Canterbury, re-,
fused to execute this bull, and stood forth as the
champion of the rights and liberties of the English people against the despotism of King John,
the Pope suspended him from his archepiscopal office, and drove him into exile. Is it not shameful \
that the venerable Cardinal Gibbons should pre- ■
tend that the Roman Catholic Church deserves
the glory of Magna Charta! Could there be a
more barefaced perversion of history!
, Now, fellow citizens, in the face of these well
known historical facts, Cardinal Gibbons, last
Sunday, actually claimed for the Roman Catholic
Church the glory of the Magna Charta. But
surely the Pope was the head of the church- His
voice was the voice of the church. His act was
the act of the church. Therefore every good Catholic is bound to believe that the church was
against constitutional freedom as asserted in the
Magna Charta. Is Cardinal Gibons becoming a
Modernist! or has he forgotten his history! (Applause.) "-        '
What an ignis fatuus, then, is this doctrine of j
the infallibility of the Pope! and how vain is the
hope that in submitting to it, men secure absolute certainty of belief! No sooner had it been
declared than the line of cleavage began to develop between the maximizers, like Ward and
Manning, and the minimizers, like Cardinal John
H. Newman. ' This same wide difference of interpretation prevails in the Roman Catholic Church
today in regard to various doctrines and practices of their faith.
A Concrete Example of Lack of Unity ,
As regards the hollowness of the alleged unity
and harmony in the Roman Catholic Church, no
better illustration can be given than is found in
the picture of the life of the Roman hierarchy in
England, so vividly drawn by Mr. Purcell in his
"Life-of Cardinal Manning." It is a tissue of
controversies and jealousies, of mining and countermining, between the different factions in the
Roman communion. The members of the hierarchy are seen in constant conflict and intrigue.
They agree neither in opinions nor in policies;
and first one, then another, of the bishops hies
him to Rome, hoping to undermine the influence
and credit of his brother prelate with the Holy
Father. It is a mournful spectacle of the absence
of unity of spirit. Purcell remarks that "second
only to his belief in the infallibility of the Pope
.... was Manning's belief in the duty of
keeping up, at every hazard, the appearance of
_ unity among Catholics_."_ But thejntestine strife,
could not be wholly concealed, and this remarkable book has drawn aside the veil and shown
us the bitterness and discord which have pre- \
vailed in the Roman communion. So vain is the
boast of unity of spirit and identity of belief
among Roman Catholics.
Spiritual Bondage and Purgatory
There is another reason for our attitude as
Protestants which I must not omit, though I must
treat it very briefly indeed. We are Protestants
because we cannot give up,our spiritual liberty.
"Stand fast, therfore," cries St. Paul-to the Gal-
atians, "'in the liberty wherewith Christ hath,
made us free, and be not entangled again with the
yoke of bondage.'"
The Church of Rome would subject us to the
bondage of a priesthood from whose lips alone we
can receive absolution for our sins. She puts the
priest between us and Christ. We read in Holy
Scripture that Christ has taken away every barrier, and that we have boldness to go direct to
God without any mediator,—yes, "boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus."
But the Church of Rome tells we must go to the ,|
priest, who sits in the tribunal-of penance, and,
kneeling before him, confess all our mortal sins,
whispering them into his ear; then he wil give us |
absolution, saying, "I absolve thee." And he
pronounces his as a judicial act, whereby pardon
is conveyed as by a judge.
This done, you are restored to your baptismal
purity, and you are released from eternal punishment. But you have still to endure temporal
, punishment for your sins, in this life, if it shall
be long enough; if not, then in purgatory- This,
however, you may shorten by masses, by alms,
fasts, pilgrmages, penances, prescribed by the
priest, your judge. Now this purgatorical fire in
the next world, remember, is for the pious, for
Christians, for men truly penitent for their sins.
It is a punishment, however, which the Pope has
the power to remit. He holds the keys of the
church's treasury of superabundant merits. He
is, in fact, the dispenser of the merits of Christ,
and he could, they tell us,t"empty purgatory at
one stroke." So, then, if you are rich, and leave
(Continued on Page S) Friday, May 1,1914
TW WSWHttN CALL
LAND ACT NOTICES
—SS^^Sfc.
>-k o
XVAVD AC*.
VAHOOmm LABD DXBfBXO*
Distrtet of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Frank
Lazier, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:— ' ,
Commencing at a poat planted 4 miles
distant in ,a westerly direction from the
.Northwest corner of Lot 425; thence
80 chains North; thence 10 chain* West;
thence (0 chains South; thence to chains
East, to the point of commencement,
containing 840 acres, more or less, for
agricutural.
Dated January 10th, 1014.
.HARRY FRANK LAZIER. .
H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVD .40*.
TAaToourn xvavb bxsvbxc*
District of Com* Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Bert Minor, of
Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post about two
miles distent, and in a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of
Lot 425, commencing at a post in the.
Southeast corner; thence 10 chains
North; thence 10 chains West: thence
80 chains South; thence 10 chains East
to the point of commencement, containing' 040 acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January  10th. 1014.
BERT MINOR,
H. O. Adams, Agent.
XVAVD AC*.
TAVOOVTVB XVAVB  BXSVBXC*
. Distrtet of Coast Swage *•
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Charles
Falconer, of Vancouver, occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:— .
Commencing at a post planted, about
one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of
Lot 421; commencing at a post in the
Northeast corner; thence West 00
chains; thence South 50 chains; thence
following the beach 00 chains in a
South-easterly direction; thence 00
chains North to the point of commencement; containing BOO acres, more or
less, for agricultural.
Dated January  16th,  1014.
ARTHUR   CHARLES   FALCONER,
H. Q. Adams, Agent.
TAVCOVTBB XVAVD  DXSTBXC*
District of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Black,
of Vancouver, occupation Telegrapher,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing; at a post planted at the
West end of Roblson Island high water
mark; thence traversing the beach in a
South and Easterly course to the East
entrance to Blunden Harbor; thence
traversing the beach in a North and
Westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less, for agriculture.
Dated January 13th, 1014/
HERBERT BLACK.
H. O. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AO*.
TAVOOVTBB  XVAVD  BXatTBXC*
Dlstrtot of Coast Baags X. ,
TAKE NOTICE that Kate E. Hen-
shaw, of Vancouver, occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southeast corner, about one milt distant and in a Westerly direction from
the Southwest comer of Lot,421: commencing at a post planted in the Southeast corner; thence 00 chains West;
thence 80 chains North; thence SO
chains East: thence 00 chains South to
the point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 16th, 1014.       _
KATE   H.   HENSHAW.
H. O. Adams, Agent.
80 chains South; thence 80 chains
East, to the point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less, for
agricultural.
Dated January 15th. 1914.
CHARLES H. BAILET,
H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVB AC*.'
TAVOOVTBB XVAVD  DXB*BXO*
District of Coast mange X.-
TAKE NOTICE that Harry George
Adams, of Alert Bay, British Columbia,
occupation Cruiser, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;
thence 40 chains East; thence 40 chains
South; thence 40 chains East to beach,
following the beach in a Southerly direction to the Southeast corner of the
Indian Reserve; thence traversing the
survey of the Indian Reserve Northwest and South to the beach; thence
West along the beach to a point one
mile directly South from the Southwest corner of Lot 421; thence North
20 chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less, for agricultural.
Dated January 13th. 1914.
HARRY GEORGE ADAMS,
H*. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVB AC*.
tavcovtsb xvavd.x>xb*bxc*
District ef Coaat Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Leonard G.
Eveson. of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a poat planted at the
Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a poat,ln the Northeaat corner; thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains West; thence SO chains North;
thence 80 chains East to the point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January ISM. 1014.
LEONARD  G.  EVESON.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AO*.
tavooutvb xvavb xnswaxo*
Distrtet of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward
Mellor, of Vancouver, occupation Capitalist, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
three milts distant and in a Northwest
direction from the Southwest corner of
Lot 421; commencing at a post in the
Northeast corner; thence 80 chains
South; thence 20 chains West to beach;
thence 00 chains Northwest along the
beach; thence 60 chains North; thence
80 chains East to the point of commencement, containing 600 acres, more
or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 13th, 1914.
JOSEPH EDWARD MELLOR,
H. G. Adams. Agent.
XVAVB AC*.
rectlon"to the point of commencement,
containing 500 acres, more or less, for
agricultural.
Dated January 29th, 1914.
BERTHA B. LAZIER,    ,
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AC*.
yavcovtvb xvavd dxbsbxo*
District ef Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Jane Dodds, of
Vancouver; occupation, spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile distant and in an Saaterly
direction from the Southwest corner of
Lot 422; commencing at a post in the
Northwest corner; , thence 80 chains
East; thence SO chains South; thence 80
chains Wast to beach; thence following the beach in a Northerly direction
80 chains to the point of .commencement,
containing 600 acres more or less, for
agricultural.
Dated January 23rd, 1914.
^ JANE DODDS,
H. G. Adams, Agent.
xvavb ao*.
TAVOOVTBB) XVAVB  BXSffBXO*
Distrtet ef coaat Baage x.
TAKE NOTICE that Rose Hamilton,
of Vancouver; occupation, widow; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
10 chains la a Westerly direction from
the Southwest comer of Lot 422; commencing at a post in the Northwest
corner; thence SO chains Bast to beach
of Cohoe bay; thence following ,■ the
beach in a South and Weat direction to
the East entrance of Blunden Harbour;
thence In a North and Easterly direction to the point of commencement
containing 4 SO acres, more or leas, for
agricultural.
Dated January 2Srd. 1914.
ROSE HAMILTON.
H. G. Adams, Agent
AC*.
TAVOff
XtASfD  UISCBXOV
Distrtet «f Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred£. Mock, of
Vancouver; occupation, broker; intend* , to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 60
chains distant and in aa Easterly direction from the Southeast comer of T.
L. 4479; commencing at a post in the
Northeast corner; thence 60 - chains
West; thence 40 chains South to beach;
thence following the beach in a Northeast direction to the point of commencement, containing 200 acres, more or less,
for agricultural.
Dated January 29th, 1914.
FRED C. MOCK,
H. G. Adams, Agent
• XVAVB' AC*.
TAYOOOTVB XVAVD DXsYIBXC*
Distrtet of Coast Xamge X.
TAKE NOTICE that William Ryan, of
Vancouver, occupation Laborer, Intends
to apply for psrmisslon to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
three miles distant, and in a Westerly
direction from the Northwest corner of
Lot 425; commencing at a post planted
in the Northeast corner; thence 80
chains West; thence SO chains South;
thence following the beach In an Easterly direction SO chains; thence North
SO chains to the point of commencement,
containing 400 acres, more or less, for
agricultural.
' Dated January 14th. 1914.
WILLIAM RTAN.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVB AC*.
tavcoittbb xvavd nxsflraxo*
Distrtet of Coast Bongo x»
TAKE NOTICE   that "Barbara Joan
XVAVD ACT-
TAVOO
District ©J Coast lean
JE NOTICE that Harfy
VHP 9Xf TBXCT
••♦ Benge X.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Joseph
Woodward, of Vancouver, occupation
Book-keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— .
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile distant and In • Westerly
direction from the Northwest corner of
Lot 426: commencing at a post planted
In the Northwest corner; thence 80
chains South; thence fO chains'East;
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains- West, to the point of commencement, containing 040 acres, more
or less, for agricultural.
Dated  January 15th.  1914.
HARRY   JOSEPH   WOODWARD.
H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVD ACT.
_    tavcovtbb xv*vp jpdj*bxc*„
District of Coast Beige X.
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Sim-
monds, of Vancouver, occupation Mar-
chant, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post ono milt distant and in a Westerly direction from
the Northwest comer of Lot 435; commencing at a post in the Southwest
corner; thence North 80 chains; thence
East 80 chains: thence South 80 chains;
thence West 80 chains to the point of
commencement, containing 140 acres,
more or less; for agricultural. •
. Dated January 16th, 1914.
GEORGE   A.   SIMMONDS,
H. G. Adams, Agent
X.AVD AC*.
tavcovtbb xvavb dutbxc*
.   District of coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that George Douglas
Bevoridge, of Vancouver, occupation
Broker, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Northeast corner and at the Southwest
corner of Lot 421; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains North;, thence
80 chains East; thence 80 chains South;
to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated  January 13th,  1914.
GEORGE  DOUGLAS  BEVERIDGE,
H. G. Adams, Agent.;
XVAVD ACT.
VAVCOVTBB  XVAVBDXSTBXC*
District of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Miss Clara Sim-
rrionds, of Vancouver,: occupation
Housekeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—- .•■','•"•'/'■
Commencing at a.post planted one
mile distant, and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of Lot
421; commencing at a post planted in
the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains
West to beach; thence following the
beach in a South-easterly direction to
the West entrance of Blunden Harbor:
thence in a North-easterly direction and
North to. the point of commencement;
containing 320 acres, more or less,, for
agricultural.:
Dated January ,13th,  1914.    ;
MISS CLARA SIMMONDS,       ,
H. :G. Adams, Agent.
.        XVAVD AC*.     : ■ ...
Gibson, of Vancouver, occupation Spin
star, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles distant, and in a Northwest
direction from the Southwest corner of
Lot 421; commencing at a post in the
Southeast corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West; thence
80 chains South; thence 80 chains East,
to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 13th. 1914.
BARBARA JEAN GIBSON,
,H. G. Adams. Agent.
▼AVOOVTBB XVAVB  DXSTBXC*
Distrtet ef Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Miller, of
Vancouver, occupation, Undertaker; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile and one-half distant and in a
Southerly direction from the Southeast
comer of Lot 542; commencing at a
post in the Southwest corner; thence TO
chains North: thence 80 chains East;
thence 40 chains South to beach; thence
following the beach 80 chains in a
Westerly direction to the point of commencement containing 420 acres, mora
or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 20th, 1914.
DANIEL  MILLER,
H. G. Adams, Agent
i ——————.
XVAVB ACT.
East; thence SO chains South; thence 40
chains West to the beach; thence following the beach 40 chains in a Westerly
direction; thence North SO chains to
the point of commencement, containing
600 acres, more or leas, for agricultural.
Dated January 27th. 1914.
JOHN MacDONALD.
>   ,. H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AO*.
TAVOO'
XVAVB
Distrtet of Coast vaaura X.
TAKE NOTICE that Harrold A.
Rourke, of Vancouver; occupation,
Freight Clerk: intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at-a poat planted about
40 chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southwest corner of
T. L. 41022; commencing at a poat in
the Northwest corner; thence St chains
East; thence SO chains South; thence SO
chains West; thence SO chains North
to the point of commencement containing 640 acres, more orxless, for
agricultural. v-
Dated January 86th, 1914.
HARROLD A. ROURKE.
H. G. Adams, Agent
SaASffV AO*.
TAVCOV .
of coast Baag* X.
TAKE NOTICE that  Thomas Carta,
tit, of Vancouver; occupation* Lumberman; intends to apply for permteston to
following     described
tht
purchase
lands:—
Commencing at a poat planted about
40 chains distant and in a Southerly
direction from the Southwest corner of
T. L. 4479; commencing at a poat to the
Southwest comer; thence it ohalne
North; thence St chains East; thence 4t
chains South to beach; thence following the beach In a Weeterly direction
St chains to point of commencement
containing S2t acres, mom or leas, for
agricultural.
Dated January 29th. 1914.
THOMAS CHRISTIE.
H. G. Adams, Agent.
xvavb ao*.
TAVOO'	
Distrtet of Coaat Baag* X.
TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Clifford
White, of Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following Ascribed lands:—
Commencing at a poat planted at the
Northwest corner of Lot 4X6; commencing at a post in the Southeast corner; thence St chalns^North; thanes St
chains West; thence St ohalne South;
thence St chains East to the point of
commencement, containing 646 . acre*
more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 22nd, 1914.
SIDNEY CLIFFORD WHITE.
H. G. Adams. Agent
XVAVD AC*.
TAVOOVTVB XVAVD XKSyBXC*
Distrtet of Coast Baag* X.
TAKE NOTICE jthat Samuel do Winter, of Vancouver; occupation. Telegrapher; Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Northwest corner of Lot 426; thence 40
chains North; thence SO chains East;
thence 40 chains South; thence 80
Chains West to the point of commencement, continlng 326 acres, mom or less,
for agricultural.
Dated January 32nd, 1914.
SAMUEL DE WINTER.
H. G. Adams. Agent
*4V» ACT.
TAWCQ
$$S£*
XVAWD BXXJVBXC*
*    -   .coast Beaftl.
TAKE NOTlCfc that Ada"**. Btvor-
ldge, of Vancouver; occupation, married
woman; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
4 miles distant and in a North-westerly
direction from the Northwest corner
of Lot 425, commencing at a post in
the Southwest corner, thence SO chains
North; thence 80 chains East; thence
so chains South; thence 80 chains West,
to the point of commencement containing 040 acres, more or loss, for agricultural.
Dated January 31st. 1914.    —
ADA M. BEVERIDGE,
H. G. Adams. Agent
XVAVB AC*.
rAKE "notice
*•*» DXffTBXO*
^ ..^.      CoastJMagt j.
TAKE NOTICE that George Hemlyn,
of Vancouver; occupation, workingman;
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands :—
Commencing: at a post planted about
3 miles distant in a Northwest direction
from the Northwest coraor of■■ Lot 425;
thence 40 chains west; thence 80 chains
South; thence 40 chains East; thence
SO chains North, to point of commencement, containing-320 acres, more or less,
for agricultural.
Dated January 21st, 1914.
GEORGE HAMLYN/
H. G. Adams, Agent.
,"-.\"'.- -.X>AW»^4»C*.•-':;:
YAVOOVTBB.XVAVB DXSJTBXC*
District of Coast Baage 1.
; TAKE NOTICE that Edgar Lees, of
Vancouver: occupation, logger; Intends
to. apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southeast corner of T. L. 1122—thence
80 chains West; thence 60 chains South;
thence 80 chains East; thence 00 chajns
North to the point of commencement,
containing 400 acres, more or less, for
agricultural.
Dated January Silst, 1914.
EDGAR LEES,
:s .".•'■■..:■■   H. G. Adams, Agent
■■ ■ XVAVD AC*.-?
TAVOOVTVB. XVAVD BSSTBXO*    ,
District of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Brown, of
Vancouver; occupation, Widow; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
_ Commencing at a post Planted at tht
Southeast comer of Lot 842; commencing at a post in the Northeast comer;
thence 60 chains South; thsnee SO chains
Weit; intnes 80 chains North; tbonco
80 chglns East to the point of commencement, containing 140 acros. mort
or loss, for agricultural ,
Dettd January 24th. 1914.
ANNIE *>ROWN.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAXfB ACT.
TA^8S8WI o^v^Sre0*
TAKE NOTICE that John SUne, of
Vancouver; occupation, Longshoreman;
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in a Southwest direction from the Southwest comer of
T. L. 41022; commencing at a post in
the Southwest comer; thence 40 chains
North; thsnee 80 chains East; thence
80 chains South to the beach; thence
following the beach in a Northwest direction 80 i chains or to point of com-
mencem nt, containing 450 acres, more
or less, for agricultural.
Dot d January 26th, 1914.
JOHN SLINE.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD ACT.
TAKE NOTICE that Hans Harold
Arthur Anderson, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—
commencing at a post planted about
60 chains distant and In a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of
Lot 424; commencing at a post in the
Northeast comer; thence SO chains
South to the beach; thOnce along the
beach SO chains West; thence along
the beach North 60 chains to a point directly West from the starting point;
tence 75 chains East to the point of
commencement, containing 480 acres,
mors or less. for. agricultural.
Dated January 23rd. 1914. ■,'.-'■
HANS    HAROLD   ARTHUR   ANDER-
H. G. Adams, Agent
/X^/.^XVAVP AO*.;* V;
TAVOOITYXm XVAVB DXSTBXC*
District ef Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Jasper Nation,
of Vancouver; occupation, Hotelkeeper;
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
; Commencing at a post planted at the
Southeaet corner, of Lot 542; commencing at a post In the Northwest corner;
thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains   North   to  the   point   of   com-
encement,, containing 640 acres, more
or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 25th, 1914.
'    JASPER NATION. .
H. G. Adams,- Agent
XVAVD AO*.
TAVCO
XVASTD DXsV*BlC*
ment, containing 260
leas'; for agricultural.
Dated January 21st 1914.
FRANK B. TAYLOR.
H. G. Adams, Agent
TAVOOtTTVVt XVAVD DXSVBXC* '-
Distrtet of Coast Baag* x.
. TAKE NOTICE that John William
Bradshaw, of Vancouver; occupation,
Mechanic; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following do-
scribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
4 miles distant in a Northwest direction from the Northwest comer of Lot
426; thence 40 chains West; thence SO
chains North; thencs 40 chains East;
thence SO chains South to the point of
commencement, containing 3X0 acres,
mom or less, for agricultural.
Dated January Xlst. 1914.
JOHN WILLIAM BRADSHAW.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AO*.
Distrtet of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE that Leo Mayne, of
Vancouver; occupation. Telegrapher;
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
2 miles distant in a Southerly direction
from the Southwest comer of Lot 426;
commencing at post plaated la the
Southeast comer; thanes St chains
Wast; thence SO > chains North; thanes
SO chains East; thanes St chains South
to the point of commencement containing 646 acres, mors or loss, for agricultural. ^
Dated January 84th, 1914.
LEO MAYNE. - <
H. G. Adams. Agent
TAVOOVTBm XVAVD XWffXUO*   .
Distrtet of coast Baaga 1.
TAKE NOTICE thatMartha Adelaide Kay, of Vancouver; occupation,
Spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant in a westerly direction
from the Southeast corner of Lot IS;
commencing at a post in ths Northwest
comer; thence St chains East; thanes
60 chains South; thanes SO chains West;
thence 60 chains North to the point of
commencement containing 600 acres,
mom or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 23rd, 1914.
MARTHA ADELAIDE KAY.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AO*.
TAVCOOYBB XVAVD BtamUO*
Distrtet of coast Baag* 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence
Hartje, of Vancouver; occupation. Engineer; Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile and a quarter distant, and in a
South-easterly direction from the Southwest corner of T. L. 44 86; commencing
at a post in the Southeast corner;
thence 80 chains North; thence SO
chains West; thence 30 chains South
to the beach; thence following the beach
In a South-easterly direction SO chains,
or to the point of commencement, containing 620 acres, mom or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 27th. 1914.
LAWRENCE HARTJE.
H. G.! Adams. "Agent
XVAVD AO*.
YAVCOVYBB  XVABTD   DXSTBXC*
' District of Coast Baage X.
TAKE NOTICE tha t Charles H.
Bailey, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase     the      following    .described
\ J* Til's * i   i r ,- . - "  y
. Commencing at a post planted about
one mile distant. and in a Westerly
direction from the Northwest corner of
Lot 425; commencing at a post in the
Southeast corner; thence ' SO chairm
North;   thence   89   chains  West;   thence
YAVCOVYBB XVAVD DXBVBXC*
District of Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Norval E. Mall-
ahan, of Vancouver; occupation, advertiser;   intends   to  apply  for permission
to purchase the following lands:—■
Commencing.at a post planted at the
Southwest corner of Lot 426; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains South;
thence SO chains East; thence SO chains
North, to the point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less, for
agricultural.
Dated January 22nd, 1914.
NORVAL   E.  MALLAHAN,
'.■■'. H.; G. Adams, Agent.
/V.3VAVD AC*.
XVAVD AO*.
■V
YAVOOVYBB XVAVD  DXSTBXC*
Distrtet of Coast Baage 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Bertha B. Lazier,
of Vancouver; occupation, married woman; intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
SO chains distant and in an Easterly
direction■: i.-om the Southeast corner of
T. L. 4479; commencing at a post in the
Southeast corner; thence 00 chains
West; thence 10 chains North; thence
40 chains East; thence 31 chains South
to the beach; thence following the
beach 60 chains in a South-westerly di-
TAVCOVTVB XVAVD  DXSTBXC*
Distrtet of Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that John Harold Al-
bertson, of Vancouver; occupation,
Logeer; intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:— ' • \\ •■.'••.
Commencing at a post planted about
1 and a half miles distant and in a
Southerly direction from the Southwest
corner of Lot 424; commencing at a
post in the Southwest corner; thence 60
chains North; thence 80 chains East;
thence 70 chains South to beach; thence
following the beach SO chains West to
the point of commencement, containing
520 acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 26tb, 1914.
JOHN   HAROLD   ALBERTSON.
H. G. Adams, Agent
XVAVD AC*.
Distrtet ef coast Baags l.
TAKE NOTICE that Sinclair A. Alch-
inleck, of Vancouver; occupation. Miner;
intends to apply for permlslon to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
4 miles distant In a Westerly direction
from ths Northwest comer of Lot 425;
commencing at a post in tht Southeast
comer; thence 80 chains North; thenco
•0 chains West; thence 80 chain* South:
thenco 10 chains East to tht point of
commencement, containing 840 acres,
mom or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 21st, 1914.
SINCLAIR A. AICHINLECK.
H. G. Adams, Agont
XVAVD AO*.
TAKE NOTICE that Jam*? vino, of
Vancouver; occupation, Cook; intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest comer of T.
L. 4487; commencing at a post in ths
Northwest corner; thence 80 chains
East; thence 60 chains South to beach;
thence following tho beach lu a Northwesterly direction SO chains or to point
of commencement, containing 200
acres, more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 28th, 1914.
JAMES VENO.
H. G. Adams, Agent
ENGRAVING—
CTCHINGS, AND HALFIOJB
ARE NOW BONG MADE W
WESTERN CANADA BY TOE
MOST SATISFACTORY PRO.
CESS r^WN TO THE WORLD
HIE "ACID ■LAST" PRCKXsb'
MAKES YOUPt ILIUSTRATIQK3
 LITERALLY TALK ~*&**%
VAMUTACTUaCO IN. *ttTS*N CAMS*
.lilandDibru (hc(:
toon  womo   HvO<
- 3 ,\-
g-
IV"
.< * r
v-.
S3. Mary tht) Virgin, tsMtth Hill.
S\
."■■* >
'-C
(Cor. Prlaee AlWrt St aai^tvc Ara.)
t:N Asi.—Holy luekartat
U:W Am.—afatlat a*4 temot.   -
(LaU eelesrausa oo lot sad tfi
SaBdaya). 'v
t:M pax—ChlMmoi's Bs^rloe (TMrt
ItuUsy).
4:«t  ».«.,  Holy  BaxHtoit   (»a«fft
Tklrd Iwaiay). /   ' '
T:S# ».at--l^ta«o»seT ABi SsTastv..
Tlear, Rev. Owea Bulkaley. aJLC
SuaaV Scaool aa4 Bible Ctssttas
•very staasay (axetft tklrol), aftar-
boob, si I o'clock, IB BL lUryw Par-
lok Hall, alto Mob's THslty rtrtallssT
•vary Tkuralay otcbIbi al t o'clock. ,
TAVOOVTBB X*AVX) DUSBXC*
XHstrtet of coast B«ur> L_   ,
TAKE NOTICE that HoTfon Evens
Sands, of Vancouver; occupation. Broker; intends to apply for permlslon to
purcbast tbt following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast comer of Lot
(42; commonclng at a post in the Northwest comer: thence 86 chains Bast;
thence SO chains South; thsnee 88
chains West; thence 80 chains North
to the pott of commencement, containing 300 acres, mors or Isss, for agricultural.
Dated January 26th 1914.
HOLTON EVENS SANDS.
H. G. Adams, Agent,
XiAVB AO*.
▼4VC0
TAKBWTICE that Florence 'Mall*
nan, of Vancouver;  occupation, Press
maker; intends to apply for permission
to purchase the   foil—'—    * ■*—■
lands:-'
to purchase the    following    described
XVAVD ACT.
▼a:
XfX»JPXB*BXCT
Vistriot of Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry.Washington Steele, of Vancouver; occupation.
Carpenter; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— -
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in a Southeast direction from the Southwest corner of
T. L. 4487; commencing at a post in tht
Southwest corner; thence- 60 chains
North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80
chains South: thence 60 chains in a
Northwest direction, or to the point of
commencement,, containing 600 acres,
more or less, for agricultural.
Dated January 28th. 1914.
HARRY   WASHINGTON   STKELE.
H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVD AC*.
TAVOOVTBB XVAVO X>XV*B|C*
XHstrtot of Coast Baage 1.
TAKE NOTICE that William Seymour, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of
T. L. 4483; commencing at a post in the
Southwest comer; thence 70 chains
North; thence 80 chains East; thence SO
chains South to beach; thence following the beach in a Westerly direction
SO chains to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more or less,
for agricultural.
Dated January 20th, 1914.
WILLIAM SEYMOUR.
H. G. Adams, Agent
Commencing at a post planted about
2 and a half miles distant and in a
South-easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at
a post in the Southwest corner; thence
40 chains North; thencs 70 chains East;
thence 40 chains South; thence 70
chains West to the point of commence
ment, containing 300 acres, more
less, for agricultural.
Dated January 26th. 1914.
FLORENCE MALLAHAN.
H. G. Adams, Agent
Thf Boy§• 3rig«4e
XJeye? Bagtts preeetjts (sjiMiej. Oav
A largo and enthusiastic crowd witnessed the 4tn annual inspection and
presentation of prises of the 5th Vancouver Company Boys' Brigade on Friday. 24th Inst, at St Paul's Presbyterian Church.
The company was called to attention
and received Capt J. W. Warden of the
6th D. C. O. B. with the salute, after
which Capt. Warden, accompanied by
Mayor Baxter and Rev. H. R. Grant,
minutely Inspected the ranks.
Under the comand of Capt H. Flddes
the boys then went through various
evolutions in company drill, showing
neatness, smartness and precision in all
their movements, calling forth loud applause. The figure marching with
lanterns and bayonet drill under Lieut.
Balrd were much enjoyed, while the
people were loud in their praises of the
fine work of the boys in wand drill and
free gymnastics.
* The ' camp scene showed originality
and a great deal of humor, and wan
greatly enjoyed, especially by those
°r I who had the privilege of visiting Bowen
island with the boys during the past
summer.
*AVJ* AC*.
TASK
10*
TAKE  NOTICE'  that"Arthur  Barr-
able, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;
&Ajrxi PVtTBX
Coast xjaafex
that  Arthur
„_-„   ,     r; occupation, B .
intends to apply for permlslon to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Northwest corner of Lot 640; thence SO
chains North; thence SO chains East;
thence 10 cheis South; thence 80 chains
West to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural. ..,
Dated January 22nd, 1914.
ARTHUR BARRABLE.
H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVP AO*.
XVAVD ACT.
VAVCOVTBB XVAVD  DXSTBXC*
XHstrtot ef Coast Baage 1.
.TAKE NOTICE that John MacDon-
ald, of Vancouver; occupation, Railway
Clerk; intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southeast corner of T.
L. 44IC; commencing at a post in the
Northwest   corner;   thence     80     chains
TAVCOXnrVB XVAVD DXBVBXC*
District of Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Peter Freeman,
of Vancouver; occupation. Book-keeper;
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing a* a post planted at the
Southeast corner of T. L. 1122; thence
80 chains South; thence 80 chains East;
thence 80 chains North to the beach;
thence following the shore line in a
North-westerly direction 80 chains or
to the point of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less, for agricultural. . ■'■.
Dated January 21st, 1914.
PETER FREEMAN.
■,'■■   H. G. Adams, Agent.
XVAVD ACT.
TAVOOVTBB XVAVX>  DXSTBXC*
XHstrtet of Coast Bangs 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank E. Taylor, of Vancouver; occupation. Broker;
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Northeast corner of T. L. 1144; thence
80 chains West; thence 80 chains North
to the beach; thence following the
beach  in  a  South-easterly  direction   SO
TAVOOVTBB XVAVD DXVTBXO*
pistrtet of Coast Baage 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Teaeger,
of Vancouver; occupation, Brewer; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of Lot
425; commencing at a post in the
Northeast corner; thence SO chains
South; thence 80 chains West: thence
80 chains North; thence 80 chains East
to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, mors or lass, for agricultural.
Dated January 15th. 1014.
HENRY TEAEGER.
H. G.Adams, Agent.
ST. SAVIOUR'S CHURCH.
(Anglican.)
Corner of First Avenue  East and
Semlih Drive, Grandview.
Rev.   Harold   St.   George    Buttrum,
B. A. B. D-, Rector.
Residence, the Rectory, 2023 First
Avenue East.
SUNDAY SERVICES — Morning
prayer and Holy Communion the first
and third Sundays of the month at 11
a. m.; morning prayer every Sunday
at 11 a. m.; Holy Communion 2nd and
prayer every Sunday at 7:30 p. m.
All heartily welcome.
Mount Pleasant Baptist Churah,
Cor. Tenth Ave. and Quebec St.
Preaching Services—11  a.m.    and
7:>»
S.m.   Sunday gehonl at 2:20 +r*
Psstor, Rev. A. F. Bek«r. 6-l«h Ats.. Ka»t
The exhibition on the parallel bars
under Lieut. R.-Fiddes was perhaps the
best event of the evening, the boys
showing remarkable skill and doing
many things that called for a great deal
of strength and ability. The beautiful
tableau* were the source of round after
round of applause. All previous records by the boys were broken in high
Jump, Sergt. J. Woosnam clearing 4 feet
11 Inches, and Just failing to clear 6
feet, while Col.-Sergt Harry Tarlton
came a splendid second with 4 feet 10
Inches.   ■■■■-.. ■ v;",'--<";-
At the close the Inspecting officer expressed himself very much surprised
at what he had seen that evening. .
The work of the boys, he said, was
marvelous. Their drill was equal to
anything he had-ever seen, comparing
very favorably with many of the best
regiments either at home or abroad1
when one considered the short time they
had been in training. p
He highly complimented the boys on
the high standard of efficiency they
had attained.     -
After a brief report on the year's
work, by Capt. H. Flddes, Mayor Baxter
said he considered it, indeed, a very
great pleasure to have been present that
night, for, he said, he was amazed at
the great work that was being, done bv
St. Paul's for the boys, and the church
had every reason to be Justly proud of
such a fine set of lads. He dwelt at
some~ length on tho great evils of the
city which face every boy, deploring
the tremendous havoc ttiat the drink
traffic of the city was doing amongBt
our young boys, and welcoming such a
movement as the Boys' Brigade in the
city. He said he only wished there-were .
more companies organized. If there
were fifty churches in" the city with
fifty companies of the Boys' Brigade,
he said» the whole complexion of the
city would be changed, for to get. right
men we must got right boys' He could
not speak too highly of what he had
seen that night. It had been.a genuine
pleasure for him to be present, and It
was. a still greater pleasure to him to
present Capt."Flddes with the beautiful
Seymour cup which had been won by
the 5th Vancouver company, and which
was emblematic of the championship of
British Columbia.
With = a few complimentary and encouraging words His Worship then presented the prizes to the following boys:
Gymnastics—Senior. Corp. Robert Mc-
Farlane; 2nd, Corp. B. Jackson.
Junior—L. Corp. R, Oke; 2nd, Pte. J.
Melville.
Essay competition—Pte. Forest Walker.
High Jump—Senior, Sergt. Joe Woosnam: JJunior, Pte. A. Lewis.
Progress Prize—Pte. C. Mcintosh. .
Squad Medal—Squad ,; 2, under Sergt.
Harry Thorley.
A hearty vote of thanks was given to
Col.-Sergt. Harry Tarlton. together with
a small gift as a token of the gratitude
of the company for his services as pian-'
ist The meeting dispersed with the
singing of God Save the King.
V- a
THK  WBHTBRN CALL
BBBBBBSJSBSSSBBBBBBnaSSBBBBBSBBBSBBlSSi
l'_ :T - Friday. May 1,1914
Address by Dr. McKim--" Why We Are Protestants"
K ' (Continued from Page 6) --'*-    ,
behind you, when you die, besides your money, affectionate relatives who are willing to spend your
money for masses on your account you may hope
-that your term of suffering in purgatory will be
shortened.   But if you are poor, your only recourse is to join a "Purgatorian Society," in
which, by a small weekly payment, a sum may be-
accumulated which may be put to your account
. in the spiritual bank of purgatory, the key of
which is kept by the priests.
Now, if this be true, then the atonement of
our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ was not sufficient to take away sin. It must be supplemented
by purgatorial fires. Then all those precious assurances of forgiveness and redemption in His
blood, of adoption into the family of God, and
of obtaining a joint inheritance with Christ, are
to be made void; and we are to turn away from
the cleansing blood of Christ to the cleansing fire
of purgatory. Our Saviour said to the dying
thief, "Today shalt thou be with me in paradise;"
but according to this interpretation he must have
meant, Today shalt thou be with me in purgatory.
And when St. Paul expressed aMesire "to depart,
and be with Christ; which is far better," he must
have meant a desire to depart, and be in purga-
toryl
Liberty in Christ
0, my brethren, if there were no other reason
CLOSED YEAR WITH
$36,500,000 SURPLUS
. Despite the financial depression of
the past year, Hon. Mr. White was
able to present, in his speech, a statement .which shows that the position
of the Dominion was never bettr, and
that the present finance minister has
ably and skilfully brought the ship of
state safely throflgh a period of commercial difficulty. The revenue for
the year was $163,000,000, and the expenditure $126,500,000, leaving a sur-
over and above the
amount required for expendiutre
upon current account of no less than
$36,500,000.
for refusing to surrender to the Church of Rome,
this would be all sufficient. We are Protestants
because we refuse to barter away our liberty* in
Christ for such miserable bondage as this. (Applause.)
We hear the voice of the omnipotent and compassionate Redeemer saying in tones of infinite
tenderness and sympathy, "Come unto me all ye m
that labored are heavy laden, and I will give  £ *    •
you rest"   And shall we turn away from him   iv c *   c
and go into that-soul trap, the confessional box,
and ask one of their priests>to give us rest?
The Protestant churches point to Jesus Christ
and say to penitent men, "Behold the Lamb of
God, which taketh away the sin of the world."       ^ ^
"Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt    White       b<jen aWe
be saved '   "Thei Spirit and the bnde.say Come.  \
And let him that heareth say, Come.   And let him    hist
that is athirst come.   And whosoever will, let
him take of the water of life freely."   And our
souls reply:
"Just as I. am, without one plea/
But that thy blood was shed for me,
• And that thouHbid'st me come to theej
O; Lamb of God, I come, I come."
(Concluded Next Week.)
Three Surpluses
During the past three years Mr.
■M"M j ft' |'W»^»»*WvyvvvvvvvtW»»»*»»»«WWHWWWW t t 11 l"t 1' M 1-HjM' t***********
Government of British Columbia Land Sale
There will be offered' at public auction in the cities of Vancouver,
Victoria and Prince George, British Columbia, the Government Holdings.    |
in the Townsites of Prince George, Port George and South Fort George,
comprising in all 2,350 lots.
Dates'of sales-^ *
May 19, 20 and 21, Vancouver
May 26 and 27, Victoria
\ June 9,10 and 11, Prince George
For full particulars1, descriptive literature and maps, apply—
Armstrong & Ellis
Selling Agents for Government of British Columbia :
Head Office: 804-5 Birks Bldg., Vancouver, B. C.
< >
■i..H..M"t"H'*'M'M'M"M''M"I'^
I Pease Pacific Foundry Limited g
HEVTINa AND VENTILATING ENGINEERS
-MANUFACTURERS
, •» Steam Heaters and Ventilators for Public Buildings
*• Cr, ««.«■ *wm«» » Steam Heaters and Ventilators for Public Bulk
EL/IintJlTI V       Warm Air Furnaces — Combination Furnaces
uvviiviu;        Steam and Hot Water Boilers. Registew
•< IHahI " Steam and Hot Water Boflers
1U C Cll      Radiators. Pipe and Fittings
1136 Homer St.      Vancouver, B.C.     Tel. Sey. 3230
H'4"H"H"M-**4"H'*'H''H'*»*^^
<«
*
t
For the year 1911-12 the surplus
was $37,000,000.
For 1912-15 the surplus was the
record one of $55,000,000.
For the year 1913-14 the surplus is
$36,500,000.
This is a record of which Mr.
White and the Conservative party
may well be proud.
"The year 1911-12 showed, therefore,'" added Mr. White,''"a reduction in the net debt of $122,591,.32,
and last.year a reduction of $25,617,-
835.03.' This year we shall show an
increase of $19,000,000, but notwithstanding this the net debt of the Dominion will be over six million less
than it was two years, ago. Since
Confederation there are shown in the
public accounts only eight reductions
in the net debt of Canada, of which
two belong to the present regime."
::
::
CANADIAN MENACE IS
SENT THROUGH MAILS
Ottawa,   April  25.—The   Canadian
Menace of    Aurora, Ont., an    anti
Roman   Catholic  publication,   which
was recently refused the , mails    in
common with the Menace, a United
States namesake, has now been ad-
Jimitted to the mails.    It" is published
\ J J. at Aurora.   The question of rates has
< •. still to be dealt with.
I  '' I .       >      •     :
\ [i   The Railway Commission has' or-
• > i dered substantial reductions in freight
',', j rates in Western Canada.   How long
|) j would the West have, had,to wait for
.H"M"t..H'.H"M"M«H,frlM''M"H'lW
JOS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
4   I
4   »
4   >
910-11 Yorkshire Building j;
Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C. ::
}.,|..i..|..t..x^H''i"i'-i"t--i'-t":-»-;"i»i"|Mt"|..:l.t-.iMi.,|i.i..;..|l.i.>i,.t.
Kmmloopm-Vmnoouver IHIemt Oo„ Ltd.
Oo*. Mmfn tmd PowmU Stm. 1849 Mate Sfromt
Phone Seymour 6561 Phone Fair. 1814
For Choice Meats
of large variety and reasonable prices, this house
cannot be excelled.   It stands to the very front.
/
\ ru.rH''M"M"t"M''Wt1111 niTfl-Tl-lfit111 VT H-H T T Hi'H-T T T T! * riT'f"!"f"l">"'"i"»"t"t"t"<"t"t"t">,*,tlli"t">">l*'» that under the Laurier Government?
M************ »|"t"t"I"l"l"t"t"t"l"t"t"l"t''l"H"t"l"H"t"l"l"l"»
South Shore Lumber Co.
1 LIMITED
Lumber Manufacturers
4>.
I Front St., Foot of Ontario St.
PHONE Fairmont 154       VANCOUVER, B. C- $
HHHHMIMIMHHJinini 111 m m i i i :tm t- -' i—---' nit T IT 1T j ' T'" " '''''" ' l*ll**llliri i i*******************-* WWM+*W***+*WM***MJ*WW*+*+*WMW4MWti*ww*4i+*4
13500
Horse
Power
Turbine
13500
Horse
«•
«f
V
.%
x
«•
«■
v
t
♦
*
+
Power
Twrbine
The Spirit of the Time Demands
,   ^^^,   ECONOMTOAb   i^CTVVER
^Stave Lake Power is Dependable and Economical
By harnessing the Great Stave River we bave made it possible to generate 100,000 horse power of electrical energy at our Stave Falls Plant,
the Bio-crest Electrical Feat in Western Canada.
100,000 HORSE POWER
Or half asjnuch again as the combined connected load in steam and electricity in Vancouver today, a fact of great significance to local industries
Offices: 603-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg.
Phone: Seymour 4770
■      w\ . R. F- HAYWABD, General Maaaesr
WESTERN CANADA POWER CO.; LM.
JOHN   MONTGOlttBT, Contract Agent
P.O. Drawer 1418
Vancouver, 6.C.
J 111 I I I 111 It 1 f I T • " -~ •-' ^ J •■■';• '•- —--';-■'-' -'■ •-'-«-*- .-'-»->-

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