BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Western Call Apr 17, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xwestcall-1.0188379.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xwestcall-1.0188379.json
JSON-LD: xwestcall-1.0188379-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xwestcall-1.0188379-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xwestcall-1.0188379-rdf.json
Turtle: xwestcall-1.0188379-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xwestcall-1.0188379-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xwestcall-1.0188379-source.json
Full Text
xwestcall-1.0188379-fulltext.txt
Citation
xwestcall-1.0188379.ris

Full Text

 Read Dr.  McKim's  Address  " r  J '   -    .J  rt,l l" ; Su|wcrlbe,for  ;;  The Western Call  Today  , ���������>",  Published in the Interests of Greater Vancouver and the Western People  '   1 ,H     t   j  ���������*  w V 3   Hi  VOLUME V.  VANCOUVER, British Columbia, APRIL 17, 1914  5 Cents Per Copy  No. 49  Immense Lumber Order Goiiw Begging in China  ! Hon. W. T. White Adds Yet Another Surplus to His Record���������Surplus lor 1913-14, Thirty Seven Millions  Sir Edward Carson and 110,000 Volunteers Stand Past in Ulster  SOUTH VANCOUVER  South Vancouver ip in the limelight once  again. Last Saturday' everyl school bylaw was  turned down by overwhelming majorities. Earlier in the week the council refused to make the  grant of $.7,500 asked for by the North Arm Harbor Commissioners.    Point Grey and" Richmond  - have" practically assured the commisioners that  their part of the necesary $30,000 would be forth-  Vcoming, and already tenders are being called for  for .the 'necessary' drilling, etc., on~which to base  the report required by the Federal Government.  Further delay in making~a start on Main  street paving is assured, and- the. weeks and  months roll on without a tap of work in our municipality. \  Meantime it is being said all over South Vancouver:  That Councillor Gold has discovered the truth  of the old adage "You can fool all the people  some of the time and some of the people all the  the time; but you'can't fool all the people all the  time."   i  That Councillor ^Gold "fooled" the reeve and  ' all the councillors," to say nothing of the ratepayers who elected him, early in the year into  supporting his foolish    and   vindictive    "two-  1 handed sword" scheme.  That he has ceased to fool some of the coun-  r cillors.  That he is still fooling others.  That it is amusing to watch   how   Edward  flatters tlie vanity of one and cajoles another .  into supporting his schemes.   ���������   ' \ -������   >    \  That he made a bad break when he accused  tbe old council of crooked work, in reducing the  . water rates.  That he showed-his hand too plainly.!"  . That as the representative of Messrs. .Gold,  and Company 'of vacant land owners Edward  tried to fool the council into the belief that there  is a deficit on the water department and tbat  the residents in South Vancouver should pay  more for their water so that the non-resident  owners of vacant property may get off scott free.  That Eddie seems to, regard the residents as  a lot of suckers.  That he has run the municipality into a nice  little lawyers' bill over the Main street paving  contract.  That his friend Woodwork's bill alone is $300  for telling the council he was "not satisfied" that  the contract would stand the test of the law  courts.  That Woodworth's bill was not the only one,  for outside advice.  That other lawyers had previously advised '  ��������� that the contract was sound in law. ,.  That taken all in all Edward has run the municipality- into -thousands of _ dollars unnecessary  cost in fighting his personal battle with the Po-  minion Creosotiqg Company, beside keeping'many  men out of work during the winter months:  That it would be interesting to know what interest he has in Granitoid?  That owing to Councillor Gold's bull headed  opposition to the North Fraser Harbor appropriation there is a strong possibility of South  Vancouver being left out of the proposed harbor  - developments.  That there are two channels on the North Arm  only one of which has frontage in South Vancouver.  That the commisioners, if they have to put up  with much more of Edward's nonsense, may decide to ignore South Vancouver and to deepen  the second channel, which is entirely in the municipality of Richmond.  That the demand for a monthly financial statement while it appeals to the gallery is unnecessary, as the Harbor Act provides that the books  of the commisisoncrs shall be inspected each year  by the auditors of the municipalities interested.  CARLINE ON 56TH AVENUE '  VICTORIA TO KERR STREET  South Vancouver, April 15.���������The board of  works this afternoon in response to representations from the improvement association of the  district, appointed Reeve Dickie and Councillors  Rutledge, Thomas and Twiddy a committee to  interview the B. C. E. R. as to the establishment  of a carline'on 56th Avenue from Victoria road  to Kerr Road.  VANNESS AVENUE  South Vancouver,  April 15/���������The board of'  works this afternoon authorized Councillor Rut-  ledge of Ward I arid Councillor Thomas, chairman of the board, and Mr. Bennett, the engineer,  to fix the grade of Vanness avenue.  North Vancouver, April 15.���������The bridge across  the Second Narrows wttl not be built for some  time, owing to rather serious complications with  the firm of Sir John Wolfe-Barry. ll  a  *^8fe������**  WARD CARSON  Vancouver Traders Wake Up  (From our Own Correspondent) Ottawa, April Xi.  The Western Call, Vancouver, R. 0.:  Hon. G. JS. Foster, minister of Trade and Commerce, it making special efforts to advance tbe trade activity of the Pacific Coast. He baa secured reports of the demand for timber  in tbe Orient which amounts to seventy-five million feet per annum, most of which is now supplied in Oregon. _   i  Tbe Chinese trade prefer, bowever, British Columbia lumber trade/and it is now up to  our mills to supply tbis demand; tbe market is there; it only requires going after. Mr. foster  also has encouraging reports re tbe demand for flour, which trade is also largely in control' of  Americans, but already, as tbe results of our efforts, Canadian flour shipments have increased  largely. This demand is capable of unlimited expansion, and Vancouver shippers, both of  lumber and flour, should cultivate tbis market by sending representatives to China fully equipped.  There is information now at Ottawa that an order for over ten million feet of lumber is going a  begging from China at attractive figures.   What is the matter with Vancouver traders?  PREMIER RACK FROM OTTAWA  Victoria, April 15.���������Sir Richard McBride returned to the city today after a four weeks,'  absence, and made the interesting announcement  that the Rt. Hon. R. L. Borden expects to visit  British Columbia during this coming summer���������  probably the latter paut .of it. Sir Richard did  not intimate whether he had the Lord High Com-  missionership in his grip or not.  latest Prom U. S. A.  Washington, April 15.���������The U. S. Atlantic  fleet has been ordered to Tampico, and a. naval  demonstration-on the Pacific coast of Mexico-has-  also been ordered. It is probable that Tampico  land Vera Cruz will be seized and. held until  President Huerta gives in���������but what will happen  if Huerta does not bow to the demands of Admiral  Mayo is still uncertain.  MILLIONS FOR ROADS  Ontario Highways Commission Recommends Expenditure of $30,000,000  Toronto.���������The Ontario Highways Commission  recommends a capital expenditure of $30,000,000  on the roads in, the province, extending over a  period of fifteen years, the province to contribute $12,000,000 of this, the various counties $12,-  ,000,000 and the cities $6,000,000.  GETS 55 PER CENT. OF  STREET CAR EARNINGS  Fraser River  "'. Water is steadily deepening through the new  north channel of the Fraser river mouth, soundings taken this week show that at no point in the  channel is there less than twenty-eight feet of  water at ordinary tide. The action of the current is. rapidly .cutting this channel deeper, while  the dredges are engaged in widening it. The  channel, while narrow, is deep and safe, and shipping is now using it though the buoys have not  been moved from the old channel.  At the present rate of deepening and widening, the prediction of "Forty feet from New  Westminster.tp the Sea," will be fulfilled in less  than the three months allowed the dredges and  current by the enthusiastic supporter of the river  route when he made the prophesy a few weeks  ago.   .-���������������������������'.���������'.'���������'  LADNER FERRY  Leaves Steveston at 9:30 a.m.  Leaves Steveston at 4:30 p.m.  Cateh the 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. cars from Eburne.  Catch the 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. cars from  Vancouver to make connections with the Ladner  ferry. ,  Chicago, April 9.���������The city of Chicago will  receive $3,599,000 as its share of the net earnings  last year of the surface street railways, according to the annual reports of the companies, made  public today.  Under the terms of a franchise granted the  surface lines eight years ago the city receives 55  per cent, of the net earnings.  Trans-Atlantic Despatches  Belfast, Ireland.���������The Belfast Rope Works  has allied itself with the Grain Growers' Association, and Jthis season will supply binder twine  to Western Canada.  At least 600 tons of twine will be shipped to  Fort William from here before July, and if neces:  sary this amount will be doubled. This arrangement will take Western Canada out of the hands  of the Twine Combine".  Leeds, England, April 15.���������The Yorkshire  coal miners' strike, involving more than 170,000  men, has been called off. The strike began on  the 2nd of April.  Telegram re Fraser River  Charles Hodgson, Harbour Commissioner South  Vancouver.  I have always held that first step should be  to open out mouth of River which would result  in more rapid development in upper reaches.  This is being done. You deserve all possible  support. H. H. Stevens.  Ottawa, April 15th  STORM CENTER IN IRELANB  There has been quite .a   shake up   in the f  Motherland during the paat three weeks, and'  even now many can hardly make up their minds  as to what has happened and what effect the  crisis will have oh the future of Ireland and'the  -,  Empire. , ���������    -.  The fight has been a bitter one.  More ao,_ perhaps, than any struggle, since the Reform hill   -  days.   And it came measurably near ending in a  tragedy.  Out of the turmoil one figure stands in bold   ,  relief���������Sir Edward Carson���������clear headed, fear--  less and wise he has guided his. party through the '-  storm. /-  Having everything���������he has risked all and Won v,  a bloodless victory that gains in importance as  the days go by and calmer views .prevail.  What will happen nextf   It ia hard to say;  but this we can say will not happen���������a million  Protestants will not be put under the rule of  Rome by any political combination that cap be  .  formed.      If   Home    Rule   is    to    be   given   .  at    all    it    will    be    given    all    round-r*nd '  Bourassa has just as much right to, ask tnfet  New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince EdwasoVv  Island be joined and subject to Quebec as Red-.  mond haa to ask that Ulster be ruled from Dub-  lin.  The Irish are not one racially, they are much  further apart in this respect than the Quebec  French and the Nova-Scotians, and they ire ab- ,  solutelyiat^dagger* drown religiously.  The irishman, outside of Ulster, is an1 evty  going, devil-may-care, jovial spendthrift (as a\'  rule). The Ulsterraan is the hard headed, keen  business man week <mys, and the best preserved,  type of a Puritan; on Sunday. To try and mix  these.two���������Uj;a political crime, attempted, only because of the exigencies of party politics..     -  The whole world owes a debt of gratitude to  > Sir Edward Carson and his Ulstermen in de- *  monstrating that there is still a people' on earth'  that cares enough about their religion to risk  everything for the privilege of maintaining it.  These are days when most Protestants seem  to think that true religion consists in not having  any religious convictions at all, and Ulster has  given the Protestant world an example of priceless  worth.  The storm center this1 week seems to be Lima-  vaddy, where Protestant and Nationalist yolun-  teer^are drilling almost side by side, and a spark  might set the whole country ablaze.  Limavaddy is a small town in Derry a few miles  northeast of Londonderry.   Limavaddy is famous  for having a unique railroad charter, wherein it  is allowed to run one train each way on Sundays,  but the locomotive is forbidden to whistle on that  "day. - - ^   Limavaddy is also famous for being the birthplace of our worthy fellow townsman Mr. John  McGatty, ex-president of the Ward I Conservative Association, South Vancouver.  But in spite of rumors of possible fights���������the  "atmosphere has been cleared���������by the consistent  and determined stand taken by Sir (Edward Carson and a host of Britain's noblest sons backed  by 110.000 of Ulster's stern brood.'  Redmond may orate and Devlin rave but the  fact stands out clearer and clearer that Ulster  will not be enslaved.  The part the British army officers���������and rank  and file, has played in this struggle brings a  glow of honest pride to every true Briton's heart  ���������given ten minutes to decide by his superior���������  it took General Gough less than ten seconds to  give a full arid final answer that none could fail  to understand, and with him stood���������unafraid���������  practically all his fellow officers.  HON. W. T. WHITE ADDS  ANOTHER SURPLUS TO HIS RECORD  Mr. White, in his third Budget speech was  able-to add another to his series of record surpluses of the past two years.  The surplus for 1913-14 was, thirty-seven millions. The series is unique in the history of Canada.  The total revenue for 1913-14 was $163,000,-  000, nearly six millions less than that of 1912-13.  This is relatively satisfactory as, following the  financial depression of 1907, the country's revenue decreased by eleven millions.  The consolidated fund expenditure for 1913-14  was $126,500,000, an increase of $14,500,000 over  the previous year; The increase in the net debt,  of the country on the year's operations will be  nineteen, million dollars. Following the 1907 financial crisis, the increase was $46,000,000.  As was expected, important changes in the  tariff were announced, including a reduction in  the duty on farm implements below the rate provided for in the proposed Reciprocity agreement  of 1911. ,',r^  ''   " , 'V. -  -VvT   '<.\    -,   '   '-.  r 2  THE WESTERN CALL.  Friday April 17,1914  Law- Druggist  Wants to See You  Address by Dr. McKim  Rector of Protestant EpiscopaJ Church, Washington, D. C.  "Why We Are Protestants"  We have again opened our  Soda Fountain  for the summer season and  we can give you better service than ever. This department of the store is under  the care of an experienced  man, one who understands  the art of putting together  soda drinks and ice cream  dishes that gratify. All our  crushed fruits are the best  that is obtainable and our  syrups are True Fruit Syrups. As for the Fountain  itself, we invite inspection.  We give you the names of  a few of our latest Ice Cream  Specials, which are extra  fine.  SPECIALS  Tango  Summer Girl  Hesitation  Panama  American Beauty  Law the  L#t "Mining,    .  Broadway and Main  Phone Fairmont 790  PHONE FAIRMONT 1M2  (MithereaihcelflOO)  (A Trust Company)  is nothing less than stored labour  and the more a man saves the  less he himself will have to work  because he has stored labour at  his command.  Hfoney saved and put away  safely on depositisa worry Killer  and a gloom dispeller, while common sense thrift in the long run  brings greater happiness than  extravagance ever can. If you  have not already done so  Open a Savings Account Here  with us.   We pay 4 per cent, on  deposits, subject to your cheque  12 Times a Year  Specially insured against burglary  and hold-ups.  NOTARY PUBLIC  Dow, Fraser & Co.  LIMITED  317-321 Cambie Street  2313 Main Street  Between 7th and 8th Aves.  McKay Station, Burnaby  Mr. Chairman, Brethren, and Fellow Citizens:  I hail the presence of so many ministers of different Protestant churches and so many leading  members of different Protestant churches in this  vast auv 5nce as an evidence that the pressure  of the conflict with Borne is drawing us closer together (Applause.) We are finding out, I venture to say, that the things in which we agree are  more important by far than the things in which  we differ.    (Applause.).  A Word of Explanation  Now, sir, no apology is necessary at any time  for setting forth the reasons why we occupy the  position we do; but, as you have already intimated, Mr. Chairman, the time is opportune for this  exposition of the Protestant faith, because of the  Mission to "non-Catholics," as they offensively  call us, recently held in St. Patrick's church, for  the express purpose of proselyting our Protestant people. Why, my friends and brethren, so  eager were the Paulist Fathers to let us know  all about it that some of them, or one of them, or  some representative of theirs, came into the vestibule of my church and tacked the notice of the  lectures on my bulletin! Well, I took notice!  (Applause.)  In the Mission, the doctrines of Protestantism  have been assailed, as usual, and every argument  known to those skillful controversialists has been  employed to seduce Protestants from their allegiance. In these notices and in the public press,  Protestants have, as I have said, been dominated  "non-Catholics." Now we resent that nomenclature. We Protestants are '' catholics "in the  true sense of the word. In our creed we say, "I  believe in the Holy Catholic church," and we do.  On the other hand, we refuse to yield to the  church of Rome the name "Catholic." It is the  greatest arrogance for that church to appropriate  that great and venerable term. I know of no\\  church upon earth that has so little claim to be  called Catholic as the church of Rome.  Under the circumstances now described, it has  been felt by the ministers at whose invitation I  am here, that the time is opportune for a definition and a defense of the Protestant faith.  Now, I am not here to attack the Roman  church, but to defend Protestantism from the attacks which'have been leveled against it. But in  repelling these attacks, it will become necessary  to expose some of the contradictions and absurdities and inconsistencies that are involved in the  doctrines of that church. I, however, am not responsible for that; but those who by assailing  our faith, and doing everything m their power to  draw our people from their allegiance; have made  it necessary for us to expose what we believe to be  tho unreasonableness of the faith of the Roman  church.  Proteitantism Not a Series of Negations.  Now, first of all, and before entering particularly upon exhibition of the grounds upon which  we protest against the doctrine and''practice of  the Church of Rome, \ desire to make two brief  preliminary remarks. The first is that Protest-  ism is not, as commonly represented, a mere series  of negations,���������denying error rather than affirming truth; repudiating false doctrine rather than  proclaiming the true. No; we write the word Pro-  testantiiph our escutcheon in its full etymological  significance. A Protestant is one that bears witness for any person or thing; and a Protestant  church is one that bears witness for Christ and;  bis gospel in the world. It is a name not to be  ashamed of, in either its origin or its history.  When our Jjqrd Jesus Christ stood before Pilate,  hT saidtohinSselfVT " T6~this"ena^^  for this cause came I into the world, that I should  bear witness unto the truth." Humbly treading  in the footsteps of her divine JJord, the Protestant church goes forth into the world having this  as her aim, that she may "bear witness unto the  truth."  Lot was a Protestant when he stood alone for  God in the midst of wicked Sodom. The Jewish  nation, was Protestant, standing among the nations of the earth, a witness for the unity of God,  the supremacy of conscience, and the sancity of  the moral law. And, supreme instance! let it  never be forgotten that Christ and his apostles  were Protestants in their day. They were  Protestants for the truth of God, against  the traditions and corruptions of the  Jewish hierarchy, the established church  of that day. And they not only bore witness for the revelation made in the incarnation .  of the Son of God, but they bore witness against  the false doctrines of the scribes and Pharisees,  the chief priests and elders of the church. In  like manner and in fulfillment of the injunction  of the great Head of the church, our Protestant  churches bear witness among men today, not only  positively, for "the faith which was once delivered unto the saints," but negatively, against  the manifold corruptions of that faith for which  the Church of Rome is responsible. And, therefore, they bear on their escutcheon the glorious  word Protestant,���������the witness bearers.  Protestants Are Not Heretics Nor Separatists  The other introductory remark I have to make  is that though we are Protestants, we are not  heretics nor separatists. |! (Applause.)  In 1868 the late Pope Pius IX. addressed letters  '' to Protestants and other non-Catholics,'' inviting  them,to return to the bosom of the Holy Mother  Church, as the only means of insuring their salvation.  Now, we deny that we have ever separated  from the Catholic Church. One of the articles of  our faith is, "I believe in the Holy Catholic  Church,'' and in this we claim and enjoy full  membership, by the same Spirit which joins in one  communion and fellowship "the blessed company  of all faithful people." In fact, the Pope and his  adherents are the innovators and heretics who  have departed from "the faith once delivered,"  who have corrupted the Christian creed; and not  the Protestants, who have rejected Rome's novelties and returned to the creed and the practice of  the primitive ages of Christianity. Yes, it is the  Church of Rome, and not the Protestant churches,  which, by her errors and usurpations has separated herself from the Catholic Church of Christ.  When she departed from the primitive faith, she  became heretical; and when she made the acl  knowledgment of her erroneous and strange doctrines a condition of membership within her communion, she then forced upon men the alternative  of separating from her or of abandoning the  faith which they were bound to "contend for."  Luther and Melanchthon, Calvin and Beza.Cran-  mer and Ridley and Latimer,���������all that noble  band of reformers in the sixteenth century, chose  the former alternative. They decided to obey God  rather than men. Were they therefore heretics!  Was it heresy to obey Christ and Christ's unchangeable truth rather than abandon these for  the sake of union with a Church which had apostatized from the faith and required all her members to acquiesce in her apostasy?���������jNay, was  not she the heretic who, abandoning the Holy  Scriptures as her guide, taught for doctrines the  commandments of men? Let it be remembered,  also, that as far as the Church of England was  concerned, the reformation was a rebellion  against a foreign yoke, and the restoration of the  original ecclesiastical authority. The British-  church had existed for centuries in entire independence of Rome. It had produced martyrs to  the faith in the reign of Diocletian. It had sent  bishops to the Councils of Aries (A.D. 314), Sar-  dica (AD. 347), and Ariminum (A.D. 359). It  had held numerous synods of its own. As to its  orthodoxy, St. Jerome and St. Chrysostom had  both borne testimony to it. But it was not until  ,the seventh century that the Church of Rome  gained a footing on the island. Her pretensions  to exercise authority over the British church were  resisted^ The bishops of the native church (refused to yield their customs or to receive Augustine as their archbishop, tfhey resisted for more  than a century the attempt of Rome to bring  them into subjection. In short, the Church of  England of that day became Romanised only  after an ineffectual protest and a prolonged resistance on the part of the native episcopate.  Scripture Versus Tradition  - Now, my friends, I Come "to the substantive  part of my address this afternoon. Why are we  Protestants? I reply, First of all, we are Protestants because we build our faith and hope on the  impregnable rock of Holy Scripture, and not on  the shifting siinds of ecclesiastical tradition.v The  Bible, and the Bible alone, is the basis of the religion of Protestants; but tradition, interpreting  the Bible, and often superseding it and contradicting it, is the basis of the religion of Romanists.  (Now when I use the term Romanist, J beg you  to observe that I am using a terra which has for  authority no less a: person, than John H. Newman himself, for he published a book called "Lectures on Romanism and Popular Protestantism."  Therefore, if instead of calling that church the  Catholic church, I speak of it as Romanism, I am  simply adopting the language of John H. Newman.) We follow the teachings of Jesus Christ  and his apostles in building our faith only on the  revelation of truth contained in the Bible.  "Search the^Scriptures," Christ said. The  Scripture cannot be broken., '  The Church of Rome, on the contrary, builds  her doctrines upon a double basis,���������the Bible and  tradition; but by making tradition the authoritative^interpreter oi the Biblershe really restsruoV  upon the teaching of the Bible, but upon the  teaching of tradition-  Now, that is a serious charge. I wish to prove  it. The creed of Pope Pius TV., which was published in A J). 1564, and has ever since been the  universal symbol of doctrine in the Roman  Church, declares as follows:  \ 1. "I most firmly admit and embrace the  apostolical and ecclesiastical traditions, and all  otber observances and constitutions of the said  church.  2. I admit also Holy Scripture, according to  that sense which Holy Mother Church, to whom it  appertains to judge of the true meaning and interpretation of the Sacred Scriptures, hath holden  and still holds."  Now compare with this the language of the  Council ofTrent: "The Holy Ecumenical and  General Council of Trent <. . . receives and  venerates with equal affection of piety and reverence all the books of the Old and the New Testament, . ��������� . as also the said traditions, as  well those pertaining to faith as to morals,  preserved in the Catholic Church by a continuous  succession."  A Fundamental Error  Here, then, is the first,, as it is the fundamental, error against which we protest,���������the making  tradition, i. e., the alleged oral teaching of the  apostles, handed down from their times, of equal  authority with the written word of God; and the  declaration that the Sacred Scriptures are to be  admitted only in the sense in which the Roman  Church explains them, The sixth article of the  Church of England declares, on the contrary, that  "Holy Scripture containeth ail things necessary  to salvation; so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man that it should be believed as  an article of faith." When this is denied, the  very foundations of the faith are sapped. Our  feet no longer stand on the rock of,God's written  Word, but upon the uncertain and shifting sands  of tradition. No wonder that the Church of  Rome has been "carried about by every wind of  doctrine," since she has cast anchor upon such  treacherous ground. For, mark you. as if it were  not a sufficient impiety to declare the traditions  (Gontlnuttf on Pag* 7)  Terminal City Press, Ltd.  203=207 Kingsway  Your Printing Orders will   ^  receive prompt and careful attention.  Pti0N.E Fairmont it4o  and ask for our prices. S  ADVERTISE IN THE WESTER  Office of THE WESTERN CALL  203-207 KINGSWAY, Cor. 8th Ave.  Commercial Prive and 14th Avenue  "The Home of Quality"  MM  Pest Quality  Groceries  jV P. Sinclair, Prop.  ffy)|)f) U^M 1033  ^!"l"^"^���������^^^^^^^^^*^^i^^^^^'^^^'^^^'<^'^l4'^l''^'^^^^'^^^������i^''l���������i^^^'i*'l'^^'t|H^���������^'^^���������^*���������l'������<^���������|>  API  50x100, corner 29th Ave. arid  St. Catharines Street, modern  7-room house.  YOUR OWN PRICE FOR CASH  APPLY WESTERN CALL  "f* .J~H������������������4������������������*4���������*^���������H'������M���������*'���������H~i^^  Terminal City Press, Ud,  24U Westminster Rd.  Pliose Fairnoit 114i - a*'  >������i.c^v<\..Y^f'1  Friday, April 17,1914  IBB WESSSSBN GAUi.  LAND ACT NOTICES  4&AH2> ACT.  V4ftJVOOtrt7E& LAND DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  ' TAKE NOTICE that Harry 4Prank  Lazier, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted 4 miles  distant in a Westerly direction from the  Northwest corner of Lot 425; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains West;  thence 80 chains South; thence 810 chains  East, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural. ���������'.  Dated January 16th, 1914.'   .  HARRY  FRANK LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  . XiASD ACT. VV:  ���������AHCOUVSK liAHD  DXSTBXCT  XHrtrlet of Coast Baaga X.  TAKE NOTICE    that Bert Minor, of  Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends  to apply for permission to pu/chase the  following described lands:���������,  .   Commencing  at  a   post   about    two  miles  distant,  and  in   a  Westerly  direction  from  the Northwest corner of  Lot 425, commencing at a post in the  Southeast   corner;     thence     80   chains  North;  thence 80  chainB West;  thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East  to  tha  point  of    commencement,   containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated  January  16th,  1������14;  BERT MINOR.  H. G. Adams, Agent  -:;> .  ,       XtAXTB ACT.  V  v   VAMaovraa, babd dxstbxct  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Charles  Falconer, of Vancouver, occupation  Clerk, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������,  ,:. Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421;, commencing at a post in the  -Northeast corner; thence West 80  chains; thence South 50 chains; thence  following the. beach 80 chains in a  South-easterly direction; thence 80  chains North-to the point.of commencement; containing 500 acres, more' or  less, for agricultural.  Dated  January  15th,   1914.  ARTHUR   CHARLES, FALCONER,  ��������� H. G. Adams, Agent  ���������    SABTB AC������. ' ���������'���������  ���������AHCOUTSB XiABS DXSTBXCTv  " District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Black,  of Vancouver, occupation Telegrapher,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  West end of Robison Island high water  mark; thence traversing the beach in a  South and Easterly course to the East1  entrance to Blunden Harbor; thence  'traversing the beach In a North and  Westerly; direction to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more  or less, for agriculture.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HERBERT BLACK,  H. G. Adams, Agent  ���������AHOOmrBB XJUVD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bange X.  V TAKE NOTICE that Kate E. Hen-  ahaw, of Vancouver, .occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:��������� :..���������;' -..   ���������  ������������������..:  -   Commencing at a post planted at the  -Southeast corner, about, one mile distant and In' a Westerly "direction from1  .the Southwest corner of ..Lot 421; com-  : 'menclhg at a poBt planted in the Southeast comer; thence 80 chains West:  thence 80 chains North; thence- 80  chains East; thence 80 chains South to  the point of commencement, containing  640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  ,    Dated January 16th, 1914.  KATE   E.   HENSHAW,       c  H.G. Adams, Agent.  V   X.AWP act.   ���������������������������.'  TAVCOJTTM iJHtp DXHTBICT  District o? coast Bray* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Joseph  Woodward, of Vancouver, occupation  Book-keeper, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������.  Commencing at a post planted about  one  mile distant    and    In a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  In  the Northwest    corner;    thence    80  chains   South;   thence   80  chains   East;  thence   80   chains    North;     thence   80  chains   West,     to   the     point  of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more  or less, for agricultural-  Dated  January   15th.  1914.       V  HARRY   JOSEPH   WOODWARD.  W G. Adams, Agent.  X.AWP ACT.  ;  TAKE NOTICE that George A. Slm-  monds,  of Vancouver, occupation/ Merchant, intends to' apply for permission  to   purchase   the     following   described  ���������JandB:��������� ���������,  Commencing at a post one mile dia-  , tant and in a Westerly direction from  the Northwest corner of Lot 425; commencing at a post In the' Southwest  corner; thence North 80 chains; thence  East 80 chains; thence South 80 chains;  thence West 80 chains to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  mora or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 16th, 1914. ���������>.  GEORGE   A.   SIMMONDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  fcABP ACT.  YMCOUVBB XiAWD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bus* X.  TAKE NOTICE that George Douglas  Beveridge, of Vancouver, occupation  Broker, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands::���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner and at the Southwest  corner of Lot 421; thence 80 chainB  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South;  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated  January  13th,   1914.  GEORGE   DOUGLAS   BEVERIDGE.  H, G. Adams, Agent.  80 chains South; thence 80 chainB  East, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  CHARLES H. BAILEY,  ; H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VABCOVVSB DAXTD DXSTBXCT -,  XHstrlot' of Coast Baage X. ,  . TAKE NOTICE that Harry George  Adams, of Alert Bay, British Columbia,  occupation Cruiser, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described lands:���������,  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 40 chains East; thence 40 chainB  South; thence 40 chains East to beach,  following the beach in a Southerly direction to the Southeast corner of the  Indian Reserve; thence traversing the  survey of the Indian Reserve Northwest and South to the beach; thence  West along the beach to a point one  mile directly South from the Southwest corner of Lot 421; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HARRY GEORGE ADAMS.  ' H. G.-Adams, Agent.  XiAXfD ACT.  VABCOITVBB  XkAXTS   DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Baage X.  TAKE NOTICE that Leonard G.  Eveson, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chainB West; thence 80 chains North;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing - 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  LEONARD  G. EVESON,V  H. G. Adams, Agent.  VBiUm'ACT.;.:'���������'.'���������-;��������� ;;������������������'.;':  VABCOWBB  DABD   DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Baage X.  TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward  Mellor, of Vancouver, occupation Capitalist, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������,'.  Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post In . the  Northeast: corner; thence 80 chains  South; thence 20 chains West to beach;  thence 60 chains Northwest along the  beach; thence 50 chains North; thence  80 chains East to the point Of commencement, containing 580 acres, more  or less, for agricultural;     :  Dated January 13th, 1914.  JOSEPH EDWARD MELLOR,  H. G. Adams. Agent. , ,  -   DABD ACT.. V  VABCOUVXm DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Baaga X.  TAKE NOTICE that William Ryan, of  Vancouver, occupation Laborer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described' lands: i,    ,   ,  ���������, Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant, and In a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  In the Northeast corner; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence > following the beach in an Easterly direction 80 chains; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 14th, 1914.  WILLIAM RYAN,  . ���������." ��������� H. G. Adams, Agent.  ��������� ' ' ��������� '   -  DABD ACT.v V  rection to the point of commencement,  containing 600 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29tb, 1914. v  BERTHA B. LAZIER,  H. G. Adams. Agent.  DABD ACT. *  VABCOUTBB XiABB DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* i.  TAKE NOTICE that Jane Dodds, of  Vancouver; occupation, spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in an Easterly  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 422; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West to beach; thence following the beach In a Northerly direction  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 600 acres more or less, for  agricultural. .  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  JANE DODDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABCOUTBB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coaat Baas* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Rose Hamilton,  of Vancouver; occupation, widow; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  -Commencing at a post planted about  10 chains in a Westerly direction from  the, Southwest corner of Lot 422; commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East to beach  of Cohoa bay; thence following the  beach In a South and West direction to  the East entrance of Blunden Harbour;  thence in a North and Easterly direction to the point of commencement  containing 480 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.   Dated January 23rd, 1914.  ROSE HAMILTON.  H. G. Adams. Agent.  :'        DABD ACT.       ���������''  TABCOUVBB DAXfD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that FredC. Mock, of  Vancouver;     occupation,     broker;     intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about 60  chains distant and  in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L.  4479; commencing at a post in the  Northeast  corner;    thence    60    chains  West; thence 40 chains South to beach;  thence following the: beach in a Northeast direction to the point of commencement, containing 200 acres, more or less,  for agricultural. ....  .  Dated January 29th, 1914.  FRED C. MOCK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.        ''V'  DABD ACT.  VABCOWSB  DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baage X.  TAKE NOTICE that Miss Clara Slm-  monds, of-, Vancouver, occupation  Housekeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands :���������  Commencing at a post planted one  mile distant; and In a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of Lot  421; commencing at a post planted in  the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  West to beach; thence following the  beach in a South-easterly direction to  the West entrance of Blunden Harbor;  thence in a North-easterly,direction and  North to the point of commencement;  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January l'3th,  1914.  MISS CLARA  SIMMONDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  TAfSpWVBB ***������ JPXSTBICT  -������������������������������������������������������   Dittrlot of Coast ftanfo X.  TAKE * NOTICE that Barbara Jean  Gibson, of Vancouver, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted about  two miles distant, and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Southeast' corner; thence 80 chains  North; thence'80 chains West; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East,  to the point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th. 1914.  BARBARA JEAN GIBSON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ��������� ' . ;��������� frAWP>WLV;;V    V  VABCOUYBB Z.AWD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bros* I.  TAKE NOTICE that Ada M. Beveridge, of, Vancouver; occupation, married  woman; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant and in a North-westerly  direction from the Northwest corner  of Lot 425, commencing at a post ln  the Southwest corner, thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains West,  to the point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated"January-21st.-1914i���������- =-���������-^-���������  ADA M. BEVERIDGE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  X-AJTD ACT.  TABOO  BCOVTBB DABB BXBTBjSCKp  Distriot of Coast Baarc X.  TAKE NOTICE that George Hamlyn,  of Vancouver; occupation, worklngman;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  3 miles distant In a Northwest direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 425;  thence 40 chains West; thence 80 chains  South;   thence   40   chains  East;   thence  80 chains North, to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  GEORGE   HAMLYN,  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  TABOOITTBB *.UU> DXSTX4XCT  XHstrlot off Coast Bugs l.  TAKE NOTICE that Edgar Lees, of  Vancouver; occupation,  logger:  Intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122���������thence  80 chains West; thence 60 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 60 chains  North to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  EDGAR LEES,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABCOUTBB XiABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Norval E. Mall-  ahan, of Vancouver; occupation, advertiser;  intends: to  apply  for permission  to purchase the following lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 426; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  North, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural. ~  ���������  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  NORVAL   E.   MALLAHAN,  H.  G. Adams, Agent,  DABD ACT.  TABCOUVBB  DABD   DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bangs X.  , TAKE NOTICE that Charles H.  Bailey, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,  intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 80 , chains  North;   thence   80   chains   West;   thence  DABD ACT.  VABCOUTBB  DAXfD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Bertha B. Lazier,  of Vancouver; occupation, married woman; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the. following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and in an Easterly  direction from the Southeast corner of  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post ln the  Southeast corner; thence 60 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 30 chains South  to the beach; thence' following the  beach 50 chains in a South-westerly di-  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 40  chains West to tha beach; thence following the beach 40 chains in a Westerly  direction; thence North 10 chains to  the point of commencement, containing  600 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th.-1914.  JOHN MacDONALD.  H. G. Adams, Agent  XiABD ACT.  TABCOUTZB DABB  BXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coaat Baage X.  TAKE NOTICE , that Harrold A.  Sourke, of Vancouver; occupation,  Freight Clerk; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing-at a post "planted about  40 chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post In  tbe Northwest corner; thence SO chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence SO chains North  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 36th, 1914.  HARROLD A. ROURKE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABB ACT.  TABCOUTBB DAXVB DXSTBXCT  .    District of Coast Baage X.  TAKE  NOTICES that  Thomas Chris  tie, of Vancouver;. occupation, Lumber  man: Intends to apply for permission to  {lurchase     th*      fa '  anas:���������  purchase     th*     following     described  Commencing at a post planted About  40 chains distant and ln a .Southerly  direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post In th*  Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 40  chains South to beach; thance following the beach ln a Westerly direction  80 chains to point of commencement,  containing- 820 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th. 1914.  THOMAS CHRISTIE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ���������;���������   DAXfD ACT.  rABCOUTBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Miller, of  Vancouver, occupation, Undertaker; In-,  tends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and one-half distant and in a  Southerly direction from the Southeast  corner of Lot 642;' commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 70  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South to beach; thence  following the beach 80 chains ln a  Westerly direction to the point of commencement, containing 420 acres, mora  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  DANIEL  MILLER.  H,. G. Adams. Agent  ".-'���������&ABI) ACT.:-'' .   '  TABCOUTXOt ������Atf������ DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* I..  TAKE NOTICE that Annie Brown, of  Vancouver; occupation, Widow; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at th*  Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner;  thence 80 chains South; thence 10 chains  West; thence 80, chains North; thence  80 chains East to th* point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less,,for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914.  ANNIE faROWN.  . H. G. Adams. Ag*nt.  X*BP ACT.  patriot o? Coast lunl.  TAKE NOTICE that John Sline, of  Vancouver; occupation, Longshoreman;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the. following described lands:���������  Commencing at a poBt planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southwest direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post In  the Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South to the beach; thence  following the beach ln a Northwest direction 80 chains or to point of com-  mencem nt, containing 450 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th. 1914.  JOHN SLINE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABB ACT.' ���������" '  VABCpUTDB DABD PXSTBXCT  _���������    XHstrlot of Coast B������������r* ������*  ^TAKE ^NOTICE���������thatHans ^Harold  Arthur Anderson, of Vancouver; occupation. Logger; intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and In a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 424; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South to the beach; thence along the  beach 80 chains West; thence along  the beach North 60 chains to a point directly West from the starting point;  tence 75 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 480 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23 rd, 1914.  HANS     HAROLD   ARTHUR   ANDERSON.  ,      j H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB. DABB BXSTBXCT  Distriot of coast Bsagt 1.  TAKE  NOTICE  that  Jasper  Nation,  of Vancouver; occupation, Hotelkeeper;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following .described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot 642; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence 80  chains    North    to   the   point   of   commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 25th. 1914.  JASPER  NATION.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABB ACT.  TABCOUTBB DAXfD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Baag* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Clifford  White, of. Vancouver; occupation. Telegrapher; Intends , to apply-for permission to purchase the following de-  cribed lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; commencing at a post in th*; Sdutheast corner; thence 80 chains North; thence 10  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement containing 640> acre*  more or less, for agricultural.':  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SIDNEY CLIFFORD WHITE.  . - H. G. Adams, Agent  DABB ACT.  y  ,'   TABCOUTBB DAXfD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baajr* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Samuel de Winter, of Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post' planted at th*  Northwest corner of Lot 416; thence 40  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains Southi thence 80  Chains West to the point of commence-  mont, contining 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd. 1914.  SAMUEL DE WINTER.  H. G, Adams, Ag*nt.  chains or to  the point of commencement containing 260    acres, mora    or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  FRANK R TAYLOR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABB  XHstrlct of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE- NOTICE that John William  Bradshaw,. of Vancouver; occupation.  Mechanic; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted' about  4 miles distant in a Northwest direction from the Northwest corner of Lot  425; thence 40 chains West; thence 80  chains North; thence 40 chains Bast;  thence 80 chains South to the point of  commencement, containing 320 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  JOHN WILLIAM BRADSHAW.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DAXfD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE  that  Leo Mayne,  of  Vancouver;     occupation,     Telegrapher;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  2 miles distant in a Southerly direction  from the Southwest corner of Lot 428;  commencing at  post   planted    in    the  Southeast    corner; : thence    80   chains,  West;  thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural..  Dated January 24th, 1914.  LEO MAYNE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABB ACT.  I  XHstrlot of Coast Baas* l.  TAKE    NOTICE    that Martha Ada-  laid*   Kay,   of   Vancouver;   occupation.  Spinster;  intends to apply for permls- \  slon to purchase the following described  lands:���������    ���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant in a Westerly direction  from the Southeast corner of Lot 13;  commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East; thence  60 chains South; thence 80 chains West;  thence 60 chains North to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural. ,  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  MARTHA ADELAIDE KAY.  ,       H. G. Adams, Agent:  Who  ������anw<Ll������i4 tlie |NCt|B*?  who  shstterad-'us nnnoj)  Who  ���������lole Robert Camenxrf  DABB ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coaat Baag* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John Harold Al-  bertson, of Vancouver; occupation,  Logger; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 and a half miles distant and ln a  Southerly direction from the Southwest  corner of Lot 424; commencing at a  post In the Southwest corner; thence 60  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 70 chains South to beach; thence  following ~ the beach 80 chains West to  the point of commencement, containing  520 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  JOHN   HAROLD   ALBERTSON.  .   H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John MaeDon-  ald��������� of Vancouver; occupation, Railway  Clerk; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and ln a Westerly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L. 4486: commencing at a post in the  Northwest   corner;   thence     80     chains  DABB ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABB BXSTBXCT  XHstrlot off coaat Xtaag* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence  Hartje, of Vancouver; occupation. Engineer; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and a quarter distant, and. in a  South-easterly direction from the Southwest corner of T. L. 4486; commencing  at a post In the Southeast . corner;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West; thence 30 chainB South  to the beach; thence following the beach  In a South-easterly direction 80 chains,  or to the point of commencement, containing 520 acres, mora or less; for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  .LAWRENCE HARTJE.  H, G, Adams, Agent  If you win! to itsd  a real devei tocnttxf  stoty don't bum a*  new seriil we hff  to .print-"-  Hie  Lorcha  A tale of toe ibewa1  cunnmgoftbcOrienl-  tk It*i food from  the vary beginning, to  C* the Etta*  With the Fir*  Installment*  .!  DABB ACT.  TABCOUTBB DAXfB BXSTBXCT  XHstrlot off Coast Baag* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Sinclair A. Alch-  inleck, of Vancouver; occupation; Miner;  intends to apply for permision to purchase th* fallowing described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant In a Westerly direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 426;  commencing at a post In th* Southeast  corner; thence 80 chains North; thence  SO chains W*st; thence 80 chains South:  thence 80 chains East to th* point of  commencement- containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January. 21st, 1914.  SINCLAIR A. AICHINLECK  H. G. Adams, Ag*nt  **mi> +e*.  'Bpxsnwer  TAKE "NOTICE "that Ames* Veno, of  Vancouver; occupation, Cook; intends  to apply for permission to purchase tha  following described lands:���������  Commencing, at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of T.  L. 4487; commencing at a, post in the  Northwest, corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 60 chains South to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northwesterly direction 80 chains or to point  of commencement, containing 200  acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914.  JAMES VENO.  H. G. Adains, Agent.  TitBOOUTSB DAXfD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct off Coast Basso X.  TAKE   NOTICE   that   HoJton   Evens  Sands, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker; intends to apply for permision to  {lurchase     the     following     described  ands:���������   '���������.  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and In an. Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot  542; commencing at a post In tha Northwest corner; thence 35- chains Eaat;  thence 80 chains South; thence 35  chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the poit of commencement containing 300 acres; more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 25th I9f4.  HOLTON EVENS SANDS.  H. G. Adams, ^Agent.  The first instalment  ; :;.-V;':-of  The Sable Lorcha  appeared in our *  issue of Jan. 9.  We can Wpply back numbers  DAWP ACT.  ���������AEC55I'3 --wif-Bifwai���������  XHstrlot off Coast Bang* }.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Washington Steele, of Vancouver; occupation.  Carpenter; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southeast direction . from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4487; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 60 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South; thence 60 chains in a  Northwest direction, or to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914-  HARRY   WASHINGTON   STEELE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  JUUTD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of coaat Baag* l.  TAKE NOTICE that William Seymour, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; . intends to apply for permission. to  purchase the following described,  lands:���������  Commencing at a post plantod about  1 mile distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4483; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 70 chains  North; thence 80 chains Kant; thence 80  chains South to beach; thence following the beach in a Westerly direction  80 chains to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more oV. less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  WILLIAM SEYMOUR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABD DXSTBXCT ,  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Peter Freeman,  of Vancouver; occupation, Book-keeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing' a*, a post planted, at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chains North to the beach;  thence following the shore line in a  North-westerly direction 80 chains or  to the point of commencement, containing 600 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  ,   PETER FREEMAN.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DAXfD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank E. Taylor, of Vancouver; occupation. Broker;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following  described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner of T. L. 1144; thence  80 chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the beach; thence following the  beach   in a South-easterly  direction  80  DABP ACT.  TABOO  ������S8S3 c^bSST?^  TAKE NOTICE that Florence Malla-  han, of Vancouver; occupation, Dressmaker; Intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  2 and a half miles distant and ln a  South-easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot 642; commencing at  a post in the Southwest corner; thence  40 chains North; thence 70 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 70  chains West to the point of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or;  lesB, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  FLORENCE MALLAHAN.  H. G. Adams, Agent,  lVAlh *  (ETCHINGS ANDHAUTCNB  ^NOWPQNC MAJ* W  WESTCRN CANADA BY THE  MOST SATISFACTORY PRO.  OSS KNOWN TO THE WORLD  rHE 'ACID DUST" PROCIEIH  MAKES VOUR ILLUSTRATIONS  ��������� LITERALLY TALK   VANUfACTWdCO IN WESTERN CAN������A*  (i tl and Dihbit Ix^y  \ uin i>     i    i>  D4IBD ACT-  TAWCOUTBB D������*BB PXSTBXCT  Distriot vof coast Bans* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Barr-  able, of Vancouver; occupation. Broker;  intends to apply for permision to purchase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 540; thence 80  chains North; thence 80 chains1 East;  thence 80 chais South; thence 80 chains  West to the point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  ARTHUR BARRABLE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  TABCOUTBB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot off Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Henry Teaeger,  of Vancouver; occupation. Brewer; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and In a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of Lot  425; commencing at a post ln the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  HENRY TEAEGER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ST. SAVIOUR'S CHURCH.  (Anglican.)  Corner of First Avenue  East and  Semi in Drive, Grandview.  Rev.   Harold   St.   George   Buttrum,  B.A. B. D., Rector.  Residence, the Rectory, 2023j First  Avenue East.  SUNDAY SERVICES ���������Morning  prayer and Holy Communion the first  and third Sundays of the month at 11  a. in.; morning prayer every Sunday  at 11 a. m.; Holy Communion 2nd and  prayer every Sunday at 7:30 p. m.  All heartily welcome.  8. Mary the Virgin, South Hill.  (Cor. Prince Albert St. and 52nd Ave.)  8:00 a.m.���������Holy Eucharist.  11:00 a.m.���������Matins and sermon.  (Late celebration on 1st and 3rd  Sundays).  3:00 p.m.���������Children's Service (Third)  Sunday).  4:00 p.m., Holy Baptism (except  Third Sunday).  7:30. p.m.���������Bvenfons aad Sormoo.  Vicar, Rev. Owen Bulkeley, A.K.C.  Sunday School and Bible Classes  every Sunday (except third), afternoon, at 3 o'clock, in St. Mary's Parish Hall, also Men's Bible Reading,  every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.  Mount Pleasant Baptist Church.  Cor. Tenth Ave. and Quebec St  Preaching Services���������11   a,m.    and    ?:8t:  p.m.    Sunday School at 2:30 p.m.  Pastor, Bev. A. F.Baker. 6-I4th Avj.. Ea*t  Do not go about repeating the  statement that nothing affects the  temper like disease of the stomach; it would be better to say that  nothing troubles the functions of  the stomach like moody tempers.  -���������Paul Dubois. s  THE WESTERN CALL.  Friciay, April 17,1914  THE WESTERN CALL  PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY  4|������������J4^.|*'fr||'>l,'I'|fr,fr4M4V'4fr'4^'<fc'fr'M  BY THE  TERMINAL CITY PRESS, LTD.  HEAD OFFICE:  203 Kingsway, Vancouver  Telephonie Fairmont 1140  ������������������,        ......    .      .,    .    ....     j  Sunoorlptlont  One Dollar a Year In Advance  $t.BO Outride Canada  If you dp not get" CALL "regularly  it is probably because* your subscription  is long overdue. Renew at once. If paid  up, phone or write complaint today.  TO OUR FRIENDS  An Appeal and Reminder, Not a  Remonstrance  WHY BEFOBMS FAIL.  , Why do reforms so often fail, is a question  which' has been asked times without number. It  has been answered in many different ways. We  purpose giving an answer and a reason.  First���������Because   many���������-yes   most���������"Reformers" are indnoere.   They will "talk" but will  not sacrifice, or even extend their interest beyond " theory.''   Theory is good but men today  . demand action as well.  , About five years ago several men bought this  paper.; They planned to make it; the organ of  clean social life and a medium through which  reform could be advocated. In this role it has  succeeded. It stood for clean civic life and has  had marked influence in moulding public opinion  at critical times. . '"���������<. '~>:   l-i  :-.  We looked for support; from those who advocated that which we stood for. Through all these  years all the support we have ever received in a  business way from that element ha 8 been applications for free'advertising and printing. We  asked for no charity���������only a chance to compote  on fair terms.  We have refused thousands of dollars worth of  advertising from sources, the business of which  was contrary to our policy���������liquor ads.,- etc. Last  month we turned down $900 worth vof this "class  of advertising, because we felt it unfair to accept revenue from a business which we editorially  condemned.  The owners of this paper have spent about  $15,000.00 in the enterprise without receiving, as  yet, a single dollar of -returh���������yet we could easily  reap a handsome revenue if we would waive  this point. .     ���������   '���������, ���������,;  :  . Here then is one reason why reforms fail-  reformers do not support their own cause.   We  -get ^nyamountTof^encdiiragement^C verbal )=-and"  friendly blessings on our efforts, but that will  npt pay our printers and atafl.   ,'  So far this paper has steadfastly kept clear -  of all questionable advertisements. Once in a  while an ad. we do not like creeps in through  agents,, but so far the paper has been kept wonderfully clean. Many of our friends claim that  we are fighting an impossible battle���������that a newspaper is a commercial undertaking and'that we  should take whatever grist comes to our mill.  We confess that we have often been tempted so  to do. And'this is the first time our readers have  heard our plaint.  Now, you can help us fight this battle. If  you believe in our policy���������say so���������not by word  of mouth or letter only (although that is helpful)  but by paying your subscription���������if you have not  already done so. By helping us to get new subscribers, by renewing promptly and above all by  giving us a chance to do your printing and your  advertising.  We do not ask for charity���������if we cannot do  your printing, as weir and as low as others we  , will make no further demands' upon you, although we run a union shop and pay the highest  wages to our men. But if you think it of value  to have a paper run upon the principles under  ii which we have sought to establish the Western  Call, then you must stand with iis in more than  mere wishes, for our welfare.  "We do not expect to please you always���������indeed we will make no effort to do so. Our motto  has been���������is and always will be���������"Be sure you're  right, then go ahead." But if our general policy  for righteousness" has your approval, then dig in  with and for us and help us make it stick."  PERSONAL  Mayor Gray and Mayor Baxter . both seem  quite satisfied that government elevator is coming their way.  Mrs. Cissy Spark, late of St: Helens, England,  has arrived, and isy making her home with Mr.  and Mrs. James Nelson, 45th avenue, Collingwood East.  THE WORLD AT WORK  BY RAIL TO BABYLON AND GARDEN  EDEN  OF  Wonderful experiences lie in store for the  tourist in Bible lands witin the next year or two,  when the great Bagdad railway is nearer completion. Within the next two years it will be possible to journey from any of the great European  capitals, Paris, Berlin, or Vienna, to Demascus,  Nazareth, and Jerusalem by rail over the Bagdad  line, to say nothing of the Garden of Eden, and  then on to Mosul, that flourishing little village  which has sprung lip on the rains of ancient  Nineveh, while Bagdad, near which lie the remains of Babylon, that mighty city reared amid  such splendor by Nebuchadnezzar, will be reached, the engineers tell us, within three years-from  now. The line also touches on Tarsus, the birthplace of St. Paul.  ANOTHER WHITE  STAR  SHIP  PITT MEADOWS BORING  NOW 1060 FEET DEEP  Mr. J. O. Noggle, an oil driller, of New Mexico, who has been conducting the drilling operations of the Coast Development Syndicate at Sturgeon's Slough, nine miles up the Pitt river, is reported to have stated that in his opinion a good  flow of natural gas may be struck soon at the  borings.  The boring is now at about 1060 feet.  It is generally known after the recent investi-  ! gation of oilfield experts that Pitt Meadows  shows excellent indications of both oil and gas,  but the greatest difficulty has been to keep off the  water which is-encountered at low depth. The  cost pf boring the present well, which is the second one sunk by the company, is about $12,000.  Redemption of the Negro  There are over 14,000 negroes in the employ \  of the federal government. Their salaries, as reported by the Republican tampaign text book,  amount to $8,255,761. The highest salary is $10,-  000, paid to the United States minister to Hayti,  but a considerable number of colored government  officials receive salaries of from $2,500 to $5,000  per year. Nearly three hundred negroes are postmasters, while about three thousand are connected  with the postoffice department. There are a number of high grade negro clerks in the patent office at Washington. One of these is an expert  examiner who has held bis position for twenty-  two years- In the government departments in  Washington are 5,768 negroes on salaries. There  are forty-eight of them in the library of Congress.  Pining WltH the Kin*  Booker T. Washington, on his recent trip  abroad, dined with King Frederick, of Denmark,  and the royal family at the palace in Copenhagen,.  A CHINAMAN'S QRATITUPE  Joe CJioynsW, Pugilist, and Jim Ron,  Chinaman  Chicago.���������Joe Choynski, former pugilist and  now director of a Pittsburg sporting club, has  been left a legacy of $10,000 in the will of Jim  Pon, a Chinese whom the boxer befriended years  ago. Jim Pon died a few days ago, and his sons  l^d Ying and Bert-Yingrunable to open the safe^  in their father's Twenty-second street restaurant,  "The Garden o| the Seven Lillies," wired to their  oldifriend Choynski. The boxer reached Chicago  today, and with him brought a safe expert. In a  few minutes the big steel doors swung open, and  on top of a pile of papers was found Pon's will.  It named Choynski as executor and guardian of  Jim Pon's sons and awarded him a substantial  part of a good sized fortune.  Choynski's first act of kindness toward Pon  was in sending his boys to school. Later, when  Jim Pon became wealthy, he sent Ned Ying to  China, where the boy married. When Ned returned to America, leaving bis, wife and their  little child in China, he was halted by the immigration officials at Seatle, but Choynski again  came to his aid. He explained by letter Ned  Ying's American-birth, and had him re-admitted.  Choynski has arranged to have Jim Pon's little  grandson join his father here and also arranged,  in addition to Jim Pon's will, to have both Ned  Ying's wife and mother taken care of in China.  BACK TO THE BIBLE.  The following quotations are taken from the  Victoria Times, a good sign when a daily paper  strikes out on this line:  "It is impossible to mentally or socially enslave a bible reading people. "���������Horace Greeley,  founder of the New York Tribune.  "To my early knowledge of the Bible I owe  the best part of my taste in literature, and the  most precious, and, on the whole, the one essential part of my education."���������John Ruskin, famous English author and art critic, 1819-1900.  "There never was found, in any age of the  world, either religion or law that; did so highly  exalt the public good as the Bible."���������Sir Francis Bacon, father of modern philosophy.  "According to the testimony of Christ himself, it is a sign of reprobation to have a distaste  or aversion for the Word of God."���������His Eminence James, Cardinal Gibbons.  "The Bible is beter worth reading twenty  times than any other book is worth reading once."  ���������Albert S. Cook, Pn. D., L.L.D., professor English language and literature, Yale University.  Liverpool.���������The White Star line ordered yesterday another huge passenger steamship for the service between Liverpool and New York. The  new vessel is to displace 33,000 tons  and is to be an improvement on the  Adriatic type.  j',t'^'4'^il'4'4''t',I,'I''t''l',l',l,,HMHt,H',M,'t,,fr 'l"t"liiI"t"l"t"l"t"l"l"t"ii"t"l"l"!'i>it"l"lwM,<fr4',>  Look out for Startling Offer  NEXT WEEK  IN CONNECTION WITH  Western Call Subscription List  NEW SHINGLE MILL  FOR EBURNE  According to the agreement t!<at is  said to have -been arrived at, the  Huntting, Merritt Lumber Company  have purchased from Mr. E. E. Hig-  gins about four and a half acres of  ground on the river front, back from  Granville street, where they intend  to erect a large lumber and shingle  mill at a cost of some $50,000.  In consideration of the ^Huntting,  Merritt Lumber Company and Mr. E.  E. Higgins conveying to the municipality a 33-foot road allowance along  the western boundaries of their respective properties, in D. L. 318, the  company will be granted free water  by the municipality for use at the mill  until such time as the cost of the  water at the manufacturers' rate  amount to, $2,000, at the expiry of  which period the company will be  charged the regular manufacturers'  rate for the water. The municipality  also agrees to consider a good street  on the proposed road allowance, part  of which will be planked and part  macadamized.  Work is expected to be commenced  on the mill within a very short time  and to be pushed on as rapidly as possible, as it is the intention of the  company to have the mill in operation as speedily as possible.        .  t  Temperance  ���������!��������� ���������!��������� -t- -l- <��������� ���������!' '8- <��������� 1- ���������!��������� ���������>��������� ���������!��������� -t- ���������!��������� -t- ���������!��������� ���������!��������� ���������!��������� ������������������������ ���������> ������������������������ <���������������������**  ALL LIQUOR BARRED  INU. S. NAVY  Washington. ��������� Secretary Daniels'  order barring the use of alcoholic liquors in thee navy, effective after July  ; 1 next, was' generally discussed today  in naval and other circles. The or-  der, one of the most sweeping ever  promulgated by the navy department, not only abolished the traditional "wine mess" of the officers,  but will bar all alcoholic liquors from  , every ship and shore station of the  navy. Surgeon General Braisted recommended it after ah exhaustive investigation into the problem.  .The order was hailed with joy here  today Ky the prohibition forces, who  declare it will have a great influence  in the' furtherance of the temperance  cause.  When asked today to comment on  the order, President Wilson said it  belonged strictly to the department.  It is understood that the president  was not consulted by Mr. Daniels before he issued the order and no one  ^profj^ses^toJknfl^  president's approval: V  DEATH OF PRESIDENT  OF W. C. T. U,���������U. 8. A.  Portland, Me.���������Mrs. Lillian M. N.  Stevens, president of the National  Woman's Christian Temperance' Union, died last week.  Mrs. Stevens, who was born in Dover, Me., 70 years ago, continued to  the last in the temperance work to  which she had devoted most of* her  life:'   . '". "  Mrs. Stevens was informed a feu-  hours before her death of Secretary  Daniels' order barring alcoholic liquors from the navy.  "It is splendid," she exclaimed, "It  is another step forward toward national prohibition for which we are  so earnestly striving."  Her last words to those dut&idc  her home were:  "Give my love to all .white ribbon  friends in the state, the nation and  the world."  New Store at  Collingwood  The Richmond Store, Groceries  and Provisions, has opened up  in a new building, corner of  Kingsway and School Road,  and will supply a district with  a local store hitherto untouched.  Mr. Richmond, the proprietor,  promises courteous treatment  to all and the best goods at the  cheapest prices possible these  days.  FOR SALE CARDS HERE  t  ������Jm{~$~$M$~{m$������Jm5m$~$M$m������.$M$mJ������JwJ^~2wJ4^^mJ������Jm2.     ������jw{M^M{w{4<{>4J4<jw{.4{^4.{.l}..{..|ll{w{ll|4.}nj^������{������4J^MJ.  B, C. EQUIPMENT QO.  MACHINERY  DEALERS  CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS. ROCK CRUSHERS.   ELECTRIC.  STEAM   AND  GASOLINE HOISTS.    . WHEELBARROWS, TRANSMISSION MACHINERY,  GASOUNE ENGINES. PUMPS AND BOAD MACHINERY  OFFICES s 606^7 Baak af Ottawa IMff.       PIwm Soy. 0040 (Exchange to all Departments)  THE DIFFERENCE  Between paper  that is "good  enough" and  that which is  really artistic,  may be a trifle  in ccAt but infinite in satisfaction. Do it right  the'first time,  is our suggestion;  Estimates  PHONE  FAIRMONT  998  HOUSE   DECORATORS  S MNi*pY CK tU* m W* itrwit/iiriMir.Till 4?.  sppp POTATOES  ; "EARl-Y ROSE," choice quality, $2.00 per (00   >  "QRACe DARMNP" (IWfMirfWl IrHHKlWl) ������������S0 ������������������    "  You Can Rely on the Quality. ������  WE CARRY SE|,ECTEP UWN SEEP ANP FERTIMZER "  <������  Our Olmmomd Ooto* food contains all that is required t������ ,; *  >   rear healthy chicks. 0 ,  r.r. v$mm*  <   "Mm tumult iff        if ay. Grain anp Febd 189 iraMwijf Nit ,  i.������.������.������>������.������.������.������.f.������.������.������,������.  ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������'���������>t���������������������������#'���������"  1  f  2517 MAIN STRICT N.MR BROADWAY  ,������\  KNOWN AS  THE BB8T   ANP  OLDEST  ESTABLISHED CAFE IN MT. PLEASANT  BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCH 25c-U:30 TO 2:00  V  DINNER 5.00 TO 8:00 P.M.  SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS  J  *  i"|^"I"|"|"|"|.l}'l{'.^l}M|M{4.}M{4.{M|4.;..'j.l{..^M{l^������^M{.       ������{44^{w{4mJw^^^4������^������4^>{������������{.4{4������{4<{m{4^*^}4^������{4^w{^������  FRANK TRIMBLE REALTY CO.1  | Real Estate and Insurance Brokers J  CONVEYANCING  RENTS COLLECTED  | LOANS NEGOTIATED  I  PHONE Fair. 185 2503 Westminster Rd.  % Vancouver, B. C.  .i.,i,,i���������i$ww.,i..i..t������M..vw  ��������� ���������.-  DOMINION WOOD YARD CO.  Cor. Front and Ontario Sts.      Phone Fairmont 1554 |  All Kinds of Mill Wood  Stored Under Cover <-,,V-  ii-  ' it? T \ V -������.  m&'^^%T������.  V    -  l     -    i\X.1  "' ���������   .t  Friday April 17, 1914  THE WESTERN CALL.,  The  -w" Revealing  Angels  SUDDENLY and without warning they came  The Revealing Angels came.  Suddenly   and   simultaneously, through    city  i \ streets, '  Through quiet lanes and country roads they walked  They walked crying:   "God has sent us to find  I The vilest sinners of earth.  . We are to bring them befpre Him, before the Lord of  Life."  Their voices were like bugles;  And then all war, all strife,  And all the noises of the world grew still;  And no one talked; '  J And no one toiled, but many strove to flee away  Robbers and thieves, and those sunk in drunkenness  and crime, ..'..������������������..'���������,  Men and women of evil repute, 7  And mothers with fatherless children in their arms,  all strove to hide.  i But the Revealing Angels passed themi by,  Saying:   "Not you, not you.        .       ��������� -  Another day, when we shall come again  I Unto the haunts of men;   , . <���������'���������'���������.'.������������������'.;:.  ��������� Then we will call your names;  l.But God has asked us, first to bring to Him  [Those guilty of greater shames  [Than lust, or theft, or .drunkenness, or vice  JYea, greater than murder done in passion,  [Or self-destruction done in dark despair,  tofow in his Holy Name we call:  I Come one and all;  'Come forth; reveal your faces."  Then through the awful' silence of the world,  i, Where noise had ceased, they came  |, The sinful host's,  \They came from lowly and'from lofty places,  'Some poorly clad, but many clothed like queens;  ,They came from scenes of revel and from toil,  <    ������  From haunts of sin, froni palaces, from.homes,  From boudoirs, and froni churches.  They came like ghosts V  * The vast brigades of women who had slain ,_  Their helpless, unborn children.   With them trailed  Lovers and husbands who had said, "Do this,"  > And those who helped for hire.  they  stood before the Angels���������before the revealing  Angels they stood.   :���������'���������"'���������*'���������  And they heard the Angels say, '  And all the listening world heard the Angels say:  "These are the .vilest sinners of all; <    '  For the Lord of Life made sex that birth might come;  Made sex and its keen, compelling desire  To fashion bodies wherein souls might go  From lower planes to higher.  Until the end is reached (which is Beginning.)  They have stolen the costly pleasures of the senses  And refused to pay God's price.  They have come together, these men and these women,  As male and female they have come together  In the great creative act.  They have invited souls, and then flung them out into  space;  They have made a jest of God's design.  All other sins look white beside this sinning;  All other sins may be condoned, forgiven;  All other sinners may be cleansed and shriven;  Not these, not these.  Pass on, and meet God's eyes."  ������"  The  vast brigade moved  forward, and  behind them  I       walked the Angels,  Walked the sorrowful Revealing Angels.  - ���������Ella Wheeler'Wilcox.   ���������  By James Whitcomb Riley.  When a man ain't got a cent, and he's feeling  kind of blue,  An' the'clouds hang dark and heavy, an' "won't  let the sunshine through;  It's a great thing, O my brethren, for a feller just  '.";:.': to lay J . ���������' .  His hand upon your shoulder in a friendly sort of  -.. ��������� way!,"... \ ���������'.'." ���������������������������/.'������������������'..  It makes a man feel queerish, it makes the teardrops start,      - ' ������        ,  An' you sort o' feel a flutter in the region of the  heart; -,-������������������*  You can't look up and meet his eyes; you don't  know what to say,     . ������������������--  When his hand is on your shoulder in a friendly  sort of way!  0,.the world's a curious compound, with its honey  and its gall, \  With its care and bitter crosses, but a good worl'  , after all;  An' a good God must have made it���������leastways  that's what-I say  When a hand is on my shoulder in a friendly sort  of way.  Athabasca Petroleum Co., Limited  ���������#  Public Notice is Hereby given that  under the First Part of chapter 79 of  the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906,  known as "The Companies. Act," letters patent have been issued under the  Seal of the Secretary of State of Canada, bearing date the 16th day of  March, 1914, incorporating Raymond  Neilus Bond, financial broker, Thos.  Todrick and Charles Leonard Fillmore, barristers-at-law, Henry James  ��������� Bethell, notary public, and Walter  ' Francis'Chaffey, student-at-law, all of  the City of Vancouver, in the Prov-  '.inceof British Columbia, for the following purposes, viz:���������(a) To ac-  -.'quire, manage, develop, work and sell  mines, including coal mines, coal  lands, oil lands, natural- gas lands,  mineral claims and mining properties  and petroleum claims, and to win,  get, treat, refine and market minerals,  coal or oil therefrom; to carry on the  =' business of a mining, smelting, mill-  i, ing and refining company in all or  ' ariy-of-its^branches-and-to-carry-on  the business of producers,. refiners,  storers, suppliers and distributors of  petroleum and petroleum products in  all its branches: (b) To obtain, by  purchase, lease, hire, discovery, location or otherwise, and hold mines,  mineral claims, mineral leases, coal  lands, oil lands, natural gas lands,  prospects, mining lands, petroleum  claims and mining and petroleum  rights of every description arid to  work, develop, operate and turn the  same to account; and to sell or otherwise dispose of the same or any of  them, or any interest therein; (c)  To dig for, raise, crush, wash, smelt,  assay, analyze, reduce, amalgamate  and otherwise treat gold, silver, coal,  copper, lead ores or deposits, oil,  petroleum and other minerals and  f metallic substances and compounds of  all kinds, whether belonging to the  company or not. and to render the  same merchantable, and to buy, sell  and deal in the same or any of them;  (d) To   acquire   by, purchase,   lease,  FISHING  SEASON  OPEN  NOW  Government  Regulations  Regarding  the Catching of Trout  From inforamtion received it appears that legally the fishing season  is now open, being eleven days later  than last"year. The idea is prevalent  that under the new act of the legislature, licenses must be taken out before angling can be indulged in. This  is not so, the Attorney General having stated that all anglers resident in  the province being at liberty to us?  rod anl line as formerly. The regulations governing trout fishing this  year state:  "No one shall fish for, catch or kill  trout of any kind, including steel head  of two pounds in weight undressed,  or under, from November IS in each  year to March 25 following, both  dates inclusive, except in the waters  east of the 12th. Meridian, where no  one shall fish for, catch or kill trout  of any kind from November 15 in each  year to April 30 following, both days  inclusive, provided that these close  seasons shall not apply to Seton and  Anderson lakes and waters tributary  thereto, 'nor to dolly varden trout  nor steelhead caught.in tidal waters  by rod and line, or in Oganagan,  Kamloops, Shuswap, Arrow and  Kootenay lakes, nor to, landlocked  salmon, weighing five pounds, undressed, or over."  . The 120th meridian it may be observed passes near Ducks so that  Kamloops is to the west of this line.  DOUGLAS FIR���������THE TREE  WITH A FUTURE  ������������������>'l"t"fc'l"I"H"t"l"M"t">r-^.I"l"I"i"I"H"W M1*'!'****'!'*'!''"'^'1-'! I'f-M'l 1'it'M'ifc  N  Mount Pleasant Livery  TRANSFER  Furniture and Piano Moving  Bagg<ige, Express and Dray.   Hacks and Oafriages'  _ at all hours.  Phono Fairmont B4B  ;  Corner Broadway and Main     J        A. F. McTavish, Prop.  ���������OHMIIMIIMIIIIHIttMltHMIllll III III������>!������������������������M  "���������IS"!"  H I II IIUiHtM IIIIIIIUM  VANCOUVER CUT-RATE FRUIT and CANDY CO. I  : J N.Ellis. Mgr. 2452 Main St. Cwt BTMiWiy  hire, exchange or Otherwise such real  and personal property , of all kinds,  timber lands or leases, timber claims,  licenses to cut timber, surface rights  and rights of way, water rights and  privileges, mills, factories, oil refineries, oil and petroleum wells, furnaces for smelting and treating ores  and refining metals, buildings, machinery, plant, patents, licenses, concessions or other real px personal  property as may be necessary for or  conducive to the proper carrying out  of siny of the objects of the company,  and manage, develop, sell, exchange,  lease or otherwise deal with the  Whole or any oart therof; (e) To  construct, maintain, alter, make, work,  and operate on the property of the  company, or on property, controlled  by the company, any canals, trails,  roads, ways, tramways, bridges and  reservoirs, dams, flumes, pipe lines,  storage tanks, oil tanks, race and  other ways, water - courses, acque-  ducts,-wells,^whar.ves,^piers,_=furnaces,  saw-mills, crushing, works, smelting  works, concentrating works, hydraulic  works, coke ovens, electrical works,  and appliances, warehouses, buildings,  machinery, plant, stores" and. other  works and conveniences which may  seem, conducive to any of the objects  of the company; and, with the consent of the shareholders in general  meeting, to contribute to, subsidize  or otherwise aid or take part in any  such operation, though constructed  and maintained by any other company or persons outside of the property of the company, and to buy, sell,  manufacture and deal in all kinds of  goods, stores, implements, provisions, chattels and effects required by  the company or its workmen and servants; (f), To build, acquire, own,  charter, navigate and use steam and  other vessels for the purposes of the  company; (g) To take, acquire and  hold as the consideration for ores,  metals or minerals sold or otherwise  disposed of, or for goods supplied or  It-  ��������� <������.|.������i||it.i|iH'it't"|..Mii|i.l.������i|iiH-t-������l|'.|'  ���������ti.li.l'.|'-l.ii''t"H"MI"i"l'������'l"l"H'i't"t"t'it"l'������  T.S.Baxter Peter Wright  Complete House  Furnishers  Agents for Ostermoor and  Restmore Ilattresses  Davenport Bed  Hifeyoo tried our Easy Payment?  Come In and talk It ever with us.  I    BAXTER & WRIGHT  X (Successors to Hutehings Furniture Co.)  |   Phone Seymour 771 416 Main Street  ���������H-M 11- H -H11 11 I Vl t 'S'i H' M' 11   ^X^K^^X-^^^-s-H^H-K^-^-H^-H-  for work done by contract or otherwise, shares, debentures, bonds or  other securities of or in any other  company the : objects of which are  similar to those of this company, and  to sell or otherwise dispose of the  same; (h) To enter into any arrangement for sharing profits, union  of interest or co-operation with any  other person or company carrying on  or about to carry on any business or  transaction which this company is  authorized to carry on, and to take or  otherwise acquire and hold shares  in or amalgamate with any other  company having object altogether or  in.part similar to those of this company; (i) To purchase or otherwise  acquire and undertake all or any of  the assets, business, property,. privileges, contracts, rights, obligations  and liabilities of any person or com-  Cany" carrying on any part 'of the  usiness which' this company is authorized to carry on, or possessed of  property suitable :for the, purposes  thereof; (j)" To distribute any of the  property of the company among the  members in specie; (k)   To sell, imr  [trove, manage, develop, exchange,  ease, dispose of, turn to account or  otherwise, daal with the undertaking  or the whole or any part of the property and rights of the company, with  power to accept as the consideration  any shares, stocks or obligations of  any company; provided, however, that  in case of a sale for shares in a company other than a non-personal liability company such shares shall be  fully paid up; (1) To enter into contracts for the allotment of shares of  the company as the whole or part of  the purchase price of any property,  real or personal, goods or chattels  purchased by the company or for any  valuable consideration, including services rendered to the company, as the  company may from time to time determine; (m) To pay a commission  upon shares offered to the public for  subscription either in cash or shares  to any person or corporation in consideration of his or its subscribing or  agreeing to subscribe, whether absolutely or conditionally, for any shares  in the company or - procuring or  agreeing to, procure subscriptions,  whether absolute or conditional, for  any������shares in tiic~sompany, provided  such payment is authorized by a resolution of the company in general  meeting and does not exceed the  amount so authorized; (n) To cause  this company to be registered or licensed to do business and to carry out  its objects in any country or place;  (o) To do all^the above things and  such other things as are incidental or  conducive to the attainment of the  foregoing objects. T^he operations  of the company to be caried on  throughout the Dominion of Canada  and elsewhere by the name of  "Athabasca Petroleum Company,  Limited," with, a capital stock of five  hundred thousand dollars, divided  into 500,000 shares of one dollar each,  and the chief place of business of  the said company to be at the City of  Vancouver, in the Province of British  Columbia.    " ������  Dated at the office of the Secretary of State pi Canada, this 21st day  of March, 1914.  THOMAS MULVEY,-  Under Secretary of State.  There are, trees in Canada whose  commercial importance is clearly on  the wane. According to one of the  latest bulletins of the Dominion Forestry branch, the value of the white  pine lumber cut in 1912, was one and  a half million dollars less than in  1911. The cut of hemlock decreased  thirty per cent; that of cedar decreased twenty-seven per cent., and  tamarack, the lumber production t>f  which' has decreased over forty per  cent, in the last two years, bids fair  soon to become commercially extinct. Of the six leading tree species  in Canada, Douglas fir was the only  one whose lumber production increased in 1912. In the province of  British Columbia alone, Douglas fir  formed Over 67:7 per cent, of the total, lumber cut, the richest timber  province in Canada, containing, according to some'7 estimates, one-half  ihe merchantable timber wealth of the  Dominion.  This remarkable} tree attains a  height of over two hundred feet with  a trunk ten to twelve feet in diameter, forming, alone or mixed with  hemlock, great forests extending four  hundred miles north of the International boundary. Its natural range  extends in Canada to the eastern  foot hills of the Rocky mountains in  Alberta, where it grows to a height  of 130 feet and a diameter of four  feet, and is considered one of the  most important timber trees on the  Dominion Rocky Mountains Forest  Reserve, which covers, an area ' of  nearly^. 21,000 square miles.  It is also widely distributed  throughout the western United  States, being able to stand considerable  climatic .variation,   and  All Fruits I!  in Season^  Largest Stock of Confectionery Froit ft Tobacco on Hillj  - PHONE Fairmont 638  Free delivery to any put of the city."  1,.M..|.������ IhImIiiM ������iM..|i ii..Mi.t..i.������.������4i*.|..i.^. 4 iMi'tft'l"!'||"M' I 'l"M"Mii|"fr ������'f ������'M ������������a  rv  practically immune to insects, or  fungus disease.  Dr. C. S. Sargent, one of the greatest^; authorities on American trees,  describes the wood as hard, durable  and largely used for all kinds of construction. According to a recent Dominion Forestry Branch publication  on the "Wood using Industries of  Ontario," it is increasing in popularity (in that province for decorative  purposes as "it has an attractive grain  and figure which readily lends itself  to staining." Douglas fir construction timber is shipped to all parts of  the world.  The Douglas fir has been introduced into Europe with great success  and large forests have been planted  which are now (yielding handsome  profits. Germany and France purchase every year large quantities of  seed from the Indians in British Columbia.  %st received a large shipment of  Polishing Mop and O'Ceclar  HOKTH *������������������������������������ UAM90M BO.MH>  Inlm for Boring*.  SEALED LENDERS will be received  by the undersigned at the Harbor Com-,  missioners' Office, Eburne Station, B.  C��������� up to noon on May 8, for sinking  test holes in the North Arm of the  Fraser River between the commencement of the estuary at Point Grey and  the westerly boundary of South Vancouver.  Specifications can be seen and full  particulars obtained on application to  Messrs. Davis & Leslie, Harbor Engineers, 502-503 Duncan Building, Vancouver, after April 16.  The Harbor Commisioners do not bind  themselves to accept the lowest or any  tender.  H. B. A. VOGEL,  1-12-26 ' Secretary.  CEDAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  Rev. J. O. Madill, Pastor.     "  Sabbath School and Bible Classes  at 2.30 p.m.  Prayer meeting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday.  Young People's meeting at 8 p.m. on  Monday night.  Make* Hard Work Eaty!  ,,e)iwwjFtmiwfj^n&m.iainMiaf ^eimem'^Mt aawyw���������^majma) y  CKSfe^  &.pwil*notih.fmnmo***otwm  tWM |0 M<f' if pl^Ot.  fllhftftftv Gavmjsot ej HiivrMMU  Tryw0^d������Po^M������>������V  tZSJr^tL9** *&. all  ^oropo\Mm^fiymWw*  ������Wpra������Bfdyr������naMyenria(  rPhone us your order.   We deliver'  promptly.  W, R, Owen S Morrison  The Mt. Pleasant Hardware  Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street  ���������������.H'������**������-H"!"������'H"H'4'������H^  NATIONAL CULTURE AND REFINEMENT  Can we measure the .value of example in bettering the social, moral,  and mental condition of home, civic or national life?  A living example Is a powerful factor in leading up to culture and  refinement as a national asset. What more so than that of an artistically made home nestling among beautiful flowering plants; roses,  flowering and evergreen shrubbery; shade trees, all encompassed with  hedges of holly, laurel or privet.  Cultivate a habit to spend your time to make such a home, and  visit our Greenhouses and Nurseries; see our stock, and get expert advice from our capable and courteous employees, which will greatly aid  you in your effort. Our stock was never better, larger or of greater^  variety. In- our stock of over $100,000 we have everything that culture  and refinement demands to make a home a credit to the owners and  pleasing and interesting to the community.  Catalogues mailed free on application.   .  Royal Nurseries, Limited  omco���������710 .Dominion. Bid*., 307 Xartlnff* 'St. W.  Vbonc Barmonr 5556.  8TOSE���������3410 Oran-riU* St.    Fhon*  BayrUw  1936.  Greenhouses and Nurseries at Royal on B. C. Electric Railway,  Eburne Line, about two miles south of the-City limits.  Tnon*���������Cbura* 43.  ~:~x~:~XK":"X^x-:"X^~:4r:^x^^ aw**.*  /if  ; -���������u*'  Ol"'"i"'  swkw  6  THE  WESTERN CALL.  Friday. April 17,1914  Horace.  HAZEtrma  ']' f������ question haa arisen, Mr. Bryan,"  Evelyn Joined me.  ihe' aald, with mora of auavlty In bla  (tone than I had hitherto   observed.  '"whether by any chance yonr patient  jhaa a mark of ary character whatever  [tattooed upon hia left forearm. If you  !hav������ obaerved such, we ahall be clad  if you will kindly describe It."  ��������� Ilia nurse flung aaueatloning glance  tat me, and I nodded, reassuringly. X  41d not wonder that Ita waa turprlaad  At the question;  ,   la there, or la there not. each   a  mark?" the Oriental vied.  Thaw ia; yep, air."  I think, involuntarily, I atartad for.  !ward. I know t'uat for juat a. breath I  thought my ears had played ma %  trick. Then, suddenly, thara awept  back across my memory that exprea-  floa ot Checkabeedy?: "Who between  fenm and me, sir, I dont trust, nohow."  jOould It be possible that Bryan waa In  the conspiracy? Bat only for tha  jbrlefeat moment did this doubt away  amid the welter of my thoughte. Into;  ftB place rolled an amaaemant that;  ���������hocked and stunned; that checkedj  pne all standing, aa it were; for Bryan  Uraa amplifying, waa tailing about the1  baric; which he had first aotloed he  El, on the night of his arrival, and  eh ha had examined more doaelyj  eeveral occasions tinoe.  IITa evidently a representation ofi  jaome aort of sailing veseeV he ex-!  tolalnad, "with a"curved hull and ai  Wngle broad sail. And below it at*  three letters: D. M.N."  : Blindly I clutched tho back of a  jahatr with both handa, for a sense of]  rlty oppressed me, and the room!  became warermgly tuumbatan-  it waa not true, of oourae, tbla thati  waa saying.  Nothing waa troaj  fothlng was real.  It was all a night-?  i; and the two  gtoattn*  yellow  were horrible dream faoaa.  i  "And you have probably noticed  a  jaear���������a. long Uvid acar?"  It waa Tup Sing's Totoe I beard. He  Bryan, at* my sug1  gestlon, went to the elevator and ascended that way. while she and I slowly climbed the broad, veivetrcarpeted  marble steps to the floor above.  "I thought you were never coming  out of that room," she declared, nervously. "Once, I waa on the verge of  going after you. The first time you  rang for Checkabeedy, I mean. . . .  What did you have him telephone for?  He absolutely refused to tell me.  Waa it the two policemen? . . .  What did you want them for? . . . .  Why did you let them go away again?  . . . Aren't those Chinamen ever  going? . . ���������'. What on earth did yon  .want with Mr. Bryan? . . . What  am you going upstairs for, now?"  Bow tactfully I answered these questions and others I shall not attempt to  decide. I know only that I aet my  teeth to guard the one problem which  absorbed me, and which for worlds I  would not have her know.  "It is all right, Evelyn," I assured  her, over and over again. "There is  not the smallest danger. '.',"���������'��������� . They  came to give me information. ..'.". .  You must be very tired, little girl.  . . . Go to bed, now, and forget it  all until morning. . . . Tea, 111  tell you everything, then."  I wonder how many women there  are who, burning with curiosity as she  was, would have obliged me as she  did! Is it pardonable, then, if again I  say that throughout all this trying experience she proved herself a girl of a  thousand?      ,  Bryan was waiting for me ln the  passage outside Cameron's door:  "I left him. sleeping," he explained,  '"and. If possible, I don't' wiah to die-  jturb him; so well go In quietly to*  gether."     .  ���������  ; Slowly and with infinite cam lest  jhe make the least noise he turned the  knob. Quite as cautiously he opened  the door, and tiptoeing aoftly, we entered.  It was the first time I had been in  jwaw ttui questioning tho nurse.   Ard l*n> room ,lnoe tne ���������day-'of that terrible  ww Bryan wou|d make another pre  posterous answer, Just aa parsons always do Id dreams. I knew ha would.  ������o when ha said: "Tn, air, Juat he-  [tween tho left shoulder blade and the  aplnal column. It looks as though it  were tha mark of a deep and vicious  knife alasb," I was not In the leaat aur-  iprlsed.  Checkabeedy brought me back to a  realization of time and place. He  spoke my- name in a half-whisper and  'l awoke againto realities with a start.  "The officers are here, sir," bo Informed me, matter-of-factly.  "The officers?" I repeated, and then,  memory reasserting Itself, I added:  "Ob, yes, of course. Ask them to wait  just a moment, Checkabeedy."  Into the mental marshalling of facts  Which ersued there came a vivid mem-.  ory of that weird acene in the alck-  chamber when Cameron had raved in  a atrange tongue, mingled with words  of pidgin-English and a few phrases-  Incriminating phrases, in the light of  tonight's revelation���������of vigorous vernacular,  if what Bryan had aald waa  true���������and for him-to, lie about-, a-mat^  ter aa readily demonatrable waa hardly to be considered���������I must conclude  myself beaten at all points. From firat  to last, then, I had been defending  a  creature unworthy of defense.  It waa difficult to accept tula con-:  elusion. Mind and heart alike were  arrayed against it. Yet, thinking  clearly now, I recognized fully the position ln which I had placed myself. I  had been willing to swear, to wager,  there was no tattoo mark, and the best  ~ evidence���������my own witness���������had;  proved me wrong. Certainly I could1  expect no mild Judgment from these  Asiatics. Honest aa I had been, they  must believe that I bad known, and,  bad meant to deceive them. They  probably thought tbat I bad signalled  to Bryan to endorse me ln my lies, and|  that the nurse had either misunderstood or openly rebelled.  Before Checkabeedy had reached tbe  ��������� door, I recalled him.  "On second thought," I aald, "tbe officers need not wait. Tell them that  It waa a mistake. I shall not require  them."  Turning to Yep Sing and hia companion, I added:  "What Mr. Bryan has told you Is tbe  greatest surprise to me. Even yet I  can scarcely believe it, unless the  mark and the scar were obtained while  my friend was a prisoner in the bands  of your countrymen."  "Tattoo marks and scars show age  ���������no less than faces," the merchant replied. "Both of these are years old.  Any capable judge of such things will  tell you that. PoBBlbly Mr. Bryan can  tell."  "The acar is not a fresh one,", aald  the nurse. "As to tattoo marks, I am  hot experienced; but I shouldn't think  the mark on Mr. Cameron's arm was  put there recently."  "Gentlemen," I said, making a final  stand, "while I do not question Mr.  Bryan's entire honesty in this matter,  nevertheless I prefer to see these  marks of identification, myself. If you  Will excuse us for five minutes, I shall  not be longer." .  _ At the foot of the grand staircase,  outburst, and It still held for me an at  jmosphere as grewsomely forbidding  aa tbat of a tomb.  1 Only one lowered light burned, over  i* tall, antique bureau between the  darkly curtained windows; the chamber was In semi-gloom. But scarcely!  had I passed Bryan, who stopped to  close the door with the same adroit  alienee with which he had accom-i  pllshed Us opening, than a stealthily  moving white figure defined itself, I*  suing, apparently from a massive  carved wardrobe, which stood against  the wall opposite the huge, tester**  *ed.  -  The spectacle waa at least arresting.  1 know I halted abruptly as if stricken  all at once with total paralysis. For a  heart-beat or two I think I stopped  breathing. But my eyes meanwhile  were strained fixedly upon the apparition, and seeing it pass with almost Incredible swiftness beneath the one  dim light above the bureau, I recognized Cameron. V  :. At the same room ent the room was  flooded with a sudden glare. Bryan too,  had^ seen^and. iiadaigw  electrics. Simultaneously be flashed  past me and was at his patient's side.  "What does this mean?" I heard htm  aay. "What did you want? Can't I  truat you alone for ten minutes? I  told you, Cameron, that you must not  leave your bed unless I am with you."  I saw Cameron cower under the upbraiding. In his eyes I read terror,  and all my sympathy was aroused on  tbis instant. Bryan might be carrying  out Dr. Massey's orders, but he appeared to me unnecessarily harsh.  "What were you doing?" he insisted; and then I saw him roughly grasp  his patient's arm, and hold It up, revealing a tightly clenched band.  "Mr. Bryan!" I cried in remonstrance. "Gently, gently. Remember���������"  But tbe nurse paid small heed to  me. He was busy opening the doubled  fist.  I stood now where I could look Cameron squarely in the face, but my gaze  was elsewhere. It was bis left band  over which Bryan was engaged, and  from his wrist to his elbow the sleeve  of his white night robe bad been  pushed back, exposing a sinewy forearm, marked precisely as Bryan had  described it.       -  Scrutinlzingly I bent forward. The  tattooing was indisputable, and, as the  nurse had said, it bore no evidence of  being recent work.  Up to that moment I had hoped  against hope that in some way or other a misconception bad occurred. I  had hoped, I suppose, for the perform*  ance of some miracle which would exonerate this man. And now that hope  was obliterated by those blue-pricked  letters D. M. N. beneath an almost exact facsimile of the black smudge  which had taken the place of signature  on each of the three threatening letters���������the black smudge, of which Cameron, wearing it then indelibly upon  the cuticle, had dared to feign utter  ignorance.  And yet, I asked myself once more,  how was it that I had never noticed  it before?   Again and again I had seen  Ty T would have "Been perplexed "by  those three unfitting initials.  "There, now!" Bryan was saying.  "Back to bed with you, Cameron. What  did you want this letter for, anyway?  If it was necessary for you to have it,  couldn't I have got it for you?"  "Give It back to me!" Cameron was  pleading, piteously. "Give it back to  me! It is a private matter. Give it  back to me, or destroy it before my  eyes.   Burn it, here, before me."  "Let me have it, Mr. Bryan," I  asked, and turning to the unhappy gentleman I said: "You'll trust me, won't  you, Cameron? I'll destroy it, unread,  it you wish it."  "No, no no," he objected, earnestly.  ^Oive it back to me."  But even as he demanded It, Bryan  put It in my hands; and spreading It  out���������for it had been crumpled to a pellet in the Invalid's clutch���������I waa about  to humor him, when the superscription  caught my eye and held it  The envelope bore the name and address: "Donald McNish, Taylor'a Hotel, Nsw York City, U. S. A."  j..$M*4������3M-^4-������^Mfr������J4<*p^44*^M-fr.JM*444������i������{4������}M$4^  CHAPTER XXIV.  Another Problem Crops Up.  fhere are, I dare aay, those who will  not hesitate to charge me with an unpardonable lack of perception. "Even  from your own telling," they will probably declare, "we realized from the  first that the creature you discovered  at two in the morning, supporting him-  aelf by means of a Fifth avenue area  railing, was not Robert Cameron, but  his physical counterpart, and a not  ���������ery deceptive counterpart at that."  I shall not dispute the justice of the  criticism. As I look back at It all now,  I sometimes wonder, myself, how I  could have been so blind, so credulous.  .And yet there is something to be said  on the other side, too. An able advocate, I believe, might make out a fairly strong case for me if I were disposed to defend myself; which, as it  happens, I am not, since the verdict  can make no possible difference either  to you or to me, and would only delay  the culmination of our narrative.  Nevertheless I must tell that for  some minutes after reading- the letter  which had bo opportunely fallen into  my bands I stood at the foot of the  bed, and in the glare of the blazing  electrics, studied with keenest scrutiny the face which had so deceived  me. ���������-,:-.;��������� '  In general contour and Individual  feature the likeness to Cameron was  monstrous in its fidelity. The same  rugged power, inherited from Scottish  forbears, was traceable in every lineament. But there the similarity ended.  The face I gazed upon lacked Illumination. Character, so strongly indicated  in the other, was from this totally absent. ; In its place waa an admixture  of craft and brutality, so palpable, now  -r-eo clearly, unmistakably evident���������  that I marvelled at my former dew-  trton.  .��������� ��������� :..;*���������:������������������. ���������;.'���������.'  It was the newspaper puzzle picture  over again. Having at length diacov-  ered the hidden rabbit I could sea  nothing else whatever. It dominated  the drawing. It fairly aprang at me  from out the printed page.  There was still another feature of  the revelation, however, which held a  contrasting pathos. Tha latter which  carried conviction beyond all possible  dispute was from Donald McNlsh's  aged mother. And while it tempered  In a measure the harshness of my  judgment against the son, It waa of  tragic import, In that it waa one potent piece of evidence in bla undoing,  severing the last link in the chain  Which connected his identity with that  of the shamefully maligned Cameron-  fvalyu wept over this latter, and I  am not sure but that ray own sight  |WW-hazyr too,^as-I-read thOHfondr  quaintly couched phrases of endearment, penned half a year back in Dundee, by this God-fearing old Hootch*  woman, to. that infamous, blood-stained  reprobate, who, to her, waa still bar  "aln bonnie bairn."  ; It ail came out, eventually, that Ho-  Nlsh had traveled tbe world over to  the sixteen years Intervening since the  coolie massacre, employing a score or  more pf aliases and so studiously  avoiding the name by which he had  then been known, as to have almost  forgotten It, probably, blmaelf, until,  yielding to tbe call of home, he bad at  |aome early period of the last twelve-  Imonth returned for a brief visit to bla  Inatlve town and bla septuagenarUn  mother.  1 It waa then, moat likely, that he  jgeve to her the address of the New  York hotel. Fate Influenced tbe moth-  jar to write, and Fate sent the son  there six months later to get tbe let-  Iter, and so carry upon bis person tbe  jconflrmatory evidence of bis identity.  Just at the time when it would prove  ifateL     . -.' ���������  :��������� "How did it happen," I have been  iaaked, "that you didn't examine imme-  jdiately the clothes that the supposed  Cameron wore, when you found him?"  In view of subsequent events it is  jvery easy to see what an important  bearing such an examination would  have had. But at the time, there was  no one who thought of it. Our chief  purpose then was to get the Injured  man to. bed, and to secure a. physician  and nurse to minister to his recovery.;  If he had been found dead, then, of  course, we should have gleaned what  information we could from his pockets.  But we daily expected him to be able!  to tell his own Btory, and in the anxiety and confusion of the moment the  possible pregnancy of the disclosures'  that lurked in his apparel was entirely lost sight of.  When we did make the examination,  on tbe morning following the episode  of the letter, It was to discover that  that forearm bared.    Surely I would   the suit/������d ^rc0^ ���������>��������� by-McNJeh  have observed so odd a mark; certain- { *?������ of  Scotch_manufacture, Jhavlng  A Complete Moving Picture Story  *'  Six Days a Week in  The Chicago Tribune  Every morning during the week The  Chicago Daily Tribune prints a complete Moving Picture 5tor^ based on  one of the Moving Picture Plays being  shown in Chicago and in the cities, towns and villages  in the vast territory surrounding Chicago.  The Play selected for each morning's story is the one  which The Tribune's Moving Picture Editor has selected  as the best of all those being shown that day. You can  read the Moving Picture Stories every morning |and then  as these fascinating plays are exhibited in your locality  your enjoyment of them will be doubled and trebled  BECAUSE YOU HAVE READPHE STORY,  THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE  not only gives you a complete Moving Picture Story  EVERY DAY enuring the week, but it also gives you  on Sunday, in serial form, the greatest Moving Picture  Story ever written, i(The Adventures of Kathlyn," by  Harold MacGrath, the thrilling romance from which has  been produced the famous "KA THL YN"^Moving Pictures which all Chicago is standing in line to see.  Moving Picture^Story  m  Read uThe Adventures of Kathlyn V m The Chicagor Sunday Tribune  11  w  ������ .^~^~j������^~;-������^,v$m^~^^^Jm$m^4^;..!~^4^j������.Jm^  been made in "Dundee, according TO  aewn-ln labels, early in the current  year.  The contents of the pockets were  not significant The letter he had  been so anxious to secure and destroy  waa the only letter, apparently, he had  carried- There was a cheque-book on  a Chicago bank, and there waa a wallet containing a small sum of money  in bill", and a few business cards of  Importing bouses, which we took to  Indicate that the possessor waa atllt  desultorily engaged In trade, or some,  species of smuggling, with the Malay  atates and the Straits settlements as  hia field, since most of tbe carde made  reference- to goods of such origin.  That morning, which succeeded tbe  inlgbt^of^exciungjevents.:alrjaad^de?,  tailed, was crowded with another succession of happenings scarcely less  ���������ensatlonaL  ; At aeven o'clock, Q?Hara, to obedl-  ance to my instructions; came to my  ������oom In the Loyalton, rousing me out  of a heavy sleep; for I bad not got to  !bwd until four, and then had lain,  awake with teeming brain until after  ftve. I received him to bath robe and  molea, sitting on the bedalde, and alp*  jptog coffee, while he, perched on a  [low, brass-bound clothes cheat, poured  .forth bla story.  "Sleep!" he echoed, when   I   had  made my apologies.  "I haven't had a {  wink, myself.  I've been with tbe boys ���������  all night doing aa pretty a round-up  aa you ever see.  We've got the bunch (  right this time, Mr. Clyde, and there'll  be a clearln' out down there In Chinatown such as hasn't been known alnco  the Chinks discovered Doyers ���������treat"  'Tea," I aald. encouragingly.  . "It'a another war of the tonga," he1  .went on. "They have 'em periodically,  jyou know, and there's alwaya a few of  ithe moon-faced boyaanuffedout, which  ioin't much loss nohow. But this time  [they interfered, you see, with you and  JMlaa Grayson, and they beat up that  ���������driver of our buzz-carriage something'  iflerce; and the Commissioner's issued;  orders to put the whole yellow population on the pan if necessary to get tho  Jones what is responsible."  "Were, any arrests made?" I in-;  |qulred. f.  O'Hara smiled."Were any arrests!  made?" he repeated in a tone that in-!  idlcated Bupreme pity for my ignorance.]  "Why, we took 'em ln by the whole*  jaale. We lowered the net and dragged:  It and you ought to see what come up.  [There was one fellow, a skinny old  geezer half-breed, neither Chink nor  White man, but a slimy mixture of all  ���������that's had ln the two. We've had him  Ion the griddle all night Talk about,  ithe third degree! He got it good, and  jbe*s made enough admissions already.  to send him straight to the chair."  i  "And Murphy?" I suggested.   __ -  (To be continued.)  You Can Say One Hundred and  Eighty Words  in One Minute  54QWordsto  Three Min������te������  ^pealcmg slowly an4 distinctly;  average  taw90 worcjs/  W letter  OVER OUR tONO DISTANCE LINES  If your service is not  satisfactory, tell us!  TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT  oeoo������aaee������eoo������������������oe������oo������������o������������oo������������������o������������aaeoe������oeooe������o������e������>t������������t  Phone Seymour 943  DaviesS  General Contractors  55-66 DAVIS CHAMBERS     ::     615 HASTINGS ST. W.  eeeeeeaeaaeeeaaaeeaeeee ������������������eee������������eaea������������eeaa#������ee������aeeaeee BViday, April 17, 1914  THE WESTERN CALL.  ������      "I     , 'J       '>-    ��������� -<   ".'I-*'.,  I    - \v (  Every W,  fty  k. Is Interested ������nd fhonld know  ���������boat tha wonderful  M"vel "BSafir  Askyour (IfBflprt  tt Ir h> ctnnot snp^hr  tha KASVJIL. soeipt ao  other, bat mm aUmp for <uw <  tntod boOk-mM. It riTu foil  urtlealanand dlnettontlnvdiwblo  toMM.WINDSOB8CPPI.VCOnWUulMir.Oii������  Oanwral Asenta for fiwila.  A DETECTIVE'S ADVICE  Before employing a Private Detective, if you don't  know yonr man, ������elc your  local adviier.  JOHNSTON, tfc* SecrM  Service lateUlgence Bu-  reen, Suite i������3*4  319 Pender St., W.  VaacMver. B. c.  Try Our Printing  Quality Second  to None  * ej  J   A. E. Harron J. A. Harron G. M. Williamson  j  HARRON BROS.  FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS  X  VANCOUVER NORTH VANCOUVER \'.  J   Office & Ohapel���������1034 Granville St.      Office & Chapel���������122 Sixth St. W.   J  Phone Seymour 3486 Phone 134 ,  ,{������HMiM4M������<HK'������M^''H-������***M .  ylMl'il*J''I'4''lvl''l'4''l''l''l''t''l''l'*t''l*'S''I',l'4''tMl*'I*^*^*^M4^  Trader's Trust Company, Ltd.  328-333 Rogers Bldg:. Vancouver, B. C.  GENERAL AGENTS:  Pacific States Fire Insurance Company  Franklin Fire Insurance Company  A GENERAL TRUST BUSINESS TRANSACTED  fMMlfrl|������l|l.{..{l.t.lfrl{������lfrlM.lill*l4fr4fr.}4������{^.{lfo^  Subscribe to The Western Call  One Dollar a year in advance  l [*^t$H$M$e*^2M2M$e������|a4$M$.M3Mg������.t^^ e$s+3M^3e������frs$s������%������o$s������3M$������o$M$to|a^ "fr'-fr'S1  The Housewife's Summer Slogan  "Cook With Gas"  No husband who cares for the comfort of his wife and no housewife  who would properly safeguard her health during the summer should  neglect to consider the , advantages of cooking with gas during the  coming heated term.       ' v  The Cost U Small-The Returns are Large  At tlie present time we are able to five prompt service In the meViai  of connection wjlh our main*, hence we advise yon to net promptly.  A phone call on New Business Department, Seymour 6000, will place  at your disposal full particulars concerning connection with our mains.  A visit to oar salesroom* will enable yon to see n fall line of mr-  lotted On* Appliances, suited to. every pnrse or particular demand. .  VANCOUVER QAS CO,  Carrall and Phone m38 qranvJIJe s%.  Hosting* Sta. .Seymour *00������ Near P������v|e������ st>  <4$4't"l"l"}"{"l"l"i"l'4t"4"l"t"������"{"?"l"I"I"!"������"t,*iV4tV     ���������^4>Vi,<i"I"t"t"l"."|"}"}"tl4l"l"t"l"l"l"t"t"l"I'^"t44 ���������  ���������   vv  Ii  b ><  ?\\  [x..  ���������-<������-j���������������~i������������S"������j������ir    <>ai<|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|iiti^ii}ii|n|i������|ii|ii|ii|������i|ii|ii{ii{ii|n|ii|ii|iif  J. ������������������  1 ���������  e  )..  Li-  '*���������  Use Stave Me fm  In ultimate results which use our electric  power service. The factories or office buildings which operate private power plants are  under a hig expense for maintenance, A  trifling accident may disorganize their whole  system ��������� more serious disturbance, with  attendant heavy losses involved, are not  preventable. Stave Lake Power is undeniably cheaper and more reliable than private plant operation. See us for particulars  and rates.  Western Canada Power Company,  LIMITED .  i$ey������wr4770      6O3-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg. :|  P. O: BOX 1418, VANCOUVER, B. C.  ewo������������l������.sli|.������.t..i<t|..|.������.y..i.������iiiri..|.������.t.it..tii|..|.������ ������������.|..i..i.<..i<H"i--i������<-'<--ivi"i-ii"������"a"i">-a-4������t--������'i-.������i  ������������������������i|.������������.|..|..t..������<..|..|..t..|..t..|..|..r.M'������������������������* ���������i-.i.������4|..������.:.������.i.^.i^.i..i'.;.i.i..i'i44i..H..|..}.^.w  AREYOU INTERESTED IN B.C. METHODISM?  THEN THE  Western Methodist Recorder  (Published Monthly)  Is almost indespensible to you.  No other medium will give you such general and  such satisfactory information about Methodist  activity in this great ''growing province. Whether  a Methodist or not you are interested in Methodist  movement 'y Send your subscription to  Victoria, BX  {) ������������H-������<M"i"i"i"i-'t"i"i">'M'i'-i-'i'������'; I'll io������*4"i"������*������'i"H i-i 11 ii'itmi'MH  Manager Metbodlst-Becorder P. I P. Co., Ltd.   ���������  i.OO   -   One Year  Address by Dr. McKim������"Why We Are Protestants"  of men to be ������f equal authority with the written  Word of God, she really exalts tradition above  the Word, by making that the rule of interpretation.  The False Decretals  Let me give you an example to show how far  the traditions to which the Church of Rome appeals are to be depended on. In the ninth century a tremendous forgery arose, under the name  of the Isidorian decretals, consisting of nearly one  hundred letters, written in the names of earlier  bishops of Borne, together with certain spurious  writings of other church dignitaries, and acts of  hitherto unknown councils. These documents  were eagerly seized upon by Nicholas I., who was  Pope at that time, and by him and his successors,  were made the instrument of completely revolutionizing the constitution of the church, and developing the papal power, from a mere primacy, into  an absolute ecclesiastical despotism. For centuries these false decretals were accepted as genuine;  but for over three hundred years their true character has been known, and they have, been on all  hands admitted to be a forgery, and a very clumsy  forgery at that Even the most extreme partisans of Rome now admit this,���������indeed, the popes  themselves have admitted it, yet the radical  changes which they were the instruments of introducing, remain. '  Now, one cannot help asking, What dependence is to be placed on the traditions which the  Church of Rome professes to haye preserved since  the time of the apostles, if she thus accepted for'  1 so many centuries this gross forgery, and made it  the support and foundation of doetrines and  usages she has insisted on as vital to the true constitution of the church? And this is only one of  numerous examples in which the infallible Church  of Rome has accepted and magnified the authority  of documents which have subsequently been  proved and admitted to be forgeries! But if she  is thus incapable of distinguishing the true from  the false in the writings and documents of her  own bishops and synods, how are we to trust her  when she presents us with alleged traditions  handed down from the age Of the apostles?; And  how can we do otherwise than protest against her  impiety when we see the plainest declarations of  the Sacred Scriptures made void by her pretended  traditions? In our Saviour's time the Pharisees  appealed to tradition, but our Lord made his appeal ever to the Scriptures. He changed them  with transgressing the commandments of God by  their traditions. His words to them are most applicable today to the Church of Rome: "Thus  have ye made the commandment of God of none  effect by your tradition." Matt. 15:6. "In vain  ' they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the  commandments of men." Verse 9. He said to  the Jews, "Search the Scriptures." He never  said, Search your traditions.  There are "the words, and there is the authority, of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ against j  the method which the Church of Rome' adopts in  asking us to accept her traditions as the basis of  doctrine.  Jtpman Catholic Interpretation of Scripture  But again, the Roman Catholic hierarchy  teaches that the Bible is to he accepted only according to the sense which the church puts upon  it. Now, perhaps you would like to have a simple  or two of the interpretations of this infallible  church. Well, here is one of many that might be  given. What do you suppose is the chief passage  relied upon to establish the dogma of papal in-  ' fallibility? Here it is in our Lord's words to St.  Peter: "Satan hath desired to have you, that he  may sift you as wheat; but I have prayed for  thee, that thy faith fail not; and when thou art  converted, strengthen thy brethren" Luke 22:  31-32. This, we are told by Romanist interpreters  since Pope Agatho, A.JX 680, contains the grant  of special privilege to the bishops of Rome as suc-  nclSSorTbf S������V^  of the eighteen Fathers who comment upon this  passage gives any hint of such an interpretation!  I give another precious example of infallible  interpretation. You know the popes have claimed  power to rule the nations, and how 'do you sup-  0 pose this is proved fronpHoly Scripture ? How ?  Just listen, listen and tremble; it is very simple.  St. Peter walked on the sea! Q. E. LY (quod erat  demonstrandum!)    (Applause.)  This is conclusive evidence that the successors  of St. Peter are entitled to rule the nations! Do  you hot see it? If you do not, you must be very  dull. It was declared by Pope Innocent III. in a  letter addressed to the patriarch of Constantinople, in which he claimed that "Christ had committed the government of the whole world to the  popes."  Such interpretations as these, proceeding from  the supposed infallible popes,���������in conflict with  common sense, in conflict with the laws of sound  exegesis, in conflict with the exposition given by  the Fathers of the church,���������may serve to show  how deceitfully the Church of Rome deals with  Holy Scripture.  Dr. Preston's Charges  A famous controversialist of the Church of  Rome, some years ago, was the vicar-general Rev.  Dr. Thomas S. Preston. He said that private  interpretation,���������that terrible old thing, you know,  private judgment,���������'' private interpretation has  virtually declared the Bible to be of straw.'T But  I say that papal and Roman interpretation has  actually used the Bible as a nose of wax, to,be  pressed into whatever shape the exigencies of their  case may require.  Again: Dr. Preston says: "Protestantism  has torn the Bible to pieces." Think of it, ye  Protestants, and repent of your sins! However,  even that is not so bad as burning it, is it? (Applause.) For the leaves of the torn Bible, borne  by the winds of heaven over the earth, may carry  the message of life and immortality to mankind;  -���������the single verse, "God so loved the world, that  he gave his only begotten Son," once led a poor  Hindu out of his heathen darkness into light;���������  but, when it is burned, its power to bless is gone,  ���������for men cannot read its message in its ashes,���������  and the only voice it then has is anathema against  (Continued from Page 2)  the sacreligious hand that committed it to the  fire.  Roman Doctrines Hot in tbe Bible  Let me repeat, then, with emphasis: If any  man asks why we are Protestants, I answer, Because the doctrines of the Church of Rome which  we are called upon to accept as necessary to salvation cannot be found in the, Bible. Do you  think that is a large order to prove? Well, I  shall not attempt to prove it; but I shall just  hide myself behind the opinion of a great cardinal. You know that is a very safe place to be.  The late Cardinal. Wiseman, in writing about  the way in which Romanists are sometimes converted, or perverted, as he would say, to Protestantism, said this: "The history, in every case  is simply this, that the individual, by some chance  or other . . . became possessed of the Word  of God, of the1 Bible; that he perused this book;  that he could not find in it transubstantiation or  aurieular confession, that he could not discover in  it one word of purgatory, or of worshipping images. He perhaps goes to the priest, and tells  him that he cannot find these doctrines in the  Bible; his priest argues with him, and endeavors  to convince him that he should shut up the book  that is leading him. astray; he perseveres, he  abandons the communion of the Church of Rome,  . . . and becomes a Protestant- Now, in all  this the man was a Protestant from the beginning;  he started withthe principle that whatever is not  in that hook cannot be true religion, or an article  of faith; and that is the principle of Protestantism. He took Protestantism, therefore, for granted, before he began to examine the Catholic doctrine. He set put with the supposition that whatever is not in the Bible is no part of God's truth;  he does not find certain things in the Bible, and  concludes that, therefore, the religion that holds  these is hot the true religion of Christ."���������"Lectures on the Principal Doctrines and Practices of  the Catholic Church," Baltimore, 1846, page 16.  The man who wrote these words was an eminent prince of the church,���������a prince who, if he  were here, the Boston Pilot would tell you was entitled to precedence over our senators, over, our  representatives, over the judges of the Supreme  Court, over the Vice-President 0 f the United  States, over the foreign ambassadors, over everybody on the face of this big continent except the  President; and if a ship bearing him should come  into port, it should be welcomed by salvos of artillery suitable to the heir apparent to the throne!  (This was said, not of a dead cardinal, but of a  living cardinal. I think his name is O'Connell.)  (Applause.) .       . ' ���������  Here, then, is a distinct acknowledgment by  an eminent prince of' the church, a noted controversialist, that neither transubstantiation, nor  auricular confession, nor pugatory, nor worshipping of images is found in the Bible. We agree  ex animo with this illustrious representative of  Rome. The same is true of all the peculiar doctrines of that church.  Rome's Teachings Contrary to (Scripture and to  the Fathers  Once more I say, We are Protestants because  the peculiar doctrines of the Church of Rome are  contrary to Holy Scripture, contrary to the teachings of the Fathers of the church. We are Protestants because we refuse to believe the Virgin  Mary more merciful than Jesus Christ; or that  she is our mediator with God; or that she is the  mother of God; or that she was born without sin.  We are Protestants because the doctrine of the  mass has nb foundation in Holy Scripture; and I  might add, no manner or sort of affiliation or  association or connection with the great American national Thanksgiving festival- (Long continued applause.) We are Protestants because  the invocation of saints has no foundation in Holy  Scripture; because the power ot the priest to sit  in i^e tribunal of penance and pronounce judicialabsolution W  in Scripture; because the doctrine of papal infallibility finds no support either in the Bil/Ie, or  in the primitive Fathers of the church.  As to Certainty of Troth  But then, O my friends, it is alleged that there  is no agreement among Protestants as to the doctrines contained in the Bible; and that this results from the principle of private judgment,  which produces endless divisions and differences  among them; and then it is declared triumphantly  that God is not the author of confusion, and  therefore God cannot be the author of Protestantism! Q. B. D. (I like these Q. E. D.'s.) One  of the arguments most earnestly pressed in the  recent Misison in this city was that there nan be  no certainty of truth in a Protestant church,'tint  certainty can be found only in an infallible  church, speaking to the world through an infallible head. =  But then, is the Roman Catholic Church a  household free from differences and divisions and  conflicts? That's an interesting question, is it  not? Are its interpretations of Scripture consistent and harmonious.  Take, for example, the controversy about predestination, which Dr. Preston referred to in sush  a manner as to leave his audience to suppose that  it was one of the dire results of the Reformation.  He traced the genesis of this doetrine to reformed  theology, and said, "So came the theory of predestination. " What a learned man he must have  been!   (Laughter and applause.)  (To be Continued)  THE INSUFFICIENCY OF  HUMAN TESTIMONY  Nothing which is properly theological can be  known by us from any other source than from  the Word of God. If' for the resolution of so  arduous a question the clearest and most consistent testimonies could be produced from all  the doctors of every age, and nothing could be  produced from Scripture, of a truth they would  have no weight whatever.���������Theophanes Procopo-  wicz, Archbishop of Noyogorod, 1722.  FORESTRY  There were eight forest survey par-,  ties engaged'in demarking forest and  agricultural  lands  in   the iar'west  last summer, and their reports which    <~  will appear in 'the annual 'report of (,  the   Director vof   Forestry,' Ottawa,  contain accounts of actual adventures  which rival the most fictitious.   The  total area examined last summer was  about 11,000,000 acres,  some on the, ,  rough slopes of the Rockies, some,in '  the rocky areas of Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, and some in the low lying  and muskeg region of northern AI-    ���������  berta.   Very little land was found fit  for agriculture in these .regions, and  most of it is recommended as forest  reserves.    The present  area  of the  Dominion Forest Reserve is 23,017,504  acres, or nearly 36,000 square   miles.  If all present recommendations  for,  reserves are approved by Act of Parliament the area will be doubled.   In  comparison, the National Forests of.  the United States cover an area of  257,855 square miles, yet Canada is  larger  than  the  United  States  and   '  contains  larger land areas fit only  for tree growth.  Alexandra Hive No. 7. L. O. T. M.  Mount Pleasant Lady Maccabees  concluded a series of open meetings  last Wednesday evening by holding a  "fancy fair," which was largely attended by their friends, and a splendid success socially and financially.  At the regular meeting, prior to the  entertainment,       Mrs.       Patterson,.  Blaine, Wash., Mrs. Hendrickson, No.'  2 Hive, and Lady Commander Mrs  Turnbull, of Hollistcr    Hive,    were  visitors.  The programme, presided over by  Mrs. R. P. Pettipiece, commander of  Alexandra Hive, was opened with instrumental duet by the Misses Gladys  and Florence Wilson, followed with a  solo by Mr. Brunell. The fancy  dancing of the little Misses Anna and  Laurie McRae, accompanied by Piper  Mclvor, was much appreciated. A  reading by Mrs. Alma Keller and a  song by Master Cecil Coville elicited  encores. Then followed the bazaar, >  the various booths in charge of Mrs.  Delzell and Mrs. Amor, Mrs. Metcalfe and Mrs. Coville, Mrs. Leslie  and Miss Piatt, Miss Lucy Monro and  Miss Eva Tubman, Mrs. Skidmore  and Mrs. Lemond, Mrs.1 Lingenfeld-  er and Mrs. Hendrickson, Miss Lin-  genfelder and Mrs. Wilson, were well  patronized. Mrs. Metcalfe won the  fancy cushion drawn for during 4he  evening,' while Mrs. Wilson was the  successful contestant in a guessing  contest, receiving a fancy doily., ���������  ,.|..t.l|.,t..t.l|Mt���������|lltl,|.l|m.l||,|,l|���������|���������|.,|,,tl,|.l|l.t..|ll|il|i  "SAfCTY MIST"  Sas been the watchword of The  utual from the day it waa organized in 1869 up to the present  time.  Only those forma of investment  consistent with the absolute security of policyholders have been  adopted.  The result is an institution that  is among the most stable in the  Canadian Financial World.  Business in force over $87,000,000  Assets over 22,000,000  1$ Surplus over     3,800,000  nheWufoa! life������'Canada  * It would-be a business mistake  for YOU to place your application  with any company without consulting our Agents and familiarizing yourself with the model  policies issued by  CANADA'S QWV UlTOl  Investigation ccaU nothing and htm  nvret* -j-  Write, phone or call for rates, etc. ������  Wm. J. Twiss, District Mgr.     ������  317-319 Rogers Bldg.   f aieoattr, B. C. .*'  ,$wX"H',H^'fr,H'fr'i^'M',H"M''Hi4'*M^  Herbaceous  Plants  for Spring Planting  ALSO  GLADIOLUS  All in first class condition.  Prices moderate.  Heeler's Nursery  Corner 15th & Main  St.  PHONE Fairmont 817 ;���������  South Vancouver Undertakers  Hamilton   Bros.  We are foremost in our line for  Moderate Priced Funerals  6271 Fraur Strait V!k������������ Frastr B  ( vm  3      1 >������M-ic* ������<*������ .ryN^it���������-*, ti -~. -s-4L*JTa.*JtJtr^^(Vik.  a  8  ' -  *' ���������'������   .-  THE WESTERN CALL.  -.,-,  ������ ���������*',  "-"   'i-jd���������mmm mill*.  ���������\-   ,        V   .���������  '.  '  V  t_a r i   ���������jNH^������^"^^^^t^^M"^^^^^���������^^l^^^^^������������������^^l^^^^^���������tM^.^���������I������������������^���������^���������.^.l������������������^4^^^������<^^<^������������  MISCELLANEOUS |  ���������J.  A WALK AROUND THE WORLD.  Mr. and Mrs. James Hartley left their home  at 197 Guy street, Montreal, on the morning of  March 29th on a walk around the world.  Mrs. Hartley is young and pretty 'and Jim  has a way of doing things promptly, for, according to the Missus, he met her on Thursday and  they were married next Wednesday, so that  whilst not out for a record, they expect to make a  fast trip of it. Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Fort  William, Winnipeg and Vancouver are some of  the points en route. Then Australia, New Zealand, Africa, India, Japan, China, Manchuria,  Russia, Germany, England and hack to (Montreal.  The trip is made for the nominal wager of  "one dollar," adventure, no.t money, being the  aim.  Mr. and Mrs. Hartley started with .$2 in their  pocket, and will trust -to fortune to replenish the  pocket book when empty. Mr. Hartley is a singer and dancer, and will give little performances  in the various towns and eities visited.  While not setting any date for their return,  they look forward to 1919 as the very latest, and  Friday, April 17.1914  will publish their diary in book form and settle  down after their "wanderjahre."  Ram says, Ltd., Montreal  Mr. William M. Ramsay, manager and vice-  president of Ramsay Bros. & Co.,'Ltd., biscuit  manufacturers, will leave on Monday to take  charge of Ramsays, Ltd., Montreal, as general  manager. His family, residing at 1156 Burnaby  street, will leave/in May to join him in Montreal.  Mr. Ramsay will be greatly missed in business and  SOME BUILDING  ,".  The newest skysc'rapper in New  York is to be 750 feet high and to  cpnsist of 55 stories.  SOME SHIP     ' //'���������;  Fort  William,    April    5.���������In    the  presence of the executive officers of  the Canadian  Steamship Lines, Ltd.,  .... __ owners of the ship, city officials of  social circles, as he has lived here in Vancouver Fort William and Port Arthur, and  about twenty-four years, and has helped to build approximately 5000 citizens, the  up a large and successful business here. He has  been a prominent member of Pacific Lodge No.  26, I. 0. O. F., and also of St. John's Presbyterian Church and the Rotary Club.  P. BURNS' CAPITAL TRIPLED.  Ottawa, April 3.���������The capital stock of P.  Burns & Company, Limited, of Calgary, has been  increased under Federal letters patent from $3,-  000,000 to $10,000,000.  Mr. Joseph Martin, M P-, denies a report he  will not be a candidate in East St. Pancras atthe  next election. He says he is in the field and intends to stay. -^ ���������  ������������.|..H"M'<i*������iM"t"M"M''t".w.v.^^  ���������$��������� ." .  1 Government of British Columbia Land Sale  | There will be offered at public auction in the cities of Vancouver,  Victoria and Prince George, British Columbia, the Government Holdings  in the Townsites of Prince George, Fort^ George and South Fort George,  comprising in all 2,350 lots.  Dates of sales-  May 19, 20 and 21, Vancouver  May 26 and 27, Victoria  June 9,10 and 11, Prince Gedrge  For full particulars, descriptive literature and maps, apply���������  Armstrong & Ellis  Selling Agents-for Govern ment ofBritishColumbia  Head Office: 804=5 Birks Bldg., Vancouver, B. C.  ������������������H'fr'M"M,'M"H',fr'K~H''H'<',fr<H^  freighter W. Grant Morgan was successfully launched shortly after noon  yesterday.  The keel of the W. Grant Morgan,  the largest bulk freighter in the  world, was laid down early last fall.  It will be put into commission May 1  next.  It is possible to carry in the combined six distinct compartments of  the vessel's cargo hold 586,000 bushels of oats���������equal to twenty train  loads of thirty cars each.. The steamer's length is 625 feet, beam .59 ;feet,  and is 32 feet deep.  The steamer was christened' by  Lady Williams-Taylor, wife' of the  general manager of the Bank of Montreal.  SOME WHEAT���������RUSSIA'S  WHEAT AREA GROWING  Ottawa.���������The weekly trade report  shows that Russia as a competitor of  Canada in< wheat growing, increased  its production, in the last five years  from seventy-three millions quarters  to one hundred and twenty-two million, or nearly one-fourth of the  world's production.  For Sale and  For Rent  .   Cards   v  10c each 3 for 25c  ������feH>������H,<H"H"r^'fr'K;*i,'H'frM^  Pease Pacific Foundry Limited  HEATING AND VENTILATING ENGINEERS  MANUFACTURERS  : Buildings  ii C.t-������yx.i*.rv4*������������njrr" Steam Heaters and Ventiiatore for PubBc Buil(  CLUIIIIIIIV      Warm Air Furnaces ��������� Combination Furnaces  v������/        Steam and Hot Water Boilers. Regurter������V/T^ '  " IflPfll " steam8nd Hot Water Boilers  1U Vfll      Radiators, Pipe and Fittings  1136 Homer St.     Vancouver, B.c.     Tel. Sey. 3230  ^M'<"M"M'*'M'M4^"M'M"H''MM  |.������H������H,'H"M,*'M'<'������^������'M"}'4^  JOS. H. BOWMAN  ARCHITECT  91(M1 Yorkshire Building*  Seymour Street VMcouyer, BV&  Kemlcepe-Vaneeuver Meat Co., Ltd.  Oor. Main end Powell Sim. 1040 Malm Street  Phone Seymour 6561 Phone Pair. 1814  For Choice Meats  of large variety and reasonable prices, this house  cannot be excelled.   It stands to the very front.  ., j QUCKACTHHU.    V ���������  ' fS A        ��������� Orders executed in say, stocks.  Ii*fiplf C no matter what town or,-dta-  ^il/WIVo trict; either for cash or raaivin.  ���������-_i_  u. Local Stocks a Specialty;  noaoa, WNI Write, phone or wire'  CottM Q0NAU) N. RMcCKCQt  Groin local Mbr. Vancouver and Seattle  I Stock Exchanges.'  Witch IMkJlur,      ffcme Seymour 8������<S|  South Shore Lumber Co.  LIMITED%  Lumber Manufacturers  t  * -  Vs  *  1 Front .St.* Foot of Ontario St.  |  PHONE Fairmont 15*   ''  VANCOUVER, & C.  .t.i|i.ti4i<|t^i|M|il>i|i.|i.|M|iij.i|i.|M|..t������|il|n|M|ii}ii|i|ii|i������4>^������.j^^^^.,|,,)H;..;.i}li;.i}.l{l  ,    ��������� ������������������f'l'H'f**f+f'l'W''M+������*������fr<wM^ ������r..T..t..i.,n,.i.j..i..t ,r,,t.i, | ���������i..i..T..T,.T.,T,A.|.....T..t....,T.f.,t.|..| hi ||-f |-| \\ |-| Uijt||ii||||i.|ii|ift1  13500  horse  Power  Turbine  13500  Horse  Power  Turbine  mmmaeamaammmaaanammmWmW^  The Spirit of the Time Demands  SAFE,   E!OQN<S������lrt  Stave Lake Power is Dependable and Economical  By harnessing the Great Stave River we have made it possible to generate 100,000 horse power of electrical energy at our Stave Falls Plant,  the Biggest Electrical Feat in Western Canada.  100,000 HORSE POWER  Or halfas'much again as the combined connected load in steam and electricity in Vancouver today, a fact of great significance to local- industries  WESTERN CANADA POWER CO., Ltd.  "    ~ " " JOHN   MONTGOMERY, Contract Agent  Offices: 603-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg.  Phone: Seymour 4770  R. F. HAYWARD, General Manager  P.O. Drawer 1415  Vancouver, B.C.  ij   ;  ,  .,  nMmniiiiiminnn ii-  .:..>-s;~>^~}~X";-4";-*-i"31 tinw������i^ 11 muni i������*iuiiuihim*���������&<���������;;*itt'#'i������M**t"i*<h*z������i*'*+ ..i..i.|.;..>������������%^^������<.44-i^'-������w-.i"i"i-.i.i4.i.4t'������.i.������.iii">i-i.i-%iH' 111111'11.1������������

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xwestcall.1-0188379/manifest

Comment

Related Items