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The Miner Jun 17, 1898

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Daily   lidition,  No. 33.
.\elson.  British Columbia.  Friday Morning, June 17,  1898.
Eighth Year
owe*
julia Mtfjcwe
fc2��3c
��8��SS��
Just
Received
A shipment of the famous
Julia Marlowe
American Footwear
FOR LADIES
GENERAL WAR NEWS;
Come Early and Secure a Pair.
LILLIE'S  SHOE   HOUSE
WEST BAKER STREET.
JUNE SALES
Ladies'
LADIES'
IV.
Lawns, Organdies,
Prints and Summer
Muslins, Linen and
Pique Dress Skirts,
Denham Suits,   Alpaca     and      Serge
Dress Skirts.
AT   REDUCED   PRICES.
XREST
Corset
D  St  A
"CREST"
CORSETS
Stand every strain. Always
comfortable and absolutely unbreakable, every active woman
needs one.
Unrivalled for golfers and
bicyclists.
Cost only 25c. more than
regular D & A styles, and mado
in all sizes.
Ask to see tbem* (,)
IMPORTANT
:P��CT��i>
KDEVEL0PMENT3   EX-
MrmttmE next
TWENTY-FOUR HOURS.
Bniiipnon to Establish Cable Conner Hon.���
Renewed Efforts to Complete tlie
Equipment or the Troops.���Gen. Miles
ComkuUs With the War Department.
PRICES U)W.
Pred Irvine & Co.
MR. JUSTICE WALKEM ISSUES A
JtESTBAINING ORDER AGAINST
THE GARONNE-
Tke Captain ami  ��lltecrs Cansot Clear
From ;wwr port ��m��We of at. men-
g*W to the ir. �� ��overnment.
England. As the agreement was entered iuto and certain moneys paid before the ship sailed, the plaintiffs contend that tlieir, contract cannot be
varied in that way. As they contracted
that the Garonne should carry them
and their goods to St. Michaels, Captain Couradi and Frank Waterhonse
Limited ax-e restrained from clearing
for any port other than St. Michaels
outside" of the jurisdiction, and the
registrar lias so .wired the collector of
customs at Comox. It is" reported that
��45,000 sterling will be cleared in the
sale to the United States.
rTHE^STIKINE- NAVIGABLE.
Engine
It Is a
"Victoria, June 16.���In chambers this
morning Mr. Justice Walkem made an
f injunction order restraining the captain and officers of the steamer Garonne from clearing for any port outside   the jurisdiction  other  than  St.
I Michaels. The plaintiffs were the
Klondike Research Syndicate, Limited. Before the Garonne sailed from
England they entered into an agreement whereby Frank Waterhouse
agreed to carry froni England to St.
Michaels on the Garonne a steel stern-
wheel steamer with which the plaintiffs intended to go up the Yukon and
prosecute their inining operations.
The Garonne arrived here on Sunday,
having on board the stern-wheel
\ steamer and about twenty members of
the syndicate. Since then the plaintiffs
say that the Garonne has either been
{or will he sold to the United States
government to be used as a transport
ship, and in that event it would be
impossible for them to get their stern-
wheel steamer to St. Michaels, as she
is too large to be put on any ship other
than the Garonne, and it is impracticable to tow her up.
On June 14 "the Garonne was taken
to Coniax, and she is now billed to sail
for  St. Michaels on the 20th, but the
'plaintiffs  say she   has been sold  and
,xtheir river freight steamer will be un-
I loaded and that some other means of
transport will be offered them. In
fact, this sort of arrangement is mentioned in one of the clauses of the bill
of lading, which was given by the offi
"cers of the ship to the plaintiffs
they weje three days out at ^sea,
r Roy Reports. That
y   "Fine Body of Water.
Victoria, June 16.���Mr. J. R. Roy,
resident engineer for the Dominion
government, returned this evening
from Glenora, where he has been with
Chief Engineer Coste for the public
works department ^examining the all-
Canadian route to the Yukon. Mr.
Roy reports the Stikine to be a fine
body of water, which steamers drawing not moro than fx-oin 30 to
40 inches of water and having powerful enough engines may navigate for
six months in the year.
Tho trouble this season has been, he
says, that several steamers with engines not powerful enough have attempted to ascend (be river. The government snagboat ��n.iipson, scut to remove obstructions, could ascend only
757 miles, but beyond work will be
carried on from Glenora.
IRVING   AT   CAMBRIDGE.
after
from
London, June 16.���The degree of
LL. D. was conferred by Cambridge
university on Wednesday upon Sir
Henry Irvirrg, who delivered his inaugural address as Rede lecturer at
Cambridge, in which office he is the
successor of John Ruskin, Matthew
Arnold, Thomas Huxley and other
eminent men of letters. Irving's subject was "The Theatre in Relation to
the State. " He argued that the theatre
being a means of spreading knowledge,
its scope in respect of working upon
the human children deserved encouragement by the state and municipalities.  '
SILVER   QUOTATIONS.
New York, June 16.���Bar silver,
58 1-8.    Mexican dollars, 45����.
Washington, June 16.���In tho way
of actual events there was little to record today. No word came from Sampson at Santiago or from Dewey* at
Manila; This absence4 of affirmative
news gave rise to no apprehension.
The officials are; resting secure in the
belief that the marines at Guantanamo
can easily maintain themselves until
the troops arriye.    .     ,  .-'.'...;SSS. IT
The worst to be feared at Manila is
not harm to Dewey, but- tojtheSpani:
ards.
Officials of the war" department do
not care1 to give out any specific information as to when General Shafter
with his troops will land in" Cuba, but
from certain signs of restlessness exhibited by them it is evident that it
would not be surprising to hear some
very important news within the next
twenty-four hours. Naval officials are
confident that Sampson will havces-
tablislied cable connection within that
time so that news of the arrival of the
American troopships off Santiago
should not be longer delayed than the
time required for a despatch boat to
make the run of 40 miles east along
the coast to tho shores of Guantanamo
harbor, where a cable will.be working
under the protection of Colonel Huntington.
There was an exhibition of feverish
activity at the war department today
so pronounced as to attract attention
even in these stirring times. It was
apparent that renewed efforts were
being made to complete the equipment
of the - troops already- -gathered at tho
concentration points and that preparations are in progress to move a number
of troops. So far, however, it is stated
that no orders have gone out for the
actual movements, and what has and
is being done in this direction is
emerely preparatory. J Very likely
definite action will follow a conference
which Secretary Alger and the president will have with General Miles
when he arrives here tomorrow. The
general is better aware of the state of
fitness of troops and the southern rendezvous points than anyone else, and
the president and Secretary Alger in
all probability will be bound by what
he has to say in deciding upon the
further disposition. If General Miles,
as is thought toy be probable, recommends a further concentration of troops
on, the southern seaboai-d the new
camp at. Fernandino will be made
ready for the reception of additional
troops.;
The president has not yet decided.
what measure of reward shall be meted
out to Lieutenant Hobson for his bravery. The men he led have been taken
care of; Secretary. Long has tended to
that himself, because it was a matter
directly under his authority. The department called upon Sampson for a.
recommendation'in this case, but in
advance of its arrival the department
had about decided to advance Hobson
10 numbers, which would have placed
him just below Constructor Liunard,
when a doubt arose as to whether the
young man would not prefer a transfer
to the line.
The relatives of the lieutenant were
consulted, among them his uncle,
Representative Pearson of North Carolina, and it was decided to allow Hobson fo make his own choice as between
line and staff. Accordingly steps have
been taken to acquaint him with the
purpose of the : department and ask
him what his wishes are in the matter. ������-     ._
Washington, June 16.���The navy department has sent to the battleship
Massachusetts a complete new breech
for one of the big 13-inch guns of that
ship. This was due to a report reaching the department about a week ago
that the breech of one of the guns
was out of order. They reckon that
it will be delivered in "a day or two
and can be readily substituted for the
old breech.
tires,'' and with it was an order for
10 shillings and 6 pence.- In the letter
Elliott said:       . '
''Will you kindly accept half a
guinea as a very small token of a great
regard for the United States and its
present highrandrighteous: enterprise ?
It may furnish a cup of cold water to
some member of your army or navy
bravely.contending in the interests of
humanity and - justice. May God
bless, protect and prosper the United
States and may He hear and answer
the prayers of the venerable and honored chaplain of your house, and may
God bless the Queen."
Mr. J. Meline, . assistant treasurer
of the United States, today sent Mr.
Elliott a certificate of deposit of the
money and'a letter of thanks. In
couching the letter' the assistant treasurer said: .;    .::..;.:.,.:
*''Be pleased-to accept the assurance
that, your generous expressions of
sympathy are received with the feeling
that they . would naturally inspire,
from the near, though foreign, kin of
a great part of the population of this
country."' ��� ..','.'.'*.'.'".
PORTO KIGO INVADED.
NEWS FROM MADRID*.
the
Telegraphic    Communication   in
Philippines/Has Been Cut Off.
. Madrid, June 16.���The Bank of Spain
has agreed to-plac6"28,"000;000' pesetas
at the. disposition of.'the.treasury for
war purposes. A despatch was received
here, from the, commodore of the Vis-
caya and Mendango islands. The latter
is the second largest island of the
Philippines. Under date of June 11 he
says that an envoy, sent to Folio, in
the Island of Pauyai with instructions to endeavor to communicate with
Governor ,;General Augusti, failed in
his mission.   : *f-:\.*:;_"_ .'...yySSL '*-'S7 -'A
The messengers found that the telegraph, lines to the Island of Luzon, of
which Manila is.the capital, had beeu
cut by the insurgents and that the native military were, deserting by wholesale. The Viscaya islands . and - the
Island of Mendango, however, were
quiet. ,
A despatch from the Governor of
Santiago, de Cuba says that . really
nothing- has occurred at that place.
Premier Sagasta upon leaving the cabinet council .today said that the provinces of Luzon .were still loyal to .the
Spanish..government, but that the.situation in Manila was of the most aon.-
OttS-OhaWfl*ter<-*We-rt--i'-i.-r;!'---*-^-r,t ;t,.ri ,.-,
TWENTY   THOUSAND   MEN   WILL
STARr FOR tORTO RI00
IMMEDIATELY.
Thirly-Flve  Transports  Have  Beeu Pro*
cured.���Embarkation   Will Be From
Fcraaudtao, Florida and Savaaaah
Georgia.���Bargalal'az *"or ���MP.
MORE   SYMPATHIES.
A  Telegram" From  Gloucester,- England, to Gloucester, Massachusetts.
Gloucester, Mass., June 16.���The
following telegram, referring to the
killing and mutilation of two marines
at Guantanamo by the Spanish at the
American camp on Saturday night
last, was received by Mayor Davis today: ���
"To the Worshipful Mayor of
Gloucester,,- Massachusetts: .please accept: sympathy of our .citizens over the
death and reported, mutilation of your
fellow:townsmen. I hope \ it is not
true. . .:.
(Signed)    COLLIS BRANWOOD."
The following answer was: sent to
Colllis Branwwd, Gloucester,���:��� England:     '  r -~'
" We appreciate your kind sympathy.
The report of mutilation isTtrue.
(Signed)     FRANK DAVIS, Mayor."
LONDON COMMENTS.
Washington, June 16. ���The war department expects to utilize approximately 35 transports in the exportation
expedition for.JJie. invasion, of Porto
Rico. This statement was made officially at the department today. It seems
to indicate that the Porto Rico a^my
will equal, if it does not exceed in
numbers, that which left for Santiago.
The estimate is made that the 35 vessels will carry between 15,000 and 20,-
000 inen with 'their equipment and
subsistence. The army officials say the
reports which have been received from
reliable sources show that the number
of Spanish soldiers ,in that country is
probably 10,000, although other state- ���
ments indicate that there is considerably less than this number.
It is stated positively that the embarkation point for troops for Porto
Rico has not yet been finally determined and Will not .be until Secretary Alger and the president have had
a conference- with . Major General
Miles, who returns to the city tomorrow. There is no doubt, however, that
the embarkation will take place probably from Fernandino, Florida and
Savannah, Georgia
Assistant Secretary Meiklejohu said
today that thc department has now
available enough transports, some of
which are already at southern points,
and these - will carry about 6000 meu
with their equipments. "The war department is now in communication
with various coast steamship companies on the Atlantic ocean and Gulf
of Mexico^'ports with a view to securing the additional vessels needed. Mr.
Meiklejohu said it had not been determined whether any of the vessels
which were soon to reach Santiago
would be utilized. That was a matter
entirely contingent upon the military
aspect of affairs as they might develop
in eastern Cuba.
PROTECTING THE COAST.
ENGLISH   SYMPATHY.
A Poor Man Sends  a Small  Gift and
������   ' Sympathetic Letter.
Washington, June 16.���Evidence of
English sympathy with the United
States in the war is being manifested
to the government in.many ways. One
of the most pleasing tributes of friendship has come to the treasury department through Speaker Reed.
He received a letter addressed to him
in his official capacity, signed by W.
Hume Elliott, of Rainsbottom, Manchester, England. The letter was addressed "To the President of the
United States,   House of Representa-
Canada Will Not Suffer by Her Ex-
clusion by Germany.
^TorontOriJune^ 16.^Thetfollowingis
a special to the Telegram, dated London, Junerl6:. ��� ;
*���������' The Daily. Mail in an editorial regarding; Germany's exclusion of Canada says that '.'Canada will not suffer
for her self-sacrifice on behalf of the
Empire." ���:.. ���
The St. James' Gazette, commenting
on the same question, affirms that
"the action of .Germany gives Canada
a free hand in making 'treates with
England and other nations."
A propos of this situation the Gazette makes the * following quotation
from Kipling's poem: "Daughter am
I in my mother's house, but mistress
in. my own "
The attorney general in the house of
commons this afternoon, replying to a
question from Mr. Hogan, member for
Mid Tipperary.said lie declined to discuss the question of Senor Polo y Ber-
nabe's recent stay iu Toronto, but he
believed that under the circumstances
had the colonial government ejected
him it would   not bo liable   for dam-
COPPER QUOTATIONS.
War Department Taking Steps to Patrol the Atlantic Coast.
Washington, June 16,���The navy department has now completed arrangements for the Atlantic and Gulf coast
patrol and stretching from Eastport,
Maine, around to New Orleans there
are no less than forty auxiliary naval
craft, including swift yachts, reconstructed single turret monitors of tho
civil war, tug boats, ferry boats and
not a few well armed merchant vessels. These.forty ships are disposed at
the several large coast and Gulf cities,
while a hundred miles or more seaward an '��� outer : picket line is main
tained by-four of the larger and more
effective warships of the San Francisco
class. One of these outer pickets is
maintained ^as^far^north. as Nova _
Scotia, and the southerly picket is off
the eastern coast of Georgia. The largest number of defense vessels is at New
York city.
A  PROGRESSIVE POLICY.
Pekin, June 16.���Weng Tung Ho, a
member of the council of state and of
the state foreign office, has
been dismissed from the cabinet office,
and is succeeded by Wang Ween Cha,
the viceroy of Child. The dismissal
of Weng Tung Ho in conjunction witli
other events is looked upon as indicating the adoption of a moro progressive
policy on the part of China.
SPANISH COALER DETAINED.
Gibraltar, Juno 16.��� The1' Spanish
trans-Atlantic liner San Augustine has
arrived here from Cadiz for the purpose of shipping 1800 tons of coal. She
has been detained by the British
authorities pending a guarantee that
the coal is intended for purely commercial purnoses.
June  16.���Copper, dull.
8;   exchange,   11.75 and
New York,
Brokers. 11 3
12.
Lead, strong; brokers, 3.70; exchange, 3.90 and 3.95.
Tin, firm; straits, 15.20 and 15.25.
GOVERNMENT   SUPPORTERS.
Vancouver, June 16.���At the government meeting held here last night
Mayor Garden, Dr. Carroll, W. S. McDonald and W. J. Bowser were nominated. The meeting was very enthusiastic and largelv attended. J. J. Ban-
field, D. S. MacDonnell and J. C.
McLagau made rousing speeches in
behalf of the Turner government.
Gibraltar, June 10.���The San Augustine was detained on the American
consul's representations that the coal
was intended for the Cadiz fleet.
CUBAN   ROADS BAD.
London, June 16.���The Madrid correspondent of the Times, commenting
on the absence of Spanish newsVas.to
the operations at Guantanamo, says :
General Linnare sent emissaries from
Santiago to Calmera to make inquiries,
but the roads proved impassable. This
suggests reflections as to the probable
rate of the advance of the Americans,
hampered by artillery and opposed by
efficient and well seasoned Spanish
troops. wo^^m^fcwlSw*)
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TROUBLE WITH KRUGER.
Public interest has been so absorbed
With the Hispano-American war, the
difficulties with France in western
Africa and other matters of first-class
importance that the unsatisfactory
state of affairs in the Transvaal has to
a large extent escaped public notice
and comment.
The Transvaal republic was originally started by a section of the Dutch
population of Cape Colony, who trekked
north in search of more unoccupied
territory in which to pursue their
favorite ��� occupations of hunting and
cattle raising. There has been trouble
with the Boers from the first, which
culminated in the disastrous Boer campaign of 1883-4.
In 1884,. after peace had been restored, a convention was drawn up between Great Britain and the Boer government, by which independence was
granted them subject io certain limitations and conditions. These conditions
���were substantially to the effect that
Great Britain was to retain her feuze ?
rainty, and that the Transvaal should
not make political treaties with foreign
powers. It also included certain limitations as to legislation. There was
subsequently a second supplementary
convention drafted in which the suzerainty of England was not mentioned.
This second convention was, however,
intended to be read in'conjunctioa with
the first, as a glance at its contents
shows, and it was not until recently
that the Boers claimed that it was to
be read alone, and based their claims
to entire independence on it. *���:.-.',
President Kruger has been growirig
more obstinate and unreasonable as he
gets older, and has for the last few
years wielded, a despotic authority.
An instance of this was given when he
deposed Mr. Kotze, the chief justice of
the Transvaal, who delivered o>n adverse judgment on the constitutionality
of a law which came up before his
court. Mr. Kotze is now in London
seeking redress from the British
"authorities.
The grievances of the " U itlanders,"
ity of the Transvaal is entirely due,
are well known, one of the chief ones
being that they were outrageously
taxed and had no voice in the disposal
of the money, while the laws of the republic made it practically impossible
for them to becomejeitizeus or to get a
vote. Th-ey are obliged also to send
their children to the.Boer schools, where
nothing but Dutch is taught and the
education given is execrable, and it is
very difficult for them to get justice in
tho courts. The "UiWanders," after
exhausting peaceful methods, lost
patience, and the agitation culminated
iii the unfortunate Jamieson raid
which put them temporarily out of
court, by making it impossible for the
British government to interfere in
their behalf, for the time being, at
any rate.
President Kruger availed himself of
this  moral  .advantage? by  having the
alien   act passed, which  is aimed directly at  British  residents, and contravenes the express declarations of the
convention  which  states  that    there
shall   be   no legislation affecting the
rights   of    British   subjects   without
the consent of Her Majesty's government.    The    colonial   secretary,   Mr.
Joseph  Chamberlain,   in his despatch
last October,   protested  against  this,
and after some exchange of despatches
President Kruger, finding his position
illogical and  untenable, has taken the
stand that Great Britain has no right*
of suzerainty over the Transvaal at all,
and offers to submit the matte* to arbitration.
Arbitration, in. this instance, ia out
of the question, for that wolild be
tantamount to surrendering all claims
to suzerainty, which is the very point
at issue. Thus a deadlock has been
reached, and it is very fortunate for
the Boers that the British government
has had too many other and more important affairs on hand lately, to give
the matter much attention. It will
not be long now before the matter is
settled, and if Kruger does not-soon
see the error of his ways, there are
likely to be some very sorry people in
the Transvaal.
In another column will be found ain
effusion from a householder on Victoria
street. The grievance he complains of
is no fanciful one, for the state��of Vic-
oria street is scandalous and presents a
great contrast to the principal streets
of the city. The small strip bf sidewalk that exists on the northeastern
corner is rotten from age and neglect,
and is positively dangerous to walk
over at night, while the greater part of
the rest of the street has no sidewalk
at all. The only reason that can be
discerned for this state of affairs is the
fact that the office of this paper is on
Victoria street, and we have sometimes
found it our duty to oppose measures
Of the city council. We hope that the
council, by promptly removing the
cause of complaint, will show that the
omission was accidental, and that they
were not actuated by feelings of petty
spite.       :-  '��� -������������. .   . ���
PIRATE OF SPANISH MAIN.
Morgan was a Welshman but not
otherwise a thief. In the perspective
of history he resembles a hero. There
his figure projects. Behind it is a
fleet of 87 vessels equipped with 2000
men. They were pirates and he was
their chief. As a lad he shipped before
the mast, reached the Antilles, met
Manswelt,the Dutch filibuster, enrolled
under the black flag, mounted hand
over hand to the grade of vice admiral,
and when his superior died, took com*
maud. His first achievement was the
sack of Puerto Principe. Puerto Bello
was the next to fall. Over the city a
pestilence stalked. It arose from the
putrefaction of the unburied dead.
Guzman, the president pf Panama,
came to the rescue. He brought with
him an army and left a ransom. It
was not the pestilence that frighened
him, it. was Morgan. Then presently
the latter was ��far, leaning -against
the Fillars of. Hercules, threatening to
pull them down, attacking Gibraltar,
silencing the forts there and demolishing a fleet
Meanwhile, partly at Jamaica, partly
at St. Thomas, he had stored his booty.
It seemed inconsiderable. To increase
the went back to Panama, There were
8000 men to receive him. He and his
band cut them to pieces. He took the
town, and from it money and jewels
to tbe value of $7,000,000. It was a
nest-egg, one which he would have
multiplied had it not been that at this
juncture peace between England and
Spain was arranged. By way of compensation be was knighted. Thereupon he married settled down, and
lived to tell his grandchildren tales of
his hazardous youth. They can hardly
be forgotten in St. Thomas yet. But
the place has lost its savior. Today it
is little more than a marine roundhouse, a restaurant and water-tank for
passing ships. ���Collier's Weekly.
ABOUT ADVERTISING.
SHADES
GLASSES.
SPECTACLES.
Eyesight Tested Free-
W. F. TEETZEL & CO. Nelson, B. C.
PERSCRIPTION& CAREFULLY COHPOUNDED.
WEST KOOTENAY
BUTCHER COflPANY
All kinds of Fresh and Salted Meats wholesale and retail. Fresh Fish received daily.
Mail orders receive careful  and   prompt  at
tention.
E. C. TRAVES, Manager.
P. BURNS & CO.
$Mmk and Retail Meat Merchants
HEAD OFFICE NELSON* B. C.
Branch Markets in Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Kaslo,
Sandon, Three Porks, New Denver and Slocan City.
Orders by mail to any branch will have careful and prompt attention.
530
The tongue of a well pleased patron
always is a good advertising medium.
���Iron Age.
No permanent advertising success
has been- achieved through exaggera-
ion or misrepresentation.
----- Bewareof^hejrpaper-that claimsH��l
guarantee results or no pay. No one
can guarantee the results of an advertisement, for once printed it never:
dies, and may bring returns years
hence. ���N. Y. Electrical Review.
It is a mistake to scatter your appropriation through half a dozen journals
simply because the.town is supporting
that many papers The result is, you
have small ads in all; you are nobody
anywhere, whereby if you will concentrate your space in the two best papers,
then the people will give you credit
for being a plunger, a heavy advertiser, an enterprising merchant.���Prosperity.
The American Machinist of New
York sends out a card which reads:
Some men won't advertise when
they are busy���think it will last forever.  ���
Some  men  won't   advertise  when
WE WOULD LIKE
In some way, to induce every man, woman and
child in the country who Buys in Nelson to come and inspect our
stock arid prices. \Ve'would have you do this for we are sure
that you would become our customer and friend. We have the
largest and best selected stock of Groceries in the city. The
famous products of every country in our line are represented on
our shelves.
EVERYTHING FIRST CLASS.���Never behind the times. Nn retrograding
here. Our business is iun to serve its pit irons to their best interests,
as well as our own, and you can always depend upon cur best service
being afforded you.
The fairness of our prices throughout our entire Iim at all times shows onr
grasp upon the market.     CAN'T BE BEAT AT ALL;   THAT'S ALL.
M. Des Brisay & Co., Nelson.
GHOCEBS AND PUCTVXHON MERCHANTS.
$   PETER OENELLE .& CO.
: : NELSON BRANCH : :
'���''-':'i��S9e-*weses':-. ��� .'.
We are; prepared to furnish.kiln dried lumber at regular
prices and carry Rough and Dressed Lumber, Coast
Flooring and Ceiling, Turned Work and Mouldings,
Shingles and Lath, Sash and Doors. Estimates
Cheerfully given.
OFFICE AND YARD C. P. R. STATION.    ...
4.   E.   YOUNG, AGENT.
of
all
times  are   dull���think  the  crack
doom is just about to the city line.
There are  others who  advertise
the time.
The latter attract inquiries and
orders, and in good times can pick
what they want.
In dull times they get all there is
going���the other fellows are out of the
business.
One is an optimist- in prosperity, a
pessimist in adversity, and a narrow
gauge weakling all the time
The other is just a plain, common
sense business man.
What kindfare you?
ANGLO-FRENCH DISPUTES.
London, June 16.���In aa interview
today with the Paris correspondent of
the Daily Mail, M. Hanotaux, minister
of foreign affairs, said that the settlement of the Niger disputes cleared all \
serious questions between France and
England except that of Egypt.
Wall Papers,
Fishmg Tackle,
Garden & Flower Seeds.
LACROSSE,
BASEBALL,
ano TENNIS GOODS.
GNS- -^Z>^
GiiW&BOOKCo.
d5
LIMITED
Pimhase
Your Tobaccos,
��� AT THK ���
Post Office
Cigar Store
Where  you will alwajs find a well
assorted stock of Imported   and
w   DomesticCigars,!Cigarettes Tobaccos and a full stock of
Pipes at reasonable
Prices.
S. J. MIGHTON. dl9>
Notice of Dissolution,
Official Directory.
DOMINION DIRECTORY.
Governor-General - Earl of Aberdeen
Premier - - Sir Wilfrid Laurier
Member House of Common?, Dominion Parliament, West Kootenay Hewitt Bostock
PROVINCIAL DIREdTORY.
Hon T R Mclnnes
Hon J H Turner
Hon D M Eberts
Hon GB Martin
Lieut.-Goveriior
Premier - .
Attorney-General
Com of Lands and Works .��� ���
Minister Mines and Education Hon Jas Baker
President Executive Council HonCE Pooley
Members Legislative Assembly tor West; Kootenay��� North Riding J M Kellie
South Riding                  - .T-FHume
Notico is hereby given that the partnership
heretofore subsisting between us as Brewers in
Nelson, B.C., has this day been dissolved by
mutual consent. All debts owing to the said
partnership are to bc paid to the undersigned
William Gosnell and oil claims against the
said partnership are to be presented to the said
William Gosnell at the Castle Brewery, Nel-
sbn. B.C.. by whom the same will be settled.
Dated at Nelson, B.C., this 28th day of May
A.D., 1888, 3wks
Witness:
Edward A. Crease
WM. .GOSNELL.
AUGUST STADLER
REISTERER & CO.,
Brewers of Fine Lager
Beer and Porter.
Drop in   and see   us.
NELSON,
B.C.
Householders Please Note.
The humble daddy long-legs; the
flying and cheerful ant; the irrepressible blow fly and the genial winged
bug can be kept out of your houses
by UFing SCREEN DOORS
2ft. 6 x 6ft. C at $1.50.
2 ft. 8 x 0 ft. S at $1.75.
2 ft.10 x 6 ft.10 at $2:00.
Screen  Windows made to order in
all sizes at the
*"'���-, " J;
NELSON PLANING MILLS
T, W. GRAY,   Proprietor.
NELSON OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Mayor - .    ,      John Houston
Aldermen���Chas Hillyer, W F Teetzel, J A
Gilker, J J Malone, E P Whalley. Thos.Madden.
City Clerk - . J K Strachan
Police Magistrate - EA Crcaee
Chief of Police . A F McKinnon
Chief of Fire Department . W J Thompson
Auditor - John Hamilton
Water Commissioner - T M Ward
Health Officer - - Dr. LaBau
Oity council meets every Monday, 3 p.m., at
city hall, cor Victoria and Josephine st
SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
Dr. EC Arthur. Dr. GAB Hall, Geo Johnstone.   Principal���J-11 Green.
SOUTH KOOTENAY BOARD  OF TRADE.
President - J Roderick Robertson.
Vice-President . James Lawrence.
Seey-Trcas. - John A Turner.
KOOTENAY LAKE GENERAL HOSPITAL
President   ? - John A Turner.
Vice-Pros. - ��    ���    '      VV. A. Jowett.
Secretary - D McArthur.
Treas.-. - A H Clements
Medical Sup!;. . Dr. GABHall.
Close
8.00 p.m.
8.30 a
1-00 p.
5.00 p.
NELSON POST OFFICE
United States, Ontario, Que
bee and Eastern Provincet
Points on N. & F. S. line.
Victoria* and norland.
Vew Denver. Sandon and
Slocan Lake Points,
fvaslo and Kootenay Lake
l-'oints
Rossland. Trail. Nakusp.
Itobson. points on main line
0. _P. 11.. Vancouver and
vV'innipcg
Due
5.15 p.m.
12.3 p.m.
7.15 a. m.
7.00 a.m.
:,    office nouns.
Lobby opened from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.; General
Delivery, 8 aim, to 8 p.m.;  Registration. 8.30
a.m. to 7 p.m.; Money Orders and Savings Bank
On.m. to -1 p.m.; Sundny 1 hour (10 to 11 a.m).
���J. A. GILKER, Postmaster.
DISTRICT DIRECTORY.
Government Inspector of Agencies XV J Goepel
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder-Tax Col
Collector of Customs
Provincial Assessor
County Court Judge
Registrar .. -
O. G. Dennis
-       RF Tolmie
Geo. Johnstone
John Keon,
J A Forin.
ETHSimpkiiiK,
PROVINCIAL JAIL DIRECTORY.
Warden - Capt. N Fitzstubbs.
First Jailor ���'.,',,.- R LiddcP.
Second Jailer - Geo Partridge.
Third Jailer - John McLaren'
Senior Guard - R Ince.
CIIUROH DIRECTORY.
e Church of Enoland-Matin 11a.m.; Even
Song. , so p.m. every Sunday. Holy Communion on 1st and 3rd Sundays in the month after
M.itins: on 2nd and |th Sundays, at 8 a.m
���Sunday School at 2.30 p.m. Rev. H. S. Akehurst. Rector.   Cor Ward and Silica streets. ���
Presbyterian CHURcir-Servicesat 11 a.m.
and 7.30 p.m. Sunday School at 2.30 p.m.
Prayer meeting Thursday evening at 8 p.m.-
Christian Endeavor Society meets every Monday evening at 8 o'clock. Rev. R. Frew
Pastor. '
Methodist CnuRcn-Corner Silica and
Josephine Streets. Services at II a.m. and 7.30
p. m. ; Sabbath School, 2.30p.m.: Prayer meeting on Friday evening at 8 o'clock; Epworth
League C. E., Tuosday at 8 a.m. Rev. Geo. H.
Morden, Pastor. ������'���������
Roman Catholic Church���Mass at Nelson
every Sunday at 8 and 10.30 a.m.; Benediction
at 7.30 to 8 p.m.   Rev. Father Ferland, Priest.
Baptist Church ��� Services morning and
evening at 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m.; Prayer meeting Wednesday evening at 8 p.m.; Meetings
arc held in the school house. Strangers cordially welcomed.   Rev. G. R. Welch, Pastor.
Salvation Army���Services.. every evening
jit 8 q^clock in barracks, on Victoria street.
AUiutantTVlillhcr in charge.
LODGE MEETINGS.
A   NELSON LODGE, No. 23. A. F. & A.
^t^^j^M. meets second Wednesday in each
.^^Amonth.   Visiting brethren invited.
G. L. Lennox. Secretary.
���I. O. O. F. Kootenay Lodge
No. 16, meets every Monday night,
at  their  Hall, Kootenay street.
Sojourning Odd Fellows cordially invited,?
> WM. HODSON, Secretary.
.��� NELSON LODGE No. 25, K. of P..
\funeeta in Castle hall, McDonald block
Jqevory Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock,
"7All visiting knights cordially invited,
  J. J. Malonk, CC.
(8201 Geo. Partridge. K. of R. and g.
NELSON LODGE. I. O. G. T. Meets in
Castle HaU, McDonald Block, every Monday
evening at 8 o'clock. Visiting Templars cordially invited, John Tei.kord,
Chief Templar.
George Nunn    Sec'y
NELSON S QUEEN NO. 241
SONS OF ENGLAND, meets
second and fourth Wednesday of
each month at K. of P. Hall, MacDonald Block, cor. Vernon and
Josephine streets. Visiting breth-
rn cordially invited. Ernest King,
Chas. H. Farrow, Worthy President
Secretary.
COURT KOOTENAY, I.O.F., J-TO.-3138 meets
lst and 3rd Wednesday in each month in the
K of P Hall. F W Swanell. CD, 8. C. R.;JR
Green, C.R.: J. Purkiss. Secy.
NELSON LODGE, NO. 10 A.O.U.W., meets
every Thursday in the LO.O.F. hall. F W
Swanell, M.W.: W Hodson. Rec.-Sec; J. J.
Driscoll, Financier F. J Squire. Receiver and
P. M. W.
NELSON L.O.L. No. 1C92 meets in the McDonald block every Thursday evening at 8
o'clock. Visiting members cordially invited.
John Toye, W.M.; F. J. Bradley, R.S.
I A
i'iXJ fl ��� v'iigiitisli^^
!3i?^.^ffiffi?^
ir^ ^n r^mF-"nVitfriffiriTT'-^^1"7-
THE MINER, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1898
MRAL LOCAL NEWS.
ffENTS   OP   IMTEEEST   IN   AND
AROUND NELSON.
j-lcT   Mention   of   Happenings   in   the
District During llie Past
Frw Iknyg.
!R. W. Brock, Ottawa,   is  registered
the Phair.
A. Whealler, barrister, of Kaslo, was
Nelson visitor yesterday.
F.   McKay, a  Kaslo   hamster,
lent yesterday in the city.
ITho brick work of the new Odd Pel-'
lvs' hall has teen started.
���A. T. Garland returned last night
un a business visit to Kaslo.
JH. Coy Kendall, a railroad contractor
St. Paul, was in the city yesterday.
'T. A. McLean, San Francisco,, and
Outhbert, Spokane, registered at
le Phair yesterday.
���Captain Petty will put 20 more men
work  in   his  mining properties in
3 St. Mary's district.
N". T. Hincen, paymaster of the
okane Fulls & Northern railway,
ts in the city yesterday on official
isiness.
The   Salvation   Army   had   an   ice
3am  and cake  social  last  night at
lich a pleasant evening was spent by
targe audience.
ptaff Captain and Mrs. Turner of
tokauo visited the local Salvation
|"my corps last night and took part
I the programme.
���John A, Gibson returned yesterday
|jm the Dominion^capital, whei'e he
fpnt a few weeks ago as a delegate
|om the South Kootenay board of
|tde in connection with the question
lead duty.
The lake is rising rapidly, and is al-
ady higher than at any time last
.ar. The C. P. R. wharf and; part of
e track are under water, and the de-
��t is almost inaccessible for teams for
*.e same reason.
The arrangement committee in con-
pction with the Dominion day cele-
ation are getting things in shape,
" express the confidence that a very
[rge crowd of visitors will be here on
dy 1.-
m '���:���'���
|The Kootenay Supply company spent
^je greater part, of yesterday  moving
f-air stocV: into their commodious new
limises, x��i Vernon   street, iihmedi-
|sly opposite Turner, Beeton &Co.,
���lere they will henceforward transact
iness.   *���*..,.>'
?.-,C. Gamble, of the firm of Gamble
lO'Reilly,   has   selected the site for
new court house   at Rossland.    It
1 be on Columbia avenue, near the
border's office. It will be a frame
[tiding,   two  stories, and will   cost
00.
This
spring a hotel has been built at
ta, where the Duncan trail be-
J.s, and has done a very good busies thus far. Every Tuesday and Fri-
|Jf evening the Canadian Pacific Rail-
ly company's steamer Kokanee
|kes a round trip to Argenta from
and is handling considerable
i|ght and u good list of passengers.
|p little steamer Idaho, which plies
Duncan  lake,   has also begun to
|S- HAVE
lgenta,_
a lot of
e
/hich no well appointed
Iiome should be  without
luring the warm weather.
^e have also constantly
|3ii hand a full line of. .
umber's Supplies,
Steam Fittings,
and Hardware
of every description
which we are offer-
ingat very low prices.
Ecouver Hardware Co..
incouver & Nelson, B.O.
(die
mako regular trips for tho -season, aiid
will be found a great convenience to
px'ospectors and miners.
SLOCAN ORE SHIPMENTS.
For the month of May there were
cleared at the Kaslo customs house 1,-
860,857 pounds of ore, valued at $07,-
735, containing 690,086 pounds of lead
and 94,052 ounces of silver. Of this
amount the port of Nakusp is credited
with 540.000 gross pounds of pre, valued
at $15,498, containing 54,000. pounds
gross of lead and 24,300 ounces of silver. The shipments through the port
of Kaslo proper were : Ruth, 528,000
pounds; Slocan Star, 480,000 pounds;
Whitewater, 74,000 pounds; Antoine,
37,000 pounds; Coin, 25,000 pounds.
ROBSON-PENTICTON RAILWAY.
'' The contractors on the Robsou-
Penticton railway are making active
preparations for commencing work,''
said John G. Sullivan, the principal
assistant engineer in charge to a Rossland reporter this week. "A little
town nailed Brooklyn is springing up
at tho mouth of Dog creek on Lower
Arrow lake, just across the lako from
Deor Park. A force of men are engaged in building a wagon road from
the lake to the divide pass on the summit of the divide. As soon as the
wagon road is completed so that supplies and tools may bc taken in, the
work of grading will be actively
pushed all along the line of the proposed railway. The work would have
beon commenced today but. the rain
has delayed operations for a day or
two."
CROW'S NEST GRIEVANCES.
The Toronto Globe says: While it is
certain that contractors, sub-contractors
and all others concerned in the Crow's
Nest Pass scandal ought to compensate
the men for the wrong done them, we
do not think the men ought to be compelled to wait until they can recover
from the offending parties. The credit
of the country is at stake. It >vill be
well not to leave the men to fight for
their rights with a powerful corporation and wealthy contractors. The
government ought to use every engine
at its command to compel redress. It
might take a step further and comr
pensate the victims itself and then try
conclusions with those who have
abused its liberality and brought discredit on the country. Offenders should
be made to understand they will have
to fight the parliament and people of
Canada if they try to evade justice.
ORDER IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mr. S. T. Wood, special correspondent
of The Toronto Globe, is much impressed with the manner in which the
laws are administered and order is enforced in this province. After reviewing the peculiar conditions prevailing
in British Columbia, he says:
"All these conditions tend to increase the difficulty of preserving
order. They create d augers that can
be scarcely appreciated in a settled
farming district. And the fact that
the peace is as well preserved and that
life and property are as safe in British
Columbia as in Ontario is most creditable to Chief Hussey and the force under his control. Let the story spring
up of a big nugget in a new mining
town in any part of the province and
immediately there is a provincial
police station established there vyith
authority to move the slow-grinding
wheels of British justice against all
malefactors."
This compliment to our province reflects credit not only upon the efficient
force but upon all persons charged
with the administration of justice.���
Victoria, B. C., Colonist.
SLOCAN VOTERS' LIST.
Alexander Lucas of Kaslo, collector
of votes for the new Slocan riding, has
just completed the compilation of the
lists of registered voters. While the
records have not yet been checked up,
they are practically as follows: Kaslo,
572 votes; New Denver, 208; Sandon,
155; Slocau City, 145; Three Forks,
96 u Ainsworth. 75; Silverton. 63;
Whitewater, 58; . Robson, 21; Pilot
Bay, 19; Cody, 19; Bear Lake, 15;
Balfour, >5 ; Verey, 11; Aylwin, 11;
Duncan, 10; Deer Park, a; Roseberg,
5 ; McGuigan, 4; Lardo, 1; Kokanee,
1; Slocan Crossing, 1; giving a total
of 1510 votes in the entire riding.
THE NELSON ELEVEN.
The following players have been
chosen to represent Nelson in the
cricket match against Rossland, which
is to be played on Saturday, the 18th
inst. No captain has as yet been selected. The names of the players are:
W. F. Brougham, E. M. Brown, P.
Criddle" J. Elliot, IP. Elliot, Frank
Fletcher, H. B. Haynes, F. A. MeCrae, K. E. McKenzie, J. R. Rowley,
E. C. Senkler aud H. J. Wilson.
B. C. 'S SWITZERLAND.
| ���������������������������������������������������������������������
li  -
% WHAT
1DO
���*>
<���
t YOU
I WANT
| For One Cent a Word?
��� '.'���''���
��     You can find a buyer for "Any
��� Old Thing " if you advertise.
ClasHlOcd Advertisements.
All advertisements in this column nro
1 cent a word each insertion.   No.ad-
X   vertisement taken for less than 25 cent?.
������������������������������������������������������������������<
FOR SAL E
Old papers at Tin: Miner office,   25 conts
per hundred.
WANTED.���A situation as chamber-maid cr
second holp in kitchen, by young lady. Apply
Temperance Hotel.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOUND.���A small key, National Cash Register.   Apply ;'Miner" ollice.
THE  KELSON   CAFE
Gives a first-class meal for
25 CENTS & UPWARDS
ICE  CREAM  &   CAKE   15c.
JAPANESE  *  TEA *   PARTIES
Every Afternoon. -AA'
EXPERIENCED WAITRESSES.
OPEN ALL NIGHT.
of the rich foliage, which, reflected in
the blue waters, makes it difficult to
distinguish the line where land and
waterjjmeet; with the hills and mountains iii the background on every side,
closing in the landscape with snowcapped peaks glistening in the sunshine ; here a mountain torrent tearing
over the rocks"; there a glacier; now a
jutting point of land seeming to close
the passage, only to reveal another
wide expanse of water, with still new
landscape, the blue hills bathed in summer haze aiid softened so as to present
an enchanting panorama to the delighted voyager.���News-Advertiser.
TWO CLAIMS SOLD.
Have Been Purchased by F. L. Mercer
".y-S'y for $7000.
The Golden Gate and the Jennie
Lind, two prohiising copper properties
near Hall's siding, in the Ymir district; have been sold to F. Ii. Mercer
of this city by the owners, Daniel and
John Baten. The price was $7000 cash,
which was paid yesterday at Nelson.
The deal was put through by Alex
Chisholm of Rossland. The work on
the property includes a 16-foot ahdan
8-foot shaft, together wiith a 16-foot
tunnel. The showing is said to be very
good.
Mr. Mercer also purchased the Dodo,
in the same country, near the Flossie
R. The Dodo was owned by J. Chestnut, who got $1700 for it.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
and  SOO--PACIFIC LINE
.PREMIER^TITRNER^COMINfi^
Vancouver, Juno 16.���Premier Turner leaves tomorrow for Delta. He
will be at Chilli whack on Saturday,
and will visit : the Kootenay next
week. -''"'".'
THE DIRECT and SUPERIOR SERVICE ROUTE
To all Eastern and European
Points.   :
To Pacific Coast and Transpacific Points.
To the Rich and active Mining
Districts  of Klondike and the
.   Yukon.
New Tourist Car Service
Daily to St. Paul.
Daily (except Monday) to Eastern Canadian and U.S. Points.
Tickets issued through and Baggage checked to destination.
dailVtrain.
To Rossland and Main  Line points,
G.lOp.m.-Leavos���NELSON���Arrives-10.30p,m
Kootenay Lake���Kaslo Route.
Stb. Kokanee
Except Sunday. Excopt Sunday.
4  p.m.���Loaves���NELSON���Arrives���11  a.m.
Calling at way ports in both directions.
Kootenay Hlver Koate.
Str. Nelson.
Mon. Wed. Fri. <   ? Mon-, Wed. Fri.
7 a. m.���Leaves���NELSON ---Arrives���8.30 p. m.
Runs to Kuskanook (formerly Armstrong's
Landing) calling at way ports and makes close
connections at Pilot Bay with Steamer Kokanee. Steamer may make additional trips provided business offers,
Trains to and from Blocnn City, Handon
anil Slocun Lake Points.
(Sundays Excepted)
fla, m.���Leaves���NELSON���Arrives���2.20p.m.
Ascertain Pbesbnt '
Reduced Rates East
and fu.ll information by addressing nearest
local agent, or OEO. S. BEER, City Ticket
Agent, Nelson,
W.F.ANDERSON, E.J. COYLE,
Trav. Pass. Agent,      Dist. Pass. Agent.
Nelson, Vancouver.
Write for Klondike folder and Map.
KASLO & SLOCAN RAILWAY
TIME CARD  NO. I
GOING WK8T.
Leave 8.00 a. m.
" 8.36 a.m.
" 9.36 a. m.
" 9.51 a. m.
" 10.03 a. m.
���'   10.18 a. m.
10.38 a. m.
10.50 a. m.
Daily Gouts East.
Kaslo Arrive 3.50 p.m.
South Fork      "     3.15 p.m.
Are.
Sproule'a
Whitewater
Bear Lake
McGuigan
Cody Junction
2.15 p.m
2.00 tun,
1.18 p.m.
1.33 pm.
1.12 p.m
Sancion        Leave 1.00 p.m.
P       CODY UNE.
Leave llKXta. m.   Sandon     Arrive 11:15 a.m.
Arrive 11:20 "       Cody Leava   11:25  "
ROBT. IRVING,       GEO. F. COPELAND.
261) G. F. & P. A Superintendent.
WHEN
. . . GOING EAST
Use a flrst class line in traveling between
Minneapolis. St. Paul and Chicago, and
the principal towns in Central Wisconsin
Pullman Palace Sleeping and Chair Cars
Service        . .        . . .  .
The Dining Cars are operated in the interest of
its patrons, the most elegant service ever
inaugurated.   Meals are served a la Carte.
To obtain flrst class service your ticket should
read via        .        .        .
��� THP WISCONSIN     *
* CENTRAL I4NES     *
Direct connections at Chicago and Milwaukee
for all Eastern points.        .        .
For full information call on your nearest ticket
agent, or write        .        .        .
Jas. A. Clock.        or       Jas. C. Pond,
General Agent, General Pass. Agent
216 Stark Street, Milwaukee. Wis.
Portland, Ore.       -
"Were these lakes in the east, their
shores would be dotted with hotels and
siimmer cottages,'' said a gentleman
from Chicago a few days ago, as lie
was traveling down the Arrow* lakes
on the Rossland, the latest addition to
the "O. P. R.'s fine fleet of lake steamers that run hetween Arrowhead and
Robson. Even as it is, the delightful
trip of something like ten hours is becoming so well��knowii that the accommodation of these steamers���large as it
is���is sometimes inadequate to meet
the demand on it. At this season the
change from the dust, heat and con-
'finement necessarily connected with a
railroad journey under the most favorable circumstances, is delightful. The
placid waters of these great inland
lakes���interposed, as it were, by nature
as a sort of check on the rush of waters
of the mighty Columbia river on their
long journey from the mountains to
the  sea���surrounded by the soft- tints
International Navigation & Tradisg Company
LIMITED
Time Card Effective Slay 16,1898
Subject to Change without Notice.
8. S. International.
Leaves Kaslo at 3.30 a.'m. every "day except
Sunday, calling at all way points.
Connects at Five Mile Point with S. F. & -N.
train at 6.15 a. in., arrives Nelson at 7.20 a. m.
Leaves Nelson at 4:30.p.m.,connecting at Five
Mile Point with train from Spokane, arriving
at Kaslo 8.30 p. m.
Connects at Pilot Bay with S. S. Alberta for
Bonner' Ferry and Kooienay Kivor points.
8. S. Alberta.
Leaves Kaslo on arrival of K, & S. train on
Saturday and Tuesday at 5.30 p. m., and Thursday at 6 a. ra., touching at all way points. Connects at Bonner's Ferry wilh G. N. trains.
Leaves Bonner's Ferry at 2. p. m. on Sunday.
Wednesday and Friday, arriving at Kaslo 1 p.
m. next day.
Close connection with East Kootenay point
via Jennings and Bonncr.s Ferry.
G. ALEXANDER. Gon. Mgr.
P. O. Box 122, Kaslo, B.C.
Spokane Falls dfc
Northern R'y.
Nelson  &  Fort
Sheppard R'y.
Red Mountain R'y.
The only all rail route without change
of oars between Nelson and Hossland and
Spokane and Bossland.
(Daily Except Sunday)
Leave 6.20 a.m. NELSON Arrive 5-35 p.m.
*'   12:05 "   BOSSL'D   "  11:20   "
:'"    830am.SPOKANE  "   3-10pm.
Train that leaves Nelson at 6:20 a.m.
makes close connections at Spokane for
oil Pacific Coast Points.
Passengers for Kettle River and Boundary Creek, connect at Marcus with Stage
Daily.
COLUMBIA & WESTERN RT.
Schedule
EFFECTIVE   MONDAY NOV.   22,   1897
WESTBOUND
P.M.    P.M.    P.M.
No. S NO. 3 NO. 1
EASTBOUND
P.M.    P.M.    P.M.
No. 2 NO. I No.
3:45 9:00.'. ROBSON.. .8*0 2:30
6.00.  2:00   .10:00...TRAIL....7*0   12:55    1:15
3:15    11:15.ROSSLAND.6-00 12:00 m.
No's. 1 and 2 connect with C. P. R. main line
steamers, and trains to and from Nelson at
Robson.
No's, 3 and I arc local trains between Trail
and Kossland.
No's, 5 and 6 are local trains between Trail
and Robson.   No. 6 connects with train No.
trom Rossland.
All trains daily.
F. P. GUTELIUS. Gen. Supt.
% ������WAR" AND " ROl-UEP OATS." %
O'er earth's greate'st Empire the union jack floats,
And this proudly due, to the use of rolled oats,   ;
While war news it thunders! on the winds it flies, riot,
That states'battles for freedom, are won by this diet.
With great Britain, tue states and rolled oats in alliance,
To all other nations, we could bid bold defiance.
No union in Europe, onr position could mar,
If the oats be well branded, with brackman-& ker.
Remember "dargai," and remember "findlater,"
Whose "pap" was rolled oats, from the hands of his mater
And "hobson," the gallant, each patriot soul fills, "_
Oh! such men are the outcome, of "NATIONAL MILLS
Rolled Oats! islands rich, like the Phillippines gain,
And National Stuff, will free Cuba from pain.
Forto Rico is settled, as one of war's fines,
While our Cereals well rolled, secure "Carolines,
If our brand of Rolled Oats, had diet been of Spain,
That country with honor, had guarded the Maine,
Then proclaim with lond timbrels, and sound it afar,
B. & K. National Oats, will an end put to war.
ASK FOR ... .
Brackman & Ker's "NATIONAL"
Brand Rolled Oats
and take no other.       q
A. B. GRAY, - Kootenay Agent.
911 P. O. BOX 6i, NELSON, B. C.
ATLANTIC
Steamship lines
From Montreal
Lake Winnipeg���Beaver Line  June 15
Lake Huron���Beaver  Line June 22
From New York.
Majestic���White Star Lino. June 15
Germanic���White Star Line .June 22
f.truria���Cunard Line��� .Juno 11
._    -lania���Cunard Line June 18
From Montreal
Yorkshire��� '^minion Line Juno 11
liorainian���Doii.^i-on Line .June 19
Laurcntiavs��� 'Jl-m ..'.-"> Juno 11
Parisian���Allan L^> ������;       ;.. June 18
Cabin, $45.00, $50, $(>o, v"J-.**-fc>- ��� -", upwards.
Intermediate, -^M.OOa.'d up*,. ���
Steerage. $22.50 and upwards,
Passengers ticketed through to nil pointy in
Great Britain or Ireland, and at specially,low
rates to .all parts of thc European conti nenU
Prepaid passages arranged from all-point'.
Apply to GEO.  S. iBEER,   C.P.R.  T eke.
Agent. Nelson, or to,     WILLIAM STITT ,
554)   General Agent, C.P.R. Oftices. Winnipeg.
EAST
ro
THE   SDRVEM'S   CHAIN   MADE
THE SHORTEST
TRANSCONTINENTAL    ROUTE.
IT
It In Ibe Mont Modern In Equipment.
It 1* tbe Heaviest Kallcd Mnc.
It ha* a Bock Ballast Boadbcd.
It Croiuiefl No ftaad Dennetts. "
It l�� tbe Only Mae Banntas  Laxarloa*
Clwb Boom Cars.
It In Noted for tbe Comrtesy ef It* .Employe*.
It Is tbe Only line Serving Meals on tbe
a la Carte flan.
THROUGH   THE
GRANDEST      SCENERY
IN AMERICA BY DAYUGHT.
Attractive Tours during Season of
Navigation on Great Lakes via Dnluth in
connection with Magnificent Passenger
Steamers Northwest and Northland.
For maps, tickets and complete infoi mation
call on or address Agents, K. & S, Ry., C. Sc K.
S. Nav. Co., N & F. S. Ry., or
C. li. MXO.V, General Agent,
Spokane, Wash.
F. I. WM1TSFY, ��. P. 4 T. A.,
51 Panl, Minn. iifcs* ^'^^���^���^'^^fjvJ^JU^i^m^iiuM'-^ii^ri^
graa^L^^i^t^^^i'^^^^u:-;^^
JSlS?*l[K>��Mr?A*ud^-W?M*l����SSi *���
���^TSESS^TaBIWia*^^
k��MWfai*S#ita^^
3s?sa?sfliowB*wa<j|Cfra-4>ES3^^
THG MINER." FRIDAY, JUNE 17. i%8.
FOOD FOR SPAIN.
ll
American   Consul    Protests    Against
Food Being   Shipped to' Cuba.
New  York,   .Tnne   16.���A  despatch
from Kingston, Jamaica, to the Even- !
i ng Telegram says: ;
A heavy cargo of food and supplies
has been lauded here by the steamer
Castledine from New York. The cargo
bears similar marks to that of the
cargo of the City of Kingston, which
has been transferred to the Purisama
Conception. The cargo in the Castledine was shipped by the same people,
Llera & Roca, New York, who furnished the cargo for the City of Kingston. The Purisama Conception will
sail tomorrow. She has obtained an
English captain, Alexander Ronnie,
who will take command. Her bill of
side was registered in the name of
William Hunter of Montijo bay, the
pilot who brought the ship around.
The Pnrisama's officers say; that a
Spanish naval officer was aboard the
Twickenham, but had landed at some
port before her capture. ,*, Strong protests have been made by Mr. Dent, the
American consul, against Jamaica being
mado the base for the shipment of provisions and supplies to the Spanish
troops in Cuba. Many of the Spanish
ships which have called recently, liave
been allowed to change to the British
register and to take on cargo for Cuban
points.' .'These in many instances havo
landed at Batobamo and were sent by
rail to Mauzanillo to private.persons,
but later on sold to the Spanish. The
Spanish cruiser Talbot sailed today
for Hassan. She will go again to
Havana to take off refugees at the request- of Mr. Gallon, the British consul. _____
Jamaica, June 16.���The Spanish
steamer Purisama Conception loaded
with food for Manzanillo left Kingston at 2 o'clock this morning, taking
a westward course. The colonial
authorities ignored the protest of the
United States consul as not based on
sufficient evidence.
ming up the matter we have the following figures, which are given as approximately correct, for the army of occupation during the year 1897: Deaths
from yellow fever, 6034; deaths from
enteric fever, 2500; enteritis and dysentery, 12,000; malarial fevers, 7000;
all other diseases, 5000; total, 82,584.
This gives one some idea of what is
meant when Cuba is spoken of as
draining away the manhood of Spain.
Small need, one would think, to fight
au army which is so ill-cared for that
it dissolves away at such a rate. A
blockade should be sufficient.���The
Hospital.
A MILLION IN DIVIDENDS.
CANADA LEFT IN THE COLD.
"Most Favored Nation" Treatment-by
Germany for Rest of  .hnipire.
New York, June 16.���A Berlin despatch to the Sun says: "The Reih-
caszeugeiger (official) announced that
from July 81 next Great Britain aiid
her colonies, with the exception of
Canada, will receive from Germany
the benefit of the "most favored nation" treatment. The exclusion of
Canada from the benefits is regarded as
a reprisal; for Canada's action which
brought about the denouncement by
Great Britain of the commercial
treaties with Germany and Belgium.
DISSATISFACTION AT GLENORA.
Mackenzie & Mann Moving Their Outfits to the Penticton Branch.
Vancouver,; June 16.���Mackenzie &
Mann, railway contractors, are bringing back their outfits from Glenora,
and it is expected that they are going
tp the Robson-Penticton branch. There
is great dissatisfaction at Glenora over
the cessation of work, and hundreds
of men,on the trail have petitioned the
government to build wagon roads.
DOWNFALL OF A PRINCE.
Prince  Alex  Galitzin Now in a New
York Lunatic Asylum.
New York, June 16.���The World
this morning says: Prince Alexandro-
vitch Galitzin, "descended from
royal ancestry," was taken from Bellevue hospital and lodged in a padded
cell at the Bloomingdale asylum.
After running the entire social
gamut from the most exclusive houses
to the coterie of Bohemia, he has
passed into the land of lost minds. He
now has gone mad from acute mania.
The cause is abject poverty and want.
WAR   AND DISEASE.
Canada's Big Banks Pay Their Shareholders.
Ou June 1 many of the leading banks
began paying their half yearly dividends, and by the end of the week
over $1,200,000 was paid over by nine
banks.
In every case the usual dividend was
declared. Of course the Bank of
Montreal leads the list, aud the shareholders will receive $600,000, or at the
rate of $1,200,000 yearly. The Merchants' Bank of Canada comes next
with a half yearly dividend of four
per cent, involving $240,000, and the
Bank of Commerce is third, paying
out $210,000, which is si% per cent,
or 7 por cent yearly on a capital of $6,-
000,000. The smallest amount to be
paid is $14*000 by Banque Ville Marie.
Here is the list in full, in half yearly
dividends:
Bank of Montreal, 5 percent, $600,-
000.
Merchants' Bank, 4 per cent, $240,-
000.
��� Quebec Bank, 3 per cent, $68,750.
Bank of Commerce, %% per cent,
$210,000.
Ontario Bank, 2% per cent, $37,500.
Bank of Ontario, 5 per cent, $100, -
000.
Banque d'Hochelaga, 3*4 per cent,
$28,000.
Banque Ville Marie, 3 per cent, $14, -
000.
Jacques Cartier, 8 y, per cent, $17,-
500.
Total in dividends, $1,316,138.
A number of the other banks have
different dates for the payment of dividends, the Savings hank, for instance,
paying its annual $7 per share on the
second of next month.
A lot of the mon�� y paid out finds
its way into speculative concerns and
into other channels, while some shareholders, of course, leave the money in
the banks, content to draw the regular
rate of interest, which is 8 per cent.
It is generally noticed, however, that
there is more activity in speculative
and investment stocks after the dividend money has been set in motion,
showing that the market gets its share
of it.
The largest dividend paid hy any
bank in Canada is 12 per cent, by the
Dominion bank, but as it is ouly on a
capital of $1,600,000, but. $180,000 is
involved, whereas the Bank of Montreal's 10 per cent on a $13,000,000 capital means that the shareholders get
$1,200,000.
"TOAST" IN  A CUP.
Doctors as Well as Fighters an Absolute Necessity in Modern Wars.    ���
It is becoming very apparent that if
it should be necessary for the United
States to invade Cuba and occupy that
country in force, the war will have to
be another example of what have come
to be spoken of as " doctors'wars,"
expeditious which depend for their
success on the perfection of their medical and sanitary departments. Fighting power is good, but final victoiy
will come to those who can keep their
fighting men alive, and, unfortunately
for the Spaniards, that is where they
have seemed to have failed disastrously. The New York Medical News publishes extracts from a report drawn up
by Dr. Brumier, who was last year
sent to Cuba as the representative of
the United States Marine Hospital service to keep them informed of the
prevalence of infectious diseases there.
He resided there from April, 1897, to
April, 1898, and his report shows what
enormous losses the Spanish troops
have suffered from disease alone, even
in the more civilized parts of the
island.
During the year 1897 the deaths from
yellow fever in the military at Havana
and Regla amounted to 2583. During
the same time 3451 deaths from that
disease occurred among the soldiers in
other parts, so that the total number
of deaths from that disease occurring
in military hospitals in 1897 was no
less than 6034, which would represent
about 30,000 cases of yellow fever in
the year among the troops. The deaths
from typhoid fever are estimated at
2500, those from malarial fevers at 7000,
and those from enteritis and dysentery
at no less than 120,000. In regard tp
enteritis and dysentery nearly 5000
deaths are known to_ have occurred in
the five military hospitals in Havana
alone, and in these hospitals the patients were better fed and cared for than
at any other point on the island. Sum-
Origin of the  Use of the Word for
After-Dinner Speeches.
The word "toast" used.for describing the proposal of a health in au
after-dinner speech dates back tothe
medieval times, when the loving cup
was still regarded as an indispensable
feature of every banquet. The cup
would be filled to the brim with wine
or mead, in the center of which -would
be placed a piece of toasted bread.
After putting his lips thereto the host
would pass. the cup to the -" guest of
honor,- seated on his right hand, and
the latter would in turn pass it on to
his right-hand neighbor. Iu this manner the cup wduld circulate around the
table, each due present taking a sip
while drinking toward his right-hand
neighbor, until finally . the.cup would
come back to the host, who would
drain what remained and swallow the
piece of toast in honor of all the
friends assembled at his table. ^
""History^teaches ifcafc^the ancient
Greeks and Romans, the Assyrians
and the Egyptians were in the habit
of drinking one another's health at
dinner. Indeed, at Athens, the etiquette concerning what may be de-
scribedas the liquid courtesies df this
kind was very, strict aud elaborate,
being known by. the uameof "Phil-
othe.'' The participants in the repast
were in the habit of drinking to one
another until they could cany ho
more, and then they would pour: out
the remainder of the wine on the altar
of any pagan deity that might happen
to be handy.
At Rome the same custom prevailed.
Post-prandial oratory, however, was'
severely condemned as out of place,
and while the Greeks contented themselves with exclaiming,as they put the
cup of wine to their lips, "I salute
you; be happy," the Romans restricted
themselves to the exclamation, "Pro-
pino, "which is the Latin for "I
drink your health."
SWIFT WATER BILL.
Swiftwater Bill is no doubt in Dawson now telling stories to the boys of
how he foiled the police. It seems
from a recent letter to hand from Bennett that he set abroad the rumor himself.    The writer says:
''Major Steel is the right man for
here, and under his able guidance the
police have no trouble in keeping very
good order -and straightening out
troubles. Swif twater Bill passed
through here a few days ago. His
crowd had increased on the way from
five women and four men to 20 women
and 14 men. William represented
himself as taking in a first-class theatrical company, composed of two fighters, two comedians and 12 lady artists.
During the  time Bill stopped in Ben
nett the police had grave doubts of his |
theatrical company, and two police- \
men were detailed to watch his!
actions.
From observations made at long and
short range' the police came to the conclusion that William was a Mormon,
and was taking a lot of Mormon converts in to start a Mormon settlement
in or near Dawson. Bill was asked to
show cause why he was defying the
good laws of Canada, and not being
able to explain this to fit his former
assertions was given until the next
day to disband his harem among the
law-abiding citizens of Bennett. William promised to do this, but during
the following night, the ice being
good and the road fair, William, hired
a dog train and clapped on all sail possible, and the last seen of Bill and his
angels was going down the lake at a
three-minute clip. It was afterward
reported that William was drowned,
but that was only a n\��ior to put the
police off the track; but you cannot get
away from the police of this country."
LORD  SEYMOUR AT HALIFAX.
Halifax, N. S., Juno 16.���Lord Soy-
mour, the new commander-in-chief of
the British army in Canada, arrived
last night from Quebec.
Advices from Newfoundland state
that a British syndicate is buying all
lobster factories on the French shore,
and it is believed that the company
has inside information of appending
settlement of the French shore question, as otherwise the investment would
be precarious.
DOES NOT FAVOR ALLIANCE.
Paris, June 16.���The Temps today
points out what the Spanish newspapers which yesterday talked of the
solitary position of the Latin races and
appealed for help to France, today declare that every sacrifice should be
made to procure the aid of the Drei-
bund.��� Continuing the Temps says:
"We wish to draw the attention of
those blatant and simple minded advocates of the Latin race and a Franco-
Spanish alliance to this changed mood
of the Spaniards."
ITALIAN CABINET MEETS.
Rome, June 16.���The new ministry
met in the chamber of deputies today.
The premier, Marquis de Rtidini, made
a statement outlining the government's
programme and submitting a number
of bills, including stringent measures
to maintain social order, regulating
political societies and economic measures.
INTERNATIONAL CHESS.
Vienna, June 16.���The games adjourned from previous rounds were finished today, the- results being as follows : Blackburne and Tschigoriu drew,
Schiffer beat Schowalter, Steinitz lost
to Walbrodt, and Maroczy vanquished
Burn; These games completed the
eleven rounds.
BASEBALL SCORES.
June 16.���At Brooklyn���Brooklyn 4,
Baltimore 6.
At Chicago���Chicago 11, Cincinnati 1.
At New York���New York 11, Philadelphia 3.
At Boston���Boston 2, Washington 1.
A BUREAU  OF  COURTESY.
:.'' A curious ;' innovation,'' says the
Boston Transcript, "at the coming
Omaha exposition will be a bureau of
courtesy. Not only is the idea novel,
but it is surprising to learn that nearly
all the people of the city will be enrolled on the committee. Every member will wear a badge, and visitors
will be at liberty to address anyone
who wears the badge and ask for information just as much as he likes.
The member, on the other hand, will
be pledged to treat the visitor courteously and answer his questions, or put
him in the way of getting them
answered."
JVICTORlASTREETiSLLAMENT.
Municipal Fathers! whom Providence sent
_To rule over, this beautiful city
Hear Victoria street's wail; its song of lament
For so woeful, and sad, is our ditty.
No sidewalk have wc, while the street's full of
 holes,"
Our position, so central, claims finer.
Consider our lot! Expand you kind souls.
And forget that we harbor The Miner
We're proud of the pathways, you've built but
of town.
But why near friends, do you leave in the
lurch!
Why should dust, or rank iriud, bespatter the
gown .-
Of each lauy here, who ventures to church?
Tho husbands who live, in the street, may bc
known,
mBy eyes full of tears, that flow forth, in rills;
The reason is mud, which can plainly bc shown
To madly swell up, tho dressmaker's hills.
Condemn not tho flock, for one minor (Miner)
black sheep.
Then tho '���Army,"-"Salvation," will bless
you,
While we all, on our knees, in mind you will
keep,
And pray, nothing may ever, distress you.
���Anon.
Waff Paper,      Sporting Goods,
'.-���"���   Hammocks,   ���
Cameras,   ��� Kodaks,
iDfiic~Suppfies.
������������������������
Thomson Stationery Co.
(d22)
Kirkpatrick h Wilson
are receiving Seasonable Goods
for the best trade of Nelson in
the lines of .-.
GROCERIES, TEAS ����<�� COFFElf
The quality is the best and prices
right.      As always, our stock of
CROCKERY and GLASSWARll
is full and being added to as needed.
Kirkpatrickand Wilson, BAKERSTREE1
BEAR IN MIND
auMP^-im
That everything you BUY here
is GUARANTEED.    If not as
represented return and your
money will be cheerfully re--
funded. .*..*..���.
FISHING TACKLE AT COST..
P. O. Store    =   =   -   J. A. OILKEI
Lawrence H^ware q$a
Pa 1 fits rea^y m��xed and dry.
Boiled and Raw LinseecJ   Qjl^
Turpentine
Varnishes, White Lead
Paint and Varnish Brushes KalSOITlirH
Miners* Supplies
Builders' Hardware
Telephone 21.   Prompt Delivery
Gam&fe & O'Reiffu
(h/if Engineers,
Provinciaf Land Surveyors
Real Estate and General Agents
Financial anj Insurance Agents
Notaries   Public,   Etc.
YX/e have for sale the  followingl
* ^ Valuable Property.       ���
Yes, but we don't advertise the
prices, as we lose money l>y
doing so.
List and Prices on application
at our Office.
Call and see our full list of property for sale in   "Hume'
and "A" Additions
Ten Lots in "Hume" Addition at a Bargain.
Gamble & 0'Reilly, Agents.
Baker Street, NELSON, B.
LONDON & BRITISH COMWBU BQMJFWUM
HEAP OFFICE, LONDON, ENGLAND.
All  Communications relating to British Columbia busing
to be addressed to P. O. Drawer 505, Nelson, B.C>
J. Roderick Robertson,
"~^"       ^"Cr^neml iVtmrager"
S. S. Fowler, JL: M.,
Mining Engineer
NE1-SON, B.
GENTS  *   GLOTHXNalO. P. J, OHEISTI
Repaired, Altered, Cleaned, Pressed
ana Dyed by the
Reasonable Prices,
and Dyed by the Nkw Pkocess at
STEVENS,  The Tailor.
Room 9, Hillyuk Blk., NELSON*
P. S.���Ladies Wool Dress Goods Sponged
before Making Up.
ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS
and JOINERS
- o
When requiring thoroughly seasoned
timber* should apply to
Tbe Nelson Planing Kill
T. W. GRAY.
In stoek,l,000,000 f t.of Flooriiig.Lining
Mouldings, Doors, Sashes and
every description of Joinery.
SCREEN   DOORS  ANI��    WINDOWS   MAO
TO ORDER.
LIMITED
ISTELSOlSr
W.A. JOWETT
MINING & REAL ESTATE BROKER
INSURANCE and .. ���
COMMISSION ACENT.
VICTORIA ST.,     M NELSON, B. O.
OENERAL BROKER.
INSURANCE, REAL E*TA1
MONEY TO LOAN.
Several Houses to rent. Proper
for sale in all parts of the cit
Accountant Work. . Ster
graphy and Type-Writij
done on shortest notice.
ARCH BOLD & PEARS*
(AIMM. MFIME, M Mia. Assoc. Cornwall >.']
MINING ENGINEERS AND ASSAYEI
Opposite Phair Hotels
NELSON, B.C. P. O. BOX 51
Extended experience in Chile and Gem
South  Africa.   Assays and analysis of oij
Reports and valuations on mineral propert
Underground surveying and mine plans k^
up by contract.
MINES EXAMINE!
AND REPORTED OX BY
F. M. CHADBOURN
Twenty years' experience in mining.
' Thorough knowledge of mines of Brlfl
Columbia.   Terms Reasonable.
718
NELSON, B.

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