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The Ledge Jul 26, 1917

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Pr
"incial Library
THE
LEDGE
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THE  OLDEST   MINING   CAMP   NEWSPAPER   IN  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
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Vol.   XXIV.
GREENWOOD, B. C, THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1917.
No. 2
LET US SHOW YOU THE
COMING FLOOR COVERING
GONGOLEDM
ART-RUGS
Made in Sizes Similar to Carpet Squares
We also have it in two yard widths, same as
Linoleum,   only at lower price   per yard.
T. M. GULLEY & CO.
New location���Russell-Law Caulfield Building
PHONE 28        X       GREENWOOD, B. C
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Hotel
THOROUGHLY  RENOVATED AND SPECIALLY.
ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL TRADE
THE WINDSOR HOTEL is one of the oest furnished
hotels in the west. It is located in the heart of Greenwood and within easy reach of all the financial and
commercial institutions of the Copper Metropolis.
Heated with Steam and Lit by Electricity
CommodionB sample rooms. The bar is replete with
all modern beverages and the meals are the best. Rooms
reserved by telegraph. ���
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������������������������������**�����������������&���������� <"M��KK��������****��,*>��,>*<"H��>** &
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Go.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL,, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SMELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
TADANAC BRAND PIG' LEAD, BI,UESTONE, COPPER AND SPELTER
^_3g_35_35��^g^^_^5&_SNCH^^
P. BHRNS & CO.
Dealers in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish
and Poultry. Shops in nearly all the
towns of the Boundary and Kootenay.
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD, B.C.
Do you always use your Telephone?
Travelling, even a short distance, takes
time. Your telephone saves minutes and saves
energy. It matters not whether the party you
want is one mile or a hundred miles away, the
telephone takes you in a moment.
Don't travel miles to do business, speak for
a few moments by telephone. Use the tele
phone instead of writing! written communica^
tions lack the directness of conversation.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY, Ltd
JOHN AKB.
Sporting Goods.
Fishing Tackle, Ammunition and Bicycle Supplies
HARDWARE
and CROCKERY
Poultry Netting, Screen
Doors and Wire Cloth
ALL SIZES AT
A. L. WHITE
FURNITURE AND HARDWARE
Around Home
FOR
BREAD
CAKES
and PASTRY ���
William C. Arthurs
THE BREAD AND CAKE BAKER
Greenwood City Bakery
H. McKEE
GREENWQOD
COAL AND WOOD
AGENT FOR
LETHBRIDGE COAL
Heavy Teaming
of all kinds
Christian Science service will be liel.i
in the MELLOR BLOCK on Sunday at u
a. in. AH welcome. Ejery Wednesday
at 8 p. m., testimonial nieetiiigs will be
held in the same block. Sunday School
every Sunday morning.
WANTS, ETC.
For Sa__,e.���A first-class letterpress for $3. Apply at The
Ledge office.
For Sale.���A 10 horse power
stationary engine. Applv to A.
D. Morrison, Grand Forks.
Rooms to Rent.���Free baths &
modern conveniences. Swayne
House, Silver screet.
LOST
Blue Mare, white face, white
streak on right hip. Branded T
on right shoulder. Left shoulder
marked __--""������.; $10.00 reward.
Notify Wm. Mekkila, Phoenix,
B. C.,' box 41.
Corporation Of The City Of Greenwood
TO WATER CONSUMERS
NOTICE RE SPRINKLING
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, lawns
and gardens may be sprinkled only between 7 and 8 o'clock p.m. Any person
or persons disobeying this order will be
liable to have the water supply cut of
without notice.
Greenwood, July 24, 1917.
G.B.TAYLOR,
City Clerk.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
C.V-0, m>. D.CX_. Prwi-tent
H. V. F. JONSS, Aart Gnenl M_tn��t.er
CiPITAL, tlSmOSfl    BESEBVE FUKD, $13,500,000
BANKlPfG JBT MAIL
Accounts maybe opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank
of Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same
iareful attention zs Is ^ven to all other departments of the Back's
business,   Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as
Wfisfo-^rily"?��' Iff1'* pT^^uirit tn��w fanL S53
:x.i SAVINGS BANK;DfePA_FTMENT
. ..���'���...^\.-;'^'-:-'-^
Local strawberries are 20 cents
a box in Princeton.
Ed Hatton is recovering from
an attack of pleurisy.
Lumber is being shipped from
Prince'on to Alberta.
Oscar  Lachmund   was  iu San
Francisco last week.
.  C.  Braithwaite  has  opened   a
law office in Princeton.
Dr. Ritchie and F. S. Norcross
were in Seattle last week.
Oliver Laporte is in the hospital with chronic nephrites.
Billy Bennett is in the hospital
suffering from  general  debility.
Last week new potatoes were
$40 a  ton iu  New  Westminster.
At the Kettle Valley postoffice
a public library has been established.
M. K. Rodgers, the well-known
mining man died in Pittsburgh
this month.
Mrs. Hugh McGillvray and
children are visiting in Nelson
and Fernie.
This summer 200,000 steel-
head trout fry will be placed in
Sidley lake,
Mrs. Bart Inghram has returned to Nelson, from a visit to Kellogg, Idaho.
Mary Vladoyano has been appointed junior clerk in the Bank
of Commerce.
E. E. W. Mills of Grand Forks
will go into business at Drum-
heller, Alberta.
A motor truck is hauling ore,
trom the Union mine at Franklin
to Lynch Creek.
Having recovered from her recent operation, Mrs. Bamber will
return to Toroda Creek this week.
Neil Robertson has returned to
Eholt, after spending some time
in tlie hospital at Grand  Forks.
F. S. Norcross has bought a
five passenger Dodge car, and R.
G. Poe has secured a Ford runabout.
The proposed'tour of the Vancouver Automobile Club, through
the interior, has been postponed
until September.
Mrs. Owen Boyer has sold her
residence to Alphonse Dumas,
and, with her children, has moved
to Buckingham, Quebec.
The Phoenix mines resumed
operations last week with about
250 men. The smelter at the
Forks blew in four furnaces on
Monday.
Mark Christianson's sawmill at
Boundary Falls burned down last
week.. The fire started from the
smokestack. There was no insurance.
Send one dollar to Walter G.
Kennedy, Trail, B. C, and receive one of those famous John
Cotton pipes; two shapes, bent
and straight.
Jimmy Copelaad is recovering
from the effects of an accident,
that he sustained a month ago,
by falling over an embankment
near Bridesville.
Fred Foster of Spokane, has
taken a royalty bond on the Copper Farm group near Princeton,
owned by Colonel Robert Stevenson aud his partners.
The planicg mill of. Porter
Bros., four mites west of Molson
was burned this month. About
half a million feet of lumber was
burned.    The loss is $20,000.
The redskin suffers from the
vices of the paleface. Ed Dou-
nell, a Siw.ish, from Hedley, was
sentenced to jail last Friday in
Princeton for forging and cashing a cheque.
Mrs. Beattie received the sad
message by telegram, informing
her of the death of a dear sister,
Mrs. Mundy, of Buffalo, who
passed away on July 12th, after
an operation.
After two  weeks   of   tropical
weather, reaching up to 99 in the
shade, the  temperature  dropped
h .        into the sump last Sunday night,
obvious and scattered a little  frost over
the potato crop.
E, S. H. Winn, H. B. Gilmour,
and Parker Williams, addressed
a large audience in the Star
Theatre, last Friday evening,
and thoroughly explained the
working of the Workmen's Compensation Act.
"������'- The horses attached: to the_ delivery wagon of P. Burns <& Goran away lasit Saturday. ������'"They.'
knocked down an electric light
pole, ringing the fire alarm, but
beyond that little damage resulted from their mad flight.
Harry  Johns,   of  the  firm   of
Keffer & Johns died of heart failure in Spokane  last Friday     He
, will be bnried at San  Jose. Call-
in-j forma.     As  a  mining engineer
was widely known
Greenwood High School
The following pupils  stand  first
for the period  Easter-Jnly,   1917:
1.
2.
3.
Gordon McLaren, 79%.
Sherman Carson, 71%-
Creighton McCutcheon \
Vera Parker j
70%
The following pupilB have passed
into the Advance Junior Class:
Gordon McLaren 78%.
Vera Parker 70%.
Mary Vladoyano 69%.
Creighton McCutcheon 68%.
Sherman Carson 66%.
Ethel Royce 65%.
Allan Eustis 58%.
Phyllis Phillips 58%.
Western Float
Conditional passes,  in  order of
standing:
Nellie Hammarstadt.
Georgina Lee.
Malcolm Williamson.
Advanced course, junior grade���
Josephine McKee, 660; Cecelia M.
Mcintosh, 613.
Feeling in Quebec
Men who have recently been
through the Province of Quebec report that the feeling against the
Military Service Bill is not so
strong as reported by members
from that province. One gentleman attribntes all the agitation to
the members of Parliament. Liberal and Nationalist members are
vieing with each other in provoking opposition to the measure.
The people of Quebec do not like
the measure but if there is any resistance to its enforcement the
blame will attach to the Liberal
and Nationalist leaders.
The Liberal Party
The Tribune has been asked
why, when it is continuously advocating Liberal or Radical policies, it shows frequently such hostility to the Canadian Liberal
party, and displays au ascerbity
and acidity in reference to it which
do not characterize its criticisms of
the Tory party.
The answer seemB so
that the query appears unnecessary. The Tribune believes that
the Canadian "Liberal" party is
not, and for twenty years has not
been, a Liberal party. It has been,
whilst using the Liberal name, a
more reactionary body that the
official or avowed Tory party. It
has been a wolf in sheep's clothing,
which is more dangerous than a
wolf inx\\is 0nil pelt. Because it
prefers an enemy to a betrayer, the
Tribune will criticize the Tory policy and administration with as
lunch politeness as it can cotn-
inund. But it cannot command
enough to have any to spare for
the "Liberal" rump: In tbe
terest of real Lil>eralism and of the j the deceased
country, that mn_!t Iw born again, f in western mining camps.
Mrs. Ada Kirby of Keremeos
has bought a five passenger
Dodge touring car.
Pte. Wm. Jones of Nicholson
Creek, has returned to Vancouver
for further medical treatment.
Mrs. Noel Kelsey returned to
Rock Creek on Sunday, after being in the hospital for three days.
Miss Gladys McCreath received
from Vancouver last week a Pomeranian dog just seven weeks old.
He is the cutest blue-blooded canine in town. He is chocolate in
color, weighs about a pound, and
has a pedigree th_it reaches away
back to ancient history. Joff is
his name, and he likes to chase
the chickens.
Thomas McDonald died in the
hospital last week trom hemorrhage of the brain. He was
about 60 years of age, and a
native of Ireland. He had a
ranch about two miles from
Bridesville. Nothing is known
of his relatives, and the funeral
took place last Monday. He did
not leave a will, and his estate is
in the hands of the official administrator.     .
While driving his auto up the
hill near the Armstrong hotel
building last Saturday, J. L.
White apparentlv made a mistake
and ran his car into W, B. Fleming's rig, as it was passing down
the hilly street, Fleming was
knocked off the high seat and
fell beneath the horses feet. One
of the horses tramped on his
game leg, and he also received a
deep gash on one hand that required to be stitched by Dr.
Wood. Fortunately Mr. Fleming
was not seriously injured, while
the horses and wagon received
little damage from the impact.
The auto had one glim doused,
and obtained a fracture of the
mudguard. There were no politics in the collision.
After playing  an engagement
for many weeks in Greenwood,
the typographical tourist, J. Peck
MacSwain, went west in the gray
dawn of last Monday to grow up
with the country.   He sent  his
baggage by freight, and is gently
travelling by hand toward   the
fringe of the blue Pacific to consult his bankers    He intends to
establish a factory^ close to the
swish of the sad sea waves to
manufacture   a   submarine   that
will torpedo schooners of beer in
any ,_kind-of a; war  zone.    He
mav also manufacture brakebeatn
cusiitons,: and a device for controlling free lunches.    The genial Peck ��� is widely popular,  and
could easily make a fortune by-
writing a book ol travels.    He is
a philosophical humorist, an entertaining reconteur,  a  lover of
scenery and an excellent judge of
topographical conditions.    He is
' an adept at making wings  for
! angels, and smiles for the melan-
' choly.  Pax vobiscum. Peck, even
if vou reach the coast sans cul-
i lotcs,
The'son^ofia hen never sets.
There are 11,000 autos in  B. C.
A sawmill is beiag built at Seal
Cove.
Dan Markle of Trail is now an
aviator.
The Rossland Miner's Union ie
21 years old.
Victoria has 9,039 telephones,
and Vancouver 25,461.
Peace Biver now has a newspaper called The Standard.
There are 222 telephones in
Rossland, and 228 in Trail.
David John Jackson died at
New Westminster this mouth.
Even in Rupe the water wagon
has been kept busy this month.
Ner Smith is developing his
group of claims around Rossland.
There were three cases in the
police court at Kelowna in June.
The salmon canneries on the
Fraser are paying 25 cents for each
fish.
Corporal Clarence Raymer of
Kelowna bas been killed at the
front.
J. G. Whiteacre, the piano man,
has a fine ranch in the Stuart river
couutry.
In B. C. the foreBt fires are doing some business with a great deal
of hot air.
For making mutton at Enderby,
Vic Poison recently Bold a sheep
for $22.20.
Nelson has a sensation. There
is at least one woman in the case,
if not more.
At Kelowna, Charles Nicol was
thrown ont of a rig, and had his
collar bone broken.
At Beaton Harry Nellie lost his
hotel this month by fire. There
was a small insurance.
Charles Reid of Hazelton has
been appointed manager of the
Union Bank at Smithers.
. W. B. Farris has left Revelstoke to practise law in Vancouver.
The attorney-general is his brother.
The Japs are buying farm land
in the Fraser Valley. They clean
np land juBt like the Doukhobors.
For making cans, the vegetable
evaporating plant at Armstrong
has recently received over 100 tons
of tin plate.
Louis Blue now lives in Spokane,
bnt quite often he drops into Rossland to talk abont old times in the
Golden City.
Five carloads of Alaska herring
were recently shipped from Rupe
feo New York. Each seven barrels
held a ton of fish.
There are two jam factories at
Mission City. This month they
have been canning daily ten tons
of strawberry jam.
If silver averages 80 cents an
ounce for a month, the miners at
Cobalt, Ontario, will receive a third
bonus of 25 cents a day.
John Crean died in Los Angeles
this month.    He was a well-known
B.  C. Mines
the
hotel man,  years ago, in Vancouver and New Westminster.
At Ainsworth, Charley Olsen
has some mining property that
should prove a bonanza, with the
present high price for silver.
The government will move its
office from Hazelton to Smithers.
It is also likely that the office at
Fairview will be moved to Penticton.. ,.
New Denver is an ideal Bummer
resort, and the Newmarket hotel
kept by Andrew Jacobson, is one
of the best in the west. Visit the
Lucerne of America, and view the
glorious sunsets from the balcony
of this famous hotel.
There are people in some towns,
who send their orders for printing
to distant points, jast to spite an
editor. In the end there is little
profit in slicing off yonr nose to
spite your face. It mars harmony
and give* the devil a chance to
play havoc with the soul.
At New Westminster Judge
Howay has ruled that Indians have
a perfect right to sell fish that they
catch by hook and line. The case
arose out of the fact that an Indian
had sold a salmon in Hope, and
been fined for catching it with a
hook, The redskins sell salmon
in Hope for less than Seven cents a
pound, thereby reducing the high
cost of living.
i The city council, of Blairmore
sends its job printing out of town.
Tne local paper .says ;that the
council of Blairmore sends its job
printing out of town. The local
paper says that the council is trying to get even with ! it for advising the city dads to quit using pro
fane language when in session.
Blairmore is in keeping with many
other little people in : little towns.
An outspoken editor is always
hammered by the nonentities who
have a little power in affairs of
chnrch, state, and society. Th-
narrow mind delights in petty pere
jsecution.
At the Skyline,   Ainsworth,
tunnel is in 1300 feet.
There are 400 men working at
the Northport smelter.
Coolgardie Smith is inspecting
his claims near Hazelton.
J. L. Parker has bonded the
Burton copper claim at Elko.
The Yreka copper mine at Quat-
sino is shipping to Ladvamith.
There is plenty of work for coal
miner?,  at  Fernie   and Coleman.
Up to 1915 California was the
only state that produced magnesite.
Coal retails in Fernie for $5 a
ton, having been advanced 50 cents
a ton.
It is reported that magnesite has
been found in the Argo at Greenwood.
In May the mine payroll of the
Standard at Silverton, amounted to
$27,689.
The Silver Hoard at Ainsworth
is employing 22 men in the mine
and mill.
The mills at Kaslo and Rose-
berry will concentrate fehe ore from
fehe Lucky Jim.
By development the ore reserves
in the Cork-Province have been
doubled this month.
The lessees of tbe Bell near
Beaverdell shipped their third car
load of ore last week.
It is predicted that no one now
living will ever Bee silver sold for
less than 70 cents an ounce.
JameB Drum has returned from
Vancouver, and is looking for miners to work on the Sally afe Beaverdell.
A trail is being built from
8keena Crossing to the Rocher de
Boule, and other properties in the
north.
By holding its ore for the past
fehree months the Rambler-Cariboo
made six cents an ounce on its
silver.
European men have taken an
option on some molybdenite claims
near Kamloops, owned by Harold
Chapman and others.
For experimental treatment, W.
J. Smith has shipped a carload
from his platinum claim at Louis
Creek, to Republic, Wash.
The Montgomery group of copper-gold claims in the Big Bend,
40 miles north of Revelstoke were
bonded  last  week  to the Granby
Co. '
Nine racks of coke are on the
way from Coleman to Greenwood.
If the forest fires do not effect the
further shipping of coke the Greenwood smelter will blow in August
10.
The Slocan Star at Sandon earned 88,000 in June working one
shift most of the monfeh in the
mill. The mill is now working
two shifts, and handiing 100 tons a
day.
In the Hazelton district three
feet of gold-copper ore has been
struck in the Golden Wonder, and .
this mine will soon be shipping to
Ladysmith. A wagon road ie being built to the Delta and Highland Boy.
Bob Perry is still in Vancouver,
where his company is still waiting
for a gold dredging machina from
Australia. The company has secured leases upon the Fraser river
for 100 miles above Hope. A hall
in Vancouver has been filled with
gravel, And. the working of the
machine will be demonstrated to
those who wish feo buy stock in
this new gold  dredging compan}7.
A company has been formed in
Spokane, to Operate the Monarch
group of copper claims near Beas-
ley, nine miles west of Nelson. A
tram will be built from the mine
to the railway at Beasley. The
new company proposes to ship the
ore in mass with very little Borting.
These properties were located by
M. C. Monaghan, about 25 years
ago. Operations will be under hie
direction, assisted by C. F. Caldwell of Utica fame. THE   LEDGE,   GREENWOOD,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
THE LEDGE
_._: a ye.ir in Canada,   and   ��2.50   iu   the
United States.
R. T. LOWERY.
Editor and Financiei.
ADVERTISING RATES
Delinquent.  Co-Owner Notices $25.00
Coal ami Oil  Notices     6.00
Application Liquor Licenses        5.00
Transfer Liquor Licenses     7.50
Estray Notices 3.00
Cards of Thanks     1.00
Certificale of Improvement  10.00
(Where more than one claim appears ir notice, J2.50 for each additional claim.)
All other legal advertising, 12 cents a
line first insertion, and X cents a line for
each, subsequent insertion, noupariel
measurement.
Tlie blue cross means that
vour sul.scription is due, and
that the editor would be pleased
tn have more money.
A riw ui.NTi.Y something has rubbed the spot oil' tho sun.
Savk   food    by    boiling   spuds,
without taking off their clothes.
Amid the turmoil of life do not
forget the potatoes. Keep them
green and growing.
It costs seven  cents to get your
hair   cut   in   Japan. Here   is   a
chanco for a good mail order business.
Bugs, tropical heat and the
"June drop" are all German agents
in Canada, and should have been
interned.
Tiik coming general election in
Canada will be one of hatred, passion, prejudice' and falsehood. It
will do much to destroy unity and
peace in this great Dominion, all
of which is pleasing to the war
lords in Germany.
led to sedition and national sacrilege by the mouthing of those
who toil not but with their vifeu
perative speech. "With universal
conscription in effect, the present
troubles would disappear like chaff
before the wind. The man who
refused to help his country in war
time by applying himself to his
trade would be drafted for the
trenches, although too much honor
would be his share. The miner
who refused feo produce lead at a
fair wage, could be sent to fehe
front to fire bullets made from fehe
lead that he would not bring forth
to his nation's need. Universal
conscription would constitute au
unescapable net to gather in the
men of middle-age who spend feheir
time in fomenting trouble. Polities, perhaps, will prevent enforcement of the only efficacious remedy
for present ills. Failing that, good
citizenry is justified in arming itself to protect the liberty for which
tli 111 republic was founded and for
wlnVh it still stands. A brick wall
and .1 firing squad here and there
may yet be tho answer to red flag
treason, unless the government
acts quickly and forcefully to quell
the growing menace.���Spokane
Mining Truth.
Tn-__.-���_ is no obscenity in nature,
but still many prudes are horrified
at the. scanty bathing costumes
used afc English Bay in Vancouver.
It is so different in. Mexico. In
that country no bathing costumes
are used and the prudes never say
a word. All depends where you
���are,- and the view you take of
worldly matters.
Win.:* the wise merchant puts a
f-tock of goods on his shelves, he
puts an ad in the paper to tell people what he.has to sell. He knows
what goods he has for sale, but he
also knows that the public will
not know it. to any extent, unless
he advertises. The unwise merchant puts the goods on the shelves
or in.the cellar, but does not advertise. He is like the chap who
puts a light under a bushel measure. He kuows the light is there
but nobody else does. Be wise and
advertise.
The newspaper is one of the
most important institutions in
modern life. When united it is
the greatest mental force in the
world, and can accomplish almost
anything. If every newspaper on
earth was in favour of peace there
would be no war by October. The
division of thought among editors
has tlie^,same effect upon public
opinions, for in this age the people
get their opinions from the newspapers. The greatest friend to any
district or country is an honest,
fearless or independent newspaper.
None but the corrupt, dishonest
and wicked, either in private or
public life hate a newspaper that is
truthful, outspoken and vigorous
in its attacks upon the evils of
church, state or society. No editor
can hold a job on a strictly parti-
Hin paper, religious political or
otherwise, unless he is a son of
Ananias. An independant press
ran save the world, but for a time
the editors would have to live in
fort.�� or war "tanks." The slaves
they would liberate would eat them
up in their ignorance and blind
devotion to custom, precedent and
environm.-nt..
Universal Conscription
In the opinion of Mining Truth,
the pre-ent unsettled industrial
fundi tion.- rail for immediate r-n-
fi.rfenient of universal conscription.
J' 1'^ foohVn to temporiz- with the
growing iM-naee of treason and
anarchy Haunted under th* banner
i-i laboi���not dignified, honest
labor, but the Miiftlpp.x labor that
f>'t.ls the world owes it a living
without work; the   scum  of.labor,
Magnitude of Magnesite
Not one person in ten thousand
realizes the tremendous importance
of the magnesite industry that has
sprung up in Stevens county within the past six months or the effect
it has on fehe commercial future of
this city.
Less than a year ago the nucleus
of the great acerage held by one
company five mileo west of Chew-
elah was offered in exchange for a
second-hand Ford car. The offer
was rejected. Today the entire
property is worth well over the
million dollar mark aud one of the
mosfe complete calcining plants in
the world, fed by a five and a half
mile cable tramway, is springing
up in tbe Colville valley.
Shipments of crude magnesite
meanwhile go forward to be used
as refaetories in steel-making plants
of the East, thus making a valuable contribution to war necessities from the natural West.
Freight charges for the month of
June, from this company alone,
reached '3G0.00O;.��20,000 went to
teamsters and truck drivers in
hauling charges, while between
��15,000 and S20,000 was paid oufe
in wages to the force Sfe work on
plant and at fehe quarries.
This is bufe one of the four important concerns now engaged in
the work. One other has erected a
calcining plant on Huckleberry
Creek.���Spokane Mining Truth.
The Rise of Silver
It was announced recently that
a Canadian mining company had
sold 200,000 ounces of silver on
the Pacific Coast at 83 9-l(.c. per
ounce, the highest price since 1892,
when the average for the year was
87.1c. per ounce The price at
which the metal was sold represents a gain of 100 per cent in the
past two years. But what is of
even greater significance is that
the price of silver is steadily rising,
and the statistical position of the
metal is so strengfehing, as to lead
to the belief that silver will shortly
sell at 81 an ounce.
It is pointed out by an authority
on the subject that the stock of
gold is disappearing from circulation, and that there is a pressing
need of hard money iu Europe.
It is evident, from the fact that
the price at which this lot of silver
was sold, and the so-called official
price in New York, which is regulated by the price in London,
represents a difference of 2 Ac. per
ounce, after allowing for freight
and insurance charges between
New York and the Pacific Coast.
It is also evident that the silver
metal is moving to Europe via the
Coast, in order to avoid  the sub-
_���
marine   menace   in  the   Atlantic
waters.
In tbe past few months the buying of silver has reached unprecedented proportions. Not only
has the United States Government been a huge purchaser, but
there have been steady withdrawls
of large quantities of the metal for
European and Far Eastern account.
The world is a silver buyer to a
greater degree than it has ever
been, and production is not gaining. The shutdown of the copper
mines in Butte and in Arizona,
and the elimation of the Green-
Cananea in Mexico, forces another
reduction in tbe output of the
metal. (Anacondaproduces about
1,000,000 ounces of silver monthly.) Cobalt is hampered in its
output somewhat, owing to the inability of the companies to secure
sufficient labor. This leaves the
burden of production on American
silver, silver-gold, silver-lead and
zinc-silver mines. Already the
profits of the lead-silver and zinc-
silver mines have been swollen by
fehe enhancement in the price of the
base metals, and the increase in
fehe price of silver means just so
much more additional profii. Moreover, every cent of the profit ia nett
A Huge Deposit
A special from Calgary to the
Vancouver World says:
Worth untold millions of dollars,
inexhaustible deposits of manganese
di-oxide, which is extremely valuable as an iron toughening material and which is in great demand
for war munitions purposes, bave
been found in the Cypress Hills in
Southeast Alberta. Eight hundred
thousand tons, worth approximately 854,400,000, have been blocked
out by -ordinarg post hole augers in
the last few months, aud the product is being sold to the British
war office for 868 or 869 a ton.
The manganese lies on the top of
the ground and is very easily developed. James F. Reilly of Montreal is the engineer in charge and
the Dr. Milton Horsey and allied
interests are said to control the
enterprise, Before the news of
this discovery leaked out every
available foot of the manganese
area was secured by the insiders.
The deposits may, however, extend
from the Cypress Hills down to the
Sweet Grass Hills in Montana and
there may be eome areas there
open to filing.
The Alberta manganese discovery makes the captnre of Lens of
less moment from an industrial
standpoint. Leus contains manganese deposit0, which has been
utilized by the Germans in their
munition making and with that
source of supply cut off the Allies
have been handicapped. . The Alberta field it h said, will fill the
needs and the manganese is being
shipped as quickly a=- the facilities
permit.
The SOO.000 tons mentioned were
blocked out from the surface and
thi" operation is simple and inexpensive, and may be continued almost indefinite!}*, it is stated.
Mars Imps
The German people have been
cursed with war lords. These
imps of Mars know they are beaten,
but keep extending tne time,
knowing too well that when the
German people awaken to the real
truth that their lives will pay the
penalty. A German soldiev recently taken prisoner says in part:
"Tbey know that  America  can
put hundreds of thousands of fresh
feroups on this  front next Bpring,
and that  the  exhaustion  of  Germany  long   before   then   will   b-��
frightful.    It  is  frightful  now; it
has  been  frightful  for a year and
more.      They   know   it all;  and,
brute  devils  that they  are   they
choose to keep the awful slaughter
going, not  because  they  hope   it
can alter the end, but for what you
call 'Wait and  see!'   because they
fear  to face   today  what they can
put off till tomorrow, at the cost of
a few   milliards of money.    Never
before since the world began has a
twentieth    part  of such suffering
been allowed to continue day after
day and month after month to protect a handful of exalted criminals
from  general  recognition  of their
crimes.    The Russian  people rose
aud smashed the bonds that bonnd
fehem.    Yes,   but not our people.
Our tyrants have been  clever.    It
was only the bodies of the Russian
people that  were  fettered.    Their
minds  were   free.      No   German
mind  in  Germany  has  been free
since 1870.    The Berlin criminals
have seen too  well to that.    Our
people think they have been well
educated.     So   they   have���very
well, very carefully���for just what
they are doing now; for the blind
est  and  most   damnable  kind, of
slavery the world  has every seen;
for a slavery in   which  the will of!
the masters must be paid for daily
by steadily running streams of the
blood   of   their    victims,   victims
taught to hire their own throats to
the knife on the word of command.
If your armies could reach Germany itself the slavery might end
suddenly.    But Germany today is
one vast prison  full of   starving
slaves who cannot lift a hand to
help  themselves,   and  that it will
remain  while   William  the   Murderer can go on   buying a daily re*
prieve for bis own miserable family
in   return   for   the   blood   of ten
thousand of   her   slaves.    Thank
God I am out of it!"
W���STHERN - - HOTELS.
TULAMEEN BOTEL
Princeton, B. C is the headquarters for miners, investors
and railroad men. A fine location and everything- first-class
J. f.. MACPHERSON. Proprietor
HOTEL PRINCETON
Princeton, B.C., now completed on the
site of the old Great Northern. Only
brick hotel in Similkameen. A first
class house,
Swanson & Broomfield. Props.
RIVERSIDE HOTEL
Rock Creek, B. C. This is one of
the oldest hotels in the Kettle Valley. Excellent accommodation for
all travellers.
S. T. LARSEN, Proprietor.
r.
THE  CENTRAL HOTEL, AINSWORTH I
. This well-appointed hotel, in Kootenay's oldest mining town,
is a pleasant home for all who travel. .It is delightfully situated,
and from its balconies the vista of lake and mountain scenery
is rTrawlly magnificent: It is but a few yards from the famous
and health-giving hot mineral water springs. Tourists, drummers, miners, muckers, millionaires, and the general public
are alike welcome at this hostelry. The rooms are cheerful,
the meals tasty, and the spirits in the bar are fit for the gods,
while the cigars are a delight to those who flirt with My Lady
Nicotine.    Come for a day, and yon will come forever.
. A. BREEZE     -     PROPRIETORS
ft���r~ r���~���TTrTirTTirititiiiiiignnniiaiiiiiinui
The Knob Hill Hotel
PHOENIX.
One of the largest hotels ia
the city.   Beautiful location,
fine rooms and tasty meals.
A. O. JOHNSON      -     PROP.
B. C. Mines
ASSAYER
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box biio8, Nelson, B. C.
Charges:���Gold, Silver, Lead or Copper
$t each. Gold-Silver, (single assay)
ir.oo. Goid-Silver (duplicate assay)
jr.50. Silver-Lead J-i.50 Silver-Lead-
Zinc $3.00. Charges for oth��r-metals etc
on application.
Mazda Tungsten Lamps
15 to 40 Watt Lamps���50c each.
60 Watt Lamps���60c each.
100 Watt Lamps^-$1.00 each.
JNITROGEN
LAMPS
60 Watts
100     ������
200   ��
$1.25 each
1.50 ������
3.00 ������
STORAGE BATTERIES
CHARGED and REPAIRED
ELfCTRIC
VULCANIZING
Greenwood City Waterworks Co
!i��
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
The best that history gives as is
the enthusiasm it arouses.���Goethe.
A new strike has been made on
the Dewdney at Sidney Inlet.
At New Denver, it is about time
the Bosun and Mountain Chief resumed operations.
J. A. Skeehe has ten men doing
development work on the Monitor
near Port Alberni.
At the coast a search is being
made for porous lava. It is used
for surfacing paper.
In the Big Bend a trail is being
built from the Columbia river to
the Mastodon mines on Laforme
creek. Work will soon be in full
swing at these properties, and it is
thought that the yield of gold will
be large from the famous Big Bar.
The past twelve months bas witnessed a revival of mining on tbe
Island and  prospectors are to be
found in all sections of the'country
seeking to discover hidden   wealb.
Interest is centered at the present
moment in the development of tbe
Blue   Grouse   property   and   the
Sunnyside and  Hereitis claims of
the Grayson Copper company  on
Cowichan Lake and  the Nanaimo
group of   claims   located   in   the
vicinity of Coleman  Creek  in the
Alberni Canal district.
A Peaceful Camp
There are no labor unions in
Sudbury, Ontario, and peace, harmony, high wages, and reasonable
hours are the rale of the camp.
A correspondent writing from that
town says:
���'If' we could find oat the
reasons, the northern districts
might profit by their study. The
secret of the whole matter is probably the absence of any general
labor anion in the district. Tbe
men are to be congratulated in
having no onion. The companies
are to be congratulated on'keeping
tbe Western Federation ont both
by controlling the land and house
and also by giving to the men increases and boars before the same
increases and hoars are demanded
by men of other districts.
Annual Meeting
The ��� Annual General Meeting of the
Greenwood City Waterworks Co., will be
held in the Company's office at Greenwood on Wednesday the ist day of August, 19.7 at 10.00 o'clock in the morning,
for the transaction of the general business
of the company and the election of a
Board of Directors.
HUGH MCCUTCHEON,
Secretary.
Argo Tunnel
The Ordinary General Meeting of the
Shareholders of the Argo Mining and
Tunnel Company, Limited, (non-personal
liability) of Greenwood, British Columbia, will be held at the Company's office,
in the Ladysmith Hotel, Greenwood, on
the 27th day of July, 1917, at 8 p.m.
Dated this 16th day of July, 1917.
OLA LOFSTAD,   JAMES McCREATH
...    President. ...Secretary...-. ���.
British Columbia has been
here a long time so has
the B. C. Cigar. Absolutely Guaranteed. Clear
Havana Filled. The Cigar
that never varys.    .   ,   .
Haveyou tried one lately?
WILBERG&WOLTZ
B. C. CIGAR FACTORY
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C
DR. A. MILLOY
DENTIST
All   the   latest  methods  in   high-class
Dentistry.
LOO BUILDING
Corner Abbott & Hastings Streets.
VANCOUVER,   -   -   -   B.C.
LUMBER FOR SALE
Flooring,  Shiplap,  Rustic, Casing, Dimension, and all kinds
.of lumber.
MARK CHRISTENSEN & CO.
BOUNDARY FALLS
^4riripitiriririririririr iririripieirirxir,it'kifri%*l
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Cbe Inline Rote!
nelson. B.C.
The only up-'tevdate Hotel in the interior,
in every respect,
First-class
CENTRALLY LOCATED
Hot and Cold Water; Steam Heat and Telephone in
each room.
ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATHS.
CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BEST
First Class Bar and Barber Shop
15 FREE SAMPLE ROOMS
Steam Heated;  Electric Lighted.
RATES 51.00 per day and up; European Plan.
Bus Meets all Trains and Boats.
ir
*
Norden Hotel
GREENWOOD
0000000<X>00000000<X>00000<>0 f
T.    THOMAS
CLOTHES CLEANED
PRESSED AND REPAIRED
TAILOR - GREENWOOD
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
���$t *t*��$-��fft'4> 4* 4* <���� <$�� 4. ���$. 4. ��$��
Synopsis of Coal Mining Reflations.
^OAL mining rights of the Dominion
>���* in Manitoba, S__sk____C._ew_.__ and Alberta, the Vukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of the
Province of British Columbia, may be
leased for a term of twenty-one years
renewal for a further term of 21 years
at an annual rental of (r an acre. Not
more than 2,560 acres will be leased to
one applicant
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which tbe
rights applied foi__ar_i situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub^dlvi-
sions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by tbe applicant himself.
Bach application most be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid Oh the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent wtth sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of nut*
chantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon: If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns should
be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the'coal mining
rights only, rescinded by Chap. 27 of 4-5
George V. assented to 12th June, 1914.
For fall information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.��� Unauthorized  publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.���
8.5575.
*
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���������-*���"���===--���
���* ���'������''���
T C LOAT is not a periodic-
"** * al.. It is a book con-
ir taining 86 illustrations all
4* told, and is filled with
J ��j�� sketches and stories of
western life. It tells liow
a gambler cashed in after
the flash days of Sandon ;
how it rained in New Denver long after Noah was
dead; how a parson took a
drink at Bear Lake in
early days; how justice
was dealt in Easlo in '93;
how the saloon man out-
prayed the women in Kalamazoo, and graphically depicts the roamings of a
western editor among the
ten der-feet in the cent belt.
It contains the early history
of Nelson and a romance
of the Silver King mine.
In it are printed three
western poems, and dozens
of articles too numerous
to mention. Send for one
before it is too late. The
price is 25 cents, postpaid to any part of the
world. Address all letters to
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4��     GREENWOOD, B. C.     <��
This hotel is under
new management, and I
will be pleased to see all
its old patrons, and as
many new ones as possible Prompt and efficient service guaranteed.
Lunch counter and dining room in connection.
GEORGE   LAMB
J.  K. CAMERON,
Leading Tailor of the Kootenays.
KAS/LO    B C.
PHONE   13
Auto    and   Morse   Stages.
Leave    Greenwood    Twice?
Daily to Meet Spokane and'
Oroville Trains
Autos For Mire.   The Finest;
Turnouts in- the Boundary;
Light and Heavy Draying
Palace   Livery  And  Staga*
greenwoood.bg.
GILLIS & ION, Proprietors;
FRED A. STARKEY.
NEI*SON, B. C.
MINING
BROKER
PROSPECTS   BOUGHT   AND    SOLD
For Good
Job Printing
I
I
-���Economy and Satisfaction
combined with Promptness
are the features whkk go to
make up the Service we give
our customers. Are you
one of them ?
I
WE PRINT
Letterheads, Nofeheacb,
(Rule.l or Plain)
Envelopes, Billlte&dsv
(All Sizesi
Statements, Business Cards,
Posters, Dodgers, Etc., Etc.
The Ledge       PHONE 29
I
GREENWOOD
Job Printing Department
J
 i

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