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The Greenwood Ledge Oct 25, 1928

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Array Provincial Library
VOL. Ill
GREENWOOD, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1928
No. 1:
MIDWAY NEWS
E.  Hawkes  shot  a  fine two point
buck Monday last..
Mrs.   McMynn   returned   home   on
Thursday from" a visit to the Coast.
Miss - Charlotte Luscombe of "Grand
-Forks, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. H. Pan-
nel.
Mrs. J. C. Boltz and son of Boundary
Falls, were.visitors in town on,Wednesday.
G. "K\ Ashman has returned to Nelson
after visiting. here with Mr. and Mrs.
E. Hawkes.
Mi's. H. Pannell returned home on
Tuesday from *the Grand Forks Hospital feeling much better.
Private lessons" in" French, Latin^
Spanish, German and Sanskrit, apply
Box 917a "Nixfurstat", Midway, P.O.
The last monthly meeting of Lodge
731 of the Sublime Elephant was held
in the Hall Monday night. , There was
a large attendance.   ,
Harold Ferguson left,for Vancouver
on Tuesday morning's train calling en
route to visit his sister, * Mrs. W. R.
Dewdney at Penticton.   7   ,
Midway is very justly proud of'the
fact that one of its prominent citizens,
Joseph Richter,- won the Golf championship at Kettle Valley this year.
Motorists travelling west of town report great difficulty. ��� dodging" pedestrians' in the Kettle Valley district al
night. '
On Friday afternoon a nice Buck
was seen on the Midway flat in shooting range, while .the deer fanciers were
meanwhile miles back in the hills trying to* locate one.
Mrs. Murray of Vancouver, will give
a Free Demonstration on Rug Making
at Riverside Hall on Nov. 5th at 7:30
p.m.; Nov. 6th at 2 p,m., and on Nov
7th at 2 p.m. Everyone welcome. Institute-members, please take notice:'"-'
It is reported that "a Midway Syndicate propose purchasing that spacious
mansion near \ Rock'" Creek Garage,
sometimes called Balmoral Castle. It
is proposed to divide it into apartments
to house the rapidly increasing population.   -
Several Midway ladies visited Greenwood on Saturday and took in the
-Catholic~Ladies'~Bazaar'~~ahd~tliey'"were
well pleased with their outing.   The
"ladies going to Greenwood were:. Mrs.
R. Kerr, Mrs. Erickson; Mrs. Jas. Bush,
Mrs. Lundy,-Mrs. Joe Richter, Mrs. E.
Hawkes" and Mrs. Oscar Johnson,
Owing to the alarming increase'in
the juvenile population, the City Council contemplate in the far- future,
building a high Consolidated school, at
the corner of Main and Pacific*Avenue.
On the completion of the new school, a
teacher will be required for Grades 1,
III and V. Preference will be given to
one with nine or ten children of school
age.
GREENWOOD AND
DISTRICT. HOSPITAL
* The Directors of the above" Hospital
very thankfully acknowledge receipt of
the following subscriptions:
Previously acknowledged   $3630.85
Beaverdell Dance per Mrs. T.
W. Clarke ".       65.00
Total
$3695.85
OF LOCAL INTEREST
Mr. and Mrs. W: A. Webb, Mrs. Helen
Thomas and Jas.* McCreath motored to
Trail and spent the week-end with J. D.
McCreath.
STANDARDIZED  TESTS
Word has been received in town from
Miss Heather Harris that she will be
in Greenwood ready to teach on the
,5th pjf November. '':
- Government Agent, W. R. Dewdney
sold $2,220.27.worth of tax sale property at the, Kettle. River Assessment
District, Land Tax Sale in Penticton
on October 12th. ���
' Drs.-Gordon and Colin McLaren returned ' on Thursday evening from a
motor trip to California. They were
accompanied by their parents,-Mr. and
Mrs. ' D. McLaren and- sister, Miss
Beatrice McLaren.
, Win. Jenks, Gordon Jenks and Bob
McClelland,** left for Lulu .Island this
morning after a week's .hunting in this,
district. They came down from the
Christian Valley section last night
Bob McClelland having a nice two-
point buck on the running .board of
the car.
.    ���" *
A. R. Lord of Vancouver Normal
School, speaking" on "The Use and
Abuse of Standardized Tests," at the
Teachers Convention in Trail last week,
said it was now admitted that the
traditional thing called an examination, and that was once considered the
proper means by which to measure the
progress of pupils, was no accurate
measure whatever.
He asked of a measure used for
guaging a pupil's knowledge, that
it measure one thing and measure
it exactly; "that it should not purport to measure one thing and at the
same time take., other things into
consideration. A familiar example was
the paper on a particular subject that
allotted points . for writing, spelling,
form, and the like. .Mr. Lord illustrated his contention that the present
type of examination' paper was noi.
marked fairly to the pupil, .with an
extensive test made at the -University
of Toronto, with hand-written 100
papers that received marks of 35 to
40 per cent. Typed but preserving the
original tests, they improved on an
average eight points when submitted-
to the same examiners as new papers.
Typed again, with errors in - s'p'elling
and grammar corrected, thoy gained
another 12 to 15 points, and in a third
form, with the-original subject matter
dressed in improved phraseology,,they
made' another appreciable gain." Tho
conclusion, was reached, he said, that
in'the original marking, thc examiners
actually allotted 25 .to ,.40'points for
tho pupil's knowledge. of the subject
under test, and 'the balance for matters
that were irrevalent.
Besides being a valid and exact test,
he required the measure used to be
reliable, giving every time the samo
results on tlie same facts. Impossibility
of doing this with the -��� familiar essay
type of paper, he illustrated with a
test of his own,*wherein he erased thc
marks on 20 papers and marked them
again, not once duplicating thc first
value he had given.
Character.Tests
Tests should be<of such a character,
also, Mr. Lord-1 contended, that they
would have^ motivating value in the
work of the "class-room, tlie pupil working . with j. the/ desire--of. improving- his
past record*._>-'.-.-..-__: _'""
They should also be' an aid in teaching, he contended,' the period following
an examination being the time when
the pupils are eager to be informed on
the matters treated of in the questions.
Discussing the so-called .'intelligence
tests at some lenght, Mr. Lord suggested dangers in'their use'except for
guaging the abilities of a group. As
applied to an individual, a single test
was-not-at-all=conclusive,-and only-one
person in a 100 was in a position to ten
whether, on- such -a test a child was
mentally, deficient. Too many teachers,
he suggested, hastily assumed that
some pupil was absolutely hopeless.
Tests of mental ability should _be
known as advancement- tests, not intelligence tests, he suggested.
' For giving a measure of a pupil's
knowledge of subjects, Mr. Lord argued
for the objective type of tests as op-,
posed to the essay type.A. _ .
He" also preferred papers that gave a
large number of questions with the majority of which the pupil must have
come in contact if he thouroughly covered the work, in preference to selecting
five' to seven questions with which
an efficent pupil might be lucky or
which the efficient pupil might have
missed.
As to the passing mark, he said it
was unfair to say the pupil must make
a certain percentage to pass, While in
the mass the children were constant,
the teachers constant, and the curri-
clum constant, the examination, because of the limits of the papers under
present practice, was highly variable.
On certain subjects, by working* out a
large number of questions, eventually
useful standard tests could be arrived
at.
The danger in the' objective type of
examinations was that the ability of
expression-by the essay would deteriorate. If that was its effect, that was
sufficient to impair its- value most seriously  (applause).
Copper Industry
Been Stabilized
B.  C. Leads Canada in Production���
Pacific Tidewater Leads Way in
Boundary
CATHOLIC BAZAAR
, KETTLE* VALLEY GOLF
Joseph Richter Is-Winner
In the final round of the men's Handicap Competition for the championship of the -Kettle Valley Golf Club,
Joseph Richter, of Midway, defeated
H. T.'Newmarch of Greenwood. It was
'a most interesting game.    . ���    "*
Mrs. Newmarch Lady Champion
Mrs. H. T. Newmarch won over Mrs.
G. F. Frost in'the final round of the
Ladies Competition for the Championship of the Kettle Valley Golf Club."
No doubt the Ottawa Government
will be issuing the usual proclamation
for a national thanksgiving, in a few
days.
For .thirty years British Columbia
has been the leading - producing prov-
for' copper in Canada, responsible for
two-thirds o.f the total output of the
Dominion. Up to the end of last year
the copper production, of this province
had'reached 1,370,154,652 pounds, of a
total value of $221,492,079., The output
of copper exceeds that o of any other
metal. Thanks to - British Columbia,
Canada - occupies the position of the
fourth largest copper-producing country
in the world,- ranking only below the
United States, Chile and Africa. The
time has come, however, when the copper industry of this, province must look
to maintaining its laurels. Ontario is
making preparations for a large increase in copper production through the
extension -of "operations at the nickel
mines where copper is an important
associate of'nickle. Quebec now has-its
place in the copper sun, and is one of
the largest sources of supply of the metal for the requirements of the British
Metal Corporation which handles the
entire output. Manitoba will, within"
the next two years, become a big producer of copper. There is no. doubt
that copper is again king in the world's
metal-markets.' It ranks next to iron
and steel as the most important industrial metal. The disorganization
following the war has been replaced by
the most stable and constructive conditions in the industry; and it is now the
opportunity of British Columbia to take
full advantage of the situation.
Copper Deposits of Interior of B.C. *
The copper occurrences in the interior
should not be neglected. It must be
remembered that for twenty-five years
the Boundary district was the largest
producer of copper in. Canada. Over
an area of 1600 square,miles there are
copper prospects of merit. It is true
they are low grade, but,they are gene-
fally'self-fiuxing and favorable for economic smelting. .Thev_., have been
worked at-the lowest cdSV ih"-the history
of-the industry, and it.is remarkable
that so' little serious attention" should
have been given to them outside the
deposits .worked by the Granby and B.
C. Copper companies. Canada has just
as good engineering and metallurgical
service at its' disposals as the United
States. Indeed, this country would
seem to have the advantage in this respect if we judge from the number of
Canadians employed by American min-
ing-and-metallurgical^companies-in-the
most responsible positions.
_ Here is the grade of copper ore successfully mined and treated by several
American copper companies:
Copper Queen   1.4 %
Miami    0.85%
Inspiration ........ 1.14%
Walker Kline, Anaconda, copper    ".... .1.49%
Utah Copper -    .97%
There appears to be a'large tonnage
of ore of similar, grades in the copper
deposits of the Boundary, so that there
still appears to be every prospect of
the revival of the copper industry in
that part of the province. It.is remarkable that it should'have remained
for a new organization, Pacific Tidewaters Mines of Victoria, to lead the
way in the reinvestigation of these deposits with a view to renewal of mining
operations, Although a new company,
it must be remembered that it is associated with and financially supported
by ��� the British Metal Corporation of
Great Britain.oa company launched
during the war, with the financial
support of the British Government1 to
stimulate the metal mining industries
of the British Empire.
'So"successful have been the operations of this company that it controls
the metal production of Australia and
India, the copper production of Quebec, is active in Nova Scotia, Ontario
and Manitoba, and through its subsidiaries, Pacific Tidewater Mines and
Ladysmith-Tidewater Smelters, promises to become one of the largest factors in the future mining development,
smelting and metal refining industries
of British Columbia. The aim of, this
company is'to produce in this province
the products' of the mines' to their
highest-marketable condition,^a work
in which it .will prove a large-employer
of labor in a - service which is now
largely performed in the United States
to the advantage of that-' country at
the expense of this.
Pacific Tidewater Mines -is already
successfully leading the way In the
development of the Tyee, Blue Grouse
and Tidewater Copper Mines on Vancouver Island, as a result of which it
will probably soon have an output of
about 1500 tons of ore per day from
its own mines with which to reopen
the Ladysmith smelter. "       ���
This ore  will,  of course  have  to
be milled to provide an enriched con-
Icentrate for the smelting furnaces.  A
I mill will, have to be erected at Lady-
(Contributed)
It is a true saying, proven by experience and accepted by all, that "Nothing, succeeds like Success." Submitting to this acid test the Bazaar, held
Saturday the 20th in the Guess Block,
under the auspices of the Greenwood
District Subdivision of the Catholic
Women's League of Canada, and in aid
of Sacred Heart Church,, we find that
the .total cash receipts amply "justify
the conclusion that said Bazaar was an
unqualified success.
The causes which combined to pro-
'duce the gratifying result above indicated were many and varied; but it seems
fitting here to refer, briefly at least, to
the chief and most conspicuous among
them.
In the.first place Divine Providence
favored .us with a day" of cloudless
beauty with neither wind nor frost to
cause discomfort or render a journey in
the open anything but delightful.
. Again,' this wonderful" kindness bf a
host of friends from outside points
swelled the list of contributions, so that
the.various booths were exceptionally
well supplied with a great variety of
appropriate and.useful articles, which
caught the eye and tempted beyond
resistance the purchasing instincts of
the many people gathered together
from far and near.
And speaking of kindness we must
not omit to voice our appreciation of
the edifying, example given by. the
people, of Greenwood itself and the districts adjoining.' In this regard also we
are especially indebted to the Catholic
Women's League of Grand Forks whose
beautiful Tea Tray netted the goodly
sum of $14.35.    -
Therefore, to God who blessed our
humble efforts of all our - friends-
Catholic and Non-Catholic alike���who
approved and supported them, Father
Mclntyre and the members of Sacred
Heart Mission offer our sincerest
thanks and promise that when the opportunity present itself we mean to
prove the sincerest of our gratitude in
a manner more tangibile than words.
The prize winners are as follows:-
1st,, Bedspread, donated by' Father
Mclntyre. Won by Mr. Thomas R.
Williams, Greenwood, ticket No.. 113. -
--.2nd.-,Mackinaw,^ donated by ...the
Catholic Women's League of Greenwood. Won by Mrs. William Madden,'
Greenwood, ticket No. 819.
3rd. Tea Cloth! donated, by Miss
Elizabeth - McDonald of Greenwood.
Won by Mrs. W. Johnson, Boundary
Falls, ticket No: 371.
4th. Turkey, donated by Mrs. Jerome
McDonell, of Greenwood. Won by Mrs.
Mark Smith, Beaverdell, ticket No.
75.
���5th.���Sack-of-Flourrdonatediby-Mrs.
George Sutherland of Greenwood. Won
by Mr. A. Legault of'Greenwood.-ticket
No. 489.
. 6th. Tea Tray, donated by the
Catholic Women's League of Grand
Forks. Won by Mr. A. Legault of
Greenwood, ticket No. 52.
The Cash receipts from the several
departments are herewith submitted:
1. Home Cooking   $ 52.30
2. Fancy Sewing, etc  101.15
3. Fish Pond .\.- ;...-. 18.85
4. Candy ....:  18.75
5. Afternoon Tea ....:.... 32,90
6. Main Lottery .'  157.85
Tea Tray Lottery   14.35
ROCK CREEK PIONEER DIES
Total $396.15
Note." At the request of Mr. A,
Legault the Tray won by him was later
auctioned and fell to Mrs. William
Madden for $3.25.
WITH THE MINING MEN
R. Lee and Lewis Bryant spent a few
days in the West Copper camp this
week.
A party of Consolidated Mining, &
Smelting Company's mining engineers
examined some" property in the Jewel
camp this' week.
J. B.'Woodworth M. E., of Vancouver,
was in town during the week-end and
examined some mining property at
Phoenix and Jewel Lake.
N. E. Nelson, of Copper Mountain,
.was. examining mining property in
Phoenix and-Deadwood last week.
Mr!.Nelson went from here-to Republic where he examined a number of
copper claims south of that city.
smith" for the treatment of the complex
copper-zinc ore of the. Tyee mine, and
this will no doubt * be built and
equipped' to meet the custom needs of
the smaller coast mines which'can not
install their own milling plants.' This
is bound to lead to the reopening of a
number of copper properties now idle
along the coast.
The outlook for the copper industry
in British Columbia is therefore bright,
and there appears no good reason why
copper should not continue to be for
many years the most important metal
product in this province.���E. A. Haggen
in Vancouver Province.
When Edward Riley Martin passed
away at the home of his daughter, Mrs.
Jas. Lindsay, Rock Creek on Monday
morning, the Rock Creek district lost
a highly respected pioneer citizen. Mr.
Martin had not been well for some
time.
The deceased was born in England
on September 14th, 86 years ago. He
came to Canada when he was 14 years
old and settled in Kingston, Ont.,'
where he a few years later opened
a furniture business. He was the
proprietor of this business for some
years, finally closing it when he entered
the grocery business in Napanee, Ont.
In 1897 he came to Rock Creek and
farmed there until about four years
ago when his wife died since when he
has been living with his daughter.
He is survived by one daughter, Mrs.
Jas. Lindsay at Rock Creek and one son
Harry Martin at Sioux Falls, Dakota.
Mr. Martin was "a gentleman of
splendid character and one "who will
be missed greatly. To the bereaved
ones the deepest sympathy is extended.
MrzM&r1'.^. was an active member of
the Rock - Creek Farmers Institute
for many years and the following rep-'
resented-the Institute at the funeral: '
Messrs. A. D. McLennan, W. Hatton, S.
Cross, M. Jewell, E. Madge, J. Madge,
G. B. M. Gane, M. Johnson, G. P.
Harpur; J, Caldwell and R. E. Norris.
Messrs. Henry Bruce and C. Weed
represented the Midway Farmers Instituted.    '
The funeral was held on Wednesday
aftrnoon service being conducted by
Rev. A. Walker in the Riverside Hall
before a very large gathering of friends. .
Burial took place in the Rock- Creek
Cemetry.., , -^
ED. MADGE'S BARN BURNS.
Ed. Madge suffered a loss when his
large log barn was destroyed by fire on
Sunday afternoon, Oct. 21st at 4:30
o'clock, onjhe ranch he purchased last
spring on * Rock Mountain! near Rock
Creek. Mr. Madge and family were
returning home when they noticed the
fire which had, got a fair start. They
set to work arid were joined"by.Rev.
Andrew Walker who was en route to
Greenwood ,fronv. holding service _. at,
Johnson Creek. 'Morris Jewell""and"
other neighbors were attracted to* the
scene and by the valiant efforts of all
the fire fighters, the residence,-rabbit
house, chicken house, straw stack,
stable and hay shed were saved.
Mr Madge lost 2 tons of sacked "oats,.
a mower, one pig and a quantity of
hay.
The origin of the fire is unknown.
"BEAVERDELL-BKlEFS"
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Walters of
Greenwood were visitors to camp over
the week-end.
Mi*, and Mrs. Ben Brown left - for
Vancouver on Wednesday morning
where they expect to make their home.
Much credit is due Mrs. T. W. Clarke,
Mrs. Mattson and Mrs. C. E. Nordman
for the successful hospital dance put on
here last Saturday night. While the
crowd was not large, they were full of
pep and everyone seemed to be having,
a "whale" of a time. There were a lot'
of local people not present but a great
many of them signified their good intentions by buying a ticket, thus showing that they appreciate the value of
a local hospital. The trustees kindly
donated the school and the ladies were
very generous with their donations towards the supper, all of wliich helped
to make the expenses for the evening
very small. A cheque for $65.00 has
been forwarded to the secretary of the
Hospital Board.
Miss Ruth Axam and Miss Edith
Knight' of the staff of the Greenwood ���
Superior. School returned on Sunday
from attending a very successful School
Teachers Convention in Trail on Friday
and Saturday. It was' attended by
"aboufc 175 teachers from all over the
Boundary and Kootenay districts and
they "received a most cordial welcome
from Trail and Tadanac authorities.
Mayor Herbert Clark, in extending- the f
city's official welcome, could hardly get
away from the* subject of "youth,
beauty and intelligence!' and declared
that Trail, Tadanac, being associated
in the welcome too, ."welcomed them
with open arms." In seeing the big
smelting plant in the afternoon, he
said, .the teachers would note.that there
were employed there from 2600 to 3000
men; half of whom were single and
ambitious; the other half, like himself, marpled,- but still ambitious. While -
Trail had welcomed many'good organizations and groups this summer, he
felt that'none equalled in importance
the group that had the training of the
citizens. of''tomorrow. He then presented the Chairman, H. J. Palmer of
the.Trail-Tadanac School Board with
a massive gilt key of the city and "the
Session got down to business. A report of one of the speeches appears in
another column. PAGE TWO
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1928.
The Candle o
HOUR by hour the flame bums the
candle shorter until, suddenly���a gust
of wind���a flicker���and the flame expires.
So with your life. You do not know
when the gust may come that will extinguish the flame of your life, but you
know that it will come.   Perhaps soon.
Familiarity with this fact often breeds
indifference that results in suffering and
privation to a family that might easily
be prevented.
Confederation Life Policies are designed
to prevent this. Do you really know the
extent to which you and yours can be
relieved of all chance of such misfortune?
Are you familiar with the liberal provisions of the Confederation Life Association's
TOTAL DISABILITY BENEFIT ?
DOUBLE  INDEMNITY ACCIDENT
BENEFIT ?
OR
LIFE INSURANCE WITHOUT MEDICAL
EXAMINATION ?
If you will write we will send you some
information about lilt insurance
that will interest you.
Confederation
Life Association
ROAD CLEARED OF NAILS-
BY HUGE MAGNET
More than two tons of nails, scrap
iron, wire and the like were picked up
by an electric road magnet between
Chelan and Manson, Wash., recently,
according to State Highway patrolman,
Joe McCauley. In some instances the
machine would progress hardly more
than 60 feet before the huge magnet
would have to be freed from its load of
metal .
01>ey Orders
'  '1
I
^yWs^.i~n)H'W*''TOT*--^''r'''^T��^
.WvWvvVvvvVWVvvvvvvvvvvvv'wwrwwrTrvvvvvv*v+w'vvwwv"
TENTH ANNUAL
"Can't keep the visitors from coming
up," said the oflice boy dejectedly to
the editor. "When I say you're out
they don't believe me. 'They say they
must see you." .
"Well," said the editor, "just tell
them that's what they all say."
That afternoon there called at,Lhe
office a lady. She-wanted to see the
editor, and the boy assured her that it
was impossible.
"But I must see him," she protested,
"I'm his  wife." .
"That's what they all say,"   replied
the boy.
And now a new boy is wanted.there.
His Funeral *���
asquerade Dance
Masonic Mail, Greenwood
Monday, Nov. S2th, 1928
Thanksgiving Day ��� Armistice Day
6 PRIZES
Best Ladies Costume, Best Gents Costume, Best Girls Costume,
Best Boys Costume, Best Comic, Most Original Costume.
Doors open at 8 pm. Dancing at 9 p.m.
GRAND MARCH AT 10 P.M.
Bush's Special 5-Piece Orchestra
Admission:   Gents $1.00; Ladies 50c; Children 50c; Supper 35c.
Spectators:   Adults 50c; Children 25c.
HEAD OFFICE
TORONTO
Old Gentleman: "Mr. Brown, I
believe? My grandson is working in
your office."
Brown: "Oh, yes. He went to your
funeral last week."
Only those masked allowed on the floor until after the Grand March
.aa AAA ���*.*,* A AAJ^^A^^-^-^^^^'A^
HOWARD FARRANT, District Manager,
Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Gilbert Prideaux, General Agent,
Princeton, B.C.
The Greenwood Ledge
Published every Thursday at
Greenwood, B.C.
G. W. A. SMITH
Editor and. Proprietor
ADVERTISING     RATES
Delinquent Co-Owner N Notices... $25.00
Coal and Oil Notices............   7.00
Estray Notices  .................yLSXA
Cards of Thanks  .'-1.00
Certificate of Improvement...... 12.5-p-
(When more than one claim appears
in notice, $5.00 for, each additional
claim.' .-rA';>A'A.a.a.a ''���':'xxy xi-:--
All other legal advertising 16 cents
a line first insertion, and 12 cents a
line for each subsequent insertion, nonpareil measurement.
Subscription: In Canada and to Gt.
Britain, $2.00 a year in advance; $2.50
when not paid for three months or
more have   passed.  To   the   United
-States^$2.50,=always^in^advarice.     >.s
Business locals 12%c a line each insertion. ���'.-'���"
No letter to the editor will .be inserted except over the proper signature and address of the writer. This
rule admits of no exceptions.
The blue cross means: that
your subscription is-due.-and
that the editor would be
pleased to have more money.
THE CANADIAN
FORESTRY ASSOCIATION
For the past twenty-eight year's the
Association, starting as an obscure
acorn, has developed into the mighty
oak, whose branches stretch from coast
to coast Four years ago the burden of
the western region called for greater
support than the' parent trunk could
adequately support and the sprout oak
formed in British Columbia has now
���become a full grown tree. The growing
national influence of the Association is
signified by the national support that
it is receiving, not only from the pulp
and paper and the lumber. industries,
but by equal support-of mercantile
firms who are indirectly affected, also
the regular increase in membership
signifying the approval of the real
owners of the forest land, the people.
How has this achievement been
brought about?   a    - . A     '
Simply by steady pressing towards
the goal of public understanding and
appreciation of trie problems of forest
conservation and by exploding the idea
q| false security in our ."inexhaustible
forest'-supplies" by quickening public
apathy toward the arch enemy of
forests���forest fires. : ';������
The'most effective method of creating
.' a forest conscious public which the
' Association has fonnd is through the
medium of motion pictures and through
the Association magazine with the cooperation of the school teachers. Consequently, the Association has spent
every effort to. improve these mediums.
For example, the Association staff: in
co-operation with the Ontario Motion
Picture Bureau, Dominion Government
"Motion Picture Bureau, the Ontario
and Quebec Forestry Branch and the
Forest Protective Association,, staffs
have* for the past thre years been producing their, own feature motion pic
tures to meet the local conservation
needs. As one phase of public education is covered, and proved from the
reports of the protectionists throughout
the country, another phase is taken up.
in this way, by tackling the most pressing needs first, the public, at first antagonistic through ignorance, is steadily
being won over to form a group of responsible co-operators. So keen do the
protectionists themselves feel in this
matter; that they spare no effort to
make ' the ��� Association educational
efforts a success. It is now a-common
statement', among the chief fire rangers
that education is the rock foundation
without which no forest guarding will
stand.
The ten thousand school teachers receiving our magazines, FOREST AND
OUTDOORS, and LA FORET ET .LA
FERME, are using them as a text book'
on conservation matters. The Association has endeavored to present facts
in readible form. The idea would appear sound, as we are in constant receipt of letters from school teachers
that the: conservation lessons are the
"most-popularin-the-school-programT
Other facts relating to the 1927
educational-campaign -may be of interest as indicating the scope of the
Association work at the present time,
The total receipts in 1927 reached
$131,950,00, an advance of $19,912.00
over tlie previous year. The Association's revenues have increased eleven
fold in the past ten years. The membership now stands at 29,000,'a net gain
of 1700 in 1927.
- The ten motor truck campaigns carried out in the more remote districts by
the use of automobiles with lecturers
and motion picture and electrical
equipment, travelled over 42,000 miles
in five provinces. The Tree Planting
Lecture Car travelled 4500 miles in the
Prairie Provinces. The total audience
on field work by staff and members for
the season was 340,481. Sixteen hundred and four public meetings were
held.    ,
The British Columbia branch of the
Association under Mr. Thos. H. Wilkinson conducted a vigorous lecture campaign resulting in the reaching of 211
communities with an attendance of
over 50,000 people. The Financial Report,, too, was rather encouraging,
amounting to $18,491,00.
The Canadian Forestry Association
also utilizes a vigorous newspaper publicity bureau, radio broadcasting, travelling lecture sets, a motion picture
library,, and the development of cooperative activities with Service Clubs,
Agricultural Societies, Manufacturers'
Associations and other institutions of
broad public influence.
The 1928 officers and directors of the
Canadian Forestry* Association are:
Patron, His Excellency The. Governor
General;: Honorary President, Rt.-Hon.
���W. L. Mackenzie King; Honorary Vice-
President, Hon. Chas. Stewart; President, WiE. Golding; Manager, Robson
Black;-Publication Manager, George A.
Mackie;: Assistant Manager, Gordon-M.
Dallyn; British Columbia Manager,
Thos.; H.': Wilkinson; Treasurer,' Miss
M. Robinson.
The Headquarters of the Association
'are.;".at:;-;51 Sparks Street, Ottawa,
Canada.!
Sure Death -
'Arry:   "Heard of the latest in poisons?"
Plane:   "No.  What is it?"
���Ar-ry: -  "Airplane    poisoning. * One
drop is usually sufficient" ���    -
Argosies of Magic Sails
"Bug". Bear .was the first shipment to be handled by the
Canadian Pacific Express Company over the Montreal-New York/
Airway.  The general view is of the St. Hubert airport, Montreal,
showing some of tho planes engaged in air transport.    Inset is.
a close up of one of the cabin monoplanes mor-o generally used.
"For I dipt into tiie future, far as human eye
could see,
SaSv the vision of the worid, and all the wonder
'    that would be;
Saw the (heavens filled with commerce, argosies of
magic sails,
Pilots of the purple twilight, ���dropping down with
costly bales;"
As ^ he -watched the very itecent departure of the
flr&t airplane to take off on the regular daily
express service between Toronto, Montreal and New
York, T. E. McDonnell,'president and general man-
:a��*fcr of .the Canadian Pacific Express Company
thought that In 'these lines, Tennyson had envisioned
the present age, when "winged messengers of peace
aui commence cross the imaginary line unchallenged". T. E. McDonnell himself has a vision of the
fii-tuie -when the travelling and shipping public will
have a greater-"air mindedness" and the service
which his Company has pioneered will have developed into an economic -factor of tremendous proportions. To just what proportions the air express
wrice will he developed immediately Mr. McDon-
nelTwould not commit himself, but "air transportation, must be seriously taken into account if one
would keep abreast of the times" he said. At
present regular air express service is maintained
by the Canadian Pacific between Rimouski, Quebec, Montreal, iNew York, Ottawa and Toronto ii the
eist and Winnipeg and Calgary in the west, and
these routes are very much appreciated and patronised.
The views of the president of the Canadian Pacific
at a time when air events and features, are filling
the columns of the dally press are not without
interest. "Aviation as a factor in commercial transportation has arrived and henceforth must be -
reckoned with on that basif." Mr. Beatty, recently
stated. "We have watched its development with
keen interest, and while it is not possible clearly
to see just in what direction or how -far progress
may 'foe effected In the near future, it ihas already
taken its place as one of the major transport agencies. Whatever may happen in the distant future,
it seems to me that at the present time there is
little or no prospect of aviation assuming a seriously competitive -attitude towards present day modes
of transport. It is crather as an auxiliary service
to railroads and steamships that it Js likely to function ifor some time to come. The Canadian Pacific,
he added, has already recognised this fact by the
establishment in conjunction with the Government
Mail service, of an air express service and^upon
the success of this service will hang future developments as far as this Company is concerned. Tn this
connection, as throujjhout its history, the Canadian
Pacific is doing a pioneer work in Canada. We are
closely watching the development of aviation in the
belief that Canada with its widely scattered centres
of population offers a particularly promis_*ig field
for its employment."
-Air transport is, of course, faster thaii., any other
and although the dare deviltry of some reckless,
stunting pilot resulting.in injury and loss of life
has earned front page prominence on occasion, it is
safer than automobile transport. '
"Argosies of magic s^ls" is -not a distent (vision. THURSDAY,  OCTOBER 25,  1928.
TIIE GREENWOOD LEDGE
PAGE THREE
ANNUAL GENERAL WESTERN
.  MEETING C. I. M. M.
The Annual General Western Mect-
-    ing of the Canadian Institute of Min-
k    ing and Metallurgy will be held this
year in Vancouver on'November 21st to
23rd.   In  recent years  thc  Institute
Meetings, both of the parent body and
of thc Division  in British  Columbia
have   been   notably   successful.   Not
.only have they attracted a-large attendance, comparable to the attendance
at similar functions in thc great centres
- of Eastern Canada, but the papers presented   and . the   discussions   thereon
- have been of high' order.   The meeting
this year promises to be no less success-
, "ful in every respect judging .from the
programme that has ��� now been announced.' The Sessions will be held in
* the Hotel Vancouver, and will open on
-Wednesday morning with an address
by the. President of the Institute, Mr.
R. H. Stewart. This will be followed
by the presentation of a review oh.conditions and-mining developments dur-
( ing the year in British Columbia by the
Provincial Mineralogist, Mr. J. D.
Galloway, and the Resident Engineers
of the respective Mineral Survey Districts. The afternoon will be devoted
to a survey of the Mining Situation,in
Manitoba by "Dr. J. S. DeLury, Pro-
lessor of Geology at the University of
Manitoba, supported by Mr. H. B.
Lumsden of Lhe Natural Resources Department of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, who will discuss the Important -non metallic resources of that
. Province. At the morning session of
v Thursday, November 22nd, attention
will be- directed to the consideration
of the oil situation in Alberta, with
contributions by Mr. P. D. Moore, Field
Geologist for the Imperial Oil Company, and Mr. S. G. Coultis, Produc-
��� tion -Engineer fof  the  Imperial. Oil
\   Company, on the Turner Valley'Oil
Fields. In the afternoon the main
topic for discussion will be that of the
��� Mining Methods employed at the Major
Mines in British Columbia, introduced
by Mr. J. I. Moore of the Britannia' M."
6s S. Company, Mr: D. Thompson of
the Consolidated M. & S. Company's
Sullivan.Mine, and representatives'of
the Granby and Premier Companies.
Ori the third11 day of the Meeting the
feature will be a discussion on desirable
revisions to the Placer Mining Act and
OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
.    -* _   '   o
Vacant unreserved, surveyed , Crown
elands may be pre-empted by British
, subjects over 18 years of .age, andsby
aliens" on declaring intention to become    British    subjects,    conditional
.  upon residence, occupation,  and im-
- provement for agricultural purposes.
- Full information concerning reula-
��� tions regarding pre-emptions is given
in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series. "How
to Pre-empt. Land," copies of ���' which
���-���can-be-obtained-free" of - charge^-hyad--
dressing * the Department - of Lands,
toria, -B. C��� ' or to any Government
Agent.
- - Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural purposes, - and which ls not timberland,
i.e., carrying over 8,000 board feet per
acre west of "the Coast Range and
5,000 feet per acre east of that Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are to
be addressed to the Land Commission-
- er of the Land Recording Division, in
which the land applied for is situated,
and are made on printed forms, copies
- of which can be obtained from the1
Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made to
���the value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating - at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved Crown
Lands, not being timberland, for agricultural purposes; minimum price for
- first-class   (arable)   land   is   $5   per
" acre.   Further   information  regarding
purchase or lease of Crown Lands is
given in Bulletin No. 10, Land Series,
'Purchase and Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, ��� or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of stump-
aee
HOMESITE LEASES
Unsurveyed areas not exceeding.20
acres, may be leased as homesites, con-
*-   ditlonal upon a' dwelling being erected
in the first'year, title being obtainable
-*
after  residence ��� and improvement conditions are fulfilled, and land has been
_   surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas not exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or a company.
,    *��� -o
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act" the Province
is divided into grazing districts and the
range administered under a Grazing
Commissioner. Annual grazing permits are issued based on numbers
ranged, priority given to established
owners, stock owners may form associations for range management. Free,
or partly free, - permits are available
for settlers, campers and travellers, up
to ten head.
the Mineral Act, with papers on the
subject by Mr. A M. Whiteside, L. A.
Bonner, R. W. Haggen and others,
Among other contributions that have
been promised are the following: 'Use
of Solid 'Fuels in' the Pulverized State
for Power and other Purposes' by Mr.
E. S. Malloch of the Mines Branch of
the Dominion Department of Mines:
'The Coal Situation in Alberta' by Mr.
J. I. Richards, 'Acting Chief Inspector
of Mines in that Province: 'Geology of
the Topley Area' by Dr. T. C. Phemistcr
of the University of British Columbia:
'Geology and Mineral Resources of the
Portland Canal' by Mr. R. Hodson:
'Production of Copper at Britannia
from Mine Waters' by Mr. F. Ebbutt:
'Milling Practice at the Premier Mine'
by Mr. Dale L. Pitt: 'A Solution of
Fault Problems' by Mr. G. V. Douglas:
and 'Pioneer Methods of Placer Mining in B.C.'-by Mr. H. Jones. The social
functions include official luncheons on
the three days of the Meeting, and a
Dinner followed by a Dance on the
evening of November 23rd.
The Easiest Way
���A Scotchman applied for a' position
as a patrolman on the London police
force. Scotland Yard asked him this
question:       -���____ ' '    ,
"Suppose,', McFarland, you saw a
crowd congregated at a certain point of
your beat, how would j*ou disperse it
quickly, with .the least "-trouble?"
"I would pass the hat,", answered
McFarland. ��� .   -
Kettle River Assessment District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, on Monday, the 5th day of November, 1928, at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
afternoon, at the Provincial Police Office, Penticton, B.C., I will sell at public auction the Crown-granted mineral
claims in-the,list hereinafter set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes unpaid by
said persons on the 30th day of June. 1928, and for interest, costs, and expenses, including the cost 'of advertising
said sale, if the total amount due is not sooner paid.        ��� .     ',
LIST OF PROPERTIES (ALL IN SIMILKAMEEN DIVISION OF YALE DISTRICT)
Name of Owner
Name of Claim
Lot No. Taxes    Interest   Costs      Total
The house is a fine house"'when good
folks are within.���Proverb.
If you do not know how-to live rightly,
submit to those who do.���Horace.
TIMBER SALE X10600
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the District Forester, Nelson,
not later than noon on the 7th day of
November, 1928, for the purchase of
Licence X10600 near Westbridge to cut
988.8 M. Boardfeet of Sawlogs.
"One year'will be allowed for removal
of. timber.
Further particulars of the District
Forester, Nelson, B.C.
ASSAYER.,-
E. W. WIDDOWSON, Assayer and
Chemist, Box L1108, Nelson, B. C.
Charges���Gold, Silver, Copper or Lead
$1.00 each. Gold-Silver ��1.50., Silver-
Lead $2.00. Silvcr-Lead-Zinc ** $3.00.
These charges" made only when cash is
sent. with sample. Charges for other
metals, etc.,'on application.
i\�� _ EV
Contractor and Builder;
MONUMENTS,.  '    ROOFING,
LAMATCO WALL BOARD
!
Get my prices on
LAMATCO
on walls finished, and save money
SHOP AT GREENWOOD
Box 332 Grand Forks. B.C.
OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION
Harvey, C, and McLean, John  Crown. Point   501-S
HarveyKC, and McLean, John .-  .Dayton    '  500-S
Kliner Anna  .Empire    '., 611
Mangott, Steve et al .- '.Morning Star   443
Mangott, Steve  .t Powis    946
Mangott, Steve  .' Silver Crown  *  442
'*-- GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION
Lander, A. J .*. .Bank of England  1536
Kelly, Joseph P BlackDiamond '.  2275
,Haas,'J. C. et al- Bruce   918
Cole, H. J. et al ...'. C. O. D :  1532
Jackson, Henry P ". .E. Pluribus Unum ...'.  3253
Tuzo, J. A. Estate et al .... A Golden ���'���.  1433-S
Consolidated   Mining   and   Smelting
.    Company ' Homestake   ;  1892
Mangott, Steve  Last Chance  751
Rose, David .' Lottie Fraction  2949
McKennan, J. T Moreen 'Fraction   1709
Consolidated   Mining   and   Smelting   " ���'_ -"-
' Company  Myrtle   ... -  1654
Casorso,' FelixxH/ Oro '._ ;  614
Tuzo, J. A. Estate et al,  .'.Relief'Fraction  1432-S
Jack Paul Mining Company  .Riverside * -.  1031
Melrud, Edward .'. Silver Tip X)  1154
Smith, David G., .'.Yorkshire Lass  3024-S
GRAND FORKS MINING DIVISION
Phillips, W. S. -.' Aldeen    1749
Jackson, Henry P Arlington  2596
Gardner, R. J :..;. .Bonanza  1617
Shannon, J. P. et al Jennie May .'  1248
Gardner, Richard J Neta    996
Phillips, W. S Tunnel  ;, 1750
DATED atlPenticton, B.C., this 10th day of October, 1928.
�� 13.00
$ .35
$13.75'
$ 27.10
11.00
.30   '
13.75
25.05
13.00
.35   '
13.75
27.10
5.25
*    .15
13.75
19ll5
13.00
.35
13.75
27.10
5.25
.15
13.75
19.15
26.00
1.75
13.75
41.50
9.50
.25
13.75
23.50
195.00
95.25
13.75
304.00
13.00
.35
13.75
27.10
10.50
.    .28.
13.75 '
- 24.53
122.20
*47.95
13.75
183.90
25.00
1.70
13.75
40.45
13.00
.35
13.75
27.10
13.00"
.35
13.75
27.10
12.25
.34
13.75
' 26.34
24.00
1.60   **
13.75
*��� 39.35
4.25
.12
13.75
18.12
72.85
28,57
13.75
115.17
.12.75
- .35
13.75
26.85
13.00
.35
13.75
27.10
12.00
.32
13.75
26.07
10.00
.27
13.75
24.02
11.25
.30
13.75
25130
4.25
.12
13.75
18.12
11.00
.30
13.75
25.05
12.75
.35
13.75
26.85
9.25
.25
13.75
23.25
W. R.
DEWDNEY,
���_
Provincial Collector.
WILLIAM H. WOOD
-PHYSICIAN AJW SURGEON
GREENWOOD
SEND YOUR
BOOTS and SHOES
To
Harry Armson, Grand Forks
The 20th Century Shoe Repairer'
All work and material, guaranteed
We pay postage one way.  Terms cash
?TrT��T?��TVyt��yTT,*'rV��'ffy'(>TTVTV��'*'>TVTT'?V'<>?'IT*>T��'f'*Ti��'��tj
[The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. i
of Canada. Limited
>
>
���
>   *    y
f
���
���
Office, Smelting and Refining Department
TRAIL., BRITISH COLUMBIA-
SMELTERS and REFINERS
> Purchasers of Gold/Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc Ores
Producers, of Gold, Silver, Copper, Pig Lead and Zinc
"TADANAC"  BRAND    '
AWttitiA^^A4A^Ai_i4itAA*i>1.<lAiA'l'.*AiAA*i'i''��****>******
CANADIAfLPACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
J<^f^i.^.^^aMM��f?,(ltf<IIAM^M.'*ArAM<*.M*'J
SAILINGS
FROM MONTREAL���QUEBEC
j     MINNEDOSA        -,..::_...,.........���.  NOV. 28
K fo Glasgow, Belfast, Liverpool
t FROM SAINT JOHN
METAGAMA  :....: .--...  DEC. 7
to Cherbourg, Southampton, Antwerp
MONTCLARE .......:......  DEC. 7
v to Glasgow,  Belfast, Liverpool
MELITA   DEC. 14
to St. Heller, Channel Islands, Cherbourg,
."      Southampton, Antwerp
DUCHESS OF ATHOLL   DEC. 12
to Glasgow, Liverpool
MONTROYAL  DEC. 21
to Glasgow, Liverpool
CABIN���TOURIST ILL-THIRD CLASS
Low Round Trip nates:    1'ourlst HI, aad Third Class.
Berth Reservations can  now be made.    Details and Literature
ia       from any Agent -or Write
J. S. CARTER, DISTRICT PASSENGER AGENT
|0 NPXSON, B.C.
Subscribe to The Greenwood Ledge
Statements
Envelopes
Billhead
s
Writing   >t    The Greenwood Ledge
Letterheads
Dodgers
Poster s PAGE FOUR
THE GREENWOOD LEDGE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1928.
,^^i^^mf^ivwwwvwwvwvwvvwwvvv^'^-
' NOW ON DISPLAY
The"New Marconi
1929 RADIO
With Temple Air-Chrome Speaker
T. M. GULLEY
has been appointed distributor for Greenwood
See and hear this wonderful instrument.
-AAAAAAAA A AAAA,��.AAA,A,fc,ftAA, tA***A4AAAAAi
Of Local Interest
tBBHEEElSEffifflS.'ESEaHESEESBEEBIS!
Cecil Floyd made a business trip to
Bridesville on Monday.
Mrs.  F.  L. Peterson has returned
from a two weeks stay in Spokane.
Isaac   Fillmore   of   Rhone,   was   a
visitor to town during the week-end.
fresh
Salmon, Halibut & Cod Fish
EVERY THURSDAY
Service in St. Jude's Church, Greenwood on Sunday, Oct. 28th at 7:30 p.m,
Major and Mrs. Swanton will shortly
leave Kettle Valey to take up residence
at Cobble Hill/ V. I.
Mass will be celebrated in the
Catholic Church, Greenwood on Sunday, Oct. 28th, at eleven o'clock.
The Internationally
Famous���
DUNCAN SISTERS
In the Motion Picture
"Topsy ahd Eva"
From the play by Catherine C. Cushing
If you laughed at "Topsy and
.   Eva" on the stage,
You'll laugh longer and louder
at the funnier screen version
of the same play.
All their antics, pep, personality
and joy���rolled into reels of rib-
tickling* merriment.
Laughs for the kiddies ~
Laughs for the debbies
Laughs for the collegians
Laughs for mama, dad, auntie, uncle or
grand-folks
Laughs for all the children���age seven
or seventy.
vwvyyvwwwwvYwvww'
Ladies and'Gents
Furnishings
Men'sJVVork Shoes and
Heavy Rubbers
',     Dress Shoes & Fancy Oxfords
l     Sox, Caps, Hats, Overalls and
�� Work Gloves
' Odd sizes in
���    Stanfield's Shirts and Drawers
\        Selling at Reduced Prices
Lcckie Miner's Boots in Stock
Rubbers for Women & Children
Just Arrived
also Ladies Fancy Silk Hose
Leckic Shoes for School Children
Ellen Trounson's Store
.11
���
^AAAAAAAAA^A,/^*^.******.****.
Fresh Sausages Every Friday
Standing Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Miss Marjorie Brewster, R.N., of
Vancouver, is the guest of her sister
and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. S. B.
Hamilton.
1    For quality and value order from
Phone 46
GREENWOOD GROCERY
Constable W. R. Powers and a number of constables from the Okanagan
are hunting in the Christian Valley
district this week.
Greenwood Theatre
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Commencing at 8:15 p.m.
Adults 50c..    Children 25c
Mr. Olaf Houline, of Beaverdell came
by train on Saturday to visit his family
and had a motor ride back to his work
on Tuesday morning.
'VW'rWWWWVVWWVVWWVWV.'WV^-YVrv-V
ire t^y TV �����'��'��������� J'*'''''*'''
Buy the Best
Edison Mazda Lamps
have again
Dropped in Price
We are their agents
TAYLOR & SON
J. C. Casselman was in town
this week on his return from Spokane
where he had undergone ah operation
some days ago. All Mr. Casselman's
friends hope that he will soon be greatly
improved.
Coming! Coming!
Saturday, November 3rd
��� Colleen  Moore   in
"Orchids and-Ermine"
BONDS   4
4
4
4
4
4
STOCKS
MINING SHARES
COMING EVENTS
Phone 17
Chas. Nichols, Wm. Walmsley, Rev.
A. Walker and G.' W. A. Smith, of
Greenwood; O. Wheeler and Wm.
Johnson of Rock Creek and Gordon
McMynn and J. L. Bush motored to
Republic on Wednesday evening.
Midway
Don't forget the next meeting of the
Women's Institute on Nov. 3rd.   Mrs.
Joseph Richter will give a report of t}ic
Conference.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas Gauvreau left on
Thursday morning for Vancouver where
they intend making their future home.
The fine weather and the many old
friends in Anaconda and Greenwood
were very hard to leave behind.
A special Hallowe'en Card Party will
be held in the Old School House on
���Tuesday next at 8:30 -p.m. A card
table will be. given for the highest
score made that evening. .     ��
PACIFIC HOTEL .
������_-���
'   Headquarters for
Boundary Mining and Travelling Men
Class-Accommodation^	
Mrs. Mark Christensen, who was recently operated on in the Grand Porks
'Hospital is'making good recovery. The
nurses state that Mrs. Christensen is
quite a model, patient and apparently
will be sorry when the time comes for
the patient to return once more to her
home in Greenwood. All Mrs. Chisten-
' sen's friends are very pleased to hear she
is resting so very comfortably and will
be only too pleased to see her back
where she really belongs once more!
Don't forget the Ladies Aid Bazaar to
be held in the Old School House on
Saturday, October 27th at 2 p.m. It is
proposed to make a special attraction
of the Pish Pond for the kiddies.
first-
Mot and Cold Water
Every Convenience
_
<
ii
J. H. GOODEVE
Prop.
Drug Store in Connection
The Great War Veterans' Annual
Masquerade Dance promises to be. as
usual the outstanding Dance of the
year. Reports from the surrounding
district would indicate that more than
usual interest is being shown in this
affair which has grown to be an annual
event, looked forward to by old and
young The^Veterans_are_endeavoring.
to make the Dance a social event, as a
fitting commemoration of the cessation
of hostilities and the signing of the
Armistice ten years ago.
Ingram Bridge
Miss Gladys Brereton's "Scholars will
give a small Hallowe'en Concert in the
Ingram Bridge School on- Tuesday
evening. Admission 25c. The proceeds
will be given to the Junior Red Cross
Fund. ~   ���
Here they are!!!
Charles King
Real Estate & Insurance Agent
Arrangements with first class
BROKERAGE  FIRMS
Some to handle BONDS,
/ . - i
others STOCKS,
others MINING SHARES
STOCKS and BONDS
��� on installment system
MINING and OTHERS
margin
on
Call and state your
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��� business.     2
'yTT'ffv*'**'!**''*''^^^^**^^**'*'******'''*'*'^*''*''^??^'
Greenwood Meat Market
Under New Management
CHOICE LINE OF MEATS
We Solicit Your Patronage
Strictly Cash
JOHN MEYER - - Proprietor
.<**>________,��_
Little Miss Edna Pope, who had to go
to Grand Forks, on Sunday morning,
to have an operation performed, on her
throat, is reported to be getting along
very well indeed and when visited, on
Wednesday afternoon by her father and
mother, Mr. and Mrs. E. Pope, was found
sitting up in bed busily playing with
her dolls, no doubt 'telling them all
about her recent experience, and quite
able to give her visitors a very "hugging"
welcome. All Edna's friends, both old
and young hope to see the little lady
very soon "trotting" away to school just
as usual.
Freddie Manery���Piano' ���
George Bernard���Drams   ���
Sterling Houser���Violin
Yngye Gustafson���Saxaphone
Just a handful of boys with
a handful of pep and melody
To those who contemplate
buying s ;
Wedding Presents or Gifts
for, their friends
Let us remind you that.we can
supply ybu cheaper than you
can buy from Catalogue
��� Let us have your
Watch and Clock Repairs
We always do a first-class job
A. A. WHITE
Watchmaker  and  Jeweler
"- F. J.'White, Mgr.
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BAILED HAY FOR SALE
DANCE
to their music in "
Masonic Hall
Greenwood
-. on
Friday, October 26
COMMUNICATION
WWW"WVVWWVVVWVWVWWWlW."-r*/VVV&vv*"VVVVVWV
McMYNN'S STORE, Midway
See our Stock of
* MEN'S WOOLEN & FLANNELL SHIRTS & SOCKS   "
STANFIELD'S UNDERWEAR, MACKINAW COATS, and WOOLEN
PANTS, BELTERS and LEATHER COATS    -
Let us fill your Radiator with
MAPLE LEAF ANTI-FREEZE
and insure against freezing
We have the CORRECT GRADES of OIL for the COLD WEATHER
���^^AAAAAAAAAA.A.AA.t.AAAAAAAAA.AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA,
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GENERAL   MEETING
A general meeting of the Rock
Creek Farmers Institute will-be held on
Saturday, October 27th at-2:30 p.m. in
the Riverside Hall.
^^HH^^^HBM^^Hn^^B^H^B^^M^^^H^^HH__H_^__a__Hi_____________H_'___'-----��'-------'r--'
A kindly word is sometimes better
than a costly gift.���Sage Sayings.
Without hearts
Byron.
there is no-hojne.-
ROCK CREEK W. A. DANCE
A Sale of Work and Dance under the
auspices of the Women's Auxiliary will
be held on Friday, November 2nd, in
Riverside Hall, Rock Creek. Doors open
at 2 p.m. for"Sale of Work; best Dance
of the season in evening with the ever
famous Bush Orchestra in attendance.
Null said. Entrance: Including supper
Adults $1.00, Children under'12 years
50 cents.
To the Greenwood Theatre Goer.
Dear Patron:
Haven't you wished you could see
those dynamic musical comedy stars,
the Duncan Sisters, in their Broadway
success "Topsy and Eva"? Haven't you
wished that'this great epic of laughter
and fine old Southern sentiment would
be made into a motion picture, so that
you could see "Topsy and Eva" right at
your own theatre?
Well, your wish is, gratified. "Topsy
and Eva" has been made into a stupendous, spectacular film with .Vivian!
and Rosetta Duncan themselves playing their magnetic roles- of Eva, the
cotton planter's beautiful daughter, and
Topsy, fiction's most comical blackface
heroine!
You will smile, you will laugh, you
will roar when you see them in-then-
pranks amid all the thrilling affairs of
old Tom and Legree and Aunt .Ophelia
and St. Claire'and young Shelby and
his sweetheart Marietta DeBrie.
-* "Topsy and Eva," the "Abiesirish-
rose of musical comedy;" is "Topsy and
Eva,J bigger and more side-splitting
than ever as. a motion picture.
Topsy and Eva - will be at the local
theatre on Saturday, October 27th.   .
Sincerely,
G. H. GRAY,
~ Manager Greenwood Theatre.
Good mixed hay at 16.00 dollars per
ton at my ranch, in lots of five' tons or
over. only. Cash with orders. Price
changed without notice.-
' ��� F. HAUSSENER,
���-��� -r-Box-364rGreenwoodrB.C-
The United Church of Canada
REV. ANDREW WALKER, B.A.
Minister in Charge, Greenwood.    ,
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28 _
Bridesville, 11 a.m. ;
Midway, 3 p.m.
Greenwood, 7:30 p.m. ���
Teacher: "Johnny, what are the
two genders?"
Johnny: "Masculine and feminine
The-masculines are divided into temperate and intemperate, and the feminine into frigid and torrid."
Guests at the -Pacific Hotel during
the week: J. B. Woodworth, J. A.
MacMaster, H. Alder, W. R. Martyn, F.
Turner, A. E. Edgetfc, Chas. 32. Blotose,
F. Lobb, C. W. Way, Vancouver; A.
Levine,- D. B. Buchanan, Westbridge;
Wm. Wynn, Beaverdell; Tom J.' W.
Hick, Victoria; W. H. Browel, Nelson;
A. McKinney, Pete Larson, Grand
Forks; Mort Gurney, Penticton; C.
Radan, Midway; N. E. Nelson, Copper
Mountain.
Colonel Edgett of Vernon, made a
business call in town on Sunday last.
'Colonel Edgetfc, who represents the
Marconi Radio Company in.B.C., is a
well known figure - in the- Boundary
country, making periodical visits in the
interests of his company. On this particular occasion he was accompanied by
C. C. Way qf Vancouver, who is official
"trouble-shooter" "for the Marconi
Company. A visit was made to all
owners of.Marconi machines in town
and all their machines' were tested out.
Mr. Way appeared willing and anxious
to, answer any question pertaining to
radio operation and we feel that the
Marconi Company are indeed fortunate
in having the genial Colonel and Mr.
Way on then* staff. We understand it-
is the intention of the * Company to
make periodical 'inspections of all their
machines, and advice and free service
will be afforded at these'inspections.
Colonel Edgett and Mr.'/Way were accompanied on their tour of inspection
by T. M. Gulley who is the local
representative for the Marconi Radio.
MINERAL TAX SALE
The Public Auction of Crown-granted
mineral ""claims for delinquent taxes
will be held at the Provincial Police
Office, Penticton, on Monday? Nov. 5th,
at 2 p.m. The advertised list appears
on page 3.
Tree-trimming
prevents
trouble on 500
telephones
Trouble was prevented
on at least 500 telephones
as the result of the trimming
of ,3,000 trees by .telephone
maintenance men in.Greater
Vancouver this year.
Trimming of trees which
grow, near-telephone lines is
essential to good telephone
service because, if the
branches became entangled
with the wires, it would put
the telephones served by
those wires out of order.
So that the trees may be
saved as much as rtossible,
only expert tree-trimmers are
permitted to do the work.
This   is   another   of   the
many   ways   in   which   the
ever-alert maintenance men
.prevent trouble before it develops.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO.

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