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The Hedley Gazette Jul 30, 1914

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 AND SIMILKAMEI  Volume X.     Number 30.  DVERTISER.  HEDLEY, B. C, TH*&ESrJAY, JULY 30 1914.  $2.00, In Advance  JflS, CLARKE  Watchmaker  Clocks and Watches for Sale.  ANOTHER WAR CLOUD  Gravest Situation Since Germany   Sent  ' War Ships to Agadir in 1911 Arises  in Europe  GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORK  Herbert G.   Freeman  NOTARY PUBLIC  HEDLEY,        -       British Columbia  N. Thompson phone skvmouh 5043  MGB. WESTERN" CANADA  Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  Sheffield, Eng.  Offices and Warehouse, 8-17-6*- Bentty Street  Vancouver, B. C.  Hedley    rimers'   and    riillmen's  Union, No. i6i, W. F. of M.  Regular meetings of the Hedley Loco , No.  16t arc held on the first and third Wednesday  in the month in Fraternity hall and the second  and fourth Wednesday at the NT. P. Mine  O. M. Stevkns T, R. Whxev  Presidciit Fin-Secretary.  .  ' A A. F. & A. M.  ""���������"CGOr*"      REGULAR monthly meetings of  /\S\    Hedley Lodge No. 13, A. F. & A. M.,  are held on the second Friday in  each month in Fraternity hall, Hedley. Visiting  brethren arc cordially invited to attend.  CREELMAN,  ���������   ��������� W. M  H. a. FREEMAN  Secretary  E. K.  Burnt  Connsel  MODERN WOODMEN  OF AMERICA  Hedley Local Camp meets in  Fraternity Hall the first- Thursday only in the month.  H. G  Fkee.ma.v  Clerk.   U.O.JL..  Regular monthly MicetingES of  Hedley Lodge 1714 arc held on  ^)^       the   .third   Monday   in    every  "swSKSS?  month in Fraternity Hall.  Visit  ing brethern are cordially invited to attend.  S. KNOWLES. W.M.  C. CHRISTIANA, Sec't.  DR. J. L. MASTERS  DENTIST  Will be at Home office in Oroville, 1st  to 20th of each month.  Office on North  Main   Street.  London, July 25.���������The darkest war-  cloud which' has appeared on the European horizon since Germany sent warships to Agadir in 1911 has arisen within 48 hours.  The Servian Government has refused  to comply with Austria's demands, the  most humiliating ever asked of an independent nation, for the expiation of  the Sarayevo murders for- which Austria holds anti-Austrian conspiracies  in Serviaresponsibleand for guarantees  of future good behaviour.  At 5.50 o'clock tonight when the  A Astro-Hungarian ultimatum expired  the Servian Premier handed to the  Austrian Minister at Belgrade Ser-via's  reply. The Minister immediately  severed diplomatic relations and started  for- home;  The contents of the note have not  been revealed but the Servian legation  in London understands that it accepted some of" Austria's conditions and  rejected others. Apparently Austria  was resolved' to have the' whole bill  paid or nothing.  Now the vital question to Europe in  whether Russia will come'to the rescue  of her liittle Slav brother, involving  the other power arrd making of the war  a dead struggle of Slav against Teuton  for European supremacy.  Reports from St. Petersburg say  that the Russian army is mobilizing  but it is to be remembered that Russia  mobilized several corps when Austria  annexed Bosnia and the German Emperor, stepping to the side of his ally,  as was said "in shining armor," put n  veto on Russian intervention.  Austria and Servia are both mobliz-  ing but the silence of all the despatches on the subject of military preparation indicates clearly that^an ironclad  censorship has'been established in both  countries.  Report by Charles   Carnsell for 1912  Certain Portions of Yale District  of  RUSH WORK ON K. V. LINE  "f- .  The work of the field season of 1912  covered certain mineralized portions  of Yale district and adjacent parts of  southwestern British; Columbia. This  work included an examination of gold-  copper deposits at Kruger mountain  in Okanagan valley; a brief study of Teri-  ary coal hearing rocks at'White Lake  in Okanagan Valley; a reconnaissance  of the mineralized belt on the range of  mountains lying between Keremeos  creek and Twenty Mile creek; and a  brief examination ofVthe copper- deposits of Copper ��������� "Mountain, near  Princeton, where development work  by the British Columbia Copper Company had been in progress for a year.  In addition, some time was devoted  to .the supervision of- the work being  carried on A. M. Bat'emen in the Lil-  loet district and by N. L. Bowen on  Fraser river-, and other duties.  Construction Force is Now Being Doubled and Work is Being Pushed Along  HINDUS BEGIN JOURNEY  HOME  HON. MARTIN BURRELL  .  VISITS HEDLEY  R. R BROU/N  British Coluih'blafLBnd.Siiryeyor  Tel, No. 7S 'P. O. Dkawkk KfO  PENTICTON,  B. C.  P. W; GREGORY  CIVIL ENGINEER and BRITISH  COLUMBIA LAND SURVEYOR  Star Building Princeton  The Hon. Martin Burrell,* Minister  of Agrrclture in the Borden cabinet,  arrived in Hedley on Monday on his  way to Princeton. He stopped off  here for a few minutes before continn--  ina his journey. He returned here  again on Tuesday morning and spent  a. few hours here meeting old friends.  He is taking a short rest after his  arduous duties of the last session be-;  fore returning to the east.  He has just returned from the coast  where he was called oh business in  connection with the Hindus.  Mr. Burrell is looking well and received a warm welcome from his many-  friends in this part of his large constituency who were sorry that his  visit had to he cut so short.  ERNEST  S.    SILCOX  Civil Engineer and Provincial  Land Surveyor  Lands, Townsite,  PRINCETON  Mineral Surveys Etc.  B. C.  COPPER COMPANY ERECTS -   - -:  BUILDINGS AT PRINCESS  lAfalte-r Clayton  Barrister. Solicitor, Etc.  MOSEY TO LOAN  PENTICTON,  B.C.  Gentlemen's Haircuttiiig  IS AN ART  Every man who has his hair cut  at this place will tell his friends  Satisfaction guaranteed  Hot and Cold Paths  IIIUIARD'S MRBER SHOP  Princeton, B. C, July 23.���������The  activities of the British Columbia  Copper Company at Princess camp,  Copper mountain, are in line with the  reports published some months ago regarding this company's proposed smelter or concentrator for the treatment  of ore. Buildings of a permanent  typo are being erected and the movements of the company denote ore production on a large scale. Eight million tons of ore have been already  blocked out and the diamond drilling  continues. ,  Negotations for some 700 or 800  acres of land in the vicinity of Voigt's  camp are in progress. This land is  presumed to be for extensive works for  the treatment of ore.  Several four horse teams are busy  hauling lumber and supplies out to  Princess camp for the B. C. Copper  company. The new buildings at the  mine are being rushed to completion  as fast as possible. The best of lumber is being used, the foundations are'  of concrete and everything about  the place suggest permanency. A  large pump is to be installed to pump  water from the river up the hill a  distance of some 1700 feet to the buildings.   ���������������  A farmer from Taroda Creek, Wash,  was fined $215.00 for smuggling pork  into Greenwood.  The Copper Deposits of Kruger Mountain  Kruger Mountain is situated in the  Interior Plateau region, on. the western side of Okanagan valley, at the  Inter-national Boundary line. It occupies the angle between Okanagan  valley and the Similkameen river. It<  is an. irregular*, almost flat-topped  mountain rising easily to a height of  about 3,000 feet abo.ye Osoyoos lake  or about 4,000 feet above sea-level.  In general character_Kruger-mountain  is not greatly different 'from the rest  of the Interior Plateau region, except  that it forms a long ridge broadening  to the north, separated from the surrounding region by the deep Okanagan  valley on the one side; and the equally  deep SimilkairieeiJ valley on the other.  These two valleys have been entrenched in the surface ofithe Interior Plateau region leaving the Kruger Mountain block as an .upstanding reiniiarrt  between them. Tt is, there, a full bodied mountain intruded thegenera) topo-  praphic features characteristic of. the  greater part of the Interior Plateau  region. It slopes easily down on the  east-to the _ level of Osoyoos lake, but  more sharply on the west to the Similkameen river.  The lower slopes of the mountain  are grass covered and quite devoid of  any trees. On the summit, however,  is arr open forest growth of large yellow pine and fir. ,  '"'GEOLOGY''  The oldest rocks of Kruger mountain consist of a highly disturbed and  amorphic series of stratified rocks  which include micaceous quartzites,  schists, greenstones, and some lenses  of limestone. The series has been  metamorphosed not only by regional  action, but also by contact action  resulting from the intrusion of adjacent batholrthic igneous bodies.  These rocks have a general east and  west strike, and have been faulted  in several directions. One of the  strongest lines of faulting runs almost north and south. The limestone  lenses are economically the most important members of the series, and irr  the neighborhood of the larger intrusive rock bodies have been altered  tind silicified to the characteristic  limestone silicate rock consisting of  garrlet, epidote, pyroxene, hornblende,  quartz, and some calcite. In places  these lenses of limestone have escaped siliciflcation and have nierely  been rendered cystalline. The series  has been called by Daly the Anachist  series and has been correlated with  Dawson's Cache Creek (Carbonifereus)  series. These rocks hold the ore deposits.  To the north, the Anarchist series  has been intended by a batholic body  of gi-anodiorite (the Osoyoos batho-  litti), a medium-grained, greyish rock  consisting of both orthoclase and  plagioclase, hornblende, biotite, and  some quartz. Apophyses of this rock  penetrate the Anachist series in all  directions, and these, together with  the main body, are responsible for  the alteration of the stratified rocks  and probably for their mineralization  as well.  On the south and west sides of  Kruger mountain an alkaline plutonic  body, younger than the Osoyoos ha Urolith penetrates the stratified rocks.  Other* igneous rocks are. dark coloured dykes of diabase and lamprophyre.  Prom latest accounts, the number  of men engaged upon construction  work on the Kettle Valley Railway  near Princeton is being greatly increased, there being now the desire to  hasten the work on by one hundred  per cent.  The men now employed are working  day and night, so as to get the connections made within as short a time as  possible. The surveyors ait; running  a line which crosses the Tulameen just  above the.forks of-the two rivers and  parallels the V.V. &E. from the bridge | "������nese  across the Similkameen to the station. I'hrm;  It is stated that a joint station will be  used by the two roads.  A party of Great Northern Railway  officials were visiting Princeton last  week, including G. H. Emerson, general manager, St. Paul; J. H. O'Neil,  superintendant of western district  with headquarters at Seattle; William  Kelly of Spokane, general master mechanic of the western district; and  other officials. The party had been  over the new Oroville-Wenatchee cut  off on a tour of inspection and then  came over to look at the Princeton  run, going as far as Coalmont. Noth  ing definite has been heard as to the  institution of through runs, but it is  believed that nothing will occur in  this respect until connection is made  with the Merritt branch of the K.V.R.  at Otter Summit.  It should be gratifying to the business men and citizens of this valley to  hear that construction is being pushed  on so rapidly, and it can be readily  taken for* granted that there will be  through connection established within  the next few months, as it is surmised  that the complete grade will be made  bv the middle of the fall.  Rainbow    Sees   that   Maru   Continues  Vogage���������Members of Crew Attempt to Swim Ashore  FIRST SERIOUS CLASH  Soldiers Shoot Down Nationalists in Dublin���������Gun Running Cause of Battle  Dublin, July 26th.���������Three men and  one woman are dead and more than  60 persons are in the hospital wounded as the result of a battalion of the  King's Own Scottish Borderers firing  into a mob in the streets of Dublin  this afternoon. Seven of the wounded are expected to succumb to their  injuries. Thearfray was the result of  a gun running exploit of the Nationalist volun teer-s, who were being aided  by a mob composed largely of women  and youths.  The wounded in the hospital include  three women and a bov of 10.  A consignment of rifles, said to number 10,000, Was landed last night at  Howth, nine miles from Dublin. The  vessel on which the arms were brought  to Howth was a private yacht. The  Nationalist volunteers cut the telegraph wires and stopped travel on the  Dublin roads, and according to reports, sent in most of the rifles together with 70,000 rounds of ammunition,  in motor cars.  Vancouver, B. C., July 23.���������  About 5 o'clock this morning the Japanese steamer Kornagata steamed  out of the harbor on its way back to  oriental waters.  The Hindus made no demonstration  and the services of the militia companies, which spent the night on the  wharf, were not needed.  While on the way between Vancou-  and.Victoria two members of the Jap-  crew    jumped    overboard    at  pers pass in an  effort  to  escape  lashore.  The cruiser Rainbow was convoying  the Japanese vessel and immediately  the signal of "Man Overboard" was  seen it lowered a cutter and succeeded in rescuing the two half drowned  men, who were exhausted in an effort  to breast a swift current. " Ib was  found they were dressed in bathing  suits with their clothing strapped on  their backs. The men were revived  on the Rainbow and transshipped to  the Kornagata at a point near Victoria.  Tlie Japanese vessel was then ordered outside the three mile limit and  escorted by the'Rainbow, she passed  out to sea. The cruiser kept her in  view until she was hull down on the  Pacific,   She  is bound to Yokohama.  RAILWAY PROGRESS  Tracklaying On Coalmont Section Will  Be Started Next Month  PRINCETON  BUSINESS  MAN  DIES  Peter Swanson Passed Away at Seattle  Last Wednesday Morning  Continued noxt week  News reached town on Thursday  morning from Seattle of the death of  Peter Swanson, one of the proprietors  of the Hotel Princeton and for the  past eight years a resident of Princeton. On the day previous A. D.  Broomfield, Mr. Swanson's partner,  received word of the serious turn Mr.  Swanson had taken and he and his  wife left on the train the same day  for Seattle.  The late Peter- Swanson was 54  years of age and was a native of  Sweden. He leaves a wife, but no  children. For some time he had been  in poor health, and on May 23rd last  left for the hot springs ab Sril Due,  for treatment. Deceased was engaged  in the hotel business for a number  of years, and some two years ago with  Mr. Broomfield built the magnificent  brick hotel there. He was a splendid  citizen and business man, and he  leaves a large number of friends all  over over this country who will deeply mourn his demise.  That tracklaying on the Coalmont  section of the V. V. & E. line is to be  started early next month, is the statement made by J. H. Kennedy, assistant chief engineer of the line, at Vancouver recently. This portion of the-  railway is to be used jointly by the  Kettle Valley railway and the. Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern, irr accordance with an arrangement between the two companies.  The V.V. & E. portion of the line,  between OoalmoiiD and Otter Summit,  is expected to be ready for traffic this  summer. In order that structural work  may be started at air early date on the  bridge across the Fraser- river, near-  Hope, grading is being rushed on the  connecting link between the C. P. Rv  and the bridge on the north side.  The substructure of the bridge has  already been completed, and as soon  as the mile and a half section of track  which wil I be required to f urn ish bhe  connection has been built, steel for the  bridge will be transported to the scene.  Ib is planned to start the erection of  the structure within a month. Rails  for the Hope-Cpquihalla joint section  will also be shipped by the C.P.R. and  over the new bridge to Hope.  WORK ON POWER PLANT  The Dam Being  Completed This Week  ���������Work of Putting in Flume Making  Good Progress  The   work  of putting in  the flume  for the power plant that the Hedley  Gold Mining Company is installing on  the Similkameen river is now well under way and  already the frame is in  for alnrost  two  miles.     Of course  a  ditch is  used for some of this distance  as  ib serves  the purpose just as well  and    is considerably   cheaper.      The  bottom  of the flume has  been  pub in  as they go along and in a short time  they will be putting on the sides and  top.     The company has a regular saw  mill plant installed at the dam and  the work of putting in the flume is being rushed along.     A siding has been  put in on the railway ab the twenty-  mile creek  tresble and the cars of material are unloaded here and run down  the hill  to the   dam on a tramway,  which    the   company   has   installed.  The material is then distributed along  the right-of-way from here by wagons.  The piece of apron on the dam that ,  could not be put in last spring owing  to the high water is being put in this  week and all that is now required to  finish the dam is the putting in of the  fish ladder and the installing'of the  machinery for the rising and lowering  of the stop-logs.  -rita  UUfflr THE HEDLEY=GAZETTE.   JULY 13. 1914.  THE KEREMEOS  KEREMEOS, the Centre of Lowe^ S^ilkarneen���������Famed for Fruit Growing  Town and Lower Valley.  Hiram Ingk-e or'YVliUc- Lake was a  visitor to town Tuesday.  Mi-, ������.-*. C. A-i-m.-ti-ong oi" Medicine  Hat is visiting Mr. and Mrs. .1. .1'. Armstrong.  Mam-ice Daly has returned 'home  from the Pi-iucet-in beef'roiindup on  Sunday.  Harry Prince, the hide buyer of  Oroville, is again irr.bhe.dis.ti.ict jilay-:  ing a skin-game.  Miss Avonia Jones of'Hedley spent'  a very .pleasant week here ,-isthe guest  of Mrs. J. A. Brown.  Leland Chase is now at Athabasca,  Alta. We have not heard any details  as to what lie is doing.  ti. S. Tickell is digging a well. He  is now down 95 feet. Another oil  boom in night; I mean  water!  Mr. and Mrs. Forge and daughter of  Minneapolis Minn, are visiting Mrs.  Forge's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Win.  Vader.  Letter heads, envelops, billheads,  statements and all other kinds of  printing dune at the Gazette. See the  local agent and get the price.-..  We arc pleased to report that Jack.  Cleland, son of Rev. .1. A. Cleland of  Penticton, has passed the Mct'ill University matriculation examinations.  Mr. Lloyd of Vancouver, representing the Magnet Separator Co., spent  tho past two or three days in town.  He left uii Monday's train for' the  Boundary country.  Miss Grey who has been visiting her  sister, Mrs. Ezra Mills, for* the past  week left for her home in Toronto last  week. She was delighted with her  visit here.  A tennis tournament is now in full  swing. The games are being played  on the courts of Mr-. J. A. Brown and  Mr. W. M. Frith. We hope.to be able  to give, a summary of the games next  week.  Miss Anna B. Vogel, late of Cascade, IB. C, has been engaged as  teacher for- the coming year, iliss  Vogel is a graduate of the provincial  normal school, Nova Scotia, and holds  it first class license for British Columbia.  Mr. H. E. Simpson left on Monday  evening for* Penticton enroute - for  Field where he will join the Alpine  Club. No donbt there are many more  from this district during the past  week who wished- they were members  also and were sitting on a glacier cooling off a little.  A memorial service to the late Mrs.  Margaret .Cameron was conducted in  the church by the Rev. F. H. Stanton  before a large and sympathetic congregation. A sole "Abide With Me"'  was beautifully rendered by Mrs. P.  Quant. Miss Elsie Hecks, as organist,  accompanied'her.  News comes -from Molson, Wash.,  that on Wednesd-iy, the 15th, Joe  Chesaw, a half breed Indian, came into town with five bottles of Canadian  booze and on being asked by the U.S.  customs official to pay the duty thereon he struck the officer a heavy blow  over the head with the butt of his  whip inflicting a nasty gash on the  head and bruising him badh". A warrant is now out for Joe and he is now  being hunted by the bloodhounds of  the law. No one would suspect Joe  of such an act of violence but a little  hootch will often turn one of these  lamb like Indian and half breeds into  violent maniacs in short order.  J.J. Armstrong returned home on  Saturday from his annual trip to the  -bC'uncUuy country on business where  has been i'or the past fortnight soliciting orders for Keremeos fruits. He  reports a very sucressful trip getting  orders for several thousand boxes of  peaches to be shipped to Greenwood,  Midway, Phoenix and Grand Forks.  All the firms visited expressed their-  satisfaction of the fruit, but in some  instances had some fault to find with  the packing and grading. The fruit  growers in this district should learn  that one of the chief factors for market ing fruit is the packing and grading of same, and in a place like this  where there is no established packing  packing house it is the duty of every  grower to see that the boxes are evenly graded both in size and ripeness.  The fruit is here and it is the best that  can be bought and with a little more  care in the packing the market for  our fruit will be far greater than the  supply.  .We endeavored to .point out to the  customers .of ithe -Keremeos Ki;iiit  .Growers and Shipper.-, through thes-e  columns a few weeks .ago, * that the  strawberry crop was about over and  that the cherries would soon be ready  for- shipping and it-hat anyone wishing  .these fruits should send in their orders right awav. Now these fruits  along -with-raspl-cL-i-ies and gooseberries are a thing of the past for this  season and-yet there is a big demand  .for these small fruits .which cannot.be  .suppliuir.fi-omthis ilistiiict. 'dlheit'i'uits'  ���������now ready-for shipping are apricots,  cling stone peaches green apples and  plums. Send in ymir* orders right  away and not be disappointed.  A Maid There Was  A maid there was in our town  Whose modesty was rare;  Of autumn trees she'd never speak  Because their limbs were bare.  When night its sable shadow threw  She'd tumble in a swoon  If curtain did not hide fiom view  The man up in the moon.  A plumber- caused her death one day,  So the story goes ���������  By asking in a careless way  To'let him se   hei hose.  60   YEARS'  EXPERIENCE  Trade Marks  , Designs  Copyrights Ac.  Anyone sending a sketch and description may  quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an  Invention is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents  sent free. Oldest acency for securing patents.  Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive  special notice, without cur.rge, in the  Scientific Jfmericmi  A handsomely illustrated weekly.   I.arcest circulation of any scientific journal.   Terms. $3 a ���������  jrenr: four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers.  1WUNN & Co.36iBrcad^New York  Branch Office. 6?5 F St.. Washinuton.D. C.  | FOR SERVICE f  T The  Throughbred   Running;  " Stallion  "Beautiful and Best"  (Canadian S.tud-Boo'k, No-237)  Will  stand for public service at.  '���������The Willows"���������'Keremeos, for  the season of 1914.  Fee for service $10.00 to insure.  Mares may lie pastured  E. M. DALY  ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������-?���������������  NOTICE  SIIUILKAMEKX .l-AXD..DISTRICT  DISTHICT OK VA1.1-:  TAKK notice that I.^Halliburton Tweddle of  Keremeos, B. C. occupation. Hotelkcci)-  er. Intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about two  miles north or lot 3207. thence north 10 chains;  thence cast forty chains: thenco south forty  chains; thence west forty chains to point- of  commencement and containing one hundred  and sixty actus.  H.U.I.IIH-KTO.V TH'KDDLE  April lGth. 101.1. 21-10  H. C. N. ETCHES  is Agent for the Hedley Gazette in  Keremeos and authorized to book  Subscriptions and take orders for  job work and advertising.  POST OFFICE,   KEREMEOS,  B. C.  SILKS  Large Assortment of choice Silk Dress  Goods, Silk handkerchiefs etc.  for sale at right prices  TOflMY SING, Keremeos  SING LEE  Laundry, Contracting of all  kinds, Ditch digging, Wood  Sawing, Clearing land, Cooking and all kinds of Chinese  Labor.  Keremeos, B.C.  J. A. BROWN  'Notary -Public  X'ONVEY.VNX'INCt, customs imOKEI'age,  FIRE ���������BfSUltANCK  .OFFICE  KEREMEOS. B^C  HOX III I'lIOXKil**  B. A. MOOR-HOUSE  Assoc. Mem. Can. Sot-. t'.K.  and.l*.C.l,.S.  -Civil Engineer and B. C. .Land Surveyor-  AUTOMOBILK ;  ���������PENTICTON,       -       -       -        B. C.  ���������K-E-R-EM-BOS - -P B*N(F1 CTO-K  TIA/JEO D-L;E ������S  AUTO STAGE SJlflCE  > Tweddle's c-ais are comfort- }  \ able. Tweddle's diivers \  \ ai;e experts. ��������� <  No delays. No-accidents   **  Aulos leave l'cnticton every morning: to connect with train-; to Hedley.  Princeton, ("oalinnnt.  Oroville and  all Uoundary points.  Leave Keremeos for Penticton on  arrival of Great Northern trains  Fake���������single $6.00  1IETUKN* $11.00  Baggage carried. Commercial trunk*  arranged for  Break the monotony of train and  boat travel and take an auto trip.  When  you arrive at   Penticton or  Keremeos ask for  TWEDDLE'S AUTO STAGE  Cars Call at all Hotels  WE'VE OQT THE BUSINESS  AND THERE IS GOOD REASON WHY  If we were,to be here to-day and pack up  and go tomorrow w.e .could -perhaps-afford to  run our business along slip-shod lines. We  are here, however, -to build a .business. This  we intend to do by stocking -high-grade  goods and selling at alow margin of profit.  See our  superior line of Goods  for Spring.  FRANK  RICHTER   ESTATE  ������S?*'*'*������'������������,*t*''*l"'**������^  I  -Pinmbing- and Heating', Sheet   I  Metal Work ���������TjusaaithiB-g'  Shop corner Angela Ave. and Bridge  ,-S St.,   in 'Murdock's blacksmith shop.'  g    Work guaranteed. Consult us about your work  | H. DIGNAN  tt    Practical Workmen Proprietors     f'  'Jf. PRINCETON, B. C. I  v *  ppiilPlnlfii^  Better than Ringing  --befls  Jk PIANO manufacturer recently made a house-  ���������*"*' to-house canvass. He's one of those men with  an absurd fear of the "waste-circulation" bugaboo  ���������cannot get away from the haunting thought that  only ID out of every 100 readers of a newspaper  may ?be possible buyers of his goods.  So he refused to advertise, and went a-eanvassing  ���������inviting people to come -to bis piano recitals.  Then he wondered why they didn't rcome.  This is why:  He wasn't reaching the people.  His canvassers rang every door-bell in  town. They talked to some one in every  house.  But one in everyhousehold isn't enough  ���������particularly if it doesn't happen to be  the right person. And, as a rule, it wasn't  the right person���������it was a servant, or a  child. The woman of the house was seldom  seen; the man of the house, never.  Now, if the piano maker had placed an  ad. in the newspaper, it would have reached  thousands, where the canvassers could  reach only hundreds.  And even though only 10 per cent, of the  readers are actual piano buyers, this does  not mean that the advertising read by the  other 90 per cent, is wasted. Advertising  talks, not only to the prospective buyer,  but also to his wife, his grown-up sons and  daughters, his mother���������even his mother-  in-law. Their coaxing will help to convince  the head of the .'house���������and pretty soon  there'll be a piano in that home.  This and dozens of similar cases which  might be cited to show that "waste circulation" is an empty bugaboo, and should  deter no one.  Take the motor truck. It can be sold  only to large firms Yet a motor truck  manufacturer is successfully Advertising  in daily papers. He realizes that he must  reach, not alone the managers of the concerns that require trucks, but also their?  directors, their foremen, their head machinists, etc. It is found in actual practice  that this Advertising radiates in a thousand  directions, and again converges most astonishingly to influence the house; that; has  made up its mind that horse-trucking is  too costly and inefficient.  Advice regarding your advertising problems is available  through any recognized Catiadian advertising agency, or the  Secretary of the Canadian Press Association, .Room 503  Lumsden Bldg., Toronto. Enquiry involves no obligation  on your part���������so write if interested.  [Rll^ig^^  ni  j !;i  ii)  sin  -4 ��������� - -.'  * ���������'; AND SIMILKAMEI  'Tt~. *���������*������  AUG  1911    ���������   h  ^^^ssajasi^-i2SS*c*^'  DVERTISER.  Volume X.     Number 30.  -   HEDLEY, B. C, THURSDAY, JULY 30 1.914.  ���������$���������2.00, In Advance  ANOTHER WAR CLOUD  Gravest Situation Since Germany   Sent  War Ships to Agadir in 1911 Arises  in Europe  GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORK  Report by Charles   Carnsell for 1912  Certain Portions of Yale District  of  RUSH WORK ON K. V. LINE  Herbert G.   Freeman  NOTARY PUBLIC  HEDLEY, -       British Columbia  !'  N. Thompson piion'e skymouu 5913  MGK. WESTERN" CANADA  Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd.  Steel Manufacturers  Sheffield, Eng.  Offices and Warehouse, 8-17-63 ficntty Street  Vancouver, B. C.  Hedley    fliners'   and    flillmen's  Union, No. 161, W. F. of M.  Regular meetings of the Hedley Loen , Xo.  16t are held on the first and third AVednesday  in the month in Fraternity hall and the second  and fourth Wednesday at the X. P. Mine  O. M. Stevkns T, R. Wiixkv  President Kin-Secretary.  A. F. & A. M.  REGULAR monthly meetings of  Hedley Lodge Xo. 43, A. F. & A. M.,  are held on the second Friday in  each month in Fraternity hall, Hedley. Visiting  brethren aro cordially invited to attend.  A. CREELMAN, H. Q. FREEMAN  W. M Secretary  MODERN WOODMEN  OF AMERICA  Hedley Local Camp meets in  Fraternity Hall the first Thursday only in the month.  H. G  BUHK  Connsel  Fkkkm.vn*  Clork.   LvO. L..  Regular monthly meetings of  Hedley Lodge 1744 are held on    the  .third    "Monday   in    every  "^SsSmP60  month in Fraternity Hall."   Visit  ing brethern are cordially invited to attend.  S. KNOWLES. W. M.  C. CHRISTIANA, Sec't.  DR. J. L. MASTERS  DENTIST  Will be tit Home office in Oroville, 1st  to 20th of each month.  Office  on North   Main   Street.  London, July 25.���������The darkest war*  cloud which has appeared on the European horizon since Germany sent warships to Agadir-in 1011 has arisen within 48 hours.  The Servian Government has refused  to comply with Austria's demands, the  most humiliating ever asked of an independent natron, for the expiation of  the Sarayevo murders for- which Austria holds anti-Austrian conspiracies  in Ser-via responsible and for-guaran tees  of future good behaviour.  At 5.50 o'clock tonight when the  A iisti-o-Hungarian ultimatum expired  the Servian Premier handed to the  Austrian Minister* at Belgrade Servia's  reply. The Minister immediately  severed diplomatic relations and started  for- home;  The contents of the note have not  been revealed but bhe Servian legation  in London understands that it accepted some of Austria's conditions and  rejected others. Apparently Austria  was resolved to have the" whole bill  paid or nothing.  Now the vital question to Europe in  whether Russia will come'to the rescue  of her liittle Slav brother, involving  the other power find making of the war  a dead struggle of Slav against Teuton  for European supremacy.  Reports from St. Petersburg say  that the Russian army is mobilizing  but it is to be remembered that Russia  mobilized several corps when Austria  annexed Bosnia and the German Emperor, stepping to the side of his ally,  as was said "in shininp- armor," put a  veto on Russian intervention.  Austria and Ser-via are both mobliz-  ing but the silence of all the despatches on the subject of military preparation indicates clearly that an ironclad  censorship hirs bee" established in both  countries.  The work of the field season of 1912  covered certain mini-ralized portions  of Yale district and adjacent parts of  southwestern British,Columbia. This  work included an examination of gold-  copper deposits at Kruger mountain  in Okanagan valley;;i brief studyofTeri-  ary coal bearing rock's at White Lake  in Okanagan Valley; a reconnaissance  of the mineralized belt on the range of  mountains lying between Keremeos  creek and Twenty Mile creek; and a  brief examination of the copper deposits of Copper /Mountain, near  Princeton, where development work  by the British Columbia Copper Company had been in pi-ogress for a year.  In addition, some trine was devoted  to .the supervision of' the work being  carried on A. M. Batemen in.the Lil-  loet district and by N.' L. Bowen on  Fraser river-, and other? duties.  Construction  Force is Now Being Doubled and Work is Being Pushed Along  HINDUS BEGIN JOURNEY   HOME  HON. MARTIN BURRELL  .  VISITS HEDLEY  R. RBROWN  British Coluiribla'Land.Suryeyor  Tel, No. 7S  PENTICTON,  P. O. Dkawkk 160  '-     -      B. C.  P. W; GREGORY  CIVIL EXGIXEER axd BRITISH  COLUMBIA LAXD SURVEYOR  Star Building Princeton  The Hon. Martin Burrell,' Minister  of Agriclture in the Borden cabinet,  arrived in Hedley on Monday on his  way to Princeton. He stopped olf.  here for a few minutes before continu-  ina his journey. He returned here  agarn on Tuesday morning and spent  a few hours here meeting old friends.  He is taking a short rest after his  arduous duties of the last session be-;  fore returning to the east.  He has just returned from the coast  where he was called on business in  connection with the Hindus.  Mr. Burrell is looking well and received a warrri welcome from his many  friends in this part of his large constituency who were sorry that his  visit had to be cut so short-.  COPPER COMPANY ERECTS      -  BUILDINGS AT PRINCESS  ERNEST S.   SILCOX  Civil Engineer and Provincial  Land Surveyor  Lands, Townsite, Mineral Surveys Etc.  PRINCETON - - B.C.  WalterClayton  Barrister, Solicitor, Etc,  MONEY TO LOAN  PENTICTON,  B. C.  Gentlemen's Haircutting  IS AN ART  Every man who has his hair cut  at this place will tell his friends  Satisfaction guaranteed  Hot and Cold Paths  IIIUIMD'S BARBER SHOP  Princeton, B. C, July 23.���������The  activities of the British Columbia'  Copper Company at Princess camp,  Copper mountain, are in line with the  reports published some months ago'regarding this company's proposed smelter or concentrator for the treatment  of ore. Buildings of a permanent  type are being erected and the movements of the company denote ore production on a large scale. Eight million tons of ore have been already  blocked out and the diamond drilling  continues.  Negotations for some 700 or- 800  acres of land in the vicinity of Voigt's  camp are in progress. This land is  presumed to be for extensive works for  the treatment of ore.  Several four horse teams are busy  hauling lumber and supplies out to  Princess camp for the B. C. Copper  company. The new buildings at the  mine are being rushed to completion  as fast as possible. The best of lumber is being used, the foundations are'  of concrete and everything about  the placo suggest permanency. A  large pump is to be installed to pump  water from tho river up the hill a  distance of some 1700 feet to the buildings.   ~~������.   A farmer from Taroda Creek, Wash,  was fined $215.00 for smuggling pork  into Greenwood.  The Copper Deposits of-Kruger Mountain  Kruger Mountain is situated in' the  Interior Plateau region, on the western side of Okanagan valley, at the  International Boundary line. It occupies the angle between Okanagan  valley and the Similkameen river. It  is an irregular, almost flat-topped  mountain rising easily to a height of  about 3,000 feet abo_ve Osoyoos lake'  or about 4,000 feet above sea-level.  In general character. Kruger mountain  is not greatly different from the rest  of the Interior Plateau region, except  that it forms a long tidge broadening  to the north, separated from the surrounding region by the deep Okanagan  valley on the one sidd and the equally  deep Similkameen valley on the other.  These two valleys have been entrench?  ed in the surface of^the Interior Plateau region leaving the Kruger Mountain block as an . ups^.-inding lemuantL  between thern. It is, there, a full bodied mountain intruded thegeneraltopo-  praphic features characteristic of. the  greater part of the Interior Plateau  region. It slopes easily down on the  east-to-the . level of Osoyoos hike, but  more sharply on the west to the Similkameen river.  The lower slope* of the mountain  are grass covered and quite devoid of  any trees. On the summit, however,  is an open forest growth of large yellow pine aiid fir.        ���������"���������-.,  GEOLOGY  The oldest rocks of Kruger mountain consist   of a highly disturbed and  amorphic series   of   stratified   rocks  which  include micaceous   quartzites,  schists, greenstones, and some lenses  of limestone.   The   series    has  been  metamorphosed nob only by regional  action,  but   also   by contact   action  resulting from the   intrusion of adjacent   batholithic     igneous    bodies.  These rocks have a general east and  west strike,  and   have been   faulted  fn   several   directions.   One    of   the  strongest lines   of faulting  runs almost north and south.   The limestone  lenses are economically the   most important members of the series,  and in  the   neighborhood of the   larger intrusive rock bodies have been altered  and   silicified    to    the   characteristic  limestone, silicate rock consisting of  garnet, epidote, pyroxene, hornblende,  quartz,  and some calcite.    In places  these lenses   of   limestone   have escaped  silicifioation  and have merely  been rendered cystalline.   The series  has been called by Daly the Anachist  series and has been correlated  with  Dawson's Cache Creek (Carbonifereus)  series.   These rocks hold the ore deposits.  To the north, the Anarchist series  has been intended by a batholic body  of granodiorite (the Osoyoos batho-  lith), a medium-grained, greyish rock  consisting of both orthoclase and  plagioclase, hornblende, biotite, and  some quartz. Apophyses of this rock  penetrate the Anachist series in all  directions, and these, together with  the main body, are responsible for  the alteration of the stratified rocks  and probably for their mineralization  as well.  On the south and west sides of  Kruger mountain an alkaline plutonic  body, younger than the Osoyoos batlr-  olith penetrates the stratified rocks.  Other igneous rocks are. dark coloured dykes of diabase and lamprophyre.  Continued noxt week  From latest- accounts, the number-  of rrien engaged upon construction  work orr the Kettle Valley Railway  near Princeton is being greatly increased, there being now the desire to  hasten the work on by one hundred  per cent.  The men now employed are working  day and night, so as to get the connections made within as short a time as  possible. The surveyors are running  a line which cro-rSt-n the Tulameen just  above the forks of tire two river*-*, and  parallels the V.V. &E. from the bridge  across the Similkameen to the station.  It is stated that a joint station will be  used by the two roads.  A party of Great Northern Railway  officials were visiting Princeton last  week, including G. H. Emerson, general manager, St. Paul; J. H. O'Neil,  sirp'erintendant of western district  with headquarters at Seattle; William  Kelly of Spokane, general master mechanic of the western district; and  other officials. The party had been  over the new Oroville-Wenatchee cut  off on a tour of inspection and then  came over to look nt the Princeton  run, going as far as Coalmont. Noth  ing definite has been heard as to the  institution of through runs, but it is  believed that nothing will occur in  this respect until connection is made  with the Merritt branch of the K.V.R.  at Otter Summit.  It should be gratifying to the business men and citizens of this valley to  hear that construction is being pushed  on so rapidly, and it can he readily  taken for granted that there will be  through connection established within  the next few months, as it is surmised  that the complete grade will be made  by the middle of the fall.  Rainbow    Sees   that    Maru   Continues  Vogage���������Members of Crew Attempt to Swim Ashore  FIRST SERIOUS CLASH  Soldiers Shoot Down Nationalists in Dublin���������Gun Running Cause of Battle  Vancouver, B. C, July 23.���������  About 5 o'clock this morning the Japanese steamer Kornagata steamed  out of the harbor on its way back to  oriental wateis.  ��������� The Hindus made no demonstration  and the services oi the militia companies, which spent the night- on the  wharf, were not needed,  While on the way between Vancou-  and.Victoiia two members of the Japanese crew jumped overboard at  Plumpers paw- in an effort to escape  ashore. "'  The cruiser Rainbow was convoying  the Japanese vessel and immediately  the signal of "Man Over-board*' was  seen it lowered a cutter and succeeded in rescuing the two half drowned  men, who were exhausted in an effort  to breast a swift current. It was  found they were dressed in bathing  suits with their clothing strapped on  their backs. The men were revived  orr the Rainbow and transshipped to  the Kornagata at a point near Victoria.  The Japanese vessel was then ordered outside the three mile limit and  escorted by the Rainbow, she passed  out to sea. The cruiser kept her in  view until she was hull down on the  Pacific.    She  is bound to  Yokohama.  RAILWAY PROGRESS  Tracklaying On Coalmont Section Will  Be Started Next Month  Dublin, July 26th.���������Three men and  one woman are dead and more than  60 persons are in the hospital wounded as the result of a battalion of the  King's Own Scottish Borderers firing  into a mob in the streets of Dublin  this afternoon. Seven of the wounded are expected to succumb to their  injuries. The atfray was the result of  a gun running exploit of the Nationalist volunteers, who were being aided  by a mob composed largely of women  and youths.  The wounded in the hospital include  three women and a bov of 10.  A consignmenbof rifles, said to number 10,000, was landed last night at  Howth, nine miles from Dublin. The  vessel on which the arms were brought  to Howth was a private yacht. The  Nationalist volunteers cut the telegraph wires and stopped travel on the  Dublin roads, and according to reports, sent inmost of the rifles together with 70,000 rounds of ammunition,  in motor cars.  PRINCETON  BUSINESS  MAN  DIES  Peter Swanson Passed Away at Seattle  Last Wednesday Morning  That tracklaying on the Coalmont  section of the V. V. & E. line is to be  started early next mouth, is the statement made by J. H. Kennedy, assistant chief engineer of the line, at Vancouver recently. This portion of tiie-  railway is to be used jointly by "the  Kettle Valley railway and the. Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern, in accordance with an arrangement between the two companies.  The V.V. & E. portion of the line,  between Ooalirionc and Otter Summit,  is expected to be ready for traffic this  .summer. In order that structural work  may be started at an early date on the  bridge across the Fraser river, near-  Hope, grading is being rushed on the  connecting link between tho C. P. R*  and the bridge on the north side.  The substructure of the bridge has  already been completed, and as soon  as the mile and a half section of track  which will be required to furnish tlie  connection has been built, steel for the  bridge will be transported to the scene.  It is planned to start-tho- erection of  the structure within a month. Rails  for tho Hope-Coqirihalla joint section  will also be shipped by the C.P.R. and  over the new bridge to Hope.  WORK ON POWER PLANT  The Dam Being Completed This Week  ���������Work of Putting in Flume Making  Good Progress  News reached town on Thursday  morning from Seattle of the death of  Peter Swanson, one of the proprietors  of the Hotel Princeton and for the  past eight years a resident of Princeton. On the day previous A. D.  Broomfield, Mr. Swanson's partner,  received word of the serious turn Mr.  Swanson had taken and he and his  wife left on the train the same day  for Seattle.  The late Peter Swanson was 54  years of age and was a native of  Sweden. He leaves a wife, but no  children. For some time he had been  in poor health, and on May 23rd last  left for the hot springs at Sol Due,  for treatment. Deceased was engaged  in the hotel business for a number*  of years, and some two years ago with  Mr. Broomfield built the magnificent  brick hotel there. He was a splendid  citizen and business man, and he  leaves a large number* of friends all  over over this country who will deeply mourn his demise.  The   work of putting in  the flume  for the power plant that the Hedley  Gold Mining Company is installing on  the Similkameen river is now well under  way and   already the frame is in  for almost two  miles.     Of course   a  ditch is  used for some of this distance  as  it serves  the purpose just as well  and    is considerably   cheaper.      The  bottom   of the fiunie has  been  put in  as they go along and in a short time  they will be putting on tho sides and  top.    The company has a regular saw  mill plant installed at the dam and  the work of putting in the flume is being rushed along.    A siding has been  put in on the railway at the twenty-  mile creek trestle and the cars of material are unloaded here and run down  the hill  to the   dam on a tramway,  which   the  company   has   installed.  The material is then distributed alonjs  the right-of-way from here by wagons.  The piece of apron on the dam that  could not be put in last spring owing  to the high  water is being put in this  week and all that is now required to  finish the dam is the putting in of the  fish ladder and the installing of the  machinery for* the rising and lowering  of the stop-logs.  .���������. ���������..���������hi1 THE HEDLEY GAZE 1TE ..JULY .''0, 19U  and  Similkameen Advertiser.  Subscriptions in Advance  Per Yenr."   S-J.(tf)  **   (I'nitcd .Statusl  -'.aO  Advertising Rates  "Muiisuremuiit. 1. lines to the ini-li.  Land Notices���������Cci-tltlc-.ites of niiproveiiieiit. i-tc.  $7.1X1 for lill-dny notices, mid So.iXi lor Wl-day  notices.  Transient Advertisements���������not exceeding one  incli. $1.00 fo;- one insertion. -'���������". cents'for  unc-li subse<|iient insertion. 0vol-one inch.  10 cents iiei- lino for llrst insertion and 5  , cents per lino for each subsequent insertion.  Transients iiiij-.-ible in advance.  Contract Advertisements���������One incli pei-.month  Sl.-i.i; over 1 incli and up to I inched, S1.00  per inch pcriiiontli. To constant advertisers  taking larger space than four inches, on  application, rates will be given ofr, red need  chili-Res, based on m'zo of space and Icnglli  of time.  \V. C. MARTIN. Manarrinx Editor.  Full Moon  ���������Last .rj uar.  l.'i  New Moon  First i.iuar.  20.  sliuw  itiim might have been belter met anil  handled.' But'in this case the journals  which have done-their best to-discredit  the immigration .-uiLlioi-iLie.- and. th"  'gii'vei iimerit are iiu-etin'g with ' lit llt*  siti-i-i-ss. On the otlu-r band high com-  pliiui'llts .lie paid by Bri'lis-h and I������":it-1-  ei-n Canadian journal:-, to I ho de'ci.-ive,  sagacious. tolerant and yet e'l'ec-ti viand decisive management of tbisdeii-  rate and troublesome afiaitv Now thai  il i- ov:-r \v<- do nol s.-i- that I be aulli-  oi-itii-.s have, made any surimi.-- mi.---  takes. They have got clear of the  11 i nc! us, who canii- here 'determined to  lake Ihe place by stoini, and who t-x-  h.-uisli-d all the resoui-c.es of the law,  all the powers of persuasion, all their  remarkable gifts of deception and strategy, witlr threats and the use <>!' force  anil .violence .'added when they k'hew  that the authorities would not hint  them.  It is not so great an   achievement to  have excluded these people.   That-was  '"he parly of Hindus who caniL- heie j *-'"���������'"- I"' ���������"-' done.      But it is .something  enforce, the order of thu.immigration  department,, hul we,re sent in rcsponi-c  to a; request of I he' Japanese, captain  for   protection and   assistance  air,',,,, j Sy���������0,,sjs 0f (foft Mining  RCglllatiOllS  his  own   mutinous  passengers.      The   ,-���������->,,.. . -.���������'���������'. .'       .   '.-������������������  ,-,     . .  ' ������ , r������JAL mining  rights  of  the   Jromimon,   in  1 i\v   would   have   instilled   the   u.-e'of V    ^Mnnitobav^SiwkatijlicwiiiKand -Alberta,  the ^ ukon   territory, the  North-west  Torn-  firearms   to   accomplish   this  purpose, tories and in a portion of the Prpvim-o of Bri-  1 Msh Columbia, may be leased  for a term  of  But   wisdom   and   forbearance..sought twenty-one years at an aiinuiil rent-il of SI an  .   !   -.   . '���������  ��������� .. acre.   Not more than 2,'oWJ acres will be leased  other '.ways, happily no.iwiiho.nl' *��������� uc- to one applicant. . -'  ^/���������ss ' '    Application for a lease iiiust, be made by the  ' *'���������'��������� j applicant in person to the Agent, or Sub-Agent  It is   iisuallv easy after the.   event lo ' "*' the district in which tlie rights applied for  ow some new and ilil'tii-iilt situ  .1011  .III]  lilll  Sun. Mon. Tties. Wr-d. Thu. Fri. Sat.j  o  VI  1!)  ���������2t>  (i  i:J.  ���������2d  ���������>,7  li  I  .s  .15  22  2!;>  !)  Hi  '2.1  HO  'A  IP  IT  21  :'l  -I  11  IS  ���������*:-.  arc situated.  In surveyed territory the laud must be described by sections, or legal stab-divisions' of  sections, and in unsiirveycil territory the tract  applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself. ���������. ���������:- . .  Knch application must be 'accompanied- by a  fee of ������;5 which; will be refunded if tlie rights  applied-for- are not available, but. not otherwise. A royalty shall bo. pa id on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of live cents  per ton  The person operating the initio shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting; for  the full .'quantity of merchantable coal mined  and nay the' royalty thereon. Jf the coal mining rights aro not. being operated, such returns  should be furnished at least, once a year.  The lease will include-'the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights maybe considered necessary for tbe working of tlie  mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary ol: the Department'-of  the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-  Agent of-Dominion Lands.  \V. W. CORY,  Deputy "Minister of the Interior.  X. 1'.-Unauthorized .publication of this advertisement will not be paid for. (l-fjni  NOTICE  HAPPILY ENDED  -determined   to'force  an ent'rn.nee into  the  country,, 'contrary   to   Canadian  worth   accomplishing to   have met all  these resourceful methods without giv-  'policy and law, and who declared that j 'i������g a single 'man a-.cause to complain  they would die rather Ihan return, | <*f personal injury, to have closed'up  have, gone away alive and comfortable  They have been exceedinglyfoitiniate.  Though  they  took  possession  of the  Japanese ship which brought them.  ' deprived   the captain of his authority.  and violently resisted the police when.  at the Captain's request, they visited  ��������� the  ship  to restore  order,   they have  been  sent away  without paying any  penalty for these olfenccs.    They have  suffered    some   hardships    at   times,  partly because, certain wealthy fellow- I  countrymen" of theirs  who contracted j  to feed them failed to keep their word j IMMIGRATION ACT TO  the a'fairs in the way calculated to do  n ) injury to imperial interests, and to  have established no precedent to we.-.k-  en the Canadian-position and hamper  future action. Canada cannot prevent  tlie publication of many falsehoods in  India, by the accomplished seditionists  who engage in this work. .But she  can . meet them all with a true story  which reflects no discredit on her  humanity or her justice, while.- ic  vindicates her authority.  and partly because  in the early stages  of the  trouble  they elected   to have a  hunger strike.     The   government  of  ��������� Canada has generously come to their  relief, and stocked the ship with abnn-  dantprovisions for the journey home.  The Hindus  will live dighc-r at the ex-  . pen.se of  the  Canadian   people   than  they did when their own countrymen  were boarding them for pay.  ���������'     Now that the incident has been closed  Canada and  the Empire may be  . congratulated on the way it was liand-  . led.     During all   these complications,  and in  spite of all provocation, every  reasonable    consideration    has    been  shown   the   Orientals.     The   government and its officers have been firm  on the one essential question, that the  Hindus should  not settle in this country if the  law of the land and authority of   the   immigration   deprrtmurit  were, sufficient to prevent it.    On that  point there was nodoubt or hesitation.  Since counsel for the Hindus claimed  that there  was no law  to reject them  and   that their exclusion would be an  act   of usurpation,   they were allowed  time and opportunity to appeal to the  highest court in the  province.    Even  after the decision was announced they  were given a long time to decide to go  iway peaceably.  In the end it was necessary to show  them that force would be used if they  would not allow the captain of the  ship to assume control and sail out of  the port. The Rainbow was not summoned because the Vancouver* police  were incapable of enforcing the law  and restoring the captain's authority.  In ten minutes the policemen who  went out to the Kornagata could have  taken possession of the. ship. They  would have gladly undertaken the  task had they been permitted. But  from first to last it was the determination qf the authorities to close the incident without bloodshed, if that was  possible.   The police did not go out to  BE STIFFENDED  Certificate of Improvements  ���������IXDKPKXnKXCK, and SPAR DYKE Mineral Claims, situate in the Osoyoos Mining  Division of Yale   District.   Where located:  Independence Mountain,  TAKI-: XOTICI'' that H. I*.  Drown as agent  ���������*���������        for C. H. Cornell Free "\l iuer's Certificate  ��������� Xo.'B. !la!)78, intend,  sixty-days from the date  hereof, to apply to the Mining. Recorder for a  Certificate of  Improvements,  for the '.pm-po.su  of obtaining a   Crown   Grant of ��������� the   above  cininis.  And further take notice that action, under  section So, must, bo'comnienccd before the issuance of such Ccrtilicate of Improvement**. '  Dated this 25th day of .Tune, A. D. 1911.  78 Years in Business.   Capital and Surplus 87,786,666.  THE   CONVENIENCE   OF   A JOINT ACCOUNT  A Joint Account may be opened in the names of two  or more persons. Whichever one can most conveniently  reach the bank can then deposit the joint funds or  withdraAV tlie cash needed.    It saves time and trouble.  Hedley Branch,  C P. Dalton,  Manager  Watch Our Show Windows  and See the Fine Line of  Goods we carry in Stock.  FRASER BLOCK  LYALL  HEDLEY, B.C.  t  I  ���������  *l  u  SUBSCRIBE FOR  THE   GAZETTE!  gplfrilllp^^  111  HI  Where Do You  m  m  Ottawa, July 'M.���������The Canadian immigration act is to bo revised at. the  next sessions of parliament. Passed  several years ago,' 'and. conferring  upon the department vei-y extensive  powei-s, it has been found,* in its  practical application, 'deficient in several vital points. The fundamatitnl  theory is that a country .should' have  the right to detifrrnruo what people  ���������should come as emigrant's [and those  who should be rejected. Jn the case  of the Hindus, for example, there is  no adequate penalty for- those who  brought to Canada these unfoitune  people. The owners of tlie vessel  maybe responsible, but they live in  Japan, and to get at them, may involve all kinds of bother andjpossible  international complications. _ Another  point arises out of the fact that the  ship owners maintain that they merely hired the ship to Gurdit Singh and  his people, and were not responsible  for inaugurating the excursion.  ! It is proposed to amend the law  so that in addition to the penalties  upon the owners it will cateroti-  cally provided that the ship itself  shall be sold. There are a number of  other points in regard to which the  law is to be stiffened.  DO you shop in a brisk, active store, or in a dull  store?  : Advertising makes bright stores. Failure to advertise goes hand in hand with dullness and stagnation.  an  m  m  m  w  m  Thu amalgamation of the. Bank of  Nova Scotia and the Metropolitan  Bank has been announced. As a result of the merger* the Bank of Nova  Scotia will take its place as the fourth  largest bank in Canada.  PI  m  m  m  m  Don't Know They  Have Appendicitis  "Many Hedley people have chronic  appendicitis (which is not very painful)  and think it is just bowel or stomach  trouble. Some have doctored for  years for gas on the stomach, sour  stomach or constipation and P. M.  Gillespie, druggist states that if they  will try simple buckthorn bark, glycerine, etc., as compounded in Adler-  i-ka, the German appendicitis remedy,  they will be surprised at the QUICK  benefit. A SINGLE DOSE stops  these troubles INSTANTLY.  ADVERTISE   IN   THE   GAZETTE  Advertising brushes away cob-'  webs and dust, smartens shop  windows, quickens the intelligence of salesmen, and lets in the  sunlight.  ��������� Advertising makes the merchant think of you���������-of your  wants and needs; makes him  anxious to serve you to your  liking and advantage.  Advertising keeps stock from  having birthdays.  Advertising acquaints you with  new things, and so brightens  your home, your life, your person.  Advertising keeps a business  from growing lazy and stupid.  Advertising injects good red blood  into the arteries of a business, and  keeps it healthful and active.  r Shop where your wants and  needs are uppermost in the mind  of the merchant. Shop in the  store which reflects you, which  you dominate. Shop where  your money returns to you in  better gpods, better values; better service.  Shun the shop that is dumb  and dark and dreary; keep away  from the shop that never speaks  to you, never smiles at you,  never bothers about you.  Reward by your custom the  merchant who lives to serve you,  and who is doing his utmost to  buildup this community; who  takes you into his confidence by  means of advertisements in your  local newspapers.  m  m  m  m  m  m  i-m  m  Smile back at the shop which smiles at you.  Shake hands with it���������keep company with it���������your  favor will be returned to you tenfold.  Advice regarding your advertising problems is available through  any good advertising agency, or the Secretary of the Canadian  Press Association, Room 503 Lumsdcn Building. Enquiry  involves no obligation on your part���������so write, if interested. --  m  i^i  Hi  'ifi  ''.'ii  an  jlljjlfi^ THE HEDLEY GAZETTE JULY 3) 19]+  THE FAMILY GROCERY  Town and District.  Riverv/iew  Oreamery  Absolutely .tho* best in  town. Try a pound and bo  convinced.  ntDLEY SHOE STORE  Tennis Shoes in all sizes  Full range of Hen's Walking  Shoes  tt  tt  ts  St  ts  at  %  st  K  - st  at  as  at  as  *i  at.  ���������at  tt  tt  at  *>:  ���������at  :St  '������������������g  Good   variety,  - Shoes .  of   Children's  Agents for Rex Tailoring Co. %  Suits Cleaned  and Pressed  at X  Reasonable Charges *2  '^T������j������'k0rt'i������^^^^'ia'������'a'ifl^^^'������������Ta'������i8^������������������  I Grand Union I  Hotel  HEDLEY,  British Columbia  Rates���������$1.50 a Day and Up  First-Class Accommodation.  Bar Stocked with Best Brands  of Liquor and Cigars  A.   WINKLER,     Proprietor  X  X  X  X  %  X  X  X  %  .������  X  X  of  i  i  e**-*.**?'!"'.****?'**-,**'^^  -GREAT NORTHERN  HEDLEY B.C.  Bar and Table the Best.   Rates Moderate  First Class Accommodation  JOHN JACKSON, Proprietor  PALACE  L>ivery, Feed & Sale Stables  ������������������HEDLEY   B. O. ������������������r' :'������������������  IT A good stock of Horses and Rigs oh  Hand.   TT, Orders for Teaming  promptly attended to.  Office of Dominion Express Gompanij,  WOOD   FOR   8 A L E1  Phono 11. D. J.  INNIS       Pi-opi-ictoi-.  FISHING   ROD������  amd Fishing Tackle  We carry a full line of all  goods that the fisherman  -   -   -   -   needs    -   -   -   -  flediey Drug & Book Store  Hedley, B. C  M. J. MEHAR  Expert at Digging Cess Pools and  Cellars.    Retaining Walls Built  Great Northern Hotel,    -   Hedley  When   Writing  Advertisers  Mention this Paper.  Please  Jack Howe was a visitor to Princeton between trains on Monday. !  Mrs. H. E. Hansen spent a few days  i n Kei (Mneo!- last week visiting friends.  W. Lowe, deputy fire warden of the  district, was in town a couple of days  this week.      - .       _  Mrs. E. M.'JDaly of Keremeos was  a visitor to town for* a couple of dnvs  last week.      '.'.''  Mr. and Mrs. .J. McLeod and son,  Jinnnie, returned home on Saturday  from Spokane.  H. A. Turner-, road supervisor, passed through town on Friday last on his  way up the. valley.  Mr. Blanchard,' who litis been visiting his daughter,, Mrs. H. E. Hansen,  returned home last week.  Geortre Bowerman and H. H. Messenger'are-driving a tunnel on the  Copper Cliff mineral claim. ���������  Miss Ina Boyd returned home from  Keremeos on Tuesday after a pleasant  week's visit to Mrs. J. F. Madore..  Rev. J. D. Uriffith, Church of, England miiiistcr-'ol' Princeton, held services in Fraternity, .hall on Sundny  last. ' "'"/  Miss Helma Jackson, who has been  visiting her parents heie for a couple  of months, left for Spokane on Saturday. ;  Mis. H. G. Freeman left on Wednesday for Moospjaw, where she' will  visit her" parents for a couple .of  months.  ��������� Mrs. W. J. Forbes who has been  visiting her* rnotlier, Mrs. Clarke,.,'of  Green Mountain, returned, home on  Tuesday.'  Judging by the hazy appearance of  the aUnnosphere there must be a number of bush fires burning in the immediate vicinity.  For Sale���������Rem ngton Typewriter-  No. 7. Good as new. cost $125,000 will  sell for $-10.00. Apply P. O. Box 491,  Hedley, B. C. tf.  Mr. M. K. Rodgers and family- are  on their way to Hedley. They are  travelling across the country from  New York to here in an auto.  Mr. H. A. Horswill who left for  Nelson about three weeks ago to undergo an operation is expected to return home irr a few days.  Mrs. Geo. -Wardell and Miss Gladys  Lyall of Princeton are spending a' few  days in town visiting their parents.  Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Lyall.  Mrs. McEwen is expected to return  home this week.- We are pleased to  report that she is quite strong again  after her operation for appendicitis.  Mrs. Guiles and Frances Hamilton  came in on Tuesday from Medical  Lake and are visiting at the-home of  Frances' father, Mr. and Mrs. S. E.  Hamilton.  A party consisting of Mr. and Mrs.  G. N. Gartrell, D. Lloyd-Jones and  Miss Lloyd-Jones autoed over* from  Simimerland on Saturday. They returned home on Sunday.  Mr. W. F. Harper, auditor of the  Hedley Gold Mining Co., accompanied  by his wife came in on Friday last and  and is spending a few days looking  over the books of the company.  A bush fire caused by a spark from  the engine of tho Great Northern  train was burning near- Princeton on  Friday. The fire was got -under control before it had done much damage.  Tlie many friends of Roy Hilliard  are pleased to sec him back in Hedley  again after his operation. He returned from Oroville on Saturday last and  says he is feeling fine although a  little weak.  The latest addition of the British  Columbia Year Book has just come  to hand. It is a very valuableaddition  for those who wish to know more  about the province in which they  live.  On Saturday afternoon a couple of  match games of tennis was played on  the town court between the members  of the two clubs. The club from the  the Daly was victorious winning both  games.  Ray Hilliard  has moved his barbershop from the small building just west  of the Grand Union Hotel to the  building of Mr. Geo. Lyon's and is  now fixing up the place. When completed he will have one of the finest  shops in the country.  For Sale���������-Lot 7, block 2, townsite  of Hedley. This property is Pa good  location as it is situated on Scott  Avenue, three lots north of the Hedley Trading Company's store. Good  house orr property. Will sell for  $900.00 cash or $950.00 half down and  the balance in eight monts.at Cjfper  cent. M. C. Kent, Prince Rupert,  B.C.  A dance will be given in  Fraternity  July 81st,  hall  on  Friday  evening  under the. auspices of 1 he Hedley,Brass  Band. The hand orchestra-; will furnish the music. Everybody come and  have a-"good' 'time: Ladies please  bring refreshments. ';���������''���������'.  Mr. G. M, Gillespie received a wire  from Merritt on Tuesday* from L. G.  !MacHaifie statingrthat he was leaving  '.Merritt on Wednesday morning for  Princeton. Mr. and Mrs. MncHaflie  will visit Mrs. Madia flic's parents,  Mr. and Mrs. W.A. McLean, at their  camp above Princeton for the day an  will pass through Hedley today, Thursday, on their way to their home in  Edmonton.  The show given by Ben La Mott and  company in Fraternity hail on Mon-  and Tuesday evenings' of this week  was not very well' patronized and  from the quality of.the performance  given it deserved a bigger house. They  intend to borne back this way again  this fall and it-is tp be hoped that the  people will turn out and show them  that th?y appreciate a good show.  We hope that they will put Hedley  011 their circuit and keep it there and  give the people- here a good laugh at  least once a year. '"-  1 Large tract of good valley farming  land just thrown open' for free settlement in Oregon. Over 200,000 acres in  all. Good.climate, rich soil, and does  not require irrigation to raise finest  crops of grain, fruit and garden truck.  For large map, full instructions and  information,, and a plat of several  sections of exceptionally good claims,  send $3.40 to John Keefe, Oregon City.  Oregon. Three years a U. S. surveyor  and timberman. An oppoitunity 10  get a good fertile free homestead near  town and market.    ' 2S-5  Firebox linings withstand years ot use because made of McGlary Semi-Steel.   See a  J&H���������$@   You'll notice the linings are  ^   &       made in nine pieces. There's  a good reason-ask the McClary dealer.      M  Sold by HEDLEY TRADING COHPANY  ALL THIS WEEK  METEOROLOGICAL.  ���������  Minimum  40  35  35  38  42  3S  39  The following are'the readings showing temperature, etc., for tiro week  ending. July IS 1914::  AT THE-MINE.  Maximum  Julv 19 (55  '20 . . 02  21 . . 03  22 .. 05  23 .. ti9  24 .. 05  25 .. (57  Average maximum temperature 65.14  Average minimum do        38.29  Mean temperature 51.71  Rainfall for the week   1.50 inches.  Snowfall               "           0.0        "._,.;.  COKRESl'O.VDl.VO WKEK OP LAST YEAK  Highest maximum temperature 80.  Average maximum do (33.00  Lowest minimum   "        do 29.  Average minimum do 37.75  Mean do 49.28  -���������-��������� AT THE  MILL.  MAXIMUM  S4  S4  70  7S  77  84  S3  Average maximum temperature  Average minimum do  Mean do  Rainfall for the week       .01 inches  Snowfall       "        "_        .00  CORrtESrOXDlN-G WEEK ok last vear  Highest maximum temperature 9S  Average do     ���������;������������������        do 75.23  Lowest minimum do 45.  Average do do 51.00  Mean .do 05.14  J uly 19  20  21  -������  ��������� 23  24  25  Minimum  54  57  52  53  40  44  42  S0.S0  49.71  ���������35.2s  A 209-pound fish was caught in the  Mississippi river near Quincy. The  fish is an alligator gar and was landed  after a two hours' struggle. Its length  is 7 feet 2 inches and arouud the body  it measures 3S inches. Its mouth, open,  measures 19 inches across.  SUBSCRIBE  FOR tTHE  Ladies' and Misses' White &;  Tan Canvas Oxford and  Strap Slippers  ���������      "   Regular Value $2.00 and $2.25  Special at        -        -        -      $1.50  Men's "Silkette" Summer  Weight Underwear  Regular value $3.00 a Suit  Special at - $2.25 a  Suit  x  New  Goods  this  Week I  McClary's Stoves & Ranges  Carpet Squares and Mats  LET US SHOW YOU  any, Ltd  $250.00 will buy a Choice  Residential Building- Lot on  Daly Avenue  Don't Pay Out Good Money for Rent When You  Can Own a House of Your Own  THE HEDLEY CI1Y TOWNSITE COMPANY, Ltd.  F. H. French, Secretary and Manager HEDLEY, B. C.  Hi  a  PIS  gpfj  1 THE HEDLEY GAZETTE.   JULY SO, 1914.  KEREMEOS, the Centre of Lower Similkameen���������-Famed for Fruit Growing  Town and Lower Valley.  Big rush for the train these days.  "Why! , Shipping is in full swing.  Twenty five per cent olf all fishing  tackle this week at Mill's tho Hardware man.  H. B. Meausette, of Princeton, spent  the past few days in town renewing  old aquaintances.  Mr. and Mrs. Alexander .Morrison of  Vancouver, arrived in town lust Friday to spend a short vacation on the  ranch.  Miss Ina Boyd of Hedley has been  visiting Mrs. Madore the past week.  She returned home Tuesday after a  pleasant time.  Mr. and Mrs. Eerier and Mr. and  Mrs. J. Thomas and son, Buster, are  spending a few days camping up the  Ashnola River.  The 40x28 concrete foundation of  the W. C. Ditmars house, is now completed and the erection of the building  is in full progress.  . Mr. and Mrs. W. H. and P.F. Quant  drove down to Siniilkuniecn Sunday  and spent a very pleasant afternoon  at the Lower Armstrong ranch with  Mr. and Mrs. Crooker-.  William Bradley of Mountain Meadow Ranch, was in town replenishing  his provisions. He reports that everything is in good shape between Keremeos and Fairveiw.  Mrs. Forbes of Hedley, after visiting her mother at Green Mountain  over the last week end spent a few  days with her sister, Mrs. D. J. Innis,  in town before returning home.  .1. R. Brown, magistrate, held court  at Okanagan Falls one day last week.  It look a whole day to determine  whether- P. L. Potter branded a steer-  belonging to Miss Bassett, by mistake  or otherwise. Walter Clayton, of  Pen tit-ton acted for defentantand L.  H. Patten of Keremeos as prosecutor-.  After a hard day's arguing the case  was dissmissed. The defendant had  -������������������-������������������to-pay-the-cost of the court.  Hon. Martin Burrell, Minister of  Agriculture, accompanied by his wife,  spent a few hours in town Monday  before proceeding further up the valley to Hedley and Princeton. Up to  the present time he has been pretty  busy since his his arrival in B. C. He  was very pleased to renew his acquaintances in the Okanagan and Similka-  valleys, and to find the progress which  is being made in this part of his constituency.  There has been great improvement  made on the Keremeos-Penticton  road. L. A. Clarke, and his crew,  have completed a new road round the  mountain side which will overcome  an eighteen per cent grade on the  summit. The road now being practically level between the two summit  hills. Dan McEaehern has made a  fine job building a road round the  Barcelo Hill to the great benefit of  transportation.  Robert Ellis, thinking the Irrigation  Convention was at Hedley arrived at  that town last Saturday. Finding  that such was not the case and that  the Reduction works were being worked by water power started next hrorn-  to calculate just how much power-  could be developed between Hedley  and; Keremeos, tind arriving home  the figures he submitted were somewhat astounding.  Buster Thomas entertained a number of little friends on Thursday the  23rd, it being the ninth anniversary  of his birthday. The afternoon was  spent in games after which a dainty  .luncheon wiis seyved. on the lawn.  "Master Buster received many beautiful presents and good wishes and  happy returns of the dixy. Among  those present were Hubert and Mary  Frith, Aka and Marie Schilstra, Lawrence and Ruth Vader, Leonard, Frank  Innis, Jim, Dorothy, Kelly and  George Emory, Clarence and "Wilbur  Mattice, Earl, Wallace, Ellsworth and  Daisy Dundas, Francis and Fred  Gibson, Alfred Mills, Wilfred Madore,  Primrose Thomson, Edwin Fai-RO,  Kathleen Richter, Kenneth Kyle,  Jack and Will Carle, Douglas and  Dorothy Christie, Ettie Manery and  Clifford Clark.  FEWER CHINESE  SEEKING ENTRANCE  Falling Off in  Oriental  Immigration   Is  Apparent on All Inbound  Steamships  Since the Dominion ordei-in-counci!  went into effect prohibiting thu immigration of Chinese for a  period of six  months, a great falling off in  Chinese  travel has  been  noticeable.   The  big  transportation lines are beginning  to  feel the pinch of the  new'r'-c-gu'latibns  Many of the steamship companies th-it  have hitherto transported large nuin  bers of Chinamen  are now using  this  space for the stowage of freight.    The  only Chinamen that are coming in  at  present are those returning from a trip  to the native heath, or the merchant or  student class.    What few  return men  are making or planning  to make, ic-  turn   passages,  appear  to  prefer  the  laiger steamships,  and consequently  Lhe  Canadian    Pacific has   the  mon  oply.    It   is   expected     that   within  another    month   all   the    returning  Chinese will have reached B.C. shores.  Chinese  passengers    will    then   be  a  rarity on  steamships  calling at   Victoria from the  far side  of the Pacific.  According  to   the  various   agents,  there are tew Chinese now aboard the  steamers now    en route,   from   Hong  Kong  to Victoria.    The   Empress  of  Russia, which sailed from Hong Kong  on July 8th, has only  100 Chinamen  aboard,   against   800 on   her   maiden  voyage.   The C.P.R. White liner, Empress of   Japan,  which    landed   last  week, had thirty-five'Orientals aboard,  arrd the liner Monteagle has but twelve  Orientals occupying the space that was  designed for* hundreds. Several otht-rs,  usually  carrying Orientals,   have  no  Chinese at   all   on   their   respective  manifests.  J. A. BROWN  Notary Public  CONVKYANCING, CUSTOMS HHOK12KA0K,  FI1J.1-*  IXtfURAXCE  OFFICE  KEREMEOS. B.C.  nox in  l'HONI-:i32  ACCIDENT ON K. V. R.  orr  E.  A very sad accident occured  Saturday evening on the Iv. V  tracks ashor-t distance out of Penticton.  Several men, who are employed on the  construction work, were returning to  Penticton to spend Sunday. They  were riding on a speeder, when  suddenly a work train rounded a  curve in front of them. The foreman  instantly cried to the others lo jump,  and all did so with the exception of  one, the 'youngest of the group, who  possibly became too dazed to do anything, and remained on the speeder,  which a moment later crashed into  the locomotive. The young fellow,  whose name is McKee. was frightfully  mangled, and his death occured at  10 o'clock at "Penticton Hospital  whither he.was taken immediately'  after the accident. His father, who  is connected with the construction  work on the K. V. R., was communicated with at Armstrong, and he and  the lad's mother made all haste to  come to their boy's side. They arrived early on Sunday morning,, too  late to see him alive. The body was  conveyed to Armstrong by Monday's  boat for interment there.  B. A. MOORHOUSE  Assoc. Mom. Can. .Sot-. C'.K.  and IS.C.L.S.  Civil Engineer and B. G. Land Surveyor  AUTOMOBILE  PENTICTON,     . -       -       -        B. C.  KEREMEOS - PENTICTON  T\A/*E DOLE'S  AUTO STAGE SERVICE  >   Tweddle's cars are   comfort- \  \        able.   Tweddle's drivers i  are experts. ^  No delavs.            No accidents  Autos leave Penticton every morning to connect with trains to Hedley.  Princeton. Coiiliiiout. Oroville and  all Boundary points.  Leave Keremeos for Penticton on  arrival of ('rent Northern trains  Fake- singi.k $6.00  return $11.00  Baggage carried. Commercial trunks  arranged for  Break lhe monotony of train and  boat travel and take an auto trip.  When you arrive at- Penticton or  Keremeos ask for  TWEDDLE'S AUTO STAGE  Curs Cull at all Hotels  (/-/\*/-/*WA*/J  FOR SERVICE J  f The Throughbred   Running f  Stallion  "Beautiful and Best"  (Canadian Stird Book, No 237)  Will stand for public service at  '���������The Willows" Keremeos, for  the season of'1914.  Fee for service $10.00 to insure.  Mares may be pastured  E. M.DALY  H. G. N. ETCHES  is Agent for the Hedley Gazette in  Keremeos and authorized tobook  Subscriptions and take orders for*  job work and advertising.  POST OFFICE,  KEREMEOS, B. C.  GENERAL NEWS  The Rosedale Lacrosse team, champions of the National Lacrosse Union,  have challenged the Salmonbellies for  the Minto Cup and will come west  early in September to to try and lift  the silverware.  The Armstrong lacrosse team has  again sent in a challenge for the Mann  Cup.  The town of Northport was nearly  wiped olf the map by fire on the 23rd.  The fire started in the basement of a  livery barn and over two-thirds of the  business section was wiped out. The  loss is estimated at about $100,000.  About two hundred men are engaged in dismantling the mining machinery at the Hosmer mines. Everything  is being recovered from the working  face out, including, ties, spikes, fishplates and bolts, and all underground  equipment, and in the course of six-  weeks the town of Hosmer will be no  more, insofar as the coal mining industry is concerned.  The Granby Consolidated Mining,  Smelting and Power Company now  has three blast furnaces running at its  copper smelting works at Anyox, the  third furnace having been blown in  lately. The capacity of the plant is  stated to be about 2,000 tons of ore a  day, but tonnage figures have not  been made public as yet, so it is not  generally known what quantity of ore  is actually smelted daily. Besides its  Hidden Creek mines, near Anyox, the  company is operating two mines in  southeast Alaska; and the ore from  these is also to be shipped to the  works at Anyox for reduction.  SILKS  Large Assortment of choice Silk Dress  Goods, Silk handkerchiefs etc.  for- sale at right prices  TOHMY SING, Keremeos  SING LEE  Laundry, Contracting of all  kinds, Ditch digging, Wood  Sawing, Clearing land, Cooking and all kinds of Chinese  Labor.  Keremeos, B.C.  60   YEARS"  EXPERIENCE  ATENTS  Trade Marks  Designs  Copyrights Ac.  Anyone sending a sketch and description may  quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an  Invention Is probably patentable. Communications atrictly contidontlal. HANDBOOK on Patent*  sent free. Oldest agency tor securingpatenta.  Patents taken through Mnnn & Co. receive  tpecial notice, without charge, in tha  Scientific JTmerican,  A. handsomely illustrated weekly. I-nrgest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a  year: four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers.  (MINN & Co.36lBroad^ New York  Branch Office. 6% V St., Washineton. D. C  Advertise in the  Hedley Gazette  and watch Results  WE'VE GOT THE BUSINESS  AND THERE IS GOOD REASON WHY  If we were to be here to-day and pack up  and go tomorrow we could perhaps afford to  run our business along slip-shod lines. We  are here, however, to build a business. This  we intend to do by stocking. high-grade  goods and selling at a low margin of profit.  See our superior line of Goods  for Spring.  FRANK  RICHTER   ESTATE  is the keynote of modern business  methods. To let the people know  just what you have and what you can  do for them is one of the first essentials of a successful business to-day.  Boldness and originality in advertising, backed up by an endeavor to give  good service has built up most of the  successful business '."houses, of "the last  tweiity-flve years.  Whether you are running  a Department Store or the  Smallest Business there is  something you have to tell  Tell it in the easiest and cheapest  way���������through the columns of a newspaper, which reaches the home of  the people.  g  First-class work done on  'shortest notice at the  NOTICE  SIMILKAMEEN LAND DISTRICT  nTSTKTCT OF YALE-  TAKE notico that I, Alfred H. Rowborry of  Fairvicw, Ii. C. occupation, fanner, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the following described -lands:��������� ���������  Commencing nt a post planted at a post  about'80 chains West and about 20 chains  North of tho N.W. corner of Lot G!)8s; thonoo  West 20 chains, thence South 10 chains, thence  East 20 chains, thenco North 10 chains, and'  containing 80 acres.  Alkhi-o II. KowitKiinv  25th April, IS1J.  NOTICE  SIMILKAMEEN LAND DISTRICT  nrs'rmcT ok yale  TAKE notice that I. Halliburton Tweddle of  Keremeos, B. C. occupation,' Hotelkcep-  or, intends to apply for permission to purchase  tho following described lands:���������  Commencing nt a post planted about two  miles north of lot 3207, thenco north 40 chains;  thonco enst forty chains; .thonoo south forty  chains; thence west forty chains to point of  commencement and containing ono'hundred  and sixty acres.  '  Halliiiuhtox TwFinnLK  April 10th, 1D1J. 21-10

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