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The Evening Sun Sep 4, 1906

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Array Fifth Year-
53K
Grand Forks, B. C, Tuesday, September 4,1906
Seml-WeeUy-51.00 Per Year In Advance
E
J.M. Simpson, While Attempting to Cross River is
Drowned
Body Was recovered at Three
O'clock This Morning In 13
Feet of Water
A most distressing drowning accident, by which a worthy and popular
citizen waB cut down in the prime of
life, occured a short distance from the
city last Sunday afternoon.
Saturday last J. M. Simpson and
a. M. Feeney started on a few days'
camping oat and hunting trip. They
established their camp about five
miles below town, near the Great
Northern railway on the south side of
the river. Shortly after pitching
their tent their paekhone broke loose.
On Sunday afternoon Mr. Simpson
forded the river and went in search of
the animal. Before leaving he told
his partner that if he could not find
him he would go back to town tor one.
Mr. Simpson found the horse without
much difficulty, and went over to Pete
DeWilde's ranch and borrowed a
bridle and saddle. Mr. DeWilde told
him where there was a shallow ford,
and be started back for eamp. That
was the last seen of him alive.
Mr. Feeney remained in camp until yesterday afternoon. As Mr.
Simpson had told him that he might
return to the city, he felt no apprehension for his safety. But as time
dragged on and his partner did not
pat in an appearance, he began to get
uneasy, and after making enquires of
a couple of smelter men who happened
to be hunting in that neighborhood,
he left them in charge of the camp
and came to the city and reported the
strange disappearance of Mr. Simpson.
A searching party composed of a
number of citizens was immediately
sent out. At DeWilde's it was learned that Mr, Simpson had borrowed a
bridle and saddle there and had started to ford the river. Shortly thereafter the horse had returned to the
ranch, riderless and drenched with
water, hut Mr. DeWilde states that
he was too busy to pay much attention to the animal. The river bank
was then examined, and at a deep
place in the stream the footprints of a
horse entering the water were found;
and a short distance below, on the
same side of the river, it wus found
that the animal had again emerged.
On the opposite side of the river no
marks of man or horse could be discovered. The party therefore concluded
that Mr. Simpson hail attempted to
ford the river ut this point, and that
the horse hud got out beyond its depth
and had sank under the weight of its
rider, who, being a heavy man and
unable to swim, had evidently fallen
out of the saddle and drowned.
So firm was this conviction that a
man was at once dispatched to the
city for a team and hooks and tackle
with which to drag the river bottom.
The team left here shortly after Ii!
o'clook last night, and after working
until about 3 this morning the remains of Mr. Simpson were found in
about fifteen feet of water. They were
brought to this city, and are now at
F. E. Cooper's undertaking establishment.
A strange phase of the accident is
found in the fact that Mrs. Simpson,
who attended the Labor Day picnic at
Curlew lake yesterday, had a premonition that some calamity had befallen her husband. On alighting from
the train last night she asked Mr.
Wm. Bonthron, who is an intimate
friend of the family, if Joe was there.
On being told that he was not, she reiterated her statement that some accident had overtaken hi.u, and immedi-
became prostrated with grief.
Deceased was a man of the highest
integrity and well liked by all who
knew him, all of whom will miss him
from their midst. He came to this
oity in 1898 from New Brunswick,
where his parents and relatives now
reside. Since coming here he has
been engaged in the blacksmithing
business, having been in partnership
until two years ago with Mr. R Feeney, with whom he always had Ihe
pleasantest relations. He was 32
years and five months of age, and
leaves a wife and infant daughter in
this city to mourn his untimely death.
He was a a member of the Oddfellows
lodge, the Independent Order of Foresters and the Fraternal Order of
Eagles, and carrie 1 $4000 insurance.
He had been foreman of the fire department for a number of years, and
up to the time of his death was act-
ing chief in the absence of Mr. Savage. The community mourns an up
right and honest citizen, and his family a kind and loving husband and
father. The profoundest sympathy is
being expressed for his wife, who is
prostrated with sorrow at her sudden
and unlooked-for bereavement.
The funeral will be held at three
o'clock tomorrow, Wednesday, afternoon from Cooper's undertaking establishment under the auspices of Gateway Lodge I. 0. O. F. The service
will be. conducted by Kev. McLeotl of
Knox Presbyterian church.
The firemen will hold a meeting
this afternoon to decide as to what
part they are to take in the funeral
services.
CITY NEWS
Harry LaDow spent Sunday with
Nelson friends.
Chas. Brown left yesterday on a
business trip to Nelson.
Alex Miller, of Greenwood, was a
visitor in tbe city last Saturday.
Mrs. James Lane left yesterday
morning for Spokane on a visit to
relatives and friends.
Provincial Constable I. A. Dinsmore made an official trip to I'hoenix last Saturday.
A. B. W. Hodges, general superintendent of the (iranby Consolidated, made a business trip to Spokane
last Friday.
Arthur Walgamott arrived in town
last Saturday from Butte, Mont,
and was immediately corralled by
Bandmaster Thomas of the City
band.
. There was a rumor afloat last Saturday that the Grand Trunk Pacific
railway was headed toward Grand
Forks. After due investigation it
was ascertained that a Grand Trunk
boxcar in the Great Northern yards
was the cause of the report.
Prof.   Shutt   Explains  How
Farming Can be Made
Profitable
Deputy Minister Urges Ranchers to Secure a Wider
Market
The meeting of the Farmers' Institute in the city hall last Saturday
night was the best attended of any
ever held in the oity, nearly all the
prominent ranchers of the valley being present. Martin Burrell presided
over the meeting, and introduced the
speakers to the audience. J. K. Anderson, provincial deputy minister of
agriculture, Victoria, and Frank T.
Shutt, chemist of the central experi
mental farm, Ottawa, were the speakers of the evening.
Mr. Anderson spoke briefly on the
work outlined for the district farmer-.'
institutes and the good work that
could be accomplished if more meet
ings were held than attempted at
at present. He urged the farmers to
join the institute, which they could
do by addressing the secretary at Nelson and paying a yearly fee of DO
cents, thus receiving free all the publications of the institute. He warned
the farmers against depending too
much on the local market, but adviced
them to take advantage of the clause
in the Farmers' Institute Act authorizing the organization of farmerg' exchanges, thus giving them a wider
market and freeing them from the
mercy of local dealers. He was of
the opinion that too many early va
rieties of apples were being planted in
this valley. He was afraid that this
would result in an overproduction of
these brands. He congratulated the
district upon the appointment of
Mr. Burrell as member of the board
of Horticulture.
Prof. Shutt's admirable address was
couched in simple and very easily understood language, translating the la
test scientific conclusions, as applied
to the best system of fruit and vegetable production. The speaker carried on his lecture in a most informal
conversational way that was greatly
appreciated by all who were present.
His suggestions were eminently practical. He was of the opinion that he
could accomplish more good if lie
coultl meet each n.ncher on his own
ground, instead of speaking to them
collectively in a hall. The experimental farms had become a sort of
bureau of information to the farmers.
of late years the had tlone more good
for British Columbia than any other
portion of Canada. People coming
from Manitoba and the Northwest
territories thought thut all that was
necessary to bo done in fruit raising
was to plant the trees and sit on the
fence and watch them grow. People
living here knew better. A rich soil,
such as was found in this valley, was
only half the battle. There must also he suitable meteorlogical contli
tions. Only from 3 to 5 per cent of
the nourishment required to grow
fruit and vegetables came from the
soil, the balance being extracted from
the atmosphere. He explained tiie
composition and proper treatment of
soils, giving much useful information
as to the life process of plants and
trees, showing what nourishment was
derived from the soil and what from
the air breathed in by the foliage.
His discussion of the treatment of alkali soils was followed with keenest
interest. His opinion was altogether
against the success of this so-called inoculation, and in favor of thorough
manuring or the turning into the soil
of some of the leguminous crops, especially clover, to increase its productivity and general fertility. A well
considered rotation of crops and mixed
farming were strongly recom- ended.
He explained that while he was
here to give any useful information in
his power, he was in the west more to
learn than to teach. He desired to
understand conditions out here at first
hand so as to be able to grasp matters
referred to bim in the east from out
here. Success of the district here as
a fruit growing one, had faiily passed
the experimental stage, and had been
proved. The government desired to
help as much as possible and valuable
assistance could be given, but all the
problems could not lie worked out at
once. Temperature and nin fall were
two must important factors and the
speaker proceeded to show this, illustrating his remark bv simple everyday
applications, adding that while it was
easy to obtain date, it was by ni
means easy to properly interpret data
so obtained. Irrigation was as a rule
necessary at times and under existing
conditions here, and it would not be
safe to go on without it. One thing
at least should be loo'ied after and
that was making the soil retain moisture by cultivation and by mulching.
Commencing with making of soils,
clay, sand and vegetable matter, the
sp a er said there had bei n a steady
improvement due to scientific research
in the methods used to supply deficiencies. Many facts had been ascer-
lained but much was yet to conjecture. Many soils contained the ingredients of plant food, but in insoluble state, and so useless for practical
purposes. This insoluble plant food
was made soluble by science. The
speaker explained the advantages to
be gained by irrigatian, but warned
his hearers that excessive irrigation
did more harm them good in the long
run, washing out and away the rich
ingredients, Every effort should be
made to conserve the moist'ire by cultivation. The growing of hay and
grain in the orchard was condemned,
because it absorbed the moisture. The
a I vantages to he derived from mulching wus explained by a series of experiments carried on at Ottawa, and
early planting was strongly recommended. Then the professor went at
length into the question of the use of
fertilizers, explaining in detail of the
various kinds.
The address of Prof. Shutt was listened to with the greatest interest
and attention.
Afler the address was concluded a
very hearty vote of thanks was passed
to Mr. Shutt for his address and half
an hour was pleasantly spent in the
professor answering questions put to
him by persons in the audience.
Messrs. Shutt und Anderson left
for the coast yesterday.
Last Saturday was the first day of
the open season, and local nimrods
were in the field bright and early..
One or two of the sportsmen report
having had trouble with their crack
thoroughbred dogs. They persisted
in chasing groundhogs instead of
! chickens.    Dogs will be dogs.
Workingmen Hold a Monster
Picnic-Have Fine time at
Curlew Lake
The   Prize   -Winners-Grand
Forks Won the Tug-of-
War
Yesterday was an ideal day for
outdoor life, and the picnic of the
workingmen of the Boundary district at Curlew lake was an unqualified success, and Grand Forks and
Greenwood unions may well feel
proud of their first combined effort.
Grand Folks, Greenwood, Boundary
Falls, Midway, Danville and Curlew contributed between four and
five hundred participants, and Republic sent an equal number. Besides, every rancher within a radius
of ten miles was present. The train
from, this city and Greenwood, composed of five passenger coaches and
two boxeurs, arrived at the grounds
at 10:30 over the Kettle Valley
lines.
The music for the day was furnished by the celebrated Citizens'
band of Greenwood and the recently
organized Grand Forks band, reinforced by the Scotch bagpipes,
which were played with charming
effect on the tranquil surface of the
lake. Considerable surprise was
expressed at tbe class of music rendered by the Grand Forks band,
and our boys divided the honors
and applau.-e with Greenwood's
crack musicians.
The dance pavilion was one of the
strongest attractions, the excellent
music discoursed keeping it crowded from the arrival of the musicians
until the departure o' tbe last train.
The Labor day address was delivered by Rev. Henry Steele, of this
city. He took for his subject the
social condition of tbe wage earners.
His remarks proved quite effective,
and they were liberally punctuated
with applause from the interested
listeners. He expressed gratification at the fact that the world had
advanced far enough in thought to
enable him to address a working-
men's without stultification to his
religious conviction. There were a
lot of people who called themselves
socialists who were not true socialists, and others who spurned that
term were socialists. To blow
the capitalists up with dynamite
would not cure the social inequality
of the present day. It would act like
shaking a crop of apples from a tree.
A new crop would appear next season. The evil must be remedied by
getting at the very root of the capitalistic system, which could be done
by the workingmen obtaining control of the machinery of production.
Tbe following were the prize winners:
Men's foot race, 75 yards—W.
Destail, Republic, first; Joe Burby,
Grand Forks, second.
Boys' race, under 16, 50 yards-
McMillan, Deadwood, first; Mickey
O'Connor, Grand Forks, second; J.
Summer, Republic, third.
Girls' race, under 16, 50 yards—
Birnie Kuchne, Republic, first; Jen-
Conlinued on Second Page. Silt? -Ebtttttu* §tm
Published at Grand Forks, British Columbia.
Every Tuesday aDd Friday Evenings,
....Editor and Publisher
SUBSCBIFTIOH HATES 1
One Tear   $1.10
One Year (In advance)  1.00
Advertising rates furnished on tilii-lloatlii
Legal notices, 10 and 5 oents per line.
Address all communications to
Thi Bvinisg Son,
Phosi Bit Qhand Fohks, B.C.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1906
A special meeting of the city
council was held list Saturday afternoon, and the Fourth street bridge
by-law was reconsidered and finally
passed by an unanimous vote, notwithstanding tbe fact that there is
a difference of opinion even among
the legal profession as to whether or
not the by-law was approved by the
taxpayers.
The Great Northern depot at Danville was broken into last Sunday
night by sneak thieves, presumably
the ones that have heen operating nt
Midway and other places of late.
The burglais had made an entrance
by breaking a window in the rear of
the building, and inside the depot
had broken through the window of
the waiting room into the express
office. The contents of this office
had been rummaged through, but
apparantly nothing of value had
been found by the intruders. At
Midway last week a burglary of .the
Canadian Pacific section house was
perpetrated in broad daylight, and
this practically under the nose i f
the police. The roast that there
Sherlock Holmes get at bands of
a business man of that village in a
late issue of the Star is delightful
literature.
CITY NEWS
A new orchestra was organized in
the city this week consisting of the
following participants: Arthur Wal-
gamott, leader.violin; F.H. Thomas,
tuba; Harry Thomas, alto; Neil
Thomas, clarionet. Mr. Walsmott,
who -arrived from Butte, Mont.,
last week, is a violinist of rare talent,
and under his leadership 'an exce'-
lent *nusieal organization can be expected.
Miss Rhodes, formerly matron of
the Cottage hospital, returned last
Saturday from the coast, where she
has been spending the past six weeks
for the benefit of her health.
Frank Macgowan, local agent of
the Dominion Express company,
who lesft for Vancouver about three
weeks ago for the benefit of his
health, returned to the city last Saturday, having been greatly benefited
by his vacation.
A. C. Van Hess, mining engineer
of Greenwood, was in town today,
leaving in the evening with the new
diamond drill that is to be used on
the Hesperus property. It is expected to sink the drill to a depth of a
thousand feet at present, but as to
the extent of development work on
this property nothing definite has as
yet been given out.
T. H. Ilea, manager of the Betts k
Hesperus, has signed a contract with
the Diamond Drill Contracting Co., if
Spokaue, for another thousand feet of
diamond drill work.
LABOR DAY SPORT
Concluded'from First Page.
ny Sullivan, Danville, Becond; Grace
Rose, Republic, third.
Married ladies' race, 50 yards—
Mrs. Logden, Danville, first; Mrs
Can-, Republic, second.
Running jump—Archie Murray,
Grand Forks, first; J. McLaughlin,
Greenwood, second.
Standing broad jump—F. Hetlden,
Greenwood, first; J. McLaughlin,
Greenwood, second.
Running hop, step and jump—
Archie Murray, Grand Forks, first;
VV. Destail, Republic, second; R.
Lawrey, Deadwood, third.
Throwing shoulder stone—W.
Miller, Grand Forks, first; J. McLaughlin, Greenwood, second.
Swimming contest—Joe Gavan-
augh,Grand Forks, first; Joe Thompson, Boundary Falls, second.
Fhe tug-of-war contest between
the Greenwood and Grand Forks
teams waB the most exciting event of
the day, and resulted in an easy victory for the latter.
All the rowboats were in constant
commission, and the gasoline launch
made hourly trips around the beautiful sheet of water. A number of
deeoiplen of Isaac Walton were amply repaid fo: their labors. All the
booths and cafes were conducted by
the unions, and there was absolutely
no grafting.
Taken all in all, it was a most
enjoyable day's outing, one long to
be remembered by those who were
fortunate enough to participate in
the excursion.
When Children are Sick
They eat something that disagrees,
catch cold, have cramps or colic. If
there is pain just apply Nerviline—
it's good to rub on, and for the in-
sides it's most comforting. Effective
and pleasant; you can't find a house
hold panacea to equal Poison's Nervi
line. Used with satisfaction for half
a century and in better demand eve -y
day because it dees stop pain, ease
suffering, and cure the thousand and
one ills that constantly arise in tiie
family. Large bottles at all oealers
for 25c.
Emil Larsen will give a social hop
at his Province ho.el parlors on next
Tuesday night. Good music anil a
good time assured.
Geo. Binn, of Curlew, who exhibited symptoms of suffering from
an attack of typhoid fever, was
brought to the Grand Forks hospital last night.
J. McMilan, machinist at the Granby smelter, retnrned yesterday from a
visit to Greenwood and vicinity.
Carl Wolfram  returned last night
from a hui ing trip neur Phoenix.
Our job department is superior to
any other in the Boundary country.
We have both the material and the
experience to turn out high class work.
"Sklddo" for Your Headache
Ascertain itseause ami the cure is
not hard to find. Look to the stomach and bowels. Aren't you constipated, isn't your liver sluj-gish, isn't
stomach failing in its mission? What
you need is the cleansing tonic influence of Dr. Hamilton's Pills. Their
effect is lasting because they aid the
all the ailing organs, flush out all unhealthy matter, and tone up the stomach. With Dr. Hamilton's Pills your
stomach gets a chance to recuperate;
and does so quickly. For real buoyant health use Dr. Hamilton's Pills
regularly.    25c per box at all dealers.
HOTEL ARRIVALS
T W Robinson, Vancouver: J 11
Fox, Nelson; John Graham, Winnipeg; W Clark, Victoria; W 15 Wilcox, Phoenix; J C Henderson, Winnipeg; E T Blnquer, Brandon; J It
Anderson, Victoria; F T Shutt, Ottawa; Thos Conliin, Toronlo; Wm
Murray, Cornell; John H McCarthy,
Jr., Phoenix; T M Storey, Vancouver; C C Snoudon, Calgary; C P
Easlmam, New Westminster; R D
Fullerton, Point de'Butte, B C; H
D Hunter, Greenwood; J R Grant,
Listowel, Ont.; Geo E Mosser, Spokane.
THE WINDSOR
T Convers, Rossland; Arthur
Walgamott, Butte, Mont.; John Le-
herny, Boundary Falls;A H Gillian,
Franklin City; A C Van West,Green-
wood; T Cove, Rossland; H H
Moore, Nelson; J A Stewart, Rossland; J A Mahan, Cascade; C Carl
son, Kaslo; Wm P Hughes, Los Angeles; Robert Edger, IRevelstoke; W
D Fuller, Kaslo; C Jones, Spokane;
James Beard, Los Angeles.
PROVINCE
John Carlson, Spokane, J Ivereon,
(T
z\
September 1st, 1906
We are opening the Oyster Season
with the following:
Blue Points, Half Shell, 75c.
N. V. Counts, Raw, 1 doz., 81.00.
N. Y. Counts, Raw, \ doz., 50c.
N. Y. Counts, Stew, 1 doz., $1.00.
N. Y. Counts, Stew, \ doz. 50c.
N. Y. Counts, Fry, 1 doz., 81.10.
N. Y. Counts, Fry, J doz., 55c.
Fancy Select Oyster Loaf, 81.50.
Boston Fancy Roast, 75c.
Pan Roost, 50c.
Olympia, R w, 50c.
Olympia, Stew. :fie-
Olympia, Fry, 60c.
Fancy Roasl, 70c.
Pan Roast, 50c.
Fancy Select Loaf, $1.96.
Cove Oysters, 50c.'
Clams, 50c.
Crabs, 50c.
Oyster Soup (to order), 35c.
Oyster Cocktails, 25c.
Windsor Hotel Cafe
Open Day and Night
Nelson; A Williams, Victoriu; H
Kerr. Greenwood; J Yentes, Republic; P H Redmond, Nelson; Frank
Myers, Franklin; J O Pay, Portland:
W Cook, Nelson. B Brechin Vancouver; G P Anderson, Republic;
Thomas Boyle, Nelson; E Hawes,
Montreal
Joseph Pary, Nelson; Arthur Harris, Greenwood: W E Muller, Winnipeg; Mflvin Day, Boundary Falls;
8 Chrisholm, Spokane; Chns Farnell, Nelson; W H Keating, Spokane; James Darling, RepublicjCfias
Snyder, Nelson.
They all Failed
May have tried to devise a corn
cure equal to Putnam's, but after 50
years milling has come upon the market that so painlessly cures corns and
warts. Don't experiment, use the
best, and that's Putnam's.
A. Erskine Smith & Co
IF YOU INTEND  TRAVELLING
To Franklin Camp by Stage, Private Vehicle, Freight Team or
Horseback, ask for our prices.
Bridge and First Sts
R. C. MCGUTCHEON
CABINETMAKER   ,
Turning, Scroll Work, Saw
Filing, Gun Repairing, Manufacturer of Screen Doors and
Windows.
P. BURNS & CO., LTD.
First Street
Grand Forks. B. C.
■\**f-/HEN Traveling to Franklin
Stop at the
VOLOANIO. B.C.
First-Class Accommodations.
Finest Brand" of Wines,
Liquors and Cigars always
in stock.
R. A. Brown, Proprietor
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND CURED
oMEATS
Fish and Game in Season
VOLCANIC HOUSE    GRAND FORKS, B.C.
Come Our Way
(And We Will Treat You Right
\X7K carry the freshest, largest and most carefully selected stock in \
V        Grand Forks of
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
Ranch Produce and Fruits
As we hut recently opened up in business, our entire stock is fresh,
and we intend to always keep it in that condition by making our prices
right. We believe in small profits and quick sales. A trial order will
convince you.
LAWSON, BAKER <®, GEORGE
General Grocers
PHONE NO-12 SECOND STREET
SPOKANE OFFICE 1
WASHINGTON
WHITE FOR CATALOGUE.
Three quart bottles of Nelson beer
for 50c at the Lion Bottling Works.
Read The Sun—The only twice-a-
week paper in the Boundary. $1.00
per year.
The oftener your advertisement
reaches the public, the greater will be
its trade-attracting powers.
Bicycles and Repair Work—A
complete line of 1906 models. A few
second-hand wheels cheap. Wheels
to rent. Geo. Crapple, opposite
Postoffice, First street.
Get your wedding invitations printed
at The Sun office. We have the closest
script type imitation of a steel engraving made.
_ uv
Buy Your Wife
Her Supply of
Groceries
At our store. It will save her a lot of inconvenience and hard work in
preparing your dinner, as we only handle the best of everything.
Everything for the kitchen. We advertise "The Best"—and we've
got the goods. The main factor in keeping the stock always fresh is
our Low Prices.
<'o,n,S ™Zlt GENT'S FURNISHINGS AND BOOTS AND SHOES
It will pay you to inspect our goods in this department before
buying elsewhere. We can save you'money, and guarantee satisfaction.
J. H. HOBSON & CO.
Opposite CP.R. Station
AS YOU LIKt IT
Curlew lake is lonesome today.
A man  may be crooked mid yet
I walk straight.
A whole  lot of girls are just as
IgoolaBlhey look—by moonlight.
Many a man begins his churity
I at home by cutting down his wife's
allowance.
Most of us find it easier to sit "In
lthe Shade of the Old Apple Tree"
than to sing it.
Phone 30
T"t palm
WALLACE
CHALMERS
PROP.
A FHE8H STOCK OF
Confectionery, Fruits,
Cigars and Tobacco.
MOST COMPLETE STOCK
of its kind in the city.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
SMOKERS'
SUPPLIES
RAINEY'SCIGARSTORE
COR. BRIDGE AND FIRST STREETS
Geo. Taylor
6ENERALC0NTRACT0
EXCAVATOR
ETC
All Orders Given Prompt and Careful
Attention.
Geo. Taylor
General Contractor.
Foo Lee
Laundry
FINE LAUNDERING.
COLLARS,   CUFFS   AND
SHIRTS WASHED CLEAN AND
NICE  AND IRONED BY
MACHINERY,    NEW
MEN EMPLOYED.
NEXT CHINESE STOBE
RIVERSIDE AVENUE.
THC COMRMTAMC WAV.
S. F. & N. RY.
Dally
Leave
GRAND FORKS1 »«
Arrive
Spokane, Seattle,
Everett, Belltug-
ham, Vancouver,
Victoria and all
Coast point.,
Spokane, Fernie,
10:40 a.m.   Winnlneg.StPuul
and Minneapolis..
Northport. K	
10:40 a.m.   laud, Nelson, Kas-
loand Bandon....
Republic Curlew
5:25 p.m.  and Ferry (Mid-
will
ft. 15 p.1*0.
ft :1ft p.m.
ft:lft p.m.
10:85 a.m.
ft:30 p.m. I Phoenix, B.C. ... | hj.i-ju s~m.
Commenting at Spokane with tbe famous
'ORIENTAL LIMITED"
g, St. Paul.
* all
2—Daily Overland Train*-—2
From Spokane for Winnipeg,	
Minneapolis, St. Louis, Chicago and
points east.
For complete Information, rates
berth reservations, etc., call on or address,
H. SHKBDY, Agent,
Grand Forks.
S. O. TKRKEB.A.Q.P.A..
Seattle.
When
You consider
that a poorly
printed job coats
just as much as
one that presents a neat and
tasty appearance, do you not
think that your
business demands the latter kind ?
Good Printing—the kind we do—is in itself
an advertisement, and a trial order will convince
you that our stock and workmanship are of the
best. Let us estimate on your order. Wo guarantee satisfaction.
It wbb so quiet in (own yesterday
that you could hear the pay roll at
the Granbv smelter.
It's no nign that a woman is an
angel because she wears frills and
wings on her dress.
When a man combines business
with pleasure business usually gets
the short end of it.
It .akes two fools with but a single thought to generate a full-sized
case of mutual jealousy.
The man who thought it funny
to rock a boat is meekly lying where
the late Mr. McGinty is.
Tbe feelin' 'way down in the
heart of a girl for a man is often
only an ice cream feeling.
A man who speaks from experience says it costs almost u.« much to
keep a wife in clothes as it does an
automobile in repair.
Some women are hard to suit.
Even the Lord failed to give them
enough ribs, and they are obliged to
buy steel or whale bones, to keep
tbeir shape.
Chicago is building a church eight
stories high. When some of the people get up to the top story they'll
be nearer to Heaven than tbey can
expect to ever be in any other way.
It Imparts strength
Just think of the enormous strengthening power Ferrozone possesses—
consider what it did for H V Pottei,
well known in Kingston. "Ii was
subject to spells of dizziness. For
eight months I had intense pain in
my right side between the shoulders.
I was almost ineurab'e with weakness
and lack of vigor. Often I scarcely
ate any breakfest and felt miserable
all day. Nervous, easily excited.
troubled with heart weakness, I was
in bad shape. Ferrozone restored and
ninrished me back to health in short
order." Whatever your weakness may
be Ferrozone will cure. Price 50c
per box at all dealers.
NORTHERN    PACIFIC   RATES
The Northern Pacific railway announces the very low rate of JtH.UO
from Spokane and common points to
Buffalo, N. Y. and return on account
of the National Convention of Christian Churches convening at Buffalo,
October 12 to 17, inclusive. Tickets
on sale October 5 and 6, with going
limit ten days from date of sale and
final return limit November 15, 1906.
Tickets will be good for stopover
within limits in either direction at St.
Paul, Missouria river points and west
thereof. Usual diverse routes west of
Chicago.
Account of the National Convention Knights of Pythias to convene
at New Orleans, La., October 15 to
25, 1906, the Northern Pacific have
authorized the following rates from
Spokane to New Orleans and return:
Via Denver and Texline, $77.85, yia
Billings and Kansas City or St. Paul
and St. Louis, {77.8 , via Chicago,
184.65; returning thru California the
rate will be 823.60 higher. Tickets
on sale October 7 and 8, with going
transit limit ten days from date of
sale; final limit Nov. 15, 1906, permitting stop-overs in either direction
at St. Paul, Missouria river or points
west thereof.
Effective August '27. and continuing until November 5th inclusive.
The Northern Pucific railway have extremely low rates from all points in
tne east to points in this territory.
A. D. Charlton, A. G. P. A.,
Portland, Ore. G. A. Mitchell,
General Agent, Spokane, Wash. W,
H- Ude, T. P. A., Spokane, Wash.
H.
\TRUEMAN
*3fe Well Known PHOTOGRAPHER
of Vancouver, B. C, will be at
Blome's Old Studio, Bridge Street,
for TEN DAYS only, commencing
September 8th.   »*»»»**
This will be your only opportunity for some time
to secure First-Class Photographic works, as the
visits to this city of artists of Mr. Trueman's
standing are very rare. His work is too well
known to the people of this city to require extended notice.
a
Remeber the Date
Sept. 8th—Ten Days
<>d
The Lion Bottling Works have cut
sheir price on all case and draught
wines and liquors.
THE
*%
Windsor Hotel
Serves tke most carefully prepared meals
and the best brands
i J wines, liquors and
ligars.
Finest Rooms In the City
First and Bridge Strests
**- yj
DRAYING
Heavy and Light Dray Work
Attended to Promptly
and Trunks to
and From All Trains
Telephone A129
GRAND. FORKS TRANSFER COMPANY
RuTHERFoan Bbos., Props.
BICYCLES
A Complete Line of 1906 Models.
Second-hand wheels always on
hand,   and   will  be  sold cheap.
BICYCLE REPAIRING A SPECIALTY
To the Doardof Licensing CommU-
sloners, Grand Forks        !
alOTICE Is hereby given that the undersign-
'*   el will, at the next meeting ul the Board
of Licensing Commissioners for the City of
Orand Forks, apply lor a transfer of  the
hotel  license granted in respect of the Al*
berta Hotel, Riverside street, Grand Forks,
from A. Traunweiser lo Soren Nelson.    Also   rc|)   pymnic
to have the name of the hotel changed from   UtU. wHAll Lt,
Hie Alberta to the Valhalla.
Dated at Grand Forks this 24th day of July,   >______
1906.
A.TRAUNWEISER,       | SIGN   OF   THE
SOREN NELSON.
Opposite Postollfce
BEST
NOTICE
Annie Lee. Mineral Claim, situate In the
Grand Korku Mining Division of Tale
District, j
Where   located.      In South    Wellington
Camp.
TAKK .
Agent  for Edmund T. Wick wire, Pree
«s-*D *"*-.s.»i(t,.<.i--> Kn  p-*-*— ■*•■■ "  " •
NOTICE that 1, John Robert Brown,
Miner's Certificate No. B2071, Thomai G. Edwards Free Miner's Certificate No. H65S? and
William E. George Free Miner's Certificate
No. B6588, intend, sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the Mini nt; Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose
of obtain.hit a Crown Grant of the above
claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section OT, must be commenced before the
issuance uf suoh Certificate of Improvements. 1
Dated this Sth day of June, A. D. 1906. I
J.R.BROWN.
NOTICE
Mountain Lion Mineral Claims, situate in
the Grand Fork Mining Division of fale
District.
Where located: Gloucester Cnmp.
.TAKE NOTICE that I, U. A. Sheads, (for
1 myself and as agent for H- Watlin), Free
Min ts Certificate No. B86286 ami Henry watlin
Free Miner's certificate No. B86I68, intend,
•ixty days from date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Im*
iirovemcnts, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of thc above claim.
And further take notioe that action, under
section OT, must be commenced before the
Issuance of snob Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 81th day of May, A. IX 1900.
H. A. SHEADS.
Route of the famous and favorite
NORTH COAST LIMITED
3-DAILY TRAINS-3
—BBTwan-
| Spokane, Butte, Helena, Fargo,  Minneapolis, Duluth and St. Paul.
—aim—
2-DAILY TRAINS-2
—BETWMK—
Spokane, Billings, Denver, Omaha, St.
Joseph, Kansas City and St. Louis.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty days
11 after date I will apply to thc Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchnse the following land, situate
about eighteen miles Northerly from the
City of Grand Forks, In the Osoyoos Division
of Yale DUtriot: Commencing at a post planted at the Southeast corner of the land hereby
applied for; thenoe 80 ohains North; thenoe
11 chains West; thence meander of the Kettle
River chains South; thenoe l-> chains East to
the place of beginning und containing 100
acres, more or less.
Dated the 80th day of May. 1908.
AUGUST JOHNSON.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty days after
dnte I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lauds aud Work-*, for permission to
purchase the following Inml, situate about
thirty-four miles northerly from the City of
Grand Forks, In Ouoyoot- Division of Yalo
District: Commencing at a post planted at
thc northeast corner of the lund applied for;
thence tJ0 chains went: thence 40 chuins
south; thenoe 80 chains east; thence 40 chains
north to the place of IjeglnnlDg, aud containing Ui'i nereis, more or leu8.
h.iti-d the 14th day of March, 1906.
H.P. WHITE, Locator.
Peril' 1). WHITE, Agent.
PULLMAN, TOURIST SLEEPERS
and Dining Car Service on all Trains.
CLOSE CONNECTIONS m^ "t st P""'
and St. Louis in Union Depot* foi all
points East and South--*-**8*"*
To enable pertles was so desire to visit
Irl.ml" eiul ^relatives In the East during the
summer season ol JW6, the NORTHERS PACIFIC will on JULY ind end ML AUGUST
Ith, eta and «th, and SEPTEMBER Sth and
loth *->ll round-trip tiokets from points In
this territory to Chicago, St. louls, St. Paul,
Minneapolis, 0"*eha and Kansas City at one
lowest lirst class fare plus Ten Dollars, with
Una) return limit ninety days Irom date ol
sale, but not beyond October Slst, 1906.
Extremely low rates are in effect from
February 19th to April 7th and September
15th to October list, 1906, Irom all poluts in
the East to points In this territory. II you
desire to send lor a friend or relative on
these rates we telegraph tiokets to Eastern
points without extra cost.
^he KOTHBRN PACIFIC have all announced very low round-trip rates from
points in the East to points in this territory,
and tiokets will be on sale from June 1st to
September 13th Inclusive, final limit for return October mst, 1WM.
For further information address any one of
undersigned.
A. D. Charlton,    G.A. Mitchell
A. Q. P.A., Gen. Agt.,
Portland,Ore.    Spokane, Hash.
W. H. Ude,
Traveling Passenger Agent,
Spokane, Wush BOUNDARY    ORE    SHIPMENTS
The following table gives the ore
1905, and for the past week:
Granby Mines,Phoenix	
Snowshoe,   Phoenix	
Mother Lode, Deadwood	
Brooklyn-Stemwinder, Phoenix	
Rawhide, Phoenix	
Sunset, Deadwood	
Mountain Rose, Summit	
Athelstan-Jackpot, Wellington	
Brooklyn-Stemwinder dump, Phoenix.
Morrison, Deadwood	
B.C. Mine, Summit	
R. Bell, Summit	
Emma, Summit	
Oro Denoro, SummitCamp	
Senator, SummitCamp	
Brey Fogle, SummitCamp	
No. 37, Summit Camp	
Reliance, Summit	
Sulphur King, Summit	
Winnipeg, Wellington	
Golden Crown, Wellington	
King Solomon W. Copper	
No. 7 Mine, Central	
City of Pans, Central	
Jewel, Long Lake	
Carmi, West Fork	
Providence, Greenwood.....	
Elkhorn, Greenwood	
Skylark, Skylark Camp	
Last Chance, Skylark Camp	
E. P. U. Mine, Skylark Camp	
Ruby, Boundary Falls	
Miscellaneous 	
Total, tons	
Granby Smelter treated	
B. C. Copper Co.'s Smeltertreated	
Dominion Copper Co.'s Smelter treated
shipments of Boundary mines for   1900, 1901,  1903, 1903,   1904,
1901.
1902.
1903
1904
1905
1906 Past Wk
231,762
309,858
393,181
549,703
653.889
565,683
15,362
1,721
20,800
74,212
2,054
820
99,034
141,326
138,079
174,298
174,560
77,369
150
25,050
55731
99,583
2,244
3,070
25,108
12,064
660
804
7,455
15,731
3,250
3,056
36,748
1,188
1,759
4.747
1,627
120
550
5,646
4,58G
150
5,000
1,720
150
3,339
47,405
14,811
56n
19,365
650
8,530
22,937
37,960
9,484
10,286
231
15,537
16,400
3,007
6,404
363
3,450
222
364
33
1,833
33
1,045
785
625
2,435
150
80
665
482
350
2,175
890
30
219
99:1
726
770
1,020
190
4.1(1
325
105
15
52
535
449
20
50
689
167
300
255
80
73
3,456
325
500
750
827,348
500
390,000
507,545
684,961
933,510
816,21*'
21,165
230,828
312,340
401,921
596,252
687,988
583 308
16,503
117,611
148,600
162.913
209.037
194,056
82,729
123,570
30,930
84,059
146,218
4,542
COLUMBIAN    COLLEGE
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. O,
Receive both Ladies and Gentlemen as resident or day students; bus a complete Commercial or Business CourHe; prepares student to -rain Teaohers' Certificates of ull
grades; gives the four yeurs' course for tin*
B.A. degree, aud the first year of tiie School
of Science course, In affiliation with the Toronto University; hns a special pro-ippctort*'
course for miners who work in It "7. Lustrut *
tion it alio given in Art, Music, PhyHicul Culture and Elocution. Term opens Sept. i'i,
19li8.   For C alendurs, eto , address
COI-UMHIAN COLLEGE.
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone lending a sketch and description may
-quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
InTentlnn li probably pmentghleA £-ommunlca-
,„.. s probably rT.
tions strictly oon0den..-d.
sent free. Oil"   *     "    "
for securfng patents.
 _ii Munn i Oo. recelv
svnial notice, without oharea. In the
"patents taken tfiroaixli JMiinnJ
Scientific American,
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any sclentiao Journal. Terms, $3 a
year: four months, ft Sold byall newsdealer*".
MUNN &Co.3e"""*-" New York
Branch Offloe, (96 V Bt.. Wiwhlogton. D. C.
rlotel Valhalla
RIVERSIDE AVENUE. GRAND FORKS
Newly Refurnished Throughout.
First-Class Accommodations {un
Transients. Smelteimen's Trade
Solicited. Terms Reasonable.
Table Supplied with the Best the
Market Attords.
The Finest Brands of Wine ,
Liquors and Cigars are Always  in  Stock  at the Mar.
S. NELSON. PROPRIETOR
You cAre Next
out the
Palace Barber Shop
Razor Honing a Specialty.
TOPICS OF THE TOWN
The Lion Bottling Works are selling Gooderham k Wort's Rye Whiskey, the best rye whiskey in Canada,
for 83.00 per gallon.
For a nice hair out or shave go tn
the City Barber Shop on Bridge street.
Baths 50c, three for 81.00.
FOR SALE nt a Ui'irjjiiin—Five*
ucre fruit r iieh, 75 o-your ulil lives;
T-rooin house: good I'tnrii nn I well;
price 82000. For furlliiir piu'tiuult*.*
call nl Tin* Suu iitftee,
I; Creeps Like a Serpent
Steals through the system like n
thief in the night. That's Imw en
tfiir'i nets. Don't trifle with such a
sc •ur*;!'. Don't experiment with ii
louhtful treatment. Time and experience prove that Catarrhozone doe**
cure, thnt it gives quick relief ami
so thoroughly destroys the disease
ihat it dies fornver.
(Jet Catarrhozone in the first plane,
and your cure is assured, in 25c ami
81.00 sizes at nil dealers and guaranteed in every ease.
P.  A. Z. PARE, Proprietor
Vlnturla H'tel,
Bridge Street, Orand I'orks, B. C.
HN'AP—nine-room house in' the
No ih addition for sale at a bargain]
terms. Inquire of Geo. Pound, nr lit
Tne Sun otlice.
P. T. McCallum
LEADS THE VAN IN THE
cAccident andlnsurance Business
The reasons are easily explained.
First—He is agent for the
Canadian Casualty and Boiler
Insurance Company
and they issue THE BEST POLICIES IN THE WOULD.
Second—A policy with his company means a promise to pay, and P.te PAYS ALL CLAIMS
PROMPTLY.
Third—Pete is an old-timer, and everybody knows hiin and ean rely on what he says.
Call at his office, JOHNSON BLOOK, FIRST STREET, and consult him. He will be
pleased to give you any information regarding his company, and delights to explain the special
features of
l$e Clim.ax Policy"
13TH
SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR
SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 6, 1906
$35,000
IN
PRIZES
AND
PURSES
OPEN DAY   AND  NIGHT
Larger exhibits in every department.
Big Poultry Show. $5,000 for County and
District Fruit exhibits. Home Industry
Exposition occupying new $5,000 building, filled with workin gexhibits. Sensational free acts every afternoon. Free
Vaudeville and Band Concert nightly*
Admission After 6 p.m., Only 10c
TWO
WEEKS
FAIR
AND
RACES
For Program, Prize Lists and Any Other Information Address
ROBT. H. COSGROVE, Sec. and Mgr., 519 First Ave., Spokane, Wash.
Pacific
Hotel
0FP, CP.R. STATION
Fltst-ClaM ia Every Respect.
Sample Rooms for Commercial
Travelers.
Bot and Cold Baths.
BAR IN CONNECTION:
Finest Brands of Wines,
liquors and Clpus.
CHAS. PETERSON, Prop.
f0\
We SIMPLEX      ■■
Loose Leaf Systems
IJThere are very few business houses today which do
not use some form of Loose Leaf System in one or more
departments, as it is u*garded as an absolute necessity
hv irnL'i'essive business firms.
f'The ml vantages of the Loose Leaf System are now
well known, and permit of adaptability to meet to best
advantage changing conditions. It permits the greatest
nmount of information to be kept in condensed iorm in
the least time, nnd the most accourate manner.
IIAiTouiits and ucoi'ds ti ull kinds can he kept by this
system in any business, large or small, with equal advantage.
^Investigate the Simplex Loose   Leaf  Syintem.    It   is
the cheapest and best.
We EVENING SUN
Ur\^
SPECIAL
RATES  _
GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
Will sell round-trip tickets from Grand Forks to
Si. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth and Winnipeg lor $54.15, Toronto $78.30, Chicago $§5.65, Si. Louis $61.65, New Tork
$101.65.
Tickets on Sale September 8 and 10.    Final Return Limit,
October 31.    For further particulars see
H. SHEEDY, Agent,
QRAND FORKS. B. O.

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