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The Cumberland News Jul 16, 1902

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Array / 1 *,  ������  I  s\  id  NINTH   YEAR.-  CUMBERLAND,   B. C.   WEDNESDAY,   JULY,i6,  C902.  ������  HBaatiflBMMHgagaaaiS^^  ������u miner  Ifl  r  .AT   THE.  .COMMENCING.  I\  SATURDAY, JULY  Br  f  l,!<  !  M  1'  rc?  K  1/  I-  IiN  FOB. PAHTICTJLABS    SEE   HAND-BILLS.  <i^!mmsss^B^s^m^s^^m^B^ss^^f!m^^  533 iflBSBaSRS&SEBB&J  OH  VICTORIA,  9  B��������� C.  L-fHe  les  61  YATE3 STREETi  HARDWARE, .MILL -AND ",MLNING   MACHINEE Y,  ���������   AND FAUMINGrJAND   DAIRYING   IMPLEMENTS  ..���������.-. .'/���������,"' '"'       .'/    'v. ,    .  Agents.for MeCormickvHarvestihg Machinerv. v   .    .  Write for prices* and- pa-rtieulars.    P. 0. Drawer 563.        {  &'  ames  ���������BABY   CARRIAGES���������  W;th Parasol,  Hood or Canopy Tops,   and  Rubber Tiro Wheels  $14 to $35  ���������GO - CARTS���������  That are adjustable to any position, complete with Parasol Top, Cushions and Rubber Tire Wheels."'. $11.40 to $25  Our Assortment of Patterns was never as  large as this seasons���������Our Makes the Best.  Write for Illustrations and give us an idea as to style wanted.  WEILER   BROS.,        Home  VICTOBIA,   IB c.  1H URNISHERS,  . JS.CKETJiTI'S   -    IFXDjR,  WRITE  FOR  PRICES  rffr m"Tirrem���������nvemmj ���������������������������u.gTmrn.M-M  [MASON &  RISCH'V  PIANOS. Is  <<CHICKERING" PIANOS,   AND  THE. ....  VOCALION    ORGAN.  V  EASY  TERMS  GIVEN  123 HASTINGS ST.,  Vancouver, B.C.  88  GOVERNMENT ST.,  Victoria, B.C.  2POIR-   lMilCniammniyM^-  JOB    PRINTING  Work of Every Description  at Moderate Rates  COUNCIL   MEETING.  (July 8th.j   "'  ;   Minutes read and,adopted.  Communications���������From M. Mit-  chell resigning as Alderman on account of moving* away from Cumberland.'' ' Laid on table. ' <���������  From Registrar General enclos  ing plan of townsite.,  From School Board asking that  truant officer be appointed. Laid  on table.  From   same  enclosing estimates  j for expenses for next three months.  Laid on table.  From same  with, estimates  for  High School for three months. Laid ,  on table.,  Accounts ,S, Leiser,'$9.45; C. .&  U. Waterworks,-.$2.60; C. H... Tar-  bell, $9.85; Boyd & Burns, ,$1; R.  Grant &' Co., $41164; H. Mitchell,  $4.25; A. B. Crawford, $16.40 ;  Registrar'General, for, plans, $12.  Referred to-Finance Committee. <  ��������� Reports -- From T: E. Banks,  rcavanger account.' .Received and '  filed n    .     <   ��������� ,-. '  Deferred business.< ���������-  /Mayor Willard'gave casting vote  for motion to keep-' ledger for scavenger accounts.'-    ,  EARLY   CLOSING   BY LAW.  ���������Aid/-Bate ;asked if Aid. Partridge.:-  -intended  to .press, his  motion- to-  quash the by-law or withdraw from  his position. L  Aid. Partridge answered that he  would, go oh.- ' ;  ���������''. Aid. Bate then produced a counter petition in favor of by-daw, sign- ;,  ed'by the following:���������C.  Stevenson.  6 Co. per,H:.Harford, Ml Maguon^  Magnet 'Cash Store, Simon -Le'is'T  'per II. P, Collis, C. J. Moore & Cc,  also    documents ������������������ from    Marrochi  'Bros.;'; and ;\Tanaka,   asking   that  their names be "removed flora petition. .-  ��������� Aid. ��������� Reid then said' that the  whole thing was a farce and should  be thrown 'out.  Aid. Bate agreed that it should.  Aid. Partridgespoke in favor of  the petition- to break the by-law,  He had seen Aid. Bate Saturday,  and offered to compromise by having the by-law amended to close at  7 o'clock instead of 6. Those people  who have asked to have their'names  removed have no right to do so,  especially .in view of the way they  have been worked on to cause them  to to do so.  Aid. Bate moved that the petition be thrown out, seconded Aid.  Robertson.  Aid. Calnan said he had always  been against the by-law. It was a  pulic insult that a person-could not  buy anything after 6 o'clock. As  to petitioners to have names removed, he stated that they could  ��������� not do this after petition had been  received.  Aid. Partridge moved in amendment, seconded Aid. Reid, that the  by-law be^repealed.,  Aid. Bate was surprised thafrany-  one would work against what was a  good by-law for employees.  Rev. Mr Wilkinson, who was  present during the discussion, here  'asked permission to speak a- few  'words. He was surprised that any  Alderman could say that anyone  had not the right to remove hid  name from a petition. No British  law or justice could say that. Even  if so, signers could sign a counter  petition, thus annulling their original signature. The rev. gentle^  man then pointed out that the aim  of the present age was to shorten  the hours of labour for all classes  of workmen, not to lengthen them,  as seemed to be the intention of  some, that would be a  retrograde  movement.  A   somewhat heated   discussion  , hereupon  took place' between  the  Aldermen,   finally' ending in both  motion and amendment being with  drawn,   the   matter then' standing  where it had before, "to  be brought  up  at the  next meeting.   , Mayor  Willard was of the  opinion   that  the matter should never have been  brought up in Council; but that the  merchants should first agree among  themselves as to closing time, and1  not let the time of the Council be  wasted in useless discussion.    >���������  Truant Officer���������laid over.  School Estimates, $1035���������receiv:  ed and filed,  Estimates for High School. It  being intended that a fee be charged it had been estimated by the  School Board that the school would  be almost self-sustaining. Received.  and filed.'  -Aid. Reid said that Mr Comb  had objected to pay $2 per���������month  for scavenger as he had only'seven  'boarders at present." ' "'    '  Aid, Robertson could not-see why  he should  not pay this 'sum when  all .hotels had .'to'do  so,* whether  they   had   boarders  or   not.     'All  boarding houses should'be charged  the same as hotels.     He ,h.id never  asked for a rebate when his number  'of,boarders became less..  "City Clerk  here  read   financial  statement'for  last half year.   , Received and filed and ordered ' to be  .printed in newspaper. ���������    <;  -'   Re Geo. S,teven's lot.    It was de-'  cided to continue Third-Street to  the end of the city limits and that  ,. Mr Baird, the Government' Agent,.  ..-..-.1 'r -. .. ' ''- "     *      .  ^bY notified that'this would ��������� be, done.  sVthat the government0road .could  be,changed to connect.   - :  -.' Council adjourned.      , ? "  ion Day  will soon be here and you  will want a.  NEW   SUIT  Don't forget we can fit you '  out in any style ;or color and'-.  At ANY PRICE  All of the Latest Coronation-;   /  ��������� Styles.  ' All go at Reduced -  ��������� Prices for Pay-D.iy ^ ;  MOORE & CO.  The Orangemen's torsion,  The train last Friday evening  took about 200 excursionists to the  steamer ''City of Nandmo,',r which  took them from thence to Nanaimo  for  the   purpose of  attending* the  Orange demonstration,on the glori-  ouy 12th.     Saturday saw that city  thronged with visitors, large numbers having arrived from Vancouver  and other mainland points, Victoria  and other points on the route from  that place���������Saanich included.    -At  one p.m. a procession of delegations  from almost all the Orange Lodges  on the Lsland, including Mt. Horeb,  No,   1676, Cumberland, also Cum-  berland City Brass Band, and quite  a number fro.m the Mainland, formed in front ol\he I.O.O.F. Hall, and  marched through the city finishing  up  at the   Green-,   where speeches  were made, and the programme of  sports exhausted.    ; Honours  came  to Cumberland, MisstPatmore winning the girls race, and H. Walker  the 200 yard amateur.   Mr'Harford-  too,   captured   the  running   broad  jump for professionals,  The excursionists returned by the  Joan Sunday, tired but liapp)r, and  unanimous in praise of the systematic manner in which Mt. Horeb,  No. 1676, had conducted a most  enjoyable puting.  '..:>'���������-*  PERSONAL  " -v"\ "--  Mrs Dowdell and family are home  after a two months visit to relatives  at Tacoma and Victoria.  Many Nanaimo people took advantage of the excursion return trip  on Sunday to visit Cumberland and  Comox, amongst whom were noticed  R. Bryden, C. Vanhouten, Mrs  Greenshields and her sister Miss  Bessie McDonald, who will spend  the vacation with her parents at  Comox Bay.  Mr Pullen'returned, on  Tuesday;  last from a visit to Victoria, "  W. Wilkinson,'jr., left on Wed--  hesday last on a month's vacation  to Mission City.  Nurse M. Smith has gone to Victoria to spend her summer holidays-  with friends.  Miss Sadie Grant of Nanaimo lavishing  relatives   in   Cumberland  and Comox.  Mrs Mateer, of Vancouver, is  spending a'few days with her relatives here.  Mavor Willard   and Mr J, Fer~ '  bow left Nanaimo on the steamer  Strathcona for a visit to Victoria.  The home of Mr and Mrs  Moore -  at-Nob Hill was brightened by'the  arrival  of  a  little   daughter 'last  week.  Mrs Dr Jeffs, late of Cumberland  arrived on the excursion train to  renew acquaintance with old friends  in'this city.  Miss Bridges who has been attending the Normal School at Vancouver is spending the vacation  with her parents at Comox.  Miss Mounce has returned from  a visit to Victoria and Vancouver,  and, will be the guest.of her brother  L. A. Mounce, M.P.P., for the  winter.     ���������  Dr Schaffner arrived from Seat-    >  tie  and   Vancouver  by Tuesday's  train   of  last  week,   he will leave  shortly to' fulfil an important engagement in Victoria.  Mr G.- Smith has sufficiently recovered from his recent illness to  permit being removed to his home  in Vancouver, he was accompanied  by his mother and sister.  Mr F. D. Little was taken seriously ill last week at Victoria.  Mrs Little left on Wednesday evening to attend him. He is now ie-  ported as being greatly improved.  '*.*'.<*  / ������������������ /' 0$'  I, I  Iff  hi  R  I  it?-  H  ill-  l-i-  in  ;r  T  111.  \0 ,'������������������  u  It-  I*  l;!_-j  11 ."'  It  ll  \t  A GIRL OF GRIT.  .By 'MAJ QR,   ATtTHUK    GRIFFITHS.  Copywright' by 11. F. .Feuno & Co.  ,   '"A little check!  There!   Keep what's  'over after you've bought a nice bit of  '"Twill now wish you a very good morn-  Miff." ,     , -"'���������  jewelry for Mrs. S. You've been long  ���������suffering with coe and shall be the,first  'to share my luck."  <  Out in the streets, along KingrStreet,  ���������down Pall' Mall,  I trod the pavement  with the conscious air of a man who  'had heard good news!, Friends -I passed saw it plainly on my face and rallied ��������� me   on   my   beaming   looks, and  buoyant demeanor.    They had not left  '<rrie when I walked through the swinging doors .of Sykes '& Sarsfield's bank.  'I was no longer the humble suppliant  'for  a  pitiful   overdraft,   but  the  possessor  of  a   fine   balance,   who  could  'hold his-head high.    Roy usually; waited  patiently outside,   but .today   I  encouraged him to enter at my heels. '  ������������������.,-������������������ CHAPTER II.  , ' AT TIIE INTELLIGENCE-OFFICE.  As I ieft tho bank.-where I had been  nnost cordially received, with my sovereign purse full and the nice crisp  :-notes for ������250 carefullyapiit by iii my  ' 'pocket-book, I began at last to believe  -in my fortune:'* There is a solid,' unmistakable reality in the chink of good  gold, while the supple'.civility of the  great financiers,-"who' had so lately  looked black at my overdrawn, account,  .pro-ed   how   completely" my   position  ���������was changed.     -��������������������������� ���������,   The morning's -adventures and surprises had occupied much time, and it  was'"now getting late; past ��������� noon, in  -fact. We members of the ''intelligence"  made it a point" of honor to be in good  - time 'at the office���������an hour or more  ���������earlier than this. It had hardly occurred to me that I need not go to the c-f-  .Ijce at all. You see, I had been some  13 years under discipline and not many  hours an archmillionaire. Besides,  there is such a thing as esprit de corps.  1 was a public servant, engaged in responsible work, and I could not, would  ���������not, have neglected it willingly; no, not  'for the wealth of the Indies.  So 1 stepped briskly down the steps  ���������below the Duke of York's column and  -crossed the park at my very best pace.  ���������For.-all that, I was overtaken near  Birdcage walk by some one who hailed  ���������trie without coming quite close. ' .  "One word, sir, 1 pray, in your own  'best interests. But. sakes alive, keep  '-back that hound. He is a fine beast,  !no doubt,' but I.'d rather have him  ^farther away."  "Quiet, Roy! My dog will not harm  ;you." 1 said civilly. "But at this moment I am very much pressed"���������  - "If you will allow me to walk with  you a few yards, no more, I reckon I  could make it plain to you that I have  L-.a good excuse for intruding,upon your  valuable time."  The park was as opeu to him as to  <me. and when lie ranged himself aloug-  -side 1 made no objections. I confess I,  'too, was curious to hear what he bad  ���������to say.  "You have enemies, sir," he began  abruptly, and he looked &o comical as  be said this that 1 was rude enough to  laugh. He was a broad shouldered,  square faced, weather beaten looking  man, with a florid complexion and a  bulgy nose, irreproachably dressed in  ;the very height of the fashion. I3ut'be  bad rather the air of a second class  tragedian, with his long, black, curly  hair and his voice so deep, and so sol  emn as he conjured me to be serious.  "I reckon this is .no,laughing matter,  :.captain. Guess your enemies will soon  ���������fix that    They mean mischief."  He spoke it like a sentence of death  rand seemed very much in earnest, yet  ���������I could hardly take'it seriously.  "Such a threat scarcely affects me.  'You see, it is ray business to risk my  life. The. queen has sometimes enemies, and hers are mine."  "These I speak of are altogether your  own, captain���������people who grudge you  .your new. wealth."  ���������    "You have heard then?"  "Heard!" he cried, with great acorn.  "'There is nothing I do not know about  :you, captain. How did you enjoy the  summer on the Cuyuni river, and were  -the maps you got at Angostura very  ���������useful to you 7"  "Hush, man. hush! Who, and what  'are vouV    What the mischief aro you  driving at?".  By this time we had entered Queen  Anne's gate and were at the door of  the office.  "Is this your bureau?" he now asked.  "May I not go inside with you, only for  one moment?' Tho matter'is ' urgent.  It afi'ects you very closely. Your danger is imminent. They are bound, these  enemies, to do you an injury���������a terrible  injury." ,      ���������   ,  "Oh. well, then, it must keep,'"I said  petulantly. - "I cannot give you any  more time now;- ,1 am expected here.  I suppose Sir Charles has arrived?" I  asked of the office messenger,' old Sergeant Major Peachey. '  "Yes, sir, he has been here these  three hours. He-came���������on his bicycle  ���������soon after 9 a. m., and he has asked  for-you, I think, twice."'  "There, your, business must keep,  Mr."-    '  "Snuyzer.    I  bow  to your  decision,,  but if you will permit me. I  will call  in Clarges street this evening at"���������  "If you must come, come about 5.  Good day," and I passed into the office.  I shared my room at the "intelligence"'  with a colleague, Swet'e Thornhill, of  the artillery, ' a lively youth ,out of  hours, but who stuck to his work manfully���������more so than^any of us, and we  were by no means idle men.  "Thought you were dead." he. said  shortly, and without looking up from  his papers; "wonder, you took the  trouble to come at all."  "I was detained by something special. Important business. ������ Anyhow,  It's no affair of yours," 1 answered,  rather nettled.  "Yes it'is, when,ltthrows me out of  my stride. ' I wish you'd make up your'  mind either to come or stay away altogether. There has been a regular  hue and cry for' you .all the morning,  and I've been disturbed abominably.  I have those calculations of the comparative penetration ' of the new projectiles in hand, and they take some  doing."  "Well, keep your hair on.' I don't  want to'disturb you. But who was'it,  anyhow?"  "The boss,chief himself, Collingham;c  Sir Charles. He has sent three times  for you., and came in .twice. -Wanted  you for something pressing. N,o\v, b  believe, he is doing'the job himself.  Wise man. Do it a blamed sight better than you or any man .lack of us."  At this moment an office messenger  came in with a huge bundle of papers,  which he placed before ' me on my  desk., They were enveloped in the  usual green "jacket," which meant ex:  treme urgency:'and oii the outside was  written, in a big. bold hand, "Captain  Wood���������speak.".-.,.     , - -  '  ;"He'll do" most of the talking, I expect," went ,on Swete .Thornhill maliciously. "He's tit to be tied. ��������� Go in,  man, at once, and take your punishment."  The distinguished officer at that time  head and chief of our department was  Major General Sir Charles Collinghain,  V. C. K. C. B.. one of the most notable  soldiers of the day. ardent, fearless,  highly skilled, strong in counsel, foremost- in the held, who had served almost everywhere, in all the wars, great  and small, of recent years and had  made a close study of the science of  his profession as well. He had traveled far, and wide, knew men and many  cities..was as much at home at court  as in camp, popular in society, which  he cultivated in his spare moments, although he allowed nothing to stand in  the way of his work. The service came  first, and first in. the service was the  all- important, transcendentlj* useful  department, as he thought it, over  which he presided.  Sir Charles expected���������nay, exacted���������  a like devotion from us, his staff officers, whom in all matters of duty ho  ruled with a rod of iron. None of us  liked to face him when lie was put out,  which, it may be said, was not seldom,  Teach j self-denial, and make its  pi actice pleasureable, and you create  for the world'a destiny more sublime .than ever issued from the brain  of the wildest, dreamer.���������Sir Walter  Scott.  Tiie   man   who     foolishly 'does-me  wrong, 1  will return him the protec-'  lion     of  my    ungrudging   love;     the'  more  the evil  that comes  from him,  the more, the,good shall go from me.  Buddha. '   "  With love the heart' becomes a fair  and fertile'garden, glowing with sunshine and warm hues, and exhaling  sweet odors: but Avithout love it is  a bleak desert, covered with ashes.���������  Charles .Warren.  LEGS SO SWELLED  HE  COULDN'T WALK.  Kidney  and   Urinary  TrouhEes   were   Followed   by   Dropsy  Perfect  Cure   by   Dr.  Chase's   Sidney-Liver   Pills.  ������--   A  This case o"f Mr. James Treneman, the well-known butcher, of 536 Adelaide street, London,, Ont'r,ris another proof that Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills are effective in the most severe- and complicated diseases (of the  kidneys. / r i      "     , .  0The  double action  -which'this  famous prescription has on1,both the kidneys and  liver is "in  a large me'as- ,  ur'e responsible for its wonderful curative powers.    When  there are'backache,  frequent,  difficult or.painful urination, dropsical swellings, biliousness,  constipation  or  stomach  derangemen'ts,' you may depend upon.-it that  the kidneys are clogged and tho liver   sluggish. ������������������",," ��������� ��������� y ��������� \ '  It is-at such times'that Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver; Pills prove themselves prompt to give relief and certain  to cITect a cure.    The evidence to prove this fact is'simply overwhelming. ' . l ,  Mr.  James Treneman  states:���������"Two years ago I was laid up 'with Kidney'   disease    and urinary troubles.  Besides tho ,pain-and inconvenience ca'.^ed by these troubles! became dioisical,    and my. r legs would swell.'up"  so that I could scarcely go around at all.  .Hearing  of* Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver    Pills-   I procured a box and  continued the use of this valuable medi������:inc until now 1 can say for a certainty     thatl' E  am entirely cured.    T.  never took any medicine that chdnie , '-���������> "> much good,  and am firmly convinced .that if if had, not been for this'  medicine I would not'be working to-day " , -  As t������, family medicine of tested andkn<jwn worth. Dr. Chase's Kidi..-y-Li\rcr .'Pills have < never 'been a'p-  -proauicd. They act'directly on c he'kidneys and liver, regulate the bowels ni:d ensure the perfect, action of ;l.e  digestive and filtering systems. Onepill a dose, 25, cents a box. At all dealers, or , Edmanson, Bates ,& Co .  Toronto. ' ��������� ' - " '. ' ,  ' '  '   < ' ,     '  "Great Scott!" he roared.    "F"ou lazy,  idle young villain!"  for he was choleric, although not cross  grained. Under a stern face and rough  manner he had a kindly nature far  down, for he did not wear his heart  upon his sleeve, certainly not for an  erring subordinate, as he considered  me just then.  [TO BE CONTINUED.] -^  Tlier.trical   Scenery.  Movable  scenery  was  first   used   in  Italy in the year 1508.   It was the in  vention of an  Peruzzi.  Italian architect named  Westminster  Aliljey.  Officials of Westminster abbey charge  fees aggregating over $2,000 when a  memorial is placed in the abbey.  (-1  OsrCjO </c<C& <Uf-uu  Gsfeior;  /m&tri/.  (Uinc,  nrtucn/  -Ainu-  4/nrds 7$uie< ncwhii, Je^s <c&  /  /  People who never worry are entitled to a lot of credit they never  gx't.. ' , '  POOR DIGESTION  RENDERS THE LIFE OF THE DYSPEPTIC MISERABLE.  Food Becomes Distasteful and a Feeling   of   Weariness,    Pain    and'  Depression Ensues.  From LeSorelois.   Sorel,   Que.  Of the diseases afflicting mankind  dyspepsia'is one of the worst to endure. Its victims find life almost a  burden. Food becomes distasteful ;  they suffer from severe' pains in the  stomach : sometimes excessive heart  palpitation, and a general feeling of  weakness and depression. Though  this disease-is one of the most distressing, it is one which, it" tlie proper remedy is applied, can be readily cured. Thousands' throughout  this country bear testimony to the  efficacy of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills as  a -never-failing cure. Among them is  Mrs. Aclo'lphe A. Latrousse, a well  known and highly esteemed lady residing-at Sorel, Que. one 'says:-���������  ���������"For two years J was a constant  sufferer from bad digestion and its  accompanying symptoms. Food became ��������� distasteful and 1 grew very  weak. I suffered much from pains in  stomach and head. I could not ob-  lo.in restful sleep and became unlit  for all housework. 1 tried several  medicines without finding the least  relief and 1 grew continually worse  until in the end 1 would vomit  exerything 1 ate. T had almost given  up hope of ever -being well again  when one day I read of a case simi-  ilar to mine cured through the use  of Dr. Williams''.'Pink Pills. 1 determined to g-ive these pills a trial and  am happy today that I did'so, a.s by  the time I had taken eight or nine  boxes my strength had returned, the  pains'which' had , so long racked me  disappeared, my stomach would digest food, properly and -I had fully  regained my old time 'hdalth, an'cl  have not since had any return of the  trouble."  Dr. Williams' Pink Pills are a purely tonic medicine and unlike all purgatives do not -weaken1 the system,  but give life and energy with every  close. They are a certain cure for  anaemia, dizziness, heart troubles,  rheumatism, ' sciatica, indigestion,  partial paralysis, St. Vitus' dance  and the functional ailments that  make the lives of so many women an  almost constant- source of misery.  Sold by dealers in medicine, or sent  post paid at 50 cents a box. or six  boxes for 82,50 by addressing the  Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brock-  ville, Ont.  DIAMOND  BACK  TERRAPIN.  o  It is  others  hearts  only by trying to understand  that    we    can  get    our    own  understood.���������R. L. Stevenson.  Formerly   Despised.   They   Are   Xotv  -, Considered  a  Delicacy.       ���������;���������,  ��������� Half a century or so ago, diamond  back' terrapin were-fed to slaves, and  hogs.' Today they are the rarest delicacy known to the epicurian world,  says the Philadelphia North American.  Then they sold for $1 a barrel, and  laborers, when hiring out, specified  that they must not be compelled to eat  terrapin more than twice a week. Today a barrel is cheap at $S00,' and millionaires traiel hundreds of miles for  a chance to feast on this most delicious of all meats.  Of course this means genuine diamond backs. There are many imitations.  Every first class restaurant in the  country features "terrapin a la Maryland" on" its menu, but in not one case  out of a hundred is the real terrapin  served. The diner regales himself on  what he believes to be, Maryland's  choicest dish. Instead he is merely  eating fresh water turtles, "sliders" or  "North Carolina goldens."  The reason is simple. Restaurateurs  don't serve real diamond backs because they can't get them. The workVa  total terrapin population does not fi-  ceed 25.000 of legal size, and these are  confined to the shores of the Chesapeake bay, the only place that produces  them.  Baltimore, Philadelphia and New  York enjoy a monopoly. These three  cities'get practically the entire output,  but few ever find their way across the  Blue Ridge. The epicure unfortunate  enough to be born in Chicago or St.  Louis must either come east or forego  the joys of terrapin.  To select a real diamond back amateurs should be guided by these distinguishing and characteristic markings:  It is of a greenish, dark olive color,  sometimes running to spotted gray,  yellow on the plate which surrounds  the shell and has concentric dark  stripes along.the plate on both shells.  The sides of the head are a dirty white,  sprinkled with small black spots. The  bottom shell is of whitish yellow.  The males are much larger than the  females and have the concentric'streaks  much better, defined. The female has  the more delicate flesh. The male can  be distinguished by his toe nails, which  are much longer than those of the female. . .   Hail   and   Bombs.  The plan of .destroying hail clouds by  exploding bombs among them was suggested nearly 100 years ago by Professor Parrot of Riga.  We are follow,laborers with'a common 'end���������reverent  to the lovvcst'-for  its     possibilities.      emulous    to. - -the''  highest' for  its"^sublime' perfections.���������  Alexander Wilder, M.D.       '        ������ "   .  ������CT9 GENTLY  ON  Klb^    BOWELS  r     nrfS'THE SYSTEM,  ov  Ha  RCOMZS  PERMANENTLY  ration  Bitual" '"  BUY THE GENUINE���������MAN'F'D BY v  ^LiroRNlApG^YRVP^.  vu  ky      <;       ^    cal.    lq      ^   N.V. T  fOR SALE BY Alt DRUGGISTS. PRICE 50c. PER BQTTlg.'  Hiccough.  For this affection, which is so often  provokingly obstinate, close the eara  with the tips of the fingers, exert a  certain pressure therewith, and at the  same time drink In small drafts any  sort of a liquid offered by another person, and the hiccough will cease instantaneously.  He who says there is no such  thing as an honest-man,' you-may be  sure is himself a knave.���������Bishop  Berkeley. , ' '  InarM Liniment Cures Colfi, Etc.  Genius at first is little' more  a great capacity for receiving  cipline'.���������George Eliot.  than  dis-  Dr. J. D. Ke.logg's Dysen'cry Cordial is a  srceecly cure ior dysentery, diarrhoea, cholera,  summer complaint, sea sickness and complaints  incidental to children teething, Ifc gives immediate relief to those suffering from the effects  of indiscretion in eating unripe fruit, cucumbers, etc. It acts with wondorful rapidity, and  never fails to conquer the disease. No one need  foar cholera if they have a bottle of this medicine convenient.  A  .'/<  i  - tin  ������������������ .1  -���������. -'���������!  .-��������� ::' I  '' ' ', f  ^- It  I  i  ���������\fl  ,1  If things fail.to  come your  go around and head thein- off.  way,  , t -r n  I  ft'  IV  r.  i  i  I  ft  //������  THE   CUMBERLAND   NEWS  Issued Every  Wednesday.  W. B. ANDERSON,       -     - EDITOK  Tlie coiuiiiuu tit 1'hk Kews are open to all.  who wish to express therein viewa ou  matt-  ra of public   interest.  White we do out hold ourselves responsible for the utterances of correspondents, we  reserve   the r gnc   of   declining  toinser  oinuiuuictiuons uauecess.it ily j.ers <aal.  WEDiNJESDAl", JULY   lu, iya*  KM I'M' AJiL.i>fcW>J>Ji;ALiii".S: 10c  PATENTS GUARANTEED  Our fee returned if we fail. Any one sending sketch and description of  any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patentability of same. "How to obtain a patent" sent upon request. Patents  secured through us advertised for sale at our expense.  Patents taken out through us receive special notice* without charge, in  The Patent Ejecobd, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted  by Manufacturers and Investors.  Send for sample copy FREE.    Address,  VECTOR J. EVANS 6   CO*,  (Patent Attorneys,)  Evans Building,      -      WASHINGTON, D. C.  Espiiaait & flanaimo By  TIME TABLE   EFFECTIVE  NOV. 19th, 1898    '  FumisiitiH Mouihiy to all Lovers 01 iViuaic u  vxHt volume < 1 New, (Jboiue,' Copyright  Compositions by the most popular authors.  32     Pages     of    Pano     Music  '5 Sonus,      5 Instrumental,  10   Complete   Pieces   for   Piano,  with interesting Musical Literature.  Once a month' for 10c.  t Yearly Subscription, $l;oo.  In one year you gefr. rieaily 400 pages of  Music, comprising 12J complete pieces f<<i  ��������� tjhe Piano. It bought in any music store at  , one-half off, would cost $30. If yon, will  send us the name and acHnsw of -live _p-..r  former-; on * r,he, Pi.uio - or Organ,,, we will  send you a sample e-ny fiee '    j  J. W. PEPPEB, Publish, r,  Catali<i|sBaml & O^c'n. Music it'lusi.���������Free  Eighth & Lofc'uvr Sts,  Philadelphia, Pa..  VIOTOBIA TO WELLINGTON.  No. 2 Daily.    ' No> ga  A.M p M  ,  D.e  j?;������? Ji?ioria Dc 4:25  ..   fjd? Goldscream ������������������   4:53  -..   ,,y.r8 -Koengs......:,,. "   5.31  lu-*o Duncans        6-l  ..        *���������*"      '      < ' P.M."   '   "  A    JE4        ..Nanaimo...: 7:41  A ��������� J23  Wellington  Ar: 7:55  WELLINGTON'   TO  VICTORIA.  No. 1 Daily. No. 3 Saturday.  _    A.M. .    < AM  ^P!^ Wellington- /..... De.'*:25  i.  2:2? ..Nanaimo " 4:.fl)'  ������ 10.37 Duncans  ������   6:t)5  a. J; 7* Goldstream ������������������   730  ������ ]'     .'       - ' ���������Viotoria - ��������� Ar. 8.00 p.m.  <a���������f.^cod laSeS. lo and,from all points   '  Saturdays and Sundays firood to retSrn Mon  c25y$T,,fiK..'1  inforniation appiy������t  Ap2SNdentJIR GEO- L-COURTNEY. "  president. Traffic Manager  :*  J AS. A. CARTHEW'fi  iLiverv Stable!  ,; Teamster   and, Draym** ���������  : Single and  DoubleI'Ries ���������  [ for Hire.    All Orders :  ; Promptly   Attended   to. ���������  ��������� *  : Third St., Cumberland,B.C.*  OF EVERY CLASS AND  DESCRIPTION  At    LOWEST : RATES.  SUBSCRIPTION  For the, J. W. Pepper.. Piano  Music Magazine, price One Dollar  l>er year (postage paid), car;. h*>  placed by applying to the office 61  Nkwp.'   Our. berlanrl,   B. 0.,   where,  CO  -f^SSS!���������J  The Best and Most Influential  Mining Paper in  the  World,  published weekly, $5.00 per year.  ��������� specimen copy free.  CIRCULARS.  * KOTJCES  BILL HEADS < .  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Little -  Manager. ,,  J Have  Taken   Office  in the   Nat,n      Building,  Bunsmuir Avenue,   Cumberla a.' ���������  and am agent  for the  following  reliable'  insurance ���������   companies:  The Royal   London   and   Lan  cashire and Norwich" Union,  am  prepared to  accept frisks a :  current  rates.    I am   also agent  for the Standerd Life Insurance  Company, of , Edinburgh and the  Ocean Accident Company of Engr  land-.    Please  call  and  investigate before insuring in any other  Company. ,.     ,.  ��������� ' ' ������.  :   JAMES, ABRAMS.  Cumberland  Hotel "^  COR. DUNSMUIR AVENUE  AND SECOND STREET  CUMBERLAND, B. C. "/,  Mrs. J. H.Piket, Proprietress.      ,        .  When in Cumberland"be  sure'     ./  and stay at the Cumberland     -  Hotel,  First-Class   Accomoda- .     !  tion for transient and permanent boarders. ' '   ���������'  Sample Rooms and  Public Hall      t  Run in Connection with  Ho'ttl'   >  '���������.   ' '' i  Rates from $1.00 to $2.00. per da/ i  253 BroeLdWa.y.   -   New York.  HENRYS JU^MIIS,  VANCOUVER.   BC.  Fruit & Ornamental Trees,  Thirteen Acres, $tll  produced by  imelli*jent  VVi ite Labor.     Le *  , than Eastern P. ices  Death Intimations  Funeral  Invitations,  Memoriam  Cards  On Shortest Notice.  Clean Certificate from Inspector.  No   San   Jose Scale  or JJorers.  GARDEN & FIELD  Seeds  and   Bulbs  for Fall & Spring Planting.  Fertilizers, Agricultural Implements, &c.  Catalogue   Fkei������.  It will Pay you     m  D^y������u intend buying u rifle or |  pistol?   I? so,   get  the best  which is a  STEVENS  ^Rifles range iu price from $4.00 to  $75.00. For LirRe and small game,  also for target practice. , Piatolsfrom  $2.50 to $:>0.00.  Send Btninp for larjro catalogne illus- $  tnitiii������f cotiiplctti line, brimful 0/valuable i>'"  information to sportsmen.   . ...        l  J "TEVEHS ARMS ABD TOOL CO. Li|  ^70   7ox No. *%?&}&?'������������������'$������'���������:/���������  ^uiwUPEE FALLS., ^tt'-^-*-  J'/i  ���������ass., u. s. a.   'u;:!:!������������������  T*0S* "Anna,  ���������    Patent. ^entbroMhj!KSfi,2.8J?noffloe-     >  ���������pecial notice in the   ^���������M^nn ^ Co- ������eoelT������.  SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN  .. W.S0 six mou������hs     Sn7ni^i!> t6ra?s W.00 a rev, .  book on r*?���������iHl^���������%%g*X***   ,  ���������Ml  !fUNN    A    ������������"  ���������-*��������������� 1 .11 i tt.t a wv ���������'   * ���������   ������������������-        >".        l  TO   ADVERTISE   IN   fHE  M. J. HENRY  3009 Westminster Road  VANCOUVER, B.C  ������N E W S,"  Livery  I am prepared to  furnish Stylish Rigs  and do Teaming at  reasonable rates.  g D. KILPATRICK,     .  o Cumberland ������  0000000000000000000  GREAT  WEST  The most Northerly Paper published on the Island.  Subscription,        - -       $1.50   per an  LIFE.  fJlHE reason why the Great West  .4- Life Assurance, Co. has more  business in force than ,iny other Company ever had at the same aj������e, is their  promptness in Paying Claims, and the  Liberal Contract given, free from all  annoying restrictions.  Any  information   asked   for   will   be  promptly and cheerfuhy given.  A. ANDERSON,  General Agent,  Drawer, 5. Nanaimo, B.C.  <cz^:  G  Advertising  FISHING RODS  REPAIRED  Mes of any Pattern Tied to Order.  WE   WANT YOUR  I Job PriijtiiQg  ISATISFAOTORT W������|  H  DUNSMUIR   AvE������f  Cumberland, B.C  Office  Hours :-���������8 a.m. till   5 p.m.; aturdays, 8 to  1.  Fancy Inlaying wood in and metal.  French Polishing.  Apply  NEWS OFFICE.  ,-yl  'ell  ls?'3  '^1  0000000000 booc^oouoo ������    ;|  '���������  H  ll  1 fr~3*:^-JV>-S1i.*P***~lh~**~'T-  ' f.-Vi=r*Ar������5j^iites������HWj������jit^jj4 , j; * ,���������  A GIRL OF GRIT.  ���������By 2dAJOTl   ARTHUK,  GRIFFITHS.  *Copywright by R. F.'Fenno  & Co.  "A little'check!  There!   Keep what's  'over after you've bought a nice bit of  '"Twill nowwisli you a very good mom-  nig."  -  jewelry for Mrs. S.    You've been long  "suffering with me and shall be tbe first  ,,to share my luck." ��������� "    ���������  Outimthe streets,' along King street,  'down Pall Mall,  I  trod the' pavement  ' with the conscious air of a man who  <had heard good news!"   Friends I passed saw it plainly on my face and rallied   me   on   my   beaming   looks   and  buoyant demeanor.    They had not left  -me when I walked through the swing-.  .ing doors of Sykes & Sarsfield's bank.  ������������������''I-was no longer the, humble suppliant,  -for  a   pitiful  overdraft,   but, the  possessor  of  a   fine   balance,   who  could  'hold his head high.    Roy usually waited  patiently outside,  but  today   I  encouraged him to enter at my heels.  .     7CHAPTER II.  "   AT TIIE INTELLIGENCE OFFICE.  As I left the bank, where I had been  ���������tnost cordially received, with my sov-,  ���������ereign purse full and the nice crisp  ;:notes:for ������250 carefully, put by im'my  'pocketbook, I began at last to believe  -in my fortune. There is a solid, unmistakable reality iu the chink of good  gold, while the supple civility of the  ���������great" financiers,, who had so lately  ���������looked black at my overdrawn account,  ' proved ,how .completely   my   position  -was-changed.     -���������- .  -  .     .The  morning's adventures and sur-  ��������� ������pri'ses had occupied much time, and it-  was  now  getting  late;  past  noon,  in  '-fact. We members of the "intelligence"  ���������made it a point of honor to be in good  lime at the office���������an hour or more  ���������earlier than this. It had hardly occurred to me that I need not go to the office at all. You see, I had been some  13 years under discipline and not many  hours an archmillionaire. Besides,  there is such a thing as esprit de corps.  1 was a public servant, engaged in responsible work, and I could not, would  ���������not, have neglected it willingly; no, not  >for the wealth of the Indies.  So I stepped briskly'down the steps  below the Duke of York's column and  . .-crossed the park^at my very best pace.  "'For.-all   that,   I   was   overtaken   near  Birdcage walk by some one who hailed  ���������tae "without coming quite close.  "One word, sir, I pray, in your own  "best interests. But, sakes alive, keep  -back that hound. He is a tine beast,  =xio doubt, but I'd rather have him  'farther away."  "Quiet, Roy! My dog will not harm  :you." I said'civilly. "But at this moment lam very much pressed"���������  ������������������ "If you will allow me to walk with  you a few yards, no more, I reckon I  could make it plain to you that I have  .a good excuse for intruding upon your  valuable time."  The park was as open to him as'to  .one. and when he ranged himself alongside 1 made no objections.    1 confess I,  too, was curious to hear what he had  ���������to say.  "You   have  enemies,  sir,"   he  began  abruptly, and he iooked so comical as  ' be said this that 1 was rude enough to  laugh.     He  was  a   broad -shouldered.  square  faced,  weather beaten  looking  ��������� man,  with a florid complexion  and a  ��������� '���������bulgy��������� nose, Irreproachably .dressed in  :tlie very height of tho fashion. But he  ;bad rather the air of'a second class  tragedian, with his long, black, curly  bair and his voice so deep, and so sol  emn as he conjured me to be serious.  "I reckon this is no laughing matter,  captain. Guess your enemies will soon  -fix that    They mean mischief."  He spoke it like a sentence of death  rand seemed very much in earnest, yet  <3l could hardly take it seriously.  "Such a. threat scarcely '-affects me.  ,'Iou see, it is my business to risk my  'life. The. queen has . sometimes enemies, and hers are mine."  "These I speak of are altogether your  own, captain���������people who grudge you  .3-our new wealth."  "You have heard then?"  "Heard!" he cried, with great scorn.  "'There is nothing I do not know about  ;you. captain. How did you enjoy the  summer on the Cuyuni river, and were  'rthe maps you got at Angostura very  ���������useful to you?"  "Flush, man, hush! Who, and what  ���������are you?    What the mlischief aro you  , driving at?"  By'this time we- had entered Queen  Anne's gate and were at the door of  the office.  ' ' ,  "Is this your bureau?" he now asked.'  "May I not go inside with you, only for  one moment?.. The matter is urgent.  It affects you very closely. 'Your danger is imminent They are bound, these  enemies,' to do you an injury���������a terrible  injury."       o , " ���������  "Oh. welh/tben,' it must keep," I said  petulantly. "I cannot give you any  more time now; I am expected here.  I suppose Sir Charles has arrived?'' I  asked of the office .messenger, old Sergeant Major Feachey.  "Yes, sir, he, has been' here these  three hours. lie came���������on his bicycle  ���������soon after 0 a. m.. and,he has asked  for-you. I think, twice."'  "There, your business must keep,  Mr."���������     ( _ '   ',. , r  "Snuyzer. .   I- bow to your decision,  but if you will permit me. I  will call  iu Clargos street this evening at"���������  '   "If you  must come, come about 5.  Good day," and I passed into the office.  I shared my room at the "intelligence"  with a colleague,  Swete Thornhill, of  the   artillery;   a   lively   youth   out . of  hours, but who stuck to his work manfully���������more so than any of us, and we  were by no means idle men.  '    "Thought you   were dead."  he  said  shortly, and  without looking up from  bis   papers: '"wonder   you'   took    the  trouble to com.e at all."  "I  was detained  by, something special.     Important   business.     Anyhow,'  ..it's  no, affair of  yours,"   I  answered,  rather nettled.        , ',  , "Y'es it is, when It throws me out of  my stride. .1 wish you'd make up your  mind either to come or stay away altogether. There ,has been a regular-  hue and cry for you all the morning,  and I've been disturbed abominably.  J-haye those calculations of the comparative penetration of the. new projectiles in hand, and they take some  doing."'  "Well, keep your hair on. I don't  want to disturb you. > But who was it.,  anyhow?"     ,      '   "  "The boss chief himself, Colllngham,  Sir Charles: He has sent three times  for you,, and came in .twice.- Wanted  you for something pressing. Now, I  believe, he is doing the job himself.  Wise man. Do it a blamed sight,better than, you or any man Jack of us."  At this moment an office messenger  came in with a huge bundle of papers,  which, he placed before me on. my  .desk. They were enveloped in the  usual green "jacket." which'meant extreme urgency, and on tlie outside,was  written, in a big, bold hand, "Captain  Wood���������speak."-.'        -  "He'll do most of the talking, I expect." went on Swete Thornhill maliciously: "He's lit to be tied. Go in.  man, at once,' and take your punish:  rnent.", \  Tbe distinguished officer at that time  head and chief of our department was  Major General Sir Charles Collingham,  V. C. K. C. B., one of the most notable  soldiers of the day. ardent, fearless,  highly skilled, strong.in counsel, foremost, in the field, who had served almost everywhere, in all the wars, great  and small, of recent years and had  ���������made a close study "of the science of  his profession as well. He had traveled far and wide, knew men and" many  cities,.was as much at home at court  as in camp, popular in society, which  he cultivated in his'spare moments, although he'allowed nothing to stand in  the way of his work. The service came  first, and-first in the service was the'  all important, transcendently useful  .department, . as he thought it, over  which he presided.  Sir Charles expected���������nay, exacted���������  a like devotion' from us, his staff officers, whom in all matters of duty he  ruled with a rod of iron. None of us  liked to face him when he was put out,  which, it may be said, was not seldom,  Teach self-denial, and make its  pi actice pleasureable, ,and you create  for the world a destiny more sublime than ever issued from the brain  of the wildest .dreamer.���������-Sir Walter  Scott.      " ,       .'     ���������  '   The  man   who     foolishly   does   me  wrong,���������I will return  him the protec  tion     of  more the  the more  "Buddha.  my ungrudging love; the  evil that conies from him,  the good shall go from me.  With Jove the heart becomes a fair  and fertile garden, glowing with sunshine and warm hues,' and exhaling  sweet odors; but without love it is  a bleak desert, covered with ashes.���������  Charles Warren.  LEGS SO  SWELLED  HE COULDN'T WALK.  Kidney  and   Urinary   Troubles   were   Followed   by   Dropsy  Perfect   Cure   by   Dr.   Chase's   Eiisiney-Liver   Pills.  ������������������, A  This case o"f Mr. James Treneman, the well-known butcher, of 586 Adelaide street, London, Ont.; is another proof that'Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills are effective iu the-most'severe and complicated diseases of the  , kidneys. ' ,��������� ���������        ��������� -' ' ' " ���������<       ,        .  The double action Which'this famous proscription has on'iboth the kidneys and liver is in a largo measure responsible for'its wonderful curative, powers. When there, arc backache, frequent, difficult or painful urination, dropsical'swellings, biliousness, constipation, or stomach derangemen'ts,' you- inuy depend upon,it that  the kidneys are clogged and tho liver  sluggish. ;      ���������     < r ,   .   ,    . - <--  It is at such times that Dr. Chase's Ividney-Liver Tills prove themselves prompt to' gi-ve relief and certain  .to effect a cure.    The evidence to prove  this  fact is simply overwhelming.        ' , ��������� ',,    'r>  Mr. James Treneman states:���������"Two years ago J was laid up with Kidney disease, and' urinary troubles.  Besides the pain-and inconvenience caused by these troubles 1 "became diojsical, and my legs would-swell up  so that I could scarcely go, around at all. Hearing of Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills 1 procured "a box and  'continued tho use of this valuable medi-iue until now 1 .can say for a' certainty that I tun entirely''cured. 1  never took airy medicine that did me t>."> much good, and am firmly convinced that if it had not been for this  medicine I would not be working to-day " ' ' r     ,  As a family medicine of tested and known worth. Dr. Chase's iCidi-.-y-LLwr Pills have never been.ap-  proai.hcd. They act directly on The kidneys and liver, regulate the bowels and ensure the perfect action of il.e  digestive and .filtering systems. , Onepill a dose, 25 cents a box. At all dealers, or Edmanson, Bates ������fc Co .  Toronto. ., ���������    ' " '    *���������  duns <������d iJ +Q A^LtJl/ </������&, #e������%������d*iH^  osnjL/ <&Cc/ i//rus  aJr-v-ior: tt&rn/^  n^t^ru/  -flew  a/nrtO 7JM<Le> /loH/ini, &&%/ jdj  Jfasob  '44/.  Cvt>ry,  People ,  titled to  get..  who   never ' worry   are     en-  a  lot   of  credit   they ��������� never  POOR DIGESTION  RENDERS THE LIFE OF THE DYSPEPTIC MISERABLE.  Food Becomes Distasteful and a Feeling   of    Weariness.    Pain   and  Depression Ensues.  DIAMOND  BACK TERRAPIN.  "Great Scott!" he roared.    "You lazy,  idle young villain!"  for be was choleric, although not cross  grained.   Under a stern face and rough  manner  he   had  a  kindly  nature   far  down, for he did not wear bis hear %  upon  his sleeve', certainly not for an  erring  subordinate,   as ' be  considered  me just then.  [TO BE CONTINUED.] -������%_  Tlientrlcnl  Scenery.  Movable scenery was first used in  Italy in the year 1508. It was the invention of an Italian architect named  P^ruzzi.      '   " Westminster . Abbey.  Officials of Westminster abbey charge  fees  aggregating  over $2,000  when  a  memorial is placed in the abbey.  From LeSorelois,   Sorel,   Que.  Of tlie. diseases afflicting mankind  dyspepsia is one of the worst to endure. Its victims find life almost a  burden! Food becomes distasteful :  rhey suffer from severe' pains in the  stomach : sometimes excessive heart  palpitation, and a general feeling, of  weakness and depression. Though  tliis disease is one of the most distressing, it is one which." if' the proper remedy is applied, can be readily cured. Thousands' throughout  this country bear testimony to the  efficacy of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills as,  a never-failing cure. Among them is  Mrs. Adolphe A. Latrousse. a weli  known and highly esteemed lady residing-at Sorel. Que. ohu 'says:-���������  "For two years I was a constant  sufferer from bad digestion and it's  accompanying symptom's. Food became distasteful and 1 grew very  weak. L suffered much from pains in  stomach and head. I could not obtain restful sleep and became unlit  for all housework. I tried several  medicines without finding the least  relief and L grew continually worse  until in the end 1 would vomit  c\ orything I ate. I bad almost given  u;> hope of ever being well again  when one day I read of a case sinii-  ilar to mine cured through the use  of , Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. 1 determined to g-ive these pills a trial and  am happy today that I did .so, as by  the time I had taken eight or nine  boxes my strength had returned, the  pains which had so long racked'me  disappeared, my /stomach would digest food properly and I . had-fully.  regained ,my old time health, an'd  have not since had any return of the  trouble.".  LDv. Williams' Pink Pills are a purely tonic medicine and unlike all, purgatives', do not weaken the system,  but give life and energy with .every  dose." They are a certain cure . for  anaemia, dizziness, heart troubles,  rheumatism',. ' sciatica,, indigestion,  partial paralysis, St. Vitus' dance  and the functional ailments that  make the lives of so many women an  almost constant' source of misery.  Sold by' dealers in medicine, or sent  post, paid at 50 cents a box. or six  boxes for .82,50 by addressing the  Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brock-  ville,  Out.  It is only by trying to understand  others that we can get our own  hearts' understood.���������R. L. Stevenson.  Formerly   Devised.   They   Are   TSorv  Considered  a'Delicacy.  Half a century or so ago diamond  back terrapin were fed to slaves and  hogs. Today they ��������� are 'the," rarestdelicacy known to the epicurian world,  says the Philadelphia North American..  Then they sold for $1 a barrel, and  laborers, when hiring out, - specified  that they must not be compelled to eat  terrapin more than twice a week. Today a barrel is cheap at SS00, and millionaires travel hundreds of miles for  a ��������� chance to feast on this most delicious of all meats.  Of course this means genuine-diamond backs. There are many imitations.  Every first class restaurant in the  country features "terrapin a la Maryland" on its menu, but in not one case  out of a hundred . is the real terrapin  served. The diner regales himself on  what he believes to be Maryland's  choicest dish. . Instead he is merely  eating fresh water turtles, "sliders" or  "North Carolina goldens."  . The reason is simple. Restaurateurs  don't serve real diamond backs because they can't get them. The worla'a  total terrapin population does not fi-  ceed 25.000 of legal size, and these are  confined to the shores of the Chesapeake bay, the only place that produces  them.  Baltimore, Philadelphia and New  York enjoy a monopoly. -These three  cities'get practically the entire output,  hut few ever find their way across the  Blue Ridge. The epicure unfortunate  enough to be born in Chicago or St.'  Louis must either come east or forego  the joys of terrapin.  To select a real diamond back amateurs should be guided by. these distinguishing and characteristic markings:.  It is of a greenish, dark olive'color,  sometimes running to spotted gray,  yellow on the plate which surrounds  the shell and has concentric dark  stripes along.the plate on both shells.  The sides of the head are a dirty white,  sprinkled with small black spots. The  bottom shell is of whitish yellow.  Tlie males are much larger than the  females and have tbe concentric-streaks  much better, defined. The female has  the more delicate flesh. The male can  he distinguished by his toe nails, which  are much longer than those of the female. -���������  Hiiil   and. Bombs.  The plan of destroying hail clouds by  exploding bombs among them was suggested nearly 100 years ago by Professor Parrot of Riga.  We are fellow laborers vvith'a common end���������reverent to the'" lowest for  its 'possibilities. emulous to . ,the  highest for "its sublime'perfections.���������  Alexander Wilder.'M'.D.   ���������  ',  '    ><'.'"  ACTS GENTLY  ON  _,, LIVER  ClEANS������JEFFECTUALLY.  ov  uRCOMES  cqH3  ������5  cflPATiOM  BlTUAL -   PERMANENTLY  ITS ft*.- ^oG^  S,  BUY THE GENUINE -MAN'F'D BY  (4L������F?RN1 AfTG$YRVP jg.  V    KY      4< CAL.      f<? ^    N.V.   T  TOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. PRICE 50c. PER B0TTLFf'  Hiccough.  For this affection, which is so often  provokingly obstinate, close the ears  with the tips ,of the fingers, exert a  certain pressure therewith, and at tbe  same time drink 'in small drafts any  sort of a liquid offered by another person, and the hiccough Will j cease instantaneously.  He who says there is no such  thing as an honest man, you rimy be  sure is himself a knave.���������Bishop  Berkeley. ;"���������. ��������� '  Marl's LiliiiMt Cures CoMs, Etc,  Genius  at first  is   little  more,  a   great   capacity  for  cipline.���������George  Eliot.  than  dis-  Dr. J. D. Ke.logg's Dy sen'cry Cordial is a  sneeciy cure ior dysentery, diarrhoea, cholera,  summer complaint, sea sickness tmd complaints  incidental to children teething. It gives immediate relief to those suffering from the effects  of indiscretion in eating unripe fruit, cucumbers, etc. It acts with wondorful rapidity, and  never fails to conquer the disease. No one need  fear cholera if they have a bottle of this medicine convenient.  If  things  go around  fail   to  come your  and head them.- off.  way,  U  \  . /  ���������('���������J  J: if I  1!  ���������< \  ' A\  1    f i  S)\  1 'i s  b  m  lN  I  x  ?������������������  ?  ty  *\4|  #/-  '  -  THE   CUMBERLAND   NEWS  Issued Every  Wednesday.  W. B. ANDERSON,  EDITOK  The coiuums oi 1'hk News are uptsii to all  who wish to express Uiereiu vievva uu matt-  rs of public   interest.  While we do not hold ourselves  responsible for the utterances of correspondents, we  reserve   the r ght    of   declining   to  inser  omniuuicaLHins unuecess.wily j.ers inal.  WEJDi\EaDA'i,' J ULY   iu, tyuz  H>M������ HY ALL i\ h,W .<i>KALiii".S: ,10c  hct'rto-*      '  t~!ni?#!^������  PATENTS GUARANTEED  Our fee returned if we fail. Any one,sending sketch and description of  any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patentability of same. /'How to obtain a patent" sent upon request. Patents  secured through us advertised for sale at our expense.  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A.M.  r ,��������� '���������  Furuialies Mouihiy���������to uli Loverd oi  iviuaic a  vast  volume   < f  New,    (Jhoiue,   Copyright  ' Compositions by the most popular authors.  32     Pages     of0   P ano     Music  <    ,'        5 Sonus, '   ' 5 Instrumental.   .,  10   Complete  Pieces   for   Piano,  with iutore������i!nt2 Musiual Literature.  Once a month for 10c.  , ' ���������  -     Yearly Subscription, $l.oo'.<  ���������In ons year you ge������; neaily 400 pages of  Music, comprising 12JaconipleLe pieces ftii  t^ie Piano.     It bmighc in any music store at  <one-half off, Would cost'$30. ~ If you will  semi us the name aud  adHnjs������  of five  p^r  .former-eon T.he Piuuo' or Organ, ��������� we will  send you a sample o-py free a  J. W. PEPPER, Publish, r,  ��������� Catalog Maw.X & O^c'ii. Music & lusi.���������Free  Eighth & Locu.-t'Sts ,'_  Philadelphia, Pa.  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B.C  GREAT  WEST  LIFE.  fliHE reason why the Great West  '������������������������ Life Assurance Co. has more  businessin force than any other Company ever had at the same age, is their  promptness in Paying Claims, and the  LiberaL Contract given, free from all  annoying restrictions.  Any  information   asked   for   will   be  promptly and cheerfully given.  A.  ANDERSON,  7 General Agent,  Drawer, 5. Nanaimo, B.C.  WE.  WANT YOUR,       ||  I Job Printing ������  I SATISFAGTORT iK|  The most Northerly Paper published on the Island.  Subscription,       - -       $1.50  per an  (sN,  <c  ->M'  -w-  c?:  Advertising  FISHING R0D3  REPAIRED  Hies of any Paten Tied to Order.  NEWS  OFFICE  Dunsmuir Ave,-,  Cumberland, B.C  Office Hours :���������8 a.m. till   5 p.m.; aturdays, 8 to  1.  Fancy Inlaying wood in and metal.  French Polishing.  Apply  NEWS OFFICE.  m  J >v  Is'v  is/>:  '���������Cu BOY/SEE'S CONCEIT.  8  HE   DECIDES   THAT   HIS   GRAY   HAIR  GIVES  HIM  A   FALSE  APPEARANCE.  In tLix .Attempt to Remedy tlie F������.Tilt  and Renew His YoutHfuI Appenr-'  ance 'the Old. 31an Trie* a Bni'ber's  Hair Dye,  Witli   Sad  Results.  w  [Copyright, 1902, by C. B. Lev.-is.]  HEN the Bowsers had returned to the sitting room  from'dinner the other evening, Mrs. Bowser detected  Mr. Bowser taking sly glances at himself in^the mantel mirror"and evidently  somewhat perturbed about' his hair.  She let it pass-as one of his "streaks,"  but after'a time he looked at her in a  half ashamed way and asked:  ���������'Do'you notice how fast my hair is  turning gray?" , '_ '���������  "Not   particularly,"    she    answered.  "You have been old enough, these live  ' .'"WHAT do toumean bx old enough?"  "'���������years'to have gray hair.    You haven't  ��������� got a great deal, but what there is of  ���������i   it looks well'." '      ,     . ������  ��������� ''What do you mean by old enough?"'  he demanded, with the threat of a family row in histories'-' ��������� " ��������� / ' ..  ,- "W^y; 'most' men -have' gray hair  iafter passing; forty;-don't they?/ You  were, forty-seven your  last  birthday,  ,anti*;^���������.",..���������;- : ,...-.. -';���������  ,'\  \  "Who said l),was forty-seven?"  J "Why���������why"���������'   . ',.';_  "There's' no why-why about it. My  true' age is forty-two. If I look five |  ��������� years older, it's because I've had so  much, trouble J with. you. If you had  your way about it, you'd make out ^hat  I was a doddering idiot. .Bow old do  ' you think-folks take me to bew.ith my  hat on?"   ���������;.',-������     ",.<*_'      -      ;  Mrs. Bowser wanted to pass a peaceful" evening, arid ������she therefore put .the  figures at thirty-six. .  , "From thirty-six to ' thirty-eight,"  said Mr. Bowser as his vanity could  be read in his face, "and I������don't know  why I should permit these hairs to  ., make me look ten" years older. Only  yesterday Brown was saying that I  had the step of _a man of thirty."'       . >  "But what can you do with them?"  ,"I   could  dye them,  I  suppose?"-he  .half  questioned   as  something  like  a  blush came to his face and he turned-,  to the glass again.  Mrs. Bowser- laughed at the back of  his head.    She didn't mean to, but she  couldn't restrain  herself.    It was, one  .of Mr., Bowser's funniest as-well as  latest fads.  "There you go with your giggle, giggle!" -he "shouted as he turned on her.  "Is there anything so excruciatingly  funny in my putting a little dye on my  hair? During the last four weeks you  seem to have lost what little sense you  ever had."  "It just struck me as funny that, you  should turn to hair dye," she explained.  "Oh, it struck you, did it? You are  always being struck if I make any  particular move. I might have known  that you would he-haw-he over it. but  I was fool enough to ask your opinion.  Nevertheless I shall go ahead and do  as I please about it."  "That is, you will dye your hair, and  perhaps you will look all the better for  it. As you say, there is no need of  your looking ten years older than you  really are. Did you bring home a bottle of dye?" c \  ."Well, yes. It's not the ordinary  hair dye you find in the drugstores,.  with the smell of a dead horse about  it, but something prepared expressly''  for me by Professor Caton, tho eminent  tonsorial artist." '  ' "The eminent barber���������yes," mused  Mrs. Bowser. ��������� "He prepared something for you that will deceive' even  his fellow artists? Well, I should try  .it and see how it works. ' If you can  look to be only thirty, I shall feel proud  of you/' "  1- -iVrr. Bowser didn't know whether to'  glare or smile, but finally decided to  go up to bis room and apply, according to directions. The family cat had  been watching things as she lay on tne  lounge, and. as he left the room she  jumped down and looked at Mrs. Bowser in an inquiring way. She received  a shake of the.head in reply and walked over and 'sat down under the. piano  to await the coming of events. Mr.  Bowser had won his point without loss  of too much dignity, and he smiled as  he sopped the dye over his scanty  locks. He had paid $5 for that special  preparation, and the eminent tonsorial  artist had guaranteed that the results  would be almost immediate. Not more  than ten minutes had passed when a j  change could be seen,' and the bottle  and Bowser went down stairs together.  Mrs. Bowser'was reading and had no  remarks to.make, and it was ten minutes before she raised her eyes and  took a look at the dyed hair. As she  did so she gave 'a start of surprise and  choked back an exclamation. ���������  "What's the matter with you?" asked  Mr. Bowser.   , .    ~  "I���������I���������nothing!"     /  "You  jumped_as  if  something  had  bitten you.    Do you see any difference  in my hair?"  "I think I will go up stairs. 'My  head aches."  '"Got another cold probably."0 he  growled as .she left tlie room. "She's  also a bit mad about this hair dye.  I'll take a look in the glass and"���������.  . Those white hairs had not turned  black,' but a queer brindle. and Mrs.  Bowser had realized that she must'get  out or explode. One look in the glass  junipjed'Mr. .Bowser a foot high, and  ,as ho came down on his heels'he jelled:    ,  "It can't be! It can't be! I must  have dirt in my eyes!" ,"  ��������� But, tho-color of that hair was the  color of a brindle cow, and wlic-n he  had satisfied .himself of the fact his  heart stood still for a, minute. , Then a  great wave of relief came. ������ t  ' "It's simply the first change, of,  .course," ho-whispered. "One more application and it .will; be .black. What  a fool I was to get scared!"- ' .     ���������   -  He'wasn't over'three'minutes in putting on another coat, and.he held his  head to tho hot air register to dry the  dye the quicker.' .Wb-en he straightened up and took another look, in ,the  glass, his hair was no longer brindle,  but the 'color of ay'ellow, dog..,,    ....      '  '"By thunder! ' By' thunder!" was alf  he could  say  as  he  stood  staring  at  himself, and the cat was rolling over  the floor In hysterics.  Hope came again; however. This  was probably three ply hair dye���������brindle, yellow and black. r The" third application would take ten years-off his  age by bringing-out the true gloss'r. It  was made'and dried ia. and Mr. Bow-  Mr consulted tbe glass'again. ,, What  he saw reflected was1 a head of celery  green ��������� color,. and what Mrs.. Bowser  heard was .such a- yell of fury . and  ,despair, that she.was sure the piano  must i. have lifted up one of. its legs.  Some one seemed to be kicking over  chairs and chasing the cat about Tor  a few minutes, and then there was the  silence of death. She waited for half  an'hour and then slipped-down stairs.  The-cat'lay.on the-floor as if dead, and  Mr.'Bowser was on his "knees, on the  floor, before, a-footbath full of soapsuds: He was seeking to restore his  'gray hairs and'his old age. and-as. he  soaped his green'locks he muttered:  "I will> see', that eminent tousorial  artist tomorrow, and.I w;ill .take-him  by1 tho throat.-and-1 ..'will ,.cry. ha! ha!  ha! and I will squeeze the life out .of  his'lying,'swindling carcass and trample on his quivering heart!" ���������  And the cat lifted up her head' and  chuckled,' and Mrs. Bowser softly retreated to her room! M. Quad.,  THE-"'PIN&PONG- PAD;  SOC!ETV.,TAKES   UP. NEW, GAM E FOR  ,', INDOOR AMUSEMENT.  A  Kind   of   Lawn   Tenuis   That    May   Bo  ' Played on   a  Dining Table���������Originated  'in   England.  Wlieru   It   Is  Popular���������It  Hax' Reached   Society in This Country  as Well.' ,     ���������  Society's latest and most fashionable amusement, is pingpc.ng. Not to  know it, is to profess ignorance'of the  very latest' fad. Pingpong is a"'sort  of table tennis and gets its name  from the peculiar noise made-by the  rricl<et"; striking'thc Wall.'It 'is' played  with battle-doors and celluloid  balls.  Ping-pong comes from England,  whore it is immensely popular.   ,     In  How It Ended  Mac���������What became  of that girl you had  the flirtation with at  the seashore last summer?    .  Lewis ��������� You, mean  the girl I thought I  had a flirtation with.  She married me.  Xo   Taste.  ��������� The Elephant  (on the links)���������  Then ypu have  no taste for  golf?  1 The Ostrich���������  Ugh!. I should  say not!' I never could go gut-  ta percha, and  the irons have  too'many cor-  ne'rfe'.< on them,  don.'t'you know,  to digest 'with  out the  pe'psin.-  aid': of  -Puck.  Feeling-.* Hurt  "You seem so  very sad," said  the tender to  the locomotive.  "Y'es, I suffer  so many reverses at the hands  of the engineer,  you know," wa������  1 the, reply.  Silk.  Silk is the strongest of all vegetable  or animal threads. It is three times as  strong as a flaxen thread of the same  si;:e.        ���������    ..'  A   PKj-cliolof?icaI  Dcdiiclton.  "My dear," said the wife of the eminent professor, "the hens have scratched up all.that eggplant seed you solved." .-���������..  "Ah, jealousy," mused the professor.  And he sat down and wrote a twenty  page article on "The Development of  Envy In the Minds of the Lower Grade  of Bipeds." '  Emotion Wasted.  "It was terrible--.even to see the villain die." said the'emotional girl at the  melodrama:  ���������"Oh.���������well," consoled the old lady, "he  would have died anyway. Did you notice how many cigarettes he smoked?"  ���������Exchange. .'      .  Tbe plans they have in the mint are  nearly all money making schemes.���������  Philadelphia Bulletin.   The  of  as  one  "   PLAYIXG PIXGPOJCG.  fact,  so .widely has it been taken^up  that  players  of acknowledged    -skill,  though from humble  walks   of     life.  are     ..welcomed      to ,    the  very  best,,  houses'.-.  ''-,-���������.     ���������   ���������' , ���������  Jn Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal  society has already acquired the pin'i-  pong habit, and it is ^spreading to  other  Canadian  ciiies.  Pingpong is usually played on a  dining table with a specially prepared celluloid ball. ��������� A. table seven to  liine feet long and half that ' width,  without a cloth, is the field. , Across  ���������the table is erected a net from five  to seven inches in height, stretched  on posts clamped tos the tab^c*  rackets are vellum, covered -bats  the kind that used to be known  battled oors.  The game is for two players,  at either end of -the table. The player who first delivers the ball is called  the server and the other the striker  out. At the end of the first game the  striker out becomes the server, and  so on alternately. The ball served  must drop anywhere on the table  top beyond the net and is then ' in  play. If it drops into the net or off  the table, it counts to the striker  out. There is no second service, as  ;in  lawn  tennis.  ��������� If the ball in play strikes, any ob-,  iiect above or round 1,b"c table before-  ���������it bounces on the table itself, net or  post excepted, it counts against the  player. The-server w.ins a stroke if-  the striker out fails to return the  service or knocks the ball off the  table. The striker out wins a stroke  if the server serves a fault, fails to  return the ball or returns it so it  falls off'the table.  On either player winning his first  stroke the score is called fifteen for  that player. On cither player winning his second'stroke the score is  called   thirty  for   that   player. On  either. player winning his. third  stroke the  score  is  called forty      for  PIXGPOSG-  SERVIXG.  fourth      stroke  is .scored game  that player, and the  won by either player  for that player. -  If both players have won three  strokes (forty in all), the score is  called deuce,      and the next      stroke  won by either player is scored advantage to that ��������� player. ' If the same  player wins the next stroke, he wins  the game. If he loses the next stroke  'the score,is again <leuce, and so on  "until either player wins the two  strokes' immediately following the  score - of deuce, 'when the game is  scocod for that player: .The player  wh6 wins six games win's a  set.   .  Pingpong is ' a successful' indoor  game because it gives an agreeable  amount of physical exertion. It is  nor irksome, like cards and other"  social games that compel,'sitting still  during  an  evening.      ,  He   Didn't   Have   (o   Kneel   Dotvn.  Flora���������What a lovely ring! And it's  a lady's ring too.  Horace���������Yes, I ,thought you would  like it.  Flora���������Why, is it for'me?  Horace���������You are a lady, aren't you?  Flora���������Ob, dear!   This is so sudden!  A HOUSE APIARY.  Last   Fate   Worse   Tlinn   Ilia   First.  . Smith��������� Poor, Wederly' is having a  hard time of It. His "first wife got a  divorce from him. you know. ,  Jones���������Yes, and he has a hard time  paying her alimony. I suppose.  .  Smith���������Worse than that.    She Is his  present, wife's   dressmaker.  u     ', Tvro Trials.  '��������� Tess���������Aren't, you going to choir rehearsal tonight?    ��������� ��������� -'���������  . Jess���������No.      ' ,  "You'd, better.    We're going to give  that new hymn a'trial,"  -,"Can't.    I'm going to give'a new him  a trial mvseif."   An Object Lesson  to  Grant.  - This story is^told of the first time  Grant over had charge of a large body  of men sent out to give battle. lie was  colonel in the early pant', of 1S02, detailed to go to the relief of an.Illinois  regiment, ��������� supposed to be surrounded  by Confederates at Palmyra, Mo., but  when he arrived the regiment had re  lieved itself by retiring. ..Grant then  went out to Florida, in the same state,  and as the regiment toiled over the hill  beyond which tho enemy was supposed,  to be in waiting Grant" says he would  have "givenanything to be back again  in Illinois."  At the top'of the hill,, instead of  troops drawn up.in battle array, Grant  saw a deserted camp. "It occurred to  me at'once thatcHarris had, been as  much afraid of me .as I had been of  him," said Grant. "From that eveut to  the close of the, war I<?never experienced trepidation upoD "confronting an enemy, though I always felt more or less  anxiety. I never forgot that be had as  much, reason, to f^ar my'forces as 1  had his."  A Trafalgar  Incident.  There is a most striking and remarkable passage in the journals of Captain  Frederick Hoffman which have been  published under the title of "A Sailor  of King George."    '���������  In giving his account of the concluding phase of Trafalgar Captain Hoffman, who was on board Collingwood'a  ship, says: "I must not omit that when  the commander of the French fleet.  Admiral Villeneuve, was ��������� brought  alongside us instead of the Victory, he  was informed it was not Nelson's ship.  'My God.' said he, 'you are all Nelsons!' "���������London Globe.   Measuring: tlie Heat of tlie Body.  By means of an ingenious instrument  invented by Dr. Lombard of New York  it is'ascertained that a woman's body-  is warmer than that of a man by about  three-fourths of a degree and sometimes as high as one degree, while in  no instance has the warmth of a man's  body been found to be greater than  that of a female. It is also definitely  ascertained that children are decidedly  warmer than adults, the difference being about 1 degree F., the younger the  child the greater tbe diversity.'' A difference in the heat of the sides of the  bedy is discovered to be an invariable  law. The left side of the head and expending downward to the base of the  neck is much hotter than the right side.  ���������  ' A Mersrin;;  of  Formula. >  .. A  commercial  traveler' well known'  in  the  cycle   trade  on  both   sides   of  the Atlantic adds  this to  the collection   of  jokes   on  newly-made  happy  fathers :  The hero is the manufacturer of  the .wheel which the narrator sells.  ���������Being compelled to go away on a  business trip about the time an interesting, domestic event was expected, he left orders for the nurse  wire him results according to  following  formula  If  a boy,  rived." ..;,. .     ^ ,,  If a girl,   "Lady's  safely arrived.'  The father's state of mind may be  imagined when a few days'-later he  received a telegram containing the  one  word; :  "Tanddm."���������The Denver  Newi.  Frosting Aluminium.  To give \ frosted surface, to aluminium articles remove all grease and  dirt by dipping them in benzine. After  this dip -them first into a solution  strong enough to blacken tbe metal of  caustic potash, next into a mixture of  two parts nitric and one part sulphuric  acid, then into concentrated nitric acid  and lastly into a mixture of equal parts  of vinegar and water, finishing by  washing them thoroughly in water and  drying in hot sawdust.  t     to  the  'Gentleman's  safely    ar-  F. G. Herman, New Jersey, Tells All About  i How  He W;i-  successful iu llun-     ,  iiinj: Ono���������I lie   l'lant.  The hives 'used are known as the  Lon^ Ideal' and' were made to order.  They- hold 20 Langstroth .frames  crosswise and'are expressly used for  'extracted honey. The total cost of  the hives, fixtures and house was  ?l2i5, not counti-ng the bees. .The-  top row of hives rests on a frame  just high enough so ,I'can raise the  covers and>'look into them comfortably,'as the interior view "shows; the  other row rests on-the'floor: The,  hives are only one story, so there  is no use for queen, excluders and no  tiering up' to, be  done.  The' hive entrances match the corresponding- slots in the side of the  house' and when the bees enter the  slot or entrance they go directly into-  their respective hives. Each" alternate notice is pointed a darker,color  for the purpose'of .helping- the bees  to mark their hive., ,    ' '  The .bee, house was built in   March.  About the,middle of April,  when the-'  weather was favorable to open hives,  ���������**^  I.VTKKIOIl  OF  HOUSK, APIAR1".    ,  I took, the Long Ideal hives into my  home apiary and transferred the bees  an-d comb from  the charl hives    into-  them. ���������> It, was only necessary to take  thi;ee frames at a time and lift them  from <orie into' the other.        Toward  evening,   when  the1' bees stopped   flying, I closed the entrances with wire  netting, loaded them on a wagon and  drove to the bee house and they were  soon "arranged in  position.  The next  day,   which  was   pleasant,   the      bees  came out-in great' numbers and evidently became      somewhat   -confused  as to.which were their right "., hives ���������  and three hives  were  deserted,      the,  bees having joined some of the others.'    But 17 built.���������up nicely and    in  -May I divided tnree of the    stronger '  ones -and' made   the- full  complement '  ,of ,20.\,In  the  latter  part  of May-'I'  removed the division board and filled ���������  the hives-with frames of comb foundation. ,,    - ��������� , ���������, .  .There      was not  a  swarm ,to  issue  which was as I had hoped. TJie   bees  are" always comfortable, being shaded  from the hot sun,  and they seem, to -  have sufficient room on 20 frames in  one body.   It is very comfortable "for  the operator too.    I took from    this  house in September 650 pounds      of  very  nicc'honey,   which  brought $91.  The yield in my home yard was-much  below the average, so,that year can  be     classed    a poor honey year.   As  there are enough surplus combs built  1- expect an average crop  of      1,000  pounds a year from this house. -    No  further    expense    is necessary,    only  rent and  cartage  in  bringing      home  the 'honey.    I visited  the house   during summer only once every week, or  two.���������F. G. Herman, in Orange Judd  Farmer.  GROUND  GYPSUM.  Ad.  one  un-  in  Practical   Kxperlenco in Using  It   t������  vantage in tho Stable.  Ground gypsum, according to  of our farm investigators, may  doubtedly be used to advantage  the stable. -The nitrogenous compound in the urine by the aid of certain micro organisms, always pres-  'ent in the air, is converted very  quickly into carbonate of ammonia.  This is volatile and will escape if  some suitable" absorbent or fixer ^is  not present. Gypsum is such a fixer,  converting the carbonate into sulphate of ammonia, which is not volatile.  Practical conclusions .from experiments are (1) that the proper place  to use, gypsum is in the stable, where  undoubtedly ths greater waste of nitrogen, as ammonia, frequently occurs, and '(2) that when the manure-  heap is kept compact and moist there  is not any considerable escape of ammonia.  Fermentation  increased  the availability of the phosphoric acid. It is to  be noticed that a considerable loss of  potash took place. This must be due.  to a certain amount of drainage from  the manure shaking into the      board  floor. This drainage was no doubt increased by the  water  used  in ���������   keeping     the      manure constantly moist.  This  result  corroborates  the conclu-  .sion that loss of potash cannot      be  entirely guarded against    without'   a  water  tight,     concrete floor  if      the  manure is to  be  kept moist by rain ,  or artificial means.   Sjop   Tallc.  The only time some employers raise  their clerks is when they play poker together.  She  Was   Not   Dull.  "You've had some acquaintance with  Miss Withers. Is she really as dull as  most people seem to think her?"  "Dull? Well. I should say not Sbe>  cuts, me every time we chance to meet."  f  1  ��������� A  41  v r  HHB4UH  ran n i  V "  It-  >  I  !'  *!  |V ,'  AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA  \  ���������4  ���������4  ���������4  ���������4  T  tiE PASSING  OF MR. Mt MRS.  JOSEPH BRUDER  By fleary Irving Dodge.  Copyright,   ������901,  By  Henry'Irrinff Dodge.  >  to  I  I  In  I  i?  K  ffTTfTTTffTfTmTTnrrf?  "Big Four" pulled into Beaver Meadows on the Rome-Watertown division,  and Joseph Bruder and his wife got  down from the passenger-coach that  was trailing behind six "fiats'' of rails.  Bruder was six feet four and broad,  and his wife was five feet and narrow.  Bruder carried a huge valise that cost  a dollarrand had done service, also an  ax. Mrs. Bruder wore mitts'and a  plaintive,, piquant smile. In her eyes  there was, a standing apology for the  disparity,'in .their'sizes. This seemed-  to be a sore'point-with the little woman/for she was ever on the alert for  the quizzing glances of strangers, and't  if one should stand apart and glance  jit the odd couple he was sure to have  his .gaze arrested by a plaintive glance  from tlie woman,which said as plainly  as speech, "Please don't make fun'of  us.", , ". '     ,     . ���������:  -   ,  -.-But the man never,bothered his head  about-what-other 'folks' thought. He  was,a woddchopper, and? that's all he  ',   knew !or cared. Next to, his wife he  / loved his "ax, mid "it used to bo his  pride that he could put a keen'enough  edge on it to' shave with, lie used to'  lay bis'cheek fondly against the purple  blade-and.pat it and call it his darling.  And/the ax seemed to understand him,  for it would bark with'quick delight'  when his giant arms swung it aloft and  bite,the maple and bury its nose to the  point where the tempered steel joined  the softer stuff. " ";  When  Bruder got off the train,   be  looked around in a sort of inquisitive,  defiant way and put his hand clumsily  around his wife-and drew her shoulder  over-against hisl.thigh. 'There was no  one at the depot but the agent, a yet-  '    eran   in   the  business,   the   tenure   of  whose position  was'due  to five toes  that Ihe had 'years, before,.contributed  to tbe annual list vbf accidents on the  ���������    road.'   Smith  had.-beard  that Bruder  , was coming to take the'place of one of  ���������    the striking woodchoppers, and it filled  , him with grave concern.   Almost all of  his relatives belonged to .the strikers,  .and his sympathies were' deeply /with  them.: On the other hand, It fell to his  lot to4 show ostentatious loyalty, to the  company.    Beaver Meadows' was the  chief-''wopdin' up" point of the road.  For miles tne'contiguous country yielded nothing fronr it's stubborn, soil save  stunted'beeeb and.kobtted.niaple.  The; president of the 'company that  supplied the ^railroad with wood was  Smith's backer. A nod from him would  have dislodged that worthy from the  comfortable niche that afforded him a'  comfortable.living.'" So Smith was between the devil and the deep sea. His  heart was with' the strikers, his interest with the company. That's why his  usually placid .mind was filled with  perturbation when he beheld the lumbering form of Joseph Bruder and the  i- diminutive wife alight from the caboose of Big Four.-  Bruder had an arm as long as his  wife's tongue and could fell at a,blow  either kind of jackass, human or  brute/ Mrs. Bruder was the brains of  tbe outfit. She took charge of the  money, when there was any, allowing  Joseph only enough for tobacco. Otherwise he was a teetotaler. On the  whole, this strange couple was deemed  a combination to be avoided. No one  ever knew where they came from.- On  that score-Bruder himself was silent,  with a persistency thatV<lefied all the  subtle influences of bucolic diplomacy.  Surmise said he was "an- ex-convict,  and as chapter.and verse of his past  were not forthcoming this comfortable  theory crystallized into a very good  counterfeit of fact.  ��������� When the woodchoppers learned that  Joe Bruder was coming to take Cy Sel-  den's job, they knew' there would be  . trouble, for they were a determined  lot. There was an understanding, however, a sort of feeling, although no  words, bad been spoken, that somehow  Smith would settle matters, and so  it was determined that no one from  among the strikers should meet Bruder  at the depot and attempt by moral or  muscular force to turn him back.  Smith knew what was expected of  him 'by his friends and relatives: he  also knew that the suspicious eyes of  the president were upon him,and hence  the delicacy of liis position. He hated  being "double faced," but be bad a  very comfortable niche indeed, and  times were exceedingly hard in those  parts. He reflected with considerable  disgust that it .was quite unjust that  he, who bad no personal interest in the  matter, should be the one upon whose  shoulders the task of adjusting the affair should be thrust, *  That explains why Smith was perturbed upon the arrival of Mr. and  Mrs. Joseph Bruder. It also explains  why he alone was at the depot to meet  the distinguished pair. It is an axiom  that good luck always comes to the  lazy. Smith was a lazy man, which  accounts for the piece of good luck  which came to-him on tbe morning of  the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Bruder.  Bab Armstrong's two-year-old baby  boy bad died of cholera morbus a few  days before, and the sorrowing parents, who were farmers, had put the  JSttle creature in a simple pine box" and  were sending him down the road to, be  buried in the Armstrong family burying ground at West Camden. The tiny  morsel of humanity whs at that moment Vesting in the freigbtroom of th������  Beaver Meadows depot.  As Smith limped down the platforst  toward Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bruder he  The young chaplain was desirous of  breaking up the habit, so one morning  preceding his customary five minutes'  address he spoke as follows:  "Young gentlemen, last night I  dreamed I was'here in the chapel addressing you. And as I spoke I' saw  every eye fixed upon me. every man  attentive, while in all the chapel there  was not a book opened, and then I  knew it was a dream."  CROKER'S SUCCESSOR.  German Scotch.,  'A good story comes from Sydney,"  !^9J;^..^rPu5^-t%_i>Pril'-<l2������,������sJ?/������l^   savs tne London Globe, "where"letters  have been received from two American  business   firms1' asking   whether   com-  rreigntrooin   and   got   his   inspiration, j  Then he accosted Bruder. ^ '  . "Waitin' for.Harris' team, ain't yer?"  Bruder looked at his wife, and she  said, "Yes."  ��������� "Coin' 'ter- work  on,the job, ���������ain't  yer?!' '  0 ,  Again Bruder looked at his wife, and  again she said, "Yes." /,  "Well, I'm right glad ter. see. yer,'/  said the unconscionable ^diplomat ef-  fusivelyl ; "I tell yer, we've been bavin'.'  great goin's on aroun' here." ..      ,'  Again Bruder looked at his wife) and    chcmiealB'"*'  again she said "Yes" softly and press- |l * ���������  ed a little closer under the shelter of  munieations to Australian merchants  should be written'in English or 'in the.  language of'the country.'  "It recalls an astonishing trade circular received a short time ago by a  business firm in Glasgow from a German manufacturer, also written In  what'his versatile clerk had apparent-  1 y taken for the language'of the country. It was in tbe best 'kailyard' style  and spoke of a 'muckle consignment or  ' .U.-id  Vi ho   U������������sjKiic(i  rlie   Oi-fjron Jt>  Made  Siipr*'in������* in  Organization <������������  New Yolk's Titer. ,  The man chosen leader of Tammany  to succeed Uichard Croker, so long  the head 'of the .N'ew York Democrats, Mr. 'Lewis Nixon, knew less  lhan half an hour before being chosen that he was even a possibility for  the office. After expressing his desire  for,a'rest, Mr.  Croker said:  *  "I want to say for Mr. Nixon,- that  I've known him 'long and well/ and I  think he is "just the-man for the'  place. . Tre is young and vigorous,  energetic una Keen and he can do the  work. He'.will start in under good  auspices and will succeed without  doubt."-     ��������� .     - '     ���������  Mr. ' Nixon, is a,, Mary lander by  birth.    In  common  with' nearly      all  his mighty thigh.      ,    '������������������.'--..      A  "Between  you  and  me,"   continued  the wily Smith, "these woodchoppers���������  I mean the'Beaver Meadow fellers,"  he hastened to explain as a slight contraction, of Bruder's forehead warned  ,him that any slur upon the craft would  not be weIcorae^-"don't know when'  they're well'off."     *..     ,- f    i   ''  He paused, and "Bruder looked at his  wife,- but she remained silent.  "Of course'I ain't got nothin' against  these-'men here, and it rniay,not, sound  well, com in' from me,, me b'ein' in the-  employ of this corporation, as'ain't supposed ter show no partiality",- but seems  ter me these men is a little unreasonable. Yer see,"- he went on as neither  Bruder nor his wife spoke," "times have  been pretty hard around here; with  -crops failin'; and a good.'deal of sickness-in the neighborhood, and I thick  these men .ought to been glad to get  "steady employment. Of course they're  really in the power, of the -company,  cos they ain't'got no-money, and the  ^officers knows it, and so they . cuts  down their wages. Now, some of 'em  finds out .that the big fellers is makin'  dead .loads of money,, and so they  makes,a- big kick and goes on strike.  So the company jest shuts down, and I  heard the superintendent say as' that  they was goin', to, start a process of  starvation: Of course ,1 don't want  that to go no further.",   .,.' ,  "Did-the   company' treat  the' men  fair?" asked, Mrs. Bruder.  "Of course it did," said Smith quickly. "Ain't -they'1 got a right to' pay their  money out any way they,like? Couldn't  these (men pick up and leave if they  didn't like it?"~ , \ ��������� '*." '  f ."Most of these men has their own  homes, hasn't they?" asked Mrs. Bruder. t ��������� ���������'..,',  "Yes, they'has," said Smith,'"but If"  they keeps on this "way they won't  have no one left in their homes." Then  he added as he walked toward/the' of-  cfice: "Ye'd better come in' and sit  down. ^Harris' team may not be here  for an hour yet. They generally, comes  ter meet the down train. 'Big Four' is  waitin' here fer it ter pass.",  He adroitly halted' the couple in  front of the open door of the freight-  room, and instantly the maternal eye  of Mrs. Bruder caught the Iittle:coffln.  "Whose is that?" she asked.  "That's Cy Selden's baby," said  Smith, lying heroically.  Mrs. Bruder looked at her husband,  then back to Smith., "What ailed it?"  she asked.  "Cholera morbus?"*  Smith drew closer and lowered his  voice a bit. "That's'what, they give  out," he said, "but between you and  me it didn't have .enough ter eat."  Just then Smith found (sudden business in the ticket office, where he remained until he heard the booming of  the down train, when he went out on  to fclie'.platform to pass^up the mails.  At   Second' Hand.  A Highland laird who could not afford to keep his own piper/was accustomed to employ the village piper when  he had company. ���������>'  On one occasion, through some over-  ��������� sight. Donald had not been given his  'preliminary glass of wbisky 'before he  "began  his performance;    Accordingly,  he found his ba'gpipe in'a most refractory temper.  The.laird asked him what  was'-the matter with it. and Donald replied that the leather-was so hard that  he could do nothing witli it.' ' ���������  '   ".What will soften it?" asked the anxious-laird. -  ".   "Och. just wbusky!" saicTDonald.  .  A tumbler of whisky was at once  brought, which Donald immediately  drank.      .  ��������� \ > '   (  "You  rascal!"  said^the' laird.    "Did  you not say it was for the^bagpipes?"  ,'' ������������������Och.'yess. yess," said'fbonald, "but  she will be a ferry peculiar pipes this.  She aye likes itblaw.ed in."  Hot   Brain   Work.  Miss Sporidulyks"���������  Mr. Chappington, I  wouldn't wear such a  high collar if I were  you.0 You don't know  how absurd 3-ou look.  1  /   True.  "The jury  was out two  days and then  failed to com������  to an agreement."  ."That proves  conclusively  that ,1 we ought  to have women  juries."    < .  "Why'so?"  "Well, you  .know a jury of  women would  have disagreed  sooner than  that.",���������Cincinnati Enquirer.  , Chappington (week  later)���������Is this bettab.  Miss Lily ? ��������� Chicago'  News.  Tough.  "He seems to  be a 'hardened  criminal," remarked the  prosecutor.  "Yes," assented the  judge; "I have  sentenced hiiii  four times, but  time seems to  make no impression on  him'." ���������Philadelphia North  ���������American.  going to  have  He lingered for a moment and watched "Big Four" pull out from the siding: then he looked all around. There  was no one in sight.  "How'd yer do it. Bill?" asked Jack  Lundy that night, while a half dozen  strikers smoked and listened.  "I didn't do nothin', and I don't  know nothin'," snapped Smith. "They  come, and they've gone, ain't they?"  And then to modify the rebuke the good  soul continued in, a tone that smacked  suspiciously of tenderness as he puffed  his pipe reflectively in the darkness:  "Strange: I used to know those folk3  years ago���������didn't know it till terday���������'  they was a good deal younger then���������  just married, I guess���������they were pretty poor���������had a little baby that died���������I  don't know, .but folks aroun' there said  the little thing died���������cos it didn't���������  get���������enough���������ter eat."  It Was  a. Dream.  When a certain divine was a younger  man and1 chaplain at the University  of Pennsylvania, like, other ministers  who filled that position he was much  troubled over the apparent lack of attention from the students during the  morning exercises in the chapel.  Tbe exercises hardly ever continued  for more than fifteen minutes. Some  of the students were in' the habit of  taking their books into the chapel and  studying.there during the services to  make up for their tardiness of the  night before in not preparing their lessons.  Bribed   In   Advance.  Briggs���������Sj j'ou are  your fortune told by the new astrologer down town. Let me give you a  pointer. If you want him to predict  that you will one day be rich, just give  him a handsome tip.  Griggs���������That's all right I'll give him  my note for a thousand or so, payable  when I become a millionaire.  Infusorial   Earth.  In the whole' catalogue of "chemicals, minerals and rare elements," the  prices of which are quoted every week  by trade journals, perhaps no name is  more, puzzling; to the. uninitiated than  "infusorial earth." Still, if one knows  much about dynamite'he is aware that  this is' the stuff .employed as an absorbent to hojd the nitroglycerin of  that famous explosive. It was Nobel,  the great Swedish engineer, who  founded a number of attractive.prizes  to, encourage scientific progress, who  first discovered -the trick by Which,  nitroglycerin could be safely handled.  Infusorial! earth is-composed of the  .siiicidus shells of minute vegetable  organisms, diatoms which, reveal wonderfully complicated and- beautiful  structures udder the microscope.  ^Golrig- Rig-ltt Ahead.  Alphonso���������Gwendolyn, why are you  so cruel as to keep me waiting for my  answer? It is now ten minutes since  I asked you to be my wife.  Gwendolyn���������Oh, pardon me. I forgot. I was simply choosing my bridesmaids.��������� BrookJynLjife^   Pen  Steel.  The sheets of steel for pen-making  are in their original condition eight  feet long and three feet wide. From  these strips are cut wide enough to  permit of the cutting of three or four  peas.   '     . ... -..-  ..  Mil. LKWIS.NIXON".      ,  .������ Tammany s New Chief,  others .in Atiie South--at the time of-  thc civjl war,-his 'parents'were - in,  moderate circumstances, but'his education , was' in jio, manner neglected,  owing to' the'fact that, his father was  a 'school teacher. I lis, early training-  was such that a'foundation , was  formed and those who knew him as  an urchin were not surprised when h'c  took the honors of his class in" 'the  United States naval academy at Annapolis. -    ..a  Leaving the naval academy he , so  improved the opportunities extended-  to. him through the courtesy of cthe  British Admiralty as a result of bis  high ' standing ���������- at ^Annapolis that,  when only 29 years old, he designed,  in the, marvelously short period ' of  ninety..days, .thrcc-battlc ships that  have'made , the American navy - respected the world over. - They were  the Oregon, the Indianaoand the Massachusetts,"' ~ all" of which are known  by their performances- and which;  at the .time'of their design, were admitted to be'the -most powerful vessels   and the best  all-round    fighters  afloat. ������������������",''" ' ' %.  , Tlie ability . and judgment so " to  grapple with mechanical problems,  naval science and tactics and vexed  questions of'engineering- and artillery  as to give each factor its proper-value in this great work won Mr. Nix-.  oi\ immediate recognition. It was  eleven years ago that these battle  ships were designed, and he protests'"  now that his reputation should no  longer rest upon that feat; yet the  work that he then did shows that  he possesses a mind capable of grasping tho difficulties of conflicting-'positions and the acumen to give c each  its proper weight.  Mr .".Nixon has lived in Manhattan  borough more than seven years. His  only votes have been cast in Manhattan. He has lived in-most of the  great cities ' of- the world, London,  Paris, Philadelphia and New " York,  and is cosmopolitan and liberal in  practice  and  theory.  '    SWINBURNE. '  Greatest tivins   J3ot:t    Kusy   Compiling a  Volume of Selected  Poems From  Kis Own   Works.  Algernon Charles Swinburne,' who  is now busy at work upon the compilation of a volume of poems selected from his works, is the foremost living poet and is regarded by  many excellent critics as  one of the  ii:-p operated by the Government,anif  civil service rules -are st: i.-tly applied. The teachcis. who an* mostly women, are ,very well, poid and  never discharged, except for cause.  When they get so od they <au't.  ,teach any more, they are pensioned-,  liberally.    -  i'r riiiiiii   t-;������m<" ;ri"ii.  Germany  is now  the best educated'  nation'  of   Europe,   yet   only hun  dreds of years ago German teath.-'rs-  in many parts of the country were-  so poorly paid, that they used ��������� to  sing in front of houses in -order to  add to their income hv odd ponce.  It   Cleann Jevrelry.  Tooth powder is ancxcellentcleana-  er of fine filigree jewelry.  Common Cows for !*��������� ef C:itil*".  It      is  not  only  possible  to   start;  with  common  cows as 'a   foundation-  and       build     up     ��������� a ��������� good  ,      herd <  of-beef cattle,   but it is one     of tli'c  best-    moves   that  the   average,farmer  can ,makc,  provided,, of        course,  he  has     tho common   cows'to   begin,  with, says a      Kansas correspondent  of ���������American  Cultivator.      There' " i.sr.  no, earthly  reason   why he e fj should'  sell     such  a herd     and' proceed      to!  put. a   lot .    of     money   in   well-bred",  cows.      I-    should    advocate     build--  ing  up  the      hc;'d   every  time  '    froia  common     stocK-,   so   that   one  would. ���������  gain  experience  while 'making        nil- _  provements.     3Jlace the average   man  without experiuvjo in   possession,of  a,  fine  herd,     and   he ,  will      in      mcWt.  cases     abuse   it through     ignorance.  lf0 a1, man   cannot   breed   carefully enough 'to' build  up a"hei-'d, he   cannot,  handle  fine   bred ,animals  well-   ��������� _ tn^-"  ough      to    -kpep   them   up ��������� to- ., their-  standard.;    If ' there ������is 'going   to-beany  failure, ,    it  is* better * 'to- have-.,  it     out    'with     the, common        hercL,  so 'the loss will     be less keen;   '  'Ttrelve Uest Hardy Herbaceou-i rorciinialfs'  These are  easily and  cheaply    pro--,  cured,   last  a  long  time,   are, .easily-  cared for and propagated. TJie    best.  'l2 does not exhaust the list,.of really,  desirable sorts by.a good  c!#al.    The*  following   are   recommended:   , Carna-������  tion, phlox,  peony, daisy," aster,'hollyhock, iris, ]ily,-"c:hrysanthcnum (not  ciuite    hardy),      narcissus,   ' western: '  cvpning- primrose,   (Oenothera      Mis-  souriensis)  and    spider.wort  (Ti'acUs-  cantia'     Virginica.)  They, need        no-  fio^ver     bods      unless you have      the-'  time     and  inclination   to. care-      foi-  them.     Plant   in   shrubbery, - borders,  and fence corners. - ; '' '  laud :mil Anii:i.i(<r. , -��������� -  -The .hog. is the an:mal "for Iev=-  el, fertilce grain land ;'n I the'T sheep  for hilfv, ' thin and worn'land, . as  sheep "i."';r/c clcsor i.o the ground than  anv other- farm sVji:1c.   ���������    -1   .. , i.i  ,   Making: an Omelet.  A frequent cause of failure in mak-'  ing omelets is'in the use of too many. ;  eggs at. a  time. ' Four ,eggs make an  omelet easy  to.1 handle.    If more, are  needed, it is better to make a'sccond or ,*  even a'third one. ''  To make a plain omelet beat tbe eggs.   .  thoroughly, not separating whites and}  yolks. Add a'tablespoonful of milk ancfc  c  a' saltspoonful of gait for every  egg,.  Put a teaspoo'nful of butteron' the end?,  of a knife (a palette knife is best, but a,"   ,  case knife will do) and oil the omelet;  pan thoroughly on bottom and sides-!  Turn in the egg mixture and keep the-  pan  in  motion  on  a   hot part of  the-  stove so that one part will  not. cook:  faster  them   another.    When  the egg*  have  become  sufficiently  firm  on  the-    *  bottom of the pan,' run the knife carefully  under and  loosen the omelet sov  that it will easily slide to and fro. Then>  cover for a minute or two and raise-  the pan a trifle from the stove, so that,  .the  bottom  will  not scorch   while the-  top is "settling."    Slide the knife under, fold the omelet over and serve at  once. ,  Women of Today.  The women of today are better edu--'  cated and hence superior in every way  as  wives,   mothers,   housekeepers and  members of the community to those of''  a   century  ago,   and   they  are  treated,  with far more respect by the men of  the household than formerly.   Women's  influence in  all  directions steadily increases with their higher development.  Naturally they are far more contented:  and'happy wl'ih all the privileges they  now enjoy than they were under the-  old  restraints.    There is nothing that  could be borrowed from the past which  would improve their present condition.  When   woman   fully   awakes  to   tho-  beauty and value of science, philosophy  and government, then will the first note  of perfect; harmony  be touched; then  will   the great organ of  humanity   be  played on all its keys, with every stop,  rightly adjusted, and the louder, loftier  strains, the march of civilization will  be immeasurably quickened.  "-ALGEKXON". CITAKLES  SWIXBUKNK.  greatest of lyric poets. Mr. -Swinburne is now in his sixty-fifth, year,  and .is'Still producing verses of genuine poetic force and fire. For many  years he has been living in retirement, seeing no one save his most  intimate friends, and to these he  delights in reading his recently written poetry. The house of Theodore  Watts-Pun ton at Putney has been,  the poet's home for twenty years.  Swiss Schools.  The   public  schools  in  Switzerland  In   Wearing   Veils.  "How many women' are persistently  ruining the 'bloom' of their lips and  the contour of cheeks and all pleasant  'expression' by pinning their veils too  tightly across the face," said a woman.  "Observe the women on the streets.,  and you will see any number of them,  at. frequent intervals 'pouting' out their  lips so as to push off the pressure of"  the tightly drawn veil and all unconscious that the peculiar action has.  grown into a fixed habit or that it  makes a perfect caricature of their  faces every time they do it."  1 0  . 'I  '   'i|  ;>.   '   il  "rf:ll  i\  .- .'.il  ,*1  ill  rl  1 THE PLANET MARS.  Science   Cannot   Say   Whether  There  Be Men  There or Not.  To th* popular mind all astronomical  research ought of necessity to'be con  <;c-riled   with   the   important   questions  whether there  are  men  in   the  moon  .and inhabitants in Mars. ,To the first  of these astronomy returns a decided  negative.. There Is no life on'the moon.  and probably no life, either vegetable  or animal, existed at any period of hu-  Iman  history.   To the  second  the an-  j swer is: We cannot tell.   There may be  j men in Mars and there may not   The  ���������conditions of life there do not preclude  jthe  existence of, human   beings.    We  'jhave in Mars rain and snow, sunshine  land gloom, summer-and winter, as on  : our earth.      ,'       "     ,-   '  \    Perhaps   the   closing   years   pf ,the  '[twentieth century will see astronomers  ; armed    with    a    telescope    powerful  ienough" to reveal  towns and cities  in'  .-jMars.!  Should ever such a discovery be  jxnude I could conceive of none greater  ��������� in the whole range of "time, none more  j upsetting or disconcerting., To the or-  idinary astronomer untroubled by such {  hopes tbe future Hues of astronomical  progress Is simply and clearly defined.  and that progress is simply to answer  .the old lines:  Twinkle, twirikle, little star,  '  How I wonder what you are.    '  ' This   was . the   problem   before   our  friend -who wrote on astronomy n hundred years ago: this will be the problem    before   astronomers   a    hundred'  years heuce.-  WlNriom   In   City   Directories.  The New York city directory for the  early years of the  nineteenth century  ���������-   contained  an  almanac  and  other  fea  lures now considered'to be extraneous  to   directories.    Tbe   compilation  "was  largely done by  Abraham Shoemaker  - Sir.   Shoemaker   had  a   htihit   of orna  meriting the margins of the pages witli  quaint old "saws" of this character:  ,A traveler should have a hog's nose.  a deer's legs and an ass' back.  "    A little house well filled, u little Held  .well tilled and a little wife well drilieu  jare great .riches.  .,'���������    A poor mau must walk to get  meat  ,jfor-his stomach, the, rich man to gt-t a  j stomach for his meat. ,  Tell a-miser he's .rich and a woman  j she's old. you'll1 get' no money of the oik-  !nor kindness from't'other.  ������������������:    I.ove. cough aud smoke can't well be  Ibid.  Some   Fninons*   Donee*.  Literary history is crowded with-in  Stances of    torpid    and   uninteresting  boyhood.   - (iibbou     was     pronounced  "dreadfully dull." and the utmost that  was predicted  of   LI nine  in  bis  youth  was that "he might  possibly l������<>come a   .  steady merchant." Adam Clarke, nr'ter-^7  ward so deeply skilled in oriental tan-''-'  fruuges and antiquities, was pronounc  t'd   by   his   father   to   he   "a   grievous  dunce." and of Hoi lean, who became a  tumdel for Pope, it was said that h ��������� was--  |) youth of little understanding.    Dry  den was "a great numskull,'-" who went  through a course of education at West  in taster,   but   the   "stlmulatiiig   properties   of   Dr.   Busby's  classical    ferrule,  were thrown away upon the drone who  (V.'ua to be known as "Glorious Joluil' "  Bodies  Turned   to  Stone.  Human bodies buried in limestone  countries are often turned to solid stone  by the limewater which, penetrates the  graves. In other soils there are ele  merits which sometimes so embalm the  buried dead as to preserve form and ,  features unchanged. Many such case*,  are on record. Uobert Burns' body was  disinterred in 1815 to be removed to a  new tomb. To tbe surprise of all his  friends the features were found to lulls perfect as at burial. When the bod.\  of Johu Hampden, the famous Mngllsh  patriot and leader, was disinterred by  Lord Nugent 200 years after burial, tbe  form and features were as uiiehuuged  as if the corpse had been recently laid  in the grave.  One of DnmnV Joke*.  Just for a joke Dumas once address-A  ed a letter to "the greatest poet in Par  Is."   The postottice seut  it to  La mar-  tine,  tbe  Idol  of  sentimental   readers-  He hesitated to open It and took it to  Victor   Hugo,   who   protested   that   his  brother  bard  bad   far too humble an  opinion of himself.  After some conver  satlon   they   agreed   to  decide^ by   lot  which of tbe two should open the envelope.   Tbe  lot   fell  to   Victor  Hugo,  who. taking out the letter, read. "My  dear Alfred."  It was written to Alfred  de Musset. .           A   Capable   Student.   .  In one of the Philadelphia colleges a  I professor of chemistry asked a student  j the other day, "Now, suppose you were  j called to a patient who had swallowed  i a heavy dose of oxalic acid, what would  ��������� you administer"':"'  "I would administer tbe sacrament."  i replied the student, who. by the way.  iis said to be studying for the ministry  land takes chemistry because it is ou-  "' ligatory.���������Argonaut.  Reaiton  For the Hit.  "Was Mrs. Gabbot's 'conversazione'  a success?"  "Decidedly.   Everybody chatted at a  great rate."  "How did she ever manage It?  "Oh she had a musical programme,  .������ou kVwt that lasted all through^  ASTHMA -SURE FREE'  Asihmalene Lirinsrs Instant Relief and Permanent  1 *' ,  Cure in All Cases.  SKNT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON'RECEIPT OF  POSTAL.  Write Your Name and Address Plainly.  There is nothing like Aithmalene, It  brings instant relief, even in the worst  ca.es. It cures when all else fai.s. '  . The Rpv. C F. Wells, of Villa Ridge,  111., says-: ''Your trial buttle of A-.thma-  l ue received in'good condition. I cannot  tull'you how thankful I feel for the good  derived from it. . I whs a si -ve, chained  with outrid son throac and Asthm* fur ten  years. I despaired of ever beiug cured. I  uavv your advertisement for the cure of this  dreadful and tormenting dint-a?*1, Asthma,  and thought you had oveispoken yourselves  but resolved to give it a trial. To my  astonishment, the trial acted like a charm.  Send me a full-sized bottle."  Rev. Dr. Morris Wechsler,  Rabbi of the Ooug. Buai Israel.  New York, Jan. 3, 1901.  Das Tafi- Bros'. Medicine Co ,   ���������  Gentlemen:    Your Aithmaleiie. is   an   excellent reme'ely for Asthma aud Hay   Fever,   '  and its composition alleviates   all    troubles'  which combine with Asthma.    Its successes  ascouishing and wonderful. .  After having it carefully analyzed, v\e can state that Asthmalene   cont- ins no   opium,  ' morph'iue, chlorof^iui or ether.    Very.trul> yours, ��������� '  REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSLER.  0 1-   ._  Avon Spkijsgs, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1901.  .Dr., Taut Bros   Mhwcine Co.  GeiiLletiicii: I w rue this testimonial from a sense of duty, havint; tested the wonder-,,  fui effect of your Asthmalene, for the cure of Authuia.' , My wife has been afil.cled v'ith  spasmodic asthma tor the past 12 yeurs. Having exhaused my own *kil. as wtll as  many others, I chanced to aee your sign upon your windows on 130th street New Y<>rk, 1  at once obtained a bottle oi Asthmalene. My wife oommenced takiug it about, 'he first < f  November. I very soon noticed-a radicil improvement., Aster us-ing one bottle lur  Asthma has disappeared and she is entirely fre.j from all symptoms. I eel that I can col-  sisient'y ucommeua the meHiciiie to all who are afflicted wit'i thi-- distressing disease.  (        ' Yours respectfully, O. D. PHELPS, M.D.  Dk. Taw nitos   Medicine Co. Feb. 5,f, 1901.  Guukiem'eu: I was troubled with Asthma for 22 years. I have tried numerous remedies, but they have all failed. I ran across } our advertisement auii started with a trial  bottle. I touud relief at once. I have since purchased your full-xizw bottle, and I am  ever gratefu . I have family of foui ohildten, and f- r six years was unable towi.ik. I am  now iu the best of health and ooiug business every day. ,'i'his testimony y.-u cau make use  of as you fee ii       -,* ���������    '  Home address, 235.Riviugtou Street. , ,'S   RAPHAEL,  67 East 129th St., NvwY r; City,  TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON  OF POSTAL.  Rk  CEIPT  Do not delay.    Write at'ouce, adurtssing DR. TAFT   BROS.   MEDICINE   CO.,   79  E st 130th St., New York City.  SOLD    BY   ALL   DRUGGISTS.  NOTICE IS HERE Y GIVEN that ap-  plioa ion will he made to the Legislative  Assembly of the Province of British Colum-  ni i at its present session for an Act to incorporate a Company wirh power to cod-  stiuot, equip, maintain and ������perate a siugle  or double line of railway, to be operated by  steam, electricity or any other mode or  power, ot and from the City of Victoria in  the province of Bntiah Columbia, thence  Ni rth west by the most fea-ible route to a  p..int at or near Seymour Narrows in the  said Province of British Columbia; and  with power to construct, establish, maintain and continu-lly operate a railway  ferry steamship service for. the purpose of  ������������������rausferring for reward pisst-ngera a d pas-  auger and freght cars from the .'aid t-oint  at or near Seymour Narrows in Vancouver's  Island to a point ou the Mainland of the  Province of Britibh Columbia; and with  further powers tc build, <quip, maintain  and operate branches of the said railway  from auy point ou the main line'thereof to  any point in Vancouver It-land ; aud with  poVer to build and operate tramways iu  connection with the said railway ; and with  power to baud, construct, t'quip, maintain  aud operate telegraph and telephone lines iu  connection witii the said railways aud  branches ; and with power to generate electricity for the supply of light, heat aud  power, and for all, any and j very other  purpose   mentioned  in  Sections  80, 81, 82  cttid S3 of the *' Water Clauses Consolidation Ace, 1S97," 'and to do everything  necessary or incidental to the currying out  of all or any of the obje.cts referred to iu  the said sections; and win power to ex-  '���������rc'se all 'he powers giveu to the Company  b Parts IV and V of rhe '��������� Water Clauses  CiMisolid-iiion Act, 1897;" and with power  to build, own and maintain saw-mills ; and  to carry on a general express business, and  to build, maintain and operate bridgett,  roads, ways, ferries, wharves, docks,  steitmhoats, steamships, coal bunkers, aud  other works; and to make traffic or other  arrangement, with railway, steamship or  steamboat and other companies ; aud with  power to expropriate lauds for the purposes  of the Company and to acquire land bonuses,  privileges or other aid trom any Govern-  :> enf, or Municipality, or other persons or  bodies corporate, ana wi n power to build  wagon nails to be i-std in me construction  ot such railway and in advance of same, and  to levy and coll fc t >ils from all persons  using, and on al fre ght passing over any of  such roads buil by the Company, whether  before or after tht. oonctructiou of the railway, and with power to sell out its undertaking ; and with all other usual, i.ecetsary  or ii cideutal rights, or privileges as may be  necessary or conducive to the above objects,  or any of them.  Dated at Victoria, B.C.;  this 24th day of  March, A.p., 1902.  ROBERTSON & ROBERTSON,  Solicitors for the Applicants  ASSESSMENT ACT AND PROVINCIAL  REVENUE TAX.  Comox District.  XT OT1CE is hereby given, in- accoidanc  ^      with the   Statutes,    that   Provincial  vi nue Tax, and   all    taxes   levied   under  e Assessment, Act, are   now   due   for tlie  yeai  1901.    Ah th<* above named taxes  collectible within the Comox District are   payable at my office, at  the "Court House Cumberland.. Assessed taxes are collectible   at  the following rates, viz:���������  If paid on or before June 30th, 1901:���������  Thret .fifths of one   per   cent,   on   real  property.  Two   aud  one-half   per   cent,  ou  assessed  value of wild land.  One-half of one per cent,   on   personal property.  Upon *uch excess of income���������  Class A.���������On one thousand dollars and not  exceeding ten thousand dollars,   one   per  cent,   up   to five  thousand   dollars,   aud  two per cent, on the remaiuder: >  Class B.���������-On ten thousand dollar, and not  exceeding twenty  thousand  dollars,   one  and one-half per cent, up to ten thousand  dollars, aud two and one-half per cent, on  the remainder :  Class C.���������On twenty thousand dollars, and  not exceedius; forty thousaud dollars, two  and one half per cent, up to twenty thousand dollars, and three   per cent,   on  the  remainder :  Class D.���������On all others.in excess   of  forty  tnousaud dollars, three per   cent,   up   to  forty thousand   dollars,   and   three   and  one-half per cent, on the remainder.  If paid on or after 1st July, 1901:���������  Four fifths of one per cent, on real propert*.  Three per ceut.   on  the   assessed   value   i f  wild land.  Thre������:-quarters of one per cent, on pereonal  property."  On vo much of the income of any person as  exceeds one thousaud dollars, in accordance with the following classifications;  up >n such excess the rates shall be,  namely :���������  Class A.���������On one thousand dollars, and not  exceeding ten thousand dollars, one and  one-half per cent, up to five thousand  do.l-trs, and two and one-half per cent,  on rhe remainder :  Class B ���������On ten thousand dollars, and not  exceeding twenty thousand dollars, two  per cent, up to ten thousaud dollars, and  three per cent, on the remainder :  Class C.���������On twenty thousand dollars, and  not exceeding forty thousand dollars,  three per cent, up to twenty thousand  dollars, and three and one-half per cent,  on the remaiuder :  Class D.���������On all others in excess of forty  thousaud dollars, thr e and one-half per  cent, up to forty thousand dollars, and  four per cent on the  remainder.  Provincial Revenue Tax  $3 per capita.  JOHN BA1RD,  Assessor and Collector.  Cumberland, B. C, Hth January, 1901.  My 22  Uiiion "��������� lire werji  THE  BEST  ppesh Lager Beei ,N the province  TEAM      Beer.   A!e,    and   Porter.  A reward of $5.00 will'be paid for information   leading  to   conviction o  persons witholding or destro3nng any -kegs  belonging   to  this  company  /  f i  IS  Ml  H*?NRY'-HETFKL.    Manan������r.     1  ESTABLISHED   1877.  INCORPORATED   1 898.  L  AUTHORIZED   CAPITAL, $100.000.  DEALERS    AND    EXPORTERS  RAW FURS  For Downright   Satisfaction,  MShlpment   after   Shipment,  Ship   Your   Goods   to   Vs.  Full    Prices    and    Imme  diate Payment' tvery Time.  Been Established 24 Years.  Write for Prices. Make Trial  Shipment.    Convince - Yourself.  *���������* j^wSHRTTi^ ������������������������ * ���������' V\vv^c*  SENECA and DEERSKINS.  McMillan Fur and Wool Co.  200-212 FIRST AVE. N.  MINNEAPOLIS,  MINNESOTA.  WRITE     FOR    PRICE    CIRCULARS.  'S   MONEY. IN   IT!  SHIP   YOUR  BJlfifflCCS.   DEERSKINS  IlHHJC.|<3   and SENECA      ,.--  MINNEAPOLIS. MINN.  High Prices. ,< Prompt Returns.  WRITE-FW VK1CK  CIKClJI.AUs^   :  Kftqumait & fteirao. Rv.  Steamship Schedule Effective Tues-  , day, Januaiy 21, 1902  . "City of   Nanaimo.  ���������  Leaves Victoria Tuesday. 6 a.m., for Nanaimo,   calling  at   North   Sarnich, .  ��������� Cowichan, . Musnraves,    Burgoyne,  Maple  Hay, Vesuvius, Chemainus,  Kuper, Thetis and Gabriola.  Leaves   N.-.naimn   Tuesday,  3   p.m.,   for  j  Union Wharf and Comox dir.ect.  Leaves Comox and Union Wharf Wednesday, 12 noon, for Nanaimo and  way ports.  Leaves Nanaimo Thursday, 7 a.m, for  Comox and way ports.  Leaves Comox Friday, 7 a.m., for "Nanaimo direct.  Leaves Nanaimo Friday, 2 p.m., for Victoria, calling at Gabriola, Fernwood,  Ganges, Fulford and North Saanich.  Leaves Victoria Saturday,. 7 a.m., for  , Island Ports, calling at North Saanich, Cowichan, Musgraves, Bi>rgoyne  Maple Bay, Vesuvius, Chemainus,  Kuper, Thetis, Fernwood, Ganges,  Fulford and Victoria, when freight or  passengers offer.  Special arrangements can be made for  steamer to call at other ports than those  above mentioned when,sufficient business  is offered.  The Company reserves the right to  change sailing dates and hours of sailing-  without previous notice.  GEO. L.    OT3RTMTEY,  Traffic Manager  Black Liannnd Nursery  QUARTER WAY,Wellington Road  HDT0HBB80I   I FERRY  20,000 Fruit Trees to choose from.  Larg-e Assortment of Ornamental  Trees, Shrubs and Everg-aeons.  Small Fruits   in   Great   Variety.  Orders   by   -mail   promptly   attended to.  s!2te.  P. O   BOX,  190.  SJVEOIKIIEJ  KURTZ'S OWN  KURTZ'S PIONEER, or  K   F"IZ'������ SPANISH BLOSSOM  ,��������� CIGARS  g!0F'The Best in  P. C.   and  made,  by Union Labor in  Kurtz & Go's,  pioneer 6igar ifactot  Vancouver,   B.C.  TO THEgUEAF.  A rich lady cured of her Deafness and Noises in the Head by  Dr. Nicholson's Artif cial Ear  Drums, gave $ J 0,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people unable to  procure the Ear Drums may have  them free Address No. 14517  The Nioho'pon fnslilute, 78  Eighth Avenue, New York, U.S.A.  11  i'l  "VI  ;<<  1       T������  .Ml  I  J  il  M  '9  > 31  I  4-1 /  (6  \  W'>  v\  I  lit'1  J  I,  r  it  1!  A  hi  V f  K  i'  i'.  I.  THE CUMBERLAND NEWS  CUMBERLAND. B.C.  tm  A  LOOK AND.A SMILE.  An  Incident   Wliicli- Explained   Mara.  McXvinlcy'tt Luck at Crib'ocsc.  When the late President McKiniey  and party went west not many months  before he was shot:, Mrs. McKiniey  went too. While talking with Mr. Scott  , one chiy, the man whose lirm built the  Oregon. Mrs. McKiniey'said, "Oh, do  ' you play cribbagc, Mr. Scott?"  "Yes," was tlie great shipbuilder's  answer. .  "Well, so,do I," said Mrs. McKiniey.  "I wish you would play,a game with  U30."  "I should be^ delighted to do'so," was  Iho reply.,    -' .    "  Later, as - President McKiniey and  *VIr. Scott were looking-over the hitter's  big plant, Mrs. McKiniey not being  present, the president snid, "Oh, by  the way, Mr.-Scott, didn't I hear you  and Mrs. McKinley^'arrapging to play  cribbage some limeV" '_'   '  '  "Yes,", said, Mr."-Scott, "we are going  to play." -, ��������� -      .-  ���������  "Well, what kind"of a player are  you?" asked tbe'president.'  "Oh, pretty fair/. I guess. I play a  pretty good game." ',  "Well, so do I," said Mr. McKiniey.'  "But .do you know, it, may seem  strange, but it is a fact, "that I have  never been able to play well enough to  'beat<Mrs. McKL.loy.", As he said this  he looked at Mr. Scolt with a significant smile. Their eyes met. , It' was  enough. Mr. Scott understood, and it  wasj safe to say that he did not-beat  Mrs. McKiniey.- "'  ��������� Ronnd   ������Tie   World   by   flTnil.  . A postal card sent from-Paris to Paris via Moscow, Vladivostok and San  Fr:snCisco made the trip around the  world in'eighty days at a cost ot "Z  cents. ," ' r  rr -^\  'Haw Winds  -AND-  Wet Weather  cause the Colds that cause  , Pneumonia and Consumption*   ���������       ������!������������������������������������       '.-  Shiloh's  Consumption  Cure  cures the cold, heals the  lungs and makes you well.  SHIL0H cures Consumption  and all Lung and Throat  Troubles; and Coughs and  Colds in'a day. Positively  guaranteed.   25 cents.   ������������������   ���������  C. Wells & Co., Toronto,  MARKETS.  WHEAT���������During the past  has seemed an. unusually  thing 'for traders to make  minds, as     the    chances     of  week   it  difficult,  up their  the" pre-  Write to S.  Can.,  for a free trial bottle.'  Karl's Clover Root Tea Cures Headache  C. C. Richards & Co\ ��������� ,     _  Gentlemen,���������I have used MINAUD'S  LINIMENT ' on my vessel and^ in my  family for years, and for every day  ills and accidents' of life I consider  it 1ms no equal.  start' on a voyage  it    cost' a dollar a  not  if  I   would  without   it,  bo title.'    a  e    i; .CAPT.'  SchrT  "Stbrko,,'/  askar-" "* --  ��������� ���������- _  '���������'-'���������' '    t'  ���������F,.R.' DESJARDIN.;  St" Andre,   Kamour-  Jt  an  ris  or.  certain 'that, either "wise bear-  ignorant .'carriage "is caught,  as men take diseases one qf._ ifriother;  therefore,- let\them-take-'he'qcnof the  company .-^-Shakespeare..  ."!*'^������~������--   ���������  There never T7a9,-and'never".Tyill be, a  universal panacea, in one remedy,', for all ills  to which flesh" is^. heir���������the very nature of  many curatives being such that were the  germs of other and differently seated diseases rooted in the system of the patient���������  what would relief one ill in turn would aggravate the other. We have, however, in  ��������� Quinine Wine, when obtainable in a sound  unadulterated state, a remedy for many and  grievous ills. By its gradual and judicious  use the frailest systems aro led into convalescence and strength by the influence which  Quinine exert3 on nature's own restoratives.  It relieves the drooping spirits of those with  whom a chronic state of morbid despondency and' lack of interest in life is a disease,  and, by-tranquilizingr the nerves, disposes to  sound and refreshing sleep���������imparts vigor  to the action of the blood, which, being  stimulated, courses throughout the veins,  strengthening the healthy animal functions  of the system, thereby making activity a  necessary result,, strengthening the" frame,  and giving life to the digestive organs, which  naturally demand increased substance���������result, improved appetite. Northrop & Lyman,  of Toronto have given to the public their  superior Quinine Wine at the usual rate,'and.  gauged by the opinion of scientists, this  wine approaches nearest perfection of any ic  the market.   AH druggists sell it.  Len\o oiil the adjectives 'and let  the nouns do the fighting.���������-Ralph  Waldo  Emerson.  A Common  Bred Cow  When toned-up'by-  Dick's Blood Puri'-.  fier, will; give   as  much, and as rich'  inilkasahighly  bred aristocratic  Jerjiey'cowgives  upon-ordinary  feed, -aiid  a Jersey,  cow when  given.  DICK'S  BLOOD PURIFIER  ��������� will -wonderfully increase her.'yield  cf milk.   It saves feed too, because .  a smaller amount of well digested  food'satisfies the demands of the  system and every.particle of nour-"  sishment sticks.   ���������  50 cents a package.  Iteming, Miles & Co., Agents,  . MONTREAL.  Write far Book on Cattle and I-Tor.-as fxia.  Times of-general calamity and confusion have ever been "productive of  the greatest minds.' The -purest ,,ore  is''.produced from "the hottest" furnace,_ and the brightest thunder-bolt  is ..elicited from tho "darkest storm.���������  Cp.l.tori;._   ��������� .-j';-"..  GRAVEL&URED  REMARKABLE     CASE     OF  PAINFUL DISEASE.-  THIS  sent situation in the wheat trade.  Last week trade showed itself active  a,ndj markets buoyant, but in the interval between Friday and Monday  there was an increase of showers  over Kansas ans adjoining territory,  and on Monday 'the speculative markets in the States felt the effects of  this strongly, and a" drop of 1c to  l^ic took place. A more confident  feeling resulted on Tuesday, but on  Wednesday another bad break took  place, resulting in a drop of 1c to'  P/je. 'Since then some renewal of  confidence is evident, but in the week  prices show a decline of lc to iyxb.  as compared with closing, prices on  Friday of last, week. The rains and  more favorable weather over a large  area' of the winter wheat in tiie  States have imparted a. 'somewhat  more encouraging- feeling as to the  prospects for the, crops over such  area, but we think the -improvement'  ��������� amounts, rather to' the saving ,of a  portion of what was promising to  be almost a lost crop had the adverse  weather been continued rather than  the ' establishing ,of anything'that  could now turn out a fairly good  yield.  1 Manitoba wheat" has been very  quiet and .demand extremely light.  On,Saturday-last thj value of 1 northern-in store Fort William, spot or  May delivery, was To^ic, and 2 n'orr  thern 73c. On Wednesday these  prices were down to 74c 3. northern,  and 72c 2 northern, and since then  ���������they have advanced again to 74-;4c 1  northern, and 72%c 2. northern, at  which prices sales' were made yesterday, although for tho'most part sellers' were holding for 75c 1 northern,  and 73c 2'northern. 1 hard is offered -at -7Sc spot "or. May delivery in  store Fort William without  buyers.  Education  IN ITSELF.    THAT IS WHAT CAN BE  JUSTLY CLAIMED FOB  THE GLOBE  TORONTO  CANADA'S  LEADING NEWSPAPER  Its news-gathering facilities���������the industrial", social, commercial or political  events of the world���������are not excelled by any paper in America. If you are  living west of North Bay you can have the early morning edition (including the big Saturday illustrated) for onlv $3.00 per annum. Take advantage of this GREAT HALF-PRICE OFFER TO-DAY.  Address:   THE GLOBE, Toronto  This is the Page Standard II Bar Fenco, made of "Paoq" wiro which iz twice as strong as  common wire. The continuous coil, note wavy nnpearsnee, allows for e^nansicn and con  traction which is important owing to Canadian climate., Our upright wires  -.-,-��������� ..    j  .     ._-       ���������   , ~~ ^.^'B��������� 1nremone piece  and have strength or about 800 poundv,.   If made of .pieces spliced at each horizontal,' they  about S'iD pounds.   We> also make gates, ' " "  would have a strength of only   .  poultry netting, nails and staples,  . ��������� ornamental fences^  The Pane Wirt; Fence Co., Limited. W?.ffccryi!!e. Ont.     6  EOSS & ROSS.  General -Agents, Box 633." Winnipeg,  Man  It is be/tter. to marry  a crying  man than  a hair-pulling one!  wo-  Monkey Brand Soap makes copper like  gold, tin like silver, crockery like marble,  and windows like crystal. X4  He is happiest, be he king ,or pea.S7,  ant, who1 finds his happiness at home  ���������Geothe.  THE BLOOM  OF HEALTH.  How.   to    Keep Little    Ones   Bright',  '-.   Active and   'Healthy.    -  finding  Reuben Draper, of Bristol, Que.,  Who Was a Victim, Finds Relief  and a.Permanent Cure���������He Tells  of His Sufferings, and How lie  Left His Trouble Behind.  Minari's Liniment Cures Garget in GWs.  I have looked to the happiness of  my. countrymen tfs the object to  which, my efforts ought to be directed.���������Lord John Russell.  Bristol, Que., May 17.���������(Special)���������  No disease can cause more severe  and dreadful pain than gravel. Reuben Jlraper, of this place, was taken  ill with this awful'trouble about five  years ago. He was cured and so  many have asked him how it was  done that he has decided to g-ive the  whole story for publication :  "About five yeiT's ago I was taken  ill with the Gravel. I suffered great  pain, so I, sent .for a doctor. He  gave me some medicine and'came Lo  see me twice afterwardo. -hut my. disease was not gone,, and in a short  time  I  had  another very bad attack.  "This  time  L sent for another  doc-  .FLO.UR-Hungarian Patent S2.05 p?r  sack ���������.of 98; pounds; G-leno'ra/ f>l .90;  Alberta. SI.70; Manitoba, S1..j0; and  <XXXX; ������1.20.   -  - GROUND FEED���������Demand is-steady  and prices remain unchanged as -follows : Oat chop, per ton," S27.50;  barley , chop, 521.50; _ mixedr. barley  barley and bats.. S24:.50;' oatmeal  feed, S1L.50; oil cake,' .$27":  . OATS���������There is not very . much  business; doing in oats just at pres-r  ent, as the weather is not.favorable  ~for> traffic- A little demand has been  experienced from the east, "which has  been met on a basis of 40c, per bushel for No. 2 white ,at Fort .William,  the same figure as we_quoted a week  ago. Local dealers ���������'are also paying  the- same prices as a week- ago for  their supplies. We quote :" No. 1  white, in carlots on track. Winnipeg,  per bushel, "42 to 44c; No'. '2 white,  40 to 41c;' feed o'ats,' 37 to 38c: seed  oats, 45 to '50c. At country points  farmers are getting 28- to 30c for  No. 2 white oats. Street oats are  not offering.  BARLEY���������Receipts   are   very   light,'  and    the market.holds firm at 40 to  42c - for   malting grades,  and.SS to  40c for feed.  ��������� ELiAXSEBD���������Dealers-    are     asking  bushel for seed flax.  S2J0O"  with   about   the  same  weaker  results,  all   the  .. OUT OF SORTS.���������Symptoms, Headache, lo?s  of appetite, furred tonguo, and g-nerul indisposition. Those symptoms, if neglected, develop  into Hcute disease. It is a trifco saying that an  "ounce of provention i3 worth a pound of cure,"  *vnd a���������'little attention-at this point may save  months of sickness and large doctor's bills. For  this complaint tako from two to three of Parme-  loe's Vegetable Pills on going.to bed, and one or  two for thr;e nights in succession, and a cure  will be effected. >  Flowers are always fit presents,  because they are a . proud assertion  that a ray of beauty outvalues alL  the utilities in the world.���������Emerson.  lOl'  only  1  was     gettin,  time.  "Then -a man advised me to try  i������odd's Kidney Pills, for he said they  had cured his mother. I. thought L  would try them,  and bought a  box.  "Just one week after I began 'the  ti eatment I passed a stone as large  a-5 a small bean, and four days -later  another about the size of a grain of  barley���������this gave me great relief aud  I  commenced   to   feel   better  and     to  strength  right away  Excellent Seasons exist why Dr. Thomas'  Ecieetr.c. Oil should be used by persona  troubled with - affections . of the throat or  lung?, jores' upon the skin, rheumatic pain,  corns, bunions, or external injuries. The  reasons are that it is speedy, pure and unobjectionable, whether taken internally or applied outwardly.  Love feels no burden, thinks. nothing of. trouble, attempts what is  above its strength, pleads no excuse  of impossibility; for it thinks all  things lawful for itself and all  things   possible.���������Thomas   a  Kempis.  W. N. U. No. 377.  gain  "That was five years ago. and I  have not had any trouble in that  way since. I have the stones in a  small bottle, and anyone can see  them who wishes. Dodd's Kidney  Fills certainly saved my life."  The story of Mr. Draper will bo  good news to many sufferers who  may not have known that Dodd's  Kidney Pills always cure Gravel and  Stone in the Bladder.  What has1 cured this gentleman and  hundreds of other very had cases  should cure any one. and those who  may be afflicted as Mr. Draper was  should try Dodd's Kidney Pills.  When a man gets up in the world  a good reputation often comes in  handy as a parachute.  Minarfl's Liniment Cnres Distemper,  A man's reach should exceed his  grasp, or what's a heaven for ?  Robert Browning.  per  HAY���������Receipts --are light, and the  market is SI higher at $8 to SO per  ton for fresh baled. Loose' hay is  not offering to  any extent.  POULTRY���������There    is   "very     little  poultry in  the market.    Chickens are  j worth 12V2C per pound for fresh kill,  ed.' and turkeys ~\.2\<p to 15c, according to quality.'  BUTTER-Creamery��������� Two of the  country factories commenced operations this week but so far have shipped no butter. The weather is not  favorable for pasture or traffic consequently milk gathering . will be  a slow- process until it gets drier.  Commission houses are quoting 21c  to 22c per pound for choice creamery  butter in tubs or rolls, while other  grades range down to 3 0c for round  lots.  BUTTER���������Dairy���������Receipts of dairy  butter are very light. Oldest traders here say they cannot remember  'the market- being so light of stocks.  As high as-20c could be obtained on  a commission basis for fresh made  choice butter.  EGGS���������Supplies are light and the  market holds firm at 9^ to 10c per  dozen for fresh case eggs at country  points'.  CATTLE,���������Some cattle have already  been shipped cast to meet the excellent export demand. Butchers are  finding cattle very' scarce and hard  to obtain. For choice beef animals  they are ;now paying as high.-as 5c  per pound off cars here. The general  range of prices is from-.4^c to 5c.  There is a good demand for stockers,  and the westward movement of these  is now quite, heavy. Yearlings are  worth as high as S1G per head at  point of shipment. Two year olds  are bringing from $20 to  ������22.  HOGS���������Hogs are in very light  supply, and hold firm at 6.14c oer  pound for best packing weights, off  cars here.  MILCH COWS��������� Cows are very  scarce, and good milkers readily  bring S45 each in this market. As  most of the stock offerings are poor,  they bring less money, the range being from $35 to $45.  ���������   - t   >  Every mother knows < that little  children, need careful attention���������but  they do not need strong drugs. When  baby is peevish, cross or unwell,' it  is an unfortunate fact'that too many  mothers dose them with so-called  "soothing" medicines which stupefy  and put the little one into an .'unnatural sleep, but do not remove the  cause of* the trouble. What is wanted  to make th? little ones, bright, cheerful and well is Baby's'Own'Tablets,  which will promptly cure,-colic, sour  stomach, indigestion, constipation,'  diarrhoea, simple fevers and teething troubles. ' They give children  sound refreshing sleep, because they  remove'' the cause ��������� of ' the trouble.  These tablets are guaranteed t,o contain no opiate or other harmful  drug.' Mrs. James Found, Valentia,  Out., says: "Before 1 got "Baby's  Own Tablets my Baby was very pale  and. delicate and'so peevish that 1  had '.to'���������walk. the "floor .with him day.  and night: The first tablet I .gave  him helped him, aud that night he  slept soundly. Since then the tablets have made him perfectly well,  and he is now- a fine, healthy looking baby, and is getting quite fat.  1 would not be without the tablets  if they cost a dollar a box."  Baby's Own Tablets are good for  children'of all ages and*are taken as  readily as candy. ' Crushed to a  powder they can be 'given with absolute safety to the youngesj,. weakest baby. Sold by all druggists "or  sent postpaid at 25 cents ta box. by  addressing the Dr. Williams Medicine"  Co.,  Brockville.   Ont.  HALCYOif HOT SPRINGS, B. C.  "Without, question tlie best , and  most effective springs in Canada for  the cure of rheumatism, - kidnoy or.  liver, troubles. The medicinal' qualities of the water ''are unequalled.'  Splendid hptel accommodation 1 fine  fishing and hunting. An ideal spot  -for the invalid.  He is only advancing in life whose  heart  is  getting ��������� softer,    his     blood  warmer,   his   brain   quicker,    and -his <  spirit  entering    into Jiving ��������� peace.���������"  John Ruskin.   '  DYSPEPSIA OR INDIGESTION i������ occasioned by tho want of action in tho biliary ducts,  loss of vitality in tho stomach lo secrete the-  gastric juices, without which d'gesfcion cannot  goon; alsobeinsrthe principal c-nuseof He d-  acho. Parmeloes Vegetable Pills taken before  going: to bed, for a while, never fail to give re-.  lief and effect a cure. Mr. W. P. Ashdown, Ash-'  'dewn, OuL., vvrices: " Parmelee's Pills &ie U���������--  ing (In lead against ten other makes I have iu  stSck." - . *���������  Let a man -overcome anger by love,  lot him 'overcome evil by good, let  him1 overcome the"greedy by liberality.  the>;liar by truth.���������j-Buddlia.  liiiari's Liniment Cures Distemper.  Of ,all the advantages ..which , come  to any young'-man, I believe_.it to beL  demonstrably    true -that  poverty" is'  the greatest.���������J.-G-. Holland.  A man who lives entirely'for himself becomes at last obnoxious to  himself. -There, .is no weariness like  the weariness.of a man who is wearied of himself, and that is the awful  demises which follows the selfish  life.���������Rev.   J.  PI.   Jowett.  WiLL CURE  difficulty oi  breathing,  tightness of  thft chest, wasting away of flesh, throat  troubles,   consumption,   coughs,   catarrh,  colds, pneumonia'and pleurisy.  A SAMPLE FREE BY MAIL to every sufferer.  Pcjl-Mo is for sale by all druggists at  $1.00 per large  bottle,  and   15 cents for  small bottle, or direct from  THE PUL-MO CO., TORONTO, G?7T.  DR.A.W.CHASE'S OK������  CATARRH CURE,.. ^UC  IS sent direct to the diseased .  parts by, the Improved Blower."  Heals the ulcers, clears the air -  passages/stops droppings In the  -��������� throat and  permanantly cures  Catarrh and Hay Fevif. Blower-  free. All dealers, or Dr. A.-VV. Chase ;  Medicine Co., Toronto and Buffalo.';  He,   w  aids  in  sary,  is  , e  ho in dubious circumstances  deeds when deeds are neces-  the  true friend.���������Plautus.  Every duty which ������is bidden to  'wait returns with seven fresh duties  at its back.���������Charles Kingsley.  No  ositv  man  admires  in  preset  bing  a doctor's gencr-  large doses.  4tL>f00t 1HCA ROOMS  Eoputauion for durability established. Eloveh  years' trial. Oursovero frost has no elljct on it.  lie ware of .Americau paper leltin^ which cracks  incur cl.nmio.  \fi*'.  C3>.  FONSECA.  TiG Bigginsc.\e.. Whimper. Sole Acen^  HEKBAGEUM.  Real Estate Agent.   Issuer of Marriage Lieonsos  $100 Reward $100.  The readers of this paper will bo pleased to  learn that there is at least one dreaded disease  that science has been able to cure in all its  stages and that is Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh  (Jure is the only positive cure now known to the  medical fraternity. _ Catarrh being a constitutional disease, requires a constitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally,  acfcingdirectly upon the blood and mucoussur-  faces of tho system. ,thereby destroying tho  foundation of the disease, and giving tho patient  strength by,building up the constitution ana  assisting nature in doing its work. The proprietors have so much faith iu its curative powers,  that they offer one hundred dollars for any case  that it fails to cure.    Send for list of tostimon-  ������Address,    F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, 0  Sold by druggists, 75c.  Halls Family Pills are the best.  Conscience has no more to do with  gallantry than with politics.���������Sheridan.  HOUSEHOLD  HINTS.  A cheerful face  \'cv an invalid as  Franklin.  is   nearly  as    good  healthy weather.���������  Where   the   cause   is  just   the  small  will conquer the great.���������Sophocles.  One ounce of Sunlight  Soap is worth more than  two ounces of common soap.  REDUCES  EXPENSE  A������U Tor the Octagon Bar :oi  Soft linen crash makes the best towels  for drying silver.  In washing silver no soap should he  used, as it is apt to give it a pewtery appearance. '  All the mend ins of the week should be  regularly and promptly done and never  permitted to accumulate.  Plaster of paris mixed with a cold solution of alum makes a slow setting, but  very hard cement for stoneware.  A canton flannel bag put on the broom  when sweeping malting takes up the dust  and saves much wear on the matting.  Cushion pillows filled with silk floss, it  is said, retain their shape and elasticity  better than those filled with cheap feathers or so called clown.  In hanging pictures the cords should be  as near as possible the color of the wall,  and the center of the picture should not  be much above the eye line.  Wringing out a cloth in hot water and  wiping the furniture with it before putting on the furniture cream will result in  a very high polish that will not linger  markJ  (''".-..".I  '���������1  I  '*' '        '��������� -si  " "'. 'll  -I  '    .      .        f|  ^1  KM Mif iftMfti ������!*���������[������������������������������������  ISSUED    EVERY    WEDNESDAY.  Subscription JjJl 50 ayoar, in advance-  1-vJ  IJ  \'?-l  i  \i  I*;  .TO. 33. Hnoerso-t, 3������&itor.  (  (tS* Advertisers v/ho want their ad  changed-, should Ret copy in by  3 a.m.. day before issue.  Suh-.cribei'H     failing    to    receive      Thk  ti uws reguiarly will confer a favor by   notifying the   oifrce.  Job Work Strictly O. O. D.  Transient Ads Cash in Advance.  Political Morality.  It must be very humiliating to  good  citizens   throughout  the Dominion to rend the reports of contested   election  ca?e6   which   have  recently   taken  place  in the   Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. That  bribery and  corruption   have,beerr  rife   at previous eleciions  to gome-  .extent,was well known;  but now it  -Appears to be perfectly legitimate,  for one'party at least,  to resort to  means  to   carry   eleciions" which  would  do credit  to the celebrated  .New York Tammany ring.   .'A case  was tried before one of the Ontario  Courts lately in which several' bal-  l\t. papers in dispute were scrutinized by the presiding "judge, who  'said they were plainly marked  for  Mr   Brown,  and, were so counted.  The Court'adjourned until the' following day, when tbe further consideration, of the case was resumed.^  The  disputed  ballot  papers   were  again  brought  before   the   Judge,  and on a close scrutiny it was found  thiat new marks had been placed on  the ballot papers between the rising  iand the sittii g cf the court.     The  Judge was staggered at the audacity-  of the party orparties guilty of the  felonious ac/.ion, and. at once rati-.  fied his former ruling.' In the Province of Quebec, the same low state  of morality prevails,.but some very  clumsy work'is often done.     One  - election   agent accepted  a bribe to  c let the  returning officer do  as  he  ..pleased.     Names of  electors were  entered as having -voted whon'evtr  cane to the poll, and  ballots .'were  ,put in the box for them. It appears  that  such things  are common   at  Quebec eleciions.    We hope that no  Eastern, pplitical missionaries will  ever  introduce  this   low   state   oi  political morality intoB C. ' There  was' one attempt  made to tamper  with  ballot   papers   in   the   New  Westminster   district   some   years  ago, but its purpose failed.     Some  elections  have been  protested, but  the only successful protest was that  which happily induced  Col. Prior  to withdraw from Dominion  politics, and to re-enter the Provincial  arena. Bribery and corruption were  as   in    all   election   prosecutions,  charged against him by his opponent  as a matter of course;  but   t  was the hiring of carriages to convey electors to   the polls   that Inst  Col. Prior his seat, an act of which  his   opponent   was equally guilty.  If elections in B.C. are in the future .  to be conducted on party lines,   we  tru?t that the low political morality  which appears to he so prevalent in  elections  in   Ontario   and   Quebec  will not be introduced.  %  LOCALS.  @*  ft  All persons desiring first-clas-  photographs taken should avail'  themselves of the services of Paull's  Studio, as this will no the last opportunity this year.  PHOTOGRAPHS.-���������We have made  arrargements enabling us to remain  at Cumberland until next Wednesday, July 23rd ; as this is the last  chance to hiive your photos taken  right at homeland and at reasonable rates, call at once. No prepayment required.     Paull's Studio.  '���������    Dear   Mrs   B , in reply to your inquiry as to which is the best tea to u;>e,,I  would say that in my opinion ic rests between the'Blue Ribbon and Monsoon  Packet Teas. If you like rich', strong tea, then -Blue Ribbon-is undoubtedly tlie  best, but should your taste be for a delicate and veryaflavory tea 1 would advise  you-to call on C. J. MoORE for a packet of Monsoon. ' Personally, I drink Blue  Ribbon in the morning and Monsoon at 5 o'clock, but then, you know, 1 am a  perfect crank about tea.   ��������� \ , , ' '<  Yours truly,    ' -     '  , SARAH GRUNDY.  It is reported that Miss Milligan  has been appointed teacher, at  Courtenay. Miss Milligan has made  herself deservedly popular .during  the many years she has taught in  Cumberland, and it is with regret  that -we hear of her departure, however, Cumberland's loss will be  certainly CourLenay's, gain,  . The July number of "The Coast"  ���������is to hand and is an exceptionally  good number. The contents embrace numbers at once varied and  unusually interesting. Since, February, 1901, the circulation has increased from 1,250 to 2,900,r Subscription $l.oo per year. 'Address,  "The Coast" Publishing Companj'  Seattle, Wash.  PIANO   TUNING.  MR OWENS'will arrive in Cumberland on the 23rd, prepared to  visit his many patrons who< require pianos tuned perfectly.  , .MUNICIPALITY OF THE.  CITY'-OF    CUMBERLAND.  ���������: 1902 :���������  Financial. Statement  From 1st Jany. to 30th June.  RECEIPTS  1902���������Jany. 1st���������  By/Balance, ' 3    15 14  Road Tax  318 00  Sidewalk Tax  SO 75  Trado Licences  1002 50  Scavenging Account  425 75  Scalo Account  59 25  Renl EsU'.o     1079 20  >  Police Coaro Account  83 00  Dog Tax '  32 00  $31)95 59  EXFEITDITUJRE '  ���������  1902���������June 30ch���������  Election's Account, 1902, $    70 25  Refund Road Tax  6 00  Isolation Hospital  16 45  Subscription to Band  30 00  Subscription to SportB, 26th July.. 25 CO  Sundries  27 40  Office' Account  35 80  Auditor for 1901  10 00  Advertising Account  20 05  Street Accouut  39 00  Sidewalk!  30 12  Fire Protection Account (Freight) ���������       85  Dog Tags ���������'  4 00  Tool Account  3 SO  Drains...... ................ 90 69  Horse Fjed Account.  50 50  Clerk's Salary to 30th June. 1902. 120 00  T. E. Banks���������Wages.  390 00  R. Hornal���������Wages......'.  405 00  Street Light, &c  63 86  Scalo Account '  118 00  Health        "   -       69 90  Police Court Account:-- .->  J. Abrauis���������Salary to 25 June, '02 60 00  Refund--Waller & Partridge���������Fine 28 00  ,'F. MoB. Young���������Costs  ' 16 50  Nail Accouut.  24 10  Cash advanced School Trustees.. -. 490 00  Balance ;  850 32  '      $3095 59  By Balance $ 850 32  Taxes due...     182 00  Sidewalk '.���������       54 35  Scavanger Accouut       35 00  .S112ll67  C o in miBiitf in iiiiii ii  LIABILITIES, -  c  Due on Contracts and Accounts,    Si 269 40  r.b>tn?_������tfru_uu_w  L.W. NUNNS. City Clerk.  Cumberland, B.C., i-iih July,- 1902.     . .  School Statement  From 1st Jany. to 30th June, 1902. '  RECEIPTS  To Cash advanced hy City $ 490 00  .  Rent'from Old School House. .        3 00  Government Grant to 30th June  -     1902   2078 70  ! ~        ��������� $2571  70  EXPENDITURE.  Teachers'Salaries $177000  Jsnitor .*.  120 00  Water Rates.".'' ';  5 00  Coal.....' '  25 00  Insurance'(3'years) to Jany., 1905 150 00  Printing '. '.: ' <  6 00  T. D. McLean���������Books, Ledgers, &c 8 00  Freight--Seats -.������  6 25  , Tarhell���������Out-house Supplies  26 45  Sundries  4 90  Ln.-er & Co--Supplies  3 55  ���������Kilpatrick���������Hauling Seats, &c... 6 55  Bakiuce  440 00  S2571  70  July Ist-By Balance   ������440 00  , L. W. NUNNS, City Clerk.  Cumberland, B.C., 14th July, 1902.'  VIOLIN  D. THOMSON.  Teacher  Music for Dances, &c., supplied  at short notice. Orders left with  Mr E. Barrett, at the Big Store,  will be promptly attended to.  SALE    OF  Farm Stock and Implements  Apply ���������" NEWS "   OFFICE.  2702  ' Sutairiiie for tlie HIS.  To Have something Swe  Take  a   Dry   Sponge   and   pour   on   it   a  bucket   of vvacer  It .will  swell   every time sure.             ....       ��������� ,��������� ��������� ���������  "f) UT we are not- Belling sponges, our line is   n  AS  SWELL     B UGGI ES--  of all kinds. We have just received a Car Load of Open and Top Buggies  wi-.h Steel and Rubber Tires. Expresses ox all kinds with Platform, Half-  Plaiform, Duplex and Elliptic or Hog-nose Springs. Buckboards, Carts,  Sulkies, etc., all of the most Up-to-Date Patterns and Finish. Guaranteed  for one year by the Makers and ourselves   JMAIia  STIAI  CARRIAGE   I0RIS  Ll   !    U IX L\  New Lines of���������  Rubber Garden Hose, Rakes,  Hoes, Axes, Hose Reels,  Spades, Shovels, Tarred and  Building Paper,      &c,     &c.  SivedI - LAWN SWINGS.  Dnnsmuir Avenue,  Cumberland, B.C.  f A. H. PEAGEY/'Mggiskytatip  P ^e^^c^-^ggq?>������gS^?3>    ^35=<S^S55^     ^gSSSgg^-'^'L-Kia&S^  w  % FOR   THAT COUGH,   TRY  ��������������� WINTER'S ������������������ -'���������   ."'.'��������� '.  ������ . '       1NSTA.NT/.  ' ���������' ���������-���������".'-  ������ ���������..-���������...  ..COUGH' CURE,  (((( '           :           it's ,a good one, and Iteliable       ' ,             "  Mj '                            FOR     OHILDllEN       AND    ' ADULTS.       '                ' ,   .  J������ ���������   We   are.-selling ��������� pur   TOILET, SOAPS   at ' Cost 'to   make'  jf room."      Finest"GLYCERINE   and   CASTILE   SOAP'S  ������ Away Down.  #������ ' "          "                            ���������'   ���������   ��������� '  W( ,              STORE OPEN Sundays from o-a.m. to 10 a.m.,  f) 0     and from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.  H) Dunsmuir Aye.,                     Cumberland, B.C.  B-12-'02  STANLEY   CRAIG,    Prop.  -   FOR   SALE ���������  MAPLEHURST   FARM,  HORNBY     ISLAND,  (comox district),  Containing���������'  230   Acres.    ���������   200 Acres Fenced.  About 400 healthy Bearing Fruit Trees.  70  Acres cleared up good, and in crops  and-hay land. ���������  -62  Acres  cleared  up  rough,   but  good  pasture..  85  Acres bush���������easy cleared.  13  Acres chopped and burned over.  The whole of the 230 acres is excellent  land and will grow any kind of grain and  root crops. 1= suitable for beef, dairy or  sheep.  15,000 Cedar Rails in boundary and  field fences.  Large 7-roomed house���������water in house  2 Story Bank Barn, 32 by 75 feet. Sheep  Barn, Hen Houses, etc.  Building's 5 years old. Abundance of  good water. Nearly 1 mile frontage on  Lambert Channel. l% miles from Government Wharf.  Cood Markets���������Cumberland (Union  Mines), Nanaimo and Victoria.  Good shooting ��������� Deer, grouse and  ducks plentiful.  Price,  $6000  1-3 casii,   balance,- 6 per cent.  Baldness; Successfully; Oared  Also, 246 Acres adjoining���������good land, at  $8 per acre.  Also, several   Good Grade Jersey Cows,  Heifers   to   calve, and Yearliny   and  Heifer Calves.  Apply' GEO. HEATHERBELL,  Hornby Island.  14-5-02  ITOTICE IS HEREBY'GIVEN that Bixty  jj days after date I intend to apply to the >  Honourable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following Crown lands: commencing at a post on the north shore of  Otter Bay, Chatham Point, Vancouver  Island, thence west forty chains, thecce  south forty chains, .thence east forty  chains, thence along tho shore to the  pMnt of commencement, containing 160  acres more or less.  ALBERT FRANCIS YATES,  Nanaimo. B.C.,  Dated the 4th day of April, 1902.  16-4-02    St  By PROF. SCHAFFNER  The Old   "NEWS" BUILDING.  A remarkable cure effected. Cures baldness of long standing by the use of PEERLESS HAIR.RESTORER and ELECTRIC  MASSAGE TREATMENT, both of which  combined destroy all germs and invigorate  the roots which stimulates circulation of the  active forces that feed the hair follicles.  From one to two months treatment  -will Restore Baldness of long standing:  Daily Treatment $15 per month.  Parasites cause all hair trouble. Dandruff  is caused by a germ which saps the hair������  vitality. Vaseline and oils are of no benefit  to the hair, as dandruff germs thrive in  them, as well as in all grease. To cure dandruff, which is preceded by, and a sure indication of, falling hair, it is necessary that  the dandruff germ be eradicated. From one  to three bottles of the Peerless Hair Restorer will cure the worst chronic case.  Advertise in the lews.  VIOLIN   TUITION.,  PROF C.H. SCHAFFNER, conservatory graduate, has decided to locate permanently in  Cumberland-is prepared to give  lessons to a limited number of  ���������pupils o'n the Piano, Violin and  voice   culture. WHITNEY  BLOCK.  NOTICE   IS  HEREBY GIVEN   tha  Daniel McDonald has made an Application for a Transfer of Licence from  William Lewis,fjCourtenay Hotel.  The Board of Licence Commissioners  will meet Monday, 21st July, 1902, at  Court-house, Comox, at the hour of 3  p.m., to consider the above application.  JOHN THOMSON,  Chief Licence Inspector.  Cumberland, B.C.,  23rd June, 1902.  25-6-02.  J  sir  >  -M  m  pi  ���������A  .j- ������; 1  .'VJ  #1  i  M  6;,  -Jtf'

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