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Creston Review Aug 28, 1914

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 s "ti',, i?ATiVH jjtti"-  _������    v  tt  ScP  v^.  ��������� - -"L-ltWr-^r  ;?Y.?7ff|rS  titism  fro. 33  CRESTON, B. C, F&1DAY, AUGUST 28, 1914  6th Yeae  Local and Personal  Made-to-measure suits, $15 and up���������  Weber.  Miss Neta Reid of Grand Forks will  he in charge of Erickson this term.  P. 0. Phillips, C, P. R. auditor, paid  Creston his official quarterly visit on  Tuesday.  Kokahee fishing in the Goat river is  reported excellent���������if you have the  right sort of bait.  Rev. W. G. Blake attended this  week the fall session of the Kootenay  Presbytery at Nelson.  Archie Fletcher, fruit inspector for  East Kootenay, is paying Creston an  official visit this week.  r The horticulture branch of the department of agriculture estimates this  year's apple crop at 600,000 boxes.  There was quite an exodus of Chinamen from Creston on Sunday when no  less than five of them left for the  coast.  Miss M. McBean of Fernie was a  Creston visitor last week, the guest of  her brother, -W. McBean of the Creston Drug Co.  The shooting season opens on Tuesday. Sportsmen should remember  that only twelve grouse may be taken  at one killing.  Miss Ida Gunn of Trout Lake is  spending a fewdaysrenewing acquaintances in Creston. She is a guest of  Miss'Annie Hamilton.  R. Bevan motored to Copeland on  Wednesday, taking out Mrs. Wheeler  of Greenwood, who arrived in Creston  that day to visit her sister Mrs. Andrews. " .  Col. Ashley Cooper left on Wednesday foe Fernie, where he was in con-  * suitatipn with Col. MacKay,  tlie re-  criuti--^ Or_-_^rr*for tlie Weft Kootenay  regimerit of irifaHtary-0* "    ,'  ..-:...--���������"  The C. F. R. optical inspector paid  Creston his official visit on Thursday  last and agent R. Reed and section  foremen Geo. Nichols and F. Romano  were given their annual eye test.  Services will be resumed in the  Presbyterian church on Sunday.  Morning service at 11.15 and evening  service at 7.30. The sermon in the  evening will bear upon the war  situation.  Creston will not be represented at  the provincial tennis tournament at  Balfour next week. At the last minute it was deoided to send four and  possibly six players but they were unable to secure hotel accomodation so  the trip has been cancelled.  The new warehouse which A. Lind  ley has hod erected for the House of  Quality at Erickson is now completed  in every detail. With ranchers talking  of holding their potatoes for fancy  prices in the spring this warehouse  will be useful as the collar will easily  accommodate four carloads of spuds.  The Creston public school opened for  the fall term on Monday morning,  with an attendance fully equal to 1018  opening day. S. A. MiicDouald is  principal, taking the entrance and  high school classes, and is assisted by  Mr. Sparks, who waa also on tho staff  last year, Miss Munro of Phoenix, and  Miss Wiuldy of Canyon City, who  will bo in charge of the primary room.  Saturday's meeting of the ratepayer., for school purposes has every in.  dication of beiug qulto interesting as  there is quite a fooling that Creston's  richool affairs need careful handling.  Thoro are rumors of quite a number of  candidates foi* the vacant trusteeship  but the only two who are definitely in  the field are Messrs. R, Bevan and T.  M. l-dmoiulHon.  Woi-Hhippors at tho Creston Metho-  _1ihI. church wore given an abbreviated  .service on Sunday night laat. Some  person or persons unknown upset tho  gasoline tank at, the roar of the church  cutting oil the lights, jiiHt about, thn  time Rev. Mi-. Carpenter had got nicely started rin his sermon, However he  waa handling a familiar topic and tho  address was in no way curtailed, nor  was tho collection overlooked���������but Lhe  closing musical features had to he  omitted.  Mrs. C. G. - Bennett  is  spending  a  short  holiday    with   her  parents in j  Cranbrook.  H. C. Sims, representing A. B. Bow-  ~ "is paying Creston  ness, of Cranbrook,  a visit this week.  Miss Ella Dow left this week for  Cranbrook where, we understand, she  will attend high school.  The open season for coast or Columbia deer, mule deer and white tailed  deer this year is from Sept. 1 to Dec. 15  Jas. Twentymen, Creston's jeweler,  is away on a trip fco Young, Sask. and  other points in that province and Alberta.  Miss Gertie .Knott of Canyon City  will attend normal school at Vancouver this year. She left for the coast  this week.  Jos. Graften, who has a wholesale  liquor business at Coleman, but well  known in Creston, spent a few days  here this week.  Mrs. Sparks, who was on the teaching staff of the Creston school last  year, has taken charge of Duck Creek  school for this term.  Mr. and Mrs. MoLaren of Midway,  who have spent the past two weeks on  their ranch here left on* Tuesday for  Cresbank, Manitoba, "where they will  remain until spring.  Upward of eighty children and forty  adults attended the Presbyterian  Sabbath School picnic at Huseroft's  grove on Thursday of last week, and  all had a splendid outing.  Mrs. Willison aud the Misses Wiiji-  son of Calgary spent a few days in  Creston, with Mr. and Mrs. J. G.  Smith this week, on their way to  Vancouver and coast points.  Haying operations, commenced on  the flats on Saturday, but to date the  haymakers have had no delays from  rain*? which is generally common about  the* time ii-ly- _ii_i^ifet"|ffetJ-n-thder?wayT  There will he a temperanee rally in  the Methodist church on Sunday  morning. At this service Pastor Carpenter will give an address on "Crime  and its producers; the cigarette and  the saloon."  Just to celebrate the advent of Oriental troops into tho European war the  proprietors of the Ding laundry have  given the front of their building on  Fourth street a brand new coat of  paint���������a light yellow.  A meeting ofthe electors ofthe Creston school district to elect a trustee to  fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of R. Lamont is called for Saturday at 10 a,m. The meeting will be  open for public discussion of school  affairs, after which nominations will  be in order, and if two pr more decide  to stand for election a poll will open  forthwith and remain open until 4 p.m  Up to the time of going to press no  recruiting officer has been named for  the Creston company of the new West  Kootenay regiment; due, no doubt, to  the militia authorities wishing to get  Kootenay's unit of the flrst contingent  on its way east beforo starting another  enrollment. There is splendid material in the district for a company, but  tho right sort of commanding officer  will bo needed to attract volunteers to  the ranks.  Mary Louise, daughter of Charles  Pusccll, a well-known resident of tho  local Indian reserve, was the winner  of tho sewing machine which F. Jackson gavo rway in connection with his  recent sale. She was fortunate in having tho key which fitted tho lock on  the machine. All told 800 koys were  given out to purchasers and Jas. Johnston luid a busy couple of hours trying  them in t.ho lock before the lucky ono  was discovered.  Official notice hut. reached ]*_. C.  GibbH, postmaster at. Creston, that  persona within the Dominion must  not trade in or carry any goodn, wares  or merchandise dot-lined for the German empire and that iu-cordlngly until  further advised po .< num.'-vm nre  not to accept for outward transmission any parcel post put-kola .Midi-eased  to Germany. Notice him also heen  reeoived at the postoflleo that the exportation from Canada of any matter  of contraband lo any pbiet-s other than  the United Kingdom or any BritiHh  pOHHOHHion Ih prohibited.  Lost {inTransif  Our Weekly supply of  ready print (i. e. the four  inside pages of the Review)  which comes to us by express, isf hung up somewhere jbetween Creston  and Winnipeg and in order  to issue Yon time we are  compeliecl to use some old  ready ppnt whieh Editor  Stanley bequeathed us.  It is alarger size than we  really require, but better  that way than a size too  small?  The reading matter on  the inside pages is therefore somewhat ancient, but  we ask our readers' indulgence for" this once, promising to use our best endeavors not to let it occur  again.  Mrs. Brewer and daughter, Rowena,  of Calgary, who have been the guests  of Mrs. Brewer's parents, Mr. and  Mrs. J. G. Smith, for a few days, have  returned home.  Crestonites who may have become  alarmed over a recent press dispatch  that Canada's tea supply would run  out in three week need lose no further  sleep. The town merchants all have  a three months' stock in sight  here, and the first shipments of the  1914 crop are due at the coast any day  now. .  Although Greece has not yet taken  any decided action in the European  war, Tom Poppas, section foreman on  the Great Northern here, and who is  a Grecian army reservist, has been  notified to rejoin the colors not later  October 1st, and is, -we' understand,  making arrangements to get there before that date.  Latest War News  The Indian .Commission will hold a  sitting iu Cres_un on Sept. 0.  Those in charge of the Labor Day  dance in the. Auditorium on Friday  evening, Sept. 4, predict that the  affair will be one of the best yet held  in Creston.  The Continental mine at Port Hill  closed down this week, throwing some  100 men out of work. Every man employed was let go, witlr the exception  of two watchmen.  ���������Capt. Forres Stay who. issues the gun  licenses'in the' "Creston?' Mi-t^efT-l-AS  been notified that under no circumstances are licenses to be issued to  Germans or Austriaias. ^  Huscroft & Blair,'lessees of the big  reclamation foam, are cutting their  year's supply of hay. Last year they  put up approximately 400 tons, aad  the 1914   cut will be   almost as heavy.  rji-u- 1������������������ ���������  ��������� JL iAO -*6w_r  crop ou -at-- xiaxiS ib repoi-ceu  lighter than ususal. However, the  demand for it will not be as heavy as  formerly as tlie yield of other hay this  year was considerably better than in  1913.  The school grounds are being further improved this year by the construction of new sidewalks, and a  fence, bet wee.i the p.aygrounds. Mr.  Hendrou has the contract for this  work.  Both the Fruit Grower's Union and  A. Lindley were busy in their shipping  departments this week. Each of them  shipped two cars of fruit and vegetables���������principally tomatoes, both  green  and ripe.  Mr. Eric Keddell returned from Nelson on Wednesday. Ho had volunteered for service but to the surprise  of his friends here, was not able to  pass tho severe medical exams imposed on candidates for the flrst contingent.  Rev. C. I-I, Huestia, field secretary  of the Lords Day Alliance will pay  Creston a viait on Wednesday. In  connection witn hin visit there wih bo  a union service in thoMothodiat church  the same evening commencing at 8  o'clock.  Creston posto-llee cannot accept for  transmission nny mail n alter for Germany, Germany colonies, Austria or  Luxemburg, either by Now York or  any other route according to official  notification whieh has ^reached Postmaster GibbH.  T. W. Bundy who wiih transferred  from Creston early in July to become  night operator at Elko, is again on  duty here. W. A. Hall, wiio Hiiocood-  ed him, lias been laid oil' temporarily.  In its policy of retrenchment thoC. P.  R. has cloned two or three of the smaller statlona on tho line, and in order  to find employment for its older employees it haa heen found nooeHHury to  luy off the newer addition*, to the pay  roll.  Co  At last the allied British and French  armies have clashed with Germany  and while the result of the first encounter was somewhat in favor of the  enemy the victory, if it may be classed  as such, does not appear to have been  of any particular significance.  The British and French armies assumed the offensive on Sunday and  engaged the Germans in a great battle  along a front extending from Mons to  the frontier of Luxemburg, the plan  of attack, however, failed owing to  unforseen difficulties and the French  and British forces retired on their  covering positions. The British loss  was about 2,000j four-fifths of which  was sustained during the retreat.'  The shooting of the British was  wonderful. Every time a Gerinan  head appeared above a trench and  every time the German' infantry "at-  temjpte.cL.to ruslt ;a position there came'  tig^&t^u^;wij^eri-_gg!ri-Je _!ref*froiK the  English. If the British lost heavily  the Germans must have lost terribly..  One of the German prisoners says:  "We never-experienced anything like  it, it was staggering."  Undoubtedly ihe heavy fighting-will  be on Belgian soil. The French war  office states that it is important tp  hold the Germans in Belgium so as to  allc-'T the HusG;a,;ris plenty of time  come up in the East.  It is equally certain Germany must  make faster progress on her march to  Paris, particularly with 3,000,000 Russians moving through Eaat Prussia  and 5,000,000 more mobilized and'ready  to follow. This huge force will require  an equally large German army to hold  them at bay and the Kaiser will be  forced to withdraw troops either from  Alsace-Lorraine or from Belgium.  The Allies therefore would gain a  tactical advantage by withstanding  the German attack for two days or so  and letting it exhaust itself against  well entrenched troops, and then, if  necessary, retiring to the next line of  fortifications to the south. Thoy could  retire slowly over ground which has  been well prepared for just such a retirement. By so doing they would  load tho Germans on to still further  extend their line of communication. A  break in the Allies line would enable  tho Gcunans to thrust south, but  would still loavo tho allien on their  fiank.s. ' Strategy may demand jnat  such a move.  Meanwhile Austria is being beaten  badly at all points. Despatches state  that battles in Lcchnitza and Shabatz  districts last week wero vory disastrous to Austria, her lessee in tho defeat on the Di-ina River being 15,000  killod, 30,000 wounded and 15,000 captured by the Servians with 75 guiiH.  Tho British fieet still holds absolute  command of the North Sea and Gorman trado and industry are being  slowly throttled. Naval authorities  ure not aiu-pi-iaod at the German naval  inactivity. It is prohabln tho -(J-tSet is  awaiting news of the hoped-for great  German victory iwdioi-c. to strengthen  the morale ai the Cliuniau navy whieh  has never yet fought a battle.  Another feature of the week's news  ia that Britain's fond supply is causing  lior no trouble, while In uomo German  towns and cities tho populace is  already -.hunting for bread, and oven  the soldiers ut thu front are poorly  supplied at m-veral pointa.  Off to the Front  Creston citizens said gGod bye, god-'  speed, good luck, a safe return, and  all the other things befitting such a  great occasion, to-day, when Creston's  delegation for the first Canadian contingent left for Quebec, along with the  other volunteers from West Kootenay  and the Boundary.  P. W. Foote, D.Howard* R.S.Smith.  R. C. Royston, H. B. Ford and P.Hope  are Creston's representatives'and they  will compare favorably with the detachments from Nelson, Kaslo, Trail,  Greenwood and ' Rossiand] who ^were  all on board, going as far as Cranbrook  on the regular traih, but at that point  a special will be made up for the balance of the journey,  Agent Reid had the station in gala  attire, flags being in evidence at every  point of vantage. The town's flag was  also afloat from the new pole put in  yesterday near the station platform.  Creston turned out en masse, the  ������and rendered numerous selections;  the crowd sang "Soldiers of the King"  and "They are Jolly Good Fellows,"  cheerd for the Creston delegotion, the  King and Kootenay's volunteers, and  the volunteers returned the compliment.  On behalf of tbe citizens E. Mallen-  daine read a brief to-the-point address  and presented each of Creston's gallant  six representatives with a pipe, a  pouch and a generous supply of. tobacco, and the citizens remembered  tbem generously with provisions,  fruit, flowers, etc.  The soleiers filled three coaches there-  being almost 200 men and officers  aboard. Nelson contributed over 100,  Rossiand 22, Trail 23, Grand Forks 20  and Kaslo 5. At Fernie atad Cranbrook and ..ther Crow points as many  more will be picked up.  Owing to the uncertainty of the  date p^t^,^^  ton's send.off? was arranded on very  short notice but it was none the less  hearty or generous on that account.  Owing to The Review going to press  at noori today we are compelled to  curtail our report of the send off, but  it will be given the attention it deser-'  ves next week.  Among the Nelson volunteers w<*  noticed Dan Smith, who tras om Thi  Review staff a few months last year.  Sidelights on the War  8 The Bank of Montreal is giving $100,  000 to Canadian patriotic funds.  An American   volunteer   force for  active  service has   been organized  Paris.  m  German troops are said to be using  saw tooth bayonets and dum dum bullets.  Up to Sunday night tho total loss of  the Belgians was estimated at 10,000  killed and wounded.  Nelson city council has voted money  to defray expenses of volunteers while  they mobilize there.    ���������  Toronto ia making a donation of one  hundred horses, owned by the city, to  the militia department.  Toronto shirt factories arc busy-  manufacturing 30,000 grey flannel  shirts for tbo Canadian contingent.  Great Britain has decided to mako a  loan to Belgium of $50,000,000. The  money will bo raised by treasury bills.  Gorman prisoners brought in by the  French are carrying beets and errroth  in their knapsacks. Thoy havo been  living on these for soveral days.  Telegrams littui Berlin, via The  Hague, state that tho populace in the  Germau capital has made a demand at  the doors of tho imperial palace shouting for bread. ���������  A sum of $75,000,000 in six month*'  treasury bills, required for war purposes was offered to the British public  .ind met with a liuurty wolcouu*. The  amount applied for wuh over $210,000,  000.  The British humane .society uhI.h for  funds and volunteers for the Purple  CroHH to engage in relief work for hor  hoh. It propoHOH to aend men to tin-  front for the purpoHo of killing badly  wounded horses and  re-.eiiliiii' dtlmt-H  Jr7"tl  !_  II  4  WBB^lifflg^Wffftfiltf  I^^WWtlHWtWWWIMjWilUI*  mmmL  mummAmlm  BilSs  0*:, tTHE   SLOCAN   STAE  I  WHAT  ECHO  ANSWERED*  STOOD within a wooded Bl������B  Before a 'mountain wall.  And, ringing to my ear again.  The echo mocked my call.  "O Spirit of the Glen." I cried.  "Will all be bliss divine  When fast the nuptial knot Is ������������&  And Phyllis shall be mine?  Beneath the lamplight's rosy glow  At even shall 1 sit  And '. atolj her fairy fingers sew  Or mend or hem or knit?"  And echo answered, "Nit!"  "When to my cozy home I haste  For dinner or for tea  _    What dainty dishes rare of taste  Will she prepare for me?  " Of 'boarding out" I've had my nil.  My appetite's a-quiver.  -   Oh, say what precious morsel wiU  Her skill to me deliver?"  And echo answered, "__iver!"  "In peaceful, placid streams of !ov������  Will all our moments flow  As clear as summer skies above  Or summer seas below?  T'ill both our natures sweetly chtmef  Will all be perfect quiet?  What will we do. O Spirit?   I'm  In love a neophyte."  And echo answered, "Fight!"  "And will I rule the roost." said r,  "And always have my way?  And  will my precious  Phyllis try  To honor and obey?  . Shall 1 be leader of the band  Or will my rule be wrecked?  1 pray thee, tell me how I stand  To her in that respect."  And echo answered, -'Pecked!"        ���������rPuck.  In Time of Peace.  The new "beast," or under class  Burn, at West Point had never heard  a heavy siege gun tired. The first  elnss tunu was solicitous.  "You bave never been close when  one of tbese guns was 6red. eh?" be  Inquired.  "No."  "No, sir," commented the first class  man.  "Yes? sir. No, sir." replied ih������  -beast."  -"Cm-m. It's liab'e to bust your ear-  drums for life. See here, don't telL  hhn I told you, but go to the commandant and ask him for"��������� The upper  class man was so solicitous that he  whispered the rest of his con-uiunica-  tion.  A few minutes later the raw cadet  presented himself before the commandant.  "Please, sh"," he said. "I want  You wilt find relief in Zam-Buk!  li cases the burning, stinging  pain, stops bleeding and brings  ease. Perseverance, with Zam-  Buk, means cure. Why not prove  this ?   -AU Dmtogtit8 and Stores.���������  *       - 60a boss.  HOW  LONDON GETS  MILK       -  "got*. ALL SU_AA\EFt SQI-H?:  Reasonable Mistrust.  "Now let us try," she said, "to keep  the otber passengers from discovering  that we are a bride and groom."  "All right, dearest," he replied. "How  shall we deceive them?"  "Buy a couple of magazines aud we  will pretend to be busy reading them  aud avoid uoticiug each other."  "That's a fine Idea, sweetheart. I'll  get them right arvaj"."  Twenty minutes later:  "T-Ovey!"  "What is it, dearest?"  "You are holding your maga./iue upside down."  "Ob. George! If you are going to  begin being critical uow bow shall I  ever be able io please you after we  bave been man-ieel for rive years?'*���������  C h i oa go 1 .eeord- Hera 1 d.  A Good Reason.  It was a red letter day at one of  our large schools, and the.boys wore  under examination in "optics." Tho  point under illustration was that,  strictly aud scientifically speaking, we  see not objects, but thoir images  picted on the retina. 'J'he doctor  make the matter plainer, said to  wag of the class:  "William,  did you  over actually  your father?"  Bill {u-oiuptly replied: "No. sir."  "Please explain  why you  never  your own father."  "Because," replied Uill, very grave  Iy, "he died before 1 was born, sir."���������  New York American.  de-  . to  the  see  saw  guncotton   for  Evening Post.  my   ears."���������New  soma  York  Noncommittal George.  George "was caugbt napping.  A pair of soft little hands covered  bis eyes, and a sweet voice command-  Itd, "Guess -who it is!"  Nothing very dreadful for George ia  this, you think: but, then, you don't  know that George has two sweethearts, and for tbe life of him be  couldn't decide whose voice it was  -Thlel! made it a very embarrassing situation for hiin. A wrong guess would  lead to complications awful to think  of? But n happy thought inspired  George, and he announced. "It's the  dearest, sweetest little girl in all  world."  "Oh,   you   lovely   boy!"   gurgled  ���������satisfied   one   as   she   removed  hands.  And now Georgo thinks of applying  for a diplomatic post, feeling that bla  talents would be wasted In any other  flcld.-T!d Bits.  High  Finance.  A man sent his neighbor's little boy  to tbe drug store to buy live postage  stamps. He handed bim two dimes,  -he extra one beiug ior himself. Some  time afterward tbe boy came back  blubbering aud said be bad lost one of  the dimes.  "But wby didn't you buy me tbe  stamps?" asked the man.  "Because, mister." replied the boy,  "it was your dime 1 lost."���������Judge.  the  the  her  Quite Obvious.  **_.Iy dear." said Mrs. Snaggs to her  husband, "what is a canard?"  "Don't yon know what a canard is?"  queried Snaggs rather sneeringly.  "Why. the word itself conveys its own  meaning."  "Does it? Well, really, I can't see  It.   What does it mean, dear?"  "Why, a canard is something one  canardly believe, of course."  '"Oh. to bo sure! Why couldn't I  think of that?"���������Savannah News.  When ths Biggest City Had a Famine  3o much milk is sent up to London  en. . the price is bo high that poor people In country d'.strlcts have simply  to go without it, was the startling  statement made by Lady Meyer at the  conference of the National Food Reform Association the other day. ���������  But it Is not so surprisir..- after all  when we remember what a mighty  volume' of milk the people of the metropolis consume every year -about  112,000,000 gallons for which they pay  annually about five million pounds.  There is no city of magnitude in the  world that can compete against London  with  its  milk  supply.  About fifty years ago the milk that  was consumed in London -mostly came  from districts within the metropolitan  area. But foo': and mouth disease  broke out among tbe cows. And it was  then that London experienced a real  milk famine. It was at this time that  a far-seeing man���������Sir George Barham  ���������thought of getting milk from, the  healthy cows in Wilts and  Hants,  London's greatest  supply    oE    milk  comes   from   Wilts,  but large  quantities come also from Derbyshire, .Staffordshire,     Berkshire,       Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Surrey.      Milk  has come to London even from Wales.  J Ireland  end   Penzance,  and  in  a few  ] instances trom Scotland"    The follow-  I ing figures    represent    approximately  j the    number    of    churns    which    are  . brought by  different railways to London  every year   (eai.li churn contains  i about   14   gallons     of     milk.:     Great.  ' Western   Railway,   1,200,(100     churn*.;  i Great      Northern     Railway.       400.000  j chums;     Midland     Railway,     341.000  j churns: London and Brighton Railway  1 255.000 churns.  All  these  railways  took   to  the  en-  ; terprise from the beginning and what.  ! thou proved an ill-paying item is now  lone of the most nourishing, and keen j time  ! competition   exists   ia counties  which  ! are  traversed by more  than one rail-  | way   company,    Special   trains  led   to  : the building af special  milk vans and  ; the  movement  towards  sanitary  insu-  j lation   led    to    improvements    which  I were not dreamt o_ at an earlier day.  i     Every line lias its refrigerating vans  ' with special accessories for excluding  | dust and ..11 kinds of genus.    The lat-  j est pattern of aiilk van belongs to the  j London and    Southwestern    Railway.  j They are fitted like modern Pullmans,  j with Westinghous? and vacuum brakes  and oil gas lamps, ari-t thc inner ven-  ; tilation is evei  better than tha   of the  I best passenger coach.  !     The  farmer,  c_*  his  assistant,  rises  ! early in the morning, not solely out of  ' consideration   for the  crowing of the  cock or rising sun;  it is the exigency  of railway traffic which tots the alarm.  The  jatient  kine  avait in the sheds  rhe milkmaid, or ma. . or boy, or automatic milking machine.  Patent strainers and coolers prepare the milk for transport. The  cooler has taken the place of an old  practice uf -.urrept.tiov.sly dusting  boracic acid into the churns.  In the suaurei, for an imperial gallon, the farmer receives 7d. and 8d..  Where the Danger Was  The train was undoubtedly a record:  breaker for speed. It held the slow-  traveling championship of the States.  The passenger who had beer, fidgeting  in his seat for several hour got up at  last and strolled along the corridor to  the front of the vain, where he came  upon the guard playing n_.-.rbles with  the engine-driver.  Hallow, therel he called. I suppose  you ^on't mind a hit of good advice  if it's given ia a friendly spirit?  The conductor pocketed two marbles  and said he ���������'' In't.  Then why, said the pale passenger,  don't you have the cow-catcher taken  off  the  front  and  _>ut on  the  back.  The conductor stared bard and suspiciously.  Why should we? he asked at length.  Why, responded the pale passenger,  for fear a cow might come along tbe  track and bite somebody.  Illllllllllllliilllllllllilili  For- Wossaeia  Who  Work  . __ _a -^  lEsffesv.,  is the best tonic.   It prevents  headaches and biliousness by  stimulating  the   liver   and  digestive organs to natural  action.  An Obliging  Horso  A doctor ond a clergyman were exercising their horses one morning In a  country lane, when an argument arose  between then as to which of the animals possessed the sweeter disposition.  I'll wager that If their respective  tempers could be tried, said the doctor,  mine would be far away the better.  That's nil nonsense, retorted the  clergyman. My mare has the best  temper of any hora . In the neighborhood.  Well, here's a stiff hedge, let us  try their leaping capabilities, suggested the doctor.  Right you are, agreed his friend.  The doctor'-; hunter quietly refused  the jump, although put at it again  and again. The clergyman's little  mare also refused, but at the same  threw back ber ears and exhibited considerable ill-temper. When  repeatedly urged to jump she finally  accomplished a clever buck-jumping  feat, which threw her master straight  over tho hedge. Strange to relate,  the reverend gentleman was quite unhurt, and scrambling to his feet commenced to scrape the mud from his  broadcloth, whilst the ..octor laughingly remarked:  " Perhaps --.a are convinced now tbat  my animal has a better disposition  than yours.  Not at all! replied th. clergyman.  Mv mare is such rn unselfish little  brute that, although unable to take  the fence herself, she had no desire to  keep me from going over. In fact,  she facilitated the mode of my transit  whilst your horse displayed a dog-in-  the-manger temperament by not going  himself and not allowing you to go  either.'  Warts will rendt. the prettiest  hands unsightly. Clear the excrescences away by using Holloway's Corn  Cure, which acts thoroughly and painlessly.  Oil the Future Fuel of Navies  There can be no doi.M that the naval future lies with oil as against coal.  A given tonnage of oil as against an  equal tonnage of coal will enable the  same ship to steam much faster, to get  up speed quicker and to travel 4") per  cent, farther; mareover, the supply  can be replenished in a small fraction  of the time, and on the high Sea in  nearly any weather instead of ih port.  When yea add that per knot steamed the cost is about the came, and  that the world's visible supply seems  as infinite for any near future as the  coal supply, the case seems conclusive. The objection that coal is a  home' product while oil is imported,  is of no relevance from a naval or  strategical point of view, because if  we were prevented from importing oil  we could not import any ^ther necessity of national existence.  This and other objections will no  doubt continue to 1 r> urged, s'nee the  withdrawal of the British navy's consumption, followed as it must be by  that of foreign navies, will \. a serious thing for the cteam-coal producers in our midst. Theirs are powerful interests, but not interests Ln  whose favor the admiralty could properly forego the highest naval efficiency.���������London Chronicle.  follow Ub dally use���������because lliio  pleasantly bubbling: drink ia mildly  laxative in its action and clears the  blood of impurities.  Take o Botll. Hone To-day.        3a  *.*S"* .    Illi  ^*l**^m. ***** e  Canada  60*  iV.inard'j Liniment Relieves Neuralgia  Dr_-.fn3ss  Cannot be  Cured  by   local   applications,   as     tbey    cannot  roach   thc  ,<.---,..- ...~ diseased portion pf tbe ear.  There is onlv one way to cure deafness  and thn* is "by constitutional remedies.  Deafness is caused by an inflamed condition of the mucous Hniner of the Euc-  taeblan Tube. When this tube Is inflamed vou have a rumbling sound or  .   - . ���������. .   ���������-.     ,  .. ..imperfect hearing, and when it is entire-  and in  winter 9d.  and  10cl.-  deliver* :d",*]V closed. Deafness is tbe result, and un-  at the London terminus, and the transportation costs him one pei_ny per  ga'.'.on.  Tree Talk.  Sentm.ontnl Young Lady���������Ah. prc-  feasor, what would this old oak say If  it could talk?  Professor���������It would say, "I am an  elm!"��������� FHegende Blatter.  A Human  Machine.  "Do  you  give  any   credence  to  the  claims of some radicals that  man is  OOCOiiiiiig    i-_i..e    iitGi't:    tiUUi    ii     _iu.u_i_-  machlue?" asked the friend.  "Yes. At times I fool that I am becoming simply a lawn mower," answered the suburbanite.���������Buffalo Express.  Trouble Amidships.  Nanny Gont���������I thought father had a  perfect digestion.  Billy���������lie hns ordinarily, but awhile  ngo ho ate a lot of adjectives off n circus poster.���������Puck.  Nice Family, This.  Wife (reminlscently) ��������� I remember  when you nsked me to say the word  that was to make you happy for life  how I hesitated.  Hub. (grumpily) ��������� Hesitated! Huh!  You never did say it.���������Boston Tran-  Bcrlpt.  No Question About It.  A child adopted from an orphans*  home was being ridiculed by the other  children because he had no real parents. The conversation wont about as  follows;  "Aw, you haven't got any real father  and mother."  "Mnybe I haven't, but tbe ones I  have got love ma as much as yours do  you."  "They do not. Ours arc our real parents."  "Well, mine love me more than yours  do yon, 'cause mine picked mo out of a  hundred othor babies, mid yours had  to tako what tlioy got," replied the  adopted son.���������Life.  Not a Bad Bargain  A certain young farmer, returning  from market, war pulled up by the urgent appeal of a pedestrian.  Hullo! that you, Tom? Want another situation .* Why, I thought you  were living with Captain Bird, as his  coachman, eh?  So I was. sir, but it wasn't a fair  bargain. As you know, sir, we were  never to get drunk both at ence.  Well, that. *eems fair enough, any  way, said the young farmer.  Fair, guv'nor? Why, the captain  was drunk the whole blessed time!  less the inflammation can be taken out  and this tube restored to its normal condition, hearing will be destroyed forever;  nine <--if-es out o_ ten are caused by Catarrh, which is nothing- hut an inflamed  condition   of   the   mucous   surfaces.  We v.-ill Rive One Hundred Dollars for  any case of Deafness <caused by catarrh*) that cannot be ������*red by Hall's  Catarrh Cure.    Send for circulars free.  V.   .7.   CHI.: KY & CO..  Toledo,  Ohio.  gold  by  Druggists.   75c.  Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation .  New Orleans requires all bread offered for sale tr be securely wrapped  to protect it from flies.  Dispensation of Providence  A teacher, instructing her class on  the composition of sentences, wrote  two on the blackboard, ono to exemplify 0. misstatement of fact and the  other to Illustrate bad grammar. The  sentences thus read as follows:  The hen has three legs. Who done  It?  The -leache: the.*, called to ono of  the children. IJinry, she said, go to  tlie blackboar.1 and show whero tha  fault lies in thoso two sentences.  Harry slowly approached the blackboard, evidently thinking hard. Thon  he took the chalk and wrote: The  hen never iloliu ll.      God done it.  ��������� Handicapped by Fashion  The timo has passed, said the orator haughtily, when any man tan hide  himself behind a woman's petticoats.  Ycu bet, commented the cynic in  a back seat. Those X* ay skirts have  stopped that.  Now, Johnny, said his mother, we  shall have company to dinner today,  and I don't want you to say a word  while they are here, then no one need  find out that you are so silly.  The guests came. After some desultory remarks, a gentleman, who ls  passionately fond of children, turned  to Johnny, whose mother, being busily engaged in another " part of the  room, did not hear the conversation  that ensued. *-  Well, my son, said the gentleman,  pleasantly, how old ar; you?  Johnny, obeying orders, sat like .-.  sphinx.  Can't you tell me your age? said  another, thinking the boy a little diffident.  Still Johnny, spake not-  I can make him talk, said a bright  young lady. You like the girls better  than you do those horrid men, don't  you, Johnny? Now; come over here  beside me and tell mo how'old you  are.  Silent as the grave.  Why, I believe the hoy is an idiot!  said the gentleman who hac". first addressed him, In h, bantcrlnc wav.  There, ma. said he. "Tain't no use!  I hain't opened my mouth, and they  all know it already!  This Should Hold Him' Awhile  Two issouri editors "/ho have  waged a word battle for some tln-e  seemed to hav e about exhausted themselves. One of them hurls this bludgeon as a climax to the feud:  He now lies buried _\ his own mud.  Not even a vurkey buzzard remains  'above the _iorizon c. ooze to mark his  burix-1 spot. A turkey .juzzard has  got .rome sense. It knows ..hen -t  has got enough. Nobody would have  gall enough, to ask a buzzard to put a  clamp on its noi>e and mako a meal of  pure mud. We feel'it a high honor  to be attacked by him in any way.  If we had not been denounced by  him and his sort we would feel that  we had been derelect in our duty and  had fallen short of life's ideals.  UPTON'S  PURE FRUIT JAMS  Are Pure Jam improved by  the   addition   of    Pure  Apple Jelly-  Try It. AU Grocers  My hnsbn.nl doesn't care for grand  op.ra.  Hut 1 notice he applauds  *l.,crously.  Ilo docs that to kee-i awake.  Ought to Work  I'm afraid t-.e_.e boiled eggs ain't  very fresh.  Write the name Genevieve on one  of them, suggested the head waiter.  Mr. Wopsey is roma-itic and that will  distract "nis attention I_ the eggs are  not so good.  Tho women wero In power, and oven  the police force was a skirted brigade.  Two blushing coppers drugged a inula  crook Into the police station.  "Wlnit Ih the charge?" asked tlio  flerfj-^iuitof-*-*.  "Currying concealed weapons," replied OtllH-r Mnyine llognn. "Wo  found this hidden under IiIm coat."  And Hhe produced n cage tilled with  ���������olco.���������..sella ngo.  Except the powder, everything  that goefi Into Winchenter cart-  ridged is made in our own plant  under our careful huperviHion,  Thin eyotem enable.! un to produce  ammunition which in etuperior to  all other m������Ue������. To f-et It anywhere  v~ ;,ut neceujiurv *<* "*"  fO V  Vt** im*m*. * - ' '   .        .      .  lJ _ ,.nit: iiiukC  uiiil  i������M,!v  lor  for  the   Red   W  on  the package.  WlNOHKSTKR RerKATINO A-.MQOO.  W.    I.  ������J.  007  Sacred.  Suffragette (Just home after slroim-  ������iit. dny uml expu-'lltu*- Important cor*  respiiiidciice)���������Have nny letters come  for nm?  Dnnghtar���������YeH, mother, bnt I tore  them np for ti doll's poiiiM- clmso.  RiifYnigftte-Tore them up! I never  hoard of mich lu-hiivlor. Haven't l  ������ft������!ii told you Hint k-ttei'H nro wiiei-ed  HiIiii.kV���������I'nrifli.  THE   DOCTOR'S  GIFT  Food Worth Its Weight In Gold  VI.* I.  Jo ���������  .rVlll.  "Tlilri In ii fool world," remarked the  [���������h.'-riTnl Idiot.  "Wliiifn lln* innttur miwV" -ihUnd lb������  ImkiI),  ��������� ���������M*iiv   *0n mnmut iinlf .mr llv������������i trv-  lw_   to  Mm- time nnd  tlie oilier halt  lc    ; tn Mil time," r<*plb*d the .���������l������i.er������  rm i.llut.-CliKliimiH KiKiulrer.  Wo UBtin.ly -..petit tho do-tor to put  us on Homo kind of peiumco and givo  t    bitter niedi.-lnoH,  An l-UBler.'i doctor brought a patient, something entirely different and  the 1'oBiili.r, nro  truly interesting.  "Two ye.ir:. ago," writes this patient, "I was a frequent victim of actito  iiulicvsllnn nnd hlliouNiii.Hi., bolng allowed to eat. very fow things. One  dny our family doctor hroujht mo a  ..inull package, .raying he bad loiuid  t.oniethlng for mo to eat.  "Uo Hiild it wiih a food called Grape-  Nut s and even :.������ Un golden color  might Huggim lt wuh woith its weight  in /.old. 1 wan 'rick and tired, trying  nun thing after another to no avnll,  but. ooiiH-'iiteil to try tbln now food.  "Well! It. fiurpiiRsiO my doctor's  fun dost. nntloipnUon and ovory day  filno.i then 1 hnve hloRKed tin good doctor nnd the Inventor of Onipo-Nuti..  "I noticed Improvement at once and  In a month's time my for.iier iipells c.  Indigent'.mr luul dllMiUimnrAfi, I?, iXTO  muni mm i l������'lt Hlu. a naw man. My  mind win- much clearer and keener,  my bndv niuk ot. the vitality of youth,  nnd thin condition ban continued."  "Thon-i'n a Hi anon." Nnw<_ glvon  by Canadian V-ontum Cft., Wlndnor, Ont.  IM-i.)   "The Unnd to Welivllh-." In pkgH.  fiver rend the nbove letter.    A new  one M|.pc������iiH iioiu mm. tu .������...*-.     ....������  are o*"u*ne* triJ0* nnii fu" of hl m4,n  interett.  Playing the Game  A pompous director of a large railway company once landed at a small  station and requested the porj^*- to  carry his bag. The stationmaster was  quick to notice the lmporta-ice of the  arrival, and as the portor passed him  ���������struggling with the heavy Gladstone,  marffecd to whisper: Bo careful, Dill!  That's Lord Blank, one oi the directors.  The porter's chance of u Lip vuuluh-  ed wlth> this Information, but snbse-  quehtly upon relinquishing tho bag, .\o  was astonished to llnd himself tho recipient, or a shilling.  Momentarily surprised, he stared at  I tho coin in his palm, and tho director  | thinking his behaviour savored of ills*  imtlsfactlon,   resuarked:    Undor     the  company'-, regulations you aro not sup-  posed to accept gratuities.  Yes, sir ��������� no, nir, stanunerod tho  porter, run) then, recovering I'j self-  control run. closing his left eyelid, ho  i.ald: lint. on., employe novor splits on  another!  Mln.-rd's Liniment Cures Burns, Etc.  A Budding Financier  Outside it was snowing hard and the  teacher considered it her duty to warn  ter charges.  Boys and girls should be very careful colds at this time, she said, solemnly. I had a darl.ng Httlo brother  only seven years old.- One day he  went out in the snov with his *aev  sled and caught cold. Pneumonia set  in and in three days *e wa*. dead.  A hush fell upon the schoolroom;  then a youngster in the back row stood  up and asked:  Where'3 his sled?  Richest Spot In Canadr.  In Toronto, Canada, there are two  blocks on King Street, between Yonge  and Bay streets, and Including the  corners of the*?e two cross --reefs,  which composes the richest strip of  property in Canada. The land alone  in these two blocks is vorth on an  approximate estii__ate, $16,000,000,  while the buildings are worth $9,500.-  000. New structures to cost $6,500.-  000 have been started, or will be under construction this year. Thus,  including the natural adva: --* in land  values that r..ay be expected, this  1,500 feet of frontage in the heart of  the city of Toronto will have, hy the  end of the year, _. value closely approaching $36,000,000. /  ��������� " ..���������_.. ,  Clothe woman wltli the ballot! exclaims Senator Sheppnry of Texas.  Wouldn't you like to soe a woman  wearing a ballot?  It was a crowded ear.    Among thote  who could not find scats was .*. young  lady.     CIoho to whore sho stood an  old  man was sitting.      Ho struggled  an if to urine.     Tho young woman cast  a glance of a corn at- ono ov two men  hldim. behind newspapers.   Plcnso tlo  not got up, she said to tho old man, I  beg you don't.      Tho conductor rang  tin: boll ii.al  lln- c;u* wont   on.      The  old man'n features worked convulsively and he mopped hin faco with his  handkerchief.     At tho noxt stopping  placo ho again tried to rhio, and again  tho -young woman tried to Btop him-..  I would much rather Btnnd, sho said  continuing to block his way.   I don't  care whether you would Oi' nol, eald  tho old lVuVil 'Crl'.'.jtion with fury, I want  to  get. out.      You'vo mado mo como  IlliU   a   mil -    i-uu   iui   ahuad-r.       __c_w  you nlop tho ear. But it wao too  lute, tne hell had .-heady rung nnd  he hnd to wak until tho next Hlopplng  place wiui reached.  Under the hodgo sat Robert lho  r-apor, takln.-. long pulls at a boor-  bottle. The new curate eyed him sadly, then approached nnd spoke. Tell  me, my man, said tho new curate, Ib  that all you havo to drlnlc?  Robert, nodded.  And you drink lt all dny, nnd every  day?  Again Robert, nodded, and tho new  curato cast; up his hando. Thcn������ho  extracted nlxponco from hin wahntcoat  and nnld: Take that, my man, It. will  buy you something hotter.  Thanks, guv'nor���������thanks, murmured  llnbcrt, deeply affected. I reckon a  pint o* boor lu moro fiiondlyllko than  thift oold toa.  All NlgMt with Asthma. Everyone  knows how attacks of astumr. often  keep their victim awake the whole  night long. Morning finds him wholly  unfitted for a day of business, and yet,  business must still be carried through.  All this night Miffering and lack cf  rest can be avoided by tho prompt  uee of Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Asthma. Remedy, which positively doea drive  away the attacks.  Pat and Jim were trudging along the  dusty road when a big touring car  passed them with a whiz like a roar  of a gigantic _ocket, nnd disappeared  in a cloud of dust.  GorryJ exclaimed Pat, thlm chug  waggons must cost a hapo a cash.  The rich in thle country is fairly burning money.  indade, thin, replied Jim, be tho  emoll uv It, It must be that tainted  n oney we tlo bo hearing so much  about.  Towne���������Do you make your cook pay  for what she breaks.  Suburbs (in amazemont)���������-Make her  pay? I should say not. Why, every  month, besldos paying her enlary, we  reward her liberal!:- for what j.he did  not break.  Mie. Bagvox���������Toll mo, profonnor,  will my daughter ever bocomo a groat  pianist?  Hon- VoRlcHClinll-dc���������-I gannot dell.  Mrs. Bngrox���������But has oho mono -t  the qualifications nccosnary for a good  munlclnu.  Herr VogloBchnltzlo���������Ach! Yah, ma-  lam; sho has two handts!  The Stomach  Is the Target  Aim to make that Blix)ii|t'-������kud digestion good���������and you  will keep well I No chain Is stronger than it* weukeat  link. No man Is otronffer than his stomach. With  stomach disordered a train of diseases follow.  !.-.  pr.riereg.ji t^iaeii JWie������icai juiscovery  liquid ErX ������ ���������*���������<������ ���������������* mti* *������������������������ **���������* 40 V**"-' ������lvln������ ������������������**��������������� ������������������<���������&*������  Mftrlfl fi-orr.  {I.U. in  action.  vv nm, u������ iiu  t������>.vj ������',iji ��������������������� ^.'���������j  i. ,  (|,(,  ������,,.r.i*       W.    Lin'l  know���������nil-  man who has j  less It Ir. pral.to for  been (lend a yonr.  ji  f tf -*���������������- *rmtw* %tmmm*tm m* -M*������l-I������4 %r M. V. )Mer������������. Ifi. *������.. ������*������������������ vmn im  HI   funa mi muaaimtma -UtitHrw rt iff��������� ���������*"*���������������*' "ir *''"" ���������*"���������** ******** ��������������������� **u -*. ������*���������������������������������**  1.     -^������������������^���������^^���������-~~^^~������������������~^^-~^^^���������m^mmmmmmmmmmm  MMM  J.  MM  _Oll!fP'^WlWI  K-TMNMM 51  xJ-T-h___ia-  ������i -i-i.-Li.jj xiUBl*,  -���������?  4*  WsSssPi  r   }::Wimmsmmmm  THE   SLOGAN   STAB,  IN DUBLIN  SCENES   OF* VIOLENCE  WITNESSED  IN  IRISH  CAPITAL.  AMERY'S VIEWS  Tramway Strikers Attack Police, and  Five Hundred Wounded Men are in  the  Hospitals���������Irish  Press Denounces Capita'ic'.s for Causing Trouble.  London.���������Dublin is at this moment a  elty of terror, and desperate rioting,  arising from the tramway strike whioh  brought BOO people into the hospitals  for treatment.     A correspondent who  was ah eye witness, says: A mob numbering 1,000  started  to  tec*  up the  tramway track in open defiance of a  dozen police on duty.    Soon reinforcements of 70 police appeared, but far  from inspiring wholesome fear on tbe  mob they appeared to be welcome, for  they were so many more targets for  bricks  and  lumps of granite.   When  tho  police at length  charged  at the  double from Bishop street to the corner of Cuffe street there was no retreat.    Th'e* mob kept    to    the    open  street and appeared to enjoy the attacks of   the    police.   Women   were  screaming hysterically. Baton charges  could hardly be   counted    and    took  place  every five minutes, each after  a fusillade of missiles, and each, too,  with an accompaniment of screaming  women,  crashing  windows,  thuds  of  stones and bricks as they landed now  and again on the nickel plated device  with  which   the   policemen's  helmets  are equipped.  Toward midnight there was a spectacle like a hideous nightmare.. Armed with iron bars and table knives the  mob rushed the doors of shops and  looted all they could while they destroyed where they could not loot.  Piteous wails came from half a dozen strong constabulary men as they  found themselves heriimed in by stone  throwers on every side just as de-  * praved bovs hem ln a cat and s'.one  It to death. I shrank with horror  from the scene.  What is happening in Dublin may  happen in Belfast for labor all over industrial Ireland seems fretful for a  fight with capital. Even the Unionist journals condemn the Dublin Tramway Company for refusing to recognize the trade unions and revise the  hours, wages and general conditions of  labor.  Kier Hardie ar_d other labor leaders  bitterly condemn the rigorous treatment of the strikers by the Irish executive under Lord Aberdeen. Hardie  says: It is a form of action against  ���������trade unionism which is very common  In America but I did not expect to  find In a law abiding country like our  own that the anarchist precedent of  the United States courts would have  been followed. Apart altogether from  the merits of the dispute with the  Tramways Company, the men will have  behind .hem thc entire trade union  movement of Great Britain In opposing what we regard as an unconstitutional action from Dublin Castle.  Why  Canada   Gets   More   Immigrants  Than Aus.ra.ia  Sydney, N.S.W.���������Mr. L. C. M. S.  Amery. M.P.. a member of the House  of Commons for South Birmingham,  and of the British parliamentary party  has arrived from South Africa-  Speaking on the question of Immigration "./hieh was : ,terred to in. Canada some members of the party say it  Is a sore point with home Britishers.  Mr. Amery expressed the view that the  causes led up to exodus from England  to North America. Easier . distance  v/as the material point, but he placed  more Importance on the fact that Canada carried out extensive sehe-hes for  advertising throughout Great Britain,  as one Government and not as was  done In the case of Australia by several governments.  Indian Agent Tells of Buffalo  Edmonton, Alta.���������There are fully  500 head of wood buffalo / west and  north of Fort Smiti., on the Peace and  the Great Slave rivers ln the extreme  northeastern part- of Alberta, at the  60th parallel of latitude, said A. J.  Bell, who has charge of the- northern  Indian agencies, on returning to Edmonton front the silent north, where he  is guardian of 3,000 Indians of the Yellow Knife, Dog Rib, Chipewyan and  Cariboo Eaters trioes.  Mr. Bell who has been continuously  in the north since the winter of 1911,  was accompanleu. to civilization by  Mrs. Bell and their two children, born  at Fort Smith, and Nathaniel Gear,  chief herder of the government's reindeer, brought from St. Anthony, Newfoundland, to northern Alberta, and  Mrs. Gear. The two last named are  natives of th- Labrador coast. Gear  learned the management of the reindeer from the Laplanders and formerly  had charge of Dr. Grenfell's herds in  Newfoundland.  Some time ago I made a proposal to  the Dominion .government that the  buffalo in the Fort Smith district b3  confined by a fence in the peninsula  between -the Per.ce and the Great  Slave rivers, Mr. Bell said. This would  afford better protection to the animals.  The fence would cost about $103,000.  TO TRANSPORT GRAIN  NATIONAL      TRANSCONTINENTAL  READY TO HANDLE THE CROP  Germany's New Foreign Trade Policy  Berlin.���������The Socialist newspaper  Vorwaerts publishes a remarkable  scheme which has been organized  quietly in the interests of Germany's  foreign" trade policy. The paper' obtained possession of a confidential letter, which a number of deputies addressed to the foreign secretary, Herr  Jagow, asking for his support to be  given a new daily paper through  which it vvas Intended to organize the  foreign overseas press. Fifty newspapers had agreed to publish weekly  letters on German affairs. The promoters of the scheme maintain that  Germany has been wilfully -nisunds:-  stood. It is stated that $2,500,000  has been promised ih subscriptions.  The Vorwaerts says that the subscribers include four shipbuilding and  armament firms.  Railways Converge on Future Shipping  Centres  Swift Current, Sask.��������� With every  prospect for two new branch lines of  the G.T.P. operating out of Swift Current within the coming year, in addition to the two branches of tbe Canadian Northern on which construction  work has made very rapid progress  this season? grain growers and large  shippers are already considei'.ng the  probable effect of an entire transformation in the traffic situation in this  section of the West. Upon the closing of the gap between Broadview and  Brandon the handling over the through  route of 930 miles from Swift. Current  to Fort William will have become  an actuality. In tbe meanwhile grading on the Weyburn-Lethbridge line  is showing rapid progrt ss, and much is  expected in a business way from the  opening of the immense territory to  the south of Swift Current which this  new line will traverse.  Hon. Frank Cochrane Mal.es This Announcement eh Arrival in Winnipeg���������Is Very Optimistic Over the  Crcp Outlook and Financial Situation Generally.  Winnipeg.���������After an inspection of  the National Transcontinental Railway from Cochrane to Winnipeg, Hon.  Frank Cochrane announced on his arrival here that the line would be ready  to handle this year's grain crop. Mr.  Cochrane is In the west to inspect the  entire G.T.P. system. On the financial situation Mr. Cochrane is optimistic over the crop outlook, and believes it will materially help to loosen  the money situation. In the party  with the minister of railways are Senator G'6o. Gordon, E. J. Chamberlain,  P_*esident of the Grand Trunk system;  Molson MacPherson, the only other  director of the G.T.P. resident in Canada; Albert Grigg, M.P.P. for Ontario;  Charles MacRae, M.P.P., Ontario;  Hon. W. H. Hearst, Minister of Mines  for Ontario; and W. R. Smythe, M.P.  P-  A. W. Smithers, chairman of the  G.T.P. directors, left the party at  Cochrane to return to London. Before going, however, he sent this meg-*'  sage to the west:  The country of Canada and in jiar-  ticuar the western territory was never  looked upon in a more favorable light  in the old country than at the present  time. There is an area of prosperity  looming \ij ahead of the country.  Mr. Chamberlin, in explaining the  purpose of the trip, (said that the new  line is in excellent shape considering  the circumstances, and tbat it will be  in full operation next year. The line  will be able to carry grain to the  east this fall if necessary.  UNSELFISH HEROES  Obscure Mariner's Deed Recognized by  President of U.S.  Ottawa.���������-Unseliish heroism of two  obscure Nova Scotia mariners has  been fittingly rewarded by the President of the United States. ; In the  month of October last year, Captain  Jamea and Seaman Richardson, of the  little fishing village of Pubnlco, N.S.,  rescued at the risk of their lives the  captain and crew of the Un'ted States  schooner 'Henry R. Tiltort.' which had  become disabled in an Atlantic Coast  hurricane.  In due time the brave rescue reached the ears of President Wilson, with  the result that there reached the Department of Marino and Fisheries a  solid gold watch and medal. "Upon the  watch was engraved:. From the President of the U.S., in recognition of  bravery in effecting the rescue of the  master and crew of the schooner Henry R. Tilton, on the Northern Atlantic.'  There is a request that he watoh  be forwarded to Captain James. The  medal is also suitably engraved, and  is for Seaman Richardson.  Homestead   Laws  May  be Changed  Edmonton, Alta.���������Delegations from  Edmonton, Vegrevilie, Wetaskiwin,  Consort and other points in northern  Alberta waited on the Hon. Dr. Roche  minister of the interior, on his arrival in this city.  Representations for the establishment of new land agencies ahd sub-  agencies at various point* were made  and the question of pre-emption conditions discussed.  The minister stated that in the,  course of his trip through the west,  j he bad received numerous delegations  regarding the abolition of the $3 per  acre charge on pre-emption homesteads, but representations from northern Alberta asking for the reduction  of the three year..* addition on all  homestead duty to one year provided  necessary improvements were made,  was a new side to the question. He  stated that in all probability a number  of changes would be made in regard  to homestead and pre-emption conditions at the next session of parliament. He had ms.de this trip in order to hear at first hand the views of  the settlers in the west. He had been  inquiring into the question of recogni.  zing" the right of a homesteader in  Prison Reform on Program  Ottawa.���������Supervision of prison reform in Canada will likely te Hon.  Arthur Meighen's first assignment jrs  Solicitor-General, say., the Evening  Journal.  It is understood in. this connection  Mr. Meighen will be given absolute  charge of the work of penal investigation and reform. It is' also understood that, included among Mr. Meighen's duties will be that of arguing  important- Government cases in the  courts and before the judicial committee of the Privy Council. These cases  are generally looked after by the Deputy Minister of Justice, but the Department has become so overcrowded  with work during the last few years  that the head officials need to be relieved of considerable of their present  duties.  THE MARKET REPORT  Voted for Twenty Presidents  Seattle, Wash.���������Very few men in  the United States today have the distinction of having voted for twenty  presidents ot the United States. One  of the few���������if not the only man allye  today���������who holds this honor, is  Thomas Warden, who recently celebrated his ninety-eighth birthday.  Wardcll was born during the Presidency of James Madison and cast his  flrst vote for William Henry Harrison In 1830. Since that time Warden  has voted in every Presidential election. He lias always taken the liveliest interest In national and local politics. Attenoing the birthday celebration wero ten members of the Borrowed Time Club, whoso ages aggregate 804 years.  Militia is In:.-easing  Ottawa.���������Militia Is becoming more  pronounced in Canada. Figures compiled in the Department of Militia and  Defence show that the established active militia today stands at approximately 37,000 officers and men. As  permanent forces have an establishment of about 3,500, the establishment  of the whole of the militia of Canada  somewhat exceeds 77,000.  It must be borne in mind that the  establishment of corps is the maximum  number of men for whom pay can be  drawn. The number of men actually  present and drawing pay never quite  comes up to the establishment. Some  66,000 have been trained this year, this  number constituting a record. In 1912  the number trained was 49,000 and in  previous years it never much exceeded 46,000.  certain areas to prove up by placing,  stock on the land. In regard tb grazing leases, the minister said that in  the main the recommendations of the  royal commission, which held sittings  throughout the west, would, be adopted. Those recommendations would  shortly be presented to parliament.  THIEF RELENTED  Customs Revenue Increase  Oilawu, Ont.���������The customs revenue  for the Dominion still shown a stendy  Increase. The receipts for August  were $10,838,060, as against $10,147.-  808 for tho corresponding month of  last. year. This shows an Increase  of $fl!i0,7!.7. For five months of tho  present fiscal year ending August 31,  tho customs rovonuo was $49,737,990,  ns compared with $46,397,937 for tho  .limn period during tho former fiscal  yoar. This shows an Inereaso to dato  of .r-b3*10,002.  Radium Was Returned to Vancouver  Doctor Through the Mails  Vancouver.���������The tiny particle of  radium, worth about $3,500*. which was  stolen from the offices of Dr. G. L.  Do Vcrteull recently, was returned  through the mall this morning. It is  thought that the thief having read of  the deadly effects that radium had ln  inexperienced handi upon the human  body became frightened and decided to  return the precious metal, or else  heard that u man's life depended upon  it.  Rushing Laying of Steel  Edmonton, Alta.���������With reasonably  good weather, steel on the Edmonton,  Dunvegan and. British Columbia railway is expected to reach tb. western  end of Lesser Slave Lake this fall and  trains will be put in operation between  Edmonton and Mirror Landing, a distance of 130 miles. This announcement is made by D. J. McArthur, president of the road, who is here on a  trip of inspection. One hundred miles  of Bteel has already been laid on the  line and ballasting gangs are busy  getting the grade in shape f������_r the commencement of operations  St. Petersburg.���������Three deaths from  Asiatic cholera have occurred at  Kherson since Augus-r 30.  Weekly  Grain    Letter    Supplied    by  Thompson, Sons & Co., Grain Merchants. Wliinineg.  Winnipeg, Sept. 2.���������The past week  over the United States and Western  Canadian   spring  wheat  country' has  generally been of the most favorable  character for th'e progress of harvest  work, and the maturing of late grain.  In our own country the euttinc of the  ripened  grain  never  proceeded  with  greater rapidly than it .has done last"  week.     We stated, in our last week's  report that   with   dry   weather    the  whole of our wheat crop would be cut  by encl  of the present week.      This  seems  likely to  be  accomplished all  except late fields and a moderate proportion of the crop in backward districts.    The favorable    growing    and  maturing weather over our country in  the last half of July and all August,  has been the means of swelling out  our crops in a most gratifying manner,  and the result is a comparatively high  average yield and high average quality as well.     Quality however, is still  ���������to some extent dependent on the wea- \  ther we may have from this time onward, until all of the crop is threshed.     There has been no frost in August  to   damage   grain   so   far  as  is  Known, but this morning's weather reports mentioned  that the  frost  line  had been touched at some points over  night.     So light a frost might do no  perceptible damage, and there  is so  large a proportion o" the crop cut, and  the balance either ready to cut, or so  near maturity    that   the    report   of  the light frost had no effect on the  mind or sentiment of the well informed trader.      The fact is our crop is  safe from frost damage, except to r  very small percentage,  probably not  exceeding five per cent.     If, however  we were to have much wet weather  in the Immediate   future,   we   might  have a . considerable  deterioration  in  quality,  but with practically no loss  in quantity of average   good   milling  wheat.    We have seen no recent estimates   as  to   the aggregate  yield  of  our Western wheat crop, but we consider we may look for around at least  200,000.000 bus. with a very large pro  portion cf it in the high grades. There,  is already some thrashing being done  in early districts, and ner wheat is  being shipped? Today the car inspections of wheat at Winnipeg numbered 98 cars, of which 58 cars were  new crop. Of the 58 cars 31 inspected 1 Northern, 14 inspected 2 Northern, and 2 inspected 3 Northern. The  other 11 cars inspected rejected, owing  to-too much mixture of other grain to  allow them into regular grades. These  figures show the high average grade  of this crop..  As regards    tha    market    situation  over the world there has come-about  a distinct reaction in sentiment from  a week ago.      Last week the United  States speculative markets were quite  depressed by the liquidation of September wheat.      Minneapolis lost 3c. j  in- three   days   on   September,   other  markets declining about l%c   While  however,   liquidation    is    September,  was depressing the markets, it began  to be noticed that other things were  happening which would have a counteracting effect, and on the  last two  days   in   August  in   spite   ot  belated  liquidation   the   markets   took   on   a  stronger  tone.      Yesterday  the U.S.  markets   and. Winnipeg   were   closed  owing to its being Labor day holiday,  but today the tone was strong and a  further moderate advance    in    jr rices  was made.    There seems good reason  to expect some further advance,  but  we do not at present see that it can  be more than temporary because hi a  we~ek or two there is almost c .rtaln.  to ba very large movements of new  wheat for export in Canada, the United States and Russia.   At the present  time there is a lull in    these    movements but it cannot last    long,    and  there is no  doubt but the  world  is  raising a larger wheat crop this year  than ever,  depending' always ca the  yield of the Argentine and Australian  crops now growing.     In the meantime  there is seen a large falling off in the  primary receipts in the United States  in  the last half of August.    In July  and  first  half  of August  the winter  wheat farmers marketed    their    new  crop on a large scale, but during the  last three veeks they stopped hauling  out  wheat   and  turned  to   ploughing  their fields for the new crop, and to  other work.      In the    United    States  spring wheat country the movement  is   considerably under  last year,   for  in Minnesota and South Dakot-. farmers have stacked a great deal of their  wheat and are going on with ploughing and fall work instead of threshing.    The great difference in the primary movement in the United States  is   seen  in   the  visible   supply  statements.      During the five weeks ending with August    16th,    the    United  States   visible   supply   increased   15,-  -269,000 bushels but in the two weeks  ending August 30th, there was an in-  At  crease of only 104,000, bushels,  the same time exports of wheat and  flour from the United States have been  very large. Liverool and other European marked have been quiet and  easy-going for some time but they  have also become quite strong and advancing in the last three days. Russia has . not begun yet to export its  new crop to i.ny extent and probably  European traders seeing the prospects  of smaller exports from America for  a few weeks at any rate,, and no immediate increase from Russia are supplying themselves in haste and so advancing prices. Of courss it will be  well to remember that this year the  United States has no record crops like  last year, except wheat. Their corn,  oats, barley, potatoes and hay are all  considerably short of last year's crops,  and the prices of these commodities  are bound to have a strengthening ef-  THE SUNDAY SCHOOL  LESSON   XI.   ���������   THIRD   QUARTtR  FOR    rEPT.  14,  1913  Text of the i-esson, Ex. xx, 12-21.  Memory Verses, 12-17���������Golden Text,  Luke x, 27���������Commentary Prepared  by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  Continuing our study of the two tables given to Moses, we will look first  at tbe six remaining commandments  and then at what is written concerning the relation of the whole to the  sinner and the saint. The fifth command is repeated and applied to believers to day ir. Ejh. vi, 1-3. In reference to the sixth: Thou sbalt not  kill; our Lord taught that it was dangerous even to be angry, and in I  John iii, 15, we read that 'whosoever  hateth his brother is a murderer. In  reference to the seventh Matt, v, 28,  teaches tbat it may be broken by even  a look. As to the eighth, the question  is asked in Mai. iii. 8: Will a man rob  God? and the answer is: Ye have robbed Me in tithes and offerings.  Many a man who wouU not be  guilty of stealing a dime or :. nickel  robs God of His Sabbath day by' finding his own pleasurejn it and is meaner than Jacob in refusi lg to give back  to God at least a tenth of that which  God has so bountifully given to him. A  good comment on the ninth i.s found in  Zach. vii, 10; viii, 17, where we are  forbidden' even to imagine evil in our  hearts against a brother or a neighbor. If any testify falsely against us  it gives us fellowship with the Lord  Jesus; against whom false witnesses  were hired to testify even as lt"had  been predicted, j-'alse witnesses did  rise up; they laid to my charge things  that I knew not (Ps. xxxv, 11; Matt,  xxvi, 59-61).  As to covetousness, it was on that  point, that Paul    saw   his    sinfulness  (Rom. vii, 7) and afterward wrote that  covetousness  is  idolatry   (Col., ii,  5).  Our Lord said: Take heed antl beware  of covetousness fer any man's life con-  sisteth  not in the abundance of the  things which he possesseth (Luke xii,  15).    From the voice of God and the  thunderings and the lightnings arid the  noise of the trumpet the people removed and stood afar off, and Moses alone  drew near (verses 18-21).  The law is  hd_y and just and good (Rom. vii. 12),  and "sets  forth  the  holiness  without  which no man can sec God.     It is so  holy that no mere mortal man ever  kept it or could keep It, for it brings  us all iu guilty before God and shuts  every  mouth,  for by the law is t--*  knowledge of sin (Rom. iii, 19, 20).  . If there had been a law given which  could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by    the    law  (Gal. iii. 21).      But it is evident that  no man is justified by the law in the  sight of God, for as many as are of the  works of the law are under the curse,  for it is written: Cursed is every one  that continueth not    in    all    things  which are written in the book of the  law to do them.     But Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law,  being made a curse for us.   The law  brings us all in guilty and leads us to  Christ that we might be justified by  faith (Gal. iii, 10-13, 24, 25) - He alone  of all men kept the law perfectly in  thought, word and deed and became  the end of the law for righteousness  to every one that believeth, but there  always have been . -d still are those  V.*lfl,   __iiig   .������_-\s- XXI, _   XJX   cr-r-t- -������   -.������_*. __.w*m  ness and going about to establish their  own righteousness, have not submitted  themselves unto tl.e righteousness of  God (Rom. x, 3, 4).  Such are all those who talk about  rUNDLE OF BONES  Huerta to Quit  Mexico City.���������That General Huorta  Jntends to quit tho presldoncy In favor of Ti-ovlno and bocomo a camlldu.o  at tho October elections, lu the ulate-  mmit mado by the woll known Mexican  close to the administration. General  Trevlno In making IiIb way to tho capital and llttlo effort hns been mado  lo _ll'.fiiil-'-- Iho fuel, thut ho hud bcou  officially sum men <ul. Just how tho  con I em plated succession is to bo  brought about has not boon disclosed.  ���������������^__������������������������������������������   __   ll-* II "���������IH���������l   -__K"<M  ADVANCED METHODS  Toronto  Will   Enforce  Sanitary  Conveniences In all Workahopa  Toronto.���������Ten thousand dollars Is to  lie spent thin your by the Incnl hoard  of* health In tho Installation of sanitary conveniences in buildings whose  owners aro unahlo to pay for thom  Immediately out of thoir own pookotn.  Dr. Haotlngo pointed out that tho,  municipality lu authorized hy tho'  Public ilealtii Act to .niital such cou-  . i      ��������� -������ *    * .........,  \t,ii*V-.MV'CU     t*>C      *���������������������������������-       I'J+l/S. kmlm^     O-J.      h.i*'W      ���������*-*.���������������>*  ers and to collect for tho name with  Intercut at flvo per cont. within five  yearn  Lone TragedL of Yukon Trail Just  Come to Light  Vancouver.���������Advices from the north  country stato that a bundle of human  hones wore found in an old tout a few  miles from tho Donjok Landing, on  tho way to uawson in tho Yukon. Tho  man had ovldont.y boon dead fer many  years. In ..io Denver district, not far  away from this place, woro found tho  bones of another man, whoso name In  believed to havo boon Milan or Nylns,  oald to havo beon a trapper.  Fund Increasing  Ottawa.���������Tho movement, originating ln Quebec to assist tho Fronch-  Canadians In Ontario In thoir fight for  the propagation of bilingual schools  has so fur netted $12,000. A check  for thai amount was received by  Chairman Doudrealt, ot tho Ontario  Educational association from Oliver  As'flolln, hood of the St. Joan Uap-  tlBto Boclety of Montreal.  Eaten by Cannlbnlo  Dilsbaiic, Australia. ��������� Word has  reached horo that Join. Hon*./ Warner, j  a mlnoraloglst of Gorman-American  dcocont has been killed and eaten by  cannibals ln an unexplored region ot  Papua. Ho wan heading an expedition, In uearch ot radium.  Prince Rupert Fltdi  Vancouvor. B.C.���������During tho month  ot AiujiiHt ban a i-uaiou iioiun  feet on wheat values. Present wheat j saiVation by character aiid the Golden  prices are moderate and if farmers  only supplied the market with it according to consumers nearby requirements, prices would never likely be  any lower and might easily be kept on  a higher level all the. time.  There has bee . very little doing on  our Winnipeg market In cash wheat  for old stocks are practically cleaned  up. At end of last week the stocks  of wheat all grades included, In store  Fort William and Port Arthur emount-  ed to only 762,384 bushels against 2,-  511,401 bushels a year ago, and of  this year's stocks only 5074 bushels Is  1 Northern. Trading in futures has  been fairly active for the time of yenr,  and prices at lowest point ofthe week  showed a decline of around 2Vic., but  have made a small recovery since.  Quotations for cash wheat are now on  the basis of new crop and these today  aro 1 Nor., 88c; 2 Nor., 85Vjc; 3 Nor.,  83c; No. 1 Alberta Red Winter, 89.4c;  2 A.R.W., 88c;  3 A.R.W., 84Vi.c.    Futures closed October 87c;   December,  85%c; May, 90%-..c. !  Oats���������  Tho price of cash oats declined during the week 2c. hut have hurl a got. 1  recovery and look stronger, and future dellverit ; show advance over a  week ago. Today's cash prices nro  2 Can. West., 34Vfcc; 3 C.W., 33%c;  ex. 1 T'eed, 34c; 1 Feed, 33Va-2'. 2 Feed,  31.4c. Futures closed October, 35%c;  December, 35%c; May, 39?_c.  Barley���������  Tho barley mnrket Is quiet nut the  feeling ls  stronger.      Today's  prices  aro No. 3, 40c; No. 4, 4-1 V_c; rejected.  41c;  Feed, 41e.  Flax���������  Tho flax market Is easier with tho  demand quiet und prices about IV&c.  under a week ngo. Today's 'cn..li  prices aro 1 Nor. West. Can., 130'^c;  2 Can. Wen.., 127.ic; 3 CUV.. Hr,._.c.  Futures closed Octobor 133c; December, 132c.  All prices quoted above are based  on delivery In store Fort William and  fori Artnin. *���������  ��������� i  ���������A O llll  Ufc     *.U..     ......     ,1..  of Prlnoo Rupert. Tho nalmon weigh-'  od 8,418,000 pounds, and there were a ���������  million pound* of halibut  PRINCE   ALRKHT.'THE   KING    OF   ENGLAND'S   SF.COND   SON.  Prince Albert, who wan born In 13U5,  entered the Naval College at Oubcrne,  four years ago-    He remained there two year*, aterward completing two  more year*' Iral r-lng at Dartmouth  Effect of Nanking Fall  Peking.���������Tho fall of Nanking will  result, in a gr.'at change in tho situation, tho robclQ then- having boon cut,  off and doomed to defeat for several  weolui. The gov'.-riinioiit cnnteiunliUcs'  going r.lowly In the work of fii.ppro.in-  Ing the remaining rebels In the various  pviivllu-.'rt.  C���������**V".*_rt-' Cc*-..I!*i**- W'?T?*t  Ottawa.--Hon. C. J. D.tlnily, l\lini;i-  ter of  JiiHtici',  will   leave  I'or  n   tour  of the went  al  the ������-nd of the mniilli.  .������',M r,       ,1 ,.     ..     V, 111     r.       . ,     ,!,  ffliM*i*l Inr.Mfiifl'MiH niiinfnhU-M-rd bv  hlu Pi-piimiii'iit. It will ho Doherty':.  lii-Ht, visit to thi* weht nine.- thc formation of tho protiunt government.  Rule as their creed and the Sermon on  the Mount good enough for ihem.  They have not noticed that the first  utterance oE Christ on that cccasion  shuts their mouths, for where is their  poverty of spirit while they talk of  how good they are and how much good  they do?  Let us consider the giving ot the  law more fully, for in this series of  lessons we have nothing in connection  with the tabernacle, every whit of  which uttereth His glory and speaks  of Him who is . the * true Tabernacle  (Ps. xxix, 9, margin; Heb. viii, 2).  The principal vessel In the tabernacle  was the ark of the covenant, and It  was made to contain the law, which  Israel so quickly broke, as wo shall  see in our noxt lesson. Moses and  Aaron, Nudab and Abihu and seventy  of the elders of Israel went up Into the  mount, and it is written t'.iat they saw  God and did oat and drink (Ex. xxiv,  9-11). This, In the light of John I, 18,  tells us that they saw the Son of  God.  Joshua seenib to have waited somewhere, for wo do not rer. '. of him  again till Moses comes down from the  mount, after forty days and nights,  with tho tables in his hands. He had  received full Instructions concerning  tho tuberiiaqlo and its furniture. As  thoy camo down from the mount tho  people, who had promised to do all  thut God had said are seen worshiping the golilon calf, and Moses, to Impress upon them what they wero doing, threw down the tables and broko  them.  By tho oomiui.nd of the Lord he  made two tables like tho first, wont  up Into the mount ngain and remained  another forty days and nights, while  God wroto again tho ten words, but  this timo he was told lo put them ln  tlio ark that, thoy inight bo kopt uu;  broken (Ex. xxiv. 9-1H; xxiv, 1-3, 28;  .���������xxll, 17; Dent. Ix. 10, 11, 37; x. 1*5).  What the people could not do the ark  did. Christ Is our ark, and onr mercy  si at, ami our pric-st, and uur -..un/ioo.  New G.T.P. Branch  Calf-nry.���������l_iiRlm*or Cnvleton. of the  Grand Trunk Pacific, announces that  his road will undertake the construction of a lino through Moose Jaw, Medicine Hat, through the Crow's Nest  country Into i,outhcrn ltrltlsh Columbia.   The Calgary-1-dmonton lino will  \\o .������v| iMulnil until h  In "t-rinkn on-nfior-ltm-i  wllh the proposed line, work on which  ���������HU  bn  o(.nimen(*.������.l   lw  the  iqn-liig.  To  Resign  PreelJency of China  St.   l-eterrtlnirr.���������Provisional     1'reBl-  ,lM\l     -I'.,..,,    Oil     I." .. I       ^t1    tt. -,    r-I.I.A,..      vr..  public,  hns  briucl   a Aorro.    announcing   hln   liuenrlo*   of  rndgnliig  oltlce  t     noon as peace is restored, record  ling to a tel-Kiiun from  Mululi n.  iiiiiiiiiiliiiiii mm  iH_.tHi.HH_1  .MM-__MM-M-_  j^^^^^U^^^J^ THE CRESTON RlVlEW  THE CRESTON REVIEW  Issued every Friday at C&reston, B.C.  Siitsscription: $2 a. year in Advance;  $_i.50 to United States points.  C. F. Hayes, Owner and Editor.  CRBSTON, B.C., FRIDAY, AUG. 28  Passing of the Pope*  Troubles rarely come singly.  Throughout the world Roman Catholics are mourning the death of  Pope Pius X., for the past eleven  years head of the church, who  passed away on Thursday last in  his seventy-ninth year.  He was the son of a peasant born  at Riese, in the Venetian province  of Theviso, and was a parish priest  until almost forty years of age. In  1893 he was created a cardinal.  His election to the Papacy in  1903 came as a complete surprise to  the outside world to whom his  name was hardly known. His administration of the high office has  been exemplary, marked hy earnest  piety aiid simplicity.  Much criticism was aroused by  his encyiicais against Socialism and  the modem spirit of the church, but  it is possible that these were productive in part, at least, of the results for which he hoped.  History may not give him a conspicuous   place   among   the  greal  popes, but it must accord him higl  rai k among the best.  Particularly did Pius X. stand  forth amo-'g the nations, and witl  all the power at his command dir  he strive to bring the day of universal amity nearer.  That his death should occur at  the begin' rig of the most gigantic  war struggle ever staged amon^  the nations of Europe, and that ii  some measure it is due to thai  struggle, is one of the saddest circumstances in the melancholy affair-  Penalizing Belgium  Tlie Germans have demanded a  war imposition of $40,000,000 from  Brussels.  The treasurer of the city state,  that "no possible coercive measure.*-  will give them even a fraction ol  that sum."  It is reported that exhorbitan.  demands have been made on other  Belgian towns and cities in the  hands of the kaiser's army.  The kaiser's levy on Brussels  means $55 per head for ev������>ry man,  woman, boy and girl in the city.  That is an average of nearly $250  for every family in the place.  All the papers in London denounce the German levy in Brussels. The Germans also ask $10,-  000,000 from the city of Liege.  Tiie papers declare that such an  assessment is opposed to all ideas of  modern warfare and is worthy of  the robber barons of the middle  ages.  It is supposed that the demand  was accompanied by threats to destroy the beautiful public buildings  of the towns and cities.  Looking at the matter from a  provincial standpoint conditions in  Europe are expected to result in  higher prices for wheat, cattle and  other exportable food products  which should increase the buying  power of the Canadian fruit consumer.  The British Columbia Fruit  Grower's Association, however,  points out that the effect of this on  fruit prices will not be felt immediately ; in fact the demand for fruit  will probably be light for at least a  few weeks. v  What it Costs  Germany Feeling the Pinch  In any intelligent discussion  as  to how long the  war will last  the' much greater,  big factor is the food supply.  While some authorities claim  Germany is prepared to survive  longer in her position of splendid  isolation than had been thought,  German newspapers do not speak  so confidently.  The issue of the Cologne Gazette  which reached Loudon on Friday  last paints a terrible picture of the  industrial   workers'   conditions   in  The first cost of tlse"'war to Canada is $50,000 per day, says the  Colonist. By the first cost we mean  the outlay involved in connection  with the expeditionary force of  25,000 men who will soon be gathered at ValcartieiC ...  The daily pay at $1.10 per man  will be $27,500. The extra allowance for officers will increase this  amount to more than $30,000 per  day.  Provisions and other supplies for  the force will cost about $20,000  per day, making a total of approximately $50,000.  The grand total, however, will be  Guns, ammunition  A conference has been held at  the Ministry of the Interior to discuss the great unemployment prob-  ein in Berlin among women. ' The  ���������stores have dismissed most of their  ���������mployees and will soon dismiss  ���������none. The costume trade is at a  standstill, and home workers are  starving.  The pinch of food is being felt in  Berlin and   other large  towns, and  he police have had to intervene in  onu1 places  between   provisioners  and customers.  The town of Gelsden Gircheri has  oought $160,000 of foodstuffs to be  old at shops. It is estimated that  :he_v are 17,000 families, each with  hree members, who need help,  w-hich will cost the town $50,000 a  month.  As we pointed out last week, the  rull dinner pail is a prime necessity  lot only with those on the firing  line but also with the men. women  and children at home. If, as the  Gazetee states, the food problem is  already becoming serious in Germany, it is bound to directly affect  the length of time the Kaiser can  continue the war.  All the experts admit General  Hunger will prove the strongest  soldier.  Unfortunate Germany  I and transport will run  into large  c   Besides, there are thousands of  troops under arms who do not belong to the foreign service force  and who ore in receipt of the statutory allowance.  We question if the total cost to  the country will be less than $150,  000 per day, in whieh case the war  loan of $50,000,000 to be raised by  the government wil! not be at all  unreasonable.  CURRENT COMMENT  Get married, fellows, and then  when you don't enlist for war  blame it on your wife.  There are 75,000 Russian reservists in Canada. They have not yet  been called home, but they are applying in great numbers to be sent  there.  And yet, come to .think, on the  records there ought to be enough  bachelors in the country to make  up half a dozen contingents���������and  then some.  jj������io������ted b*"- the recruit-in** orSicsr  there is no reason why fight-loving  Canadians shouldn't be in the heat  of battle so long as the admiralty  keeps calling for stokers for the  warships.  The Business Outlook  Sir William VanHorno is out  with tho prediction that Canada's  ���������itimulatcd export of war supplies  will bring a remarkable revival of  trade in Canada.  Certain it is that the more trade  Canada can develop in this time of  orii-iu the greater will be her influence when peace  is  again reached.  TJiOi^i v.l_.> v.'./i-li for loo/il consumption have no reoflon to go into  a panic;; on tho contrary, thoy will  have a larger fiold, because thoy  will liavo no German competition.  And thoi*e is no foar of a monetary panic Tlie .jiuusuroH taken  by the federal government are sufil-  eient to  dissipat** all  fears in that  1%-JKiijTi i.  In the midst of trouble more  trouble comes.  The emperor of Japan has declared war on Germany, and the Japanese fleet and land forces are  ready for the struggle around Kiao-  chau, the German protectorate in  China.      *  Whatever idea the Italian government may have had at one time  of standing by Germany, there is  certainly no u_bj_t.i___-������jr__ ___ t_._������t  direction now.  Neither does it seem likely that  Austria will be more than a broken  reed in tho struggle.  An important Servian victory  over an Austrian army of 80,000  mon is confirmed. Thi*. must have  a potent influence upon the course  of Austria and news of mutiny  among Austrian troops should not  occasion surprise.  So far as news has boon allowed  to filter through tho hands of the  censors, it seems that tho Austrians  have lost even their ambition to  conquer tho Servians.  Certainly tlioy uro making no  progress against them, nor are thoy  lending any particular aid to Germany.  Chances are that in a very short  timo thoro will ho no muoh trouble  in Austria, and among tho Austrians thomnolvoH, that that nation  will oooso to ho a fighting factor in  tin. big i-vents.  Herald: Issuing orders for general mobilization of troops is  child's play compared with the  ticklish task which now confronts  Col. Sam Hughes���������selecting officers  for the mbbolized troops:  Herald: I hate to mention it,  but really there seems to be something the matter with female, patriotism when Canadian wives in  such large numbers refuse to let  their husbands go to war.  Ledge: In America several millions of men are fighting .the European war. Tho fighting is princ-  pally from store counters and arni  chairs, while the weapons used are  war bulletins and ozone more or  loss heated.  There is a silver lining to tho  darkest cloud. In districts visited  by tho army worm the hens are increasing their output of eggs, while  tho broilers are ready for market  in half the usual time. Chioken  feed cost nothing.  The corn oob is doing for Missouri what beer has done for Milwaukee. Tho corn oob of commerce manufactured in that state  and exported to oil parts of the  world brought to tho manufacturers last year tho sum of over half a  million dollars.  Los Angeles Times: Of tho kai-  sor it may ho said, as a California  highwayman onoo spoke of himself, that ho nevor liken to cause  annoyance, but "ho is just hell"  whon ho is angry.     Tho Montreal  Mail iuI-Im   il������.it fho   onmtohv-iwon   it*  apt,  William II. is   the erownod  highwayman of Europe.  -.'?v  .'������'���������.  V ���������  J.  wvmm  Whema duck Says aii egg  she waddles off her nest  as unconcerned as you  please without making:  any noise.  When a hen lays an egg  she makes a whale of a  noise, and keeps it tip  i lor some time.  he MuvtRTioB:5  Hence* .the greater de-  mand for hens eggs than  eggs.  SOME PEOPLE  Afe just like ^he duck,  they never let the buyer  knovv wliat they have for  sale---Hence they are not  making a success of their  business.  t.  ADVERTISE!  MAS  HMMamimwM  mtilm.  l|,.*_.y������i|.-_v._.llM_J���������,,. ___���������_______!  ft  THE  CRESTON  REVIEW  \?  Creston  The Leading  Hotel of the  Frnit    Belt  Oar  Guests  Call   e&ga&i  YOU will: make no mistake  when you get off the train  if you Sign the register at  the Creston Hotel. Travelling  men will substantiate this. We  study the comfort of our guests.  The rooms are well furnished in  a manner up-to-date.  ?   -J ��������� ?   ' . .   . .    ; . ������  Headquarters for Mining Men, ft  Lumbermen, Ranchers, Tourists >&  and Commercials, 1������  ���������^syvgy^s^j  la.Bsj Moran  dai  _-_H  Prop, ||  THE CANADIAN BANK  OF COMMERCE  Sm EDMUND WA_-KEI^aV.O-,I.I-.D-������D.a-_^Pn-sidcot  ALEXANDER XAIRD, General Manager JOHN AIRD, Ass't General Manager  CAPITAL, $15,000,000     RESERVE FQHD, $13,500,060  FARMERS'* BUSINESS  The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every  facility for the transaction of iheir banking business, including  the discount and collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes*  are supplied free of charge on application. ������35  C. G. BENNETT  Manager Creston Branch  Get "Ypur Fro and  K: ? Ornamentals of Every Description from the  Largest and Best Nursery in the West  1000 Acres iTnder Cultivation  Buy From THE  j Bi.iT.Si. COLUMBIA NURSERIES GO.  Limited  Our Specialty:  "One year trees on 3-year whole roots"  Growu and Packed by Men of Lifelong Experience  NO IRRIGATION NO WINTER INJURY  Write fnr 80-page Illustrated Catalogue to  David D. Horne,  Nakusp,  P.  O.,  or A.  MILLER,  Arrow Lakes CRESTON, B. C.  Transfer, Livery and Feed Stables  Shipment of McLauglin Sleighs and Cutters ou Hand   |  TEAM   SLEIGHS  Harness, Single and Double and Supplies on Hand      ������  Several Sets of Second-Hand Harness  Sleighs and Cutters   . COAL FOR SALE  H. S. McCreath, Prop.  Phono CO Sirdar Avenue Box 14  .**fc*^H*������r-^i_^>^  i  J. D. SPIERS  News of the District  ! LIVERY AND TRANSFER.  : Wood for Sale  Phone 85 +  Already Fernie. citizens have paid  up $4,000 of 1914 taxes.  The Michel coke ovens have closed  down for an indefinite time.  -       -������������������"il'"-.  Four marriage licences were issued  at Fernie for week ending Aug. 20.  All the sa^vmills in the Baynes and  Waldo districts are still in operation.  Blairmore had the heaviest rainstorm of theyear Monday of last week.  Nelson looks for an attendance of  some 90 pupils at the high school this  term.  The government agent at Rossiand  has received notice to refuse to issue  gun licenses to either Germans or  Austrians.  Ten million feet of cut timber was  destroyed in the recent forest fires at  Bull River.  Nelson merchants are, ref using their  customers credit for a longer term thai-  thirty days.  - J. McCulIough of Greenwood is making a motor cycle trip tour of Spokane  and Vancouver.  Rossiand Miner:���������The Sisters' Hospital would like to havesomebodygive  them a good watch dog.  In B. C. last year bounties were paid  on 58 golden eagles, 232 coi-gars, 277  wolves, and 1618 coyotes.  ��������� Lardo quary has closed. The marble the company was getting out was  the best so far encountered.  Greenwood water supply is not good  and the citizens are compelled to boil  all water used.for drinking.  Every incoming train into Kaslo  brings down men from the mines up  the lines who have been laid off.  The first carload shipment of this  season's apples from the valley left  Grand Forks on Thursday for Alberta.  The independent company of Grand  Forks sharpshooters is holding itself  in readiness to entrain at a moment's  notice.  The diamond drill on the coal mine  at Midway, B. C, has drilled through  two seams of coal, both about nine  feet in width,  jn Kootenay, the Bluebell. Rambler,  Standard and other mines are temporarily closed down until the smelter  can handle their ore.  A. B. Trites.came up from Waldo to  Fernie in his car the other day in an  hour and ten minutes. This constitutes a record for this trip.  What are reliably stated to have  been a couple of silver-tip bears were  sighted a few days ago by a Phoenix  resident a few miles from town.  Considerable complaint is made at  Kaslo of the ravages of the of the festive cut worn in local gardens. The  pest eats up all kinds of green stuff.  At Cranbrook the manual training  school will not be opened until the return of Principal Webb, who is delayed in England on account of the war.  Several of Kaslo's hitherto unused  shacks around town are being made  use of by the miners who-are out of  employment as a result of tho shut  down.  R. G. McConnell has been appointed  acting deputy minister of mines to  temporarily at least fill the vacancy  made  through   the resignation of R.  W. Brock.  0  Enterprise;���������A Montreal tea company estimates that Canada's supply  of tea will Inst only threo tres!::.. It  may be a month boforo the Blairmore  brewery will supply tho substitute.  Bears are reported to bo quite numerous in tlio vicinity of Kaslo. Em-  brat Myrvang of Mirror lake was attacked near A. Loot's ranch by one  ugly brute whioh ho killed with a pick  axe.  At a meeting of Nelson trades and  lnborcnuncil a committee was appointed tp interview tho oity council in regard to looking after tho unemployed  and to go into tho question of tho high  price of foudiiLulT...  The boxing bout at Rossiand between Far roll and Maxwell, scheduled  for Thursday night did not come off  owing to tho gate boing too small.  Farroll wanted to go on for ten rounds  but Maxwell would not.  Kaslo's board of liconco and pollco  commissioners has sorvod an ultimatum to hotel keopors, stating that if  intoxicated men are found on thoir  promises, or  issuing   therefrom, tho  jp.;';.__!iy ..III V<- ���������<" -uuuiHiiaM'.raiKuu-  lutioii of the licence of tho offending  innkeeper.  -i������m  .i.l-.H-ll������B__W_--���������  _0M  I  THE   HOME  OF   THE  TRANSIENT  COMMODIOUS  SAM RLE  ROOMS  THE BEST ANO  MOST  PORUSmAR HOTEL. IN  THE  KOOTENAYS  Ruia on strictly up-to-date  lines. Unexcelled service in  all departments. Kitchen  staff (including cook) all  white ladies. Every comfort  and attention given, to guests  The bar is s upplied with  only the best brand of goods.  Porters Meet Trains  A HI/?0/V,  MAN AG,  B *  The Star theater at Greenwood has  been closed.  Horse thieves are active in the country around Midway.  191 indoor patients were tieatedat  Golden hospital last year.  The Frank Lime Company have  ceased operations indefinitely.  The post office building in Greenwood will be finished next month.  Nelson schools will refuse adr_.it-  tance to pupils under six years of age.  C. P. R. policemen are guarding the  bridge at Wardener and trespassing is  forbidden.  The mines of British Columbia have  distributed in dividends $1,252,131.46  so far this year.  The Presbyterian summer school at  Elko was a decided success. It will be  repeated in 1915.  Fifty special refrigerator cars have  been ordered to carry fish east from  Prince Rupert.  Twenty-four new mining claims  have been recorded in Nelson mining  district during the past week.  Grand Forks ratepayers are paying  their 1914 taxes in large number to  take advantage of the 10 per centre-  bate.  One of the Italians offering for enlistment at Fernie, but who was refused, offered $109 to be allowed to  enlist.  Greenwood smelter will probably  blow out this week, Tt will resume  operations when the price of copper  reaches a higher point.  The sale of gun licenses in B. C, last  year brought the government $99,225.  The fines for breeches of the game act  amounted to over $4,000.  Fernie .police magistrate had. nine  cases last week: four drunks, two vags  and three breakers of the cow by-law.  In the month of May the B. C. Copper Co. smelter at Greenwood produced 528,458 pounds of copper, 2114 ounces of gold and 9337 ounces of silver.  One man was killed in thocoal mines  of British Columbia duaing tho last  three months. Eight men were killed  puring the first six months of this  year.  Tho suggestion has been made by  W. J. Astloy of Nelson that a supply  of Kootenay apples, should be provided for tho members of the Kootenay  contingont.  Tho boxing contest between Chas.  Lucca and Young Maxwell, which was  booked for Pernio last Tuesday night,  failed to como off owing to tho small  box receipts.  A particularly wet season has beon  exporioncod in the northern section of  tho province and there him boen little  damage in that portion of tho province from forest fires.  The Canadian Pacific Railway in  view of tho decrease in tho passenger  traffic during the pnat few weeks has  decided to take off ono of thoir trans  continental trains now being operated  daily each way.  D. P. Kano of Kuslo has a tree In  his orchard which producer, a pitless  plum. Thc plumn are uuuil) mid contain a small sood en-rased in a light  husk. Thoy are said to bo excellent  for preserving purposes.  Fernie Froo Pro*.-.;���������Govt. Agent  Stalker has received Instructions that  no gun licences aro to be issued to Austrians and Germans. Owing to these  instructions Mr. Stalker haw boon having a vory iivoJy timo with citi������-onu of  tlieso countries ivh<������ havo boon in tho  habit of|taking out gun IIcouson.  Blarirmore will celebrate Labor Day  with a* picnic and sports.  A large number of foreigners leave  Blairmore by every train for the east.  Two fisherman were fined in the  Greenwood police court last Friday  for catching undersized fish.  At Greenwood owing to the extreme  dry weather it has been found necessary to employ a night watchman.  The final game in the Crow's Nest  football league game the championship to Coal Creek who beat Frank 2-0.  The normal training and domestic  science branches of the Nelson public  school course have been discontinued  for the fall term, at least.  RAL ACT  l-formF.)  Certificats of Improvements  NOTICE  Dickinson nnd Backless Mineral  Claims, situate in the Nelson Mining  Division of  West Kootemny District.  Where located:��������������� ������n the north-west  slope of Summit Creek about four miles  above the mouth  nf th* north fork.  TAKE NOTICE thut I, A H Green,  noting as agent for H P. Dickson.  Free' Joiner's . Certificate No. 8J379B,  inteii.-., sisty daysfron- tbo dstfl besr-ro",  to apply ro the Mining Recorder for  Certificates of Improvemeu s, tor thc  purpose of ob aining Crown Grants of  the above claims.  And farther take notice that action,  under section 85, must be commenced  before tbe issuance of snch Certificate  of Improvements.  Dated this 7th day of July. A. D. 1914  A. H GREEK  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINIG REGULATIONS  Ooal mining rights of the Dominion,  in Manitoba. SuHkatnbewnn and Al-.erta  the Yukon Territory, the North west  Territories nnd in a portion of the Pro-  vino** of British Columbia, may be leased  for a terra of twenty-one years at  au annual rentnl of $1 an aore. Not  moro tbnn 3,660 aores will be leased to  one applicant.  Ai-piiurt-io" for a ionso must be made  by tbo applicant iu person to the, A cent  or Sub-Agent of the distriot 111 whioh  tho rights applied for are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must  be described by sections, or legal sub-  d;visions nf sections, nnd in unsurveyod  territory the trnot applied for shall be  staked out by tho applionnt himself.  Knob application mant bo accompanied  by a foo of $6 wnioh will bo refunded it  the rights applied for aro not available  but not other wine. A royalty shnll he  paid on tho merchantable output of the  mine nt. tho rate nf flvo cents por ton.  Tho person operating tho mine shall  furnish tho Agent with ��������� voin return.,  accounting for tho full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pav the royalty therein If tho coal mining rights  are not boing operated, suoh rotornn  should bo furnished nt loast onoo a yoar  Tho Iohbo wiii include tho ooal xnln-  inp richtr. tm\y, bat lho lcn^oo tuuy U  permitted to purohi.no whatever avail-  atvo nnrrano rights mny be oonsidt-red  neoensnry for thn working of tho mino  At tho rate of $10 nn noro.  For full information npplioatlon ahould  bo mado to the Soorotnry of the Department of tbo Interior, Ottawa, or to nny  Agont or Sub-Agoat of Dominion Land..  W. W. OOHY,  Derti-ty Hfini������t,������r of the fntn-Hnr.  N. B.-���������Unauthoriaed publication ot  thi*- nd-fcxtl-tin-cnt will not lx> paid for.  ���������30000.  9gB  mmimmmmmmmim im  murnx. mmxm000m00m  0mm*****  W.J-M  MMM  ���������Mil  mmwam  /  / geeBBggg-qwg^if  ,THE   SLOCAN   STAJEt  WHAT  ECHO   ANSWERED,  S STOOD within a wooded Klen  Before a-niountaln wall.  And, ringing to my ear again.  The echo mocked my call.  "O Spirit of the Glen," 1 cried,  "Win.all he bliss divine  When fast the nuptial knot is ti������4  And Phyllis shall be mine?  Beneath the lamplight's rosy glow  At even shall I sit  And -. atch her fairy fingers sew  Or mend or hem or knit?"  And echo.answered. "Nit!"  "When to my cozy home 1 haste  For dinner* or for tea  .  What dainty dishes rare of taste  Will she prepare for me?  Of 'boarding ouf I've had my fill.  My appetite's a-quiver.  X)h. say what precious morsel will  liei- skill to me deliver?"  And echo answered, ���������'I_iver!**  "In peaceful, placid streams of lovs  Will all our moments flow  As clear as summer skies above  Or summer seas below?  T'ill both our natures sweetly chlmef  Will all be perfect quiet?  What will we do, O Spirit?   I'm  In love a neophyte."  ���������. And echo.answered, "Fight!"  ���������*And will i rule the roost,'* said I,  ���������'And always have my way?  And will my precious Phyllis try  To honor and obey?  El3?1I_I.be Ieader of the band  Or win my rule be wrecked?  .'    I pray thee, tell me how I stand  To her in that respect."  And echo answered, "Pecked!"  ���������Puelt,  In Time of Peace.  The   new   "beast,"   or   under   class  man, at West Point bad aever heard  MiHES  Yoii will find relief in 2am Suk!  It eases ihe burning, stinging  pain, stops bleeding and brings  ease. Perseveraru  Reasonable  Mistrust.  "Now let us try," she said, "to keep  the otber passengers from discovering  that ���������we are a bride aud groom."  "AH right, dearest." he replied. "How  shall 'we deceive them?"  '���������Buy a couple of magazines and we  will pretend to be busy reading them  and avoid noticing each other."  "That's a fine idea, sweetheart. I'll  get them right away."  Twenty minutes later:  "I.ovey!"  "What is it, dearest?"  "You are holding your maga-dne upside down."  "Oil,  George:     if yoa   are  going  to-  begin  being critical  now  how shall   I  ever  be able to  please yon after  we  have been  married  for  five years  Chicago Record-Herald.  HOW LONDON GETS  MlLK  When the Biggest City Had a Famine  3o much milk is sent up to London  aL I the price is so high that poor people in country districts have simply  to go without it, was the startling  statement made by Lady Meyer at the  conference of the National Food Reform Association the other day.  But it is r_iot so surprlsir;; after all  when we remember wbat a mighty  volume of milk the people of the metropolis consume every year -about  112,000,000 gallons for which they pay  .annually about five million pounds.  There is no city of magnitude in the  world that can compete against London  with  its  milk  supply.  About fifty years ago the milk that  was consumed in London mostly came  from dis.tri.ts within the metropolitan  area. But foo'. and mouth disease  broke out among the cows, and it was  then that London experienced a real  milk famine. It was at this time that  a far-seeing man���������Sir George Barham  ���������thought of getting* milk from Unhealthy cows in Wilts and Hants,  London's greatest supply of milk  conies from, Wilts, but large quantities come also from Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Surrey. Milk  has como to London even from Wales.  Ireland r.nd Penzance, and in a few  iustances from Scotland. The following .'igures represent approximately  the number of churns which are  brought by different railways to Lon-  ���������   ! don every  year  loach  churn contains  T������.  u-st  a   ueavy   siege   gun   fired,     'iho  class man waa solicitous.  "'You have never beeu close when  one of these guns was fired, eh?" be  Inquired.  "No."  "No, sir," commented the first class  man.  ���������'Yes, sir. No. sir," replied th������  "beast."  "Um-m. It's liable to bust your eardrums for life. See here, don't tell  him I told you, but go to the commandant and ask him for"���������- The upper  class man was so solicitous that be  whispered the rest of his communication.  A few minutes later the raw cadet  presented himself before the commandant.  "Please, sir," he said, "I want some  guncotton for my ears."���������New York  Evening Post  A  Good  Reason.  It was a red letter dny at one of  our large schools, and the boys wore  under examination in -'optics." The  point under illustration was (hat.  strictly and scientifically speaking, wo  see not objects, but their Images depicted on the retina. Tlie doctor, to  make tbe matter plainer, said to tho  w;is" of the class:  "William, did you over actually see  your father':"  Bill promptly replied: "No, sir."  "Please explain" why you never saw  your own father.*'  "Because." replied Bill, very gravely, "be died before 1 was boru. sir."���������  New York American.  j about  3 4   gallons  ! Western   Railway,  j Ureal       Northern  i churns:     Midland  of     milk.:     Great  .l.*_'>0,000     churns;  Kail way.      400.000  Uailwav.     341,000  Noncorrim.tta! George.  Guorgeywas caught napping.  A pair of soft little hands covered  his eyes, and a sweet voice command*  M, "Guess who it is!"  Nothing very dreadful for George in  this, you think: but. then, you don't  know that George has two sweethearts, and for the life of bim he  couldn't decide whose voice it was  which made it a very embarrassing situation for him. A wrong guess would  lead to complications awful* to think  of. But a boppy thought inspired  George, and he announced. "It's the  dearest, sweetest little girl in all the  world."  "Oh, you lovely boy!'' gurgled tbe  -���������atlsfled *ono as she removed her  hands.  And now Georgo thinks of applying  for a diplomatic post, feeling that his  talents would bo wasted in any other  field.���������TId Bits.  High  Finance.  A man sei_. his neighbor's little boy  to the drug store to buy five postage  scamps. Ho banded him two dimes,  the extra oue being tor himself. Some  time afterward the boy came back  blubbering end said he had lost one ot  the dimes.  "But why didn't you buy me the  stamps?" asked, the man.  "Because, mister," replied the boy,  "it was your dime 1 lost."���������Judge.  Quite Obvious.  "My dear." said Mrs. Snaggs to fcei.  busband. "what is a canard'."  "Don't you know what a canard is?"  queried Snaggs rather sneer ingly.  "Why. the word itself conveys its own  meauing."  "'Does it? Well, really. I can't see  it.   What does it mean, dear?"  "Why, a canard is something one  canardly believe, of course."  "Oh, to be sure! Why couldn't I  think of that?"���������Savannah News.  churns:  London and Brighton Hallway  .73-1.000 churns.  All  these  railways   took   lo   the  enterprise from the beginning aud wbat.  then proved an ill-paying item is now  one of tho most nourishing, and keen  competition  exists  in  counties  which  are  traversed by  more  than  or.o railway   company.    Special   trains   led  to  the building of special  milk vans and  tho movement towards  sanitary  insulation  led    to     improvements    which  were not dreamt ol at an earlier day.  --.very line has its refrigerating vans  with special accessories for excluding  i dust aud _������!! kinds of germs.    The lat-  ! est pattern of milk van belongs to the  | London and ' Southwestern    Railway.  I They aro fitted like -modern Pullmans,  ! with Westinghoiis.? and vacuum brakes  | and oil gas lamps, and thc inner ven-  j tiiation is evci  better than tha. of the  ��������� best passenger coach.  ���������     The  farmor,  cr.*  his  assistant,  rises  j early in the morning, not solely out of  ��������� consideration for the crowing of the  cock or rising sun;  it is the exigency  j of railway traific which tots the alarm.  | The jatient kine avait in the sheds  the milkmaid, or ma. , or boy, or automatic milking machine.  Patent strainers and coolers prepare the milk for transport. The  cooler has taken the place of an old  practice ut -.urrept.tioi.sly' dusting  boracic acid into the churns.  In the suamrei, for an imperial gallon, the farmer receives 7d. and 8d..  and in winter 9d. and 10d.- delivei :d  at the London terminus, and the transportation cos.s him one pei_ny per  ga "on.  An Obliging Horse  A doctor and a clergyman were exercising their horses one morning in a  country lane, whon un argument arose  between thon as to which of tho animals possessed tho sweeter disposition.  I'll wager that if their respective  tempers could be tried, said the doctor,  mine would be far away tho better.  That's all nonsense, retorted the  clergy man. My mare has the best  temper of any bora, in the neighborhood.  Well, here's a stiff hedge, let us  try their leaping capabilities, suggested the doctor.  Right you are. agreed his friend.  The doctor'., hunter quietly refused  the -jump, although put at it again  and again. The clergyman's little  mare also refused, but at the same  time threw back ber ears and exhibited considerable ill-temper. When  repeatedly urged to jump sbe finally  accomplished a clove: buck-jumping  feat, which threw her master straight  over the hedge. Strange to relate,  the reverend gentleman was quite unhurt, and scrambling to his feet commenced to scrape Lie mud from his  broadcloth, whilst the .'.octor laughingly "remarked:  Perhaps r:.t are convinced now that  my animal has a bettei* disposition  than yours.  Not at all! replied th. clergyman.  My mare is such r.n unselfish little  brute that, although unable to take  the fence herself, she had no desire to  keep me from going over. In fact,  she facilitated the mode of my transit  whilst your horse displayed a dog-ln-  the-manger temperament by not going  himself and not allowing you to go  either.  Where the Danger Was  The train was undoubtedly a record-  breaker for speed. It held the slow-  traveling championship of. the States.  The passenger who had beer, fidgeting  in his seat for several hour got up at  last and strolled along the corridor to  the front of the -ain, where he came  upon the guard playing marbles with  the engine-driver.  Hallow, there! he called. I suppose  you don't mind a bit of good advice  if it's given in a friendly spirit?  The conductor pocketed two marbles  and said he <'* In't.  Then why, said the pale passenger,  don't you havo the cow-catcher taken  off the  front  and  _>ut  on  the  back.  The conductor stared hard and bus-  plciously.  Why should we? he asked at length.  Why, responded the pale par.senger,  for fear a cow might come along the  track and bite somebody.  Warts will render the prettiest  hands unsightly. Clear the excrescences away by using Holloway's Corn  Cure, which acts thoroughly and painlessly.  Tree Talk.  Sentl..-._ntnI Young Lady���������Ah. professor, whnt would this old oak say IC  It could talk?  Professor���������It would say, "I nm an  elm!"���������rilegcnde matter.  A  Human TMachinc.  "Do you give any credence to the  claims of some radicals that man is  becoming little more thaw a human  machine?" asked the friend.  "Yes. At times I feel that 1 am becoming simply a lawn mower," answered the suburbanite.���������Buffalo 1Hz-  press.  Oil the Future Fuel of Navies  There can be no dot:'-, that the naval future lies with oil as against coal.  A given tonnage of oil as against an  equal tonnage of coal will enable the  same ship to steam much faster, to get  up speed quicker and to travel 4. per  cent, farther; moreover, the supply  can be replenished in a small fraction  of the time, and on the high sea in  nearly any weather instead of in port.  When yoa add that per knot steamed the cost is about the came, and  that the world's visible supply seems  as infinite for any near future as the  coal supply, the case seems conclusive. The objection that coal is a  home prod-Act while oil is imported,  is of no relevance from a naval or  strategical point of view, because if  we were prevented from importing oil  we could not import any v.ther necessity of national existence.  This and other objections will no  doubt continue to 1 2 m-ged, since the  withdrawal of the British navy's consumption, followed as it mast be by 1  that of foreign navies, will "ir _ a serious thing for the steam-coal producers in our midst. Theirs are**power-  ful interests, but not interests in  whose favor the admiralty could properly forego the highest naval efficiency.���������London Chronicle.  drogf&ts and '  -^   stores    i  Canada   il  25* <^ I  60*  j,  HllliPfltl  Trouble Amidships.  Nanny Goat���������1 thought father had a  perfect digestion.  Billy���������Ilo has ordinarily, but awhile  ngo he ate 11 lot of adjectives off a circus poster.���������Puck.  WINCHESTER  Nice Family, This.  Wife (remlulscently) ��������� I remember  when you asked me to say the word  tlmt was to make you happy for llfo  how I hesitated.  Hub (grumpily) ��������� Hesitated! Huh1.  You never did say it.���������Boston rJ ran-  script.  No Question About It.  A child adopted from an orphans*  home was being ridiculed by tho other  children because he had no real parents. The conversation went about ns  follows:  "Aw, you haven't got nny real father  and mother."  "Maybe I haven't*, but the ones I  have got love ive as much us yours do  you."  "They do not. Ours nro om* real parents."  "Well, mine love 1110 mure Limn your.)  do yon. 'cause mine picked ine out of a  hundred othor babies, nnd yours had  to take what thoy got," replied thi.  Hilopted hoii.~r.ife.  Not a Bad Bargain  A certain young farmer, returning  from market, war pulled up by the urgent, appeal of a pedestrian.  Hullo! that you, Tom? Want another situation." Why, I thought'you  were living with Captain Bird, as his  coachman, eh?  So I was. sir, but it wasn't a fair  bargain. As you know, sir, we were  never to get drunk both at ence.  Well, that '.ems fair enough, any  way, said the young farmer.  Fair, guv'nor? Why, the captain  was drunk the whole blessed time!  Dc-.-rr.ess Cannot be Cured  bv local applications, as they cannot  l-pach thc diseased portion of the ear.  There is onlv one way to cure deafness  pnd tl.s"������- is'tov constitutional remedies.  Deafness is caused toy an inflamed condition of the mucous lining of tlie Euc-  taehiai Tube. When this tutoe is inflamed vou have a rumbling sound or  imperfect hearing, and when lt Is entire-  lv closed. Deafness is the result, and unless the inflammation can be taken out  and this tube restored to its normal condition, hearing will be destroyed forever:  nine rises out o_ ten are caused by Catarrh, which is nothing but an inflamed  condition   of  the   mucous   surfaces.  We will give One Hundred Dollars for  any case of Deafness (caused by ��������� catarrh) that cannot be <*red by Hall's  Catarrh Cure.    Send for circulars-free.  F.   J.   CKE. EY & CO..  Toledo,  Ohio.  Sold  by  DruRRists.   75c.  Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation .  New Orleans requires all bread offered for sale tc be securely wrapped  to protect it from flies.  Dispensation of Providence  A teacher, instructing her class on  the composition of sentences, wrote  two on tho blackboard, one to exemplify a misstatement of fact and the  other to illustrate bad grammar. The  sentences thus read as follows:  The hen has three legs. Who done  it?  The ienclio:* the,: called to one of  tho children. Hairy, she said, go to  the blackboard and show whero U13  fault lies in those two sentences.  Harry slowly approached the black-  hoard, evidently thinking' hard. Then  he took tho chalk and wrote: The  hen never done lt.     God done it.  Handicapped by Fashion  The timo has passed, said the orator haughtily, when any man tan hide  himself behind a woman's petticoats.  Ycu bet, commented the cynic in  a back seat. Those X- ay skirts have  stopped that.  (V.inard's Liniment Relieves Neuralgia  Now, Johnny, said his mother, we  shall have company to dinner today,  and I don't want you to say a word  while they are here, then no one need  find out that you are so silly.  The guests came. After some desultory remarks, a gentleman, who is  passionately fond of children, turned  to Johnny, whose mother, being busily engaged in another pare of the  room, did not hear the conversation  that ensued.  Well, my son, said the gentleman,  pleasantly, how old ar; you?  Johnny, obeying orders, sat like ~  sphinx.  Can't you tell me your age? said  another, thinking the boy a little diffident.  Still Johnny spake not.  I can make him talk, said a bright  young lady. Yon like the girls better  than you do those horrid men, don't  you, Johnny? Now. come over here  beside me and tell mo how old you  are.  Silent as the grave.  Why, I believe tfjie boy ls an Idiot!  said the gentleman who hac". first addressed him, In a bantering way.  There, ma. said he. "Tain't no use!  I hain't opened my mouth, and they  all know it already!  This Should Hold Him Awhile  Two issouri editors **/ho have  waged a word battle-for some fin.e  seemed to ha\e about exhausted themselves. One of them hurls this bludgeon as a climax to the feud:  He now lies buried i\ his own mud.  Not even a .urkey buzzard remains  above the Iiorizon c. ooze to mark his  burl.-l spot. A turkey ..uzzard has  got ,:ome sense. It knows vhen -t  has got enough. Nobody would have  gall enough to ask a buzzard to put a  clamp on its note and make a meal of  pure mud. We feel it a high honor  to be attacked  by him in any way.  If we had not    been denounced    by  him and his sort we would feel that  we had been dereieet 'n our duty ant-  had fallen short of life's ideals.  Ought to Work  I'm afraid these boiled eggs ain't  very fresh.  Write the name Genevieve on one  of them, suggested the head waiter.  Mr. Wopsey is roma*itic and that will  distract nis attention 1^ the eggs are  not so good.  UPTON'S   PURE FRUIT JAMS  Are Pure Jam improved by  the   addition   of    Pure  Apple Jelly  Try It. All Grocers  Rifle, Beoolver and  Pistol Cartridges  W  WW  Til IS  tiltZO  IJRAND  I  P___  t"������acc uAn*. men. in u. t. p������t. orr.  Except the powder, -iverythinft  that fjoi-S into Winch-.nt-_r c.irt-  ridgca ������_. made in our own plant  under our careful nnpervinion,  Thia fiyatern enable*, un to produce  nTr....������"ni������inn which in -.nip**trior tor  nil other ninUen. To f.tt it nny.  where '.i't but _.<*r.-r'-i;iry to ur If  for Wii-cheuicr make und look tut  for  the   Red  W on tbe packuffc,  Wihomii .tc* RrKi'ATiu-.ARur.Cn,  NCW MAVKN, OONN.  The womon were in power, and even  lhe poi lee force was 11 skirled brigade.  Two blushing coppers drugged a uuilo  crook Into tho police station.  ���������Wbat Is thu charge." arsked tlio  (.ergon 11 less.  "Carrying concealed weapons," roplied Ollicor Mnymo Ilognii. "Wo  found this hidden under IiIh coat."  And she produced 11 oiigo lilled wllh  mice.���������I.xehiuige.  My husband doesn't care for grand  np.ira.  But 1 notice ho appl-uids  'l^crously.  lie doos that to keep awake.  THE  DOCTOR'S  GIFT  Food Worth Its Weight in Gold  VV.    I.  i)   Mi  Sacred.  fi'-fl'r:'.--' tic- (.hvt hcriiio n?Vv r.'romi-  ���������UH dny and expecting Important cor-  r.-s|ioii(k'iice) ��������� Mavo nny letters como  for me?  Daughter���������-Voi-i. mother, hut I toro  thom up for u doll's paper chase.  Suffragette���������Toro them up! I never  heard of t-ui.-h behavior. Haven't I  nftfii fold you that lolt.'i'H are sacred  IhlngHV��������� Punch.  Wisdom.  "Tl.!,. I. a f'-'rl world," n-iuarJ.c.l Iho  t-heerfiil Idiot.  "WIiiifn tho iiiiiMit nowV" UNked III*.  I mob  "Why. wc -;pi'ii<t 1111 If our liven try-  on*     Ol    Ml \ ������l     Mill'-    llllll     Um    UUUI      <"'l  li ���������     ;: lo UIM Hino," replied \'nt ol){t������|K  'ul idiot.-i.'liu-liiiintl ^nfliilrei-,  Wo ut.ua.ly -xpect tho do:tor to pat  ua on somo kind oi pontuico and givo  1    bitter niodl-lnes.  An EiiHlor.'X doctor bi'oiu.Iit a patlont rnnvthlii!* oi-iiiroly ������lliTepont and  flu.  result-,  aro truly  interesting,  "Two yoara ago," writes this patlont, "I wub a frequent victim of octiro  Indigestion and bllloupness, being allowed to eat. very fow things, Ono  day om family doctor broti.-ht 1110 a  ..mull package, Raying ho had found  -.omcthlng for mo to oat.  "lie said Ir. wiih a rood oallod Ornpo-  .Muts and even rs its golden enlnr  might Hiiggasi it was woith its woight  In cold. I wuh nick and tlrod. tvying  ouo thing after another to no avail,  but consented to try thhi new food.  "Woll! It imrp.-vKHi-* ur/ dootor'a  rondont anticipation and. every day  siliu-e then 1 havo blessed the good doctor and tho Jiiventor of Grapu-NiilH.  "I noticed Improvement at. once and  in a month's time my forucr rap el la <*;.  liKllg.'Hl'.iii   bad   dlsuppoarod.    In   two  iiioutliH I  felt llko a now 1un.11.      My  mind   wan  nim-li  clearer ami   keener,  my body took 01. the vitality of youth,  and thia condition linn ci * nth-���������,*���������;.,'���������,'���������  I     "ThenYt 11 manor.,"      xSi~tU, KiVrtl,  ll,v riuiudlun ''..NTurn On . Wlnilmr. Ont.  I I1*''';.. ���������������������������'I'-IO Uoad to Welivlllo." la pUga.  Ever read tno above mucrj    s\ new  one appears from time to tlrr.ft     Thev  are fleiiulite, true, ond full of litm.n  ! ioteic.t.  Playing the Game  A pompous director of a large railway company once landed at a small  station and reciuestecl the pori^j* to  carry his bag. Thc statlonmaster was  quick to notice the importae.ee of tho  arrival, and as the porter passed him  struggling with the heavy Gladstone,  managed to whisper: Bo careful, Bill!  That's Lord Blank, one of the directors.  Tho porter's chance of a tip vanished with this information, but subsequently upon relinquishing the bag, -Vo  was astonished to Unci himself the recipient of a shilling.  Momentarily surprised, ho BtarotI at  the coin In his palrii, and tho director  thinking his behaviour savorod of dissatisfaction, remarked: Undor tho  company's regulations you avo not sup.  posed to accept gratuities.  Yor, sir ��������� no, sir, stammered tho  porlor, *i)id then, recovering 1 ' 1 Rolf-  control run. closing his loft eyelid, ho  '���������aid: But. on., employe nover splits on  another!  Mlnrrd's Liniment Curea Bums, Etc.  A Budding Financier  Outside it was snowing hard and the  teacher considered it her duty to warn  her charges.  Boys and girls Bhould be very careful colds at this time, she said, solemnly. I had a darl-ng llttlo brother  only seven years old. One day he  went out in the sno*v with hiB next  sled and caught cold. Pneumonia set  In and In threo days *-e war* dead.  A hush fell upon the schoolroom;  then a youngster in the back row stood  up and asked:  Where's his sled?  It. was a crowded car.    Among thof.ro  who could not find, seats was .-. young  lady.     CIobo to whore sho stood tin  old  man  was sitting.      Mo titruggled  as If to arise.     Tho young woman can't  a glance of scorn at ono o: two men  hldlm, behind newspapers.   Please do  not. got up, sho said to the old man, I  bog you don't.      Tlio conductor rung  tho boll nnd  tho car *"������y.-.nt on,      The  old man's featiirea worked convulsively and ho mopped IiIh faco with his  handkerchief.     At th3 noxt stopping  place ho again tried to rise, und iiguln  tho young woman tried, to Btop him.  I  would much rather stand, sho sold  continuing to block his way.   1 don't  cam whether you woi.ld o. not, said  tho old man cvlmnon with fury, I want  to get, out. you'vo Hindu 1110 e.oiuu  half a mil: too far already. Hero  you Htfui il.*, car. Tsui. 11, was too  late, th?* bell lwad already rung nnd  ho had to wiSli until the next ittopphiff  plan- wan reached.  Clothe -woman wlt_i the ballot! exclaims Senator Shoppary of Texas.  Wouldn't you llko to soo a woman  wearing a ballot?  Under tho hedge sat Robert tho  vapor, taklnr, long pulls at n boor-  bottle. The now curate eyed him sadly, thou approached ami spoke. Toii  me, my man, said tho now curate, is  that all you havo to drink?  Robert nodded.  And you drink It all da/, ond every  day?  Again Robert nodded, and tlio new  curato cast up his hands. Then, he  ox tract cd sixpence from his waistcoat  and said: Tako that, my man, lt will  buy you Bomothlng bettor.  Thanks, guvlnor��������� lhnnl.ii, murmurcil  Robert, deeply affected. I reckon a  pint 0' boor la moro friondlyllko than  thlB cold tea.  Richest Spot In Canadr.  In Toronto, Canada, there are two  blocks on King* Street, between Yonge  and Bay streets, and including the  corners of the^e two cross --_reets,  which composes the richest strip of  property in Canada. The land alone  in these two blocks is ./orth on an  approximate esti___a"ce, $16,000,000,  while the buildings are worth $9,500,-  000. New structures "fo cost $6,500,-  000 hove been started, or will be under construction, this year. Thus,  including the natural advai --* in land  values tbat r-.ay" be expected, this  1,500 feet of frontage in the heart ot  the city of Toronto will have, by the  end oi' the year, a value closely approaching $35,000,000.  All Nlg'it with Asthma. Everyone  knows how attacks of asthma often  keep their victim awake the whole  night long. Morning finds him wholly  unfitted for a da: of business, and yet,  business must still be carried through.  All tbis night suffering and lack cf  rest can.be avoided by tho prompt  uee of Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Asthma Remedy, which positively doeo drive  away ths attacks.  Pat and Jim were trudging along the  dusty road when a big touring car  passed them with a whiz like a roar  of a gigantic .oclcet, and disappeared  in a cloud of dUBt.  Gorry! exclaimed Pat, thlm chug  waggons must cost a hapo a cash.  The rich in tblp country is f<.ir!y burning money.  Indade, thin, replied Jim, bo tho  Emell av it, it must be that tainted  n oney we do bo hearing so much  about.  Towne���������Do you mako your cook pay  for what she breaks.  Suburbs (ia -iir)-i_,0iuC������it)���������-Maki* lirr  pay? I should say not. Why, every  month, bcsldea paying hor salary, we  reward hor Hberallr for what f,he did  not break.  1  MrB. I-agrox-*-Toll me, profossor,  will my daughter over become a great  pianist?  Herr VoglcBchnltzle���������I gannot dell.  Mrs, Bagrox���������-But has Hho nono ..f  the qualification!! itoco-ssnvy for n good  musician.  Herr VogleHchnllzlo���������Ach! Yah, ma-  tarn; sho hft������ two handts!  ftmmmmmmmimtmmmuimtmmmmxmmm^mmmmmmmm^mmm.. ..... , -,_,.  TTBie Stoinsucli  mmwmmss****t-f    _M_MM-_-_---------MM-anMMMM  Is the Target  ii.it nr  ...... ...  m-diM the poet. We  loan It Ir. prul.-ie for  hofii  dead  a  year.  f.    ,r-|.,������.    I..    T.mft'  ion't know���������un-  .-!  man who has  1  ,i  Aim to make that stronfl,���������and dilation cood���������and you  ���������will keep well I No chain Is stronger than Its weakest  link. Mo man Id otroncer th������n his Btomacli. With  Mt_-.mi.eh d I Bordered a train of dioc_u.es follow.  pjt^g**? Golden Medlocal BIscovery  Iliutd form ������t ���������1.00 por l������������ttU fo* *vor 40 ytuu-o, vivid* *<mo_������l _������U������.acUon.  ��������� I   M rmm prefer UU_ti mm mmMam* ha K. V. W������r������e. M.!������.. Ifeci-* cat- ���������>*���������   | ������  in #>  .-��������� - '-��������� ���������������'>v:Jh?K������?.;;-SSl)^rt������?^^3&$Z3  titii -m>:ti^i^B^mm  ��������� ' - ��������� ���������,;,;.'l\-.- .''t*,>1M-**.'K-;iI'V'KlPt,  ?'-?;vYv?|^?ir.7'liiii^  THE   SLOGAN   STAR  Ha  WILD RIOTSilN DUBLIN  SCENES  OF VIOLENCE WITNESSED IN  IRISH CAPITAL  Tramway Strikers Attack Police, and  Five Hundred Wounded Men are In  the Hospitals���������Irish Press Denounces Cap.talic'3 for Causing Trouble.  London.���������.Dublin is at this moment a  city of terror, and desperate rioting,  arising from the tramway strike which  brought 500 people into the hospitals  for treatment. A correspondent who  was an eye witness, says: A mob numbering 1,000 started to tec: up the  tramway track in open defiance of a  dozen police on duty. Soon reinforcements of 70 police appeared, but far  from inspiring wholesome fear on the  mob they appeared to be welcome, for  they were-so many more targets for  bricks and lumps? of granite. When  the police at length charged at the  double from Bishop street to the corner of Cuffe street there was no retreat. The mob kept to the open  street and appeared to enjoy the attacks of the police. Women were  screaming hysterically. Baton charges  could hardly be counted and took  place every five minutes, each after  a fusillade of mlssslles, and each, too,  with an accompaniment of screaming  women, crashing windows, thuds of  stones and tricks as they landed now  and again on the nickel plated device  with which the policemen's helmets  are equipped.  Toward midnight there was a spectacle like a hideous nightmare. Armed with Iron bars and table knives the  mob rushed the doors of shops and  looted all they could while they destroyed where they could not loot.  Piteous wails came from half a dozen strong con-.tabulary men as they  found themselves hemmed ln by stone  throwers on every side just as depraved bovs hem in. a cat. and s'rrone  it to death. I shrank with horror  from the scene.  What is happening in Dublin may  happen ih Belfast for labor all over industrial. Ireland seems fretful for a  fight with capital. Even the Unionist journals condemn the Dublin Tramway Company for refusing to recognize the trade unions and revise the  hours, wages and general conditions of  labor.  Kier Hardie ar.d other labor leaders  bitterly condemn the rigorous treatment of the strikers by the Irish executive under Lord Aberdeen. Hardie  says: It ls a form of action against  trade unionism which is very common  in America but I did not expect to  find in a law abiding country like our  own that the anarchist precedent of  the United States courts would have  "been followed. Apart altogether from  the merits of the dispute with the  Tramways Company, the men will have  behind .hem the entire trade union  movement of Great Britain In opposing what we regard as an unconstitutional action from Dublin Castle.  AMfeRY'S VIEWS  Why  Canada  Gets  More   Immigrants  Than Australia  Sydney, N.S.W.���������Mr. I_? C. M. S.  Amery, M.P., a member of the House  of Commons for South Birmingham,  and of the British parliamentary party  has arrived from South Africa.  Speaking on the question of Immigration "./toich was : -.erred to in Canada some members of the party say it  Is a sore point with, home: Britishers.  Mr. Amery expressed the view that the  causes led up to exodus from England  to North America. Easier distance  was the material point, but he placed  more importance on the fact that Canada carried out extensive schemes for  advertising throughout Great Britain  as one Government and not as was  done in the case of Australia by several governments.  Indian Agent Tells of Buffalo  Edmonton,   Alta.���������-There   are   fully  500 head  of wood  buffalo west and  north of Fort Smiti., on the Peace and  TOTRANSIW GRAM  NATIONAL     TRAN-SCONTINENTAL  READY TO HANDLE THE CROP  Hon."Frank Cochrane MaJ.es This An-  nouncement  on  Arrival  in    Winnipeg-���������!s-Very  Optimistic  Over  the  Crop Outlook and   Financial   Situa-  _ tion Generally.   >  Winnipeg.���������-After an inspection of  the -National Transcontinental Railway from Cochrane to Winnipeg, Hon.  Prank Cochrane announced on his arrival here that the line would be ready  to handle this year's grain crop. Mr.  Cochrane is in the.:west to inspect the  entire G.T.P. system. On the financial situation Mr. Cochrane is optimistic over the crop outlook, and bell-eves it will materially help to loosen  the money situation. In the . party  with the minister of railways are Senator Geo. Gordon, E. J. Chamberlain,  President of the Grand Trunk system;  Molson MacPherson, the only other  director of the G.T.P. resident in Can*  the Great Slave rivers in the extreme .   northeastern part of Alberta, at the j &������**���������/: Albert Grigg, M.RP^for Ontario;  60th parallel of latitude, said A. J.  Bell, who has charge, of the northern  Indian agencies, on returning to Edmonton from the silent north, where he  is guardian of 3,000 Indians of the Yellow Knife, Dog Rib, Chipewyan and  Cariboo Eaters trioea.  Mr. Bell who has been continuously  in the north since the winter of 1911,  was accompaniea to civilization by  Mrs. Bell and their two children, born  at Fort Smith, and Nathaniel Gear,  chief herder of the government's reindeer, brought from St. Anthony, Newfoundland, to northern Alberta, and  Mrs. Gear. The two last named are  natives of the Labrador coast. Gear  learned the management of the reindeer from the Laplanders and formerly  had charge bf Dr. Grenfeil's herds in  Newfoundland.  Some time ago I made a proposal to  the Dominion government that the  buffalo in the Fort Smith district be  confined by a fence in the peninsula  between the Pe_.ce and the Great  Slave rivers, Mr. Bell said. This would  afford better protection to the animals.  The fence would cost about $103,000.  Charles MacRae, . M.P.P., Ontario;  Hon. W. H. Hearst, Minister of Mines  for Ontario; and W. R. Smythe, M.P.  P.  A. W. Smithers, chairman of the  G.T.P. directors, left the party at  Cochrane to return to London. Before going, however, he sent this message tc the west:  The country of Canada and in par-  tlcuar the western territory was never  looked upon in a more favorable light  in the oM country than at the present  time. There is an area of prosperity  looming u_- ahead of the country.  Mr. Chamberlin, in explaining the  purpose of tbe trip, said that the new  line is in excellent shape considering  the circumstances, and that it will b  in Full operation next year. The lim  will be able to carry grain to the  east this fall if necessary.  UNSELFISH HEROES  Obscure Mariner's Deed Recognized by  President of U.S.  Ottawa.���������Unselfish heroism of two  obscure Nova Scotia mariners has  been fittingly rewarded by the President of the United States.. In the  month of October last year, Captain  James and Seaman Richardson, of the  little fishing village of Pubnico, N.S.,  rescued at the risk of their lives the  captain and crew of the United States,  schooner 'Henry R. Tilton.' which had  become disabled in au Atlantic Coast  hurricane.  In due time the brave rescue reached the ears of President Wilson, with  the result that there reached the Department of Marint and Fitrheries a  solid gold watch and medal. Upon the  watch was engraved: From the President of the' U.S., in recognition of  bravery in effecting the rescue of the  master and crew of the schooner Henry R. Tilton, on the Northern Atlantic'  There is a request' that he watch  be forwarded to. Captain James. The  medal is also suitably engraved, and  is for Seaman Richardson. . -  Germany's New Foreign Trade Policy  .... Berlin.-r^The Socialist newspaper  Vorwaerts publishes a remarkable  scheme which has been organized  quietly in the Interests of Germany's  foreign trade policy. The paper obtained possession of a confidential letter, which a number of deputies addressed to the foreign secretary, Herr  Jagow, asking for his support to be  given a new daily paper through  which it was intended to organize the  foreign overseas press. Fifty newspapers had. agreed to publish weekly  letters on German affairs. The promoters of the scheme maintain that  Germany has been wilfully misunderstood. It is stated that $2,500,000  has been promised in subscriptions.  The Vorwaerts says that .the subscribers include four shipbuilding arid  armament firms.  Railways Converge on Future Shipping  Centres  Swift Current, Sask.��������� With every  prospect, for two new branch lines of  the G.T.P. operating out of Swift Current within the coming year, in addition to the two branches of the Canadian Northern on which construction  work bas made very rapid progress  this season, grain growers and large  shippers are already considei'.ng the  probable effect of an entire transformation in the traffic situation in this  section of the West. Upon the closing of the gap between Broadview and  Brandon the handling over the through  route of 930 miles from Swift Current  to Fort William will have become  an actuality. In the meanwhile grading off the Weyburn-Lethbridge line  is showing rapid progress, and much is  expected in a business way from the  opening of the Immense territory to  the south of Swift Current which this  new line will traverse.  Voted for Twenty Presidents  Seattle, Wash.���������Very few men in  ihe United States today have the distinction of having voted for twenty  presidents of the United States. One  of the few���������if not the only man alive  today���������who holds this honor, is  Thomas Wardell? who recently celebrated his ninety-eighth birthday.  Wardell was born during the Presidency of James Madison and cast hla  flrst vote for William Henry Harrison In 1836. Since that time Wardell  has voted in every Presidential election. He has always taken the liveliest Interest in national and local politics. Attenalng the birthday celebration were ten.members of the Borrowed Time Club, whose ages aggregate 804 years.  Customs Revenue Increase  Ottawa, Ont.���������Tho customs revenue  for the Dominion still shows a steady  Increase. Tho receipts for August  wero itnti,8a8,������(i������, as against $10,147,-  908 for the corresponding month��������� of  inst year. This shows an increase  of $000,757. For five months of tho  present fiscal year ending August 31,  tho customs revonuo wns $.9,737,999,  as comparod with $40,397,937 for the  ������amo period during tho former fiscal  yenr, This shows an inereaso to dato  of $3,340,002.  Huerta to Quit  Mexico City.���������That General Huerta  intends to quit tho presidency In favor of Trovlno and bocomo a candldato  at tho October elections, is tho statement inudo by the woll known Moxicnn  close lo Lho administration. Genoral  Trovlno ls making his way to tho capital and llttlo effort has been mado  to dlsgulso tho fact that ho had boon  olilclally biimmouHl. Just how the  nontom plated nucccsDlon la to bo  brought about haa not boen disclosed.  II "I 1.1*1     '    L     I     "I     "'    I "     ~' mmm**  ADVANCED METHODS  Militia is In:.easing  Ottawa.���������Militia Is becoming more  pronounced in Canada. Figures compiled in the Department of Militia and  Defence show that the established active militia today stands at approximately 37,000 officers and men. As  permanent forces have an establishment of about 3,500, the establishment  of the whole of the militia of Canada  somewhat exceeds 77,000.  It must be born, in mind that the  establishment of corps is the maximum  number of men for whom pay can be  drawn. The number of men actually  present and drawing pay never quite  comes up to the establishment. Some  56,000 have been trained this yeai*, this  number constituting a record. In 1912  the number trained was 49,000 and in  previous years it never much exceeded 46,000.  Homestead Laws May be Changed  Edmonton, Alta.���������Delegations from  Edmonton, Vegreville, Wetaskiwin,  Consort and other points in northern  Alberta waited on the Hon. Dr. Roche  minister of the interior^ on his arrival in this city.  Representations for the establishment of new land agencies and sub-  agencies at various point; were made  and the question of pre-emption conditions discussed.  The minister stated that in the  course of his trip through the west,  he had received numerous delegations  regarding the abolition of the $3 per  acre charge on pre-emption homesteads, but representations from northern Alberta asking for the reduction  of the three year_���������' addition on all  homestead duty to one year provided  necessary improvements were made,  was a new side to the question. He  stated that in all probability a number  of changes would be made in regard  to homestead and pre-emption conditions at the next session of parliament. He had made this trip in order to hear at first hand the views of  the settlers in the west. >He had been  inquiring into the question of recognizing the right of a homesteader in  certain areas to prove up by placing  stock on the land. In regard to grazing "leases, the minister said that in  the main the recommendations of the  royal commission, which held sittings  throughout the west, ��������� would be adopted. Those recommendations would  shortly be presented to parliament.  Prison Reform on Program  Ottawa.���������Supervision of prison reform in Canada will likely be Hon.  Arthur Meighen's first assignment _ s  Solicitor-General, say;, the Evening  Journal-  It is understood ln this connection  Mr.'M'elghen will be given absolute  charge of the work of penal investigation' end reform. It is also understood that, included among Mr. Meighen's duties will be that of arguing  Important Government cases in the  courts and before the judicial committee of the Privy Council. These cases  are generally looked after by the Deputy Minister of Justice, but the Department has become so overcrowded  with work during the last few years  tbat the head officials need to be relieved of considerable of their present  duties.  THIEF BELENTED  Radium Was Returned to Vancouver  Doctor Through the Mails  Vancouver.���������The tiny particle of  radium, worth about $3,500, wh_������-h was  stolen from the offices of Dr. G. L.  De Verteull recently, was returned  through tho mall this, morning. It is  thought that the thief having read of  the deadly effects that radium had in  Inexperienced handi upon the human  body became frightened and decided to  return the precious metal, or else  heard that a man's life depended upon  It.  Rushing Laying of Steel  Edmonton. Alta.���������With?. 2-w.so_-c.b_r -  good weather, steel on the Edmonton,  Dunvegan and British Columbia railway is expected to reach th. western  end of Lesser Slave Lake tbis fall and  trains will be put in operation between  Edmonton and Mirror Landing, a distance of 130 miles. This announcement is made by D. J. McArthur, president of the road, who is here on a  trip of inspection. One hundred miles  of Bteel hap already been laid on the  line and ballasting gangs are busy  getting the grade In shape t*.r the commencement of operations  St. Petersburg.���������Three deaths from  Asiatic cholera have occurred at  Kherson since Augus*r 30.  THE MARKET REPORT  Weekly  Grain    Letter    Supplied    by  Thompson, Sons & Co., Grain Merchants*  Winnipeg,.  Winnipeg, Sept. 2.���������The past week  over the United States and Western  Canadian  spring wheat country  has  generally been of the most favorable  character for the progress of harvest  work, and the maturing of late grain.  In our own country the cutting of the  ripened  grain  never  proceeded  with  greatdr rapidly than it has done last  week.     We stated in our last week's  report that    with   dry   weather   the  whole of our wheat crop would be cut  by end of the present week.      This  seams likely to be accomplished all  except late fields and a moderate proportion of the crop in backward districts.   The favorable    growing    and  maturing weather over our country in  the last half of July and all August,  has been the means of swelling out  our crops in a most gratifying manner,  and th'e result Is a comparatively high  average yield and high average quality as well.     Quality however, is still  to some extent dependent on the weather we may have from this time en-  ward,, until all of the crop is threshed.     There has been no frost In August  to   damage  grain   so   far   as   is  known,-but this morning's weather reports  mentioned  that the  frost  line  had been touched at some points over  night.     Sp light a frost might do no  perceptible damage,  and there  is so  large��������� a proportion o'  the crop cat, and  the balance either ready to cut, or so  near maturity    that   tho    report    of  the light frost had no effect on the  mind or sentiment of the well informed trader.      The fact is our crop is  safe from frost damage, except to a  very  small  percentage,  probably not  exceeding five per cent.     If, however  wo were to have much wet weather  iri the immediate   future,   we   might  have a considerable deterioration  in  quality, but with practically  no loss  ln quantity of average   good   milling  wheat.    We have seen no recent estimates  as to  the aggregate  yield  of  our Western wheat crop, but we consider we may look for around at least  200,000.000 bus. with a very large pro-  CUNDLE OF BONES  \/..i������r>���������   >-#���������..  Toronto WIII  Enforce'Sanitary Conveniences In all Workshops  Toronto.���������Ten thousand dollars Is to  bo spent this yoar by tho local board  of health In tho Ij.ctaHatlcr. of ccnl  tary conveniences ln buildings whotro  ovners aro unable to pay for them  immediately out of their own nockcts.  Dr. Hastings  pointed out that tho  municipality lu    authorized    by    tho  ���������Piihllf-.  TTonlth   Art ��������������� -Jnnt-Vl  ������<������/-������*.  .nn.  venlwncen at tho expenso of the owners ana to collect, tor uio name wnn  Intorent at flvo per cont. within five  year* '  ukcr  Come to Light  Vancouver.���������Advices from the north  country stato that a bundle of human  bones woro found in an old tent a few  miles from tho Donjok Landing, on  tho way to uawBoii in tho Yukon. Tho  man had evident.y heon dead fer many  years. In tho Bcavor district, not far  away from this placo, woro found.tho  bones of another man, whoso namo ls  beliovcd to have hoon Milan or Nyliis,  said to havo beon a trapper.  Fund Increasing  Ottawa.���������Tho movement originating In Quebec to assise tho French-  Canadians ln Ontario In thoir fight for  tho propagation of bilingual schools  has bo far netted $12,000. A chock  for that nmount was rocolvod by  Chairman Uoudrt-alt, of tho Ontario  Educational association from Oliver  Asflolln, head of tho St. Joan Bap-  tisto society of Montreal.  Eaten by Cannlbalo  Brisbane,   Australia. ��������� Word   has  roaohod horo that Join* Hon; / Warner,!  a mlnoraloglst   of   Gorman-American '  doscont has been killed and eaten by  ������*pnT*lhnln  In   ������*n  unovnl-.rort  rpr-lon  nf  Papua.   Ho was heading an  expedition in  Hoarch of radium.  Prince Rupert Flah  Vancouver, B.C.���������During the mouth  0.t   A������.n.������������t -fcnlf n  wdlltn-n  ,i-������rdli>,r-"  \Vo>rll>  of flsh has boor handled In tho port  ot I'rinco Kuperi,     '.uio muuion wmgu-  od 8.418,000 pounds, and thero were a |  million pounds of halibut  portion of it in the high grades. There  is already some thrashing being done  in early districts, and new wheat is  being shipped. Today the car inspections of wheat at Winnipeg numbered 98 cars, of which 58 cars were  new crop. Of the 58 cars 31 Inspected 1 Northern, 14 inspected 2 Northern, and 2 inspected 3 Northern. The  other 11 cars inspected rejected, owing  to too much mixture of other grain to  allow'them into regular grades. These  figures show the high average grade  of this crop.  As regards    ths    market    situation  over the world there has come about  a distinct reaction in sentiment from  a week ago.      Last, week the United  States speculative markets were quite  depressed by the liquidation  of September wheat.      Minneapolis  lost  3c.  in   three  days   on   September,   other  markets- declining about l*/_-c.   While  however,   liquidation    is    September,  was depressing the markets, it began  to be noticed that other things were  happening which would have a counteracting effect,  and  on the last two  days   in   August   in   spite   ot   belated  liquidation   the   markets   took   on   a  stronger   tone.       Yesterday   the  U.S.  markets   and   Winnipeg   were   closed  owing to its being Labor day holiday,  but today the tone was strong and a  further moderate advance    in    j rices  was made.    There seems good reason  to expect some further advance,  but  we -do not at present see that it can  be more than temporary because hi a  week or two there is almost c urtain  to be very large movements of new  wheat for export in Canada, the United States and Russia.   At the present  time there is a lull in    these    movements but it cannot last    long,    and  there is no doubt  but the  world  is  raising a larger wheat crop this year  than ever,  depending always ca the  yield of the Argentine and Australian  crops now, growing.     In'the meantime,  there is seen a large falling off in the?  primary receipts in the United States  in  the  last half of August.   In July  and  first  half  of August  the  winter  wheat farmers marketed    their    new  crop on a large scale, but during the  last three veeks they stopped hauling  out  wheat   and  turned  to   ploughing  their fields for the new crop, and to  other work.      In the    United    States  spring wheat country' the movement  is "considerably Under  last  year,   for  in Minnesota and South Dakot- farmers have stacked a great deal of their  wheat arid are going* on with ploughing and fall work instead  of threshing.    The great difference ..in the primary movement iri the United States  is   seen  in   the   visible  supply   statements..      During the five weeks ending with August    16th,    the    United  States   visible   supply" increased   15,-  269,000 bushels but in the two weeks  ending August 30th, there was an increase of only  104,000 bushels.      At  the same time exports of wheat and  flour from the United States have been  very large.      Liverool and other European ri-arke.-  have, been quiet and  easy-going   for   some   time   but   they  have also become quite strong and advancing in the last three days.    Russia has not begun yet to export its  new crop to-~Lny!. extent and probably  European traders seeing the prospects  of smaller exports from America for  a few weeks at any rate, and no immediate increase from Russia are supplying themselres in haste and so advancing prices.     Of coursa it will be  well to remember that this year the  United States has no record crops like  last year, except wheat,    Their corn,  oats, "barley, potatoes and hay are all  considerably short of last year's crops,  and the prices of these commodities  are bound to have a strengthening effect on wheat values.   Present wheat  prices  are  moderate  and  if farmers  only supplied the market with it according to consumers nearby requirements,  prices would never likely  be  any lower and might easily be kept on  a higher level all the time.  There- has bee . very little doing on-  our Winnipeg market in cash wheat  for old stockB are practically cleaned  up. At end of last week the-stocks'  of wheat all grades included, in store  Fort William and Port Arthur amounted to only 762,384 bushels against 2,-  511,401 bushels a year ago, and of  this year's stocks only 5074 bushels is  1 Northern. Trading In futures has  been fairly active for the time of year,  and prices at lowest point of the week  showed a decline of around 2Mc but  havo made a small recovery since.  Quotations for cash wheat arc now on  the basis of new crop and these today  aro 1 Nor., -88c; 2 Nor., 85V.-C; 3 Nor.,  83c;"No. 1 Alberta Red Winter, 89Uc;  2 A.R.W., 88c;   3 A.R.W., 84>/_,c.    Futures closed October 87c;   December,  85%c; May, 90%-.ic.  Oats���������  Tho price of caBh oats declined during the week 2c. but havo had a got J*  recovery and look stronger, and fu-  tm-rt .'i.-.iivnT-t1.; ; nhow ntlvancc over a.  week ago.. Today's cash prices avo  2 Can. West., 34yac; 3 C.W., 33>/3c;  ex. 1 Feed, 34c; 1 Food, 33%--; 2 Feed,  31%c. Futures closed Octobor, 35%c;  December, 35"$_.c; May,. 397-C  Barley���������  Tho barley market is quiet nut tho  feeling  ls  stronger.      Today's  prices  avo No. 3, 4fle; No. 4, 44Mic; rejected,  41c;  Feed, 41c.  Flax���������  The flax markot. Is easier with tho  demand quiet and prices about 1Vj������\  under a week ago. Today's each  prices aro 1 Nov. West. Can., 130Vjc;  2 Can. West.. .27-.fee: 3 C.W.. 1ir.i/_e.  Futures closed October 133c; Dcccm-  bov, 132c.  All prices quoted above ore based  on delivery In store Fort William and  Port  Arthur.  THE SifDAY SCHOOL  LESSOM   XI.   ���������   THIRD   QUARTER  FOR   1EPT.  14,  1913  Text of the t-esson, Ex. xx, 12.2L  Memory Verses, 12-17���������-Golden Text,  Luke x, 27r���������Coinn-ientary Prepared  by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  Continuing our study of the two tables given tor Moses, we will look first  at the six remaining commandments  and then at v/bat is written concerning the relation of the whole to? the  sinner and the saint. The fifth com- ���������  mand is repeated and applied to be-,  lievers to day ir. Ejh. vl, 1-3. In reference to the sixth: Thou shalt not  kill; our Lord taught that it was dangerous even to be angry, and in I  John iii, 15, we read that 'whosoever  hateth his brother is a murderer. In  reference to the seventh Matt, v, 28,  teaclies that it may be broken by even  a look. As to the eighth, tha question  is asked in Mai. iii, 8: Will a man rob  God? and the answer is: Ye have robbed Me in tithes and offerings.  Many a man who would not be  guilty of stealing a dime or .. nickel  robs God of His Sabbath day by finding his own" pleasure In it and is'meaner than Jacob in refusi lg to give back  to God at least a tenth of that which  God has so bountifully given to him. A.  good comment on the ninth i._ found in  Zach. vii. 10; viii, 17, where we are  forbidden even to imagine evil in our  hearts against a brother or a neighbor. If any testify falsely against us  it gives us fellowship with the Lord  Jesus, against whom false witnesses  were hired to testify even as it had  been predicted. False witnesses did  rise up; they laid to my charge things  that I knew not (Ps. xxxv, 11; Matt.  xxvi, 59-61).  As to covetousness, It was on that  point that Paul saw his sinfulness  (Rom. vii, 7) and afterward wrote that  covetousness is idolatry (Col. il, 5).  Our Lord said: Take heed and beware  of covetousness for any man's life con-  sisteth not in the abundance of the  things which he possesseth (Luke xii,  15). From the voice of God and the  thunderings and the lightnings and tbe  noise of the trumpet the people removed and stood afar off, and Moses alone  drew near (verse3 18-21). The law is  holy and just and good (Rom. vii. 12),  and sets forth the holiness without  which no man can see God. It is so  holy that no mere mortal man ever  kept it or could keep it. for it brings  us all in guilty before God and Shuts  every mouth, for by the law is t;.-  knowledge of sin (Rom. iii, 19, 20).  If there had been a law given whioh  could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by    the    law  (Gal. iii. .21).      But it Is evident that  no man is justified by the law in the  sight of God,.for as many as are of the  works of the law are under the curse,  for it.is written: Cursed is every one  that  continueth not    in . all    things  which are written iri the book of the  law to do them.     But Christ hath redeemed us frdm the curse of the law,  being made a curse for us.    The law  brings us all fn guilty and leads us to  Christ that we might be justified by  faith (Gal. iii, 10-13, 24, 25). He alone  of all men kept the "aw perfectly in  thought, word and deed and became  the end of the law for righteousness  to every one that b'elieveth, but there  always have been ; :d still are those  who, being ignorant of God's righteousness and going about to establish theh*  own righteousness, have not submitted  themselves unto tl.e righteousness of  God (Rom. x. 3, 4).  Such are all those who talk about  salvation by character and the Golden  Rule as their creed and the Sermon on  the Mount good enough for them.  They have not noticed that the flrst  utterance of Christ on that occasion  shuts their mouths, for where is their  poverty of spirit while they talk of  how good they are and how much good  they.do?  Let us consider the giving of the  law more fully, for in this series of  lessons we hi���������ve nothing In connection  with the tabernacle, every whit ot  which uttereth His glory and speaks  of Him who Is the truo Tabernacle  (Ps. xxlx, 9. margin; Heb. viii, 2).  The principal vessel Jn the tabernacle  was the ark of the covenant, and it  was made to contain the law, which  Israel so quickly broke, as wo shall  see in our next Icbsoii. Moses and  Aaron, Nadab and Abihu and seventy  of the elders of Israel wont up into the  mount, and it is written ihat they bhw  God and did eat and drink (Ex. xxiv,  9-1.1). This, in the light of John i, 18.  tells us that they saw the Son ' of  God.  Joshua seems lo have waited some  where, for',.we do not ret.'. of him  again till Moses conies down from the  mount,   after  forty   days  and ^iiisiitH,  w'llb  tlio 'luuJt:*- in ills liliuu...       * "' i'������"i  received full instructions concerning  the tabernacle and its furniture. As  they camo down from tho mount the  people, who had promised to do all  that God had said are seen worshiping tho golden cair, and Moses, to Impress upon them what they were doing, threw down the tables nnd broke  them.    * ,  By the cow ni Mid of Ihe Lord he  limdo two tables HUo tho fir*-1. Weill  up into the mount again and remained  another forty days and nlgum. whllo  God wrote again tho ten words, but  this time ho was told to put them In  the ark that thoy might bo kept; unbroken (Ex. xxiv. 9-18; xxiv. 1-3, 28;  xxxll, 17; Dent. Ix, 10, 11, 17; x. 1-5).  What, tho people could not do the ark  did. Christ Is our ark, and om* mercy  I.'-ind our prl.-.".1, ..ml our :��������� :���������.<���������'.���������', 11 cc  HHINCU   ALUfcHI,    IHt.  MI-IU    Ul-    tlMULANU t������   -UOOI.U    -Ui������.  Kr,nce Miucri,  who WtiM uum in   1 Jju,  unicrcu wic im^vmII Cuiicuu ������i -w^r.^ i,-,  four yenr* ago.    He remained there two yenr*, aterward completing two  more yenr*' tral ring at Dartmouth  Effect of Nanking Fall  Peking.���������Tho fall of Nanking will  result In a Rival change In tho situation, tho rebels there having boon cut  off and doomed to defeat for novoral  weeks. Tho ���������j.ovornnient contemplritps  going slowly In the work of tnppreHH-  Ing tho remaining rebels In the various  provinces.  Doherty Coming Wect  Ottawa. -Hon. ('. .1. D.iherty, Mini*-*  tot* of JiiRttce, will leave for a iour  of the Went at the end of the month.  While In the west ho will liifiir-ct the  federal   liiHtltutloiiH   niiniinlNtt;red   by  llih   l"|iiluii,.lii, .v    ...i.   _,.     t't.iik.t..,   ,,  first vinlt to iho wrat. nlnoo the formation ot tho prosont government.  :���������(..!  New G.T.P, Branch  Calgary.���������Engineer Cnrleton. of the Nv-  Grand Trunk Pacific, announces that  his road will undertake the construction of a line through Moose Jaw, Medl-  ������.-lne   Mat,   through   the   Crow's   Neat  count ry  Into nouthorn British  Columbia.    The 'Calgary-Edmonton lino will  bo o:\teiided i-outh to make connection  with the proposed lino, woric on wnicu  will bo eommon-'Ml In Iho spring.  To Benign  Presidency of China  St. rclcrnburrr.    Provisional    Pretl-  dent Yuan Shi Knl, of tho ChiiiCHo ve-  publ'c. ban i.-iMio.l a Uecit-c iiniioiiiic-  . .     . ,, .        , -1.. . .  Ill*,        It...        1 II .%-  .. . ill M, It   ... .,|. .������������#.,        >-������������...-i  i     noon ns peace In restored, record  ling to a teU'Kram from Mulwh n.  !__)_____ r:s,mmm  mm  THE CRESTON REVIEW  **_3_--_  [The Following DISCOUNTS Will be |  given on IMMEDIATE ORDERS   |  25 per cent on Apple Trees  10 per cent  on  All Other Nursery  Stock Except  Kose Bushes  Do not place your order before getting our quotations  The Riwerside Nurseries  Comprising 125 Acres GRAND FORKS, B. ���������,  Frank V. Staples, Agent, Erickson, B. C.  %  77  The  Creston Mercantile Co*  Ltmited  We have this week opened  up a large shipment of  tJOO  Including Dress Goods in  Lawns, Linens' Nainsooks,  Serges, Tweeds, Etc.  Also  Hosiery for Men,  Women and Children  A Specialty with us are Galateas  Denims, Shirtings, Etc., for  Rough Wear  smmmms  ���������=m  K^'i^f  ''JiS-'Sfv'-  The  Creston Mercantile Co.  Limited  XSSmmmm&mVnr.  ���������mmmm^mmmmm^mXi^mi  Lower Prices on Ford Cars  Effective August 1st, 1014, to August 1st,  1915, and guaranteed against any reduction  during that time.      All cars fully  equipped f.o.b. Ford, Ont.  Runabout .. $340  Touring Car ..        390  Town Car . . 840  (In the Dominion of Canada only)  Buyers to Share in Profits  All retail buyers of now Ford cans from  August 1st, 1914, to Auguflt 1st, 1915,  will sharo in the profit*, of tho company to  tho extent of $40 to $60 por oar, on oaoh  oar thoy b���������y> PROVIDED: vro noli and  deliver 80,000 now Ford can. during tha*  IHiiiod.    Ask for particulars  Creston Auto & Supply Co,  CRESTON       - B.C.  DUCK CREEK NEWS  Miss Andestad spent Wednesday iu  Creston. ���������  T, Buttea*field  was a. .Creston caller  Thursday.   .?.".���������'  Mr. Bathie left on "Wednesday for  Cranbrook.  School reopened on Monday with a  very fair attendance.  O. J. Wigen was a visitor to Creston  and Erickson, Monday.  Guy Lowenburg paid Duck Creek a  visit Tuesday morning.  Miss Gladys Mason of Alice Siding  was a Dnck Creek caller Wednesday.  The largest shipment of tomatoes  from this place was sent out on Monday. 100 cases wero sent out in all.  100 of which were grown by Carl  Wigen, the remainder by Paul Ofner  and J. J. Grady.  On Friday night August 28, there  will be a dance at the social club house.  Everyone is asked to be present as  this event will take the form of a farewell dance to two of our popular young  ladies who leave oa Saturday for Calgary.  Tho prospects for a good hay crop  this year seems to be practically nil.  Paul Hagen who returned from his  hay camp on Wednesday, says he can  find uo horse hay ut all, and that the  rushes are so flattened out as to make  cutting almost impossible.  A most enjoyable day was spent on  Sunday last when over 80 people of  Duck Creek and Alice Siding went for  a picnic on the bank of the lake below  Bob Dixon's ranch. The day was very  warm and the crowd found plenty of  amusement in boating and strolling  around. Towards, the latter part of  the afternoon and throughout tho  evening when it was cooler, races and  games were iudulged in. Great merriment was caused by some novel  kinds of races such as the Jack Rabbit race and the 3 legged race which  ended in a mighty Jack pot on the  ground everyone piled tip in a heap.  Death of Mrs* Francis  The death of Annie, the beloved  wife of Harold P. B. Francis, occured  at Sparta, Ontario, on August 4th,  after a long and painful illness. I  The deceased died without a tremor,  her husband and one sister remaining  with her till the lost. Mrs. Francis  was a member of the Society of  Friends, with whom she has always  taken an active part when opportunities allowed.  The burial rites were conducted by  Mr? Samuel P. Zavitz of Poplar Hill,  near London, assisted by Miss Emily  Atkinson of Morristown. N.J., Miss  Stover of California, and the two resident ministers, Bev. Westill and  Kenghum. Each speaker bore testimony to the beauty of her life.  She leaves her husband and. their six  year old daughter, Eva, who mourn  their loss.  The beautisul tributes of flowers to  the deceased were marked by their  simplicity of love. H.F.  Sturgeon Fishing Profitable  Bonner's Fex*ry Herald: But few  people of the Kootenai Valley realize  the number of sturgeon which are  caught each year in the Kootenai  river. The sturgeon fishing in this  vicinity is not only carried on for the  sport but also for the financial returns  as sturgeons command a fair price in  the markets of surrounding cities.  C. W. and S. M. Skeels are among  the most prominent sturgeon fishess*  men in this vicinity and have caught  eighteen sturgeon so far this season.  Three of them weighed under 100  pounds and the others weighed from  100 to 300 pounds. The Skeels brothers have a line stretched across the  Kootenai river just below the K.V.  Railway bridge and have from three  to eleven hooks set all through the  season.  School  Suppli  Talks Reclamation  They Prefer Ymir  Greatmindsimnin the same channel.  About the time the members of the  Creston Board of Trade were wrestling with the resolution concerning  the reclamation of tbe Kootenay flats,  the editor of the Bonners Ferry, Idaho,  Herald was having some correspondence with United States Senator Brady on the same business.  In passing it can do no harm to remark that the election primaries are  being held in Idaha on Tuesday, and  vuSiii EjSuc-iA'I* xjiaxjiy iS one   %jx _ue lOur  candidates seeking the Republican  nomination for that office.   At such a  time one   -would naturaJly   expect him  to "deliver the goods" as he is doubtless anxious to make his calling and  election sure.    His letter reads:���������  "We are making splendid progress  in that matter. I expect parties to be  there and make an examination of the  situation in a very few days���������in fact, I  have an idea that one of them will be  there by the time you receive this letter. I have now gotten the Secretary  of the Interior to take the matter up  with the government of British Columbia and do not think there is any  doubt but what we will get that government to co-operate with us. If we  do our success is assured. There is  nothing in tho world that will do me  more good than to be thc cause of having this beautiful valley drained."  "You can rest assiu-ed that I will  leave no stone unturned to have that  valley drained, and this is no political  talk either. I want the help of every  man in this work, it docs not matter  whether they are Democrats, Sooial,  ists, Progressives, or Republicans. Let  us an put our tmouiders to the wneoi  and drain that valley. This is not a  political proposition. It is a simple  business proposition, and should bo  dono and dono along business lines,  and as a business man I am going to  see to it that it is done."  Sincerely Yours,  Jamkb H. Biiady  If, as the eonator assures tho Herald, tho U. S. Socmt.-ryof' the Interior  is already in touch with tho British  Columbia authorities in this matter  tho Creston Board of Trade's memorial might be .more effective if the  hoard played off its own bat and sent  this particular resolution direct to  Victoria.  In the numerous recommendations  tho associated boards will have to forward tho government tho ono anont  reclaiming thn flats may not get tho  spoclal attention it deserves. This is  a big question and tho government  should bo ovck-lastitigly reminded of  Its duly in this connection.  A special meeting of the Proctor and  District Conservative Association was  held on Monday to discuss the proposals made before the provincial  yediatsibution cosamission in Nelson  that the West'Arm as far as Proctor  should be included in the Nelson  electoral district instead of the Ymir  electoral district and a very strong  protest was passed and forwarded to  W. P. Ogilvie, secretary to the commission.  We have a new stock of  Pencils, Pens, Inks  Rulers,  &c,  ������be.  for the^Fall Term, and  will promptly order any  special School Books you  may require.  Creston  Drug &.  Book Company  L  GUY   LOWENBERG  OONStH-TINO   EHOINB-.B  RESTON  v_  B.C.  j/������������5.   ri.   *5*~.SrM.KJrLl^LfiJ  -fire. Life nnd Accident Insnranoe  REAL ESTATE, Eto.  TRAIL        -        -       -   B.C.  Sidelights on the War  The London Chronicle Btates Germany is calling out her last reserve.  It is now stated that at least in the.  early stages of the war no call for the  mounted policemen to report to the  colors will be made.  The Royal Bank of Canada has announced that it will grant leave of absence on full pay for the full term of  their enlistment to all members of its  staff, who may go upon active service.  Thc U. S. government is generally  commended for opposing the floatation  of a French loan in New York. This  would pave the way for a possible Overman loan later on, with the effect of  prolonging the war.  P. BURNS & Go.  Llmltnd  CRESTON   ,    .       B.C  Head   Offices  CALGARY; VANCOUVER; EDMONTO.\.  Denlera in  MEAT  Wholesale and Retail  Fish. Game,  Poultry,  and Oysters  iu Season  We have the goods, and  onr pr.ces are reasonable  PRESBYTERIAN   CHURCH  Service every Sunday at 11:15 a. m.  and 7:30 p. m. ���������  Sabbath Schooi and Adult Bible Cins*  at 10:i_o a. m.  W. ������. Bl_AKB  Minister  METHODIST CHURCH  Public Worship, 10 ;80 and 7 'M P. tt..  Sunday School aud Adult Bible Class  U:J*0 A. fid  Come and yon will be made welcouu*  Fred L. Carpenter  sto r  CATHOLIC CHURCH  Mass 10:30  Benediction 7;30  Every first Sunday of the month.  Father John O. M. I.  A. -Mirabelli  SmltHe and  Harness  Repairing  A SPECIALTY  Dealer in   h:gi   class  boots and saoes.  GET  YOUR  Plumbing, Tinning and  General Repair Work  Done by  W. B. Embree  The nr.t .nfuotion of wn-.lt   wi.11  Ann*,  lln ers lontr affor tho price is foreot������cn  City Bakery  UNDER  N BW M3n3g6!ll8ni  Mrs. E. W. Payne begs to  announce that she has taken  over the City Bakery.  All kinds of Pastry aud  Cakes made to order.  Cold Lunches served at all  times.     Afternoon Teas.  Cooked Ham and Beef Always Ready.  Ice Crcnm    Soft Iced Drinks  I  .I  _{i  i  il  )*���������  ���������?a  .ii  1.  -*  V .,<*  t

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