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Sunshine Coast News Apr 3, 1989

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 A Sechelt puzzle  oning discrepancies  are inexplicable  Andy and Tula Maragos were honoured with the key to the Town of Gibsons at an affectionate  tribute to mark their change in direction after the sale of Andy's Restaurant recently. The occasion  doubled as an extremely successful fundraiser for Gibsons Waterfront Park (see story below).  ���Ellen Frith photo  Event doubles as fundraiser  A public hearing in the Senior  Citizens' Hall in Sechelt on  March 29 clearly showed that  when planning to buy property  in Sechelt these days, it is best to  first check the zoning.  The hearing was called to  consider the rezoning of the  Sechelt neighbourhood bound  by Trail Avenue, Anchor Road  and Salmon Drive which consists entirely of single family  dwellings. But, oddly enough,  the area is zoned R-4, for multi-  family dwelling use only.  Although there are conflicting opinions as to why this  discrepancy exists, nobody  seems to be absolutely sure of  the answer.  The fact that, according to  the zoning laws at least, an  apartment block could well  have been built in among the ex  isting houses, was brought to  the attention of the Sechelt  planning department when  Roger Frisson of Vancouver  bought an empty lot on Anchor  Road in November, 1988.  Frisson bought the lot  through Terry Brackett of Mitten Realty with the intention of  building a house on it for his  daughter Michelle Alexander,  of Secheltv His plans were for a  single family dwelling similar to  those around him for which, he  assumed, \the neighbourhood  was obviously zoned. Brackett  says he assumed the same thing.  Unfortunately, they were  both wrong and Frisson was left  with a lot that was of no value  to him because a single family  dwelling is not allowed to be  built in an area zoned R-4.  Stan Anderson of Anderson  Maragos tribute well justified  by Ellen Frith  In a wonderful demonstration of communal solidarity and  good cheer, Tula and Andy  Maragos, retiring proprietors of  Andy's Restaurant in Gibsons,  were feted and honoured and  given the gold key to the town  last Saturday night during a  rollicking good time had by all.  The celebration was in honour  of the Maragos' considerable  contribution to this, an appreciative community.  The party, officially called,  'The First Annual Fund Raiser  for Gibsons Waterfront Park'  was held in the hall at Camp  Elphinstone in Langdale, and  gathered together over 200  friends and acquaintances of  the Maragos family. Out from  Toronto where he is a radio  news announcer for CBC was  their son Costa, and taking time  off from UBC law exams to  help celebrate was their younger  son, Anastase.  Tula and Andy came to the  Sunshine Coast from Greece via  a somewhat circuitous route  through Regina and Kitimat, arriving here in 1974. So, in  honour of their homeland, and  to make the party an official  Greek one, Ed Hill, MC for the  evening, started it all off by  breaking a plate.  And although Tula and Andy  are to r-e-t-i-r-e (a word not to  be uttered in their presence, it  was stressed), this was not an  evening of saying goodbye.  "The Maragos' are not r-e-t-  i-r-i-n-g," said Hill, "but merely changing direction. We are  here to say thank you for their  warmth, generosity and friendship."  The party was intended to be  a 'roasting' of Tula and Andy  (while Murray Pezim got his in  Vancouver) but included a little  of everything. Up on the  podium to draw blood were  Gerry Dixon, Carol Kurucz,  Bernie Mulligan and, rival to  Andy and Tula at the Omega  Restaurant, Kristine Gian-  nakos. But all speakers had to  admit that they couldn't really  find anything derogatory to  roast either Tula or Andy with  and were left instead with genuinely warm and funny stories  gleaned while sharing the  Maragos' hospitality and  friendship. Pezim should be so  lucky.  Gerry Dixon presented Andy  with a pair of pyjamas. "It was  either that or a trip for two to  Turkey," he said.  Costa and Anastase also  spoke in their parent's honour  and it was the common consensus that not only were these two  sons of Tula and Andy very  good-looking, (and very single)  but they could also work nights  as stand-up comics.  It is Tula's most ardent wish,  apparently, that her boys marry  sooner than later. It was suggested that perhaps more maternal energy could be directed  towards finding them each 'a  nice girl' now that Andy's  Restaurant is no longer their  responsibility.  For more entertainment,  there was a skit by the Driftwood Players organized by Nest  Lewis and one by the Gibsons  Volunteer Fire Department. In  the latter presentation, Graham  Webb's portrayal of a cigarette-  smoking, television-adjusting,  throwing-money-around Andy  Maragos was much appreciated,  not least of all by Andy himself.  Note must also be made of  the party decorations and floral  arrangements in the hall and of  the food which was catered by  Emma Upe and staff at the  YMCA. It was all excellent.  And there was music. World  renowned pianist and xylophon-  ist, Elmer Gill, a long-time  friend of the Maragos', played  some tunes which included Andy's favourite, 'My Funny  Valentine'. Iris and Rob  Buchan sang, 'Never on Sunday' and, since they performed  later on in the evening, Andy,  Anastase and Costa were persuaded to dance Greek-style  while everybody clapped.  Gibsons, Mayor Diane Stromy  ever given a real one."  The dinner, at $30 a person,  raised over $3000 for the yet unnamed Gibsons Waterfront  Park. The money will be held in  trust until a theme for the park  is developed.  The Maragos' are worthy  recipients of the honours  bestowed upon them last Saturday night. They are that rare  thing these days, a family whose  love and support for one  another and the ensuing  strength it brings reaches out  spoke   briefly   and  pr^eiSted^f^afld'embraces all those around  Tula and Andy with a plaque of Y'them.  the key to the Town of Gibsons.  "I have given many cardboard  keys away in fun," she said,  "but this was the first time I've  i There is little doubt but that  the Maragos' have enriched the  lives of those they have come  across and befriended as well as  the community as a whole. But  the success of the evening, and  it really was a success for it  celebrated the appreciation and  respect a community can have  for some of its citizens without  once resorting to maudlin sentiment, was also a testament to  the community itself.  In celebrating with the  Maragos family, the people of  Gibsons did themselves proud.  They demonstrated a genuine  wit, warmth, good will and a  sheer generosity of spirit long  thought to have disappeared  forever.  The staff of the Coast News  joins with the rest of the community in wishing Tula and Andy Maragos the very best on  their r-e-t-i-r-e-m-e-n-t.  Realty claims the zoning of the  neighbourhood was changed in  1981 from R-l (single family  dwelling) to what it is now  because he wanted it changed.  "We (Pebbles Holdings Co.)  paid the district a zoning fee of  $100 to change it from R-l to  R-4 eight years ago," he says.  "When they adopted the present zoning bylaw in December,  1987,  they just kept it that  way."  Anderson owned 113 lots in  the Village of Sechelt. After  many were sold off, for single  family dwellings, he was left  with four lots in the contested  area that were too steep to support the building of a single  house on each.  His plans were, therefore, to  combine these four lots with  others that he owned next to  them and to create, all together,  a parcel of land extending to  Neptune Street. On this he  would build condominiums.  "Our purpose in originally  seeking the existing zoning,"  Anderson says, "was to create  approximately 60 units in four  clusters of 15 units each. To  create an example of density,  the Royal Terraces has 40 units  and comprises less than one  acre. Our site has four acres and  proposes 60 units."  Rob Sabine, Sechelt municipal planner disagrees with  Anderson saying that the rezoning in 1981 affected only Anderson's lots along Salmon Drive  and not those in the contested  area at all.  "I don't know why most of  those lots are zoned R-4,"  Sabine says. "It may have been  just an error in outlining the  map. Until we find the original  1981 bylaw, we won't know for  sure.  Please turn to page 7  RCMP smash drug ring  Gibsons-Thailand  The RCMP Drug Enforcement Branch, Vancouver, last  week wrapped up a major  15-month international drug investigation which involved  drug-related offences in Gibsons as well as in Montreal and  Thailand.  Three men died during the  major investigation, two  members of the alleged drug  ring, including one in Gibsons  and one in Montreal, and an  RCMP officer died in the line of  duty in Thailand.  Cpl. Derek Flanagan was killed in Thailand when he was  reported to have fallen from a  truck during a struggle with a  drug smuggler.  Alleged drug ring member  Daryoush Delfanie of Montreal  died when shot by an unknown  assailant in Montreal and a  58-year old Gibsons resident has  been charged in connection with  the death of Claude Joseph  Dupuis, age 58. All three deaths  were related to the drug investigation which was known as  Operation Deception.  Spearheading the Gibsons  section of the international investigation was an undercover  RCMP officer known locally as  Glen Barry who, as his cover,  operated fishing charter boat  the M. V. Misty.  Around Gibsons Wharf the  so-called Barry was said to be a  very good guide and fisherman  who went out of his way to provide a first class charter service,  taking customers out again if  they didn't catch fish.  In retrospect, locals remember that there were times when  the M. V. Misty was not  available for charter when its  operator said he couldn't book  because he didn't know what he  would be doing.  On one occasion he had to go  to Japan for a few days and  once cracked: "Me married?"  in response to a question.  "Who would put up with my  lifestyle?"  In all, 33 people were charged  as a result of the investigation  with 72 charges being laid.  Eleven residents of Gibsons  were charged and face a total of  23 drug related charges.  Mayor reports  Restructuring was not discussed by Gibsons council at the  March 28 committee-of-the-whole meeting but Gibsons  Mayor Diane Strom did answer a question from the press on  her recent meeting in Victoria with Minister of Municipal Affairs Rita Johnston.  "My specific reason for going to Victoria," Strom said,  "was to ask the minister if she would allow us, out of consideration of fairness, to hold a referendum in Areas E and F  separately from the one in Gibsons. The Municipal Act calls  for a single vote, but the minister said we could be accommodated."  Pender chamber  Anyone with an interest in improving the community,  whether a taxpayer or a businessperson, is urged to attend a  meeting at Pender Harbour Senior Secondary on April 5 at  7:30 pm, to plan and organize the re-establishment of the  Pender Harbour and Egmont Chamber of Commerce.  The chamber, although never officially disbanded, hasn't  met in over five years, but recent moving and shaking by  several unconnected groups has led to this coming Wednesday's meeting, where directors will encourage community involvement and look for new people to take over offices.  The Chamber of Commerce will focus on the general improvement of the area, including community beautification,  economic well-being, and services to residents.  They're off and running in the 12th tuiuual running of the April Fool's Day Run relay teams. The winner of the Coast News Challenge Cup this year was Jim Vaster  from Gibsons to Sechelt. Despite truly miserable conditions this year 53 participants ��� of North Vancouver. Verster also won the cap last year. Next week we will have a  showed up at the starting line, 36 individual runners and 17 runners making up five      complete list of participants and trophy winners. ��� Vern Elliott photo  V  Y  Y A Sechelt puzzle  oning discrepancies  are inexplicable  Andy and Tula Maragos were honoured with the key to the Town of Gibsons at an affectionate  tribute to mark their change in direction after the sale of Andy's Restaurant recently. The occasion  doubled as an extremely successful fundraiser for Gibsons Waterfront Park (see story below).  ���Ellen Frith photo  Event doubles as fundraiser  A public hearing in the Senior  Citizens' Hall in Sechelt on  March 29 clearly showed that  when planning to buy property  in Sechelt these days, it is best to  first check the zoning.  The hearing was called to  consider the rezoning of the  Sechelt neighbourhood bound  by Trail Avenue, Anchor Road  and Salmon Drive which consists entirely of single family  dwellings. But, oddly enough,  the area is zoned R-4, for multi-  family dwelling use only.  Although there are conflicting opinions as to why this  discrepancy exists, nobody  seems to be absolutely sure of  the answer.  The fact that, according to  the zoning laws at least, an  apartment block could well  have been built in among the ex  isting houses, was brought to  the attention of the Sechelt  planning department when  Roger Frisson of Vancouver  bought an empty lot on Anchor  Road in November, 1988.  Frisson bought the lot  through Terry Brackett of Mitten Realty with the intention of  building a house on it for his  daughter Michelle Alexander,  of Secheltv His plans were for a  single family dwelling similar to  those around him for which, he  assumed, \the neighbourhood  was obviously zoned. Brackett  says he assumed the same thing.  Unfortunately, they were  both wrong and Frisson was left  with a lot that was of no value  to him because a single family  dwelling is not allowed to be  built in an area zoned R-4.  Stan Anderson of Anderson  Maragos tribute well justified  by Ellen Frith  In a wonderful demonstration of communal solidarity and  good cheer, Tula and Andy  Maragos, retiring proprietors of  Andy's Restaurant in Gibsons,  were feted and honoured and  given the gold key to the town  last Saturday night during a  rollicking good time had by all.  The celebration was in honour  of the Maragos' considerable  contribution to this, an appreciative community.  The party, officially called,  'The First Annual Fund Raiser  for Gibsons Waterfront Park'  was held in the hall at Camp  Elphinstone in Langdale, and  gathered together over 200  friends and acquaintances of  the Maragos family. Out from  Toronto where he is a radio  news announcer for CBC was  their son Costa, and taking time  off from UBC law exams to  help celebrate was their younger  son, Anastase.  Tula and Andy came to the  Sunshine Coast from Greece via  a somewhat circuitous route  through Regina and Kitimat, arriving here in 1974. So, in  honour of their homeland, and  to make the party an official  Greek one, Ed Hill, MC for the  evening, started it all off by  breaking a plate.  And although Tula and Andy  are to r-e-t-i-r-e (a word not to  be uttered in their presence, it  was stressed), this was not an  evening of saying goodbye.  "The Maragos' are not r-e-t-  i-r-i-n-g," said Hill, "but merely changing direction. We are  here to say thank you for their  warmth, generosity and friendship."  The party was intended to be  a 'roasting' of Tula and Andy  (while Murray Pezim got his in  Vancouver) but included a little  of everything. Up on the  podium to draw blood were  Gerry Dixon, Carol Kurucz,  Bernie Mulligan and, rival to  Andy and Tula at the Omega  Restaurant, Kristine Gian-  nakos. But all speakers had to  admit that they couldn't really  find anything derogatory to  roast either Tula or Andy with  and were left instead with genuinely warm and funny stories  gleaned while sharing the  Maragos' hospitality and  friendship. Pezim should be so  lucky.  Gerry Dixon presented Andy  with a pair of pyjamas. "It was  either that or a trip for two to  Turkey," he said.  Costa and Anastase also  spoke in their parent's honour  and it was the common consensus that not only were these two  sons of Tula and Andy very  good-looking, (and very single)  but they could also work nights  as stand-up comics.  It is Tula's most ardent wish,  apparently, that her boys marry  sooner than later. It was suggested that perhaps more maternal energy could be directed  towards finding them each 'a  nice girl' now that Andy's  Restaurant is no longer their  responsibility.  For more entertainment,  there was a skit by the Driftwood Players organized by Nest  Lewis and one by the Gibsons  Volunteer Fire Department. In  the latter presentation, Graham  Webb's portrayal of a cigarette-  smoking, television-adjusting,  throwing-money-around Andy  Maragos was much appreciated,  not least of all by Andy himself.  Note must also be made of  the party decorations and floral  arrangements in the hall and of  the food which was catered by  Emma Upe and staff at the  YMCA. It was all excellent.  And there was music. World  renowned pianist and xylophon-  ist, Elmer Gill, a long-time  friend of the Maragos', played  some tunes which included Andy's favourite, 'My Funny  Valentine'. Iris and Rob  Buchan sang, 'Never on Sunday' and, since they performed  later on in the evening, Andy,  Anastase and Costa were persuaded to dance Greek-style  while everybody clapped.  Gibsons, Mayor Diane Stromy  ever given a real one."  The dinner, at $30 a person,  raised over $3000 for the yet unnamed Gibsons Waterfront  Park. The money will be held in  trust until a theme for the park  is developed.  The Maragos' are worthy  recipients of the honours  bestowed upon them last Saturday night. They are that rare  thing these days, a family whose  love and support for one  another and the ensuing  strength it brings reaches out  spoke   briefly   and  pr^eiSted^f^afld'embraces all those around  Tula and Andy with a plaque of Y'them.  the key to the Town of Gibsons.  "I have given many cardboard  keys away in fun," she said,  "but this was the first time I've  i There is little doubt but that  the Maragos' have enriched the  lives of those they have come  across and befriended as well as  the community as a whole. But  the success of the evening, and  it really was a success for it  celebrated the appreciation and  respect a community can have  for some of its citizens without  once resorting to maudlin sentiment, was also a testament to  the community itself.  In celebrating with the  Maragos family, the people of  Gibsons did themselves proud.  They demonstrated a genuine  wit, warmth, good will and a  sheer generosity of spirit long  thought to have disappeared  forever.  The staff of the Coast News  joins with the rest of the community in wishing Tula and Andy Maragos the very best on  their r-e-t-i-r-e-m-e-n-t.  Realty claims the zoning of the  neighbourhood was changed in  1981 from R-l (single family  dwelling) to what it is now  because he wanted it changed.  "We (Pebbles Holdings Co.)  paid the district a zoning fee of  $100 to change it from R-l to  R-4 eight years ago," he says.  "When they adopted the present zoning bylaw in December,  1987,  they just kept it that  way."  Anderson owned 113 lots in  the Village of Sechelt. After  many were sold off, for single  family dwellings, he was left  with four lots in the contested  area that were too steep to support the building of a single  house on each.  His plans were, therefore, to  combine these four lots with  others that he owned next to  them and to create, all together,  a parcel of land extending to  Neptune Street. On this he  would build condominiums.  "Our purpose in originally  seeking the existing zoning,"  Anderson says, "was to create  approximately 60 units in four  clusters of 15 units each. To  create an example of density,  the Royal Terraces has 40 units  and comprises less than one  acre. Our site has four acres and  proposes 60 units."  Rob Sabine, Sechelt municipal planner disagrees with  Anderson saying that the rezoning in 1981 affected only Anderson's lots along Salmon Drive  and not those in the contested  area at all.  "I don't know why most of  those lots are zoned R-4,"  Sabine says. "It may have been  just an error in outlining the  map. Until we find the original  1981 bylaw, we won't know for  sure.  Please turn to page 7  RCMP smash drug ring  Gibsons-Thailand  The RCMP Drug Enforcement Branch, Vancouver, last  week wrapped up a major  15-month international drug investigation which involved  drug-related offences in Gibsons as well as in Montreal and  Thailand.  Three men died during the  major investigation, two  members of the alleged drug  ring, including one in Gibsons  and one in Montreal, and an  RCMP officer died in the line of  duty in Thailand.  Cpl. Derek Flanagan was killed in Thailand when he was  reported to have fallen from a  truck during a struggle with a  drug smuggler.  Alleged drug ring member  Daryoush Delfanie of Montreal  died when shot by an unknown  assailant in Montreal and a  58-year old Gibsons resident has  been charged in connection with  the death of Claude Joseph  Dupuis, age 58. All three deaths  were related to the drug investigation which was known as  Operation Deception.  Spearheading the Gibsons  section of the international investigation was an undercover  RCMP officer known locally as  Glen Barry who, as his cover,  operated fishing charter boat  the M. V. Misty.  Around Gibsons Wharf the  so-called Barry was said to be a  very good guide and fisherman  who went out of his way to provide a first class charter service,  taking customers out again if  they didn't catch fish.  In retrospect, locals remember that there were times when  the M. V. Misty was not  available for charter when its  operator said he couldn't book  because he didn't know what he  would be doing.  On one occasion he had to go  to Japan for a few days and  once cracked: "Me married?"  in response to a question.  "Who would put up with my  lifestyle?"  In all, 33 people were charged  as a result of the investigation  with 72 charges being laid.  Eleven residents of Gibsons  were charged and face a total of  23 drug related charges.  Mayor reports  Restructuring was not discussed by Gibsons council at the  March 28 committee-of-the-whole meeting but Gibsons  Mayor Diane Strom did answer a question from the press on  her recent meeting in Victoria with Minister of Municipal Affairs Rita Johnston.  "My specific reason for going to Victoria," Strom said,  "was to ask the minister if she would allow us, out of consideration of fairness, to hold a referendum in Areas E and F  separately from the one in Gibsons. The Municipal Act calls  for a single vote, but the minister said we could be accommodated."  Pender chamber  Anyone with an interest in improving the community,  whether a taxpayer or a businessperson, is urged to attend a  meeting at Pender Harbour Senior Secondary on April 5 at  7:30 pm, to plan and organize the re-establishment of the  Pender Harbour and Egmont Chamber of Commerce.  The chamber, although never officially disbanded, hasn't  met in over five years, but recent moving and shaking by  several unconnected groups has led to this coming Wednesday's meeting, where directors will encourage community involvement and look for new people to take over offices.  The Chamber of Commerce will focus on the general improvement of the area, including community beautification,  economic well-being, and services to residents.  They're off and running in the 12th annual running of the April Fool's Day Run relay teams. The winner of the Coast News Challenge Cup this year was Jim Vcrster  from Gibsons to Sechelt. Despite truly miserable conditions this year 53 participants ��� of North Vancouver. Verster also won the cup last year. Next week we will have a  showed up at the starting line, 36 individual runners and 17 runners making up five      complete list of participants and trophy winners. ��� Vern Elliott photo  V  Y  Y 2.  Coast News, April 3,1989  , v^H___��&__r' _ffi___fflg8P > liSK s.^ES' _3K ���' 9K BBS '���������ESS <___��J!_i# ,B_S"~ ISSS \W��b\^. ^ ^  ^'^lwB_f <^��5___P^ JS��t J&& 9B& ''J_8<��S,im:'':^^__W'��^~��_fcy.^B^,c:\.1  ^_rf*_------s��*----*--*--��---^^ t^' ---^A^^-'iMimnirMil llhllli^  As the gigantic oil spill in Prince William Sound,  Alaska, spreads inexorably through the northern seas there  has been an understandable tendency in the news reports  to focus on the human error involved. But there are  underlying factors here more instructive than simply the  sins of an allegedly drunken captain.  The possibility of human error is always with us and  when shipping vast quantities of a commodity as potentially damaging to a beautiful and sensitive environment it  behooves those responsible to take or require to be taken  every possible safeguard to niinimize the risk of disaster,  even when human error takes place.  That the Exxon Valdez, and presumably other newer  tankers too, are steaming through the narrow icy waters of  the Inland Channel carrying huge loads of oil with only a  single metal skin between them and disaster is unforgivable.  A recent report has it that some older tankers have double hulls and are compartmentalized so that an accident  doesn't lead to the jettisoning of the whole cargo or a major portion of it. The Exxon Valdez had neither double  hull nor compartments because the U.S. government  relented from a previous intention of making such precautions mandatory.  After the foolish and hapless captain has been justly  dealt with and punished for his irresponsible, possibly  criminal folly, these larger questions will remain.  Why has the company who hired him chosen to maximize profits by cutting the costs of building their huge  tankers? And, why has the responsible government allowed them to do it?  When are politicians going to stop paying lip service to  the protection of the environment and start taking, and  demanding that other take, real and responsible steps to  safeguard on our planet?  For re-election  It is good news that we have a balanced budget. It is bad  news that the taxpayers of B.C. continue to make huge interest payments on old debt while the government squirrels  away hundreds of millions of dollars for unleashing prior  to the next election.  The debt should be retired as speedily as possible. It is  the responsible course and one would hope that a financially responsible government would take that course as  the best means of ensuring re-election.  ��<  5 YEARS AGO  Provincial legislation ends the lockout of workers-at  the Port Mellon mill but the Canadian Paperworkers  Union promptly changes its locked-out signs for on-  strike signs, protesting the legislation.  The new fire hall on North Road, serving the West  Howe Sound Fire Protection District and Gibsons,  opens this week.  Gibsons Food Bank helps out 188 people at the weekly opening.  A special commemorative service is held in St.  Aidan's Church in Roberts Creek in honour of long-time  Roberts Creek stalwart Miss Ena Harrold.  Gibsons Building Supplies opens its new outlet in  Sechelt.  10 YEARS AGO  Mr. and Mrs. CD. Hanson of Gibsons and Mrs. E.M.  Webb of Soames Point are the winners in the annual  Sunnycrest Mall Association contest. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson won a trip to Hawaii and Mrs. Webb a $500 shopping spree.  A dramatization of the short story 'The Lottery' is  presented at Elphinstone Secondary School under the  direction of student Donnard Mackenzie.  20 YEARS AGO  Wolfgang Buchorn, master councillor of Mount  Elphinstone Chapter, Order of Demolay, presented a  cheque to Mr. Dalton Murphy, executive director of the  B.C. Society for Retailed Children. The presentation  was made at the Cedars Inn.  The RCMP are checking closely on anyone dumping  garbage in the waters of Howe Sound or Gibsons Harbour.  30 YEARS AGO  A presentation of Maunder's cantata Olivet to Calvary  by combined choirs of Gibsons and Port Mellon  augmented by other singers interested in choral work is  a highlight of the musical history of the Sunshine  Coast.  Michael M. Dane of the Department of Slavonic  Studies at UBC addresses a local Kiwanis meeting on  the subject of the 'present Soviet educational system  and proposed changes by Kruschev and their implications'.  40 YEARS AGO  Local firemen oppose a federal government plan to  charge for side wharfage in coastal waters.  Pender Harbour has decided to organize its own  board of trade.  The Sunshine  Published by GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  Editorial: John Bumside       Vern Elliott  Production:  Jane Stuart  Bonnie McHeffey  Bev Cranston  Advertising:  Fran Burnside  John Gilbert  Loni Shaw  Tha Sunshine COAST NEWS is a locally owned newspaper, published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Glassford Press  Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or  886-7817; Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class Mail Registration No.  "4702.'-    ;  The Sunshine COAST NEWS Is protected by copyright and reproduction of any part of it by any means is prohibited unless permission In  writing is first secured from Glassford Press Ltd., holders of the  copyright.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  C.nsda: 1 year 835; 6 months $20; Foreign; 1 year 940  Taking care of our forests  Editor's Note: The following is  the text of an address to the  Ministry of Forest Public Information Session held in Vancouver, March 8, 1989. Jack  Bakewell is a respected member  of the Sunshine Coast Forest  Advisory Commission.  Mr. Minister, Ladies and  Gentlemen:  My name is Jack Bakewell. I  am a professional forester and  forest engineer working as a  consultant.  I was born in Ocean Falls and  for the first six years breathed  the sweet smell of success that  drifted   from   the   pulpmill.  Later, the Depression., in,^the,;  forest, communities}; ;ieit.}some ;y.  vivid .impressions of what :bap--M  perish when the forest iiidustr^isy;  YmaehveY''YY;--y-'<:.' ���������- yv|||Y  My career has been inyjbjvti/1  in some way 'dir^y^vf'mSi'.*?  forestry and the forest andv  heavy construction industries as  an employee, manager, owner,  and consultant. 44 of my sixty-  one years have been spent earning a living basically in and  from the forest. I have worked  in every forest region in BC, the  Northwest Territories, and on  projects in the Western U.S.,  South America, and West  Africa. I suggest that I haye  seen more of the forests of BC  than 95 percent of the persons  present in this room. ���  I wish to present some  perspectives.  1. Long-term wealth comes  from renewable natural  resources. That's what we are  here scrapping over today. This  whole "resource land-use environment conundrum"  resembles an over-boiled stew  where it is difficult, if not im  possible, to isolate the constituents. Special interests present  a mass of rhetoric encompassing the subjects. Much of it is  misinformation and self-  serving.  The Government decision  makers have been misled by  programmed pressures to react  rather than lead in issues like  South Moresby, Carmanah  River, TFL Licences and the  Countervail.  These special interest groups  prey upon the ecologically ignorant and indifferent citizens.  Some espouse the popular cause  of profits and economic growth  for their own sakes. Others promote radical resource preservation instead  of conservation,  Which, _by  definition,   would  ;ASweir;���ly^r^trjc]t,.re^sniie...for the  social programs  iifxm which  .many ..^Jjepend   for   their  i.^^ livelihood^  v* There appears to be evidence  that radical groups have been  financed with tax dollars.  Let us realize that the long-  term well-being of BC, Canada,  and for that matter the world  must rely on long-range, integrated, resource development.  In other words, economic  development must be based  upon sustainable natural  resources.  For a world perspective,  which refutes short-term  political and economic expediency, read the 'Planet of the  Year' (Time magazine, January  2, 1989) and 'Our Common-  future' (Brundtland Report).  2. Custody of 95 percent of  BC's resources is entrusted to  emasculated resource ministries,  both  provincial  and   federal.  The bulk of our resources are  undermanaged. It would appear  that even the Ministry of  Forest's hands are tied and the  government plans to dump  much of the responsibility for  forest management into the  hands of industry. Even  acknowledging the good  work done by many corporate  citizens, that's putting mice in  charge of the cheese factory. I  hope we have good cats.  The implementation requires  a strong Ministry Staff to audit  progress without extended  delays and to be able to report  objectively without political interference; for example - cut  control and log exports.  3. Government has to have a  plan. Government has to provide tenures and policies that  provide security and continuity  that are operable and has to  practice "Use it or Lose it"  equitably.  Regardless of size, the  Ministry has to insist that companies have to stay within  allowable cuts for each cut control period. If they don't they  must be penalized. However, it  must be understood that the industry must be allowed to react  within that cut control period to  the realities of the international  commodities market. It must be  understood that no one here in  BC can control international  commodity markets, whether  they be wheat, steel, or wood.  4. Since the province's  economy is largely dependent  on forest resources it behooves  investment in accurate up-to-  date forest inventories. We  must know what we are talking  about. I believe confidence is  lacking in NSR, immature coniferous, and deciduous forest  inventory statistics, thus rendering suspect our ability to sustain  our forest industry, let alone  provide for socially essential  non-consumptive uses. '���'���������  Satellite imagery and computer extrapolations are meaningless without extensive ground  truthing surveys based on conventional aerial photography interpretation.  Please turn to page 4  r  The Pasture  Pm going out to clean the pasture spring;  I'll only stop to rake the leaves away  (And wait to watch the water clear, I may):  I shan 't be gone long.���You come too.  Pm going out to fetch the little calf  That's standing by the mother. IPs so youngt  It totters when she licks it with her tongue.  I shan't be gone long.���You come too.  Robert Frost  In a nutshell  The ashes of Nora McNee  by S. Nutter  J  Seat-mates in planes, in fiction at least, can provide one of  life's more interesting draws. In  the time when I was a flying  passenger, in the 50's and 60's,  it seems to me that I had usually  had a late night and wanted  simply to drop off as soon as I  could get the seat belt done up.  It was like this on a morning  north from Edmonton in something like '56.1 ignored my seat-  mate when he came, settled  back in the tilt of the old DC3  and sought to get off before we  did.  It didn't work for long. He  was an active ground-watcher.  Also he seemed to know what  ought to be down there though  it was clear he hadn't been this  way before. He was a small grey  haired man in a neat business  suit and had a brown paper  parcel about the size of a cookie  jar which he carried in his lap/  He was polite and all, but he  peered across me with a stream  of questions. 'Is that the Lliard?  Where is Fort Simpson? Do you  see any buffalo? One, 'Do you  know where they took off to  cross the lake with the tractor  trains?' had me thinking.  In Yellowknife I was met by  one of the town's two cabs. Still  in a semi-comatose state I  crawled in, and was about to  scoot when I noticed my seat-  mate. He was at the back of the  aircraft overseeing the  unloading of a bunch of what  looked like flower boxes. I offered him a lift (flower boxes?  in Yellowknife?) and we  managed to get the whole lot  jammed in with room for  ourselves. He still had his parcel  on his lap.  A nice little mystery, enough  to wake one up. On the way in,  he told me his tale. He was from  San Diego, and had never been  out of there before in his life, let  alone this far towards the pole.  The parcel contained the  ashes of his only sister, Nora.  She had been, he said, the first  white woman in Yellowknife,  and had married a chap called  McNee.  He had run a tractor for the  trains across}; the ice in the  winter, and one spring, when  the ice got tricky at the mouth  of the river,/McNee went  through and drowned.  Nora went back to San Diego  where she died some years later,  and her last request had been  that her ashes be scattered at the  mouth   of  the   Yellowknife  River, somewhat to the north.  He dropped off his bag at the  hotel and went on with his  flowers looking for a bush pilot.  In the bar Congest in the north)  a few oldtimers remembered  McNee, but there was some  shuffling and down-looking  when it came to Nora.  Not long after, Max Ward's  pilot came in ('Ward Air' in  those days was just two float  planes.)  "Holy old baldheaded," he  said and ordered another drink.  "You wouldn't believe," he  said a few times. "All those  damn carnations..."  He had, tied his customer  firmly to the fuselage and it  didn't take them long to get to  the mouth of the river. After a  certain amount of shouting  back and forth he was circling  over an apparently OK spot.  The ashes went down all  together in a stream, but then  the flowers.  The flowers flew about every  which way and he, circling,  found himself flying through  them. Then of course they were  blowing back into the plane until it was full of floating carnations.  Then, on a turn, there was a  whoosh!! from the door and the  whole lot plastered on his windscreen. He was at something  under 100 feet and at that point  they called it quits.  By the time our little grey  visitor entered the bar everyone  in it was up on the story. He  was a hero, and there was the  beginning of a feeling that this  faithful act, performed so  matter-of-factly, added a touch  of some sort of nobility, otherwise perhaps lacking, to the  town itself.  A party ensued of course.  Too long after to be any kind of  wake, but with sort of an odd  character to her. Before long  just about everyone it seemed  had found some fond memory  of Nora, but the guest just smiled politely, refused most drinks,  and got himself firmly off early  to bed. Frenchy, the transport  king, would drive him to the airport in the morning.  Later, I found Don Hagel,  the 'second* lawyer, looking  thoughtful at an end of the bar.  "You know", he 'said* "he  hardly mentioned his sister at  all, but he said to me at a point  'That fellow, McNee. He was a  real sport that fellow McNee  and no mistake.' "  i  If  I ^i-ci:;".K-V'-'"'.'.'.v:  YYHS -Y ^.i^s  ^y^V^'P.-  ���^t^^Ss^y^r  Coast News, April 3,1989  **���   �� __*_Lff   ? ___!'��� ____*��� ^Vat  4*  1   J  ni_iMii�����iiiiiiiimii-*imH.iiiwnriii��i>  Editor:  The recent 'Forests Forever'  insert in your paper invites  criticism for its simplistic 'trust  us, we care too' theme.  'Forests Forever' is a catchy  alliteration meant to infer that  once we cut down a forest we  can then reproduce another  one.  We cannot! We are replacing  non-renewable, complex  ecosystems that have evolved  over tens of thousands of years  with, in comparison, hectares of  ecologically sterile wood fibre  plantations that are forecast to  be mowed down again in 50 to  75 years.  We don't even fully understand the blueprint of an old  growth forest, never mind trying to replicate it.  On page two outlining the  economic profile of the B.C.  forest industry, there is no mention of the fact that all of the  large forest companies in B.C.  are now owned by gigantic  multi-national resource companies who have long histories  of depleting resources, and then  reinvesting the profits in other  countries to stripmine their  resources.  Neither is there any mention  of the fact that the B.C. lumber  industry could add more than  $1.7 billion annually to its'  revenues by producing more  specialty wood products. There  is little attempt to manufacture  value added products because  quite simply, the greatest profit  margin is in harvesting the  resource as quickly and as efficiently as possible.  Nowhere in their Market  Outlook is there any mention of  the inevitable drop in lumber  prices that will occur as we  begin to mill ever increasing  amounts of inferior quality second growth timber. Our current lumber prices are buoyed  by milling rapidly depleting  stocks of old growth timber that  produce internationally  valuable mature wood lumber.  The 'before and after' shots  purported to justify clear cutting on page three yvere particularly deceiving. By choosing  to take the 1986 photo from a  camera angle and depth of field  setting that has the forefront of  the photo filled with sharply  focused trees of healthy but indeterminate height, this photo  creates a three dimensional illusion that the stature of the  backgroud trees are comparable  to those in focus. Some might  call it trick photography.  Regardless of the illusion being created by the photography,  it should also be noted that this  is a picture of the White River  Valley. Valley bottoms are the  most ecologically resilient areas  in the province for tree growth.  This is where the fastest growth  takes place and where the biggest trees are found.  The side hills of the valleys  that have been clearcut have  been ravaged by wind and water  erosion that in many cases have  totally destroyed the fragile  layer of topsoil that took  rnillenia to build up. Even on  those sidehills where young  seedlings have taken hold, it will  be a couple of hundred years  before they grow back to a  marketable size due to restricted  water resources, higher altitudes  and increased vulnerability to  wind buffeting.  Page four opens with the  bold headline "80 million trees  were harvested last year in  B.C....and 200 million were  planted."  This trite bit of deception is  self-addressed by the second  paragraph subheading: "The  figures don't tell the whole  story." The 80 million trees  harvested in this province last  year were survivors in a complex natural selection process  that resulted in some of them  reaching ages in excess of 500  years. Each old growth tree  could account for several good  size sawlogs for the mill.  Furthermore, the 80 million  only represents those trees that  made it to the mills or for export. There were many more  millions left in the woods  because of falling breakage,  yard breakage, small diameters  and what the M.Q.F. calls  unavoidable waste: "that component of the waste which cannot be removed with a reasonable effort because of physical  impediments."  Wilson in error  Editor:  Mr. Gordon Wilson indicated  in the press that the Gibsons  bypass is not a priority. The  Gibsons bypass has been and remains a priority on the list of  projects under consideration by  the Ministry of Transportation  and Highways and has been  strongly advocated by the local  MLA, Mr. Harold Long.  As a matter of fact, my  ministry will be purchasing right  of way this year and intends to  begin construction on this  crucial section of road in the  1990/91 fiscal year.  Clearly, Mr. Wilson's statement was incorrect. Had he asked me this question at the recent  meeting of the Association of  Vancouver Island Municipalities, I would have told him  exactly that.  Honourable Neil Vant  Minister  Festival thanks  Editor:  On behalf of the Sunshine  Coast Music Festival, I would  like to thank all those who  helped make our festival a success.  Throughout the year a group  of hard working volunteers plan  and coordinate the festival.  There are also several parents  and friends of the festival who  help us during the actual events.  I would also like to thank  Gibsons United Church, Royal  Canadian Legion, Branch 219,  Roberts Creek; Mr. and Mrs.  G.E. McKee, Joyce Roots,  Brian Butcher, Ken Dalgleish,  Chamberlin Gardens and The  Coast News.  Barbara Cattanach  Chairman  Sunshine Coast Music Festival  More letters  on Page lO  O BCF6RRIGS  New Fare Day  SATURDAY APRIL 1,1989  When you travel with BC Ferries, you'll be  paying a new fare.  On major routes between the Mainland and  Vancouver Island, the new fare for car and driver will  be $21 ?75. Adult passenger fares are $4.75.  There are fare changes on BC Ferries minor  routes, as well.  Picrt up the new Fare card, listing the changes,  at any ferry terminal. If you have any questions  about the new fares, just give us a call.  BC FERRIES: Vancouver.   Victoria.. ...  ....669-1211  ....386-3431  April 1st; The day for a new fare on BC Ferries  The ministry also permits the  logging companies to leave 35  cubic metres/hectare. This is  referred to as an avoidable  waste allowance. (The average  highway logging truck carries  about 30 cubic metres). Each of  these old growth trees would  have the potential of producing  fine-grained, mature wood  lumber.  To draw a direct comparison  between these exquisite  specimens of nature's beauty  and a greenhouse-raised six inch  seedling that has a 70 per cent  chance of properly rooting is  folly of the highest order.  I could go on here about the  elementary school innocence  that the cute little drawings  (page five) describing forest  management try to evoke or the  commission from the glossary  of terms such words as soil  degradation, wind and water  erosion, juvenile wood, off site  planting, sympathetic administration, hi-grading, X and  Y exemptions, die-back,  sinuosity, etc.  Suffice it to say, the only  redeeming quality of the  'Forests Forever' insert is that  you can recycle it and honestly  show that "You care about  B.C.'s forests..."  Jim Pine  P.S. I began my career in the  forest industry as a chokerman  in 1970. I worked summers in  the industry until 1978 when I  began a five year full time job  with B.C.F.P. in Port Renfrew.  I then worked two years at a  data processing firm producing  reports for logging companies.  This fall I finished up four years  as a log scaler and am presently  working as a teacher in Victoria.  -*,  Sechelt JM^a��N��linic  **?,,,    u now o$m $&s*s;'  5545-B Wmf Ed:, Sechelt }'  suf  -/' *  iy* ** *-~"  L<y ~y  '"?+> Retaxatipn &?hempeteieMessage ^''  ���j-     Si. ?i */&'%$' |  ,yp<y   *  Beth Emms, RMT - ���  ^ ' f  Sat. 9-12  JOY'S Birthday GIFT  to You!  ENJOY birthday cake,  refreshments, and a  COMPLIMENTARY  MAKE-UP  application, with Yvon Bourgeois  ---mith products, at Joy's NEW SHOP  ALL THIS WEEK: APRIL 3*8  Quality, Professional Skincare Services  COAST IMAGES ^^  New Location: 5545-D Wharf Rd.  Sechelt (Galiano Market Mini-Mall) 885-7174  LIMITED TIME OFFER  FORD CREDIT FINANCING  No Limit on Amount  On all Cars and Selected Trucks  Call Today for Details  O.A.C.  \\ev*  co^  S600 u"  dq\^  *   C!>N ^f^"  ^Sb^<&-:  o<Ca S.  CO^  dtf��n'  PER       MOhTn  "hcs'80�� *.* Ycs r" ��'c  ^yy;y-'^rn  irS'ttE*6 AT LAST!  FESTIVA  As seen  on TV  Ha*  ?*IVE  TODAY  l4CYL  6 Year Powertrain Warranty  ��� Power Brakes  ��� Locking Fuel Filler Door  ��� Opening Rear Quarter Windows  ��� Electric Defroster  ��� Front Wheel Drive  ��� Overdrive Transmission  ��� Fold Down Rear Seat  Fabulous Fuel Economy  Service Loa/iers for Life  # Lifetime Service Guarantee  ��� Free Oil Changes for Life  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  MDL5936  Vancouver Toll Free 684-2911  885-3281  SAVE ' STawffiwgtBgEiaB^ ��-nTTffn��i  Coast News, April 3,1989  elp needed with old dump  by Ellen Frith  Public cooperation is needed  the old Gibsons dump on  t jjtewart Road is ever going to be  Cleaned up and ready to be put  j^o good use by this summer says  Gibsons works superintendent,  $|kip Reeves.  ��f The old dump is the one site  So far that may be approved as  J&art of a sludge utilization pro-  t*gram to recycle Gibsons human  bvaste into a pasteurized fertilizer that will grow, in this  %��&se, trees for park use.  Jgt But before that approval is  ^rthcoming, a management  ^plan and various tests on  ^achates in the area must be  -Sfone.  m  The management plan is in  construction, Reeves says, and  meanwhile the Department of  Highways, the Sunshine Coast  Regional District (SCRD) and  the Town of Gibsons is involved  in a cleanup campaign.  Reeves says that 10 to 20  hours of concentrated effort  with a tractor, backhoe and  gravel truck is needed to clean  up the dumpsite road allowance  and right-of-way before any  other work can be done. They  also hope to install a vandal-  proof gate to the site.  "We want the public to  understand that they can't just  drive up Stewart Road and fling  their garbage around," Reeves  says. "We are now going to  prosecute at random all the lit-  terers we can catch."  In spite of the dump having  been officially closed for five  years, garbage has been left all  over the place.  Reeves says a monitoring station will soon be set up and a  sample of the leachates seeping  out of the 20-year-old dump will  be measured. Once the trees are  planted and the sludge spread  on the ground, another  measurement will be taken.  If approval for the site comes  through, Reeves says, he hopes  500 to 1000 trees will be  planted. With any luck, he says, ~  approval will be soon as Gibsons has been offered free seedlings for the project.  jNo apology for Burk  by Ellen Frith  r i  No apology to Mr. D'Arcy  SjBurk from Gibsons Alderman  >Ken Collins is necessary said  ^Gibsons council at their  Commit tee-of -the- whole  Meeting March 28.  ���:��� Council had sought legal advice after Burk took exception  [io a 'Letter to the Editor' from  Rollins printed February 13 in  ;��he Coast News. The letter,  :-Burk said, contained 'two major errors' involving him and  l^vas the responsibility of Gibsons  council  because  Collins  ������Signed himself 'Alderman'.  ;:;   "When an individual writes a  letter and signs it with a title, he  is acting on behalf of the group  or organization with which he  holds the title," Burk said. He  requested that council instruct  alderman Collins to apologize.  But this will not be necessary.  After careful consideration of  the case and a five page reply  citing several precedents, Vancouver law firm McCarthy &  McCarthy conclude: "In the  present case, it is in our view,  clear from Alderman Collins'  letter that he is not speaking on  behalf of council but rather is  expressing his own reasons for a  statement made by him at a  council meeting. There being no  suggestion that the alderman is  speaking on behalf of council, it  is not necessary for council to  make clear that the letter does  not record council's position."  Council recommended, therefore, they simply reply to  Burk's letter quoting the relevant information from the  lawyers.  Alderman Collins wished to  go on record as haying voted  against council seeking legal advice on the matter. He was not  responsible, therefore, for  council incurring the approx-^  imately $500 in legal costs.  ^According to Wilson  Bypass takes backseat  & A recent meeting of the  ^-'Association of Vancouver  ^Island Municipalities (AVIM)  i'l'has left Area A director Gordon  !*;Wilson 'disheartened'. In a verbal report on the meeting made  *;at last week's Sunshine Coast  ^Regional District (SCRD)  ^meeting, Wilson told directors  pthat the Vancouver Island  ��;mayors had turned their backs  j&on the Sunshine Coast.  & the SCRD has been a  .^member of the AVIM for  ^several years, and Wilson has  $#>een on the steering committee  ��iof the powerful lobbying group.  ��5However, after the Sunshine  5i  Coast was included in a separate  economic development region  from the island, Gibsons and  Sechelt withdrew from the  association.  At the last meeting of the  AVIM, Wilson said the mayors  refused to support the motion  that the Sunshine Coast  Highway receive the same  priority rating as the Island  Highway. Representatives from  the Sunshine Coast were informed by Mr.'Vant, he $aid,  that highway development on  the Sunshine Coast will take a  distant backseat to the upkeep  and maintenance of the Island  Highway.  Wilson said he also made it  clear that the Gibsons bypass is  not a priority in this year's  budget.  Jim Gurney, who also attended the conference, was less  discouraged than Wilson.  "When you get; knocked  down you have to get back up  and fight even harder," he said!  But ��� Stan Dixon suggested  mat' airy attempts to gain tlsj  support of the AVIM were  useless. He maintained that the  only effective way to lobby is  through the minister of state's  office for this region.  Taking care of forests  9  %  ^Continued from page 2  *J 5. Three Royal Commissions  *pn forestry since World War II  ||iid not divulge anything that  pivasn't known before. Forestry  ���^Commissions were grandstands  j$for self-serving organizations to  Express opinions which were  Soften not in the best interests of  jghe province as a whole. The  {^Commissions and the vacuums  i^that followed were political expedients to buy time because of  ^indecision and lack of government objectives.  $ Among my fears, if we go the  fcJRoyal Commission route again,  g��is the lost time in establishing intensive forestry systems involving incentive-oriented people.  ^Immediate decisions are needed  on government policies and  leadership for TFLs, Woodlot  Licences, log exports and  priorities of other forest land-  based uses related to the concept of sustainable resource  development.  BC doesn't need a Royal  Commission. BC needs people1  that can think in principles. BC  needs a practical politically-  oriented community-cognizant  think tank. These people must  be able to think in principles so  as to advise the government on  resource matters. Details won't  matter a hoot if the principles  are haywire.  Mr. Minister, your government must decide on fundamen  tals to be followed on uses of  our resources and their  priorities. Then the government  must stick with its principles  and stand by tenure systems,  appraisal methods, arid  management schedules so the  forest industry, the public, and  non-consumptive resource users  know the objectives and the  rules. Only then will your  Ministry be able to plan,  manage, audit, and accounrfor  the actions which intensive  forestry is going to impose on  the government, the forest industry, and the other resource  users.  Get the principles straight,  layout the rules and stick by  them.  1 st Thursday of every month is  SENIORS DAY at  Sunnycrest Mall  f  Extra discounts throughout the mall Thurs.  Bring your Pharmacare Card & SAVE  SUNNYCREST MALL  OPEN 9:30-6 pm FRI. NITE'TIL 9  SUNDAYS &HOUDAYS 11-4 pm'  Grace, with 15 years experience as a. hairdresser, is  our hair care specialist. Be  sure to ask Grace if you have  any questions about hair care  or hair care products.  "UOfHsM?  ��/V  fuwr  ^jgi^itow*-  Be sure to check  **/  ��� ,^>Y^  ���Y\s ^  iniiliiiiii" iftlfi  c\.MR��L  Present your Pharmacare Card and SAVE  10% Off  This Thursday, April 6  Except prescriptions,  dispensary, magazines  tobacco &  'sale' products  No Service Charge to seniors  on telephone, hydro, &  cablevision payments at the  Pharmasave sub Post Office  W*s  ThursdaV  FOR THE FIRST 50  'SENIORS' CUSTOMERS  HEALTH CARE, CONVENIENCE, LOW PRICES  FRIENDLY PROFESSIONAL SERVICE  RIGHT IN YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD  Be our guest for coffee & cookies  Get it at the       Po.  GIBSONS at,  PHARMASAVE  y PRICE: y^mnn  Post Office  Utility Bills  Sunnycrest Mall  886-7213 :^^^?*^>^^^  ;��� -?&r*'?*7 *"w **">���_**��  ^��~.**^"��*?^^,tV^:l^^^^^^^ *W :^*~,^Y.^;/*'^;^-:/<5_r.7;:.* ';-*���"���  ^;V*^v-~*t33*r:'*-  ; ;-��y _-��*:"^^*-_�����<*���* ���_. rf'  . *��� ������ ���*'���'- *"'  Coast News, April 3,1989  Manager Merillee Mulligan of Sears Catalogue Sales in Sunnycrest Mall was happy to present the cheques last week to Marg Lamarche (centre) and Pat Cook (right) in the Win Your Purchase contest.  Marg was one of three winners in Western Canada to take the maximum $1000 prize. Pat Cook won  $217. ���Vera Elliott photo  Davis Bay News & Views  Flea market this week  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  Have you got your table yet?  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  Peninsula Mtarttatt  Davis Bay  "A Friendly P��opl* Place"  Have you got the date straight?  The Flea Market is at the  Davis Bay/Wilson Creek Community Hall, 5123 Davis Bay  Road, April 8 from 9 am until  noon. To reserve a table phone  Lauralee Solli at 885-3510 or  leave a message at 885-5212.  Come and buy if you aren't  selling. There will be coffee and  tea available from the Western  Weight Controllers.  Henry's SENIORS' DAY SPECIAL  | For Large Quantities Please Order by Wednesday |  s^ VOLKORN Wheat Bread  Reg. $1.55 Seniors' Day Only, April 8  HENRY'S BAMSmtg&T?  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons :-   - ^"00TfTM  I  Prime  RETAIL SPACE  available in  Sunnycrest Mall  500 sq. ft. to 1200 sq. ft.  Ideal For  i -  Toy Store  Books, Cards  Records & Tapes  CALL: Marvin Mogul, 277-3688  Vancouver Collect  Geri's EELECTROLUX  "Dt#* 0u4bm*s%4t  Af*U3, t989  ftytfr S/btUf * pw ��Ui K*. 0*mtM *** tuildiMf *md &'*��� ttmejt*  Ik* UtHeVAto-ia^U 4*0* WeW* feH#U<U*f   %titfMUif3 ��WM> 7  tUSwd^CM^/PwrnintcJ^a^eias^t^  *tVU ���� StUUUfVUti 'tVtttiL  t*.m*u*toiHtktt^4t*MdMd^*wte  e����cvt*Ut*mM^4^t**M,t��eato��^*���  ctf 044t tame.  (%A*i��t Sftttm* futm tilt <t**x* fato-t* ta- t*% tidtM cammtofrt. Stf*\  Idtfl,  gjfottl/tlMf. /&**&��� eVtditMM. tteaM^tffMte^ *M*���MJM���*>  *�� cp** tttf mOttmt *x��U*f <K  1km  RwdRd.  - Henry Rd.  Hwy. 101  'If****- 46tuufy  Geri Bodmer  (Authorized Etoctrolqx Oltttibutor)  Now at 1507 Reed Rd.  (1 km West of Henry Rd.)  886-4776 or 886 8053  STORY HOUR  Don't forget to bring your  pre-schooler to Story Hour on  April 7 at 10:30 am at the hall.  Your little one will be read to by  one of our volunteers while  moms chat or have a cup of coffee.  It is also a good opportunity  to browse in the excellent  library.  WHALE WATCHING  Ed and Helen Cuylits have  been whale watching out of  Ucluelet recently. Weather was  windy, some rain and the seas  rough. They didn't see any of  the grey whales the first day out  but saw quite a few the next  morning.  They were able to get fairly  close to sea lions as well.  If the pictures turn out maybe  we will get to see them at the  hall some time.  PORPOISE BAY PARK  We are so fortunate to have  such a beautiful park and campsite   so   near.   Good   Friday  wasn't the greatest day weather- y  wise, but visiting children and I  grandchildren enjoyed a fire, ��  hot  dogs  and  marshmallows '  around the pit in the park.       p  The smaller children loved s  being able to run from beach to  grass, play hide-and-seek and  toss a baseball. We even set up  badminton.   The   local   geese  gave us a superb fly-past, twice.  Everyone had a good time  and it may become an annual  event even if Easter in B.C.  usually has bad weather.  CANCER  The Canadian Cancer Society  who sell daffodils in malls each  Easter, ran into difficulties this  year. Because of the cold  weather, the sale of sunny daffodils is delayed until Friday,  April 7.  These will be sold in the local  malls. Be sure to purchase a few  bunches in order to help fight.  this dreaded disease.  SOD TURNING  The St. John's United  Church is having the sod turning ceremony on the site for the  new church on May 14. An important event for the congregation. I will let you know the  time later.  FOLK CONCERT  On April 9 at 2 pm, at the  Davis Bay/Wilson Creek Hall,  the Watersyde Folk are presenting a concert. James Gordon  will play Celtic music and John  McLachlin will sing folk songs  of the West Coast.  Tickets are $7 if purchased at  Talewind Books, Coast Book  Store, Peninsula Market, or  Seaview Market. If tickets are  bought at the door it's $8.  TURNER RECOVERING  Had a nice chat with Turner  Berry who was seriously ill  while on vacation in Hawaii and  came home only to enter  hospital. After many tests it was  discovered he had a vicious  form of arthritis.  ������i With medication he is on the  road to recovery although still  very weak. Best wishes to you  and Esther. Get well soon.  Interested?  Call Dave at 886*8779^  The White Tower  Mediaeval Society  sunnycrest Man, Prices effective:  Gibsons . .       . _  Apr. 4 - Apr. 9  _______._-,__���     9:30 am ��� 6=00 pm          .^ mlw    ������*,  it P F N ���   Fr'days 'til 9:00 pm jfe  w"   1-11 ���   Sundays 11:00 am djJ5p~ ��� raw w  - 5:00 pm              flKjg^iji W_#>��j r  HHtt_bB_nHBnH_D_B_H__H_B_^__^f      "     i_Fja_H_M_a_i_nl^KF    >�����  1^���B_Mi~__;.  _t   -a,       W     ������������������mP*'  ^^B_i_Br*jfe V i_fc:��\;^  Thursday is  Seniors' Day *.  SuperValu  Limit 1 With $25 Order " J_\        *m^ __m__.  MJB - 3 Varieties - Ground ^        mM MM  COFFEE soogm    I ��� fc 51'  Limit 2 With $25 Order __m __m  Duncan Hines ��� All Varieties _Jf MM  CAKE MIXES .OO  Boneless- Whole Round mM      ���M jD  STEAK     fcg5.03 *�������()  Boneless ��� Outside Round or mfkm,       mf^ _m^  Rump mM      MZII  ROAST    ,,5.93  .-l.OD  California ��� Pink | 1   Q  GRAPEFRUIT 1%  I ��� I 9  Sunkist   Navel MM MM  ORANGES     ,_&M .99.  f " " ~ " " " " " parZTnim n7u^��SSSS��mS����*  [POTATO BLACK J  ���SALAD FOREST HAM       \  ���       39 99 ���  J lOOgm    ��M*J 100gm    ��WW -  Oven Fresh ��� Nature's Best gHL\ 0^  12 Grain ||||  BREAD ��..��� .99  Oven Fresh - 4 Varieties 1        1111  MUFFINS        e,   I . 99  ^ms^^csmSPRING CLEAN-UP!!  Thick Bowl Cleaner  3 Varieties  SANI-FLUSH  Sani-Foam  BATHROOM  CLEANER  Easy Off  GLASS  CLEANER  675 ml  .575 gm  ���������*��*������  750 ml  Zero  RUG  CLEANER  -������������������a*.  624 gm  2.19  2.79  1.69  3.29  Wizard - Rug & Room  DEODORIZER  400 gm nmn..��yii ��� m^i^-u n^)>-jw  6.  Coast News, April 3,1989  WmB*&m^&^S��  {Robi Petraschuk plants what will be the beginning of a Christmas  ITree farm on her property near Oyster Bay in Pender Harbour  [(see Story below). ���Myrtle Winchester photo  ���Christmas Tree Farm  l One of the nicest spring pro-  Tjects on the whole coast this  'year is the budding Christmas  -tree farm at Petraschuk's.  Looking closely across the road  ��� from D & D Welding at the foot  of Misery Mile, you can see  rows of tiny seedlings in newly-  tilled earth, a beautiful contrast  to the logged-off-sidehill eyesore that's opposite the farm.  Robi says that the trees won't  be ready for harvesting for  another five or six years, good  news, because it's going'to be  rather nice watching them grow  for that time.  Egmont News  Anniversaries  by Phil Muncaster  ; We seem to have quite a list  ;of people for the month of  April to whom we wish a Happy Birthday or anniversary.  For birthdays, we have Doug  Silvey, Danny Cummings and  his new teenage granddaughter Tiny, Larry Campo, Walt  Higgins, Gloria Fritz, Marty  Lowe, Jacci Joseph, Janet  Bowles, Kinji Van Arsdel,  Elaine Silvey, Katie Devlin,  Stan Jerema, Mike Legge, Steve  Leander, Len Silvey, Pattie  Jackson, Elisha Marie Barham,,  Video Sue, and Marilyn  Bathgate.  jpHappy anniversary greetings  go out to Joe and Trudy Muller,  32 years, also to John and Norma Martin, 24 years and  especially to Bill and Jean  Graham on their 50th.  There will be a Community.  Club General Meeting at the  hall, Sunday, April 9, at 1 pm.  by Myrtle Winchester, 883-9302  Marg Schoular's second  hand/antique store is now officially moved across the street  to a bigger and better space  from its old location, the  panabode building in Madeira  Park Shopping Centre, which is  now the Pender Harbour Paper  Mill, a new business belonging  to yours truly.  The Paper Mill is an office-  services business that includes  word-processing, and in the  next couple of weeks I'll be able  to offer an answering service as  well. I would have liked to have  had it installed this week, but  you know how BC Tel is way up  here in the far north.  The Coast News is also  located in the Paper Mill, so  you can drop in with news, ads,  etc. rather than playing techno  tag with my answering machine.  Vern Elliott, our photographer  and darkroom technician, is  providing me with proof sheets  of all the photos that I've taken  in Pender Harbour, and  reprints of those will be  available.  LEGION NEWS  Members and guests of  Branch 112 are invited to enjoy  the music of the Carrie Fowler  Quartet (Carrie and Les Fowler,  Duffy Holberg, and Merv  Charboneau) on April 8 from 9  to 1 in the Legion lounge. Admission is free.  The big Easter meat draw last  Saturday was greaj, and the  most noteworthy winner was a  guest from the DrumheUer  Alberta branch who gave his  turkey back to auctioneer Shelly  Kattler to be used for another  Roberts  Creek  by Jeanie Parker, 885-2163  When people ask how big  Roberts Creek is, you usually  tell them there's one store and a  bost office. That may not be  p-ue much longer.  I The Postal Corporation has  Closed   many   rural   offices  iecently   and   it's   thought  Roberts Creek's turn will come  $oon. Then everybody will have  ijb get his mail at boxes on the  rural route and go to Gibsons or  ��echelt for other postal services.  ��� Many people feel the post office is an important institution  ip  the  community  and  they  don't want to lose it. What to  dp about it?  Write to your  Member   of  Parliament:   the  postage is free!  CHILDCARE  I Roberts Creek parents are  forming a new group called  Rainbow Childcare.  \ The group's first meeting is  this Tuesday, April 4, at 8 pm in  the Grade 7 room at Roberts  Creek Elementary. If you can't  make it or want more information phone Jane at 886-7610.  LEGION WEDDING  ��� Best wishes to Fay Lewis and  ' John Bottomley on the occasion  of their marriage in a private  ceremony at the Roberts Creek  Legion this coming Sunday.  Mr. and Mrs. R.I. Jones of Pender Harbour celebrate their 50th  wedding anniversary this week. Richard Isaac Jones married Lily  Rhea Gregg in Vancouver on April 5,1939. The Coast News joins  family and friends in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Jones many more  happy years together.  60.LTD  Diesel Engine Rebuilding  Industrial Parts  Hwy 101, __i-__|- _%���___ _������___���  Madeira Park OOO-ZOlO  draw. He deserves a big thank  you for his generosity and true  Legion spirit, but unfortunately  I didn't get his name.  Another extraordinary turn  of events at the meat draw was  the sharp decline in wins from  the remarkably-successful  Garden Bay (and token  Egmonster) table. Must have  been all that heavy competition  from the front table, and  unlikely combination of winners from West Sechelt, Gunboat Bay, and Madeira Park.  Sam Wice and Julie Reid  were the big prize winners at the  Ladies Auxiliary Easter Tea,  receiving (respectively) a  wooden table and a ceramic cat.  COLORING CHAMPS.  Following are the winners of  Jackie and Stan's Easter coloring contest at Marina Pharmacy:  Gloria Reid won in the two  and three-year-olds' category,  Kimberly Cole won in the four  and five-year-olds' category,  Ashley Fielding won in the eight  and nine-year-olds' category,  and Jordan Harbord won in the  category for ten and over.  All the very talented winners  were presented with stuffed  animals, and the prizewinning  artwork is now on display in the  window of Marina Pharmacy.  HUMMINGBIRDS BACK  Summer is surely on its way,  despite recent cold and nasty  weather, because the hummingbirds are back. They showed  up on Good Friday, within two  days of their arrival date last  year in the Narrows Road area.  MISC. MESSAGES  A warm Pender Harbour  welcome to Terri and Dave  Craig and family of the Seattle  area, new owners of the Ruby  Lake Resort.  Best wishes to Walter Blair,  retiring this week from the  Department of Highways in  Madeira Park.  Thanks to Peter for getting  the drains in good order at the  clinic parking area.  APRIL CALENDAR  3 - Branch 80 Seniors' Meeting  4 - Legion Crib Nite (drop-in)  5 - Chamber of Commerce  meeting, PHSS, 7:30 pm  6 - Community Club Bingo, 7  pm  8 - Ladies' Tea & Silent Auction, St. Andrew's Church,, 11  am.  - Carrie Fowler Quartet,  Legion, 9 pm. '  - Legion Meat Draw, 4pm,  earlybird 3 pm.  Fire Protection District  BURNING PERMITS  April-15. to October 31,1989  Available at: Oak Tree Market  Madeira Park 883-2411  Cliff Orr  John Henry's Store  Garden Bay 883-2253  Denny Bowen  Fire Marshal  Pender Harbour  Fire Protection District  ANNUAL  GENERAL MEETING  Sunday, April 23rd, 1989 at 3:00 PM  Madeira Park Emergency Centre, (Fire Hall)  1. Financial Statements:  2. Appointment of Auditor:  3. Election of Trustees:  4. Other Business:  Flora C. Sim  Secretary/Treasurer  PUBLIC INVITED  pmte Wutbaut Paper JKIt  is now open to professionally & confidentially  complete all your word processing, editing,  and computer disk storage of:  Correspondence  Manuscripts  Business Proposals  Business Plans  Club Lists  Reports  Resumes  Minutes  Newsletters  Contracts  LOCATED IN THE MADEIRA PARK SHOPPING CENTRE  ������-  b)Ounn.a\on9  Weekend.  m After vou'^  C) nad the rugs  cleaned.  Ptff mM* "*/  ,    Pump it now.  Bonniebrook  Industries  886-7054  ������murphy!!  THE MARK  OF SUCCESS.  Every successful business person in British Columbia knows the  smartest way to advertise. The way that is more effective than any  other. The Yellow Pages.���  Consumers use the Yellow Pages. More importantly to you  they use it when they're ready to become customers, 97% of British  Columbians generally phone or visit a business after looking in the  Yellow Pages. And almost half turn to the Yellow Pages at least once  a week. Yellow Pages is the most accurate, comprehensive and  reliable business directory available.  With over 60 years experience in the directory business  Dominion Directory knows how to plan a Yellow Pages proqram that  exactly suits your business needs. ���  Advertising in the Yellow Pages will increase your sales and  get you the attention you want from potential customers. For more  information on how effective advertising in the Yellow Paqes can  be/call toll-free, 1-800-242-8647 y  Y: Good advertising leaves its mark. Especially in the Yellow Pages.  fcQ favourite shopping centre, :**^!^37K����Se^j��A%77^?^:~<5^Vr^f'V^^'>  '. ���^^^'\^^;,-C.*-^i��V7^~-^Vi^^^i^j-'^"i'-:?��"'Ti-  ". t*...-  >;**���  Coast News, April 3,1989  I  i  s  jl  West Sechelt Elementary School's display at the Young People's Exhibition will be on show at the  Sunshine Coast Arts Centre until April 16. ���Vern Elliott photo  Halfmoon Bay Happenings  nor Park opens  by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418  Despite the wind and rain of  Easter Sunday there was a good  turnout of families at Connor  Park for the annual Easter Egg  hunt.  It was a special event this year  which was the official opening  of the play area of the park.  Jane Woods, Chairman of  the Halfmoon Bay Recreation  Association opened the  ceremony and, on behalf of the  group, expressed thanks to the  many people who had worked  so hard to make this dream  become a reality.  She introduced Cliff Connor  ��for whom the park was named,  and who was the instigator of  the process of obtaining the section of Crown land as a park. It  was he, together with a small  group, and with the cooperation  of the SCRD, who had the  foresight to see the potential in  that area of Welcome Woods,  now the home of the new Halfmoon Bay School as well as the  park.  It was most appropriate that  Cliff be thus honoured.  SARGEANT BAY MEETING  There were 20 members present at the Sargeant Bay Society's Annual General meeting on  March 25 at the home of  Rosemary and Eric Hoare.  Members were informed that  membership has been increasing  steadily, now standing at 93. It  is important that this increase  continues, as the chances for the  establishment of a public park  at Sargeants Bay are improving  and a strong voice in the planning is necessary.  The   meeting   appointed   a  Thank You  The Halfmoop Bay Recreation Association would like to take this time  to send a big Than* You to all those volunteers who helped make the  Connor Park Playground a success. We especially appreciate the  generous support we've received from the Country Fair.Committee. We  would afsblike to thank the following businesses fordonations of time  and or materials:  Ben Hoe Contracting  Watson's Landscaping  Ron Robinson & Lorns Watson  from Ron's Contracting  Pastimes  Fred Swanson from Swanson's  Ready Mix  John Nanson from B.A. Blacktop  Sunshine Coast Building Supplies  Clayton Stanton  Planning Committee to start  drawing up a detailed proposal.  Bryan Carson was elected to  fill the vacancy on the Executive. With the four directors  that were re-elected, the Executive now consists of: President, Tony Greenfield;  Secretary, Joop Burgerjon;  Treasurer, Elise Rudland;  Membership chairman, Eric  Hoare and Member at large  Bryan Carson.  Plans are underway for a  birdwalk and for a Sargeant  Bay clean-up. Dates of these  events will be announced later.  HUMMINGBIRDS  Kan Hermiston of Redrooffs  reported her first hummingbird  visit of the season last Tuesday,  March 28. It's always a joy to  see these little beauties back  again in the early spring.  DAFFODIL DAY  Volunteers will be in the Trail  Bay Mall this Friday, April 7,  selling daffodils for a very worthy cause, the Cancer Society.  Stock up with fresh flowers to  add that touch of spring to your  home. ���",_��.,,>*,..   -;:���     ,v  HOSPITAL AUXILIARY  The Halfmoon Bay branch of,  St. Mary's Hospital will hold  their regular monthly meeting  next. Monday, April 10 at  Welcome Beach Community  Hall at 10:30 a.m. Please, even  if you have never joined .  anything before, show up and  introduce yourself. You will be  made most welcome.  Zoning  NOTICE  For the Information of Residents of the  Egmont Area  The B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch has received, and is considering, a request for an Agency Liquor Store in the community  of Egmont. Agency Liquor Stores may be established, generally in  conjunction with an existing grocery business, for the sale of  beer, wine and spirits in packaged form. The program is intended  to improve service to consumers in small rural communities  without convenient access to retail liquor outlets. Comments on  this subject may be made, in writing, to:  Agency Programs Division  Store Operations Department  Liquor Distribution Branch  3200 East Broadway  Vancouver, B.C. V5M 1Z6  until April 25,1989  Province of British Columbia  Liquor Distribution Branch  Continued from page 1  One solution to the present  problem, Sabine says, would be  to rezone most of the area back  to R-l while allowing Anderson's lots to remain as R-4.  Meanwhile Frisson and his  daughter had an opportunity to  explain their position at the  March 29 public meeting.  Anderson had a chance as well,  and now it is up to the Sechelt  council.  "I just hope the rezoning  goes through quickly," Alexander says. "I phoned the planning department about this in  November and they're just having the meeting now."  Prevent the damaging effects of road salt build-up with a  chassis pressure wash -1500 PSI of forced water will clean  & safeguard your car from premature rust damage.  Call Now!  i  MDL-792 WHARF RD., SECHELT     Toll Free- 684-6924 885-5131  ^eGhelt  Scenario  Help for  Sechelt  firemen  by Margaret Watt 885-3364  M*VM Snugli Soft  Since February 1989 the  Sechelt Legion has supported  the Sechelt Fire Department in  its efforts to raise enough  money to buy safety equipment,  including the well-known "Jaws  of Life".  By setting up a special account, the Legion has collected  monies through lotteries, charity funds, ways and means and  individual donations.    r  To add to the Legion's efforts, the Sunshine Coast Naval  Association is donating its  members' time by having Tag  Days for the 'Jaws of Life' on  Friday and Saturday, April 28  and 29 at various spots around  Sechelt centre.  Culminating their efforts, the  Legion is sponsoring a benefit  dinner for the Sechelt Fire  Department on Saturday, April  29 at 6 pm to 9 pm at the Legion  hall at a cost of $10 per person.  Any business or individual  wishing to donate at this benefit  dinner is welcome to do so, and  also join in the fun planned for  the evening.  The cost of the jaws of life is  approximately $19,000, so come  on out and support your Fire  Department! Also, donations  may be made at the Sechelt  Credit Union. For more information you may call Ernie Patterson at 885-7789.  GARDEN CLUB  The next meeting of the  Sechelt Garden Club will be  held on Wednesday, April 5 at  7:30 pm in St. Hilda's Hall.  Questions and answers on  general gardening will be the  topic. With spring just around  the corner, I hope, and all those  dandelions just waiting to pop  up in your lawn, it would seem  a good idea to attend this  meeting.  GIANT SALE  St. Hilda's Church women  will be holding their 6th annual  Whale of a Sale on Saturday,  April 15 in the church hall. This  is a-much looked forward to  event every year and shouldn't  be missed. If you have any contributions for the sale, please  phone 885-7152.  CORRECTION  In last week's column I made  a mistake. Bridge resumes at St.  Hilda's Church hall at 1 pm on  Monday, April 3 not 1:30 pm as  I said. I'm sorry if this has caused any inconvenience.  SECHELT LIONS  Ladies Diamond Night will  be,held on Saturday, April 8 in  the clubhouse of the Sunshine  Coast Golf club.  Babykins Diapers  Doz. Reg. $71.00  Specia, *6088  Reg. $21.00  Special $1688  Trail Blazer Day only - Thur. Apr. 6  Trail Bay Centre Mai!, Sechelt  885-5255  ft  's,f w   > < '*���<**&_ \4i}j^^iy^A^yh>^y^^&  'h?yh'  UNDER THE YELLOW AWNING COWRIE ST. 885-7767  Featuring  Homemade Salads,  Cold Meats  Feta Cheese  and Fresh  Calamata Olives!  Piping Hot Soup  Hearty Sandwiches  and Tasty Muffins  (inquire about our  Sandwich Club)  2/��5��  7" Pizza  Thurs. is SENIORS' DAY  10% OFF Regular Prices  Club - Group Discounts  PACIFIC HOMES  *&  'i&eWm  \p^\\  Pacific Homes, B.C.'s leading manufacturer of prefabricated  package homes is pleased to announce the appointment of:  DAVID PYE CONSTRUCTION ltd.  P.O. Box 1873 Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  (604) 885-4490  As a dealer for their residential and recreational homes in the  Sunshine Coast area.  Please contact David Pye for information, construction details,  costs, ect. on our line of quality package homes.  PACIFIC  HOMES  20079 - 62nd Avenue. Langley, B.C. V3A 5E6  Tel. (604) 534-7441  Fax (604) 534-1802  SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 46    EDUCATIONAL CALENDAR !  Langdale Elementary  Peer Counsellors  receive their  special caps at  the assembly held  in their school to  recognize  achievement  APRIL  NOTICEBOARD  Monday, April 3  7:30 pm  Gibsons Elementary School  Wednesday, April 5  7:30 pm  Chatelech Secondary School  Friday, April 7  7:30 pm  Chatelech Secondary School  Tuesday, April 11  7:30 pm  Langdale Elementary  Tuesday, April 25  7:30 pm  School Board Office  Thursday, April 13  8:00 pm  Thursday, April 27  7:00 pm  The Board of School Trustees encourages  the community to take an active interest  in the districts' educational activities  Parent Response to the Special Education  Evaluation Report  Parent Response to the Special Education  Evaluation Report  Public Meeting on School District No. 46  1989/90 Budget  School Board Education Meeting  ��� Peer Counselling  ��� Discipline  Regular School Bc^ard Business Meeting  Coast Cablevision Educational Program (Channel 11)  ��� Superintendent's Program  * Rot^iCreek Musica' 'Dogs' and interview  with Barry Krangle.  1 Ty^jjiggffi^Hnpsr^wwi-m* ��*��*������*��� ^m^i^m.^^*- wwiiiw��M   r~-TTTng Bwo^iiirjKngww rnrfflu   "ifii i-iiih^w m ����p  8.  Coast News, April 3,1989  isi^WiiiSMniiisi  by Larry Grafton  Officially "The Time of Your  Life" show was advertised in  the Vancouver Sun of March 29  as follows:  The Time of Your Life, a  trade fair that calls itself "a  special event for mature  people" will be held at the Vancouver Trade and Convention  Centre on April 6,7 and 8 from  10 am to 6 pm. Geared for people over 50, it offers speakers  and more than 110 exhibits on  health, education, financial  matters and government ser  vices. Daily admission is $5.  This news release allows me  to retract the dates listed in my  column of March 13. May Yarrow 885-5200 has a trip planned  for this show. Call her for further details.  THE TELEPHONE  If some of my suggestions  and statements are a wee bit  vague this week, you must  forgive me. I have successfully  accomplished the move to my  new home, but why on earth it  would take over a week in our  beautiful small town Sechelt to  get a phone transferred from  one home to another I'll never  know.  We are inclined to take the  telephone, for instance, for  granted until we are without it.  Then you realize how dependent  we are on such small blessings.  Anyway don't try to reach me  until April 5 at least.  THE 69ERS  Members of the group, and  those of you who may be interested, should note that the  singing group will be putting on  a short performance in the Sunnycrest Mall on April 6 at 2 pm  which just happens to be a  Senior's Discount Day.  On April 12 we have been invited to sing a few numbers at  the Fifth Annual Volunteer  Recognition Tea in the Sechelt  Indian Band Hall which takes  place between 2:30 and 4:30  pm. Our time schedule for the  performance is 3:10 to 3:25 pm.  It would appear that we will  have one more engagement, at  least, in April, the date of which -  will be released at a later date.  REGIONAL COUNCIL  Branch 69, as indicated in an  earlier column, is hosting the  Sunshine Coast Regional Coun  cil of the Senior Citizen's  Association of BC on April 12.  Starting time is governed by  the arrival of the Powell River  contingent (usually around 11  am).  A light lunch will be served  prior to the time Chairman  John Miller brings the meeting  to order for the conducting,of  the business of the three branches involved.  Members are invited to attend! It's your business too! For  catering purposes you should  call Olive Marshall 885-9904 if  you wish to attend.  ..lv>;:  with  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  To place your ad by phone,  . ...j just call  :  It's that easy!  OR:   ���   Drop by either our   '"''  .       Gibsons or Sechelt offices   .  ADS MUST BE PREPAID BY NOON SATURDAY  we honour  Visa arid Mastercard  foK.your further-,: ..-���   '���^  convenience.  APPLIANCE SERVICES ���  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES  EXCAVATING  ��� 'FINANCIAL- SERVICES  i  (J. and M. APPLIANCE)  SERVICE c   ......  Small & Major  Appliance Repairs  Chaster Rd.,    Ph. 886-7861  SERVICE & REPAIR  To All Major Appliance   Quality Reconditioned Major Appliances For Sale  GUARANTEED & DELIVERED  Will Buy Nice, Non-Working Major Appliances  BJORN  885-7897  Refrigeration & _  Appliance Service  PRATT RD. 886-9959  BUILDING CONTRACTORS  L-Q ROOFING & SIDING  k��� Specializing In:  - duroid  iree ��� VINYL SIDING  [Estimates    885-9203    -soffits   Hans Ounpuu Construction  flfc 886-4680  |Bg        Res. 886-7188  ***        General Contractor  RESIDENTIAL, TOWNHOMES & CUSTOM HOMES  A DIVISION OF TWIN OAKS REALTY LTD. _,  POMFRET  CONSTRUCTION  For all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  886-8900       P.O. Box 623. Gibsons. B.C.  DAVIS BAY ROOFING  Residential ��� Commercial  "All Roofing Applications" m_B  Re-Roofing/Repairs/Skylights       ESTIMATES  \__AII Work Conditionally Guaranteed  . 885-5722^  <���*.  tf_  ���s_L  100% Guarantee  0_ Workmanship  All WEST ~=T.Vf     %OH*"TrtS��  OnWoAma  __*_�����_        ?*?__#     jSnttflC6*^^   * Materials  HOME        ^^^V**** ������te����i��  -VBUirVC VINYL SIDING-SOFFIT FASCIA-  SttHVlwES   Door and Window Conversions  Box 864. Roofing  Sechelt. B.C. von 3AoCall for FREE ESTIMATE MMS72 _,  ROOFING  Specializing in all types of  commercial & residential roofing  ALL WORK  IE S T 1 M A T E S 886-2087 evesi   ouamnt-ED  COQUITLAM TRUSS LTD.  Residential and Commercial Roof Trusses  886-9452  _ _���    ������    (604)522-8970  Brad Robinson   (604) 4^^291  AGENT  2990 CHRISTMAS WAY, COQUITLAM, B.C. V3C 2M2  K. CONSTRUCTION  ^Master Craftsman - Trained in Canada & Great Britain  '"Framing,  Extensions,  Remodelling,  Repairs,  Reasonable Rates  ���FREE ESTIMATES TO $2000  Chris Klymson *%_ references -        885-5525  TOP JLINE UONCRETE  ��� Foundations   ��� Stairs      ��� Sidewalks  'We build 'em, We pour 'em"  Free Estimates 885-9203  s=PiReady-Mix Ltd.  r���S4HOUBCENTHALDISPATCH-,        ,  ACCOUNTS ,  L  885-9666    885-5333  3 Batch Plants on the Sunshine Coast  Gibsons ��� Sechelt ��� Pender Harbour  R  N  R��ady Mix Concrete  Sand & Gravel  C     CONCRETE  O   LTD"  SECHELT PLANT  885-7180  SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST  CIBSONS PLANT  886-8174  fTurenne  Concrete Pumping' Ltd:  ��� Pumping   ���Foundations ��� Patios  ��� Placing     ���Sidewalks     ��� Floor  ��� Finishing  ���Driveways  _     RR��4 Gibsons 886-7022  Coast Concrete Pumping  ��_ Foundations  FREE ESTIMATES   John Partem     885-5537  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  . Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  886-2938  ELECTRICAL CONTR  Electric Plus  Authorized  B.C. Hydro  Contractor  *eadi��le Electric JCU  Residential - Commercial - Industrial  Box 467, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  886-3308  Olson Electric  General Electrical Contractor  Fraa Estimataa Including B.C. Hydro Plus  Residential ��� Commercial  DENNIS OLSON , .  885-1939  Box 2271, Sechelt  EXCAVATING  f Fastrac BACKHOE  Kleindale Roofing  Commercial - Residential - Industrial  Tar & Gravel - Metal Roofs - Shakes - Duroids  ��� SEPTIC FIELDS  ��� DRAINAGE DITCHES  ��� EXCAVATIONS  ��� WATER LINES  ��� clearing Steve Jones  (CASE 580)  886-8269  Pender Harbour  883-9303  ri  i  t  CLEANING SERVICES  PENINSULA SEPTIC  TANKSERVICE  Box#.SM",eit3;c.       RAYWILKINSON  V0N3/W 885-7710  A Efr G CONTRACTING  Giirry VCr.int! S(;tvi<:fr  ��� Clearing, Excavations ��� Septic Fields & Tanks, Driveways  Komatsu Excavator  8 ton Crane  450 John Deere I  12 cu. vd. Dump  X  X  Truck  886-7028  BLACKBIRD INDUSTRIES  ��� DITCHING ���  ��� WATER & SEWER ��� EXCAVATING  RICHARD SMITH 886-7386  S8, C61, RR #1. Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  "We Can Dig It"  ECONO-HOE  Custom Backhoe Service  RON GILLIES  R.R. **2, Maskell Road  Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0- S11C8  1 Ton Flat Deck/Dump  For Small Deliveries  886-8290  Accounting Services  .���.COMPLETE'ACCOUNTING SERVICES ��� - Yy:  ��� WORD PROCESSING ��� ..-.....'_  R. Bruce Cranston, C.GJL  557 Marine. Drive ooe   '' ' ''  (across from Armours Beach) 886-3302  GEN   CONTRACTORS���  COAST BOBCAT SERVIC  Small In Size - Big In Production  - Yard Clean-Up      - Post Holes  - Topsoil/Gravel/Mulch Spreading ^S*^��  - Light Trenching ;��������������  I885-7Q51   SECHELT <������������'  A Bonniebrook Industries Ltd.-  Sftft.7064  ��v  1 *>jM^tM*rJ��jM^^ ���        ^  ��Conc��t�� Sortie T��nkS��lw* '  *Cr#NTfi��kR*U��l*  ' *Port��_t�� Toltet Rwittra *  T  ^y/e'd    WELL DRILLING LTD.  -Jttlan J-^ainh & <Jjecoratei  FREE ESTIMATES SEVEN DAYS A WEEK  INTERIOR EXTERIOR PAINTING  RESIDENTIAL ��� INDUSTRIAL ��� COMMERCIAL  Mark A. Maclnnes  Office: 886-2728  Home: 885-5591  Now serving the Sunshine Coast  - Submersible Pump Installation  - Air Transportation Available (only 15 minutes  from Quallcum)  R.R. 2, Quallcum Beach, B.C.  VOR2T0  752-93587  ���res  ���?88 ' ���  ��� FINANCIAL SERVICES  f    GREAT  PACIFIC  MANAGEMENT   "\  ��� Financial Planning Service  CO. LTD. (EST. 1965)  ��� Investment Fund  Alaidair W. Irvine  ��� RRSP's  Representative  ��� Retirement Income Funds  (604)885-2272  L ��� Tax Shelters  Box 2629, Sechelt, B.C.   j  ^WesFCoasr Drywall""  RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION  ��� Board ��� Spray - Demountable Paftltlona ��� Int. & Ext. Painting  - Tape   ��� Steel Stu te     ��� Suspended Drywall'     ��� Inaulellon ���  " -TBarCtl'lnfl*        Cemnga"w -  ���-'"'" "- -���"--���? For Guaranteed Quality & Service Call ** --��.,..  .    BRENTROTTLUFF Y  : OFt, RONHOVDEN   .  V,886-9495  ���* u       \ 886-9639^  RENOVATIONS WITH  A TOUCH OF CLASS  COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL  _AtolS6*7Ek "5^  LUX HALFMOON BAY  F�� bc fgrrigs Schedule  VANCOUVER-SECHELT PENINSULA  HORSESHOE BAY-LANGDALE  JERVIS INLET  EARLS COVE-SALTERY BAY  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  7:30 am    3:30 pm M  9:30 M  11:30 am  1:15 pm  5:30  7:25 M  9:15  Lv. Langdale  6:20 am      2:30 pm  M denotes Maverick Bus  M' denotes no Maverick Bus on Sundays  Lv. Earls Cove  6:40 am 4:30 pm  8:30 M'       4:30 8:20 6:30  10:30 am     6:30 10:30 8:30  12:25 pm M 8:20 M 1^:25 pm M 10:20 M  Additional sailings March 23 through March 27,1989 and  May 19 through May 22,1989 only.  Lv. Saltery Bay Lv. Earls Cove   ;  1:30 pm 2:30 pm  Lv. Saltery Bay  5:45yM ��� 3l30 pr  7:35 5W9H  9 25M 7:30  11:30 9:310  m  Gihsons  BUS  'Note there will be no  "First Ferry" run on  Saturdays, Sundays & Holidays  (via Park & flsed, North Rd. 4 Swot, Gewtr Pt. & Franklin, Lower But Stop)  Gibsons Bus Schedule  Effective March'1, 1989 ' ���  (via Marina, Franklin, Firahall, Park * Ratd Bd.) '"  Depart  Mall        5:45  7:45  9:45  11:45  Arrive  Langdale 6:10  Ferry Ter. 8:10  10:10  12:10  2:10  4:10  6:10  8:10  Sat But Driver lor Langdate Height*, Bonniebrook Heights.  Woadcroek Park Schedules  Depart  Lower     6:15  Bus Stop 8;15  10:15  12:15  2:15  4:15  6:15  8:15  Arrive  Mall        6:30  8:30  10:30  12:30  2:30  4:30  6:30  8:30  |M_NS BUS SCHEDULE   MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS    Effective Sept. 12  FARES Adults Seniors Children (6-12)  Comm. Tickets;  Out of Town   $1.50    S1.00 .75        $1.25/r'ld-  InTown .75        .75   . .75 Y  Depart:  Sechelt  8:25  Depart:  West Sechelt  8:32  Depart:  Sechelt  8:40 9:15  10:30 (Lower Rd.)  Depart: Depart:  Lower Gibsons   Gibsons  9:25  Y*  ���*1:20. M:50  3:00 (Lower Rd.)   3:45  Lower Rd. it Lower Road in Roberts Creak  The bus will stop on request at any sate spot along its route.  11:15 (Lower Rd.)  *2:00 (Lower Rd.)  3:55.  FARES:     ;  One Zone: 75'cent's i  Each Additional Zone:^Scents \  Zone #1.."- Lower Gibsons to Flume Rd.  Zone #2 -Flume Rd. to West Sechelt  Regular stops at: Seehert arid Gibsons Medkal Clinics i  Please Nole: There is no service on Salurtiays. Sundays & Holidays:'  ���No service on Fridays'al these times     A:      ;  Suncoast Trahsportation Schedules Sponsored By  riunirrlr 4miM�� A^mrH ��� 1 Cttwini 1t.nl  Red Carpet Semce From Fnendly Professionals In Sunnycrest Mall, Cbsons  Insurance,  Notary  s a ��  .1 /ilril)l)Cf (il   ,  iNOEPtNDfNT Travel '  PROrfSSIOSALS    .  886-2000  '���/* **i^^*^^,>^j^^j^";.vi:.> -yyy^y ^r^^v^i^;^'^^^ ? y��yz ;yr;y ^-y^-y  ... ^..^-y^v; ��� ��� r-��r ~  ���V *-���-��������� v�� '"--���^.-''-���.���^z.^'^'r^'-rr.*  Coast News, April 3,1989  9.  -8  Pollution of the air, water  and land continues to be a topic  of major concern at the Sunshine Coast Regional District  (SCRD) board meetings. Last  week, directors discussed dioxin  pollution in Howe Sound,  debris burning in that area,  chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's),  and fish farm waste.  In attempting to address the  problem of pollution in Howe  Sound, Area F director John  Shaske suggested that SCRD  representatives meet with direc-.  tors from the Squamish/Lilioet  Regional   District   and   the  Greater.  Vancouver   Regional  District to coordinate lobbying  efforts with the federal and provincial governments.  ���:-ji second task force was set  up of representatives of the four  local governments on the Sunshine Coast to look at environmental problems on a local  level. -.      ���  The board also received a letter from the debris control  board regarding the burning of  debris adjacent to the Avalon  Log Sorting operation.  This agency operates a boom  inspection and debris collection  as well as a debris burning site  for floating debris collected in  Howe Sound. According to the  letter, the bum site operates  about 200 days per year and  disposes of up to 200 sections of  debris a year. A section is the  area contained in four boom  sticks of 66 feet in length.  Laterin the same meeting,  the board received a letter from  the   District   of   Coquitlam  soliciting their support for a  resolution being brought to the  Canadian Federation of Municipalities dealing with the  elimination of CFC's and  halons by the year 2000.  The directors gave the resolution their unanimous support,  as have Gibsons and Sechelt  councils.  Before the board meeting  ended, there was one more piece  of business regarding environmental pollution brought  before the directors. A major  report on fish farm wastes from  consulting engineers Dayton  and Knight was presented to the  board.  The document analyzes the  current problem and makes  recommendations for future  handling of the waste products.  SECHELT DENTAL CENTRE  885-3244  To All Our Patients (Past, Present and Future):  We are working behind the scenes to re-create our dental practice. It is a  lengthy and complex process, especially when 'starting from scratch'. We  thank you for your patience and understanding, and look forward to seeing you as soon as we are able, in a new, central ground-floor location.  Sincerely  Dr. Lome Berman  Dr. Dan Kingsbury  inglis perspective  by Dick Kennett  For the most part not only  were they doctors and music  makers, the Inglis family was a  prescription for social democracy from the early days old  Doc's   association   with   the  GEN. CONTRACTORS  ROLAND'S'  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD  ��� 5" Continuous aluminum gutters  ��� Aluminum soffits & fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  ��� Vinyl siding  885-3562  WINDJAMMER  PAINTING & RENOVATIONS  Interior���Exterior Painting  Patios and Decks���Fencing  House Repairs���Art Work  FREE APPRAISALS - 385-7295  MISC SERVICES  f G.T. HOME AND YARD RESTORATION^  Will Do,* Interior and Exterior Painting  Yardwork, Gutter Cleaning & Sealing,  Roof Liming & Moss Removal,  Small Carpentry Jobs, Fencing, etc...  ^Seniors 10% Off Caii Guy or Tim at 886-8820  -J  J & $ Contracting  ��� Cleaning ��� Water Lines  ��� Driveways ��� Stump Removal  ��� Sand & Gravel7 Deliveries       886-9764  1950 Kenmore Truck Rubberr Tired Hoe 886-8523  CUSTOM BUILDING, REMODELLING,  RENOVATIONS, ROOM ADDITIONS  ' Coast Construction  J Where Quality Comes First  FREE ESTIMATES 885-4190  JON JAREMA  DESIGN CONSULTANT  PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS  CUSTOM HOME DESIGN  RENOVATIONS OR ADDITIONS ��� REVISION OF EXISTING PLANS  DRAWINCS AND RENDERINGS  CALL 886-8930 TO DISCUSS YOUR HOME ENVIRONMENT.  PENINSULA INDUSTRIAL  & LOGGING SUPPLIES  General Industrial Supplies  ��� Hydraulic Hose & Fittings ��� Welding Supplies  ��� Wire Rope ��� Truck Parts  ��� Detroit Diesel Parts  DELIVERY  SERVICE  24HOUR  SERVICE  ICG LIQUID GAS  ��� Auto propane  ��� Appliances  ��� Quality B.B. Q's  885-2360  Hwy 101, across St.  from Big Mac's, Sechelt  Phone 886-2480  Van. Direct 689.7387   Mobile 'HMM  1042 Hwy. 101. Gibsons   (across from Kenmac Parts)  r  HEATING  WOOD HEAT  Metal Fireplaces  Wood Furnaces  Wood Stoves  Chimneys/  Inserts    ;  Liners  ^S  GIBSONS TAX SERVICE  Ave. Price $18.00  Income Tax Preparation  All business strictly confidential  A. Jack  635 Martin Rd., Gibsons 886-7878  founder of the CCF in the  1920's in Gibsons, J.S.  Woodsworth.  But they were builders too as  witness the landmark home  above the wharf and Pioneer  Park, the "winkin', blinkin',  and nod' cottages on the waterfront, as well as the sturdy  apartment building and lower  boathouse.  Son Jack's speedboat PDQ  was the pride and joy of Howe  Sound and I am sure he would  not question my assumption she  could do at least 25 knots on a  fast taxi trip to Horseshoe Bay.  Hugh, like his father, was a  unassuming doctor and surgeon. I can remember my  father, gored by his power saw,  had little trace of leg scars after  Hugh had stitched him up.  A friend was felled in his  mid-40's. I asked of Doctor  Hugh, "What's wrong with  him?" Hugh's reply was sure  and short, "Well he is rather  young to be having a stroke."  My trusted friend was dead by  morning.  Alan too followed in his  father's footsteps, 'Spiv' was  his nickname in our school. He  specialized in his field of  medicine and politics of a lefter  kind.  Helen Shoebottom, the only  daughter, a jovial sort who liked her job at the old Co-op store  on the waterfront, and daring-  too, for one winter day as a  youngster she sledded down  School (Rocky) Road and ended up in the saltchuck at the end  of the dock, unscathed.  Eric of course was the  workhorse of the family, logging, trucking and operating a  freightliner with the oncoming  if^^4J^^^pibsons  w&&  Vancouver. He married Lenora  I Gibson,  thus  cementing  two  famiUeSipf legendary pioneer  .'spirit, unsurpassed and unspoiled.  FAMILY BULK FOODS &  ��� . DELICATEflffif'  UNDER THE YELLOW AWNING COWRIE ST. 885-7767  ���. _ -v ' ~  *Fuui sEwmm.  Featuring Fwybe'4  You tasted it in our deli, and  you asked to take it home  - NOW YOU CAN -  _Crv����  \i^r  BUftSfflAmit  DAKCRV  products will be  arriving every Tuesday & Thursday  Starting April 4th  We will be stocking  popular items  and advance  orders are  welcome  District Of Sechelt  PUBLIC  NOTICE  Local Improvement Bylaw No. 26,1989 sets out the  proportion of costs to be specifically charged  against the parcels benefitting from or abutting the  classes of work listed hereunder to be as follows:  Glass of Work  Proportion to be charged  as Owners' share  l  / All facets of  wood heating  AC Building Supplies  Certified  Wood Stove  Technician  STEVE  CHRISTIAN  883-9551  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  &  Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows]  Auto  & Screens  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  Mirrors  a) Road constructed to1 Municipal    ��� -~  Standards  b) Pavement  c) Concrete sidewalk (Residential)  (Existing Commercial)  d) Concrete curb & gutter (Residential)  (Existing Gommerciaiy  e) Underground wiring for street lighting  90%  90%  60%  50%  60%  50%  60%  Property owners interested in the above-noted cost  sharing programs should contact the District of  Sechelt Public Works Superintendent or the Administrator at the District of Sechelt Municipal Hall,  Sechelt, B.C. or phone 885-1986.  ��� MARINE SERVICES  Cottrell's Marine Service  SERVICE TO ALL MAKES  Specializing In Merc-Outboard  A 9tem drive rebuilding  s    Located at  Smitty's Marina, Gibsons  SHOP 886-7711     RES. 885-5840 _  GIBSONS MOBILE SAW SERVICE  Custom Cutting ��� Planing  Bevel Siding - Posts & Beams  Chris Napper 886-3468  R.R.#4, S6, C78,  ^_ Qlbaons, B.C. VON 1V0  DIVER  BOAT  \jL /hauling  HARBOUR VIEW MARINE LTD  ��� IWfUEl ��� SALES ��� SCPJVKE ��� IMPAIRS ���  STERN MlttS -���,_    ���   Bm.    __  _ WMARD EMSrNES by...     "���"���    BSSHBJ   �������  Fully licensed FULL LINE OF MARINE HARDWARE & ACCESSORIES  & insured     BOAT HAULING ft FULL SHOP REPAIRS -  van.oirtct   DOCKSIDE SERVICE -^^- VHFCh.Mor  _884-0��33     7WH-tiei,B*��M   JgOmm 886-2233^/  6\7'& 8" GOLDEN^  HEDGING EVERGREENS  s3M/ft.  COMPLETE LANDSCAPE SERVICE  Designing, Turf, etc.  Fres Estimates  BARK MULCH #a__  15 vds. delivered In Sechelt 5270 CQASrs U)M��$r NURS��fiY  MURRAY'S NURSERY '"����"  Located 1 mile north of Hwy 101 on Mason Hd.    885-2974   _^  t Tarn Gov't Dock  u__.  * Motel & Campsites  * 'Marine Repairs  Salt Water Licences  Water Taxi  Ice and. Tackle      883-2266  Hydraulic ��� Truck ��� Industrial  FAST 24 hr. Service:  Pager 885-5111  WOOflStf SUPPLY.  Hwy-101 naar Pralt Rd., Gibsons  (scrota from Un Wray Transfer)  886-4990  //  Mi  mccaneer  Marina 6? Resort Ltd.  Located in Secret Cove 885-7188  MARINE SPECIALISTS 21 years  PARTS - SALES - SERVICE -REPAIRS  y&ohnson  1/OIJVO  PENtA  tvmmioet  i  i  1OUT-JOARDSI  wSt^mWi  MlSe SERVICES  SALES ^INSTALLATION  Commercial & Residential  Carpet & Resilient Flooring  SHOWCASE  at the Alternative, Hwy. 101, Gibsons  & Furniture Land, Hwy. 101, Sechelt  ^QUALITY IS SATISFACTION 886-8868  fPHAINSAWS  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  73 V NORTH fr6Ab   886-2912  SUNSHINE KITCHENS]  -CABINETS'  336-9411  Showroom Kern's Plaza, Hwy 101  Open Tuesday to Saturday 10-4 pm  Florence Craven was inadvertently left out of the picture of the over 90's being  honoured at the Kiwanis Care  Home    last    week.    Our  apologies. ���Vera Elliott photo  Gardening  by Marguerite  The weather is too wet and  cold for usual plantings outdoors, except in a cold frame,  so indoor plantings will help until we get warmer temperatures  which can't be far away.  Inspections of our gardens  show loss of some plants including roses, which haven't  survived that keen frost and  winter chill we had earlier.  Prune away all black stems  until white pith shows. You may  have to go down to the crown,  but do not be alarmed.  By June they will have normal growth.  A visit to your local nursery is  encouraging with annual flower  bedding plants and perennials  for selection. Perennials are the  backbone of the mixed border,  having roots which live for  more than two years, adding  permanence to our gardens  while needing minimal attention.   Y  Later they burst into brilliant  displays which include  delphinium, gaiilardia,  aquilegia or columbine, araleis,  aubretia, phlox and Iris,  needing only to be divided every  three to five years.  Y The Sechelt Garden Club  meeting will be held in St.  Hilda's hall at 7:30 pm on  Wednesday April 5. A "garden  forum'' of your questions and  answers will be held.  Old and new members and  guests welcome.  -FrA--^T-A��4^T'4NB^  Flowers, Shrubs, Trees  w*2_��!,,r  at Wholesale Prices    "T^tT8  Lace Leaf  <\  Japanese  Maple  ^  .V*  v  ts.\      - IIIHWIW ' ^      "    ,-  The rnoatfceattWfttf -4 ���   <  ,s "    Japanese Mapl^u   -"'  ���<   -      with weeping Y.\  brands ^Y'\:V  3'to4*Till  R��g. $45.00 * * \     ~v  Now 1Wk. Only    -  19��  Large Variety of  Fruit Trees  up to 4 years  $1495  and up  DaphneCneorum  <fio*i:0apr��n��)  A fcreel favomte on account  oftt'sfraer&nce Rose-pink  flowers In clusters on proatratc  branches during April and May  One 9*lten pot SS 85 aa or  -*r810M  For One WMk Only  Wide Selection of Grade A-1  Container Grown  Roses  Only $5.95 or  2/MO00  Japanese Evergreens  Azalias  $049  One Gallon    w       ea.  .Mjia ii�� m  W5I  ���yu  ���I 1>  ii.iiilnni'niiii  11_  mm  mmmmmm  ��� a !���_.   _^__.ie.a_.  iviagnoiia oieisaia  (Star Mignolia)  Profusion   of    ricrar    whi e  flowers 8 c i across  3' -4' Reg $2/50  Now For 1 Wk. Only  ��199b  deautif  Camelsas  all co ojrs  4 5 tall Reg $24 95  $Q95  Now 1 Wk Only    9  Magnolia  SoulangiMMi  A smaN MM, tang* mM0 *_H*4  (lowers, %9> ��wi. tiomPm, a*?iH#  atainad roieawgto it turn.  to+WrJ*  Grown from start right here at  NURSERY  ftaMa_aa___MMnnmHasa_M-Ni  886-2796  1826 Sunshine Coast Hwy, Gibsons  r- WI'WaPffWBfly  KifcTy~.T"fi-iirFfT)rnT<  wwBBBPWBaaaBwtaaTyww^w  Coast News, April 3,1989  r  I.  I,  i!  a  I:  '' Bring  I Editor's Note: A copy of the  following was received for  publication.  The Mayor and Council  District of Sechelt  A small article in the March  20 Coast News entitled 'Bay  \ Rezoning' hit me like a bombshell. It reads, "A public hearing will be held on proposed  rezoning changes in Porpoise  Bay."  That zoning would permit expanded industrial use of several  water lots. "The changes are an  attemptby planner Rob Sabine  to bring the zoning of these lots  into some conformity with their  actual use and the intentions of  the Official Community Plan."  Two points: First, to bring  zoning of these lots into conformity with their actual use is encouraging industry to ignore  zoning regulations and operate  beyond the allowed usage and  then rewarding them by legalizing their activities.  It seems all backwards to me.  Why should industry not abide  by zoning regulations as all  citizens are expected to do?  Secondly, just what are the  intentions of the Official Community Plan? The voters have  been told at public meetings  before the election that industrial use of Sechelt Inlet  would not be expanded; but the  inlet would be used for recreational purposes. It is on the  basis of these commitments that  many of us elected the present  mayor and council members.  I hope the public is aware of  the implications of these proposals and will attend the public  Fed up with the Quehecois  Editor:  Our national Communications Minister, Marcel Masse, is  doing a great job of  demonstrating French Canadian arrogance in two recent  events.  For years, roughly 80 percent  of Canadians have been acceding to the demands of  French Quebec. Quebec Legislature has taken it on itself to  be called the National Assembly  and their premier the prime  minister.  Now, the federal government, at the behest of Marcel  Masse has agreed to drop the  word 'national' in federal institutions, for the word 'Canadian'. Thus the 'National  Research Council' will become  'Canadian Research Council'.  Apparently   Marcel   Masse  and French Quebecers are offended by our use of the word  'national', as they are the nation  and the majority of Canadians  are something else again.  At the recent academy  awards in Hollywood, Marcel  Masse, pushed the. National  Film Board film makers into the  background and accepted the  Oscar, then made his acceptance speech in French to a  On civilized accomplishments  Editor's Note: A portion of this  letter was inadvertently ommit-  ted last week. It is accordingly  reprinted.  Editor:  With interest we read 'On  Mexico', in the Coast News of  March 20, until we got to the  sentence: "...here was an ancient and sophisticated culture  which flourished and created  whilst most of the ancestors of  Europeans were painting  themselves blue and eating raw  meat."  At that point we began to get  curious. Who painted themselves blue and ate raw meat?  At what time an in which area?  We then gathered the following information: While the  famous cultures of Mexico and  South America appeared Maya,  250 to 900 AD (Yucatan);  Aztec, 1200 AD (Valley of Mexico); Inca, 1400 AD (Chile), the  great cultures of ancient time,  which in one way or another  have been the roots of our  European ancestries, date back  to: Sumer, 4000 to 1000 BC  (Ziggurat or Ur, 2100 BC);  Egypt, 2700 BC (Pyramid of  Saqqare); Greek, 2500 BC  (AAWK); Celt (Druid), 1500  BC (Stonehenge); Roman, 700  BC (AAWK); Iran, 500 BC  (AAWK). AAWK stands for  accomplishments are well  known.  , The cultures from 2500 BC  on forward were all established  by people belonging to the family of Indo-European languages,  meeting to be held in the Seniors  Centre in Sechelt on April 12 at  7 pm.  If these changes are allowed,  they will certainly serve as a  precedent for other industrial  concerns on Sechelt Inlet to ignore zoning laws.  Let's designate industry to its  proper location in the now existing Industrial Park on Field  Road and follow through on  previous commitments to make  Sechelt Inlet a recreational area.  Hannah Damtoft  preponderantly English speaking audience, doubtless leaving  the Americans with the impression that Canada is a French  speaking country.  I'm fed up with Quebec sign  laws, Quebec minutes in the  government, so many federal  grants to Quebec and in other  words 'being ruled by em arrogant minority'.  Lome B. Blain  our common ancestors.  Resources: The Columbia  Viking Desk Encyclopedia;  Readers Digest, The Worlds  Last Mysteries; National  Geographic Society - Builders  of the Ancient World, The Incredible Incas, The Might  Aztecs, The Mysterious Maya.  The 'Musings' are stimulating  to read as they inspire our own  thinking.  Elisabeth Brown  and Christine Kluge  and at Extras  ...New Hours  -Sat, 10-5 Cowrie St., 885-2661  USIEO BUILDING SUPPLIES  Quality, used lumber, bricks, windows, lights, plumbing, etc.  P A B USED BUilJMNQ MATERIALS  11947 Tannery Rd.. Surrey  JKONDAV-SATURDAY SSS-13M  We also buy used building materials  LET'S SHOP!  Tues.-Sat. 10-4  AND HELP THE  GIBSONS  886-2488 or Box 598  FANCY  SHOELACES  SMALL TOYS  KITES  Loomis Agent     Dry Cleaning Drop Off    Open 7 Days a Week  MARY'S VARIETYGo���er^..01^1^0.        886-8077  Peace Committee to show special film  t Editor:  I     "Nuremberg Actions" is the  * name of a peace group in Pitt-  ! sburg, California. This group  j has held a continuous vigil at  >the railroad tracks in front of  Jthe'rriain gate of the Concord  I Naval Weapons Station, since  �� September 1, 1987. Their action  ,'is   based  on  the  belief that  r weapons transported from this  r base to Central America are be-  ;ing used there in direct contravention of the "Nuremberg  ^Principles" formulated by the  ! International Law Commission  rafter the second World War.  '   Freedom of Information Act  requests have revealed that the  Concord base has sent to Ei  Salvador   demolition   bombs  which have destroyed hundreds  of villages, fuse extenders which  cause shrapnel to fly in all directions, white phosphorus rockets  which burn through the flesh,  and ammunition  for General  Electric machine guns that fire  100 bullets per second  from  helicopter gunships.  The Nuremberg Actions  group adheres to a strict nonviolence covenant. Hundreds of  vigilants have been arrested at  the tracks. On September 1,  1987, a train with orders not to  stop came through the gates at  three times over the five-miles-  per-hour speed limit and ran  over a man by the name of  Brian Wilson, causing the loss  of both his legs and a severe  head   injury.   The   following  Saturday, 10,000 people came  to the tracks to protest not only  his maiming, but also the ongoing maiming and killing of the  Central America people.  Since that summer, the  number of trains-cleaving the  weapons station ' weekly has ^  dropped dramatically. In addition, the Concord base has  become well known for its role  in the wars in Central America,  and tens of thousands of people  around the world have written  and called Nuremberg Actions  expressing their determination  to do more in their personal  Offended  Editor:  To see a naked woman in a  cage advertised as entertainment  is, according to me, a signal of a  sick society.  I have nothing against strippers, be they male or female,  but this advertisement of March  20 in the Coast News, degrades  women, as well as the men it  tries to attract, and has no place  in a socially-conscious  newspaper.  J. VanDyk  lives to work for peace.  If you are interested in the  work of Nuremberg Actions,  plan to attend the Sunshine  Coast Peace Committee's showing of 'The Vigil at the Tracks?  on Monday, April 10 at 7:30pm  .in the library of the^Rbbefcts  Creek Elementary School. A  regular meeting of the group  ���will follow the presentation - all  are welcome to attend that as  well.  AnneMoul  Sunshine Coast  r.iI.,,.-i��.;   Peace Committee  /-DEPENDABLE ���  AUTO SERVICE  did tou now...  We're known for successful  TROUBLE  SHOOTING  The South Coasts Only  BCAA APPROVED Shop (Special consideration to BCAA members)  ^OHUCdOil   AUTOMOTIVE  '.0?8 ha.  ' .-��� ;-,.;.:    ���       ,   ���        '.    ���   !���   ,������ .. - 886 7919  Chamberlin Gardens  Drop olf your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  S��av8��w Mm*lc��t  Roberts Creek  "A Friendly People Place"  DIABETICS  X  s  "*���-  You are invited to  A Learning Clinic for Self Measurement  & Control of Blood Sugar  Saturday, April 8, 9:30am - 1:00pm  at Howe Sound Pharmacy  SPONSOR: Boehringer Mannheim Canada Ltd.  Experts will be on hand to answer your questions about diabetes  PROGRAM INCLUDES j  ��� Blood glucose testing demonstrations  ' ��� Free literature, diaries, & product information  ��� Free cleaning & control testing of your Accu-Chek  ��� Ask about our trade-in plan: A new high-tech monitor for any  make of your old meter  ��� 10% discounts on all DiabetiCare TM products (except monitors)  �� .v.;���a for 1 Box of 50: $28-99 ea.  New ?"Cl$8J%rWs    2 Box of 50: $27.99 ea.  Tracer bG Test strip*   3 Box of 50. $25 9_ ^  , .Y   ,     For further information phone John or Chris at  flm^  886-3365  Next to Gibsons Medical Clinic,  Hwy 101 &. Farnham Rd.  Soil Testing Clinic  Bring Your Soil Sample  SATURDAY, APRIL 8, 10-4  CIL Fertilizer Representative will also be on hand  to answer all your fertilizer questions  Stock up for Spring at these Special Prices  ��;:;:;:Jn:_if*���t &^��r_*v Qfm*? mPE&r.Yr?  '^S^r^f^^v-Z-S-^V- '^=~^S--l-i1?.'^??  s^fa^VS^JO-!  ���;*_Z^j0fy\. t^*-xe*~-Xjr_;-a*f_fz  Coast News, April 3,1989  11.  by George Cooper  When you have grandchildren visiting at another holiday break from school, try a  conducted tour of some of the  region's parks.   '  Soames Hill, for instance, is a  real grinding thrill not for the  young fry but for Grandpa bringing up the rear, which is a  heavy enough' task on a level  road.  Not to be distracted by short  lectures on shrub names on the  ascent, the/youngsters moved  Gibsons  Fish Market  New Hours  10:30 am - 7 pm  7 DAY'S A WEEK!  & CWPS  Gowi  886-7888  r Pt. Rd., Gibsons  quickly up the uneven steps (the  former log notched with steps  now rolled aside and out of  use), up the three levels of viewpoints to the topmost point.  Altitude 800 feet says a chart.  * Two eagles soared below us  on a brisk breeze and disappeared.* Much exclaiming over  the glimpses of road below, distant ferries on their way to  Nanaimo; the cluster of islands  like Worlcombe, Pasley, and  Hermit the other side of Keats;  Gibsons Harbour looking tidy  and neat at this distance. And  time to rest before the equally  demanding descent, this time by  another route.  Fortunately the foresight  shown by the Regional District  has preserved Soames Hill and  some fine stands of fir and  cedar at its foot for recreation.  The well known entrance from  the Port Mellon highway is closed by a berm. Those who have  long used this access, however,  park across the road and risk  crossing at the blind curve.  Signs   direct   the   walking  EUROPEAN  YOGURT  STYIE  Variety  Gibsons Landing  Deli &  Health  FOODS  886-2936  J  APRIL SPECIAL  Share That Special Occasion  WALLET PRINT SETS  From Same 35 mm Colour Neg.  8 Wallet Prints (2"x3")  or  16 Sub-Wallet Prints  (1%"x2%")  M99  Per Set  (Must be ordered in multiples ot each size)  (8. 16. 32 or 16. 32, etc.)  =WEBBER PH0T0=s  287 Gowar Pt. Rd., Gibsons       886-2947  School District No. 46 (Sunshine Coast)  PUBLIC MEETING  <  The Boarqj'of School Trustees invites all residents to  attend an informational meeting on the School  District budget for the upcoming school year.  PLACE: Chatelech Secondary School  DATE;   Friday, t%pr\\ 7th  TIM^i    7:30 p.m.  *>'y4,  __/-"K.-  ^__>  fr It's our       , ,  fist ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION*-  Patricia  Different  Specials  EVERY DAY  April 3-9  <^  ACCENTS  GIFT  WARE  Cibsons landing (next lo Variety Foods)  886-9288  $100  ciftTCheert. Winner  of our  NEWUOCAJJON,  v^  OPENING  Pinky P'est  Gibsons       (  &  fSr-w:  886-3812  ���*-"!"-'^     oA   Gibsons     ^ ���   rafe Gibsons landing  i  climber to Chamberlin and  Bridgeman and an easy walk  among stately trees and crumbling stumps of yesteryear to the  base of the hill, The Knob. It is  hoped the "blue" trail can be  extended through the tall stand  of evergreens to join the newly  built road that runs past  Chamberlin Gardens nursery  from Chamberlin Road.  Children and the beach? Try  Smith Road in Langdale and  the signed access. The concrete  steps are not very trying to old  limbs. The gravel lane off Smith  looks as though it could give  trouble to the driver coming up  out of the parking area. Get out  and look it over first.  A short walk further is the  viewpoint with warning signs  about the abrupt drop-off. But  it is securely fenced, a quiet spot  to look across at the mountain  stubs, Liddell and Killam or  "Peter and Paul", on Gambier.  A Regional District park in  the initial stage of development  is the 25-acre tract adjacent to  Woodcreek Park subdivision on  Highway 101. The name  "Whispering Firs" was selected  from many suggested by pupils  in a contest in Cedar Grove  School. The contest was won by  Ella Moorcroft and her prize, a  year's admission for the family  to the swimming pool.  The parking lot is open and a  lawn surrounding it flourishing.  In a memory garden shrubs  have been set out to commemorate hard working  volunteers in community service. The garden is a special  project of the Elphinstone Electors Association.  Next to be done in "Whispering Firs" are walking trails with  stopping spots for aerobics - a  participark - and picnic sites for  family outings.  Regional Director Jim  Gurney says there is a walking  trail to the beach from the bottom of Woodcreek Park subdivision. Steep but readily  passable.  A Sunshine Coast Parks  Guide, a folder available at The  Chamber ��� of Commerce information a5ffice> in Gibsons and  elsewhere, lists every park and  its facilities on our Sunsnine  Coast. Published by  Regional District, the guide is a  well laid out directory.  NONAGENARIAN  Lionel Singlehurst will be  ninety-five years of age this  April 12. Best wishes, Lionel,  from your many acquaintances  in Gibsons and the district  around.  Lionel does not get out now  and so enjoys conversation with  those who get in to see him. His  clock still rings out the bells of  the ship's watch, and his painting of Pitcairn Island brightens  the room with its strong colours. "I first saw Pitcairn in  1917," says Lionel, "and traded  my watch for a uniquely carved  coconut shell."  In sail and steam, Lionel circumnavigated the world six  times and was three times  through the Panama Canal in  his years as a sailor, before he  came ashore in BC.  LIONS CLUB  Their motto, We Serve, has  been thoroughly lived up to by  the Gibsons Lions Club this  past year. The sum of almost  $41,000 was disbursed by the  club and among the recipients  were the handicapped with a  weekly swim time at the pool,  the Beachcombers Volleyball,  Little League baseball, the park  on Bay Road (just named  Labonte for Larry and Agnes),  and a number of other deserving agencies.  Joining the Lions Club is an  opportunity for fellowship as  well as to serve as people who  care about the community.  For information on joining  call Larry Labonte, 886-8107;  or Bob Nygreri, 886-8107; Hank  Wilson, 885-5417; Terry Neil,  886-8628.  :.FReE-BglilVERYyT-6^HE^MAR^.'  Sat., Sun. & Holidays  930 - 6 pm  Prices effective:  Mon., April 3  to Sun., April 9  Pacific  EVAPORATED  MILK 385 ml  Golden Harvest Pitted  prunes 375 3m  Kellogg's  Corn Flakes  Maxwell House - Fine/X-Fine/  Regular - Ground  69  1.19  Fresh - Utility Grade  Frying  CHICKEN       .   ���  HALVES    ��, 1.Z9'  Fresh - In Family Pack  chicken legs  A.B.C. Powdered Concentrate  laundry  detergent 4/ 3.49  ���J5l  Hunt's - Whole/Stewed/Crushed  Choice  tomatoes  Del Monte  juices  Spray Trigger  Winds)  ������������     f)V  Royal City  peas  Fortune  oranges  ���- -%.  Flavour Snacks  Milkbdhe  I Purina  Heinz - With Pork in Tomato Sauce/  With Pork in Molasses Sauce/  In Tomato Sauce  Ocean Spray - Whole/Jellied  cranberry  sauce  Bistro Sourdough & 100% Whole Wheat  bread 450 3m 1.09  Original - English  muffins  Our Own Freshly Baked  fruit pies  a  DOLLAR  FOODS  Present this coupon to a cashier  at KEN'S LUCKY DOLLAR and receive  10     BACK      -���  on your family grocery order (excluding tobacco products)   (Ai  \m>  _i5*55_W ���  /__M  Palm - Old Fashioned  Assorted Flavours  ice  cream 2/ 2.19  Palm - Regular & 2%  cottage cheese 500 m/  -LUCK1.  DOLLAR  FOODS     Ken's Lucky Dollar Foods  Snowcap  1 kg  .89  Rupert - Flip & Fry  perch  350 gm  2.79  loomed up before me. I was searching through my recipes - not  one of your simpler more straight-forward tasks! You may think  I'm organized - indeed I go to great pains to convince my husband that I'm super-organized but I'm beginning to think he.  can see through me! I digress! At the bottom of one of my piles  of plastic bag 'files' there lay a yellowed, torn scrap of paper -1  could see why I'd saved it!  ORANGE CHEESECAKE  Base:  1 Va cups graham cracker crumbs  2 tablespoons sugar  1 teaspoon cinnamon  Va cup melted margarine  Stir all these things together and press into a 9" pie plate. Bake  at 350��F for 5 minutes. Set aside.  Filling:  250 gms cream cheese      1 teaspoon lemon extract  Vz cup yogurt 2 tablespoons frozen orange juice  % cup sugar 1 teaspoon grated orange rind  2 teaspoons orange flavoured liqueur 2 eggs  All ingredients must be at room temperature. Cream the  cheese, then add all other ingredients and beat until smooth.  Bake at 350��F for 30 minutes until firm. Cool and chill.  Topping:  1 cup plain yogurt  1 can mandarine orange segments  When you are ready to serve, pour the yogurt over the cake.  Drain the oranges and arrange on cake. Then, watch your  waistline.  NEST LEWIS  Personal Shopping Only, please  WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES  GOWER.'PQI'V'T   ROAD-. Cl'BiONS .LANDING  Day by Day, Item by jtem, We do more for you  in providing, Quality; -tFrie^ndly Service Coast News, April 3,1989  i *  'Billy Cowsill worked his considerable magic again while helping  .'Gramma's Pub celebrate its 5th anniversary last week in Gibsons.  '.'��� ���Vera Elliott photo  Channel Eleven  TUESDAY, APRIL 4  7:30 p.m.  ; Gibsons Council Meeting "live"  ,'    Full coverage of this week's  : Council Meeting brought to you  "live"   from   the   Council  .Chambers in Gibsons.  THIRSDAY, APRIL 6  7:00 p.m.  'Talk to your Load Government  i Al Price hosts this month's  'program that allows viewers to  -call in and talk to members of  Aocal governments. Topics of  'local concern will be discussed  This Community  Television Schedule  Courtesy of: ������ ������ ��� ���  SOUTH COAST FORD  885-3281    during this one hour program with invited guests including Gibsons Mayor Diane  Strom, District of Sechelt  Mayor Tom Meredith and  Regional Board Chairman  Peggy Connor.  8:00 p.m.  Volunteers  Join host Dianne Evans and  her guests for a lively discussion  on volunteering.  8:30 p.m.  Coast Profiles  with Stan Dixon  Stan Dixon hosts a monthly  program with interesting pe6pl��  from around the Coast. This  month Stan's guest is Harold  Fletcher, Administrator for the  Sechelt   Indian   Government  District.  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  CIBSONS  Glassford Road 11:15 am  Sunday School 11:15am  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay 9:30 am  Sunday School 9:30 am  Rev. Stan Sears    Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone        . 886-2333  k*4k-  LgMumm  GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Morning Worship 11:15 am,  St. Hilda's Anglican Church  Evening Worship    7 pm in homes  Wednesday Bible  Study 7:30 pm in homes  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  ...     885-7488  ALL WELCOME   4��4&.*l_   ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. Al DAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  11:00 am  Phone: 886-7322 or 886-3723  St. Aidan's, R.C. Road 2:30 pm  First Sunday in month   MkSte sn   CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  711 Park Road  Telephone: 886-2611  Sunday School    - 9:30 am  ���  Worship Service - 11:00 am  Hour of Inspiration 7 pm  Cal Mclver - Pastor  Arlys Peters - Music Minister  "The Bible as it is...  for People as they are."   .���xkst.4. ���  GIBSONS COMMUNITY  FELLOWSHIP  Welcomes you to join us  in SUNDAY Worship  Children's Progress 9:45 am  Prayer 10:00 am  Morning Worship Service  ',    10:45 am  Wednesday 7:00 PM  599 Gower Poi nt Road  Pastor Monty McLean  886-7049  New Life Fellowship  New Testament Church  5531 Wharf Rd., Sechelt  Sun. Worship Service      10:30 am  Wed. Bible Study 7:30 pm  Morning Prayer 6:30-7:45 am  Tues.-Sat.  New Life Christian Academy  Enrolling Kindergarten - Grade 12  Pastor - Ivan Fox  Principal - David Cliff  Phone 885-4775 or 885-2672  ��� - ���^p�� 31* >^pj>< <   ��� "  ������ .,  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  St. Columba of lona Parish  8835 Redrooffs Rd., Halfmoon Bay  The Rev'd E.S. Gale: 1-525-6760  Information: 885-7088  "Prayer Book Anglican"   ije f|p tfp���~~   PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Sunday School 9:45 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30 pm  883-2374 & 883-9441  Pastor Mike Klassen  Affiliated with the Pentecostal   y  Assemblies of Canada   atkJtist,   GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Pastor Ted Boodle  Sunday School 9:45'am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Evening Fellowship       "   7:00 pm  Bible Study  Weds, at 7:30 pm  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada  ' : <**a*s+������ _  A  THE SECHELT PARISH OF THE  ANGLICAN CHURCH  ST. HILDA'S, Sechelt  8:00 a.m. "Prayer Book" Communion  9:30 a.m. Morning Prayer or Communion  Sunday School for children .-  ST: ANDREW'S, Pender Harbour..   ":'  11:30 a.m. Morning Prayer or Communion  10:45 a.m. Sunday school for children ���  885-5019 Reverend June Maffin, Rector  "We extend a warm welcome to all"  Presents:  A 'People' ��� 'Expertise9  'Surprise Gift Box'  AUCTION  by Peter Trower  . Later at the apartment they  share when Herb is not playing  the dutiful husband with Alice,  he and Helen talk the whole  thing over. "I still don't like this;  federal angle," he says, "but  Bertsche, Cox and the others  are all for it. I suppose it will  mean some really big money  however."  "Think of it this way,  sweetheart," says Helen, practically. "Two or three big jobs  like this and we'd be set up for  life. You could get out of the  rackets for good and go  legitimate. We could go away  somewhere, maybe to Europe  or Australia, start a whole new  life together. Think of it, honey,  it's worth the gamble, it's worth  any gamble."  "When you put it like that,  my dear," says Herb, buoyed as  always by Helen's ardent support, "I can only agree. The  rewards are certainly worth the  risk. In the meantime, there is  the matter of a poker game that  Elerick suggests we should attend."  When Nick the Greek hosts a  poker session, only the highest  rollers are invited. Tonight is no  exception. It is a warm night  and most of the players have  removed their jackets, revealing  -gold tie pins and diamond cufflinks.  There are six men in addition  to the Greek, ringed around the  green felt-topped table. The  sixth man is Jack Elerick, no  stranger to fast company.  They have just finished a  hand of lowball. The film producer has won with a seven  -high-in-spades, and is raking in  the large and lucrative pot. Nick  the Greek is freshening the  drinks. There is a sudden knock  on the door. "It's Louie," says  a deep voice.  "Don't know who the hell  that can be," says the Greek,  "but he's got the right  password." He unlocks the  door. Then, to the surprise and  alarmbDf all; the others, except  Elerick, the famous gambler is  backing into the room,.closely  followed by five armed men.  They sport the usual wigs, false  moustaches and beards that  have become a Wilson gang  trademark.  "All right, gentlemen," says  Herb, as though he were addressing some errant congregation, "let us have your cooperation and I assure you that no  one will get hurt."  Herb and Charlie Stahl,  another recent conscript from  Chicago, keep the room covered  while Lou, Bertsche and Cox  shake the startled gamblers  down. Elerick is frisked along  with the rest. Curiously,  however, when Nick the Greek  is searched, they come up cold.  Elerick manages to catch Herb's r  eye and flicks a glance at the"  Greek's feet. Herb gets the  message. "Check his shoes," he  says to Cox.  A   large   wad   of  bills   is  discovered, stuffed in one of the  gambler's socks and is tossed in  a swag bag along with watches,.,,..'  stick-pins, rings and anything . /  else   of   value.   Then,   inex  plicably, a shot'rings out. The  film producer gives a cry of pain  and clutches at his neck as  though swatting a wasp. Blood  oozes through his fingers.  Herb, angered to rare profanity, turn on Charlie Stahl.  "Goddamit, what the hell did  you do that for?" he demands.  "I said no gunplay."  "I thought he was reaching  for a gat under the table," says  Stahl casually. "I just nicked  him anyhow."  "There was no gun, you jumpy bastard," snarls Bertsche.  "Let's get the hell out of here!"  The caper turns even more  sour when the money is counted  later. The holdup has yielded  only $10,000 plus the jewelry.  "Gentlemen," says Herb, "I  suggest we chalk this one up to  experience and start work on  the armoured car operation immediately."  Stahl's victim proves to have  incurred only a minor flesh  wound and the incident is not  mentioned again. But Herb,  recalling Little Benny back in  the Detroit days, vows to get rid  of the trigger-happy hood at the  first opportunity.  To be continued...  j AT: Elphie School Gym ON: Saturday, April 8th TIME: 12 Noon  ADMISSION: $1.00 Kids under 12 Fre��    .  Please come, have fun and listen to the band play  NOW OPEN  MONDAYS!  ���;    ���_  ������������       ��� "''"���. '. i:  to serve you better  Store  o      ���_ ��� ���_ Free Delivery     E  decnelt OpenMon-Sat    ���  Furniture Land  sunshine Coast Hwy. Best Prices! Best Selection!  885-5756 Best Quality! Best Service!  GET TO KNOW US  V-. -���::<:���  it:  I  $'  3  The Rockwood Centre.  The Rockwood Centre started as a dream  and is now the whole community's reality���  a place where you can take part in the cultural  and recreational activities you always wanted  to, in the kind of space you've been looking  for...  The Rockwood Centre���comprised of the  beautiful Heritage building and its North  Wing���is managed by a non-profit society  for the District of Sechelt.  The society's sole purpose is to support  YOU. Specifically, we are committed to  supporting all the arts. But we don't stop  there���we support a host of cultural and  recreational activities and are eager to  promote the development of all kinds of  skills. We do this by providing affordable  meeting space for seminars and workshops,  and overnight accommodation for user  groups.  Come and take a look at our comfortable  and spacious meeting rooms. For big events  we have an excellent 2,500 square foot  activity area with sun streaming through  its 14 skylights. It is the perfect place  for a quiet retreat or an intense workshop.  The Centre is available for your use seven  days a week. You can't beat that. Drop in and  get to know us!  You can call us at 885 - 2522, Monday to  Friday, 9 to 5.  THE ROCKWOOD CENTRE  for the arts, culture, recreation and learning  P.O. Box 767. Sechelt. B.C. VON 3A0  TOURIST AND RECREATION GUIDE  Visitors  Welcome  ;:   '5*L":  Sy^  IIWill,. ������  Highway 101, 2 kilometres North of Garden Bay Turnoff  Phone 883-9541  SUNSHINE COAST  Golf & Country Club  Year 'round 9 hole course  Coffee Shop & Lounge Area  VISITORS WELCOME  Hwy. 101, Roberts Creek 885-9212  D HELLY HANSEN & MUSTANG  OUTDOOR WEAR  ��� MARINE BATTERIES  ���CHARTS & BOOKS  Come  Down  &  Browse  280 Gower Point Rd., Gibsons Landing  ^Zm.. .at  Fine Art �� Art SuppHta - Gifts  I    ____   .   _       Y. Y, �� jrr.  PGALLE&Y  'CUSTOM  FRAMING'j  886-9213  MMeftt  Waterfront, Gibsons  GIBSONS marina  WAKEFIELD TENNIS; CLUB  Next to the Wakefield Inn - on the beach  Pay As You Play    ' I  VISITORS WELCOME - INDOOR COURTS]  'MM666lM:y ,  $ PH"  ��� ,*jn^?f���*V-1"* _S"r'*t**'" f ^xT '���  Coast News, April 3,1989  13V  U  [M '���  if)  I  $'  3  on s  ���YOUNG ARTISTS Sf_OW  THEIR WORK  On now at the Arts Centre as  part of the Young -People's Exhibit is a selection of work  created by students in our high  school art programs. While  those- prograjhs give the  students the opportunity to experiment with many different  media, they also encourage self-  expression and the chance to be  creative and constructive. And  the students have responded.  There is a wide range of emotions expressed here: the quiet  introspection of finely detailed  drawings, the looming menace  of powerful faces, the peaceful  tranquility of nature at rest, the  fear of loneliness and isolation.  Sorrow, exuberant joy, anger,  delight-r-they are all represented  here.  For our young artists this is a  time of emerging adulthood  with all of the attendant fears  and anticipation that this entails. Look closely at these  works and you will discover  what these young people are  thinking, hoping, dreaming as  they move closer to it.  The exhibition continues until  April 16 and the gallery is open  11-4 Wednesday-Saturday and  1-4 on Sundays.  COMEDY FILM TO SHOW  AT ARTS CENTRE  A Swedish comedy feature is  this week's showing in the Spring Film Series at the Arts Centre on Wednesday, April 5 at 8  pm. The Mozart Brothers, a  1986 release which was a surprise hit on this continent, is the  hilaridus tale of a Swedish  opera troupe and their efforts  PALS meet governments  by Penny Fuller  On March 20, members of  the Peninsula Association for  Leisure? Services (PALS) met  with representatives from the  four governing bodies on the  Sunshine Coast to discuss the  terms of reference of a proposed study of leisure services,  facilities and needs on the Sunshine Coast.  They were prepared with suggestions from the Sechelt Indian  Government District, Sechelt  Municipal District and the Sunshine Coast Regional District  (SCRD). Gibsons Mayor Diane  Strom was unable to attend but  sent' Gibsons' endorsement of  the SCRD terms of referenceMa  Peggy Connor. /  During the first half of/the  meeting, the group discjiss^d  the various suggestions, and it  became apparent that the  government bodies were mostly  in   agreement   about   several  issues, including the importance  of transportation in looking at  recreational activities.  Carol Feenstra, from PALS,  presented a document of all the  public input to date. These included over 100 questionnaires  filled out by members of the  general public, and 400 filled  out by students.  The proposed terms of  reference for the study were  discussed and Harold Fletcher  from the ./S.I.G.D., suggested  that they be kept within the  parameters set out by the  Ministry of Tourism for funding such studies.  The result of the meeting was  eight guidelines for the study,  some of which may be handled  by local people, such as the inventory of facilities and activities.  If these terms are accepted by  the government bodies, the  study will include assessment of  needs and present and future  usage of recreational facilities.  It will also look at what sort of  leisure service should be  delivered municipally, regionally or by specified area.  An important aspect to this  proposed study is that it will set  both short and long term goals  for the area, and outline the  cost breakdown of each recommendation and possible ways of  financing them.  PALS was instructed to draft  the terms of reference and present them to each of the government bodies, which they did last  week. It will be discussed by  each group and their reactions  brought back to PALS by April  15.  If the terms are acceptable,  PALS will be calling for bids on  the study so that they will have a  clear idea of how much it will  cost when they explore funding  sources.  with producing Don Giovanni.  The ghost of Mozart laughingly  looks on.  PUPPETRY IN MOTION  There have been sawing and  hammering noises coming from  the Drama department at  Chatelech Secondary and finally the students are ready to  show what they've been doing!  On Saturday, April 8 at 1 pm  they will present what they call  Puppetry in Motion, an afternoon of puppetry and movement routines for children.  The performance will take  place at the Sunshine Coast Arts  Centre as part of the Young  People's Exhibition and will  compliment the colourful  display of student art from  throughout the Sunshine Coast.  Stories told with puppets will include Jack and the Beanstalk,  The Princess and the Pea, The  Wolf and the Wren, and Joe  Meets the Ogre. As well, individual performers will present  movement routines (like dances  that tell stories) set to music.  Tickets are $3 for adults and  $2 for children at the door. All  comers are in for a treat!  SPRING CLEANING DONE?  For as little as $5 per month  you can redecorate your home  or office. Fill in those bare  spaces by hanging original art  from the 'art rental program' at  the Sunshine Coast Arts Centre  located on Trail Avenue at  Medusa in Sechelt.  Our next art rental date is  Monday, April 10, from 10 am  to 4 pm. See you there!  For any further information  call Diane at 885-2264, Doreen  at 885-7951 or Carole at  885-3618.  Call the Moving  Specialists  For all local moving, or for help with  moving awkward heavy items, pianos, etc.  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Custom Packing, Storage, Local & Long Distance Moving  MMfV 1(11  MMflMS Pender Harbour customers   " "������������ please CAU. COLLECT  Rhythms of Life  a matter of perspective  by ^enny Fuller  It's all a matter of perspective, isn't it? What one person  thinks of as a tragic ending,  another may view as the chance  for a rebirth. Absolutely  everything that is, everything  that happens, can be interpreted  and viewed differently depending on your perspective.  So the fact that astrology interprets everything from the  perspective of the earth, is only  an acknowledgement that there  are no absolutes, there is only  the point of view from where  you stand.  This is by way of justifying  the discussion of retrograde  planets. A planet is called  retrograde when, because of the  relative position of the earth  and it's orbit, that planet appears to move backwards.  Every spring most, if not all,  of the outer planets go  retrograde. The outer planets  are considered to be Pluto, Neptune, Uranus and Saturn. They  tend to indicate the longer term  changes in a person's life, the  stages of growth rather than the  moods of the moment.  When they go retrograde, it  indicates a time of internalizing  change, of going back over and  redoing things that you haven't  Society  clarifies  Many people have called the  offices of the Canadian Cancer  Society (CCS) to question mail  they have received from an  agency called the Cancer  Research Society Inc. of Montreal.  The Canadian Cancer Society  wishes to clarify any confusion  this organization has caused.  The CCS is the only national  Drganization dedicated not only  :o research but also to public  jducation and patient services.  All the money raised by the  CCS in B.C. stays in B.C.  We urge people to know well  the organization they are supporting,      y y  done right or completed yet.  Pluto, the planet of personal  transformation, has been  retrograde since the. middle of  February, and will continue it's  backward motion until July 23.  This indicates that the major  changes that have been made in  ; ybfirlife^irice last July are likely  to be rehashed and some details  dealt with once more as the  transformation process is completed.  This month, the other three  outer planets join the backward  trek. Uranus starts it all next  Sunday and it will stay  retrograde until September 10.  Uranus represents individual  freedom and self-expression, as  well as revolution. It's reversal  indicates a time when the  revolution will likely be happening on the inside.  Outer circumstances will  change in a less dramatic  fashion than internal conditions. You may experience sudden realizations and understandings about yourself that ex  plain the restrictions that you  find in youryhfe and how you  contribute to them. You will  likely have some unexpected opportunities to explore your  capacity to change situations by  the way you handle them.      j  This clarification of personal  responsibility is further helped  when Neptune, the planet of illusion and delusion goes  retrograde on April 13. This  planet, when moving direct, can  indicate a fogginess and deceptive quality (including self-  deception) that seems to clear as  it moves backwards.  It is not unlikely during this  time that you'll realize some  areas of life that you've been  fooling yourself about. Or if  you've been deceiving others, it  may come out between now and  September 21 when Neptune  starts to move forward once  more.  Last, but certainly not least in  a practical sense is Saturn,  which goes retrograde on April  22. Saturn rules business and  structure. It's the most  pragmatic planet and indicates  the necessity of dealing with  restrictions in our lives.  When it goes retrograde, we  tend to become aware of our  restrictions on a very emotional  level ji setting the groundwork  "for their removal at a later time.  It is not likely that the things  that hold us back will change  until after September 11, when  Saturn goes direct. In the meantime the -awareness of those  limitations will grow.  This time when Saturn is  retrograde, is also not a time to  initiate new business deals, since  there is a strong possibility that  it will all have to be renegotiated at a later time.  So, externally, not a lot may  change this spring and early  summer. But internally, there  will be a lot of necessary  changes taking place, preparing  us for whatever changes we  need to make in our personal  environment next fall and  winter.  ���.���������.���.��jjuj��..����jjji��f��jjjjfii.  The  SYLVIA  Hotel  'I  *  Make the Sylvia part  of your Vancouver adventure...  Single from $37   Double from $45  Featuring "Sylvia's Restaurant & Bistro"  #-  Bring in this ad and receive a &  FREE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST     -apSfe  during your stay with us! 9  ...Overlooking Vancouver's English Bay  On the Beach at 1154 Gilford  SBSSSSSSBOSXi  *  _____  S3  '99999999  681-9321  _22_B_  ^1S  ki?  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  s\.  ��� V  ^y*,��  ���>*$  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  ^fe  Y>...*.vYYY  TS"  *&&!  mmwCmN  loOot ��J  (be Cowl  MCHI ()\  THE H)\\\  I had been looking forward to going out to dinner all day  especially since we were going to my favourite restaurant,  Pronto's. We arrived and were shown to a window seat.  After ordering drinks our waitress left us to peruse the  menu at our leisure. We deliberated a while over the appetizers (my eye was on the Caesar Salad which is fantastic)  but decided to head right into the entrees, all of which are  preceded by a salad.  With so many delicious entrees to choose from it was not  an easy decision to make. As usual, I had to check out  eveiTthing (even; though I'm sure I know the menu off by  heart) and finally decided on my favourite, Steak and  Lasagne. My partner chose the 12 oz. New York Steak.  Our salads came soon after giving bur orders to the  waitress and we Happily started to munch. The entrees came  very soon after we finished our salads and the smell and look  of our steaks made our mouths water.  The New York came with vegetables and baked potato (his  choice over rice)with all the fixings: My Lasagne was absolutely delicious, as usual, especially with the basket of piping hot garlic bread which complemented both pur entrees.  Pronto's alsoserves great pizza which is another of our  favourites. I'm sure we'll be back very soon, probably next  week!  fograge meal prices do not Include liquor  Creek House - Intimate dining and  European cuisine in a sophisticated yet  casual atmosphere. We serve rack of  lamb, duck, crab, clams, scallops, steaks,  also daily specials. Reservations recommended. Roberts Creek Road and Beach  Avenue - 885-9321. Open 6 pm. Closed  Mondays & Tuesdays. V. MC. 40 seats.  The Omega Pizza, Steak And  Lobster House - With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere, the Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of The  Beachcombers can usually be found dining here. Menu includes pizza, pasta,  steaks and seafood. Steaks and seafood  are their specialties. Banquet facilities  available. Very special children's menu.  Average dinner for two: $20. Reservations recommended. Located in Gibsons  Landing at 1538 Gower Point Rd.  886-2268. Open Sun-Thurs, i 1:30 am -10  pm, Fri and Sat 11:30 am - 10:30 pm.  Seats 145.  Pronto's Restaurants Two locations  to serve you. Both serve an extensive  variety of pizza, steak, pasta, lasagne,  ribs, souvlaki in a delightful family atmosphere. Children's menu available. All  dinner entrees include garlic bread and a  choice of soup or salad. Average family  meal for four about $15-$20. Located at  Wharf Rd., Sechelt, 885-1919; and on  Highway 101, across from Gibsons  Medical Clinic, Gibsons, 886.138.  Mariners' Restaurant - On the  waterfront with one of the most spectacular views in Gibsons, the Mariners'  specializes in fresh and live seafood, and  also offers a full range of lunch and dinner entrees. Both menus change daily,  with delicious daily specials. Marine  Drive, Gibsons Landing, 886-2334. Tuesday to Saturday: Lunch 11-3, Dinner  5-10; Sunday: Brunch 11-3. Closed Monday. 100 seats. V. M.C.  / \ Mil ) DlVIXi.  Cornerstone Tea House -  Featuring traditional cream tea, by  reservation only, Saturdays 1-4  886-9261.  pm.  PAID ADVERTISEMENTS  /'( 7?S  Cedar's Inn - Appetizers all day till 11  ptn. Darts every Tues. Everyone  welcome. Cedar Plaza, Gibsons 886-8171.  Open 11 am - midnight, Sun-Thurs; 11  am - 1 am, Fri-Sat. 100 seats. V., MC.  Regular menu 11 am to 8:30 pm.  ���M l\ , lAht Ol 7  Chicken Shack - Deep fried chicken,  pizza, hamburgers, salads. All to go.  Cowrie St., Sechelt -885-7414. Video Rentals. Open 11 am - 9 pm, Mon-Thur; 11  am - 10 pm, Fri-Sat; noon - 9 pm, Sim.  Home delivery within 5 miles of store  after 4 p.m.  Sechelt Fish Market - Fish & Chips  our specialty. A variety of deep fried  seafoods and sandwiches, using only the  freshest of fish. A favourite with knowledgeable locals and tourists. Cowrie St.,  Sechelt, 885-7410. Open 10 am to 6 pm,  Monday to Saturday. Closed Sundays.  5?  1 j.''i_ ���if^-"  r**  f  -�����<3r  ���OT"���     ��*_f ^  K_v��a_._.ur v t _A-wiiifeu��HatjuiaUn-j��.^iJiv.ti�� irf-_^i_��a:^ttjtJ.i  i_,_ o-t-^  Coast News, April 3,1989  ~1 Breakers to host  7-a-side tourney  SG. Golf ^Country Cluh  by Frank Nanson  j    John   Mosiuk   from   Burlington Ontario made a "hole-  v in-one" on the third hole after  joining   Rob   Gill,   and   Bob  Williams for a quiet inexpensive  game of golf. It was a big thrill  for the visitor, who says it is  bound to bring him back to the  coast again.  ;'    I understand he does now or  Vsoon will be sporting a nice  "hole-in-one" badge on his club  bag with the Sunshine Coast  ���printed in large letters on it.  Ladies take note - the ladies  spring luncheon will be held on  Tuesday, April   11.  The day  starts with golf at 8:30 am. Play  \ will be organized such that the  ; nine-holers and the  18-holers  : will   be  brought  together  in  ; teams of 2, by means of a draw  ; from the hat. Sounds like fun.  ; The  charge   in   $6.00  which  ; includes the luncheon.  You are asked to sign up ear-  : ly on a sheet located in the lunch  ��� room bulletin board. Please do  : so before April 7 to give the  ; organizers time to prepare the  ; catering.  Mixed Twilight golf is to start  on Monday, April 17 at 5 pm. It  is being organized this year by  Donna and Harry Johnston,  who gave me permission to put  their telephone number in this  column, for use, if you have any  questions of them, 885-5740.  If you wish to join in on a  Monday, you are welcome, it is  an evening that is open to all,  and you can come as a single or  couple, it matters not. The  players are organized into teams  as they arrive. It is intended to  be a night of fun so your ability  or lack of it is of no consequence.  So if you are just a learner  you are welcome to play. You  might even win! The charge is  $1.50 per person to cover the  cost of prizes. This event repeats  each Monday until August 28,  when the wind-up banquet takes  place.  On March 28 the 9-hole ladies  played a scramble in teams of 2,  using the best ball. The winners  were Doreen McGrath and Edna Fisher.  The 18-hole ladies first flight  had the following winners. The  scores are shown in brackets.  Kay Budd first with (13), Ruth  Head next (30 bb9), and Isabel  Rendleman third (30). The second flight winners were Helen  Milburne, who is just back from  practicing up in Florida, with a  (33), in second was Peg Dorais  (30) and in third came Reta  Hincks (29).  The Senior Men had their second kick at the can on Thursday with a turnout of 78 players  plus 2 guests. Walt McMillan,  of skiing fame and the husband  of Joyce, led his team consisting  of Bruce Matthew, George  Bayford, Bill Sutherland, and  George Cooper to be victory.  George Cooper added to the  honours by taking closest to the  pin on the 8th.  Ain't it true - the shorter the  missed put he louder the  screams! See you.  This Saturday and Sunday  will see the culmination of a  long winter of hockey, with the  Suncoast Breakers hosting it's  first 7-Aside hockey tournament.  Sixteen teams have entered  the competition, with two divisions competing. With only  seven players aside, the games  are shortened to one 20 minute*  stop time period . of  hockey...gruelling! If the  players who fail to show up or  get injured, no substitutes, so it  is definitely a thinking man's  game.  The game is played under  Old-Timers rules, the no slap  shot and no hitting rules in effect, so Bantams and Midgets,  can easily play against the Old-  Timers.  Games will begin Saturday  morning at 9 am and continue  all day up until 9 pm. Games  Sunday will start at 8 am, with  all the division playoffs starting  at approximately 1:30 pm, and  continuing through until 6 pm  when the two division finals will  take place, the OTH (Over The  Hill) Final followed by the  Open Division final game.  For a different look at  hockey, come up to the arena  for a peek at the local talent getting set to put their hockey bags  away for the season.  The following is a list of  teams and game times for the  tournament, a note to teams,  first team named is responsible  to have a timekeeper in the box  to work the clock.  Suncoast Breakers  7-Aside Tournament Schedule  O.T.H. Division  ACHE - Breakers, Howdens Hurricanes, Rink Rats, Midget 'A'.  PAIN - Medics, Bantam Ice Queens,  Wrecks, Midget '_��'.  Open Division  BRUISE   -   Wakefield   Stars,  Lighthouse Pub, Gilligans, B&D Kings.  Blister  Evans   Hurricanes,   Dream   Team,  Wakefield Whalers, Buccaneers.  Saturday, April 8  9^0 am  Wrecks  vs  Ice Queens  9:40 am  Rink Rats  vs  Midget'A*  Mh-Oam  Whafen  vs  E. Hoiricanes  11:10 am  Breakets  vs  H. Hunfcanes  12:00 pm  Stan  vs  Gittigaas  12:40 pm  Lighthouse  vs  B&D  1130 pm  Dream Team vs  Whalers  2:10 pm  Midget'B'  vs  Ice Queens  3:00 pm  Medics  vs  Wrecks  3:40 pm  B&D  vs  Stan  4:30 pm  Buccaneers  vs  Dream Team  5:10 pm  Gittigaas  vs  Lighthouse  6:00 pm  Breakers  vs  Rink Rats  6:40 pm  E. Hunfcanes vs  Buccaneers  7:30 pm  Midget'A'  vs  H. Hurricanes  8:10 pm  Midget'B'  vs  Medics  Sunday, April 9  8:00 am  Stars  vs  Lighthouse  8:40 am  GUBgans  vs  B&D  9:30 am  Wrecks  vs  Midget 'B*  10:10 am  Medics  vs  Ice Queens  11:00 am  Dream Team  vs  E. Hunfcanes  11:40 am  Whafcrs  vs  Buccaneers  12:30 pm  Midget'A'  vs  Breakers  1:10 pm  Rink Rats  vs  H. Hunfcanes  v  Playoffs  1:30 pm  4th Bruise  vs  4th Blister  2:10 pm  4th Ache  vs  4th Pain  3:00 pm  3rd Ache  vs  3rd Pain  4:30 pm  2nd Bruise  vs  2nd Blister  5:10 pm  2nd Ache  vs  2nd Pain  6:00 pm  1st Ache  vs  2nd Pain  6:00 pm  1st Ache  vs  1st Pain  6:00 pra  1st Ache  vs  1st Pain  6:40 pm  1st Bruise  vs  1st Blister  More Relaxation  More Living Space  Increased Home Value  Call us now for prices, options, planning  l__L_�� _3UL-3@ &contractin3  (5)  Hwy. 101 & Pratt Rd., Gibsons    886-7359  $)  No zamboni funds  A request from the District of  Sechelt to Gibsons council for a  one time grant towards the purchase of the new Zamboni ice-  cleaner for the Sechelt arena has  been turned down.  "We don't have those kinds  PeeWees take tourney  : On March 29 the Thunder-  ; birds, a Pee Wee team, from the  \ Sunshine Coast Minor Hockey  Association went to Fuller  ��� Lake, Vancouver Island to play  at the Annual Fuller Lake Pee  Wee Tournament.  In the first game Brad  Wingfield was picked the Most  Valuable Player in a 6-0 win  over Harlo Towing from Che-  mainus. Terry McKay was picked Most Valuable Player in the  second game in an 11-0 win over  A & D Tire of Kerry Park. Colin MacLeod was Most Valuable  Player in a 20-1 win over*  Saanich.  The roster was reduced by  one when Shamus Gaaudry sustained a shoulder injury.  The final game was for the  Championship against an  undefeated and powerful Ra-  quet Club team from Victoria.  The final score was a 5-3 win by  a very hard working and tired  Thunderbird team.  Goalie Ben Stretch ended up  being the most successful goalie  in the tournament permitting  only 4 goals while the team  scored a tournament high of 42  goals.  The Thunderbirds would  especially like to thank  Stockwell & Sons for donating  the entrance fee for the Tournament.  of dollars in our budget," Gibsons Mayor Diane Strom said  of Sechelt's request for $10,620.  The purchase price of the new  Zamboni is $59,000.  The request from Sechelt  which was based on an examination of arena traffic  showing that residents of Gibsons make use of the rink some  18 percent of the time, was  discussed at the March 28  c om mi ttee-of-the-whole  meeting.  PLEASE  LET A  >]_**1Ii]  TEACH THEM  TO DRIVE  AHD SURVIVE!  OVER 250,000 GRADUATES RECOMMEND  Young Drivers of Canada  TRAINING CENTRES FROM COAST TO COAST  Defensive Driving is jargon  that everyone uses, but very  few teach the subject effectively.   Young   Drivers   is  famous throughout the world  for ITS ACCIDENT-FREE  DRIVING HABITS often  called "survival training".  For Information Call 483-3347 Collect  Spring Training  Midget misfortune  The local Midgets were carded this year and entered in the  Provincial Midget 'A' Playoffs.  These were held in Lake  Cowichan on Vancouver Island.  Generally, the team calibre  was probably good enough to  get second place, but due to  some misfortune as well as self  destruction, the team had its  problems.  Initially four of the players  decided not to make the trip.  Another three missed the first  game. Consequently, we played  with nine skaters and were no  match for the powerful  Revelstoke team.  The second game was in control by the local boys when the  goalie received a match penalty  at the end of the second period  and was effectively out of the  tournament.  Jesse Stretch was pressed into  goalie service and gave it his  best shot, but we lost a close  one. Also, by the end of this  ALWEST  HOME  SERVICES  Box 864, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  Professional Home Renovations by an  established local company  Vinyl Siding ��� Soffit ��� Fascia ��� Gutters  Roofing ��� Duroid ��� Cedar & Aluminum  Replacement Windows & Doors  Skylights ��� Porch Enclosures���Decks & Fencing  Call For Free Estimates  100% Guarantee on Workmanship & Materials  Seniors Discounts 885-4572  game, we had lost Aaron Joe  and Ryan Paul, two of our better players, who were incapacitated due to injuries.  This left us thin again for  game three and we couldn't  keep up with the Rossland boys.  Frustration showed and three'  more boys were lost due to  match penalties. We averaged  64 penalty minutes a game and  championships are not won this  way.  David  Paetkau with seven  goals and two assists was the  scoring leader for the locals, >  followed  by Shane  Joe and  Ryan Paul.  All told, it was a new and interested learning experience for  the Sunshine Coast Minor  Hockey League. We can only  improve.  Dollars  The town of Gibsons decided  not to play ball with the chairman of the British Columbia  Sports Hall of Fame and  Museum after all.  In a recent letter to Gibsons  Mayor Diane Strom, the provincial hall of fame asked for  financial support for their planned move to B.C. Place  Stadium in Vancouver.  "We are asking each municipality in British Columbia to  help us by making a capital contribution to this new, exciting  provincial hall of fame," the  letter said, suggesting a formula  of five cents per capita with a  minimum of $500.  It was pointed out at the  March 28 meeting that five  cents per capita in Gibsons  comes to $138.25.  "I don't feel we can give  them $500." Mayor Strom said,  and the vote to deny the request  was unanimous.  ��� * 1  I^^^&VTlYr*^^^  .*-��� j .-rtW*** r^^.xzir;  is^arfessw? ^^i^^^^-^-^6^^^  ::.���-���-���*��� ���--& -  ~# -LTy��.-^-��/.T.  Coast News, April 3,1989  15.  Eventual champions of the Men's Hockey League this season,  Wakefield, press on the attack around the beleaguered Salish  Hawks goalie in action during the best of five final, won by  Wakefield three games to one. ���Vern Elliott photo  '  In Men's Hockey  Reference: Point Atkinson  ^ Pacific Standard Time  by Mark Benson  The Salish Hawks defeated  Wakefield 9-4 to even/their best  of five final playoff series at a  game a piece in Men's Ice  Hockey. <  The Hawks led 2-1 at the end  of the first period and 6-2 at the  end of the second. Wakefield  fought back to within two goals  on goals by Tom Poulton (2),  Kelly Cousins, and Billy  Stockwell, but were thwarted by  the goal tending of Hawks'  Kevin August.  The Hawks handed Wakefield their first defeat of the  season on goals by Trent Dixon  (2), Ricky August (2), Danny  Meyers,   Robert  Joe,   Darren  Dixon, Ryan Paul and Ian Dixon.  League champions, Wakefield, took a 2-1 lead in their  best of five playoff by knocking  off the Hawks 12-7 in game  three.  The Hawks led 3-2 at the end  of the first period, but the  'green machine' got in gear in  the second and ended up winning 12-7 in a shootout.  Wakfield scorers were Tom  Poulton (4), Kelly Cousins (3),  Mike Yarrow (2), Rory Walker,  Teddy Brackett, and Claude  Charleton. Hawks goal getters  were Trent Dixon (3), Troy Joe,  Adrian Dixon, Cory August  and Darren Dixon.  It was do or die for the  wins play-offs  ice news  GIBSONS RCMP  Police draw attention to the  number of wallets stolen in bars  and the cabaret from untended  purses. Contents other than  cash are often thrown to the  roadside to scatter in the breeze.  Between March 18 and  March 20, thieves broke into  Sunshine Feeds on Industrial  Way by breaking a window,  and took the cash float.  This cash float is no longer  left overnight in this store, and  other storekeepers are reminded  to think about doing the same.  Some time in the early morning of March 22, a boat belonging to the Beachcombers was  stolen from Smitty's Marina  and taken apparently on a joy  ride to Horseshoe Bay.  Between March 18 and  March 20, tools, namely a Black  and Decker circular saw, Skill  jigsaw, and Sears power plane,  all worth about $400 were taken  from the back of a truck. Any  information? Call The RCMP  office.  The red and white fish sign  was stolen from the Fish store  next to Ken's Lucky Dollar on  March 29.  On March 29 there was a  complaint of someone  unknown firing a shot at people  in the woods on Keats Island.  Investigation continues.  Some time prior to March 24,  the campsite and attendant's  cabin at Plumper Cove were  befouled by persons unknown  on a rampage of mischief. With  information call The RCMP.  On March 29 lighted matches  were dropped into the red mail  drop box at Gibsons post office.  Some damage was done to mail.  Investigation continues.  On March 30 a custom truck  cover to fit a Chev pickup was  stolen from the vehicle parked  Ever Since  You Were  a Kid  Ybu ve  Wanted  to Try If  ��  Learn to  Scuba  with  SEASPORT SCUBA  ADVENTURE THROUGH EDUCATION  Hawks in game four, but  Wakefield came out like  gangbusters right from the start.  Three quick goals by Wakefield  drove Hawks goalie Kevin  August from the nets in favour  of Tod Brown, but Wakefield  would not be denied building up  period leads of 6-0 and 8-1.  Wakefield coasted to the  playoff championship on goals  by Darren Kohuch (2), Claude  Charleton, Kelly Cousins, Billy  Stockwell, Brian Poison, Rory  Walker, Kenny Robinson, and  Mike Yarrow to end up winning  9-3. Hawks scorers were Trent  Dixon, Kevin Hanson and  Adrian Dixon.  After the game the trophies  and awards were presented to  the respective winners.  League Champions, Wakefield; Playoff Champions,  Wakefield; MVP for Playoffs,  Tom Poulton (Wakefield); Best  Goalie, Danny Hemstalk  (Wakefield); Best Defenseman,  Claude Charleton (Wakefield);  Most Sportsmanlike, Adrian  Dixon (Hawks); Most Improved, Mike Evans (Roberts  Creek).  The players of the Sunshine  Coast Men's Hockey League  would like to take this opportunity to thank Bob and Hilda  Young and the referees for helping make this hockey season  such a; success. See you next  fall.  0225 10.2  9 0735 14.4  SU 1450 1.7  2215 14.7  0325 11.0  10 0810 13.8  MO 1540 2.2  2325 14.5  For Skookumchuk Narrows add 1 hr. 45 min ,  plus 5 min. for each ft. of rise.  and 7 min. for e��ch ft. of fall.  (k TIDELINE IV  VQ_S_X3___5__X  MARINE  Tune-Up  5637 Wharf  Attention  BOATERS  Spring Specials  Bottom Painting  Boat Hauling  Pressure Washing  ^   \    \    \KK\K  & Stern-Drive Service     "1  .rfM.   885-4141   h  -_-_3___^a_S/  ���nY'-V; {\<'!s.*---;rji."i }?<������  ���ft   ;*(���  Gibsons  Swimming Pool  MONDAY &  WEDNESDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Ease Me In  Noon Swim  Lessons  Swim Fit  6:30 a.m.-  9:00 a.m.  10:00 a.m.  11:30a.m.  3:30 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  8:30a.m.  10:00 a.m.  11:00a.m.  1:00p.m.  7:30 p.m.  8:30p.m.  TUESDAY  .Fi't&50+     >,,-9:30a.m.  -10:30.a.m  Senior Swim      10:30 a.m.  -1.1:30 a.m  Adapted Aquatics 2:30 p.m.  - 3:30 p.m  Lessons              3:30 p.m.  - 6:00 p.m  Public Swim        6:00 p.m.  - 7:30 p.m  Co:ed Fitness      7:30 p.m.  - 8:30 p.m  FRIDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Fit & 50 +  Senior Swim  Noon Swim  Public Swim  Teen Swim  6:30 a.m.-  8:30a.m..  9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.  10:00 a.m. - 10:30a.m.  10:30 a.m.-  11:30 a.m.  5:30 p.ni.  7:30 p.m.  11:30 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  9:00 p.m.  on Maplewood Lane. The cover  was manufactured by Beverley  Hill Motoring Company. Call  the RCMP with information.  How safe are our roads?  Score for March: eight impaired and 15 24-hour suspensions.  SECHELT RCMP  It's once again the time  year when complaints of noisy  motorcycles are received at this  office. M/C operators are  reminded that if they are  operating their machines in an  irresponsible manner they will  be ticketed.  On March 30 a pedestrian/  vehicle MVA occurred on Trail  Avenue. An adult female was  taken to hospital via ambulance  with undertermined injuries. No  charges were laid against the  driver of the vehicle.  THURSDAY  Adapted Aquatics  Lessons  Public Swim  Co-ed Fitness  2:30 p.m.  3:30 p.m.  6:00 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  3:30 p.m.  6:00 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  8:30 p.m.  SATURDAY  Public Swim        2:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.  Public Swim        7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.  SUNDAY  Family Swim        1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.  Public Swim        3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.  Lessons Commence  Sept. 19th  REGISTER NOW  Gibsons Swimming Pool 886-9415  Publication of this schedule  sponsored by  Super Valu  Spring  Tune  4 Cyl. $44.95  6 Cyl. $55.95  8 Cyl. $OZ.95  SOUTH COAS T FO RD  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  Van. Toll Free 684-2911 885-3281  FOfTD -LINCOLN ��� MERCURY ...Do  what  you like  you see?  THE DENTAL PROFESSION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA AND THE CANADIAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION  Any uuoy you Slice it  the Classifieds bring results  *     t      *     *     ft     *  Young Drivers of Canada is  an organization that has been  teaching people to drive for  almost 40 years, and this spring  they will be offering a course on  the Sunshine Coast.  The course will start in April  and highschool teacher Dan  O'Gorman will be doing the  classroom theory part of the  course.  Bernice Berry of Powell  River, a 12 year veteran with the  program, will be coming over to  teach the practical portion of  the program.  The course is designed to  teach new drivers (anyone of  any age over 16 can take it) accident avoidance skills, so that  they are aware of potentially  hazardous situations and take  the necessary action so that problems don't become accidents.  Because this area has basically secondary roads with rural  traffic, part of the course will  involve taking the students to  Courtenay. This will give them  the opportunity to experience ���  loading and unloading at ferry  terminals, city traffic and  highway driving.  Powell River is the 155th  Young Drivers of Canada training centre. For the time being,  the Sunshine Coast will be a  satellite program. Anyone  wishing more information can  call Bernice Berry collect at  483-3347.  A $10 prize will be awarded the first correct entry drawn which locates the above. Send your entries to  reach the Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons by Saturday off this week. Last week's winners were James  and Jason Wilson, who correctly identified the seal on Gibsons Seawalk.  A look back at winter  A lonely outpost  by Myrtle Winchester  "When I got to the cabin I  realized, 'Hey, there's somebody else on the island!' "  A group of tree planters had  been staying in the cabin since  the temperatures dropped,  unable to continue their work  because of the frozen ground  and having no way off the  island.  "So I guess I'm staying there  now, but we realize that we have  a drastic water shortage. Their  well    is    frozen    up,    the  S\1N%  Sunshine Coast Regional District  BULLETIN BOARD  *'sm<>  Royal Terraces Building  5477 Wharf Rd.,  Sechelt  [TNES?  FlTNl^~   future  1 >r|  WOB  a  P.O. Box 800  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  885-2261  UPCOMING MEETINGS-  HALFMOON BAY  COMMUNITY PLAN  Meeting: Tuesday, April 4th at 7:30 p.m.  In the SCRD Board Room  The Planning Departrpehi^iII receive comments  from the Area B (Ha|fmboh Bay) APC and any concerned residents regarding the Area B Technical  Background Report for the Halfmoon Bay Official  Community Plan.  Fresh from the "Fitness For the Future '89 Conference", the  Pender Harbour Aquatic Centre is holding a fitness  workshop for area residents. COME AND LEARN about  the latest in fitness workouts, fitness philosophy, diet and  nutrition, plus individualized fitness programs guided by personal fitness assessment. Be prepared to PARTICIPATE as  trained instructors lead you through a one hour session of  the most recent developments in fitness workouts designed  to give you the most benefits for your individual fitness  needs.  WORKSHOP PROGRAM:  1. Introduction - Fitness for the Future  2. Fitness Assessment and Individualized Programming  3. One Hour Fitness Workout: - includes the latest in low  impact/high impact aerobics with a difference, the new  supercircuit weight/aerobic workout, plus aquafit information.  4. Registration and Refreshments - nutritious juices and  muffins will be served.  Thursday, April 6,  7:00 - 9:00 p.m.  Pender Harbour Aquatic Centre  $5.00 per person  REGISTRATION: Please phone the Pender Harbour  Aquatic Centre at 883-2612 .  Register for  pff��\E   BY PRESENTING THIS COUPON  r���-._.._.-__,....._.._._!  -FITNESS for the Future WORKSHOP |  Pender liarbour Aquatic Centre |  ADMIT ONE I  Thursday, April 6, 7:00 - 9:00 pm  ���FISH M0RT DISPOSAL  Effective immediately the fish mort pits  at the Sechelt Disposal Site will be  OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY  From 9:00 am to 11:30 am  ATTENTION  AQUACULTUREINDUSTRY  The dumping of fish feed bags at  the Pender Harbour Disposal Site is  STRICTLY PROHIBITED.  S.K. Lehmann,  Works Superintendent  ���-D0G CONTROL INFORMATION'  The enforcement officer for the Sunshine Coast  Regional District Dog Control Bylaw can be reached  at the Town of Gibsons offices during regular office  hours - 886-2274.  PLEASE NOTE: THE AFTERHOUR  EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER IS 885-5111  1989 DOG TAGS  May be purchased for $5.00 at the SCRD office or at  the Town of Gibsons office.   <  MINIBUS SCHEDULE'  MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS  IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUTi  YOUR HOUSE NUMBER  House numbers have now been issued for most  residents on the Sunshine Coast.  House numbers help emergency vehicles find the  correct house in an emergency. If your number is not  posted, the extra time that may be required to locate  the house could mean the difference between successful Intervention and a tragedy.  Please POST YOUR HOUSE NUMBER in a visable location, at least two metres off of the ground. The numbers  should be at least 10 cm in size and made of a suitable  material that is easily visible in all lighting conditions.  Thank you for your cooperation.  DEPARTS:  Sechelt to West Sechelt 8:25 am  West Sechelt to Sechelt 8:32 am  Sechelt to Gibsons 8:40 am  Lower Gibsons Circle 9:15 am  Gibsons to Sechelt 9:25 am  10:30 am  (Lower Road)  11:15 am  (Lower Road)  *1:05 pm  ���*1:12 pm  *1:20 pm  *1:50pm  *2:00pm  (Lower Road)  3:00 pm  (Lower Rd)  3:45 pm  3:55 pm  4:25 pm  4:32 pm  "Lower Road" route ��� via Flume Road, Beach Avenue and Lower Road.  Regular stops at Sechelt and Gibtocw Medical Clinics.  West Sechelt Bus Stop: Mason/Norwest Bay Rd.  Sechelt Bu�� Stop: Trail Bay Mall, Trail Ave.  Gibsons Bus Stop: Lower Gibsons Municipal Parking Lot,  Gower Point Rd.  FARES:  One Zone ��� .75; each additional zone .25  Zone #1: Gibsons to Roberts Creek (Flume Road)  Zone #2: Roberts Creek to West Sechelt  THIS SERVICE IS FOR  PUBLIC USE  Door-to-Door Service is  available for the disabled  and handicapped, and  can be booked by phoning  the dispatcher at  885-5881  plumbing's frozen, no running  water, but we do have heat. Not  much, and we spent the time all  huddled around it, within two-  three feet. It was cold.  "There are little cabins and  shacks and whatnot all over the  island, so we hop in the truck  and head out to try to scavenge  some water. I ransacked one  cabin and found a propane  heater and a five gallon jug of  frozen water, and that was our  only water. The bulk of it got  used for coffee, just to stay  warm. You could have given me  a bar of gold, and I'd have said,  'Big deal, I'll take the water!'  "The next day I go back to  do a damage assessment at the  farm, and it's looking a lot  worse. The waves haven't let  up, the wind hasn't let up,  there's more ice, and the pens  are riding even lower. More  pens with broken rails. Of the  eight pens that were holding  fish, I figure six might have fish  left in them.  "I'm in constant communica  tion with my employers through  this, giving them a play-by-play  of the damages. They're saying,  'Hang in buddy, don't worry  about anything, don't go out  there and play the hero. This is  gonna blow over and someone  will come and get you.'  "Thursday morning I see that  four of the pens have broken  off and are hanging by a  guideline. It's heading for  shore, but it's still hanging on.  The work float that's holding  all our gear is with the pens, all  heading for shore.  "I went over to the other end  of the island, it took about 45  minutes, and when I got back  again the whole works was on  shore, the four pens and the  work float. The main pen  system is still hanging on by a  thread, but the dock, the ramp,  has broken up and one boat has  sunk and another is up high and  dry with the wreckage.  "I go back into the trailer,  pry open the door, and call the  Please turn to page 19  Gibsons confusion  Another Gibsons council  member voiced confusion at the  March 28 committee-of-the-  whole meeting over the previous  week's seemingly impromptu  meeting called by the ministry  of the environment to discuss  Gibsons sludge utilization program.  Alderman John Reynolds  said that he had to read about  the meeting in the newspapers.  None of the council members  besides Mayor Diane Strom,  who was unable to attend, knew  that a meeting had been called  because it was originally  thought that only the Gibsons  and SCRD staff were invited.  It was agreed that Mike  Wong who called the meeting  for the ministry of the environment should have invited all the  council members.  flow Selling  ��Sunshine  Ridge  765 School Rd.,  Gibsons  FromJTIjSOO  Family Oriented  View Town Homes  2 & 3 Bedrooms  1280 to 1425 sq. ft.  Adult Oriented  Single Level  Town Homes  Twin Oaks  Village  824 North Road,  Gibsons  From $62,500  2 Bedrooms  1029 to 1157 sq. ft.  Marketed By:  Lisa Keller, 886-4680, 946-0887  Montreal Trust 278-8181  Sales Office, 765 School Road  For Further Information  Sales Representative on Site  Open Wednesday, April 5th  & Saturday, April 8th  1-4  Time of Your Life Show  Vancouver Trade & Convention'Centre  April7, 8&9  Sechelt Home Show  at Trail Bay Mali  April 10 to 15  Hans Ounpuu Construction  A Division of Twin Oaks Realty Ltd.  888-4880,886-7188  Ji7^,l*in^��-^r>��f*^-;^r.s^v^*^'"^^*^'1^  ���?_Sc.- >_*_:  ���"���iiir--���;T_ii 'n'n ���; art  S^:^#^^$%��^  ___���_���  ^^���"���^  iiiiiiiliiiMilMi-lliiliili-iiiiliil-lii-iiIilir  ���    Hlllllllllll-M-iW        -     ' -*���-*-"���*-��� - *,?u w-*^j��^7^:?^.Tr,ir^  ;g=5g��aE��:!i��B��i*siS i  Coast News, April 3,1989  17.  :��ywti%*y'-.\- \  .-. ;:��YW*****_fc-Y'  ^^ijtfwif'; Ya ,..-  ae.,  '* ii.'  - ' tt"  :* '%���%,  ���:����..  .-V 25*'  "5 It.  .   a*.  ���After & Icftd*'  iForS*Ste, ^  *�������*. .Y 1,  Motorcycle*.'  mtA JL-VotftfcftMf.  WoAWa***)* Y  - v .*.  ���������__*  ~ t  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  -IN PENDER HARBOUR-  Marina Pharmacy 883-2888  AC Building Supplies 883-9551  ���IN HALFMOON BAY���  B & J Store 885-9435  ��� IN SECHELT ���  The Coast News  (Cowrie Street) 885-3930  IN DAVIS BAY  Peninsula Market 885-9721  IN WILSON CREEK-  Wilson Creek Campground 885-5937  ���IN ROBERTS CREEK���  Seaview Market 885-3400   ���IN GIBSONS���   B&D Sports  (Sunnycrest Mall) 886-4635  The Coast News  Y    (behind Dockside Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  f^  ,SjK&|  _^��g  %-? s  > j  '**<.  f"*? �����  Drop off your Classifieds with Lisa Wyles Bland  and Judy Eldred (right), the happy new owners of  Seaview Market, our "Friendly People Place" in  Roberts Creek.  4 bdrm. cedar house, vaulted  ceilings, 3 baths, large fenced  yard, close to mall and school. By  owner 886-3188. #16  Waterfront West Sechelt % acre,  dead end street, quality subdivision, no agents please.  886-2463., #16  60x250' West Sechelt waterfront  lot, 2 cleared building sites with  driveway. New steps and trails  down park-like hillside to rock  buli-dozed beach. Have septic  permit, house plans, spectacular  view, outstanding beach areas.  885-7629. _#16s  1 bdrm. newer cabin, approx. 3A  acre, 1 block to Rbts. Ck. School,  $57,900. 885-5280, 885-3127  courtesy to agents. #16s  Small 2 bdrm. cottage (450 sq.  ft.) to be moved from lower Gibsons. 886-2911. #14  Large prime view lot overlooking  Gibsons Harbour, $38,500.  886-3483. #14  Excellent Pender Harbour tourism  oriented golden oceanside acre.  Hotel, restaurant and duplex  residence. Owner 883-9676. #14  Building lot, 75x150, Feeney  Rd., close to ferry and Gibsons.  886-3940. #15  Lot for sale by owner, upper Gibsons, really convenient location,  asking $18,000. Call Donnie  886-7751 or 886-2881.        #14  View LOT for SALE  Underground services, centrally  located at Wildwood Cres. in Gibsons.   Sacrifice   at   $29,500.  886-3382.  #15  Great Lot with unobstructed view.  Cleared, 50x102, Harvey Rd. Ann  Gurney-886-2164 The Argosy  Group. #15  Waterfront lot Gower Pt. Rd.,  asking $64,900. 886-9485 or  526-4061. #16s  Approx. 800 sq. ft. home,  workshop, woodshed, nearly Vz  acre lot, Mason & Norwest Bay  Rd., Sechelt, $49,500.  885-3982. #16s  1150 sq. ft. 3 bdrm. rancher  w/ensuite and w/w carpet, %  block tc^beach, bay area Gibsons^  $85,900.886-8356. #16'  2 beautiful view lots, Granthams  Landing, all services available.  931-4681. #17s  764 Hillcrest Ave., 3 bdrm.  $59,000, 707 Hillcrest Ave., 4  bdrm., view $89,000, 214 Pratt  Rd., 3 bdrm.. $75,000,  1027/1029 Rosamund Rd., s/s  duplex, $55,000, 445/447 S.  Fletcher, 4 plex., 3 bdrm. up, 2  bdrm. down, view, $180,000.  886-2455.        #16  V* acre level cleared lot with  culvert, suitable for mobile home.  $12,500,886-8441. #15  ANDERSON REALTY  The Sunshine Coast  Specialists for  ��� Recreation  ��� Retirement  ��� Relocation  FREE CATALOGUE  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-3211  Van. Toll Free 684-8016  lassif led Ad Rates  f^*  (minimum) for 10 words  Vc&v.~Z\,o*x  $400  25    *or eac^ ^d'*'003' word  W  Pay for 2 weeks, Get the 3rd week FREE  When paid by CASH, CHEQUE  or MONEY ORDER  Suite Sg��(!"cLASSIFIEPS  They run until your item is sold!  *1 5       for up to 10 words    1        per additional  word  Your ad, featuring one item oniy, will run for four consecutive  weeks and will then be cancelled unless you instruct us to renew it  for   another  four,   by   Saturday,   3   pm.  NO CHARGE FOR RENEWAL for as long as you want!  (Not available to commercial advertisers)  ALL CLASSIFIED ADS must be PRE-PAID before insertion.  For your convenience, use your MASTERCARD or VISA!  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  Friendly People Places" Saturday NOON  SATURDAY, 3 pm  At"  At COAST NEWS Offices,  Sechelt & Gibsons  COAST NEWS Classifieds  Cowrie St.. Sechelt  885-3930  The LOWEST Price!  The HIGHEST Circulation!  The FIRST on the street!  FAX: 886-7725  Cruice Lane. Gibsons  886-2622  Scott Pauloski and Tracey Bond  have a beautiful daughter, Angie  Ada Pauloski, born March 8,  1989, 7 lbs., 14 ozs. Proud  grandparents are Pearl Pauloski,  Gibsons, Robert Pauloski. Prince  Rupert, great grandparents Bill  Farnham and the late Ada Far-  nham. A special niece for Tanya.  #14  Charles and Joanne are pleased  to announce the long awaited arrival of Jesse's little sister,  Samantha Joanne, 9 lbs., 6 ozs.,  born March 25, 1989. Grandparents are Olaf and Sandra Star-  void and Susan Maconnell.  Special thanks to Dr. Berlin and  the nurses at St. Mary's  Hospital. #14  Obituaries  LUMSDEN: Passed-away March  25, 1989 Mary Helen Lumsden,  late of Roberts Creek, age 76  years. Survived by her loving  husband George; one son, David  and wife Pam, of Roberts Creek;  two daughters, Sandie and husband Ken Eidet of Roberts Creek;  Patricia and husband Kennedy of  Aberdeen, Scotland; four grandsons Colin, Greg, Michael and  Chris; two granddaughters, Tam-  mie and Kristen; two sisters,  Alice and Isabella; one brother  Jack, all in Scotland. Service was  held Friday, March 31 in the  chapel of Devlin Funeral Home,-  Gibsons, Reverend Alex Reid officiated, cremation. #14  LEECH: Passed away March 27,-  1989 Leone Sidney Leech, late of ^  Roberts Creek, age 47 years.  Survived by her loving husband  George; two sons Glen Leech and  wife Leslie of Gibsons, Thomas  Leech of Sechelt; one daughter  Marie and John Nickerson of Gibsons;  four grandchildren;   her  parents John and Clara Stevenson and  one sister Margaret  Stevenson. Service was held Friday, March 31 in the chapel of  Devlin Funeral Home, Gibsons.  Reverend Alex Reid officiated. ;i  Cremation, remembrance dona-���-'  tions may be made to the Cancer *  Society. #14  ������' ������m  Male orange fluffy cat, Grand-  view/Pratt Rd. area. 886-3779.  #14  Grey & white 10 mo.-1 yr. cat  behind vet hospital, answers to  Blue. Reward. 886-3333.     #14  Lost - medium sized rubber  dinghy, Pender Harbour Easter  Monday, Call collect  (604)327-2919. #14  Beautiful cedar strip canoe missing from Wood Bay area approx. 3  wks., great sentimental value,  would be grateful for its return.  CHARLETON:   Passed   away- [**?*�� " E1,iot-"or   Ci"^  $larch 29. 198987^bmT rcM-op8**469*'-'***-- *!; m  Charleton, late Qf Halfmoon Bay injj  his 75th year. He leaves to mourn,;;  his loving former wife Brucenda,,'  two   sons,   Claude   and' wife  Joanne; Bruce and wife Anita;  two   daughters,   Nancy   and  Juanita;   four   grandchildren,  Tracy, Cory, Serena, Jeremy; one  brother Peter and wife Irene, of  Winnipeg; one sister Ruth and  husband Tony Werbin, of Ottawa.  Bethel Baptist Church, Sechelt,  Pastor Calvin Mclver officiating.  Cremation   to   follow.   Devlin  Funeral   Home,   Directors.  Remembrance donations to Heart  Fund   appreciated   in   lieu   of  flowers. #14 -  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS  885-2896, 886-7272, 886-2954.  TFN  If someone in your family has "a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doing to you? Al-  Anon can help. Phone 886-9903  or 886-8656.  Attention Teens  Al-Ateen   Can   Help.   Phone  886-2565. TFN  Phone us today about our beautiful selection of personalized wed-.  ding invitations, napkins, matches, stationery, and more.  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems  886-2023  TFN  We've moved again! From Sunnycrest Mall to 1507 Reed Road  (1 km west of Henry Rd.) Sorry  for any inconvenience and please  call for service and supplies.  886-4776 or 886-8053. Geri's  Electrolux #16  Busy? Tired? Unwell?  Stock up  on  Leigh  Currier's  DELECTABLE DEALS  Let a professionally trained chef  simplify your life. Service includes preparation of meals, portioning, packaging and delivery,  all for a reasonable rate! Eat  healthy and delicious meals,  hassle-free, menu and prices  available upon request. Call  885-7950. #14  In Memoriam  Gordon W. Grant  Fondest memories - With Love,  brothers   Stan,   Les,   Jack;  daughter, Daria. #14  Thank You  Thanks to 'First-Aid Roy' from  the tooth patient! #14  Personal  Are you; in an unhappy relationship? Call the Transition House  for free confidential counselling.  885-2944. TFN  INDIVIDUAL THERAPY  COUPLES COUNSELLING  Call Eleanor Mae 885-9018  #16  SKIN CARE BY JOY SMITH  Now open at 5545-D Wharf Rd.,  Sechelt, Galiano Market Mini-  Mall. Facials, pedicures,  manicures, makeup, eyebrows,  waxing, full body relaxation  treatments. 885-7174.        #16  Announcements  than & Now Furniture  699 Hwy. 101, Gibsons  will pay fair prices  for your quality used  furniture  Please phone 886-4716  We are open 10:30-4:30, Tues.  toSat. #16  No More Long Distance Phone  Calls! The MOOS BROTHERS  -Rome Milke Delivery Services  -have moo-ved to the Sunshine  Coast. New Orders now being accepted. We ,100k forward to hearing from you. Phone 886-3542.  Y #15  Found  Found, young grey fern, cat,  gorgeous, friendly. 886-9025 or  886-8481. #14  iMen's ring, red stone plus initial  P, at Coast News, Gibsons.  #14  1 ��� Pets  &. Livestock  MAGUS KENNELS  ��� Bright clean dog  & cat boarding  :# Dog grooming  Lowest Prices On  Y   "SCIENCE DIET"  OPEN 8 am - 6:30 pm  everyday. 886-8568  Kanata/Welsh pony mare, 5 yrs.,  very fancy, $500. 886-3999.  CKC   registered   Cairn   Terrier  . pups, $400. 885-3805.        #15  ��� >~: SPCA ADOPTION  "Poodle X male, golden Lab X  female, variety of cats and kittens. 885-5734. #14  SCIENCE DIET & IAMS  Pet Food  Quality Farm & Garden  Supply Ltd.  Pratt Rd. 886-7527  CASTLEfiOCK  KENNELS  Highway 101,  Roberts Creek  885-9840  -farting & 0ro*mjn$  No animals will be accepted without  current vaccination records.  SPCA   SPAYING   PROGRAM  886-7837, 886-8044, 885-9582.  TFN  Sharon's Grooming  Now at Sunshine Feeds  886-4812  SUNSHINE FEEDS  670 INDUSTRIAL WAY  CO-OP FEEDS  PETFOODS  & ACCESSORIES  9:30 to 5:30  886-4812  15 H.H.  registered Q.H.  Bay  Gelding, exc. beginners horse,  tack included, $2000.886-3093.  #16s  Marcey's Pet Service  Pet taxi pickup and deliver pets,  livestock, house sitting. We care.  ;886-4967. #14  For sale, electric piano, Rhodes  73.886-3805. #14  Electric Base Guitar player  wanted for performance end of  May, must read music.  886-8026. #14  'JeJ piano  TUNING  repairs & appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  W Anted  Patio sliding glass doors, 76 to  78"H. max., or French doors.  886-3882. TFN  Apt. size freezer, 50" or under,  around $100-$130. 885-9209  aft. 6pm. TFNs  Walnut tea wagon, gd. cond.,  reas. price. 886-7425. #14  Manual typewriter in gd. cond.,  for beginner student. 886-9290.  #16  Bldg. lot to put cabin on, must be  reasonable, location not important, letters to Box-307, c/o  Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons,  B.C. #14  I would like to borrow owner's  manual for 1978 Mustang.  886-7722 aft. 6pm, thank you.  #14  Need ride from North and Reed  Rd. to 6:20 am ferry, Mon. to  Fri., will, share expenses.  886-2191 aft. 6:30 eves.      #14  Moving - yard sale, Sat., Apr. 8,  10 am corner Reed & Chamberlin  Rd. (582 Reed Rd.) carpenters  tools, bicycles, household effects  and much more. 886-7389.  #14  Sun., Apr. 9, 11-3pm, Cheryl  Ann Park Rd. off-Lower Rd.  Rbts.Ck. #14  Apr 8,10 to 2,^,513 Sargent Rd.,  antique French birdcage, piano,  $995. #14  Sat., Apr. 8, 9 to 5. 743 School  Rd., housewares, misc. tools,  garden implements. #14  Gibsons B.P.W. Club, Apr. 15,  10 to 3, Rbts. Ck., watch for  signs, early birds pay double.  #15  Garage Sale - Sat., Apr. 8, 10  am, 724 Dogwood Rd. #14  Barter & Trade  78 P/U Courier, 4 cyl., 4 spd.,  runs good, new paint. 885-4593.  #16s  Toyota 10 Forklift on propane,  ready to work, exc. shape, new  rubber. 885-4593. #16s  '81 Escort 4 cyl., 4 spd., low  miles,, new paint, exc. shape.  885-4593. #16s  For Sale  T & S SOIL  Mushroom Manure  Topsoil Mixed  Bark Mulch  By the yard or 14 yard diesel  dumptruck-full. Top quality products at reasonable prices. You  pickup or we deliver.   Phone  anytime 885-5669. TFN  Wood stove, CSA approved,  heats large house. $650 OBO.  885-5461. #15s  Stereo, receiver, rec player,  cassette & Altec speakers (cas. &  recs inc.), stand. $975.  886-7819. #14s  The Woodman  Firewood for sale  Full cord guaranteed  886-3779  #20  ict^ftdtWrFiijfewtTUfiE'  tt'. Interiors  Introduces  Gas range 4 burner, gold, med.  size fridge (white), offers.  885-3167 885-3244 (mess.)  #14  White toilet complete, $40; 2  fibreglass shower stalls, $50 ea.  883-2296. #14  Men's 12 sp. touring bike;  typewriter table; letter size filing  cabinet; 2 antique dressers &  rocking chair. 886-8504.      #14  Canopy for Ford pickup, $125.  885-5770. #14  CB radio, $50; receiver &  speakers, $275; TV stand, $100.  886-7819. #16s  Jack & Jill Preschool chicken  sale, Apr. 13. For orders call  886-3119 or 886-8443. #14  Scouts, Cubs & Beavers,  mushroom manure sale, Apr. 8 &  9, Gibsons Curling Rink.       #14  Speed Queen auto, washer, $295  Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648. TFN  Elna Lotus sewing machine, compact, portable, full feature, direct  drive, 8 builtin stretch stitches,  exc. working cond. $150 OBO.  885-2203. TFNs  Child's 20"BMX, suitable for 6  : yf" old, $30. 885-9209 aft. 6pm.  TFNs  Approved temp, power pole,  $125. 886-7947 aft. 6pm.  #14  Firewood For Sale  885-5461  #14  JEWELLRY DESIGNER  Lindy LeBlanc  Stone Setting; Construction; Old  Gold   Recycled;   Wedding   &  Engagement.   For  appointment  886-7941. #14  Mixed firewood. $80/cord.  Phone eves. 886-9674 or  886-3310. #14  Small 2 bdrm. cottage (450 sq.  ft.) to be moved from lower Gibsons. 886-2911. #14  SPRING CLEANING  Special!  Lvgrm. Dng. area  & hall $49*5  Any 5 Rooms $9900  -UNCOMPROMISING QUAUTY-  886-8564  A DIVISION OF DEE'S FINE CLEANING  White Admiral stove, $25; working cond., builtin Roper D/W  gold, $50; gd. cond.. Irg.  covered bbq with rotis., $30.  886-8454. #14  5 HP B/S hydraulic wood splitter,  $750.886-8290. #15  3/8 factory plywood cuttings,  hundreds to choose from. 8 am to  5pm. 886-2664.. #15  Decorating Consultant - House &  Holmes. 886-4883. #15  Green Onion  Earth Station   ��  SATELLITE j  Sales & Service     H  885-5644  Any message that isn't of a business or  commercial nature may be placed on  'The Back Fence'  at the regular classified rate of $4.00  for the first 10 words and 25e for  each additional word, plus $2.00 extra  Brown Kenmore range, $100  OBO. 886-9009. #16  9 pce. country oak dining suite,  like new, $2200; 5 pce. queen  size pine bedroom suite, like  new, $800; dishes, misc.  886-8156. #16  IW��j^M  Power  Equipment  Specif  Lawn Mowers;  on Sale  Years from now,:  You'll be     :  glad you didn't:  compromise   J  TIDELINE MARINE;  S��S7 WtiaH M. I  885-4141  8' pool table with snooker & pool  balls.cues and stand, $200 O_0.  886-7919. >14  Canopy for full size pickup. $350  OBO. 886-3383. #16  Old bathtub (clawfoot); old sink;  door in frame; brass tips.  885-7105 eves. |14   ,, ,  . fc���  Detroit diesel 8V7IN macjrie  engine; recond. gen. pafts,  guaranteed prof, workmanship,  with or without rebuilt twin dj$c.  3 to 1 gear. Call 886-4577 da&'S,  886-3575 eves. #16   3_  _ ��� ���7���  Bed chesterfield, like new corjti.,  comfortable. $250. 886-7757:  .     #14  STEAM CLEAN  Carpets &  Upholstery  ., .   fc'  ���Just    /�� >  Ask    )M  Around Wa  v       Over 30 years experience  in the Carpet Industry  Our reputation for      '���  dependability and thorough"  results is well known   '  ��� The most powerful unit \  on the Sunshine Coast   >  ��� The system most     ��  carpet manufacturers    ',  recommend! ',  CHERISHED CARPET  709 Hwy. 101, Gibsons'  886-3823 or 886-7112  ;  Green stove, Viscount model, gd.  cond., $125. 886-4770.       #14  Rockwell Beaver 9" tablesaw,  stand, 4' cast iron bed, various  blades, dado, % HP, $250;  Rockwell Beaver 36" wood lathe,  stand, motor, chisels, accessories, $150. Various woodworking tools and appliances.at  bargain prices. Custom made  Saxon spinning wheel. $200; inlaid backgammon cabinet set,  $100.885-9792. #15  26" colour console TV, works,  $100. 886-7558 eves. #15  Thanks to\  Sylvia at  Shop Easy  for the  Birthday Cake  you did a wonderful'  job of copying  Bill's cartoon onto itY  zr  Thanks to  Wendy & Marieo  for their help  in a beautiful  home birth of our  daughter  March 28, 1989  ��     Sonja & Brian .--    i.;. . .  I        '    .  1&  Coast News, April 3,1989  :  PUMP FEATURES  *- Polished solid  ceramic plungers to  last long and  resist abrasion  \,�� Triplex plunger  ^design provides lov/  "pulsation and quiet  .���operation  -'- internally lubricated  * and cooled packings  GEARBOX FEATURES  --���' No belts to be  adjusted  - No bulky belt guards  THERMO SENSOR  Protects pump  when by-passing  Strong, lightweight  framework. Powder coated  HONDA  OHV Gas Engine  c/w recoil starter,  oil alert,  automatic  decompressor  for  easy-starting.  Storage for spare  nozzles and hoseJ  3" Wand  with nozzle  Adjustable  pressure  regulator/  unloader.  Pneumatic Tires  finish for durability.  Trigger Type  Gun rated for  10 USGPM and  4,000 PSIG Max.  OPEN CONSTRUCTION ALLOWS FOR:  - continual visual inspection of  components without need of removing  shrouds, covers, etc.  - easy servicing of engine  - easy servicing of pump  ��� easy cleaning  TIDELINE MARINE  5637 Wharf Rd. 885-4141  HAY FOR SALE  $3.50 can deliver. 885-9357  TFN  Antique   marble  topped   wash  stand,  excellent shape, $450.  i 886-7696. #16s  ��� Dining room suite, antique, oak,  bow front buffet with mirror and  48" round oak claw foot table,  :_2" leaf, 4 spindle-back chairs,  ���$1700.886-7696. #16s  i . Potent Horse Manure  ": Beat the spring rush  r^~; $20/P.U. (aged)  --: $15/P.U. (fresh)  Y 885-9969  Y: TFN  ^*i#   TKenmore   heavy   duty   white  Rasher,  $359  0B0  (recond.);  ."24" white auto, stove, recond.,  !|~$189 OBO; 18 cu. ft. white auto.  TStove, recond., $189 OBO; 18 cu.  ;ft.   McClary   chest   freezer,  r yfecond., $247 OBO; Inglis white  'iii'ryer,   recond.,   super  shape,  jt$249 OBO; Admiral h. gold frost  -free 15 cu. ft. fridge, recon.,  %347 OBO;    Viking white 30"  I .stove, auto., rotis., $279 OBO;  ^McClary Easy white 30" stove,  3rpt., 30", $249 OBO;   Westh.  Swasher & dryer (stacker), $669  Iqr. OBO; Maytag builtin recond.  . J^mond dishwash., top of the  $ne,  $399  OBO;     Appliances  ���guaranteed from 90 days to 2  . jyrs., parts and labour. Corner  Ycupboard   885-4434   or   Bjorn  $85-7897, will buy non-working  *6> used appliances. 885-7897.  #13  fisher fireplace insert, CSA approved, large firebox, very efficient, $250.885-9017.        #14  ���VI  ;|<,      RH0D0S & AZALEAS  Roberts Creek Nursery  &irge selection $3 to $16, 2569  :_&werRd. 886-2062. #14  Ail   Texas instrument computer/w.  flgfnes, cassette recorder & 14"  $$pur TV. 886-7425. #14  ESklar chesterfield and chair, dark  *tgreen, 4 yrs. old, one person us-  '���led, $275 firm. 885-9545.     #14  *i   JJM.E.I. car stereo deck, $100;  8  *_  Redline   BMX   bike,   $150.  885-2339.  #14  ��f!0"  sp.   bike,   woman's,   gd.  ���Sjcond., $55. 886-8097. #16  ���q   &26" colour TV, gd. cond., $250.  $886-8955. #14  ;-4   rfGold fridge/stove, $250 ea., or  $$400 pr. 886-9749. #14  S  Arborite tble. with leaf, $40; 3  shelf util. table, $15; bathroom  J^space saver, $20; long mirror,  "$20;  gal.  undercoat, $10; 4'  elec. mtr., $12; Ige. 4 draw.  chest, $35. 886-2644. #16  S'Dbl. stroller, front to back, dbl.  lock, wheels, fully reclining  seats, basket underneath, brand  *���- new cond., rain cover incl., paid  $225, used once, take $150  0B0.885-2512. #16  Burgundy contemporary chesterfield, like new, $295. 886-4827.  #14  Chesterfield   suite;   queensize  bed; stereo; TV; freezer; satellite  dish;   lawn   mower,   misc  _. household  and  garden  items  ��j 885-3332. #16  r,\    ��iRropane stove & fridge, hot water  |s neater for  motorhome,  $100  885-3839. #14  ?  f8 cu. ft. chest freezer, $165;  antique German piano, $550.  885-3502 aft. 7 pm. #16  Pair Good Year tires, 31x11,  $200 pr. 885-5797. #14  AM/FM tuner record player, two  speakers, $150.886-8286.  #16  Canopy for Vz or % ton pickup,  $250,885-5444. #17s  ������*  <-*  &  10' Sears radial arm saw with  stand, like new, $800; 3.5 HP  Tecumseh engine, new, $300;  set hardware; for 9x7 garage  door. $150 OBO. 885-9245 mom.  or eves. #15  Complete  bee  keeping equipment, extractor etc. 883-1112.  #16  Autos  CASH PAID  For Some Cars and Trucks  Dead Car Removal  886-2020  TFN  Sales &   885-2030  Rent-Is  DL7711  74 Olds, 2 dr., PS, PB, AM/FM  cassette, $800 OBO. 885-9425  eves. #16s  1986 heavy duty F250 4X4 XLT  Lariet Explorer, fully loaded,  $16,900 OBO, towing pkg. con-  sidertrade. 886-8104.       #15s  1970 Corvette 350 tunnel ram,  new paint, tires & mags, $8,500  OBO. 886-4870.   . #16s  '68 COUGAR  Silver-grey with black roof  & interior, new tires, carb.,  dual exhaust, headers, good  shape, 302 V8 auto.  Asking $2000.  886-2215 aft. 6 pm.  TFNs  71 Mercury Comet G.T., 302  auto., mags, bucket seats,  AM/FM stereo cassette, PS/PB,  $2995.886-9500. #15s  STEWART ROAD  AUTO WRECKING  Some FREE car removal used  parts   and   mechanical   work,  guaranteed 886-2617, bring this  ad in for 10% discount.        TFN  72 Ford Courier, economical, no  problems. 885-4546. #16s  1979 Datsun pickup, run. cond.,  $550 OBO. 886-4743. #17s  73 Volvo S/W exc. run., cond.,  cheap on gas, $800. 885-5505.  #14s  '84 GMC Vz ton, trailer package,  exc. cond., $7995 OBO.  883-2433. #15s.  '83 Chevette Scooter, 4 dr.,  sedan, runs well, $2800.  886-7581 aft. 3pm. #14  '69 GMC pickup, run. cond.,  very rusty, $200. 886-2426 aft.  6pm. #14  '86 Honda XL, 4dr.,HB, 5 spd.,  low mileage, $5495. 886-4967.  #14  '87 Ford 4X4 F150, exc. cond.,  $13,500, or could trade.  883-2863 aft. 6pm. #15s  79 Mercury Monarch 4 dr., V8,  battery, tires, paint, motor good.,  $1875.885-3933. #14  78 Chev Impala S/W, V8 auto.,  PS/PB, cruise AM/FM cass.,  near new tires, batt., paint, looks  and runs great, $2500 OBO.  885-7008. #14  '69 Plymouth 30,000 mi. on  rebuilt motor, N/B, runs great,  $650.886-8290. #15  '82 Ford Escort, 4 dr., 4 sp., gd.  cond., $2250.886-2433.    #16s  1977 Honda Civic hatchback,  new brakes, new muffler, $1500  OBO. 886-8387. #14  1980 Pontiac Safari wagon,  engine 1982 c/c, PW/PS/PB,  AC, $4600 OBO. 886-9009.  #16  '83 Ford Mustang h/back, exc.  cond., $5000. 885-2231.     #16  '67 Baracuda, runs well, fair  cond., offers. 885-5161 Kevin.  #16  79 GMC Vz ton, 4X4, 150 km,  $3500 OBO. 886-3383. #16  75 Hornet, 3 spd., runs great,  $550 OBO. 886-3729. #14  1986 Cutlass Sierra Brougham, 4  dr., PS/PB, wirewheels,-4 cyl,  fuel inj., f.w. drive, 36,000 mi.,  $8700 firm. 886-3105. #14  '84 Ford Escort GL wagon, auto.,  PS/PB, AM/FM stereo, 45,000  kms, immaculate, $5100.  886-3858. #14  '81 F250 Supercab, 400 auto.,  clean truck', 78000 mi.  886-3767. #14  1975 Dodge Dart, some rust,  dependable trans., $400 OBO.  886-9145. #15  79 Ford Fairmont, 6 auto., exc.  cond., air cond., extras, new  tires, $1695. 885-9545.       #14  %  AUTO  *  Ni  SUPERMARKET*  We Dare You to Compare!  ��� *E tfSEU  1  i      ,-rPWCeSl   BETTER BOYS  # 40 Cats  TRADES WELCOME  FINANCING AVAILABLE  1  !  SAVE THOUSANDS NOW!  .M=ett  Bfcp05 \,FrtlCLfcS-  POWEfJTRAIN ��  WARRANTY ��-  ON MOST USED *'  VEHICLES ���<  BUY  WITH  m      CONFIDENCE  ���_ilIi(iEii_0!i  FORD ��� LINCOLN ��� MERCURY  5  Wharf Rd., Sechelt . MDL5936  885-3281.  SOUTH COAST FORD    SOUTH COAST FORD    SOUTH]  1983 Buick Skyhawk, 5 spd.,  85,000 kms., exc. cond., $5600  OBO. 886-4624. #16  Wanted - '86 Honda Civic G.L  exc. cond., auto., or similar vehicle, call collect 980-9098.     #15  '67 Dodge Coronet, exc. cond.,  cared for, $4300 OBO. 885-1921.  #16  78 Chev Nova, 6 cyl. auto., gd.  run. cond., $600 OBO.  886-9964. #14  35oH4  #14  1974 Chev % ton P.U.  sp., $500. 886-9749.  75 Dodge Club Cab, 318 auto.,  PS/PB, cruise control A/C  AM/FM, body exc. runs well, 4  new all season radial heavy load,  new starter & waterpump, Just  tuned, $2300 OBO. 885-9487 or  885-5503. #16  72 Chev Camaro, metallic green,  PS/PB, exc. cond. 883-9041.  #16  1976 Ford P/U, 460, little rust,  $1100.885-5797. #14  Wanted -1969 Fargo, run. or for  parts. 886-8541 aft. 5pm.    #16  '80 Mustang, V8 auto., sunroof,  AM/FM/Cass., extras, gd.  cond., $3500 OBO. 886-8059.  #16  Campers  Motothomes  14' Scamper, $1700 OBO, 3 way  fridge, furnace, gd. cond., sleeps  four, would consider trading for  bigger trailer. 886-9890 aft.  5pm. #14  18' travel trailer, fully equipped,  $1950.886-9224. #14  Hunter's Special - 8' camper with  jacks, $500 OBO. 885-7623 aft. '  6pm. #15  1969 Empress class 'A' 21'  motorhome, very clean, $10,500.  886-2432 or 886-7923.       #16s  Hunter Special - 8' camperettei  stove,   furnace,   cupboards.  886-3821 aft. 6pm. #16s  24' deluxe motorhome 1988, immaculate, 17,000 kms.,  $32,900,886-8481. #16s  '60 GMC 22 ft. bus motorhome,  prop, fridge, stove, furn. needs  TLC, $800 OBO. 885-7033.  #16  77   VW   Westphalia   poptop  camper, no rust, new paint, new;  engine, exc. cond., $7000 OBO. j  885-2382. #16 j  ���  ��� :  i  27' Airstream trailer, tub shower, '���-.  stove, fridge, heater, etc. 'gd. |  tires, work/order, asking $6000. \  886-3032. Y        .#14!  Marine  OUTBOARDS FOR SALE  9.9-20-30-40-50-70 HP  1987-1988 Evinrudes. Excellent  condition. Lowes Resort,  883-2456. TFN.  Samson 37' FC sailboat, world  cruiser, live aboard, equipped,  42 g. 886-7400 messages. #17s  '68 H.P. Osco Ford marine diesel  and hy. gear, as new cond.  883-9401. #|7s  14* fibreglass boat, 50 HP Merc,  new leg, new trailer, new suntop  with side windows, very clean,  comes with 2 fuel tanks, $2800  OBO. 886-3882 aft. 6pm.  TFN  Thinking of  A  /  Re-Powering  your boat?  Mercruiser  Volvo Penta  or OMC  /  Free Estimates  Trades Welcome  TIDELINE MARINE p  5637 Wharf tW.  '. 885-4141 JJ  xXs-SZ_-_srv\'v y-_~>7  OMC new manitold & riser, $450;  4 cyl. OMC motor with rebuilt  head, $300. 886-3191.        15s  30' Disp. Cruiser,, recently  rebuilt, 340 Chrys. dual hyd.  steering, many extras, $11,500.  885-2814. #17S  17V2' older boat with 270 Volvo  leg, with or without motorboat.  $1500, motor $1000. 886-7677.  #17s  .\   S   \ A   \   \   \  N   V V  BROOKS & MILLER  FLOOR COVERINGS LTD.  Benjamin Moore & International  Paints  Marine  Finishes  Commercial  Pricing  Bill Wood  SECHELT  Bus. 885-2923  Res. 885-5058  \   V \   \    \  \   \ N   S   \   \   V   \  \   \  A  16 ft. Available Now  17 ft. & up ORDER NOW  FOR SUMMER ENJOYMENT  Arriving Soon  12' Springbok Car Toppers  Used 1987 IS HP  Johnson Motor  M595  Used 12'  Harbercraft  $899  10'  Harbercraft  $899  Trail Ave .4 Cowrie SECHEU   885'2517  7.5 KVA generator Onan marine  diesel, rebuilt. 883-1164 eves.  883-9459. #15  M.V. Bristler, 40' ex-  gillnet/hallbut boat, plywood  Cummins 903 radar, sounder,  Loran C, Mark IV pilot, 20,000  Ib. capacity, $65,000. 883-2667  eves. #16s  fy^���*^^'^W*��lk  Cal25, fully equipped, moorage  included, $11,500. 886-8706.  #16s  '84-17' BOSTON WHALER MON-  TAUK centre console 80 HP,  Merc, galvanized trailer, Biminy  top, video sounder, $15,500.  270-6764. #17s  12Vz' Springbok alum, boat and  trailer, $800, gd. cond.  886-8595. #14  20' sailboat and trailer, near new  motor, $2000. 886-9056.     #14  "SECHELT MARINE"  SURVEYS LTD.  , Captain Bill Murray  M.C.M.M.C    M.N.A.M.S. |  M.A.B-Y.C-.-,*. Marine,  Surveyors arid Consultants  885-3643  '  '  885-4141  ���I23 ft. Pension, 10 ft. beam, ^  Twin F.W.C. 165 Mercruiser  engine & sterndrive, compl.  ^rebuilt,   full   warranty,  $15,000 firm.  14 ft. wide Misty River alum,  boat, new condition, fresh  water use only, $1,895.  TIDELINE MARINE  5637 Wharf Rd.  r 885-4141 ^j  M \ \ v, TT-VT TVCy  20' F/G cabin boat, OMC motor &  leg, trailer, $5000. 886-9865.  #16  '69 100 HP Merc, outboard, for  parts, $100 takes all. 886-9009.  #16  18' Sangster, 120 Merc, AM  radio, LB tank & pump, depth  sounder, 1.5 Honda OB, new  steering cable, bilge pump, alum,  fuel tank, Road Runner trailer,  $4500 takes all. 886-7916.   #14  1980 24' Campion I/O 280 HP  Mercruiser, S.O. head, elec.  winch, VHF, sounder, 2 way  fridge, alcohol elec. stove, block  heater, low hours. 886-2155 aft.  6pm. .#14  14' Whaler 70 HP Merc, and  trailer. 885-2243. #14  12' aluminum cartop boat, $450.  886-8290. #15  1979 20' Apollo 232 HP Mercruiser head, trimtabs, CB,  sounder. 883-9937. #16s  German made inflatable boat,  carry car, 410 kg, takes up to 25  HP motor, $2600 OBO. 885-9245  morn, or eves. #15  8' Sabot 15' mast, spare boom  and skeg, $400 OBO. 886-7919.  #14  77 Bayliner Nisqually, standup  head, sounder, FWC trim, VHF,  full canvas, 7Vz Evinrude incl.,  exc cond., $14,900. 926-6944.  #15  171/2' Hourston Glascraft, 120  HP, 4 cyl., Mercruiser, IB/OB  hardtop trailer. $3500. 883-9303  eves. #16  Model 2280 Reinell 188 Mer-  cruiser, new leg, sounder, CB,  anchor package, flying bridge,  stove, cooler, sleeps 5, gd. top,  heavy duty trailer with elec.  winch, $9000 for the package.  886-7304. #16  New and Used  Mobile Homes   ,  CHAPMAN CREEK  HOMES LTD.  4496 Hwy. 101, Sechelt  885-5965  Park Spaces Available  D.L. 7283  '83 Kawasaki GPZ 550, exc.  cond. 13,000 kms. $2000 OBO.  886-7198.   , #17s  1979 Yamaha 750 DOHC fully  .dressed. 886-3841. #17s  '84 KX 250 CI. exc. cond.. little  used, must be seen, '82 MX80,  $175 OBO. 885-7585. #17s  '86 Yamaha 50, low hours, exc  cond., $300.885-5904.     #16s  '83 Honda CS650E, water cooled, shaft drive, sport bike, $1800  OBO. 885-5770. #15s  1987 Virago 535, 1100 kms.,  comes with 2 helmets, asking  $2500.886-4690. #14  '82 Kawasaki KE175, on/off  road, 2200 kms., $575 OBO.  886-3383. #16  Yamaha 100 cc trail bike, $275.  885-7033 eves. #16  24.   'y:'-\...;"y:Y  Wanted to Rent  _EE_  3_C  MOBILE HOMES  INSTANT HOUSING  NEW AND USED  TTLbwlis 5% Down  1 *thMJ^��i��  REGAL HOMES LTD.  Call Collect: 580-4321  z_e  _____  ���'- ay,"vr\Vr>'fV v-'  Vf.'  CHOICE LOT  Big Maple Park  BRIGHT  DOUBLE WIDE  2 bdrm. or 1 plus Den,  Master bdrm. has  ensulte powder room  F/R.W/D  Redecorated & new  carpet throughout, not  a wallboard in sight  Large Patio,  Landscaped, Carport, ���  Toolshed & Cedar  Storage Shed  Listed  36,900  885-2203  sv' ^'fy'Vr"^r*.",V(*;",yf'  Small garage suitable to work on  classic car. 885-7112.    .    #14  Mature responsible adult. N/S,  N/D, refs., room or small suite  with cooking facilities, Sechelt.  885-3889 days, 885-7301 eves.  #14  2 bdrm. house Pender Harbour  area N/S, no pets, approx. $450,  immed. P.O. Box 370, Madeira  Park. 885-5296 Ed. #15  Carpenter looking for house to  rent, 1 or 2 bdrm. willing to do  work for less rent. 886-9089.  #16  Reliable father arid son seek rental home on the Sunshine Coast,  furn. or unfurn., for year round  residence, near secondary  school, exc. refs. 943-6664.  #15  Responsible family looking for  permanent 3 or 4 bdrm. home in  Gibsons as far as Hall Rd., refs.  avail. 886-8593 or 886-9288  mess. #16  Apartment, bachelor, basement  suite wanted by nonsmoker, non  drinker responsible working  woman, Sechelt area pref. Call  Odette aft. 5pm. 886-3217 or  886-4650. . #16  For Rent  rrs s   v  Commercial  Building  For Sale, Rent or  Lease  Highway 101, Gibsons  Store front and parts area,  J 1,500 sq. ft., 2 bay shop  Y 1,500 sq.ft.  For appointment to view, call  Dorhn Bosch, 885-4141 ^.  ������  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  These Ads appear in the more than 90 Newspapers of the B.C. and Yukon Community  Newspapers Association and reach more than 1,400,000 homes and a potential two million readers.  $159. for 25 words ($3. per each additional word)  Call the Coast News at 885-3930 to place one.  AIRCRAFT  West Wind Aviation. Buy,  Sell or Trade. BC's largest  selection of used aircraft.  For your free monthly flyer  or free appraisal phone  Brian at (604)837-2948.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  EDUCATION  AUTOMOTIVE  What's your choice? Buy,  lease, new, used, repos &  ex-lease, or take over payments. Access to large inventories. Financing arranged OAC. Call collect,  520-1113.    Nodown payment and bank  financing O.A.C. Lease/purchase new, used trucks,  cars. B.C.'s largest Ford  Dealer, since 1927. Call Bob  Langstaff collect 522-2821.  DJ5276. y  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  Award-winning   community,  newspaper,    supplementary  publications, real estate..  Average revenue $155,000; ���  prospects for more. Reply:  Newspaper, #312, 4809 - 34  Street,  Red  Deer,  Alberta  T4N 0P2.   Entrepreneur interested in  any viable business, phone  (403)482-6428 or (403)627-  4751 or send Information to:  910, 9837 -110 St., Edmon-  ton. Alta. T5K 2L8.  Cash in on Tax Reform!,  Learn Income Tax Preparation by correspondence.  Earn your certificate now.  Also enquire about exclusive franchise territories.  For free brochures, no obligation, U&R Tax Services,  #205, 1345 Pembina Hwy.,  Winnlpog, Man. R3T 2B6:  1-80CM585-5144.   Established and thriving  taxi business for sale in  Agassiz-Harrison Hot  Springs area. Three licenses  available. Dlrect-to-car telephone equipment. Some  terms may be arranged. Box  418, Agasslz. BC VOM 1AO.  Attend! "International  Franchise and Dealership  Exhibition," Sheraton Landmark, 1400-Robton St.,  Vancouver, March 31-, noon-  6 p.m.; April 1st & 2nd, 10  am��8 pm. Vlow- complete  selection of leading Iran-  chlsas and dealerships lerce  and small. Admission $10 at  door. For -Info: [604]687-  2900. ���    r  We built a successful business on our own! Retiring,  so we're selling on our ownl  Bridge Street Cleaners and  Custom Decorators, Princeton, BC started 1953, growing In thriving, revitalized  community with solid financial base: Lumber, mining,  agricultural industries. Includes: dry cleaning, personal laundry, rug and upholstery shampooing.  Custom Decorators: drapes,  fabrics, upholstery, blinds,  carpets, flooring. Sales - and  made to order. Town Center  31'x99' frame and concrete  block building w/large  apartment above, 31"x53' 3  bedrooms, 2 bath, electric  heat, fully carpeted, shop  and apartment air conditioned. Asking $75,000 for business and equipment or  $200,000 including building and property. Contact  Mel or Norma Turner, Box  446, Princeton, BC VOX  1WO. Phone (604)295-7133.  Import/ Export. Thousands  of contacts/products guaranteed. Step by step manual  showing how you can be  successful in import/export  business. Free sample product provided to get you  started now. Send $49.95  check or money order: Global Traders, Box 375, Chilliwack, BC, V2P 6J4. Include  S3 for shipping/handling.  Attention entrepreneurs. Be  first in your town to get In  on a new and exciting Canadian franchise opportunity.  Perfect as a start-up business or can be easily Incorporated into an existing  salon. Fantastic earning  potential. Complete training  provided. Call collect even-  ngs, 477-6163.  P  Ir  Sunny Okanagan: 8-year-old  motor inn. 160-seat banquet  room, restaurant, pub,  courtyard swimming pool.  Gross $754,000. Asking  $795,000. Far below replacement cost, Midtown  Realty, Vernon. (604)542-  SQ1Q.   "SHOE REPAIR AND  SHOP MANAGEMENT,"  Take the first stop towards  a business of your own with  Canada's best-known-pro-  ��ram.-Information: Counsel-  ng Department, Vancouver - Community - College,  Downtown -Campus, 250  West Pender Street, Vancouver, BC, 681-81 It, local  220. .     ���    n   .  Diploma correspondence.  Free calendar. High school  upgrading, English, book-  . keeping, Accounting, Computers, Business Administration, Small Business  Management, Office Management, Legal Secretary,  Taxation, Marketing, Personnel, Hotel & Restaurant  ...more. National College,  Vancouver 688-4913. Toll-  free 1-800-387-1281 (24  hours)  .  EQUIPMENT &  MACHINERY   1980 850 J.D. Crawler,  winch, arch, $85,000 OBO;  1978 640 J.D. Line-skidder,  $39,000 OBO; 1973 740 J.D.  Line-skidder, $29,000 OBO.  832-7723 after 6 p.m.  Fiatallis ��� parts - Aids Chalmers. New & used parts  plus large exchange program. Barger Equipment  Inc., 5967 - 103A St., Edmonton. Phone (403)438-  6700. Fax (403)438-6701.  FOR SALE MISC.  Mail-order ��� lovers toys  and sexy novelties. Send $4  to receive (4-colour) catalogue. Visa/MasterCard.  161 East 1st St., North Van-  couver, V7L 1B2. 987-1175.  Lighting Fixtures. Western  Canada s largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre., 4600  East Hastings Street, Burn-,  aby, B.C. V5C 2K5. Phone  1-299-0666.  QARDEfWTNQ        Interested in Greenhouse or  Hydroponic Gardening?  Greenhouses $195., Hydroponic Gardens $39., Halides  from $140. Over 2000 products in stock, super prices.  Free Catalogue call Toll  Free 1-800-663-5619. Water  Farms, 1244 Seymour St.,  Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3N9.  HEALTH  Vitamin Discounts Stores in  Vancouver offers across-  Canada mail order. Write  to: BEA Per Capita, 260  S.W. Marine, Vancouver,  B.C. V5X 2R5 for your free  catalogue.   HELP WANTED   A fully operational print  shop located in Port Hardy  requires a full-time manager - duties to include sales,  costing and responsibility  for the bottom line. A take  charge person with the enthusiasm needed to take our  print shop to the top. Resumes to Box 458, Port  Hardy. B.C. VON 2P0.  Volunteers required  throughout BC by the Multiple Sclerosis Society for  Carnations Campaign. May  11-14, 1989. If you can  spare a few hours call collect "VOLUNTEERS", 437-  3244.    Overseas positions. Hundreds of top paying positions. All occupations. Attractive benefits. Free details. Overseas Employment  Services, Dept. CA, Box  460, Mount Royal, Quebec,  H3P3C7.      PERSONALS   Would you like to correspond with unattached  Christian people in Canada/  USA with the object being  companionship/ Marriage?  Write to Ashgrove, Box 205,  Chase. B.C. VOE 1MO.  PETS A LIVESTOCK  INCUBATORS - hatch  chickens, ducks, geese,;  game birds, etc. Models  from $63.95. Free catalogue. Berry-Hill Limited, 75  Burweli Rd., St. Thomas,  Ont. N5P 3R5. (519)631-  0480.    SALERS BULLS - Your Partners In Profit. Performance  tested for predictability.  Raymond Bull Test Sale -  Fort Macleod Auction, April  3, 1:00 p.m. Cattleland Bull  Test Sale - Nilsson Bros.,  Clyde, April 8, 1:00 p.m.  For further information  (403)291-2620.  PETS & LIVESTOCK  New carriages/wagons, restorations, parts and accessories. Wheel repairs, coach  rentals. Consignments. Discounts for clubs and organizations. Cariboo Carriage  Works, Box 1017, 100 Mile  House, BC, VOK 2E0.  Phone (604)395-4111.  REAL ESTATE  Beautiful downtown Peach-  land, concrete block building 25x80, 220 - 3-phase  power $99,000, or buy existing custom wood-working  business, $148,000. Reply  Box 535, Peachland, BC  VOH 1XO. __L_  FREE booklet. Concrete or  wood for your basement?  Before you decide get all  the facts. Write: Foundation focus, 201-1155 W.  Pender St., Vancouver, BC  V6E2P4.     SERVICES  ICBC Injury Claims? Call  Dale Carr-Harris - 20 years  a trial lawyer with five years-  medical school before law  0-669-4922 (Vancouver). Experienced in head injury  and other major claims. Per-  centage fees available.  Major Injury claims. Joel A.  Wener, personal Injury trial  lawyer for 21 years. Call  collect, 736-5500 Vancouver.  If no recovery, no fee. No  Yukon Inquiries.    TRAVEL  _��'_���?eautiful QUALICUM  BEACH Vancouver Island.  Stay at Famous "Olde Eno-  Hsh" GEORGE INN Super  special 3 nltes $75 to May  31 (excepting holiday week-  eud.s)' ,��wo award-winning  chefs. (604)752-9236.  SKIERS: Lake Louise, sun-  tanning capital of the Canadian Rockies has Ski and  Stay^packages for only $33/  day (double occupancy, min-  _T"m��3 days). Call 1-800-  WANTED ���"~  POSTCARD COLLECTIONS WANTED. Top pric  68 pJi_Uor U8ed or unused  Kfrl^P plcture postcards.  Wrltejor free Information. 9ZmG<<.��^,^,^-si-''-���**  ^~?..^-.^;>,^;~r,^^^  Coast News, April 3,1989  #-  Davis Bay/Wilson Creek Hall  available. Wheelchair facilities.  Phone 885-2752 or 885-9853.  #18  1600 sq. ft. commercial building,  Gibsons. 886-4812. #14  1 bdrm. suite in Gibsons, avail.  Apr. 1, $40Q/mo. plus hydro.  886-3729. #14  Waterfront Porpoise Bay, new 3  bdrm. house, avail. Apr. 1.  $600,885-5053,525-2275. #14  Furn., room to rent, kitchen  priviledges, $200/jmo.  886-4650. #15  Upper Gibsons, modern 1 bdrm.  suite, lease only, adults, furn- or  unfurn. $450/mo., Phone collect  522-9630 or 886-3168.        #14  2 bdrm. house, furnished, lower  Gibsons, refs. 278-9224.  PRIME RETAIL  OFFICE SPACE  For Lease ��� 627 sq. ft.  Gibsons Quay,  .Next to Dentist & Real Estate  Great Harbour view  886-9110 days  INCREASE YOUR CHANCES! LET  OUR FINGERS DO YOUR TALKING! Call Arbutus Office Services  for fast and confidential preparation of your resume - 885-5212  TFN  Jack & Jill Preschool is looking  for a qualified Preschool Teacher  for Sept., 1989, ECE supervisors  certificate required. Apply to Box  801, Gibsons, B.C. #14  The Sechelt District Chamber of  Commerce requires the services  of an experienced Editor for a  research manuscript. Please  send resumes to Box 360,  Sechelt. Deadline Apr. 7. 1989.  #14  Babysitter required in my home  for 1 and 3 yr. olds, refs. req..  hrs. & days negotiable.  886-7145. #14  WAITRESSES &  BARTENDERS  REQUIRED  PENINSULA  MOTOR INN  886-2804  ^���-v--��v.v^v:.-T.-'?-'f'-";:;''~-r*rI7.'u.-jriKlr ' ���. "  Willie's   Restaurant  waitress  wanted, apply at Willie's.  #14  Intra Travel has a position  ' available for either part time summer, May thru August, or immediate full time employment.  Qualified travel consultants with a  minimum of 1 year agency experience preferred. Sabre an advantage. Please send or drop off  resume to Intra Vagabond Travel  Inc.. P.O. Box 2330, Trail Bay  Centre, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0 or  phone 885-5885. #17  Experienced filleters wanted,  please send resumes, Box 2540,  Sechelt, B.C. #14  Gardener required, retired person  pref. Write Box 306 c/o Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  Distributors required exclusive to  the Sunshine Coast to establish  their own F/T P/T business in  sales of a new Home Micro  Brewery System. A sure seller,  first time offered in Canada.  Nothing compares to it, simpler  and best tasting brew. Sundry  items also available. Earn extra  dollars through generous commissions. Self-motivated need  only apply. Must be over 21  years. For information or interview K.R.S., Box 1947, Sechelt,  B.C. VON 3A0 or call 885-2593.  ;       #14  Manager/Coordinator  Sechelt & District  Chamber of Commerce  This position is to manage, initially on a part-time basis, the  Sechelt & District Chamber of  Commerce office.' Qualifications  include research, planning,  organizational and communication skills; liaison with all levels of  government, grojups, associar  tions and members. Must be able  to work with minimum supervision and meet deadlines. Salary  commensurate with qualifications. Further information:  885-3100. Please send resume  and covering letter identifying  specific and additional skills and  experience by April 14,1989 to:  Manager/Coordinator  Sechelt & District Chamber of  Commerce, P.O. Box 360,  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0.        #14  Home Support Workers from  Langdale to Pender Harbour to  work with families who are experiencing stress; to work with  seniors and disabled adults in  their homes. Assist and support  persons in the activities of daily  living; Must enjoy working with  people, be in good health, and  have a car. Phone Sunshine  Coast Home Support Society at  885-5144. #16  DRYWALLERS NEEDED  Immediately!! Hans Ounpuu Construction 886-4680 #14  Mature individual for seasonal  work at marina/gas dock,, valid  driver's license a must, N/S  pref. For interview call 883-2296..  ass  ____r______s  3-D  U&&3E  The Mariners' Rsstaurant  requires the services of an  experienced, qualified  Brunch Cook  This is a full; part-time  position which may create  further opportunities for the  right person. Please apply in  person with resume and  application to the Chef,  Tuesdays, Wednesdays or  Thursdays between 2 and 3.  No phone caHs will be  entertained  te*xxieTii*r:irx*L  FRANC IS PENINSUl A PLACE  j6^|SrS��ffiiSS  RNs required for casual work,  please apply to ML Schoeler, Administrator/Director of Care,  Kiwanis Village Care Home.  886-9183. #17  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICE LTD.  Topping - Limbing - Danger Tree  Removal, Insured. Guaranteec  Work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  .        TFN  HOME IMPROVEMENTS  & RENOVATIONS  Reasonable & Reliable  886-2215  TFNs  Income Tax Service - complete  return including duplicate, $10.  Douglas Baird, 1255 Carmen Rd.  886-3955. #15  TREE TOPPING  Limbing, falling danger tree  removal, free estimates, fully insured. Jeff Collins 886-8225.  #16  EXPERIENCED PAINTER  Home and Garden Renovations,  Good Rates. 886-8161.        #16  ' SPRINGS AHEAD ~  and yardwork' to be done^  ���$10/hr. refs. on request.  886-8796. #14.  HOUSE PAINTING  Interior ��� Exterior  Call Sam Dill 886-7619  #17  Econo Hoe, Custom Backhoe Ser-,  vice, Langdale to Davis Bay.  886-8290. #15  Young willing student available  for part time work and odd jobs.  885-1921. #15  Things you want done? Odd jobs,  fences, sundeck, etc. Gord  .886-7224. #15  BRICKLAYER AVAILABLE  Extensive European & Canadian  training & experience in brick,  block, stone & concrete. Free  estimates. 886-7476. #16  Truck driver, new to area, class  1, W/A exper., gravel trucks,  trac-trailer, front-end loader, etc.  Frank 885-5823. #14  Craftsman Designer Builder, having a great variety of skills including cabinet making and fine  inside finishing. Will be available  between  Gibsons and  Pender  Harbour starting this summer for  quality projects, new or ren. dif-;  ficufr'sitesr'cfeative clients,''Win1 f,  ding stairs and round view tur-y  rets, welcome. Refs. available,  Call   Rod   Koenig,   Vancouver  734-6600. #15  TYPING SERVICE AVAILABLE  Resumes, Manuscripts, Business  Letters.    Prompt   service  886-8097. #16  Experienced painters and landscapes available for any size job.  885-5846. #16  Reliable watchman available,  $7/hr. Please leave message for  John 885-5937. #16  Roofing, re-roofing and repairs.  Reasonable and guaranteed.  Lome 885-4190. #16  Carpenter available for kitchens,  sundecks, general remodelling,  refs.. Brad 886-2558. #14  Tandem dumptruck avail, for  hauling, Liz. 886-7947 days,  886-9033 eves. #16  Child Care  Y DROP IN  Child Minding Service  Wed. to Fri., 9am to 3pm  Out of school care, Mon. to Fri., 3  to 6pm. Sat., 9 to 6pm. 3 hrs.  max., safe fun, licenced.  BANANAS PLAY CARE 886-9261  TFN  Mother of grown children will  babysit, my home, weekdays,  Sechelt, Jane. 885-5295.     #14  Now have openings for full time  daycare close to Gibsons Elementary School. Call Yvonne  886-8910. #16  MOTHER' HELP needed 3 days  p/week (Rbts. Ck.) never a dull  moment and lots of fun and  laughs! 886-4535. #14  3'0.       Business  Opportunities  Marine  H Business  For Sale  Commercial  Building  Marine Zone  Highway 101, Gibsons  Authorized dealer for Volvo  Penta, OMC, Evinrude out-  boards, Cobra Stern Drive, H  Chrysler and Mitsubisi  Diesel,  f] Includes stock, special  tools, forklift and shop}']  equipment.  For appointment to view, call  N   Dorhn Bosch, 885-4141  ^1\\ \ >\\U v\<y  H  Legal  INVITATION  TO TENDER  All found rental of Case 580C  backhoe or equal - Sechelt  District.  Reference: Q9:3246" '  Closing Date: 26 Apr. '89  Details available from office*  of B.C. Hydro Purchasing  Agent, 1265 Howe St., Suite  200, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z  2G8; 663-2577 or  663-2560.   Sealed tenders  clearly    marked    with  reference  number will  be  received in Room 226, address as above, until 11:00  am on above closing date.  teRCHydio  J  Continued from page 16  boss. I'm on the cellular phone  telling him what's going on,  then, all of a sudden, here  comes Farley! I'd thought he  was dead. Apparently he huddled in that stupid box, in two feet  of ice, and when the pens hit  shore he jumped off and ran all  the way along about a mile of  beach, and comes wagging his  tail, into the trailer. He's coated  with ice. He's got ice the size of  baseballs crusted all over him.  How that dog lived through two  nights of misery out there I  don't know.  "After the pens hit shore, the  winds eased a bit. By 'eased' I  mean they went from 60 to 50  miles an hour. The waves were  still washing two feet over the  dock.  "I think the thermometer hit  18 below on Wednesday, and it  stayed there. The winds hit 60  quite often for two or three  days. You can tell by the groan  of the trees and that...it's like  there's ten square miles of air  moving past you.  "You feel it, such a huge feeling, this great air mass, an  ominous feeling. It throws your  balance off too, your inner ear.  One side's heavy pressure and  one side's lean, and it's enough  to throw you off. You're kinda  dizzy out there in a lot of this,  and you're weaving around like  a drunk. A lot of it's just trying  to stand up in the wind, but  some of it's discombobulation.  The human body isn't really  designed to perform in high  winds like that.  "Thursday night we listened  to the news and heard that  they'd declared the coastal area  a disaster area, and that there  was a help line number. I rushed  right on the old radio phone and  I called that help line number.  He said, 'You're one of probably 30 thousand calls. We're  really swamped. Where are  you? Are you in immediate  danger? You can't land a chopper in 60 mile-an-hour winds.  "By Friday morning the  winds eased a bit, and the ice  fog was gone. I could see that  what was left (of the pens) was  breaking up badly. Another  couple of sections had broken  off and washed up on shore on  tnursday. A lot of it didn't  float to shore, it went straight  down. If a piece of walkway lost  its flotation, it went straight  down. Anything metal, dive  gear, lots df stuff.  "There's only one pen left  that might conceivably hold  fish. So much ice cover that  none of it's riding the waves,  the waves are just crashing into  it. So much ice weight on  everything.  "The  sub-freezing   weather  ���<2_^?_'X<r?*s-9��'  SUNSOFT ELECTRONICS  & VIDEO RENTALS  883-2988  j&TCKJjT^dWEl^  Rentals, Sales, & Service  883-9114  PENDER HARBOUR  CHEVRON  Complete Auto Repair  24-HOUR TOWING  883-2392  Pender Harbour Diesel  AUTO, MARINE & INDUSTRIAL  PARTS  883-2616  Peninsula Power &.  Cable Ltd.  Hi(;h & Low Volume Power Line:.  Outdoor Sub-Stations  883-2218  Marina  TOTAL SHOPPING  7 Days a Week  All Chevron Products  883-2253  Indian Isle  Construction  Backhoe & Dumptruck  Service  883-2747 or 883-2730  Garden Bay Hotel  Pub, Waterfrotnl, Restaurant, Moorage. Air  Charters, Fishing Charters, BOw Rentals  803-8674 Fu-  883-9919 -testae-ant  ��7f,  0,  enmar 'Jjrapertes  & NEEDLECRAFT SUPPLIES  883-2274  AC Building Supplies  HOME ALL HARDWARE  883-9551  Pender Harbour & District  MEDICAL HEALTH CENTRE  883-2764  PENDER HARBOUR  GOLF COURSE  VISITORS WELCOME  Vz m. north of Garden Bay Rd.  Hwy. 101 883-9541  Pender Harbour  READING CENTRE  TUES-THURS- SAT  1:30 - 3:30  Royal Canadian Legion  Branch 112  KITCHEN OPEN  MON-SAT  was the thing that finished off  the pens. The high winds for  long enough would have probably pounded the pens apart,  by the ice piling up on them just  sped the demise up."  It was Friday, February 3,  and the five day onslaught of  severe cold and winds that had  virtually destroyed the west  coast fish farm was finally letting up. Dennis Labelle and the  group of tree planters might not  have survived much longer.  On February 4, a Canadian  Coast Guard helicopter corn-^  pleted a rescue mission '$o'  Sidney Island to pick up Labe^e J  and the tree planters. ��  '  "They didn't want to tajjeil  Farley because they weaje'  borderline on weight. Whaijs<  the alternative? The dog com��s ���  and we crash enroute, or^tpe;  dog stays because 60 pounds ;  makes a difference. That w$s ]  the pilot's attitude. I said, '_iey, j  that dog's been through h$_ 1  already, and he's coming.' ijfe j  came, and we made it."       S  *  TERMINAL  Forest Products Ltd.  WEST HOWE SOUND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT  GIBSONS FIRE DEPARTMENT  PUBLIC NOTICE  OUTDOOR BURNING  WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF SAID DISTRICT  Under the provisions of the Forest Act and with co-operation otY  the Forestry Service, the West Howe Sound Fire Protection",  District, and serviced by the Gibsons Fire Department, will issue!.  Burning Permits in the following manner:  FROM APRIL 1 TO OCTOBER 31,1989  Step No. 1   ���An application form obtainable at the Gibsons  Municipal Hall, South Fletcher Rd., Gibsons, will  be filled out by applicant and deposited there.       .  Step No. 2  ���Twice a week or as required a "duly appointed  Fire Prevention Officer will take these application    j'  forms, personally inspect the proposed burning     -'  site, and if approved will upon the receipt of $5.00  issue a burning permit.  NOTE: No permit is required for a screen covered incinerator.  MEL BUCKMASTER, FIRE CHIEF  MADEIRA PARK SHOPPING CENTRE  Oak Tree Market  Open 7 Days a Week  8 am - 10 pm  CENTRE HARDWARE  & GIFTS  883-9914  BONNIE MURRAY  Accountant  883-2857  Irvine's Landing  THaUta, & Put  Marina  Pub  883-2296  883-1145  Need This Space?  Call Myrtle  883-9302  JC(Ut!e'6 RESORT  BOAT RENTALS  AIR  883-2456  Ray Hansen Trucking  &. Contracting  Gravel, Clearing  - Septic Systems  883-9222  IGA  F00DLINER  (Check our Flyer)  Marina Pharmacy  883-2888  lust the spot for a  Delicious Snack  FRANCES*  HAMBURGER  TAKE-OUT  HUGH W. JONES  Lawyer  883-9525  HARBOUR INSURANCE  AGENCIES LTD.  883-2794  Now in Pender Harbour:  The Sunshine  'IS*  mJT';.  Located in the  Pender Harbour Paper Mill  Pender Harbour  Community Club  BIN0C  Every Thursday  7:00 pm  Pendsr Harbour Community Hail  Beaver Island  GROCERY  Pizza, Subs, Video Games  883-2108  Roosendal Farms  Garden Bay Road  SUPPLIERS OF FRESH  PRODUCE TO THE  SUNSHiNE COAST  Telephone 883-9910  Sales & Service  883-1119  KAMMERLE'S  CARPETS COMPLETE  883-9357  Madeira Marina  Pender Harbour  Restaurant  Canadian & Chinese Cuisine  883-2413  Matrix  Miss Sunny's Hair Boutique  883-2715  Pender Harbour  Realty LTD.  883-9525  FAX: 883-9524  ^  F-HD-B  K-JUOUB  fJoptr mn  comuRxsi oitice  883-2266  MOBILE HOMES  New and Used * Instant Housing  883-9338 or 580-4321 (call collect)  REGAL HOMES LTD.  HEADWATER MARINA ltd.  Ways, Hi-Pressure Washing,  & Year-Round Moorage  883-2406  :ry.  PENDER  HARBOUR  CREDIT  UNION   y-  883-9531  f-njnv .1 <1.y utHn^ir^  ioi^ureyandjluwmn-fi Jn y''VE����T/��E HORTH-'  > V  )  ���_-v - a ii :'  .y/  ^'''_;^sttr:^-^:__r._a^:^:_lr���t_^^���tf',!_':, jk* i |ip_��ii��MiiwiigBrwTpBHMimiyii;iMiiiiiia��;  nywna|gy.ry'��gn  i ���������  20.  Coast News, April 3,1989  Heads B.C.  Book Publishers  The book publishers of  British Columbia have chosen a  Sunshine Coast man to head  their trade organization for the  second year in a row. Publisher  Howard White of Harbour  Publishing in Madeira Park was  elected president of the Association of Book Publishers of B.C.  at the group's general meeting  in Vancouver, Friday.  As head of the ABPBC,  White is chief spokesman for  the province's $22 million  publishing industry and travels  regularly across the province  and across Canada speaking on  such issues as Free Trade, the  Salman Rushdie affair, the  government's new proposal to  place a tax on books and a host  of other issues effecting B.C. art  and culture.  During much of the past year  he has been involved in tense  high-level negotiations with  federal communications  ministers, Flora MacDonald  and Marcel Masse over a new  $34 million Economic and  Regional Development Cultural  Agreement which would benefit  all of the province's cultural industries, including motion pictures and sound recording. The  task is especially challenging  because it involves bringing the  provincial and federal governments together in a joint agreement.  "Being head of the ABPBC  is like having a second full time  job," says White. "I really  don't have the time, but we are  involved in a lot of promising  negotiations at the moment and  I do want to see them successfully concluded.''  Publishers at the meeting  were high in their praise of  White's leadership during the  1988/89 year.  "In my opinion, Howe White  has  been  the  most  effective  president the organization has  ever had," said author and  critic Alan Twigg. "He's made  an enormous difference at the  ABPBC. He's revitalized the  staff, gotten the membership involved, and raised the profile of  B.C. publishing nationally.  "The whole country is talking  about what's going on in B.C."  Twigg named the B.C. Bestseller List, a provincially based  survey of top-selling books  which now appears in B.C.  dailies, and the popular new  province-wide publication B.C.  Bookworld as two of White's  successful initiatives, adding,  "If he can pull off this deal he's  cooking up with Victoria,  they'll have to bronze his old  tweed jacket and mount it in the  foyer."  "I'm relieved he agreed to the  second term" said Colleen Mac-  Millan of Whitecap Books. "I  don't know quite what we  would have done if he'd said  no."  As president of the B.C.  group, White also sits on the  Association of Canadian  Publishers in Toronto, the  country's national publishing  organization. From St. John's,  Newfoundland, ACP president  Clyde Rose of Breakwater  Books said he had occasion to  be thankful for White's "strong  voice from the west coast," saying he had provided 'wise  counsels' which had kept the  national group together at some  very trying moments during the  year.  The B.C. association also  elected Steve Osborne of Pulp  Press, first vice-president; Colleen MacMillan of Whitecap,  second vice; Diana Douglas of  Self Counsel, press secretary;  Rolf Maurer of New Star  Books, treasurer; and Pat Sloan  and Julian Ross, members-at-  large.  New voting proposal  NDP lauds  Fisher report  by Ellen Frith  The recently released findings  of the Fisher Commission regarding electoral boundaries in  British Columbia recommend a  change in the Mackenzie riding  which would eliminate Bella  Bella, Bella Coola and Ocean  Falls from the seat. These communities would become part of  a newly determined North  Coast riding which includes  Prince Rupert.  Brenda DeGraag, president  of the New Democratic Party  Association for Mackenzie, said  most of the constituents in the  area would prefer to remain  within the old Mackenzie  riding.  "The over all report is very  fair," DeGraag said. "It's the  fairest that's ever been done in  the province but we would  prefer Mackenzie to stay as is."  As of March 18, Bella Bella,  Bella Coola and Ocean Falls  became part of the Association  of Vancouver Island Municipalities (AVIM), which makes it  preferable they now stay connected to this area through their  provincial riding, DeGraag said.  The findings of the Fisher  Commission which was headed  by the Honourable Judge  Thomas K. Fisher, are now to  be sent to a committee yet to be  set up by the provincial government and studied.  The next provincial election  will probably be with the present boundaries in tact,  DeGraag said.  THE TIME IS  NOW  To Prepare For Those  Special Occasions  In Your Life  =FREE  -Lose 10 lbs. - 2 weeks,___  :CONSULTATION=17-25 lbs. - 6 weeks:  Janice Edmonds  Counsellor  Colouring Book  t-S.m* W        ** ����V*4m��-*  Masterpiece  -i*emiumiK^ '':j*'K~mk\mm*wimm  . Mint Gf��e*u 30**: yds. *^'ifLyX3*- Y 7*t**$' * ^     tjiy*tmi 3&$r4T *&  '���.-���'    Y<an* For On!y " *4H*��i5; 0 '*-"**      -     '^S^^lfW  Extra heavy sa^y^ndQi* plyfk    y^yY;  'a\WP^- >.'-'$'��� * "  '.Pi*.    * + *  D*V��I_$'WHC��  ������"������ *r-  Special Edition  i * i  %'~t *  *V  *   **o    > *���,  _>-\���  \r  i_��vl^S'PlllC�� '  * f  Crown Sovereign  Supreme  Snow Vti&^^^t^'''' **  BSSi^-*?  wrorn^hrnond Carpets     .  ���-Stainmaster ^ plush  Super Th��ckSa^V,   ,  M.S.R;5A^s^d'  &**;���   y&M  Condide  Armstrong's most popular  no-wax vinyl  Irregulars & two piece  perfects.  sq. yd.  50 Choices in stock  Starting as low as  ��� that's only 33c sq. It.!  sq. yd.  Over 50 to qhoose from.  Values to $30.00 sq. yd.  NOW  sq.yd.  Ask About Special Discounts on  Levolor C  Jy/mmi//  w/m/m  Custom Vorfiicali A Nin-Ji  on sale here  ���^ Myy  More & More LowerBalrtland People are Buying at DeVRIES because DeVRIES'  operates more like a wholesale: High Volume, Low Mark-Up  8887112  709 Hwy 101, Gibsons

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