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Similkameen Star 1911-11-29

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 //
No choked pipes or flues if Princeton coal is used.
— -No cnoKea pipes or iiues ir Princeton coai is use a
SIMILKAMBN
First the blade, then the ear, then the full corn in the ear.
Two railroads will serve Princeton and district in the near future; the Great Northern (V., V. & E.), is already here and the
C P.R., (K.R.V.), is building—Investments made now will increase rapidly—Large industrial enterprises will be established.
Vol. XII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1911.
No. 48
OUT CEMENT
Princeton to be Home of
Big Cement Works    s-
Now Building. 4*
 /l^
Most Favorable Conditions for Cheap
Manufacture—Company Safe
ahd Sound.
Seeing a large cement works in process
of construction at East Princeton it is
not unlikely that many persons will be
interested in a subject that has such an
important bearing on the future of this
district. The cement industry is in its
inliaqcy and its common use forbtHlding
purposes and ready adaptability to so
many requirements of man, make it the
most popular of materials. Cheap and
in lestructible it is bound to increase in
favor, as the following comparative statement taken from the Scientific American will illustrate :
' in 1909, 65,399,889 barrels of cement
were produced in the United States, valued at 152,797,973. In 1900 the production was only 17,231,150 barrels. In 1905
it was 31 675,257 barrels, in 1906 it was
51,000,445 barrels, and in 1908 it was
52.910,925 barrels.'
In Canada the consumption of cement
has Increased from 207,017 barrels in
1890 to 4,527,566 in 1909.
Getting in Shape for Business.
At East Princeton the conditions are
ideal for the cheap and perfect inanufac
ture of cement. All the raw materials are
here found in contact with each other,
obviating expensive transportation wiih
consequent .reduction in profits. The
coal required to-calcine the cement is
mined within a few hundred jards of
the limestone, shale and other constituent
elements at East Princeton. At no other
Portland cement works are the materials
so readily at hand. The British Columbia Portland Cement Co. have all the
la ge buildings and railway spur nearly
completed, the machinery merely awaiting the bridge across the Similkameen
river, now being erected. It is expected
that cement will be manufactured at East
Princeton in the early spring. At present about three fourths of ay__the cement
consumed In B.C. is imported from Japan,
China, U_TEe_ States, England, Belgium,
France, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and
Russia.
History of Cement.
Very early in man's dtvelopment as a
builder and as a fashioner of things ont
of natural materials, long before any
written recr rd of such achievement of
which we have knowledge, he had
learned ways of cementing together particles of sand and gravel and blocks of
teto'ne.
■^terpof exist in the remains of structures
ot whpse designers and constructors historic word is almost entirely lacking.
Asia and Africa and the land of the mysterious Maya in Central America, all
afford samples of prehistoric remains of
morter-bonded stones.
Four or five yaars ago in making excavation for moder improvements at Bath
England, it became necessary to remove
portions of the buried walls of certain
old Roman-baths dating from the second
century of the present era. These walls
were found to be constructed (5f hydraulic
cement concrete of most excellent cnaT-
acter.
The next step in cement development
was the discovery some 1800 years later,
that certain impure limestones, composed
of lime and clay, w_!_i_ it 6urne_ and
ground, produce a greatly improved
cementing n a'erial, the so-called
•'natural" cement.
Increased Demand.
With the development of the country,
and the necessity for permanent structures, especially for canals and railroads,
the demand for cement increased in the
United States uutij__t)y_the beginning of
the Civil War the output .had increased
to i,ooo,o"o barrels yearly.
In Europe, where permanent construction was the rule rather than the exception, as it wis in our land, many experi.
ments by many men had  resulted along
about T_gr> in th_ inversion nf thp r. ally
wonderful product which is known all
over the world at "Portland cement."
This is-a purely artificial product composed of matenals so widely disseminat-
el over the face of the earth that it is
doubtful if another compound will ever
be found to take its place.
The great value of "Portland" among
all .the cements lies in the fact that it de
Vilops a very great strength in a very
short time.
Its Composition.
It is composed of Uaie, silica, alumina,
iron and a little sulphur. Generally
speaking, there are two erthree other
useless, harmless substances in very small
quantity, but they are there only because
of slight impurities in the raw materials
used in manufacture. The raw materials
are generally limestone and clay. Sometimes marl-takes the place of ..imestone
and sometimes shale the place of clay,
but the contained elements, lime, silicia,
alumina, iron and sulphur, are always the
same, and within clearly defined limits
are always in the same proportions.
Portland cement is a heavy bulky product, and to be made economically must
be made on a-JLarge scale. The smallest
economical unit of manufacture is about
52o_barreJs-Per day and a plant of this
economical capacity costs about $300,000
to construct. The manufacture is not a
simple process by any means. It requires    scientific   management   of   the
Continued on page 4.
RAILWAY RUMBLINGS
Board of Trade Protests Any
Extension of Time to
K.R.V. Line.
Hope Citizens Demand Improved Service from C.P.B.—16,000 Men
Building C.N.B.
Engineer Brookes of the Kettle Riyer
Valley line has moved his survey party
from Fivemile to Onemile, near Percy
Rowland's ranch. A loop between the
two points is said to be necessary to overcome the divide.
Citizens of Hope have demanded from
the C.P.R. better treatment in railway
service and a resolution from the Citizen's Association has been forwarded to
the proper authorities.
The Canadian Northern has 16,000
men at work on construction.
The Penticton board of trade recently
passed a long resolution requesting the
Dominion and provincial governments
not to grant an extension of time to the
Kettle River Valley railway for completion of its line. The K.R.V. Co. advertise that application will be made for the
aforesaid extension In the language of
the street, 'wouldn't that jar ve.'
The Kettle River Valley Co. is apply
ing for an act to build a line from Penticton to Vernon.
Gangs of bridge builders are now at
work on the line west of Princeton.
EAST PBINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, Nov. 28.—About 40
men are at work finishing the grade to
the cement factory and the United Empire coal and copper mines.
The machinery, for the cement factory
is ready to leave the manufacturers and
as soon as the rails are laid to the factory
it will be shipped. The most of the
machinery comes ftptn Owen Sound,
Ontario. "~
Piledriving started on the last pier of
the Similkameen bridge today and the
steel will soon be across it.
The United Empire Co. is opening
their new coal vein.
PUBLIC SPIBITED CITIZEN.
J. D. Lumsden left for Vancouver on
Tuesday where he will in future reside.
During some four years' residence here
Mr. Lumsden has been identified with
every public movement, being president
of the board of trade, member of the
hospital board, a manager of the Presbyterian church, contributing by personal
effort and means to charitable and other
purposes.   In the Oddfellows and Rebek-
ahs he was held in brotherly love and
esteem by brethren and sisters and citizens generally regret the loss of a good
citizen. Star bids goodbye and extends best wishes to both Mr. and Mrs.
Lumsden.
DEEB ABE PLENTIFUL.
Large numbers of deer are falling to
the deadly aim of local huntsmen, some
of whom have had the fortune to secure
very fine heads. Last Sunday there was
a procession of returning hunters from
the chase, some with sleigh loads, on
pack horses and others dragged over the
slippery snow. Among those who were
in the hills enjoying the sport of the
past fortnight or three weeks were John
Gulliford, J. A. Freeman, E. Waterman,
F. Wampole, S. Perkins, W. Bryan, P.
Johnson, C. Snowden, Bert Irwin, j. A.
Osborne, Bert Thomas and W. Allison.
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, Nov. 27, 1911.—S. R. Tilson
has ordered goods and will open a gent's
furnishing establishment Feb. ist.
J. W. Brown, of Winnipeg, director of
the Columbia Coal & Coke Co.. was in
town for a few davs, and was greatly impressed with the developments.
H. Holmes had the contract to excavate
McTavish's celler. Hughie did some fast
work.
McRae   & Anderses have   completedV^
__. hotel   irj  si^ty da_7_7 this being  ten/
days less than _ieyr lime limit.   In  the
meantime theAhjfflt  a half dozen other
large buildings, and deserve some credit
for speed.
Three men brought in six d er yesterday.
The Great Northern will have the wye
complete in a few days.
About two score of the Great Northern
meu are looking for lodging.  A£^-___4
TOWN AND DISTBICT.
Ladies of the Anglican church are
holding a bazaar on behalf of the building fund on Wednesday, Dec. 6. The
church is to be opened on Sunday, 17th
December.
Board of t ade meeting next Monday
night at 8 o'clock in the court house.
This is the last meeting of the year and
a full attendance is requested.
Dr. and Mrs. Whillans of Victoria are
visiting at Hedley and Princeton. The
Dr. was the first practising physician in
Princeton and sees great changes in the
' old town.'
Lawrence Lavalley returned Monday
from Portland, Ore., where he had been
attending school. Hus brother, Dr. Lavalley, may come to\_. rinceton and practise chiropractics.
J. C. Wilson, inspector for P. Burns Co.
was in town Tuesday.
Wm. Mainwaring is Improving nicely
in the hospital—many friends will be
pleased to hear of his complete recovery.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 29, 1911,
SPECIALS.
FOR SALE—Tent, 12x24, three rooms,
good floor, sides boarded and double
roof. Ready for occupation. Apply to
M. S. Wilson, Princeton.
See King & Gibson for all kinds of
building materials and inside finish—
have received If; car of lime, cement,
Samson plaster and plaster board. Ask
for prices.
Semerad's sauerkraut just seems to
'hit the spot.' Appetizing, healthy. Try
it and you will get some more.
Dance, Friday night, I.O.O.F. hall.
Princeton orchestra. Ai music. Good
time, good people.    Come
King & Gibson have received a carload of No. 1 *A* clear sawed shingles
and will be able to sell at a low figure.
For Sale—Townsite of Welldo, on
which are gypsum deposits and gold-
platinum placers. Timber. V.,V. & E.
station on property. Owner desires to
sell ori ' account of age, taxes and
longing to travel east.' 350 acres. Price,
$25,000, good for ten days. Apply J.
M. Wright.
King & Gibson have a car of blacksmith coal on the road and will be able
to deliver at a low price—see them.
Thomas Bros, have  received a carload
of the best coal oil and gasoline.    Try an
order and be convinced.
■ .1 Strayed from   Chas. Asp's pasture, one
bay -filly branded with an inverted an
chor  on  left  shoulder.     Finder   please
notify GEORGE & BLAISDELL, Coal
mont, B.C.
Just received a carload of No. i shingles, $3.50 per M Reduction for large
orders.    A. E  Irwin, Kenley Av.
King & Gibson have brick at the usual
price.
For Sale.—Lot 636S, lying about half a
mile soutfi '6f-\A;lli_<__'; 2<T5"acres. Price
fi,8oo.—Apply'J.°M."Wrlgr_t, Princeton.
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS ii WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New building, well Furnished and Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE |
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Dressmaking & Millinery
Aims. TURNER & BYSOUTH
French Block, Bridge Street
Orders Promptly Attended To
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention gi_e_,,,to  all
Mail 'Orders.
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Friday, 13th
day of October, 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock iu
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER.
Registrar County Court.
lMb-NOTICE, the above court is postponed
to Friday, Nov. 3rd, 1911.
HUGH HUNTER.
U__.NOTICE—The above court is postponed
until Friday, December ist, 1911.
HUGH HUNTER.
NOTICE.
Yale laud division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, C O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 380 and marked C. O. French's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains uorth, then.e 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, ign.
C. O. FRENCH, Locator.
By J. B. Wood   Agent.
************************************************^******^!>***~!.*&*f***.
********.**.**.**.**.**.*****+****************************************,***<
1   ...Hotel...
I oner m
. __
TgLAME£N,B,.G_,r
Good Fishing, Boating • v
j^j;      Mining Centre
Mrs. L J. Henderson
-'t PRORIETOR
T
•.AAAA»-A/_A»*-AAAA«*»AA_-____AA__A»*7i<
Advertise in the Similkameen Star
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
boundary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
nipre or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, 1911.*" 'Pefcyw. Gregory, agent.
V-
NOTICE.
-; ' X   'Yalelanddivisid-VYale'district.
Take notice that I,, T. Oswald Coulthard, of
Princeton, B.C.»intend to applv to the chief com-
m_ss_6ner of lands for*'a'lic..__se to 'prospect for
coal and petroleum under the. following described land : Commencing at a post planted about
% mile north -of NW corner* of lot 118 group i
and marked J. Oswald Coulthard \s NE corner
post, thence 80 chains south,' 80 chains west, 80
chains north, ,%o .chains rtest to ooint of com-
inencexneiit. J. OSWALD COULTHARD,
'/..located Nov. 6, 1911. Locator.
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAYINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $i and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
delay in withdrawing the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed. A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
•  J. D. ANDRAS,   Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
P. BURNS & Co.
I   MEAT CONTRACTORS
"■^^■^°»i^---____________________________i
Wholesale and   Retail  Butchers
and Provisioners
•*4*4*Z\***$****4*****B*********?B**4***t4^
^**^*^L^*^W*'W*^*^^*B9**^Bf******^
lay la Your Winter Stock
Of Potatoes, Apples and
Vegetables, Etc., From
O. H. CARLE
$ THE GROCERYMAN   .-.  .♦.  PRINCETON, B.C.
»z**z**z<<<<<**.<<**.<***<**&
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We Carry a Complete Line
Of Excelsior, Cotton Top and Cotton Top and
Bottom, All Cotton Felt, Restmore, and
Osterntoor  Mattresses
A. L. WHITE, THE FURNITURE MAN
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Sac. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,  ,,,  B.C.
W$.. BRITTQNuBLQCK
November-29, 1911.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
EXTRAORDINARY SHOTS.
Down in Chilliwack where they raise
hogs, hay and hunters, two men recently
shot a deluded deer that walked into a
wire fenced field, innocently looking
around for a way out. Taking a double
barrel shotgun the barnyard hunters sallied forth to the slaughter, pouring four
shots into the poor thing before it fell
to the ruthless aim of these mighty nim-
rods. Proud, of their prey they got a
photographer to take a shot at it with his
camera, making a total of five shots it
received. No doubt these valiant sports
put several 'shots' under their belts to
celebrate the event. Now, Star has plea-
Sure in taking a shot at them, reserving
their names for future developments.
A touch of zero weather recently was
followed by mild, sunshiny weather, in
striking contrast with the rain blizzards
of the eoast. No necessity for invalids
to migrate to California when the pure,
fresh, bracing atmosphere of tbe Similkameen is all that one needs.
Building operations on the Howse
block, Anglican church and several dwellings goes on and new structures are planned for early completion.
Princeton Bakery
Fresh Oysters, New York Counts,
Can or Bulk.
Fresh Cranberries,
Fruit, Vegetables,
and Confectionery.
C. V. Semerad & Co.
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C. .F.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Sleighs Built to Order.
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good   Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.'
BROOMFIELD _ GARRISON
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERJK. A
Meetings, third Mondays, tejffie Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome, js
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
.5?£x Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles  $3.50 per M
Our  Business
Has IncreasJp
_»__.___f__.»__L.__t__.._^^
&x*S*JS**4**4f**i*****4**4**4**4*V
And we are extending trade to all
parts of the district. Our business
principles, combined with GOOD
GOODS have produced Satisfactory
Results. We want new customers
and an enlarging trade. That is
why we advertise.
Groceries Are AH Choice and Fresh!
Clothing of the Best Manufacture
For Fall & Winter Wear
Try One of Our Genuine
•   STETSON HATS    W-
The best money can buy
z**z*<'**?*ti«** -i,»z*<*<*<<**y>>*i<*<<*^^^
Thomas Bros.
_fPRINCETON, B.C.i:
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
NELSON BREWING CO.
PRINCETON, B.C.
P-hysicians Recommend Our Beer
for Emaciated Patients
As a beverage, healthful;   for the table, appetizing ;   for social
and proper use, better than wine.    Families Supplied.
_$......*...._..........^.....£.....-**..J~ £ ■ ^rtjfc
FINE ASSORTMENT OF
Xmas Cards, also  Xmas
:|- Post Cards     :§| M
An odd line of Dolls and Games at extremely
Low Prices
Mi Princeton Drug and Bookstore
"AT IT HERE SmCE 1900. ®
i£_"4S.
R i*
CO.
yOU WORK,
MM YOUR MONEY
WORK TOO.
& PEFOSmnfi. OUR5/1VIFI65
WITH US THE. WJli- __R_
4% INTEREST WHICH
WECREPITMOriTHL.  :
flWWmil IS RETURN-
/IBLEONPEMANP
AS QUICKLY _ S THEM/IILS
Cflh CARRY IT.
PEOPLE JUST US GflREFW
AND CAUTIOUS AS
.OUCflHBE,
/1REWE& PLEr.5EP,
■/.ND THOROUGHLY
SATISFIED,
WITH TOE WAV !n WHICH
our business is
TRflN5_JCTED-A BUSINESS
r._N_&£D BY PEOPLE OF
MTURED EXPERIENCE
..HMSTinTEGiM'X
fl postal.giving
yOUR NAME OPPRESS
WILfcPROMPTS BRING .0U
fUL_-INFORMATION.
WRITE TOM
SH0ULP .0U HAVE .NY
FINANCIAL BUSINESS IU
Vancouver "-viciniT.,
RENTS TO COLLECT,
AGREEMENTS FOR SALE"
MORTGAGES TO l_0K_P.ER
/1NPC0L.EGT,
FIR_I_51IRANGBT0P_.CE,
LET US ATTEND TO IT.
WE ARE PLEASING
OTHERS WE WI&BE SURE
TO PLEASE YOU.
321 Caisiliji Stmt,
i^Va_\co\iver B.C.-^
PRINCETON   LODQB
I.O.O.F. No. 53.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   ■' Oddfellows HaU. ••W^aMSu.
J. F. Waddell, Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary-
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 29, 1911.
m
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIGHT)
PUBIJSH.D EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -  - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading.Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
S cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Citizens of Princeton are noted
for their patience, tolerance and
long suffering regarding public
grievances. Their submission to
wrongs, however, cease to be a virtue when it is due largely to sheer
indifference and inertia. . It is a
matter of common complaint and
notoriety that the railway service
given the people of Princeton and
district is about as unsatisfactory
as it could be. Freight handling
is so insufficiently manned at the
station that merchants and others
suffer loss and inconvenience by
non-delivery of consignments after
arrival. The business of tbe station from all sources is approximately estimated at $1-00,000 per
month. To expect a staff of two
men to handle such a large volume
of business is not reasonable and
far from being in the public interest. Also, the, public have to suffer a waste of time and money by
the exasperating layover at Oroville, which might easily be overcome if the interests of passengers,
shippers and mails were at all considered. Picayune economy and
hence increased dividends may be
attained by working employees
beyond the limits of endurance and
reason but the unwritten law of
compensation is silently at work
and trade is diverted into other
channels. Another injustice to the
public lies in the refusal of tbe
Great Northern to place a telephone
instrument in the station. For a
great company to deny so useful
modern convenience to its patrons
seems incredible, yet it is fact. How
much time, expense and worry are
lost and inflicted by downtown citizens having to walk or ride a good
half mile when a mere whisper into
a telephone would obviate all. Isolated action is futile in any public
cause but despotism quails before
the concerted fire of general opinion. The board.of trade is an all
puissant weapon for rectification of
grievances—will citizens use it ?
ALL ABOUT CEMENT.
From First Page.
highest character. The elements composing it must be carefully broportioned
by the chemists, who watch the continually  raw   materials,   and   indeed   the
whole process must be incessantly supervised   with the greatest care   to  guard
against a product wotse than useless, a
powder without  enduring strength  that
might mean  the fall of a floor, the collapse   of a   wall,   the   crumbling of  a
foundation,   loss of   property, -possibly
loss of human life.
In  a modern cement plant the limestone   is   received,   dried,   if necessary
crushed in  great gyratoy  crusheis,  then
still more finely broken by other powerful machinery till all  the particles are
less than  one-twentieth of an  inch   in
diameter, and js stored in great concrete
bins.   The clay or shale is likewise dri d
in immense rotating steel cylinders, pulverized and stored in  other great bins.
Drawn from these bins the raw materials
are constantly checked by the chemists,
mixed  in the proper   porportions from
hour   to   hour in   automatic   weighing
machines, as decided by the results   of
the continual chemical analyses, and pulverized in revolving tube mills by means
of tons of flint pebbles which,  tumbling
against each other in the  reyolutions of
the tubes, pound the mixture of limestone and clay to a meal, so fine that  80
per cent or more of the particles will be
no larger than  on  two-hundredth of an
inch in diameter.   This meal is then  fed
in continuous stream   to great  revolving
kilns, six or eight feet in diameter and
125   feet long    In these  kilns the raw
meals is subjected to intense heat produced by combustion of powdered coal
or of   gas  or petroleum   (oil _f~"_sed in
California), until it begins to melt into  a
sticky mass.    In technical  phraseology,
it comes into a state of "incipient fusion."
As it reaches this state, it is drawn^from
the kiln and cooled.    It is now a greenish
black, hard, brittle lot of lumps ranging
in size from that of peas to four or five
inches   in   diameter.   This  is   "cement
cliDker."     Cement   clinker  is   what  is
chemically known as a "solid solution,"
an alloy of very peculiar and interesting
chemical   compounds,   silicates of  lime
and alumnia which have arranged  themselves in the kilns after the decomposi
tion of the raw materials of the meal ty
the intense heat.
A modern kiln will, in twenty fours,—
for cement plants keep going   day and
night—produce enough clinker to make
400 or 700 barrels of cement.
Cement clinker very finely pulverized
is "Portland cement."     The   pulverization is   accomplished   in another set of
mills,  the fiinishing   being done   with
flint pebbles in a revolving steel tube, as
already described.   All things (chemical
composition, proper burning, etc.,) being
the   same,   the  more   finely   a   cement
clinker is ground the greater will be its
sensitive power, and this is because only
the very finest  portion of  the product,
the impalpable flour^r float, is true cement.    A Portland cement  which is not
fine enough to pass three quarters of its
mass through   a sieve   having   400,000
meshes to the'square inch is not  ______?
ered market_td__
Without Portland cement concrete,
many of our greatest enterprises would
be utterly impossible of ecomical accomplishment. Architects and engineers
welcome its use because of its strength,
because of its resistance to the elements,
air, fire and water, and because of the
rapidity and economy of construction
which it renders possibte.
Molded into water and sewage pipes
and still other shapes, it spans ravines
and rivers, carrying railways and highways. Our massive wharves and docks
could no be built without it. The de-
velopement of its use measures the advance of building construction in our
time, and furnishes the very valid reason
for so appropriately terming this the
"Concrete Age." '
eicii Resources*
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SURROUNDING
EAST
PRINCETON
The New Cliy with The Payroll
Give you the opportunity for one of the
SOUNDEST INVESTMENTS
In British Columbia.
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CITY LOTS ARE BEING OFFERED
SALE FOR THE FIRST TlflE.
FOR
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WILL GREATLY INCREASE
Here are some of the Reasons :
East Princeton is surrounded by huge deposits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
other important ninerals.
The British Columbia Portland Cement
Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
The United Empire Co. is shipping a lig-
nite coal of the best quality and is developing
immense copper deposits, requiring large re-
duction works and several hundred em=
ployees. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of
coal, providing employment to about 150
men. Other coal companies are spending
over $2,000,000 in development, and Will give
work to at least 1,000 men.
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It presents a rare opportunity for investment.    Get full particulars immediately.
».:■■'. D.G. McCURDY     ;
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write C. R. BRIGGS, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver.
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For transportation, East  Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern ^
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which, *$*
will pass through the townsite. m
East Princeton is beautifully situated on Y
the Similkameen River, with an abundance &
<|>   of water power available.   The new city has ^
every facter for growth into a big industrial ♦♦♦
centre;
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'.-^s_"U..j. ... _'sjT1^   '_■.I__-^.i_s,.:ss_:_..
November 29, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
£Kl
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Anglican church services for Advent
Sunday, Dec 3: Granite Creek, n a.m.,
holy communion and sermon. No service at Princeton.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday, December 3 : 'God
the only cause and creator.' Known unto
rJSod are all his works from the beginning of the world.—Acts 15 :18.
Presbyterian church services.—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
Dec. 3. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Princeton Bakery
Fresh Oysters, New York Counts,
.Can or Bulk.
Fresh Cranberries,
Fruit, Vegetables,
and Confectionery.
C. V. Semerad __ Co.
Great Northern
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good  Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMFIELD _ GARRISON
Similkameen motel
SUMMERS S WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New building, well Fur-,
nished aud Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
Real Estate is dull but prospects are bright.
Good time to buy.
FOR SALp
Three mineral claims, showing gold and platinum, $25,000.
Ranch V/i miles west of Princeton. 192 acres,
$3,000. .
Lot 27, Block 19, with 2"roomed house, price,
$400.   Wood aud coal shed, root cellar and well.
Lots 7 and 8, block 43, 50x190 feet and 50x165
feet. Choice residential, second bench above
town.   Price $400 each.
Lot 11, block 8, 50x100 fee.    Price $350.
Two lots in Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op- Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $500.
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600.
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.       /..
Suburban acreage to lease.
Business lots in. east Princeton from $450 to
$600,
Address :    J. M. WEIGHT,
Princeton, B.C., Canada.
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.',
Nicola to Okanagan. ' Bulldog"
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar Shingles $3.50 per M
STAR
JOB PRINTER
DO YOU WANT:
Letterheads
^Billheads
Meal Tickets
Milk Tickets
Printed Envelopes
Visiting Cards
Ladles', Gent's, Misses'
Business Cards
Posters
Dodgers, Dates
Statements
Invitations
Wedding and Ball
Ball Programs
Bills of Fare
Butter Wrappers
Letter Circulars
Memos.
Cotton Signs
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY I
STAR QUICK PRINT
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description ma?
Quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
' Invention is probably patentable.  Coramunica-
. tlons strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
-Sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munm& Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific liericati.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir-
eolation of any scientific Journal. Terms for
Canada, $3.75 a year, postage prepaid, gold by
all newsdealers.
10S.N &Co/6""a^ New York
Branch Office, 6_» F 8t_ Washington, D. C.
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COALMONT
The Town ol opportunity
«<NAAA^^SA^A/_^/W^^^/%^¥»^W^W^M
^A/i^AAAAA<W_>WVWSAA^A^^^%^<»_M%_i^S^V»A<
Before six months have passed there should
be a payroll in Coalmont of between
350 and 400 men.
This means population, which naturally
means good business.
If you are wise
YOU WILL INVEST IN A LITTLE
COALMONT REAL ESTATE NOW
while the choice is still good.
Don't let this Opportunity Slip
Along with the others which
have got past you.
Write for our circular and price list--A post
card will bring it to you.
*«******__3_>**_«*$_>4>o««<»
There are still some so-foot lots left
Two Blocks from the centre of town ot
Only $225.00, $55.00 cash t
And balance spread over 18 months to suit.
Write us today
Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, OALflONT,  B. C.
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The rails have been laid into the town ^
and Coalmont is now the new termi= k
nus,  the base  of  operations for the k
next forty miles of railway building. ^
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_..J-^__:,._^-^l-l__    ' '. _: ..__._..■_.-. !_; S^_._L_J-_i_---_a __^    _ S.; __^____... '     ,'"'   '      ,__...__^
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 29, 1911,
SIMPLE TESTS FOR PURE POOD.
It is idle to deny that there is a great
deal of 'butter' sold which if it is not
margarine, is an indifferent substitute of
doubtful composition. Of course, pure
margarine, made as it is from vegetable
oils, is at any time better than poor
quality butter, although there is of
course,-nothing like the genuine article,
on nutritive grounds. Happily it is not
a difficult matter to distinguish between
margarine and all other butter substitutes
an'd the pure article. The so-called
"spoon" test has been commonly employed by analytical chemists for a long
while, and is very reliable. A sample of
butter two or three times the size of a
pea is placed in a large spoon and heated
over an alcohol burner, or if this is not
available an ordinary lamp or gas burner
will do as well. Good fresh butter will
boil very quietly, producing a number of
small foamy bubbles. On the other
hand, margarine and most examples of
made up butter will crackle and sputter,
making a noise very similiar to that
which .s caused by the placing of a green
stick on a hot fire. Still another point
of distinction is to be noted if a portion
of the sample be placed in a bottle and
this iyplaced in water warm enough to
melt the butter. If this is kept warm for
half an hour the fat will either be cloudy
or entirely clear. In the former case the
material is certainly margarine or at any
rate not pure butter; in the latter instance however, the article may be adjudged to be of a high standard of purity
and freshness. Some of the cleverly
made process-butters which are on the
market do not always give very definite
results but a little study of the matter
will  enable   the  experimenter to judge
Continued on page 7.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON; B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
oressmahing & Millinery
Mms. TURNER & BYSOUTH
French Block, Bridge Street
Orders Promptly Attended To
Neat & Artistic Printing at Star Office
It is only natural for any woman to
wish to see her figure at its best
Bias Filled Corsets
are not only thoroughly comfortable and
easy for every movement but they are so
splendidly   constructed, that  they  create
Figure Beauty   j|
They fit perfectly.and give in the largest measure the required
combination of slender grace and flexibility so necessary to the
desired effect of youth and buoyancy.
We just received a good assortment of these splendid corsets
and are able to supply our. customers with almost any size and
style, in colors white and drab :—
Prices: $1.25, $1-75, $2.00 and $2.50
Especially Good Values in Linen Huckaback and Turkish Towels
To appreciate these values you must call and see them.'   We are
always glad to show our goods.
Linen Huckaback Towel, hemmed ends, size 18x36 inches.—20C. each
Snow white bleached  Turkish towel, fringed,  size 24x45 inches, good
weight, splendid value, 25c. each.
Extra heavy bleached Turkish Towel, fringed, size 24x45 inches,   35c.
Get the habit of trading at Howse's, it'll save you money.
The AU_7noisc1^ lm.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
mm
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**+**4**+*%**4**B**4**+**B**B^
**\_
KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
:_:_;_:_:_j_j_;_i_:_j_:_;_:„^^^
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Koldsfrearn Estate Nurseries!
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VERNON, B.C
Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS
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% Budded Stock a Specialty!
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All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate
General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.
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Advertising is the Life of ksiness=-=Try it
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
PRINCETON   LODGE
I:O.O.F. No. 5a.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    H_ll situate  in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. Waddell, Jas. Gellatly.   •
Noble Grand. Secretary   .
»ywwyv
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   F.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc. |
General Blacksmithing.
Sleighs Built to Order.
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed;
The Princeton
Livery n Feed
stables
N. HUSTON, PP.pT
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
NOTICE.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum in Kamloops division of
Yale district as follows:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner oflot 1520 and marked
C. O French, S.W. corner, thence 60 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 60 chains west,
thence 80 chains south, to point of commencement.
C. O. FRENCH
Dated September 18th, 1911. Locator.
WATER NOTICE
The Similkameen Power Company,Limited,of
Vancouver, B.C., give notice that we intend, on
the 10th day of November next, at eleven o'clock
in the forenoon, to apply to the Water Commis
sioner at his office at Nicola, for a license to take
and use 20 cubic feet of water per second froni .
Red Creek, a tributary of Fivemile Creek, near
Princeton.
'The water will be used at Fivemile Creek, at out
|4 of a mile below Red Creek, for power purposes.
We intend to apply at the same time for permission to store 4,000 acre-feet, more or less, of
the said water in a reservoir at head of falls on
Red Creek.
SIMILKAMEEN POWER COMPANY, Ltd.
Dated this 27th day of September, 1911.
November 29, 1911.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
TESTS FOR PURE FOOD.
the extent of the adulteration of which
he is the victim.
Of the commonly used breakfast beverages there is little doubt that coffee is^
the most widely adulterated. Fortunate-1
ly, agai_7 tnere are _ome simple tests by
means of which anyone may determine
the character of the article which he
buys. When the admixture of foreign
matter is carelessly done an examination
of the grains with a powerful magnifying
glass will be sufficient. Absolutely pure
coffee should give an entirely uniform
appearance, but the presence of adulterants which may take the form of ground
peas, beans or a host ofo__er_Tt___Ts isj
readily observed. Chicory, which ofj
course may have beent>penly employed
is recognized by its dark and gummy
grain; thig is very harmfuHfitisjDre§e_it
in large quantities.,. Further, nearly all
the adulterants employed p esent a shiny
appearance, wJ_ereas-ee_Fee alw_ ys.l-Sks
.lull. A more rapid way of testing any
kind of ground coffee is that pictured in .
an accompanying illustration. Take a!
tumBler of water nearly full to the brim |
and scatter about half a teaspoonfull of
the grains upon the surface of the liquid.;
Pure coffee contains a large amount of
oil and on t^rts^acwuDt^tbe^gratns will
float with a very few exceptions. Practically all the adulterants in use will sink
to the bottom of the tumbler. The presence of chicory_inthe sample is at once
known by the almost instant coloring of
the water a deep brown shade. If the
tinting is very intense chicory has been
added to a positively unwholesome extent. Pure coffee grains—will_not color
cold water, at any rate not until the passing of -"considerable interval. In these
experiments it is interesting to include
a few samples of the so-called coffee substitutes, many of which wiil be shown to
contain a large amount of coffee, and
this in spite of the assertions of the
manufacturers
F. P. COOK
PRINCETON
COALMONT
GRANITE CREEK
General Merchandise
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
NOTICE.
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETORS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOflS, ETC.
Commercials Sample _*Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
1   ...Hotel...   I
loner m\
I TULAMEEN, B.C. J
X Good Fishing, Boating X
jl Mining Centre $
I Mrs.L J. Henderson |
Y PRORIETOR ♦♦♦
v $
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of I^ands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 380 aud marked C. O. French's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911.
C. O. FRENCH, Locator.
By J. B. Wood   Agent.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
bonndary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, 1911.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, J. Oswald Coulthard, of
Princeton, B.C., intend to applv to the chief commissioner of lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the following described land : Commencing at a post planted about
% mile north of NW corner of lot 118 group i
and marked J. Oswald Coulthard's NE corner
post, thence 80 chains south, 80 chains west, 80
chains north, 80 chains east to ooint of commencement. J, OSWALD COULTHARD,
Located Nov. 6, 1911. Locator.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick Logan, of Vancouver, B.C , occupation an agent, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lauds : Commenciug at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C.. and about
ten miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary
of Granite creek, marked Frederick Logan's s w
coiner, thence So chains east, 80 chains north, 80
chains west, 80 chains south to poiut of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK LOGAN.
Sept. 23, iqii. Charles O  French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take nctice that Thomas Wilson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a clerk intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted about 16
miles west of Princeton, __ C, and about 10 miles
south of the Tulameen river a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Thomas Wilson's n e.
corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains scuth. 80
chains east, 80 chains north, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
THOM.iS WILSON.
Sept. 23, 1911: Charles O. French, Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nathan P. Daugon, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation 1 builder, intends to apply
forfpermission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about ten
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Nathan P. Daugon's
n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
NATHAN P. DAUGON.
Sept. 23, 1911. Charles O. French. Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Scharff, occupation a
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about 16 miles west of
Princeton, B.C., and about ten miles south of the
Tulameen river, a tributary of Granite creek, and
marked George Scharff *s s.e. corner, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east to poiut of beginning, containing 640
acres more or less.
GEORGE SCHARFF.
Sent. 23, iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James M. Watson, of Vancouver, B C, occupation a contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands ; Commencing at a post planted
about 16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about
eight miles south of the Tulameen river, a tribu-
taiy of Granite creek, and marked James M.
Watson's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. JAMES M. WATSON.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Enoch Wilson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation farm hand, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted about 16
miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about 8 miles
south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Enoch Wilson's
n e. corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chaius
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, to place of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
ENOCH WILSON.
Sept. 22 1911. Charles O French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Gorgon Cambell, of vancou
ver, B.C., occupation teamster, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B C., and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Gorgon Cambell's
s.w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains souih, 80 chaius west, to point cf
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
GORGON CAMBELI.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale lafad division, Yale district.
Take notice that James F. Wilson, of Vancou
ver, B.C., occupation a carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 milrs west of Princeton, B.C., and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked J, F. Wilson's se
corner, thence 80 chains north 80 chains west, 8c
chaius south, 80 chains east, 10 pla^e of beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
JAMES F. WILSON.
Sept. 22, iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
/Take notice that James Burlon, of Vancouver
B*.C. occupation a teamsttr, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following describ
ed lands : Commencing at a post plantea about
three miles southwest of timber limit No. 39,107.
on the east side of Roche river, and marked
James Burlon*s n w. corner, thence 80 chains
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres
more or less. JAMES BURLON.
Oct. 2, 1911. Charles O. Freuch, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Alma Anderson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a widow, intends to apply tor
permission to purchase the following described
lands : Commencing at a post planted one mile
southwest of timber limit No. 39107. on the east
side of Roche river, and marked Alma Anderson's
s.w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to point of
teginning, containing 640 acres, more or less
__.LMA ANDERSON.
Oct. 2, iqii. Charles o, French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George A. Howell, of Vancou-
couver, rt C , occupation a builder, intends to ap
ply for permission to purchase the following
described lands : Commencing at a post plauted
one mile southwest of timber limit No. 39107. on
the east side of Roche river, and marked George
A. Howell's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. GEORGE a. HOWELL
Oct 2, iqii. - Charles O.French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Francis T. Reid, of Vancouver,
B.C , occupation a book-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles southwest of timber limit No. 39 107. ou
the east side of Roche river, and marked Francis
T. Reid's s w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west,
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. FRANCIS T. REID.
Oct. 2, iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Cory Keamster, of Vancouver,
B C, occupation a clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lauds: Commencing at a post planted one mile
vest of the northwest corner of timber limit
No 36,827, and marked Cory Keamster's n e. corner, thence 8c chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east,80 chains north, to point of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or less
CORY KEAMSTER.
Oct. 4, 1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Harry M. Bayford, of Vancouver, B C, occupation an electrician, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about one mile west of the northwest corner of
timber limit No, 36,827, and marked Harry M.
Bayford's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains east, 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point ct beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. HARRY M. BaYFORD.
Oct 4, 1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James H. Graham, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation a clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described
lands: Jcommenciug at a post planted about 15
miles south of Princeton, b c, and one mile west
of the Similkameen river, and marked James H.
Graham's n.w, corner, thence 80 chains east, 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. JAMES H.*QRAH_vM.
Oct. 4,1911. Charles O. French, Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick H Corby, of Vancouver, b c, occupation a teamster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands: commencing at a post planted
about 15 miies south of Princeton, b-C, and one
mile west of the Similkameen river, and marked
Frederick H. Corby'ss.w. corner, thence 80 chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres,
more or less. FREDERICK H. CORBY.
Oct. 4,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
WATER NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that an application will
be made under part V of the 'Water Act. 1909,'
to obtain a license in the Ashcroft water division
of Yale District.
A The name, address and occupation ot the
applicant: Walton Hugh Holmes, Granite Creek,
B C-, in the District of Yale, preemptor.
B The name of the lake, stream or source is
Ward Creek.
C   The point of diversion is on Lot 520.
D The quantity of water applied for (in cubic
feet per second), four.
E The character of the proposed works:
ditches, flume or pipes.
F The premises on which the water is to be
used is pre-emption Lot 520, Record No. 329.
G The purposes for which the water is to be
used is irrigation and household,
H If for irrigation describe the land intended
to be irrigated, giving acreage. Bench on north
bank of Granite Creek, 160 acres.
J Area of Crown land intended tp be occupied
by the proposed works, not any.
K *This notice was posted on the 16th September,.
1911, and application will be made to the commissioner on the 23rd day of October, 1911.
L Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands
are likely to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet.   None.
WALTON HUGH HOLMES.
Granite Creek.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, J. B. Wood, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit :-—Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. corner of Lot 388 and marked J. B. Wood's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south, thence So
chains west, thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911.
J. B. WOOD, Locator.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
T^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
•*• '   December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Similkameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th Day of October. 1911.
GEO, E. WARDLE
CHRISTOPHER SUMMERS
JAMES WALLACE.
■M'OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
*■ * December next, applicatioh will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Tulameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in tbe Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
KIRKPATRICK & BARNES.
"MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
J-^ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Great Northern Hotel,
situate at Princeton, in the Province of British
Columbia,
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
P. SWANSON.
M'OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
•*■ ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial '■ olice for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Otter Flat Hotel, situate
at Tulameen, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
MRS. E. J. HENDERSON.
"MOTICE is hereby given that; on the first day of
*• ^ December next, application wiil be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Granite Creek Hotel, situate at Granite Creek in the Province of British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
H. GOODISSON.
MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
a ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known, as the Allison Hotel, situate at
Allison, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
G. GOLDSBOROUGH..
MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
1 ^ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
grant of a license for the sale of liquor by wholesale in and upon the premises known as The Nelson Brewing Co., situate at Princeton, B.C., upon
the lands described as Lots 1,2.3, and the property
is on 23. 24, Vermilion Avenue.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
THE NELSON BREWING CO.,
per Aug. Thomas.
MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
•'■ ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent ofJProvincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as^Ke Coalmont Hotel, situate at
Coalmont, in thaProyjrife'e of British Columbia.
Dated this 1#_ da_j__f Octobe_|:1911.
•    •'COALMONT HOTEL CO., LTD.
L. N. Marcotte, Manager.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
Notice is hereby given that, on the first day of
December next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the transfer of the license for the sale of liquor by retail in
and upon the premises known as the Tulameen
Hotel, situate at Princeton, B.C., from Kirkpatrick & Barnes to Kirkpatrick & Malone, of British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
KIRKPATRICK & BARNES,
Holders of License.
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE,
Applicants for Transfer.
 ssfe
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 29, 1911,
Mm
feSg
•52
PRiSVS
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so=called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.   Investigate Now!
1
1
Princeton
With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its Healthful Climate and Pretty § Site
n
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. _* E. is finished.
1
Y<
_»ur Opportunity Is NOW
|
CHOICE LOTS FOR fSALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of
ERNEST WATERMAN
Manager for
nectm coal & um Co
li_^_S
$*tWM$B^
W_£k
2Jr
i

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