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Similkameen Star Mar 2, 1901

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 o
SIHILKAMB
P«<UUc-UoA in tn& Tnf»4*»cf r\( PfinrMnn ar\A .Sfrnf lira
Vol. I.   No. 49.
PRINCETON, MARCH, 2nd, 190J.
HIGH WATER
AT PRINCETON
SPRING FSESEETS  BEGINNING
TO COME DOWN.
oads Washed Out, Bridges Damaged
by the Torrents—Stages and Many
Freight Teams Delayed.
tains caused the Similkameen and Tula
meen rivers to rise at an alarming rate
on Wednesday, which steadily increased
until Friday morning the ice in the rivers began to break and form into ice
flows and jams, doing unestimable dam
age along its ronte.
Considerable anxiety for the differeni
bridges was felt, and especially the on<
just being built across the Similkameer
at the foot of Bridge street. False worll
to support the spans, while in course o:
construction, had been placed on the ic<
which was considered comparatively safe
for a few day, but grave doubts were en
tertained as to whether the ice above
would rot come down leftie the timbers were put in place, thereby causing
the collapse ofthe whole structure. But
luckily, however the ice in the Similka
meen did not break up as quickly as in
the Tulameen, and on Thursday evening
the workmen on the bridge succeeded in
completing the structure to such an
tent that they were enabled to take away
the false work, and unless some unfor-
seen accident happens when the Similkameen breaks up the bridge is considered
The bridge across the Tulameen has
however, had a narrow escape from
going out altogether, and comes
very badly wrecked.
On Thursday a Chinook wind struck
*. the Otter Valley, and following down the
river swept the country clean, leaving
many a hill, which was in the mon
covered with snow, without a yestige of
its wintery appearance. Parties con
from Otter lake report that the wind had
caused great havoc with the road between
"Thynne's" and Princeton, and that
numerous large trees had been blown
across the road, and in many places
-: regular torrents of melted snow and
slush were running across and along the
highways.
On Friday morning the lakes of slush
upon the high flats and benches began to
break away and came down with a rush,
Crsusing the ice in the rivers to break up
and to form into jams. One of these
jams formed early in the morning just
below the Tulameen bridge leading ____.
Princeton, and while this ice flow was I
still intact, another one came on, forcing
tbe water and ice up to high-water mark.
The second flow of ice struck the middle
pier with such force that for a while it
was thought the bridge would go. As it
was it damaged it to siich an extent as to
make a new support and bridge inevitable.
Had not the lower jam timely broken
away the bridge would have in all probability given away by still another jam
which came down shortly after dinner,
luckily having an open river to flow
through, but which caused still further
damage to the pier, completely demolishing the upper end of it.
Three miles further down the river the
flood struck the Allison bridge and for
a time apprehensions were felt for that
structure. Bejng a new bridge, however,
it came through with small damage to
the approaches. It was a most fortunate
thing the Tulameen bridge above did
wash away as then nothing could have
saved the lqwer one, and it would h.
put this part of the country back many
months.
HEDLEY NOTES.
A new store building is being built
here by W. Hine & Co., of Fairview, who
expects to open up a gefiferal store.
. The new hotel at this place will be
opened to the public on^March ioth, by
mine host Hackneyf On St. Patricks
day, March the 17, Vfree dinner will be
given.   Everybody invited.
The townsite company have built a
bridge across Twenty Mile creek, hoping
to induce the authorities to put the road
through the town. As>be distance is
very short to the government survey is
it is expected there/will be very little
trouble in securing the favor.
J. H. Yates, a Spokane mining and insurance man visited the camp a few days
ago. While here he took an option on
several 'promising claims, among them
Morning Star, owned by the Jamieson
boys. He also secured an agency for the
Hedley townsite, and on his way back to
Spokane sold six lots in Oro, nine in
Loomis and a number in Spokane. A
number of lots have also been sold quite
recently, on the coast, by C. E. Oliver.
Rennie & Bell had an ice house built
on their lot on Bridge street this week.
Work on one of Cook & Co.'s new
buildings was started "this week.
R. O. Hawtry of Hedley and Mr. Hair
of Fairview were doing business in town
yesterday.
Wm. Simpson arrived in town today
from Faulkland where he has been spending the winter.
Robt. Stevenson has returned from the
coast, where he has been for a number of
weeks, to look after his mining interests.
J. H.Jackson and Jas. Murchison returned Thursday from Otter Valley,
where Mr. Jackson is having a house put
up on his recently located pre-emption.
BOND TO BE
PAID UP SHORTLY
VALUABLE   PEOPEETY   AT  20-
MILE TO THE FBONT.
A Mr. Patrick, Representing Eastern
Capitalists Visits the Camp—First
Payment Nearly Dne.
The indications are that the bond 01
the claims at Twenty-Mile, mentioned ii
last week's Slui will be paid up shortly
when the payment becomes due.
A responsible party from that camp, in
conversation with a Star representative,
stated that prospects for the camp were
beginning to look very bright, and that
indications pointed to a busy season
A Mr. Patrick had arrived at the c
a few days ago, on behalf of the eas
parties who have an option on the Rolla
and Kingston group, owned by Pete
Scott and others. As the option had
about run out, Mr. Patrick tame i
look over the property and to decide
whether it would be advisable to take up
the bond. As the value of the claims
so well-known it is hardly possible that
a reverse decision will be given,
reported, however, that Mr. Patrick has
made the statement to the effect that 1
if the parties whom he now represents
did not care to take up the bond, he
knew of an other party, whom he
almost positive would be willing to take
up the bond as it now stood. However,
if the property proved to be anywhere
near its reported value, he had no hesitancy in making the statement that the
payment about due would be paid by the
present holders, as the money was
in the bank waiting for his decision.
A PRINCETONITE  TALKS.
Tells Gait, Ont. People About Princeton and the Similkameen.
"Yes, I was a pioneer of Rossland, bul
I am now at Princeton, near Coppe:
Mountain. T^"•"ir-pffd thn first; map of
Trail Creek miping eamp—that's at Ross-
laritP^but it was out of date in three
months, so rapidly do things develop and
change in the west. By the way, I believe that a citizen of yours, Robert
Scott, was Rossland's first Mayor."
The speaker was James Hislop, civil,
railway and mining engineer^who spent
the day with Dr. Moyer. He is visiting
his home at Strasburg, but returns in a
few weeks to' the gold fields of British
imbia. A brother of his is at Skag-
way engaged at the same work.
"Now, Mr. Hislop," said the reporter,
"I want you to tell me something, and
I want it divested of all politics.     What
is British Columbia's attitude toward
railways. You may have noticed that
W. F. McLean, the Tory M». P., told Parliament that the Province didn't want
them."
"Don't wan't them, eh! Why, what;
nonsense, Railroads are what we do
want, and the Government can't give
them too quickly to suit us. We have
the ore, and we are getting it out, but
we need transportation. » Rossland is-;,
busier than ever. The Yale districtas
yielding immense quantities of ore, and'
twenty miles from Princeton is the richest mine in British Columbia, one of the
best in the world. What do I think of-"
British Columbia's prospects ? I can give
but one answer. They are great. We
have wealth in the ground 'tis true, but
it will come out. We could use more
capital than we have, but it is coming;
our way. What are the industries ?
Mining principally, but grazing is possible, and a good deal is done. Any farming? Not .much, it's more of a mineral,
than an agricultural country you know ?
Are we standing still in population ? No, .
we are not. There's a steady influx from
the east, and the time will come when
British Columbia will be as large, num-
erably, as Ontario. Do you agree with
Horace Greeley when he said, 'Go West,
young man.' I most emphatically do,
for didn't I take his advice myself," Mr. -
Hislop   laughed,   "and   I would   do it.
The talk became general, then reverted to Mr. Hislop's new home.
"Is the climate   healthful?" he was
"Healthy!" he replied, "why it is so •
healthful that our physician is allowed
a grant of £300 a year by the Provincial-
Government to exe out the income from
his practice and enable him to live ; and
he is a good doctor, too, and there isnt-
another within sixty miles. One of our
residents was told by the doctors five
years ago, while living in another place,
that he would certainly die of consumption within six months, but he came to
Princeton instead, and is living yet and
likely to keep on living. We have no
cemetery at all at Princeton. No, I
wouldn't advise Gait doctors to emigrate.
Better stay here. British Columbia is a
bonanza, but not for medicos. We are
two monotonously robust. Our physician gets #5 a visit, and isn't a Midas at
that. Now, a dentist toured the territory
last year. He filled our teeth with gold,
and we his pockets. But, I think his
was the better bargain."—Reformer.
A Pleasant Time.
A most enjoyable event occurred at the
Princeton hotel on last Saturday. A
large number of citizens gathered there
in response to an invitation from Landlord Wallace. The evening was given
up to dancing and ajjerieral good time.
Rev. Neville wfNicola Lake will hold
'"'" ~'"i Princeton tomorrow.
r
S*        I
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
March 2nd, 1901
Mining Men
and Prospectors
t+++r>PWP+P++r\
GRAND PACIFIC
HOTEL MAMl00PS'B-c-
WfrJ
it hotel to the
ation. Head-
people
Good Rooms.
Good Table
Good Liquors,
Good   Stabling in Connection with hotel.
P. A. BARNHART, Prop.
B. C. POTTERY CO.
Manufacturers of
CHIMNEY PIPES, SEWER PIPES, ETC.
VICTORIA, B. C.
ff£MLD A
mM&m
TMH
TH^T we v/Ht
VAllE TO BE HAD IN
Groceries, Dry Goods
Boots and Shoes.
Stock always fresh.   Prices will suit
you at Rc||n|C Jj  UW$
STAR BUILDING PRINCETON
ECTION OF BIO HOEN.
Editor of Eecreation Writes in Regard
the Matter.
b sent  me a clipping from a r
e of your paper containing t
behalf of thous-
1 and nature lovers
ad Canada, whom
represent, for the
Lave shown in this
editorial recalls vividly to
[ delightful hunting trip
Le in  the  Ashnola   district many
ago when sheep   were abundant
there and when many of the old rams
.carried fine large heads.   As I went into
hills Mr. Warburton  Pyke,  whom
jloubtless know,  came out and  so
ly as I can remember he had 14 big
s on Jiis-pack animals.     Still there
plenty of them left.     I got three
large heads aud that was all I wanted.''
It pains me greatly to learn of the
slaughter of the female and young sheep
liament may soon decide to employ a
sufficient force of game wardens to thoroughly patrol the country inhabited by
the big horns and to punish the men who
are attempting to exterminate them.
I take the liberty of sending you under
separate cover certain literature explaining fully the nature and aims of the
League of American Sportsmen, and I
trust you will take time to examine these
documents carefully. This league now
las nearly 5000 members distributed
throughout all the states and territories
of the Union and all the provinces of
Canada, We are making a vigorous effort to build up a strong working division
B. C, and as soon as we accomplish
s we shall be in shape to aid mater-
ly in the protection of your game. I
jh I could induce you to help us in
s work. There are no doubt many
sportsmen in your town and vicinity
who, on account of living so near the
sheep and goat country could be induced
to join this league and aid us in this work
if the matter was personally brought to
their attention. If you are willing to do
some missionary work among these men
I should be glad to send you any amount
of our printed matter which you may be
able to use. I trust you mav see fit to
join this League yourself as a starter. I
take the liberty of enclosing herewith a
blank application for membership. Hoping to have the pleasure of hearing from
you by early mail, I am,
Yours truly,
G. O. Shields.
The Atlin District.
Mr. J. D. Graham, Gold Commissioner
for Atlin district, is spending a few days
in Victoria. Mr. Graham expresses himself well satisfied with the progress being
made in his district.
"The camp is all right," he said, "but
it would not stand a stampede. The gold
is there in (paying quantities, requiring
only systematice work to save it. There
may be extraordinarily rich ground
stuck at any moment, but the claims
already staked and being developed 1
returning good, substantial profits,
profits are estimated in this country.
People are quietly going into the district,
which is pretty well covered with prospectors, but there are acres as yet unexplored, and quite as likely to prove rich
as anything yet discovered."
Something New
and Pleasing *£
That is the kind of Goods you like to buy and THAT is the
kind .we sell. To assure you of this fact we would invite you
to call and examine our newly arrived consignment of goods..
GROCERIES
SMOKED HALIBUT, GRAPE-NUTS, RICE FLAKES,
FLAKE BEANS, PRESERVED FIGS, AUSTRALIAN
CREAMERY BUTTER, OLIVES, ETC., ETC.
DRY GOODS
We are in receipt of a new lot of. Ginghams, Prints,  Laces,
Ribbons, Cretons, Etc.
BOOTS AND SHOES
Men's Kangaroo Lace Shoes.    Gents' and Ladies1 Oxfords
and Slippers.
A. E. Howse
Princeton
What
You
Want
To
Know
Vancouver, B.C.
—When you are figuring on a HYDRAULIC  MINING OUTFIT is—where can you do the BEST?
BEST includes all the conditions—price, quality of
materials, and workmanship, knowledge of mining requirements, ' closest proximity to seat of mining,
promptness and absolute reliability manufacturers.
There are other conditions—we cover them all.
Think these ove
onably sure ofyoi
' and Monitors.
ARITSTRONG   &  MORRISON,
IRON AND STEEL WORKS.
Mfg"rs of Hydraulic Steel Pipe, Mining and Water Work
S. A. HARTMAN,
Mines and
Mining . ..
ROSSLAND  B. G. Jai
, 1901.
We have first class connections and can find the necessary
capital to work and develop meritorious copper propositions in
the Similkameen country. If you have a good claim with a
fine showing we will find you a buyer. We cordially invite
your correspondence.
Respectfully,
Office: 43 Columbia Ave. S. A. HARTMAN.
THE DRIARD HOTEL
JOB RICHARDS. Manager NICOLA   LAKE.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
>m Service Unsurpassed. Only the Choicest Brands of Liquors at j
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE^ SIMILKAMEEN^ STAR
I Published Ii He interest oi Prlncetou and lie j
JAMES ANDERSON, Ma:
PRINCETON PUBLISHING COMPANY.
PRINCETON, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MARCH 2nd, 1901.
EDITORIAL
The agitation for the building of the Coast
Kootenay Railway is growing stronger every
day. An influential delegation of Fraser river
valley farmers were in Victoria last week with
the object of impressing the government with
the immediate necessity of building the line.
A great effort should be put forth by the peo
pie living in the Similkameen, Nicola and Kere
meos valleys to bring prominently before the
government the resources of their districts and
every means possible should be used to urge the
different members of the house to use their influence and support toward the granting of a
substantial subsidy to the Coast-Kootenay railroad. Let stringent building conditions be imposed and thus put a stop to the trading in railroad charbifl§»which has been one of the principal drawbacks in charters granted before.
The country demands the construction of the
road, let the government see to it that it be built
on lines whereby it will benefit the people. And
above all let there be no necessary delay, Vic
torians are strongly in favor of regranting the
old subsidy and the settlers in the Fraser river
valley are also supporting the scheme. The
delegation now in the capital city is working
strenuously in support of a railroad through the
Fraser valley to the Kootenay. The Victoria
Colonist of the 19th inst. has the following to
say on the subject:
Jt is unfortunate that circumstances prevented
the majority ofthe members ofthe City Council
from being present last evening at the time appointed for the conference with the representatives of the Fraser valley farmers, and that consequently nothing was done in the way of endorsing the effort which these gentlemen are
making to bring about the immediate construction ofthe railway from the Coast to Kootenay.
We can safely say, however, that this ought not
to be taken as indicative of any apathy on the
part of the people of this city towards this important project. They have three times expressed themselves upon it at the polls. At the
by-election in 1899 one of the chief questions
submitted to them was the repudiation by the
Semlin government of the contract for the building of the V. V. & E. railway, and the same
was the case at the last general election. On
both occasions they declared in favor of the
men, who had pledged the province to the construction of the railway and endeavored to
bring it about.    The extraordinary vote for the j
ferry by-law a few months ago, was largely due
to the fact that the people believed the ferry
would form a part of a line from this city to tbe
Kootenay. The City Council, the Board of
Trade and more than one public meeting have
declared for the railway, and if anything is evi
denced on the part of the Alderman, which
looks like indifference, it may be explained by
the fact that the city is committed up to the hilt
in favor of such a railway.
• • •
Now that the Legislative Assembly is again
in session it would be well for some member to
bring in an act to enforce the present game laws
in British Columbia. The provisions of the
present act may be all right, but the lack of en
forcement is a weak spot. At a meeting re
cently held in Vernon, B. C, ofthe local Game
Protective Association, several useful amend
ments to the present laws were brought forward
and endorsed. We notice the adequatd protec
tion of Big Horn in the Ashnola districts was
not discussed, notwithstanding the fact that the
home of the Mountain sheep is in the district of
East Yale. Mr. Price Ellison M.L.A. as representing the greatest hunting and game section
ofthe province should certainly be the representee to bring forward a bill to make the necessary amendments. Regarding Big Horn al
lovers of the sport will be glad to read the letter printed in another column of this issue from
Mr. G. Shields, editor of Recreation, who has
done much- towards the proper preserving of
game throughout the United States and Canada.
• • •
The Nelson Tribune in its endeavor to instil,
the loveof C.P.R. into the hearts of tbe people ofl
Southern British Columbia would like to lead
them to the conclusion that because coal is being shipped to the otherside of the line, the
country, and incidentally the C. P. R., is doomed to ruin if something is not done to avert it
According to our own light it is the best thing
that could have happened. For the last fifteen
years large tracts of coal land have been known
to exist in the Similkameen, and it only needecl
a similar reminder to what the Kettle River railroad scheme gave the C. P. R. in the Boundary
to have them acknowledge the fact. We heartily voice the sentiment of the Victoria Times
when it says:
"It seems to us that now would be an opportune time for the people of British Columbia to
acquaint the legislators at Ottawa with their
sentiments on this particularly interesting subject. We want development all along the line,
and we want it particularlg when it is not to
cost us a cent to set it going. We want to be
treated as other provinces have been treated in
which large sums have be granted by the government to connect them with their southern
neighbors by means of expensive bridges. It is
time to ignore canting appeals to the patriotism
and to pick up business wherever we may
find it, as they do in Great Britain and in the
United States and wherever a business man i j
to be found.
• • •
The project of a fall exhibition in the capital
city has now begun to assume definite form,
and what is required to make it a success is persistent energetic work and determination not
only on the part of the Agricultural Association
but ofthe citizens generally. Unceasing vigilance and determined effort must be now be put
forward, that the exposition may be one worthj*
of the city and province.—Province.
business km pwftsxrtwii am
W. J. WATERTIAW, JWL E,
p. a. s. m. a, 1. 1%. e» me.
Examination, Development »n/J Hf&&>
..   agement of Prospect*, Clauu
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B.C
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
......NOTARY PUBLIC	
PARKINSON & FETHER
STONHAUGH, p*n££S£EV<
Provincial Land Surveyor,
Civil Engineers .
and   Notary Publics.
.. JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
..Princeton.B. C...
PRINCETON ASSAY
OFFICE,       C.  B.  HARRIS,
. Assayer and Chemist.
Will Guarantee Accuracy and Return Report of
Assay on Stage Bringing Sample.
Bridge Street.,    PRINCETON, B. C.
LINDLEY & FOSTER,
Taxidermists   and Furriers.
42\i Johnson St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
ASSAY OFFICE AND ORE
TESTING  WORKS	
W. PEIXEW-HARVEY,
Assaying and Complete Mining Smelting Tests Made from
Small Samples up to Ton Lots.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
JOHN W.   PECK & CO.,
Mens'   Furnishings.
VANCOUVER,  B.  C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trade.
Careful   and   Prompt   Attention to all
LETTER ORDERS.
I   Wnn't ALL WORK
1    VV AH  U Promptly Executed
Your       We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
A full Line of Watches and the Latest Styles of
Jewelery always on hand.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
 ■ffM
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
March ms, 1901
The Nearest Point to the 10 Mile   A
Creek Mines. t
woodward's |
...HOTEL!
LOWER NICOLA.
Via Lower Nicola.
V The table is supplied  with pro
ducc from our own gardens.
COMFORTABLE ROOMS.
Headquarters for Smith's Stage J
1
Granite
Creekmm
mmmHolel
mm. Jans, pr»triet«r.
This Hotel has always been
Famous For the Excellence '
of its table. 1
The nearest point to the '
richest Silver Lead mines 1
in B. C, 'Summit City.' j
There is more gold in '
Granite Creek than has •
yet been taken out.
Stopping Point for
Princeton stages.
Prospectors
....STOPi
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
You can save time and
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
BIO MACHINERY MADE IN 8HEB-
BROOKE.
rlarge
mpri
rfor
ippei
Canadian Rand Dri!
is for theTtosstem? Great Western Mines
(-British American Corporation) and has
compound or two stage air cylinders, 36
inches and 22 inches in diameter by 48
inches stroke. It is to be driven by at
electric motor through the medium of J
rope drive. The driving wheel on thi
compressor is 18 feet in diameter by 5
inches faca and is groved for 32 ropes 1%
inches in diameter. The wheel has 1
double set of arms, is made in halves am
weighs complete about 40,000 pounds.
The low pressure air cylinder has Corless
air valves driven by special valve gear.
The inter-cooler connecting the two aii
cylinders is ofthe company's most recent
water-tube type, which gave such remark
ably good results on a similar compressor
shipped to the same mine last summer
This makes the third 600-horse power
compressor shipped to the British American Corporation, the former two being
direct—connected to compound Corliss
engines. The completed machine weighs
about 150,000 pounds.
Two more compressors will soon be
shipped to the Dominion Coal company
for their mines at Glace Bay, Cape Breton, and one went forward about a month
ago to the same company. Each of these
compressors has two stage air cylinder 33
iuches and 20 inches in diameter by 38
inches stroke with water tube inter-cooler
between them. The air cylinders are
direct connected to compound Corliss
engines, the cylinders being 20 inches
and 36 inches in diameter by 48 inches
Each machine has a capacity of about
3,000 cubic feet of free air per minute and
weighs about 150,000 pounds.—Montreal
Witness.
NOTICE.
A Sitting of the Licensing Board for
the Nicola -District will be held at the
Government office. Princeton on Monday
March 25th, 1901, at-the hours of 10 a. m.
to consider the application of George W.
Aldous for a hotel license for the Hotel
Tulameen situate at Princeton.
HUGH HUNTER.
Chief License Inspector
Princeton, March ist, 1901.
FOR SALE.
320 acres Nicola Valley.    Crown Grant.
Price $1350.   Apply E. A. Harris,
35 Fort Street Victoria,
Or at Star Office, Princeton.
Q. flURDOCH
Blackstnithing
and Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON,    B.   C.
New York Stocks.
E. GARDINER-JONES
STOCK AND SHARE   BROKER
Mackinnon Building VANCOUVER, B. C
LEADING HOTEL IN PRINCETON
The James Robertson Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Lead Pipe, Shot, Traps, White
 LEAD  PAINTS,   Etc	
Jobbers hi Wrought, Cast or Steel Pipe  and Fittings, Metals  and Steam
Fittings.   Write for Quotations.
mJXSSFva.      THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., LTD,
Branches Toronto, St. John, Winnipeg and VANCOUVER. 	
Boors
AND
Shoes
Now is the time to secure your Winters Supply of
Foot Apparel. Avoid sickness by having your
Feet properly dressed with the Best
Boot and Shoes,
Rubber Goods, Etc.
In the Market. We have a large and well assorted stock which we are selling as Cheaply as yoi
would have to pay for an Inferior Article.
PROSPECTOR'S SUPPLY STORE.
. E. THOMAS, Prop.
Similkameen   Butcher-
ing   Co.,   Princeton,   B. C.
. WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any point in the Similkameen 2a^ey-
C. SUMMERS,
Manager Princeton Branch
 March 2nd, 1901
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS,
Presriptions ^Carefully^ Compounded.
Orders by mail or stage promptli
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
CIGARETTES.
TThey are the Purest
Smcertainly the
Dest in the market.
Geo.LTuckett&sonCo,
HAMILTON, ONT.
G. L. ALLAN
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN
Boots and
^SHOES^
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
Palace
Livery
Stable.
&
]
KEREMEO
Saddle Horses to al
similkameen Distri
ers  from the Bou
:an    secure    horse
'rinceton.
wm
^.un in Connectic
the Ken
S, B. C.
Points in the
:t. K,S?.Travel-
ndary District
s   through   to
n with
-meos Hotel.
II'
COAL LICENCE APPLICATIONS.
coal on lands situated on the West side of One
Mite creek, about two miles from the Similka-
l.E.C. and n
I intend to apply within 30 days to the Chii
to prospect for coal on the following describe
I intend to apply within thirty days to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
licence to prospect for coal on the following described lands situated on South bank ofSiinilka-
meen river opposite Scots ton,Joining Wampole's
on south side and being one of Spencer-Warn pole
Within 30 days I intend to apply to Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a licence to
prospect for coal on following described lands:
joining S. Spencers on north side being one of
the Spencer-Wampole group.
Commencing at notice post and running*north
. Thirty days after date I intend to
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
license to prospect for coal in and
here described:
On the north bank of the Tulam
from Princeton,   Commencing at tl
mencement.'   Containing in all 640
Dated at Princeton, February 4th
oint of com
RUSSKLL.
THIRTY days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for
a license to prospect for coal in and on the following described land:
bank ofthe Tul
the  north
irth, thence
JAMES ANDERSON.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty days after
date, that, I, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a licence to
prospect for coal on the following land: Commencing at the Initial Post, north of Scotston
on the north bank ofthe Similkameen river, and
all 640
Dated this 18th day
SAMUEL SPENCER
COAL LICENSE APPLICATIONS.
NOTICE.
Thirty days after date I intend to apply tot
:hief Commissioner of Lands and Works, foi _
lere described;   On the north bank of the Sim-
ocation and running thence north 80 chains; 80
LAND LEASE.
^OTICE is hereby given that 30 days after da
JAMES DARCY.
CERTIFICATES   OF   IMPROVEMENTS.
RED E-xGLE MINERAL CLAIM.
TAKE NOTICE that I Arthur E. Thomas, free
1  miner's certificate No. B46705, intend, sixty
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
To William H. Morrison, Rossland,
British Columbia.
You are hereby notified that I have expended
the sum of Three Hundred and thirteen dollars
and seventy-four cent, ($313.74) in labor and improvements on account of your interest in the
kameen mining division of Yale district:
The Ada B, Combination, Ruby Day, Yellow
Jacket, You and I, and Center Star Fraction on
Copper mountain; Copper Butte and Golden
Eagle on Kennedy mountain; and the Coppe:
Mountain in Aspen Grove district.
The above three hundred and thirteen dollars
expense necessary,  in order to hold the said
lentioned sum which is now due, with- all cost
f advertising your interests in all the said claimi
'ill become the property of the subscriber,   un
Princeton Meat Market
WARDLE  & THOMAS
Orders for Mining Camps promptly attended
to and delivered.
FRENCH & DAY
Tinsmiths, Gunsmiths, and Plumbers
Baat and Shoe Repairing.
Repair work  of    Every   Description.
NOTICB is he
J. D. PRENTICE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
20th November, 1900.
TAX NOTICE.
ASSESSMENT ACT AND PROVINCIAL
REVENUE TAX.
Similkameen Division of Yale District.
Notice is hereby given that in accord-
Tax and all taxes levied under the  A«!>r«mpnt
UNDER authority of Order in Council,
passed December 30th, 1899, the Honourable the Minister of Mines has been
pleased to sanction, and I do hereby give
notice that I have appointed George Murray, of Nicola, a Deputy Mining Recorder
of and for the District known as the
neighborhood of Nicola in the Kamloops
and Similkameen Mining Division, with
Sub-Recording Office at Nicola.
G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner for District.
KAMLOOPS, ASHCROFT, yALE AND
SIMILKAMEEN MINING DIVISIONS  OF YALE
DISTRICT.
T^TOTICE is hereby given that all placer
*^ claims legally held in Kamloops,
Ashcroft, Yale and Similkameen Mining
Divisions of Yale District, will be laid
from the ist day of November ensuing, to the ist day of May, 1901.
G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner.
Kamloop. Oct. 28th, 1900.
 THE     SI MILK ANTE EN   .STAR.
March 2nd, 1901
The  Townsite  of
PRINCETON
British ColumhsaB
m&
Lots for
• • • 4^€llG • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2*00 to $10.
Per Front Foot*.***
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft* and 33x100 Ft*
One acre Residential
Lots*** «* •* «* «* i*
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal* 3 and 6 months*
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum* «*
Government Head-
quarters FOr fftie SHnllkameeii BSsirlci.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following; Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain,
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM.
*##### w######
Send for Map and Price List to «* «* .* .* **
W. I WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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