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Similkameen Star Mar 9, 1901

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 SIMILKAmbm
Voi,. I.   No. 50.
PRINCETON, MARCH, 9th, J90I.
New Mail Service
People in the Similkameen Alive to
the Needs of Better Mail Service
with the Boundary and Kootenay
Countries.
Considerable agitation has been
going on for some time in both the
upper and lower Similkameen country, for a mail service connecting
the two districts. It is believed the
proper route—the route accommodating the greatest number of people—would be from Fairview to
Keremeos and on up the Similkameen to Princeton, thereby connecting this district in the closest
possible way with the Boundary
and Kootenay country. We understand that endeavors have been
made to secure a service from Penticton to the Nickle Plate mine,
but as this would five accommodation to a few only, it is hardly feasible. There are others who desire
the mail to come by way of Penticton to Hedley, and to Princeton via.
Keremoes.
However, a glance at a map of
Southern B. C, giving the different
mining divisions, will show plainly
why the route from Fairview to
Princeton is the most favorable.
One of the principal reasons for this
southern mail service is to bring
this part of the country as near
as possible to the mining centers of
the Boundary and  the   Kootenay.
This could not possibly be obtained by meandering up the Arrow
lakes and back down Okanogan
lake. Nor by going from Camp
McKinney to Penticton and back
to Keremeos. Mail could be received from Midway or Greenwood
at Keremeos, in two days and at
Princeton in three days. At present it takes three days to come from
Greenwood to Keremeos via Penticton, showing the absurdity of
this northern route. - Mr. Darman,
P. O. Inspector, is having considerable correspondence on the matter,
and we understand he is asking for
special tenders from Keremeos to
Hedley,   a   once-a-week    service.
The matter of a tri-weekly service from Fairview to Princeton
should be settled on the completion of the Keremeos road, thereby
giving the whole of the Similkameen better service.
ROADWAY TO COPPEB MT.
Work to Commence on the Road Leading to the Mines.
Now that the Similkameen  bridge
finished it is expected that torbmpt s
tention will be given to the building of
the wagon road to Copper mountain.
Various obstacles and delays have happened in the building of the bridge, but
now that it is finlshffl it is one in which
the people of Princeton have ever reason
to be proud of. The structure has a complete length r>f ">\t *»•», including a
Howe Truss span of 108 feet long. Its
width will comfortably allow the passing oftwo_yehicles—a fact, which is not*
ably absent in other bridges in this section of the country.
McAlpine Bjsa_—afatt-»Mr. Swan, the
superintendent, deserve great credit fo:
their work, which we hope will long re*
main an example of their thorough work.
manship. Tenders will shortly be called
for the grading .of the approaches to the
bridge, which will cause no small ami
of work and expense. A large amount
of logs have been hauled for the north
approach which will be covered with
gravel. On the south end of the bridge
a steep hill will have to be graded, down,
the surplus dirt being used to grade up
Bridge street. On the' completion of
this work, attention will be given
proposed road to Copper mountain. This
much needed road will furnish a short
and easy" outlet for the mines, and its
early completion is absolutely necessary
if mnch work is done on the mountain.
Several property owners have indicated
their intention of putting in machinery
the coming season and no cause for delay should be given by not having the
road built.
"SUNSET" BROWN.
His Eastern Trip on Mining Business
Fairly Successful.
R. A. Brown (Sunset), of Grand Forks,
was in-town yesterday, en route for home
after a three months' visit to New York,
Boston and eastern Canadian cities. Mr,
Brown, who is general manager of the
Sunset Copper company, owning the
Sunset property on Copper mountain,
Similkameen district, made a lengthy
stay in New York. The primary object
of his trip was to place treasury' stock of
the Sunset. He said yesterday that he
had met with fair success. Investors as a
rule are plunging in industrial stocks
and little attention is at present being
devoted to the mineral recources of British Columbia. Mr. Brown, however, did
no little pioneer work in Boston and
New York, and expects that good results
will be forthcoming later. Mr. Brown
indignantly denies the report that he had
been the victim of a "con" game on the
New York bowery.—Rossland Miner.
UNTBUE REPORTS SENT OUT.
Mysterious Telegrams Sent Ont About
C. S. Morris of Olalla.
The question is why and by whom the
rhe report was caused to be put in circulation and the reasons therefor. President Tietjens of the New York bank,
which Morris is accused of embezzled the
funds from, says he received a telegram
from a town in Washington stating that
Morris was under arrest there. The bank
recently began a suit against Morris in
this province to racnvor the—amtmTil he
is alleged to have stolen and it is possible
that the report of his arrest was put in
circulation for the purpose of affecting
this suit Another explanation is that a
plot actually existed to lure Morris across
those in the attempt were prematurely
made public. It is a most mysterious
affair throughout.
Tulameen Bridge.
Now that the waters in the Tulameen
have subsided, the extent of damage
done to the bridge by the recent ice flow
is easily ascertained. The nose of the
middle pier is completely demolished,
and if it were not for the heavy cross
pieces nothing would have saved it from
breaking to pieces. The south abutment
is also shattered so that it is useless as a
substantial support. The question now
is not whether the bridge can be repaired
—but whether it will hold together until
a new one is put in. However, word was
immediately sent out to the government
official, and it is to be hoped prompt attention will be paid to the matter.
NIGOLA NEWS.
The entertainment given Wednesday
evening under the auspices of tbe Nicola
Methodist church was a financial success.
During the entertainment Rev. Thos.
Neville presented Bro. Calip Woodward
on behalf of the Nicola Good Templars,
with an address and a well filled purse.'
The floods of last week done great
havoc to the roads in all directions. The
bridge at the Forks of the Nicola and
Covjf^iater, known as Chapman's Bridge,
was washed away last Sunday.    ,
Messrs. Arthur Stevenson, road superintendent, and Steve Tingley, of Ash-
croft, arrived in town this evening by
special rig. They are on their way to
Princeton.
Mrs. Sutton presented^e'aoctor with
a daughter on the wp>mslC All doing well.
Half Interest Sold.
A mining deal was consumated the
first of the week in which Mr. Matt Fin-
lay sold a half interest in Jthelngersoll
Bell mineral claimV sitpafed on Kennedy
mountain to Mr. H^f Jones, of Ogdens-
burg, N. Y. Tbe terms were cash, and
it is understood for no tn
Railway News
Big Citizens Meeting at Vancouver in
the Interest of Coast-Kootenay
Charter.
Vancouver, Mar. 6.—Citizen's
Committee of Vancouver held a
meeting here tonight on R. R. question and endorsed V. V. & E. railway. They are working hard for
a direct route through the Hope
pass. J. Anderson of Princeton on
request addressed the committe on
behalf of the Sim ilkameen. A delegation from the committees will
go to Victoria to urge the government to grant the usual subsidy.
Every indication points to the
passing of the bill and the immediate construction ofthe railway.
Similkameen Appropriations.        /\
The government will be asked to vow
the following appropriations for Princeton and the Similkameeft district during
the present session of the Legislature:
Road from Princeton to Copper Mountain, $50oq-/Trail from Princeton to
Roche river, $1000; Completion of Princeton-Keremeos road, $5000; Trail from
Otter Flat to Summit City, $750; Slate
creek to, Bear creek, $1000; Extension
of One-Mile creek road, $500; Repairing
Tulameen bridge at Prtnceton, Jiooo.
Denis Murphy, M. L. A., for West
Yble, is urgently pressing-upon the government the necessity of the appropriations being made and he isconfident that
the above sums will be voted in the estimates.
The Coast to Kootenay R. R. is being
strongly agitated in Victoria and Vancouver. The regranting ofthe old V. V.
& E. subsidy would be a most popular
move by the government, as public opinion on the Pacific Coast is strongly in
favour of an independent line. A mass
meeting was held in Vancouver on Wednesday night by the Citizens Association
when strong resolutions were passed in
favour of the V. V. & E. railway.
PURELY PERSONAL.
Hugh Kennedy will return to Princeton, from Vancouver, in two week's time.
J. C. Mcintosh, Princeton's legal light,
is expected to arrive on next Saturday's
stage.
Mr. Chas. Revely, who has been spending several weeks with his parents, at
Vancouver, returned on today's stage.
Hilton' Keith, late of Allison, has
bought out a wholesale and retail tobac-
coist's business in Vancouver. He will
operate in Similkameen mines and real
estate. His address in Vancouver is 301
Cambia street:
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
March 9th, 1901
TELEPHONE
FOR PRINCETON
BIO TELEPHONE COMBINATION
COMING THIS WAT.
Will Extend line From Camp McKinney to Princeton Early in the
Spring.
Manager Griswold oKhe Colt
ia Telepbene Co., is report
line will remove its headquarters
into the office of the Spokane &
Northern Telegraph company in
the Bank of Montreal building, and
the city service will be extended
and remodelled by the installation
of about three hundred new telephones.
"Early in the spring our telephone system will be extended west
from its present- terminus at Camp
McKinney into the , Similkameen
district as far as PrincetonT' All the
important intermediate towns and
camps will be tapped, and before
fall it will be possible for a Rossland
mining man to transact business
over the 'phone with parties 200
miles away as readily as though the
•s the Pi
?d out
the
the Columbia Telephone Co. ha\
made a combination with the  Co:
powers conferred in our Western
Company's charter. Late last fall
see finished our line into tbe Okan-
agan district in the state of Washington. The system extends south
from the international boundary as
far as Brewster on the Columbia
river, thus opening up an entirely
lew territory."
Will Have Charge of Brick Yards.
Richard Truswell, says the Trail
tfews, has left to take chare of the
jrick yards of   E.  L. Steves   at
Princetoi
.'ill first s
Ehc
ffhe
fected are the Spokane & No
and Kootenay and Yale teleg
and the Columbia, the Spokai
British Columbia, theNorthw
and Western telephone conii
-ell
:cts
iab-
The
it I!
ill
New lines Planed.
W. B. Davey,   of Grand   Forks,
ho is the president of the various
It was he who made
brick used in the Trail
ng the past few months,
led two large kilns on
t last fall. Mr. Trus-
f the pioneers of Trail,
red here in November,
his way home say the Rossland
Miner. Asked as to the correctness
of the reported deal he said:
"Yes, your information is substantially correct. Negotiations
have been in progress for some time
the final papers having only been
signed yesterday in Spokane. The
combination will enable us to affect
economies in management as well
allc
He pu
improved service. Our first step
will be to extend into new territory.
As soon as the weather moderates
we will build a new line from Rossland to Nelson, B. C, via Trail, and
all the intermediate towns, including Ymir. This proposed extension will provide a much needed
service for a new and important district that has hitherto not enjoyed
these facilities,
"The work will be done under
the charter of the Western company.
About the same time our telephone
Prospectors
....STOP!
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
LEADING HOTEL IN PRINCETON
J. H. JACKSON, Sole Proprietor.
The James Robertson Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Lead Pipe, Shot, Traps, White
-LEAD PAINTS,   Etc-
Jobbers in Wrought, Cast or Steel  Pipe   and Fittings, Metals  and Steam
Fittings.   Write for Quotations.
THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., LTD,
t. John, Winnipeg and VANCOUVER. 	
BOOtS
AND
Shoes
Now is the time to secure your Winters Supply of
Foot Apparel. Avoid sickness by having your
Feet properly dressed with the Best
Boot and Shoes,
Rubber Goods, Etc.
In the Market.   We have a large and well a
ed stock which we are selling as Cheaply as you
would have to pay for an Inferior Article.
PROSPECTOR'S SUPPLY STORE.
B. E. THOMAS, Prop.
Similkameen   Butcher-
ing1    Co.,   Princeton,   B. C.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any point in the Similkameen 2a^ey-'
C. SUMMERS,
Manager Princeton Branch
 March 9th, 1901
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
•DENIS MURPHY M.L.A.
HAKES A MAGNIFICENT SPEECH
IN-MOVING THE ADOPTION
OF THE ADDRESS.
West Yale's Member Makes a Record
for Himself—-Princeton and the
Similkameen Brought Prominently to the Front.
On moving the adoption of the
address in reply to the throne Mr.
Denis Murphy, the member for
West Yale, delivered a magnificent,
speech which was well received not
only by the members, but frequent
bursts of applause from the galleries testified the appreciation of his
listeners. The following extract is
taken from the portion of his speech
which dealt with the R. R. policy
and proves forcibly that Mr. Murphy is watching closely the interests of the Similkameen coTjhiry. i
"The construction of the proposed railway from the Boundary
to the Coast, is the most crying
need of the province today. When
built it will open up in the eastern
portion of West Yale a mining camp
which I venture to prophesy -will
shortly after its completion be second to none in the province, if, indeed it does not surpass in importance any now in existence. In the
vicinity of PRINCETON, notably
on Copper mountain and Kennedy mountain, are immense deposits of ore, principally copper,
Which experts unite in declaring can
be converted into 'sources of enormous wealth, and the same may be
said of the deposits in the Nicola
valley. The work of the hardy
prospector has already been done
in these distii&s with that thoroughness which everywhere characterize it in British Columbia. A
great number of claims have been
staked, and under the most discouraging conditions development work
has been pushed forward to a stage
where capital can be readily invested—in fact is eager to invest—and
yet the camp is in a state of stagnation. Why? Simply because mining cannot be carried on there without a railroad. In addition, as the
house is well aware, immense de-
I posits of coal have recently been
< discovered, both in the Similka-
! meen and Nicola valleys. So valuable are these considered that capitalists have hastened to obtain
options on a portion of them for
enormous sums, despite the fact
that they must remain practically
valueless until rendered accessible
by a railway. The proposed road
will run over these coal beds, and
by these great mineral deposits. It
will change what is now almost a
wilderness into a hive of industry ;
the population of the province will
be largely increased and its revenue
greatly expanded. The result of |
the building ot this road will be
equally beneficial to the farmers of
the Fraser valley, and the merchants of the Coast cities. It will
give them accessjto this rich, new
region,and to the Boundary country,
and will enable them to secure the
trade which is legitimately theirs,
but which is now diverted to the
East, owing to the lack of a direct
Coast-Kootenay line. So important do I regard the building of this
road to the province that had the
goverment given no sign this session
of an intention to promote its construction, I would have felt bound
in justice to my constituents to withdraw my support from it on this
question, no matter how much I
might agree with its general policy.
I am well pleased, therefore, to see
that the government realizes its importance, and intend to aid its construction. As to the extension of |
the Island railway, I am not so
familiar with the facts bearing upon it, but doubtless when these are
fully laid before the house by some
one who is, the necessity for building it will be equally apparent. I
feel certain also that in granting aid
to either or both of these roads, the
government will take every precaution compatable with not hampering the enterprises to safe guard the
interests of the people in the matter
of freight and passengerrates. (Ap-
plause.)
The Nearest Point to the 10 Mile
Creek Mines:
Woodward's
...HOTEL
LOWER NICOLA.
The shortest route by 10 Mile to
Princeton from Spence's Bridge is
Via Lower Nicola.
The table is supplied   with produce from our own gardens.
COMFORTABLE ROOMS.
Headquarters for Smith's Stage
Granite
Creekmm
mmmHotel
^ MRS. JAMES, Proprietor.        3
* \
P This Hotel has always been  j\
1 Famous For the Excellence  T
of its table. J
i The nearest point to the  jf
richest Silver Lead mines w
V in B. C, 'Summit City.'  J
i There is more gold  in T
V Granite Creek than has •
V yet been taken out. 4
s 5
C Stopping Point for        3
V Princeton stages. $
spring
Offerings
NEXT WEEK we will have
something to tell you about
our line of Spring Goods.
It will pay you  to
watch our advertising space.
A. E. Howse
^General Merchants
What
You
Want
To
Know
Office and Works, foot
of Heatly Avenue,
TEL 25°-
P. O. BOX 51.
Vancouver, B.C.
—When you are figuring on a HYDRAULIC  MINING OUTFIT is—where can you do the BEST?
BEST includes all the conditions—price, quality of
materials, and workmanship, knowledge of mining requirements, closest proximity to seat of mining,
promptness and absolute reliability manufacturers.
There are other conditio
Think these over carefully,   If y
r them-all.
:t order for Riveted Steel Pipe
ARriSTRONG   &   MORRISON,
IRON AND STEEL WORKS.
S. A. HARTMAN,
Mines and
Mining. ..
ROSSLAND   B. C.Jan. 4, 1901.
We have first class connections and can find the necessary
capital to work and develop meritorious copper propositions in
the Similkameen country. If you have a good claim with a
fine showing we will find you a buyer. We cordially invyte
your correspondence.
Respectfully,
Office: 43 Columbia Ave. S. A. HARTMAN.
THE DRIARD HOTEL
JOE RICHARDS,  Manager NICOLA   LAKE.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
ing Room Service Unsurpassed. Only the Choicest Brands of Liquors at the Bar
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
March 9T11,1901
THE.* SIMILKAMEEN^ STAR
published la tbe Merest ol Princeton and the
PRINCETON PUBLISHING COMPANY.
PRINCETON, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MARCH 9TH, 1901.
rertising II
EDITORIAL
The following suming up of the fuel situation in B. C, by the Phoenix Pioneer, covers
the question so well that we give it in full:
No one topic is more absorbing in this province today than the question of coal supply,
especially as the new smelters now starting up
will call for no small amount, and the needs of
the old smelters are steadily growing large*
with the constantly increasing capacity. It is
indeed serious if, as - widely stated, the only
available supply is in the Crow's Nest, and the
output of that locality is practically contracted
to American smelting interests, to the exclusion
of the needs of the British Columbia smelting
works.
* *
But there are severaL view points to every
question, and this is no exception. To begin
with, it is stated that J. T. Hill, hacked by the
StandardJiiLHionopoly and American smelting
trust, has practically secured control of the
Crow's Nest output, contingent upon his securing a charter to build a railway line from Montana to connect with those fields. Therefore
the hue and cry is raised to refuse Mr. Hill the
charter, and the old patriotic song is sung in
many keys.
* *
But Robsrt Jaffray, president of the Crow's
Nest Coal Co., asserts^hatMr^HUl has not se-
cured the controL-in-jiuestion. ancTthat the
American demand will not be supplied to the
detriment of the needs of British Columbia
smelters. Whatever axes Mr. Jaffray may be
attempting to grind with the C. P. R., on account of high freight rates, it is only fair to
credit his word in this matter.
* *
But for the sake of argument, let us suppose
Jim Hill does get his charter, builds his road
across the line, and secures some of the coal aud
coke. An estimate of the capacity ofthe Crow's
Nest coal fields, in this connection, is interesting. The facts are worthy of perusal by every
fair minded man:
"It is true, says the Kamloops Sentinel, that
up to the present the Crow's Nest Coal Co.,
has been unable to adequately and promptly fill
all the orders of coal and coke from the smelters
and from power and transportation companies
of Southern British Columbia. But this is not
due to any lack of coal, but simply to the undeveloped state of the coal mines. In the course
ot a few months the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co.
will be able to turn out 10,000 tons of coal per
diem, their output today being barely 1,500
tons per diem.
"The coal fields are practically inexhaustible
and it would be no dificult matter to increase
the daily output from 10,000 tons to 20,000 tons
if the demand justified the increase. Now the
present coke requirements of the smelters of
Southern British Columbia do not exceed io,j
000 per month. There are new smelters in
course of erection and that demand in the near
future may reach 15,000 ton per month, but
even were it to increase to double that quantity, the Crow's Nest fields could easily meet
the demand, and still be in a position to export
thousands of tons of coke per month to United States points."
It would appear from this that the Crow's
Nest Coal mines can easily supply the needs of
of the province for many years to come, and export many thousand tons monthly besides.
Some 900 men are now employed at Fernie and
Michel, in getting out coal, and this number
would be and will be increased many fold to
mine the increasing output. This would mean
prosperity for a large part of the province.
But this does not take into account the immense areas of coal already discovered in the
Similkameen, Okanogan, Nicola and other districts, now about to be exploited by strong corporations in many cases. It is stated, for instance, by a reliable authority, that on the Tulameen river near Otter Plat there is a large deposit of coal, which has been proved for a distance of over four miles, and which contains
two veins of coal, 16 feet and 20 feet thick respectively. It is estimated that this deposit
contains over 150 million tons of workable coal,
which gives a good firm clean coke (as per report of the Geological Survey Department, Ottawa.) In addition to this coal field there is a
large deposit of equally good coking coal in the
Nicola Valley, which contains two seams oi.8
and 7 feet in thickness respectively, and which
underlie many thousands of acres. It is esti-
lated that from 3,000 to 4,000 tons per day
could easily to mined and shipped from these
fields.
There can be no two minds as to whether the
local smelters should be supplied before the export of coal in any quantity is begun. But the
point is whether the immediate available supply will meet local needs and admit of foreign
shipments also. As a rule, generally speaking,
competing railways are welcomed everywhere,
but in this thus far the preponderance of editorial opinion has been against the construction of
this proposed Jim Hill line to the coal fields—
whether justly or unjustly. Therefore, the next
step, at Ottawa, is being narrowly watched all
over the dominion.
• • •
The Similkameen still has a few wants which
the provincial and dominion government have
it in their power to grant. One of them is the
immediate building of a bridge across the Tulameen river, as the present structure in its pres-
wrecked state is liable to go out the next high
water. Another matter is the necessity of a
mail service between Keremeos and Princeton.
A route should be established as far as Hedley
immediately, and continued on to Princeton as
soon as the road is completed. We have other
needs but the foregoing ones are the most
urgent. These two questions are treated more
fully in another column of the Star.
BUSINESS and PROFESSIONAL CARDS
W. J. WATERHAN, M. E.
P. 0. S. M. A. I, n. E., Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
PARKINSON & FETHER-
STONHAUGH, '"EES^b.c.
Provincial Land Surveyor,
Civil Engineers
and   Notary Publics.-
 JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
•Princeton^. C...
PRINCETON AS5AY
OFFICE,      C B. HARRIS,
Assayer and Chemist.
Will Guarantee Accuracy and. Return Report of
Assay on Stage Bringing Sample.
Bridge Street.,    PRINCETON, B. C.
LINDLEY & FOSTER,
Taxidermists   and Furriers.
43K Johnson St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
ASSAY OFFICE AND ORE
TESTING  WORKS	
W. PELLEW-HARVEY,
Assaying and Complete Mining Smelting Tests Made from
Small Samples up to Ton Lots.
Repre
St Son
VANCOUVER, B. C.
JOHN W.   PECK & CO.,
Mens'  Furnishings.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trajle.
Careful   and   Prompt   Attention to all
LETTER ORDERS.
I  Wan't AU- work
1    W AH  L Promptly Executed
Your       We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
 March 9TH, 1901
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
GRAND PACIFIC
HOTEL kamloops, B. c.
The nearest hotel to the
Railway Station. Headquarters for all people
coming from Nicola and
the Similkameen.
Good Rooms.
Good Table
Good Liquors,
P. A. BARNHART, Prop.
B. C. POTTERY CO.
Manufacturer* of
CHIMNEY PIPES, SEWER PIPES, ETC.
"WeInvite Correspondence."
VICTORIA, B. C.
®0P
TMH
that we v/Ul
GlVC-YoU-jH^^
VALUE TO BE HAD IN
Groceries, Dry Goods
Boots and Shoes.
Stock always fresh.    Prices will suit
ou Rennie s Ben's
PURELY PERSONAL.
A man is like unto a deck of
cards. He starts out at night feeling like a king, and in the morning
wakes up feeling like the deuce.
Mr. O. S. Stevens of Kamloops
was through the Nicola district
lately installing new telephones.
There are now fifteen 'plonejson the
line from I/wer Nicola to Kamloops.
Mr. Adams, of Nelson, B. C.
arrived in town the middle of the
week and expects to make it his
headquarters for the summer. He
reports that a great number of prospectors and mining men are only
waiting for spring to open up to
come to this district.
Murdoch Mclntyre, of Mclntyre
& McDonald, Liverymen of Phoenix, has, according to Pioneer, started for the Similkameen with the intention of acquiring coal land. Mr.
Mclntyre who was prospecting
through here last summer, has
terested various Phoenixites in the
proposition, which is situated in the
Aspen Grove district.
Characteristic of its management
the Hotel Jackson banqueted the
bridge contractors and mechanics
right royally Wednesday evening,
on the completion ol the Howe
truss bridge across the Similkameen
river, connecting Copper mountain
with Princeton. This is the first
permanent improvement leading to
and bringing the mines closer the
metropolis of the Similkameen,
True appreciation of the Jackson
hospitality was shown till the wee
sma' hours, when every one retired
praying for more bridges and banquets.
Just a little paper,
Justa little ink,
Jolly's up tl e editor,
Makes the buyer think.
R. A. Brown brought back from
the east with him a silk quilt made
by his mother who is now 82 years
of age, says the Grand Forks Miner.
This quilt is one of the most beautiful things in this line we have
ever seen. It is composed of hundreds of blocks all beautifully worked with fancy stitching and designs,
more than $10 worth of silk thread
being used in this work alone. A
number of pictures of flowers, birds,
etc., are so realistic as to be readily
mistaken for paintings. Owing to
failing health his mother was unable to finish the work, it being the
last of her work in this line, giving
it an additional value in Mr.
Brown's eyes.
WANTED to purchase farming land in
Keremeos Valley Similkameen Valley
or thereabouts.   Apply to
B. H. Hurst & Co.,
35 Fort Street.
Victoria, B. C.
TENDERS will be received between the
13th and 17th inst. for tbe excavation
of a grade between the end ofthe Similkameen river bridge and the bench
above. Specifications can be obtained
from W.J. Waterman after the 12th inst.
Vermii,ion Forks Mining Co.
THE
SUNSET
COPPER
MINING
COMPANY
LIMITED.
Owning
and
Operating
The
SUNSET
Mine
On Copper
Mountain,
Similkameen
Mining
District.
Everyone who has  seen the property
RENDERS
A UNANIMOUS
VERDICT
The Biggest and Best Mine in British
Columbia.
NOW IS THE
TIME TO BUY
STOCK IN
This Wonderful Mine. \ It is an investment ! No Speculation ! Ore enough in sight to return 100 per cent, on amount
invested.    BUY TO-DAY before advance in price.
Sunset Shares Will
Make You Rich.
FOR FURTHER IMFORMATION APPLY TO
R. A. BROWN,
PRINCETON or Grand Forks, B. C.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
March 9TB, 1901
Canadian Pacific
Navigation Co.
Time   Table   No.  35
VANCOUVER ROUTE.
VICTORIA TO VANCOUVER' daily, excep1
Monday, at i o'clock a. in. Regular freigh
— "'-toria at midnight on Tues
VANCOUVER TO VICTORIA daily, a
Tuesday and Thursday and
on Wednesday aud Friday.
Steamer Beaver leaves NBW WESTMINSTER
r Chilliwack and way landings, Tuesday,
uirsday and Saturday at 8 a. in., connecting at
ission City with C. P. R. from Vancouver.
Returning, leaves Chilliwack for New West-
mster, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 7 a.
, connecting with boat for Victoria.
aud way port* on ist,' 7th, 14th and 20th ofeaclj
month; extending later trips to Quatsino and
Cape Scott. .The Company reserves the righto
changing this Time Table at any time withou
notification.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 ABB	
SOO LINE.
DAILY TOURIST CARS
ST. PAUL
TUESDAY and SATURDAY.
 TO	
TORONTO
WEDNESDAY
Montreal and Boston.
'rains pass Spences Bridge as follows:
Test Bound East Bound
(■,•05   22:03
W. MAXWELL,
AGENT
CLAIMS
STAGE
LINE
Leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
■ Nicola Lake every Monday.
L/eaves Nicola Lake for Kamloops
every Friday at 6 a. m.
Carry flail and  Express.
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicola,
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 8 a. m.
Princeton Meat Market
WARDLE & THOMAS
Orders for Mining Camps promptly attended
to and delivered.
FRENCH A DAY
Tinsmiths, Gunsmiths, and Plumbers
Boot and Shoo Repairing.
Repair work  of    Every   Description.
IT IS QUITE APPARENT THAT:
"The Government" has adjourned sine die.
Peanuts have gone up since high
water went down.
There is considerable irony in
the fate of the Similkameen bridge.
The government is underpaying
their road men in this part of the
country.
.■; Our business merchants are progressing, as the click of the typewriter testifies.
Princeton has a highly efficient
and pleasing school system. Long
may it continue so.
What some Princetonites don't
know about putting up ice would
fili a good sized book.
Princeton is in need of fire protection. Here is a chance to invest
in a profitable undertaking.
The report of the Similkameen
boom has not arrived from Victoria
yet. Expected in on this stage
though.
The new cross-walk on Bridge
street is highly appreciated by our
citizens, and due credit is given to
the source from whence it came.
The Cook & Co. building
changes the appearence of that end
of town—and for the better. With
other promised improvements that
portion of town will assume a very
natty appearance.
The Similkameen bridge is bu It
at last. As the Star has dwelt
e or less on this subject since
its first issue, we will now give oui
attention wholly to the Tulameen
bridge and Copper mountain road.
A little more energy on the part
of the townsite owners would not
come amiss, and it would give some
encouragement to those who have
spent their last dollar in trying to
build the town up. A few practical business methods and more
hustle is what is needed. pa M
(A
The need of good side-walks qj-e*]
recognized by some of our citizens.
The one built this week by French
Day and A. E. Howse, in front
of their buisness property is a much
needed improvement. Other parties interested in Princeton would
do well to follow their example.
t t
We need a new bridge across the
Tulameen, and need it bad. Rome
was'nt built in a day, neither are
bridges—but sometimes they are
destroyed in less time. It is to be
hoped that the necessity for this
bridge will be seen by the proper
authorities—and something be done
toward its immediate attainment,   m
FOR SALE.
3 20 acres Nicola Valley.    Crown  Gra
Price $1350.   Apply B. A. Harris,
35 Fort Street  Victorif
Or a
r Office, Princeton.
New York Stocks.
E. GARDINER-JONES
STOCK AND SHARE   BROKER
Hackinnon Building VANCOUVER, B. C
JOHN LOVE <S CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
. F.URVIEW and CAMP McKINNEY.
Presriptiofls ^Carefully .* Compounded.
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
CIGARETTES.
'T'hey are the Purest
C» certainly the
Dest in the market.
Geo.LTuchcn&sonco.
HAMILTON, ONT.
G. L. ALLAN
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN
Boots and
#SHOES^
VANCOUVER, B. C
Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
*?*'
 March 9TH, 1901
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
CULLED.
THERE ARE OTHERS.
Not a yellow Chinaman  has be
left in Moyie.—Ledge.
TO ARMS, YE FORESTER.
The Foresters should get out
their axes. The Simcoe Reformer
calls Dr. Oronhytekha "Mr. Iron-
teakettle." Wouldn't that make
you boil?—Belleville Intelligencer.
LOWERY LUMINOSITIES.
The local legislature meets next
week. The mineral act is already
shaking with fear. The newspaper correspondents on the coast have
not sold the Britannia mine for several days The army canteen has
been abolished in the United States
army. Must have seen Mrs. Nation coming.—New Denver Ledge.
PANTS WERE WELL MADE
Two Grand Forks girls recently
visited a photographer and hac
themselves photographed with their
faces stuck coquettishly through a
torn newspaper. When the pictures were finished and delivered
they were horrified to find that the
newspaper they had used was a
Chicago sheet, and below theii
smiling faces was a big display ad
vertisement of a Chicago firm which
announced: "Our pants are linec
in the seats."—Cascade Record.
ONE WINNER ANYWAY.
This amusing -incident is said to
have happened a few days ago at
Lincoln, Nebraska: The'fifteen
year old daughter of Mr. Bryan
- started from home to go down town.
She hailed a street car half a block
away and failing to attract the attention of the conductor, she sprinted down the street, and after a lively chase caught the car. All out
of breath, she dropped into a seat
and exclaimed: "Thank goodness.
there is one member of the Bryan
family who can run for something
and get it."
SHOULD PASS THEM UP.
It is sincerely to be hoped that
the members of the Provincial Assembly will have sufficient nerve to
pass the C. P. R. up for one deal
f and allow one of the other companies applying for charter to builc
a railway 1 -ough the Similkameen
to get what it is after. A great
share of the future of this section
depends upon obtaining a competing railway to the coast. There is
an enormous trade here which
should be handled by Coast merchants, but the monopolistic tendencies of the C. P. R. will preclude
any such trade unless a charter is
granted some company which wil:
come into   competition    with  the
great Canadian octupus. Granc
Forks Gazette.
COAL LICENCE APPLICATIONS.
>. P. TUNSTALL-
Commencing at a post marked J. R. Hunter
S.W-C. placed alongside of 8. J. TunataU'a 8.W.c
running nonn 80 chains, theme east 80 chains
mmencing at a post marked T. H. Murphy
C. placed along side of S. J. Tunstall's S.E.C
Irunning   south 80 chains, thence west 80
tted Feb.uaiy Zand, 1901.
tend to apply within 30 days to the
lissioner of Lands and Works for a Lii	
npect for coal on the following describee
situated on the north side of Sunilkamee-
startiug point.   In all ojoacrei
H.'j. CAMBIE,
8. Spencer, Act.
hsid.
South bank	
opposite Scotston, joining Wampole'
~   J being one of Spencer-WampoU
Commencing at notice post north side crossing
ver and running 80 chains south, 80 chain!
ast, 80 chains north and 80 chains west, back
j starting point.   In all 640 a	
Located February 5th, 1901.
E. M.	
S. Spencer, agt.
Within 30 days I intend to apply to Chief Cora-
lissioner of Lands and Works tor a licence to
rospect for coal on  following described lands
the Spencer-Wain pole gi
:e post and running north
M. SPENCER.
Palacel
Livery &
Stablem
D. J.  INNIS
KEREMEOS, B. C.
Saddle Horses to all Points in the
Similkameen District. b^S?-Travellers from the Boundary District
can secure horses through to
Princeton.
WW
Run in Connection with
the Keremeos Hotel.
Q. 1TURDOCH
Blacksmithing
nd Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON,. B.   C.
Dated this 18th day of December, 1900.
Notice is hereby given tl
to the Chief Commissioner
for a license to prospect foi
ing described lands:
bank ofthe Similkameen
Princeton, running thence
east 80 chains, thence noi
VERMILION FORKS
Dated this 19th. day of Jan
>ply tot!
-irks, fed
sense to prospect for coal in and on the lai
■re described:   On the north bank ofthe Sii
cameen river, on the north    side   Spencer's
cation and running thence north 80 chains: 80
lains east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west f
irting point.   In all 640 acres.
F. W. WAMPOLE.
Dated this 16th day of January 1901.
LAND  LEASE.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days after date
1 ~ I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works at Victoria, B. C. for permission to lease the following described land as
hay lands:
'ebruary 9th, 1901.
CERTIFICATES   OF   IMPROVEMENTS.
ROANY MINERAL   CLA]
Where   1
Yale District.
Tub
ilkameen river.
Take Notice that I, F. W, Groves, actini
agent for J. O. Coulthard, Free Miner's Certifi
No. B3970, intend, sixty days from the date tl
of, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Cei
cate of improvements, for the purpose of obi
ing a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
tion 37, must be commenced before the issui
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 21st day of January, 1901.
F. W. GROVES.
RED E^GLE MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate
Copper M<
TPAKE
days from the date hereof, to apply to the Gold
And further take notic
s 9th day of Fein
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
i in .ispen Grove district.
•e thre
i thirt
1 dollar
Mou
Thei	
nd seventy-four cents is your proportion ofthe
xpense necessary, in order to hold the said
[aims under the provisions of the Mineral Act,
nd if within ninety days from the date of this
otice you fail or refuse to contribute the above
mentioned sum which is now due, with all costs
come the property of the subscriber, un-
tion Four of an act entitled, "An Act to
the Mineral Act 1900.
ROBERT O. CRAMER,
Dated at Princeton this 19th day of January, 1901.
TAX NOTICE.
ASSESSMENT ACT AND PROVINCIAL
REVENUE TAX.
Notice is hereby given tha
m
uch ofthe income, 0:
houiand dollars, the
iot
e thanten dollars, 01
ousand dollars, one and one
laid on or after ist July, 1901.
Upon.
quarter of one per cent.;  when such excess is
over ten thousand,   and not more than twenty
thousand dollars, one and one-half of one per
cent.; when such excess is over twenty thousand
dollars, one and three-quarters of one per cent.
Provincial Revenue Tax, $3.00 per capita.
HUGH HUNTER,
Assessor and Collector.
Princeton, January 12th, 1901. 1-5
UNDER authority of Order in Council,
passed December 30th, 1890, the Honourable tbe Minister of Mines has been
pleased to sanction, and I do hereby give
notice that I have appointed George Murray, of Nicola, a Deputy Mining Recorder
of and for the District known as the,
niighborhood of Nicola in the Kamloops
and Similkameen Mining Division, with
Sub-Recording Office at Nicola.
G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner for District.
KAMLOOPS, ASHCROFT, YALE AND
SIMILKAMEEN  MINING DIVISIONS  OF YALE
DISTRICT.
T^OTICE is hereby given that all placer
■*■ ^ claims legally held in Kamloops,
Ashcroft, Yale and Similkameen Mining
Divisions of Yale District, will be laid
from the ist day of November ensuing, to the ist day of May, 1901.
G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner.
Kamloop. Oct. 28th, 1900.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
The  Townsite  of
PRINCETON
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • • 4?dlw • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $ JO,
Per Front Foot..* .*
Size of Lots 50xJ00
Ft. and 33x100 Ft
One acre Residential
Lots..* <£<£*.<<**£
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum. «*
Government Head-
quarters m Ut Slnlikuicci llstriei.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers! The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Gimps:— Copper Mountain,
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM.
*####* W ##*###
Send for Map and Price List to «* <£ <& ** <&
W. J. WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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