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The Silvertonian Jan 19, 1901

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Array **T*r
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For     Sal©.
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Our.    C>4_jiuiQix«
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VOLUME FOUR.
SILVERTON, BRITISH  COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19,  IDOL
NUMBER  29
EVERYTHING
THE MINER
HEEDS,BK ™
He comes to us to get it
THAT THE QUALITY AND THE TRICE ARE BOTH RIGHT
IN  THE    WAY   OF
CLOTHING OR PROVISIONS,   HE WANTS   TO
FIRST-CLASS,        WHEN
UK KNOW*
Ft*11
I^lixes  Of Drygoods   and
IPrcrvrisions.
A.JEFFREYS:
STORE   IN   UNION  HALL,
SILVERTON, B. C.
NEWS OF
THE WEEK.
MEREST REVIVES IN R0CE.IM.
0000030000030000000000000$
I MINING
QOC
Ali Owner Talk of Rig Developments
in   The   Spring.
Red Mountain Troperty Will
Bc in Remand.
Soon
Tbe United Mtatea Tnnnel Laws -\V?»ul
the l'rtiniittera Oet From I'nolc Sum.
Sntinrutiiiiry   tl.e    SUipintmta.
I
p. BXJR_N» & co
WHOLES\LE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL STORES AT
Silverton. Nelson, Trail. Ymir. Kaslo, Sandon,
New l)enver, Qaacade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
M VILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO..
OFFICE NELSON, B.C.
HEAD
THE VICTORIA
t
Hm>*
SILV E It T 0 N     B
C.
SI'I
1\1
.! ft BL     ti 9
F
THE
RAYMOND
The following appeared in the Nelson
Mi nit of recent date, tbo infoimalion
having been supplied by one of tho prlu.
cipal owners in the Rockland Group,
and may be idled upon as a COTreu
Bt iteiiii-nt regarding tlie intentions of the
Miner-Graves couipany in regard to
their operations in the Silverton diatrict
in the near future:
"About May 1 next, the Miner-Graves
syndicate will tuko the initial steps in
tho development of the Rnckland
Kroupon Eight*Mile creek, the outcome
of which will be to establish what it
likely to bu (he greatest mining industry
in tho Slocan. Tne expenditure oi
175,000 in development and the eoii-
struciion of a smelter on lhe ground to
licit RueLland ores ure ibe principal
features of tho nyndicute's program. The
Rockland gm-ip comptittes two fill.
claim*, and a traction aggregating ab _ui
110 Hires of miotic.! land. The propeit)
came into the possession of Frank
Watson, one of. the best known uiinint!
ipcratois in biitndi Columbia, with
whom was affiliated Jndjje Spinks of
Vernon. These gentlemen put con
ridetiible mouey into development and
devoted lime and attention  to H.-cuiin-j
enn titles to the  ground.   When  thi*
wm in siia|ie Ihe proposition  was pre-
v iitcd in Mr.   Miner  aud was taken up
the syndicate on the strength of u report
dom     tbeir   sopeiinteiid.nt,   W. Yoh-n
t\ illiami. who is  said  to have ilescrilied
the   Rjcklund  us  "tl.e biggtst   cupper
piupcriy in the country."    .Mr.  \\ ats..n
i and Judgo Spinks retain a third Interest
in  the property,    The agreement governing tin-side provides fnr   tho  placing
'. oM'.i.OOO in   lhe   treasury   for development  und   for   the   commencement  of
oi leritloill by a certain date about three
months hence.    Work will be carried on
I under lite direction ol Mr. Willisnu,
SHADES, ALL1    Tbo Rockland ll a gold-copper proposition,    the    values  being   curtied  in
I sulphides,   whicli   also   mn   about    an
oiiiice in silver to the ton.   It is a strong
f-atuiu   in  Iho   enormous oro body the
ex'ent ot wliliili has wit yet been determined, \\ hen Messrs Watson ami
Spinks operated the- property they
drove across the depo.-dt for il") feet encountering ore all the distance. Drills
weie run iu both directions from the
tunnel and the ore continued in place.
Thorough sampling indicated the
CABINET BBWlNOl MACHINE - SlOOO1, preMUeooUM loot  paistroak. aven.g-
THE PES? Kir.NlMll^l' HOTEL IN THE SLOCAN.
!\|   vm-.STION TO THE TRAVELLING PUBLIC.
TABLE   UNSURPASSED IN THE   NORTHWEST
I T'tNISHED Willi T«E BESf PROCURABLE BRANDS.
.,
l.y
t. it
P r i ;> r \ r 11» r.
Silverton's
MERCHANT    TAILOR,-
(MIRIES A    FULL    L'NE   OF   CLOIUIS,    ALL
WEAVES,    ALL    W'F.tCKTS.
YOU    WILL   FIND   THESE OOODS XVaF. FINEST,1 TO, BE HAD
IN THE SLOOAN,
I Must Call Your Attention
For this is my offer to you-
One car was the amount of Enterprise
shipments this week.
i _
The Black Prince shipped a car of ore
•from Slocan this week.
Ore sacks have been taken up to thp
Emily Edith and a shipment is being
g-it ready.
The G.-st shipment of ore for some time
from New Denver was made this weejt
by the Hartney.
The Nelson Miner sneaks of "the
Hewett mine at Silverton, operated by
the Hewett Bros."
The Highland concentrator at Ainsworth is now completed and had a sut-
oeatful trial run on Wednesday.
The Silvertonian was the first paper
to unnoiiiice the reduction of the freight
istes ou Kootenay ores consigned to the
Am eric in smelters.
The cross-cut tunnel on the Majuba
Hill. Eiidit Mile, is being steadily driven
ahead and a strike of oro may be heard
of from ihat property at any time.
Tlie ore being sacked at Iho St.
Eugene mine at Moyie is bov being
shipped to Hamburg, Germany. Already over 5..0 tons havo been shipp d
there.
The Hewett mine is again thc only
shipper from Silveiton Ibis week, with
ninety tons to ils credit. Oro is being
rapidly sacked at tlie mine and it piom
ises lo be some time before the freighter!
cnteb up to the output.
The question ol the water rights on
Gout creek, Ior whicli the Slocan City
Water k Power Company and the Citizens Committee sre fighting, will not
l«fettled until the 26th inst. Neither
side tn the dispute are us yet a corporation to whom water rights could Le
granted.
TUE LOCAL HYOliT.
JSOOOOOOOOQOaOGOOOOGOOOQC
NEW
i. DROP-HEAD
TIIE WHEELER A WILSON CABINET SI'.WING MACHINE      -
DROP-HEAD  "
THE   "DOMESTIC"     SEVEN-DRAWER      "
THE   "STANDARD"
THE   "WHITE" " it
THESE MACHINES ARK QU41UHTRRD
TO  BE  IN  FIRST-CI.ASS   CONDITION.
P. O.  B.    N''.I.SON
Thfsft hires Stand (iood Until Jiimury Will, lOftl.
Dover,  TI1NS WE LB!,
B.
it ing $17per ton and the ore body for its
won qq j entire width   averaged   $8.   The  values
*4l) Oil i are about equally  devhl-.-d  between Hold
- |M 00 1 ,,»,l «W
- f40 00
MD.Oil
Jacob
NELSON,
"•Between now and Spring everyone   should  provide
themselvea with Wet Weather Goods,  and   there is no
0. • ■>       I
more seasonable time than the present.
We aro showing full lines of tho  following and  can
assure Special Values:
RUBBERS,   OVERSHOE8, GUM BOOTS,
RUBBER AND OILSKIN COAT8,  MAOl-
NAW8,     WATERPROOF    BOOTS   AND
SHOES, UMBRELLAS, ko.
A yett hence the program of develop
ment will be completed Slid Ihe smelter
proposition will have advanced in a
pisctlcal stage, With a view to lids
contingency the syndicate has staked the
entire li iw of Ibiar eruek. This give*
l litii i 3iH) miners' inches of water at Ihe
extreme low water mark and as a decent
Of 1,000 (est call lie scented in tlie immediate vicinity of tlie smelter site,
making a water power of rare utility.
This power will bo used next spring for
a compressor plint.
Altogether the proposition Is decidedly
Ilie most interesting of tho day and its
importance to the section ol the Slocan
in which the Rockland is shunted cannot be overestimated. Further pai-
tic.ulars of tho matter will be awaited
with keen interest.
'.WILLIAM HUNTER CO.
Mining Ki't'onlcr's Records.
The following figures were compiled at
the office of the Mining Recorder for the
Slocan Division. They show the work
done in Ihe district on undeveloped
claims during 1900.
Locations         2'r>'
A ssessments         TOO
Certificates of Improvements ... 100
Cash in lien of worl^     11,800
Free Miners' Certificates issued
Special Certlficatet	
Companies Specials	
Abandonments	
Water Rights granted 	
American Timid Rights.
Now that we havo a tunnel and
drainage proposition by n company
nsk; -g for the right to run a tunnel
from her" to Sandon, the lirst proportion
of its kind to coir.e un befo-e our Legislature, we lake Ibis opportunity to lav
In lore onr readers the privilege! granted
to like companies operating in the
mineral slates to tho south of ns. While
Ihe following ilo-s not fully cover a
parallel esse it shows what a company
ot this kind might consistently ask of
onr Legislature.
full til Minn-H Tunnel    icighm.
The law provides that where a tunnel
is mn for the development of n vein or
lode, or for lhe discovery of mines, the
o.vnpr ol such iiiniiel shall have tho
right of possession nf nil veins or lodes
within three thousand feot irom tho face
of such tunnel on tbe line thereof, not
previously known to exist, discovered In
such tunnel, to tlio same extent ns if
discoveied litini the surface; and locutions ou the .ine of such tunnel ot veins
or lodes not appearing on the surface,
imiln by other parties idler tlie commencement of the tunnel, anil while Iho
same is being proaeOUte I with reasonable
diligence, shall be invalid; tint failure
to prosecute Iho work on the tunnel for
six months r)uill be considered us an
abandonment uf thu right to ell undla-
covered veins or lodes ou the line ol
said tunnel.
The itr.'ct of this is simply to give tin-
proprietors of a mining tunnel run in
good faith UlO possessory right to fifteen
hundred feet ul any blind lodes cut,
tlltOQVOred, or intersected by sucb tunnel,
which were not previously known to
exist, within three thoiwand feet from
the face or point of commencement of
the tunnel, and lo prohibit other partic,
after the commencement of the tunnel,
from prospecting for und making locations of lodes on the line thereof nnd
within said distance uf three thousand
feet, unless such lode appears upon th"
surface or wero previously known to
exist.
The Colorado law in regard to the
drainage of mines provides that all
mines benefited by a drainage tunnel are
liable to the parties undertaking the
the work, for their share of the expense
of iiiantaining such drainage. And
in porporlion to the amount of benefit
received they must pay their share of the
actual and necessary cost and expense
of such drainage, which may be recovered by an action in any court of competent jurisdiction.
Wm, Cliffe, of Sandon, spent Wednesday in town.
Wm. Hunter did Nelson on a business
trip tbis week.
Chris. Wheeler ig rapidly recovering
from his acute rheumatic attack.
R, Peel is back from Three Folks and
in his old place behind the Wm. Hunter
Co's counters.
Frank Card has closed the City Hotel,
and ihe licence has been transferred to
the Hick's House.
The Legislature has been summoned
to meet on February 1st, tor the despatch of business.
Geo. T. Kane waa defeated by Gus
Ca.lson tor the Mayoralty ol Kaslo.     He
was 30 votes In hind.
E. W. Matthews, the Nelson manager
for R. G. Dun .i Co, wrote up our merchants on Thursday.
Coal oil is down to f3.5Q a case in New
Denver, and it isn't a tight of the Standard Oil Company either.
H H Reeves left on Wednesday for
Phoenix, where he will visit beioie journeying to the Crows Nest i.'ttss dibtiict.
Mrs. Wheeler left last Satuiday for
Pendleton, Oregon, having received
word uf the seriuua illness of her moiher.
.lack Smith underwent an operation
at the Islucau Hospital ou Wednesday
ior tlie K'lnov.d of a tumorous growth ou
ins wrist.
The congregation of the Silverton Episcopal Church are preparing lur a concert,
whicli tbey will on tUd uigUtof St. Valentine's Day.
Go  lo R G. Dingle's for alt kinds of
ii.sii li ii iln.    He it receiving sh.uiuuuts
.Jaiiy.    Fresh cuuhctiuuery, choice   IlUc
ui iresli groeerie*. *
Tiie uew manager oi the Lank of Montreal in tw Denver ia le Laruu ue Weber.
inn Silverton cons should be notified
icsl they commit lese ni.ijeete.
James '.'owes wns picked up by the
Siiiiuuii hockey pluvers who passe'l
llnuugli hi'it en route lo Nelson yesler-
iijy. fhey promise lo reuir,. liiin uller
Uieir g.ui.e.
S. Slurch, who is the head push around
the Slocan Ciiy baatiug lluiR this yean
wss la lown yesterday , uniting everyone
lo lhe ii g Carnival he is g jiug tu hold iu
Uie neur lulure,
All    woik   in  the Jewelry  lie pail log
due, lelt ut the Sitverlou inugMure, wul
he promptly forwaiued iii Jacuu Dovm
ihe »eli-Kno,\ii Nelson jeweler.     All re
pans aie ouAiiA.vrisiti. t\tn o.nk vuab. •
II. 11. Pitts has been n-oloolO 1 Mayor
of bandon. 'Iii.- uew council is composed ui .vltssis.H' U Hunter, E U AUi-
eilull m.d R Ml'DoUald, ull re-elected,
and i< It Fohieti, K A Camerou aud Dr.
uoinm.
A. Smith and bis wife, wbo have been
living hciu lor Hume utoiilhs, tuft ou
.Momlav fur houtheru California. -Mrs.
Smith lias been euduiMig puor health
i.aely uud expects lu ttCUperalU iu a
vuiinicr cliiiiuiu.
W. Watcrlai.d wan again refused a
liquor licence tor lhe luteiiiatioual Hotel
ai bl_uuatt by the LiuOUUO Cunimissi-jiiers
Una week     ll ia liutv   uudeistuud   thai
tboow'uer of the i.udding will hlmiell
apply lur a licence.
On Wednesday the 0th. Inst., at the
residence of Wm. Stocks of Cranbrook,
Wm. Mcintosh and Letitin McMillan,
both of Siverton, wereunitod in marriage
by the Rev. Mr. Fortune of that place.
On Monday Mr. and Mrs. Mcintosh
returned to their Silverton home and
have been busy receiving the congratulations of their many friends. Owing
to Silverton's lack of a band to welcomo
them, a brass band was improvised,.
mostly with tin instrumental tlie town
paraded ami long life, health and hapV
pinesB to the bride and groom wa> drunk
in all the hotels.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments of ore fr.im Slocan Lake for
the year 1899. totaled 3078 Tona.
Shipments in  1900 totaled 4930 Tons.
The shipment   ot   ore   (mm   Sloean
Lake points, np to and including   tlio
present week, from Jan. 1, 1901.
From New Denver Tons.
Hartney 20
From Bosun Landing.
Bosun     80-
From Silverton
Hewett Z0A
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise      40
From Slocan City
Arlington       100
TwoFiioids 4<V
Black Prince 20
Total
369
THE   METAL MARKET.
New  York.  Jan. 17.—Bar Silver, fift^
Lake copper,   $16.50.
Lead—The firm that fixes the selling
price for miners snd sin1. Iters quotes lead
at $4.00 »»the close.
U. 8, Prodwtions.
Owing to tho good demand for lead and
the firm control of the market by that
smelters, the production of lead shows a
great increase, says the Western Mining
World, and is the larsest yet recorded.
The uitpnt from domestic ores and- bullion wss2")l,781 short tons as compared
with 217,085 short ions in 1899. There
were also recovered from foreign ores
and base bullion smelted and refined in
Ibis country 103.705 short tons, assgainss
76.423 short toot in 1899.
Increased production of ropper and
lesd caused a corres|>otiditn! increase in
silver, a lurge part of the output being in.
tbe nature of a by-product. The tnfal.
output was 60.748.276 trov ounces, valued at $:!7.(Kr),248. The United Statea,
also produced from foreinn ores and-
bullion in 1900 a total of 46,332,281 trov
ounces valued at 128,423.210.
Tho weaker markets, particularly
abroad, resulted in a decreased output of
zinc last >cai, the production being
122.850 sliurt tons.
Tho United Ststesonco more takes first
place as a gold producer,   owing   to  the
■unoponaloo of mining in the Tranavoo
nml ihe decreased   output   of Australia.
The output wss  8.803,456. fine   ounces.,
valued at $70,190,081.
A disastrous lire in Pnoeiiix on Thursday did damage lo llle amount ul f 30.01)0.
M Mcl-cau kCn WON tho heaviest sii-
fercrs, losing a IIU.OOOstock, 'lhe Wm.
Hunter 0o, of Silverton, lost a J.iuOO
block, partly covered by insurance.
Municipal polities In Sandon radiated
(rum the police headquarters and the
whole ul the present cuinpaiiiii was between die friends ol the City Policeman
and fi lends of those who wanted his j ib.
To be Mayor ol Sandon is not to be the
big man.
The Silverton Miners' Union expect lo
be Incorporated under a provincial charier within a few days, having been working with that end in view for several
WOOko, They havo been working formerly nnder the charter of tho Sandon
Miners' I'nion.
275
fo
1
"Editoi Dailv Brood," wrote Indignant Citizen, "that editorial in your paper
this morning ou 'Corruption in Ward
Polities' has cost you the subscripts n of
myself und 16 other men who have
been taking your vile sheet for years.
Hereafter  we   shall   borrow   it  ol tho
A mean health inspector in Victoria
bas been informing the public how the
Chinese gardeners prepare vegetahl a
for market by sprinkling them with pat*
lid urine. He has spoiled tbo appetites
ol many fair enter ol celery, which wns
red horrid ol hi....
An observant Silvertoniun has infom-
ed us of a sine way of learning the home
town ol any Moean stranger we might
meet. He DOtlOM that every New.
Ilenveiite has a string on hi. hat and
carries his left hand ready to grab in
case the wind blows If a mail looks
guilty when bearing a piano played ho
hails from S.nxlog, while if he wants lo.
hold you up on the corner and talk
socialism he comes from Slocan City.
If ho comes from Roseberrv evereone
knows boo mse ho's a Frenchman
Tommy Atkins had taken a B >er oris-,
oner, and, the two getting friendly,
talked about iho prospects of the war.
"You may us well give up: vou will
never win," said the Boer. "Cos why?1'
Mked Tommy. "Because we've the
Lord on our aide," said the Boer.
"ti'arn" said Ton.my, with great contempt, "whv, we've throe lords on onr
side, and ono of them made a bloouiiii''
bass of 'imself!"— London Despatch.
\ ojlghb
ws!'
When   Kipling   writes a poOUl, Alfred
Austin says il's N.Ot   When Mr Austin
write*, Kipling doesn't say a word.   He
'(doebii't have to,—Toronto Telegram.
"Johnny!   Johnny!"   exclaimed  the
stern parent,   as  he   brounlit down the
leather strap wilh light good will,'where,
will you be when you are a middle aged
man,  if  you  keep up    your   present-
conduct?"
"I know whero you'll be!" whimpered-
Johnny, under his breath, as he lelt the.
woodshed a few momenta later, rubbing
hinm'lf.   "But I ain't goin' to tnlU">
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ID
LAWS OF CANADA
Amendments to the Criminal
Code Now in Effect.
RAFFLES    FOR    PRIZES
Whipping of Bnrfllar»--Pos»e»»ion
of Humbling Utensils—Chinese Dens.
Vancover Province: There is in
one of the several amendments to
the criminal code of Canada that
became of force and effect on New
Year's day, material for much discussion—and much sarcastic and
contemptuous comment on the part
of the unregenerate.
This is the provision attached to
the general law prohibitory of lotteries and similar enterprises, which
provides that hereafter the ban of
the law shall not be placed upon
"raffles for prizes of small value at
any bazaar held for any charitable
or religious object, if permission
to hold the same has been obtained
from the city or other municipal
council, or from the mayor, or reeve
of the municipality, wherein such
bazaar is held and the articles, rallied for thereat,have first been offered
for sale, and none of them are of a
value exceeding $50."
*   Common  Law
The principle underlying a com
mon law should unquestionably be
general in its applicability, and
it is therefore not quite clear how
the above secures a place in the
statute book of Canada, or why a
raffle should be any less reprehensible or more permissible when the
proceeds are to be applied toward
advancing the prosperity of some
religious or charitable body than
when (as is often the case) designed
to pull some poor chap, whose
affairs have gone wrong, out of
temporary difficulties.
Another provision disposes peremptorily of such concerns as that
at Montreal which for years has
operated under the mask of an "art
union;" while still another aims to
check the growth of theft where the
stolen property has a special value
as in the case of prized cattle, or
dogs—the penalty heing increased
where the worth of the stolen
animal exceeds $20, to a maximum
fine of $50 over and above the
value of the stolen animals, or two
years' imprisonment, or both fine
and imprisonment.
The provision for the whipping of
burglars apprehended with dangerous weapons in their possession
has already been discussed in the
province since its coming in force,
and there are also among the newly
effective provisions, sections with
reference to the punishment of
gambling that greatly enlarge the
powers of the officers of the law.
Prima Paela Proof.
For example, the possession of
gambling utensils may now be held
to be prima facie proof of guilty use.
the amended law reading that;
"When any curds, dice, balls,
counters, tables or other instruments of gaming used in playing
any unlawful game are found in any
house, room or place suspected to
be used as a common gaming
house, und entered under a warrant
or order issued under this act, or
about the person of any of those
who are found therein, it shall be
prima facie evidence, on the trial of
a prosecution under section 198 (or
section 199), that such house, room
or place is used as a common gaming house, and that the persons
found in the room or place where
such tables or instruments of gaming are found were playing therein,
although no playing was actually
going on in the presence of the
officer entering the same under such
warrant or order, or in the presence
of those persons by whom he is
accompanied as aforesaid."
Still another feature of tho new
enactments that is decidedly interesting to any town where the
Chinese are a factor in the population,where every den is liable at any
time to be the object of a police raid,
provides that it shall be accepted as
prima facie' evidence of guilt if,
when a visit is paid to any premises
suspected of being put to illegal
uses.
"Any constable or officer, authorized to enter any house, room or
place, is wilfully prevented from, or
obstructed or delayed in entering the
same or any part thereof."
Another new provision of the law
puts a check upon evil disposed
persons who plot the injury of industries carried on by those against
whom they harbor ill will, they being now rendered liable to penalties ranging from $200 to $4000,
together withjtwo years' imprisonment.
HE STOLE TO PLAY   CARDS
Trying to Beat Ihe   World,Youuk ftlau
Lauded In  Jail.
The belief that he could beat the
world playing poker caused the
downfall of J. J.Myers, an employe
of the Southern Express at Charlotte, S. C. He learned tn play
cards last month and had such a
run of luck that he determined to
play on a large scale and make a
fortune quickly. To get a suitable
stake he held up a Southern Express package containing $600 in
cash and a mumber of checks.
After losing a few hundred in
Charlotte he tried to break
Columbia's gambling houses. In
three days ail his cash was gone.
He did not attempt to use the
checks. Myers drank heavily and
attempted to poison himself. He
was arrested,
HAZING PIPT*   YEARN AGO
A   Preahnian'a   Leiter show. How It
Waa Done at tba Time Indicate*.
At the present time, when so
much of public attention is being
directed to hazing at college and in
government academies, the following extract from a letter written
over a half a century ago will be of
interest. The writer was at that
time a freshman of Vale, but was
not at the college when inditing
the epistle.    He says:
"I had a letter from the other
day—they are having a great time
at Vale plaguing the fresh, etc.
Thaj business is carried on to a
great extent here. Many of the
poor devils have been ducked under
the windows a dozen times, etc.,
etc. The greatest sport is to
break into their room at midnight
(a whole party of sophs at a time)
make the scart fellow get up,
mount the table in his shirt sleeves,
answer questions in geography,
arithmetic, Latin, grammer, etc.,
(the simplest possible, so far as to
be suited to a freshman's comprehension.) read a little Greek and
then, what is the greatest trial,
declaim. If he refuses to comply
he receives a shower from his water
pail until he submits. If he 111.
swers well he is highly complimented and flattered and politely bid
goodnight."
HAS NOT IKIIKD THE RAILROAD
Lord Sallakurr Haa No Power lo Make
Sueh Traaefar.
The foreign office at London, declares the report ol the cession of
the New Chwang-Shanhaikuan railroad to Russia by Lord Salisbury,
as announced by the Daily Chronicle, is unfounded. It points
out that Great Britian has no
power to cede it, as the railroad is
Chinise property. Moreover it is
stipulated that it shill not be mortgaged to any foreign government,
or company. There have been reports that Russian agents are en
deavoring to buy out the British
interests,but the British government
is not connected therewith. Representations have been made to
Russia in behalf of the English
bondholders, as the action of the
Russian officials is considered to
have exceeded the military requirements, and the question of compensation will come up when the
line is restored to its owners. A
convention on this subject is now
under discussion.
The fuller blown the rose of
pleasure the sooner its petals will
fall.
Soclallani lu the -JOtli Century.
By M.   Millerand,   Minister   op
Commerce, France,
The Socialist movement is co extensive with the civilized world. It
knows no national limits. Where
civilization is high there collectivism
is the strongest, The twentieth
century will see it in full swing. It
will not retrograde. The hands of
the economic clock can never be
moved back to feudalism. Socialism cannot remain stationery, for it
is viital force. The only possible
evolution for it is in an onward
and upward course.
Socialism works ior concoid and
peace. It makes hearts generous
and it gives us men of good will.
The solidarity of the human race
should be the aim of noble minds.
Such solidarity enforces the sovereignty of right. Might is not right
and never will be with the people.
Solidarity of the race breaks the
back of mere brute force. Men
should not bend the knee to blind
power. Solidarity promotes peace.
What can be more noble than a
festival of work and peace? Honorable peace is more glorious than
the most brilliant war.
The grave and the delicate questions of social economy are now all
tempered by Socialism. Mechanism
and invention are .if use only in so
far as they improve the position of
mankind. We measure the degree
of a people's civilization not by
mechanical improvements, but by
the welfare of the men of toil. This
is the highest and noblest standard
of measurement.
It is generally laid down that
man is the arthitect of his own
fortune. But society must let him
have ihe leisure to work it out. He
must not be brutalized by a task
beyond his strength.
This applies to all nation? and
races. For sons of different races
and citizens of different nationalities
belong to the same family. The
duty of all is to increase the common patrimony. The region of
unknown toilers must not be forgotten.
In the coming century the organisms of iron and steel will continue
mere and more to replace flesh and
bone, epidemics will be unknown,
distance     will  further    disappear.
Science will keep on multiplying
the means she puts at man's disposal. The great service it can render
to man is to teach him the material
and moral grandeur of union—of
solidarity. Where Socialism holds
sway the hatred born of uncultured
brains disappears. It vanquishes
misery to a large extent.
Altruism is the sweetest of sentiments. Even personal interest
justifies it. Men of all nations
should foster societies for self help.
Such associations group men together to resist individual weakness.
Human solidarity will never
stop at the frontier. It lessens the
enequalities born of the social regime. It draws the world's children closer together. Promote it,
and the time will come when these
latter will know no strifes save the
fruitful rivalries of peace and the
splendid struggles of labor.
Socialism will go on widening
the ethical conception of political
economy. It were worth one's
while to study its influence upon
economical and political thought.
Co operation, the municipality, the
state, will all be brought to aid
Socialism. I should like, to see
the principles of association developed as much as possible.
The time has gone by when men
are frightened by mere words. The
men in the twentieth century will
be at least as brave as we aro.
They will not fear to have the
Socialist slung at their heads.
They will know that there is a
noble and generous idea behind
thst word.
The progress of socialism in the
new century is insured by the
triumph of democracy. In France,
Germany, Denmark, Russia, Italy,
Spain, England, everywhere In
Europe I see it making gigantic
strides. It has found a foothold in
the far  off Antipodes, and il has
crossed the Atlantic  to  the great
republic ofthe west,
A triumphant  democracy means
a     world-wide     fraternity. The
twentieth century will lead us  fa
toward'   that    goal.—New York
Journal.
THEY     FOIIIillT    FOR     LIRBRTY
Beat African Natives Bound Por tbe
Rhodealan Minea
On the arrival of the German
steamer Hertzog at Beira, Portugal, with 136 Abyssinians and
Somalis for the Rhode«ian mines,
the "boys," as they are called,
were informed by the firemen that
they would be compelled to work
in chains. Thereupon they refused to go ashore.
Portuguese police and troops
were summoned and a big fight
ensued, vthe "boys" barricading
the foredeck. Victory rested with
the police after an hour's fighting.
One Somali was killed and 36
wounded. Subsequently it was
found there were only 50 "boys"
■n the steamer, the remainder
having jumped overboard.
Homing Ihe Chlneae Giant
In twenty years Japan has increased her capital in factories
sixty five times. She is now an
exporting nation. in ten years
from now China, forced to open her
country to foreign capitalists, will
follow the example of the Japanese
and will be an exporting nation,
and her teeming millions of cheap
labor, will drive every other nation
into the corner, and will force the
labor of all other nations down to
the level of their own wretched
working classes. In that day the
American and European working
people will get the benefits they deserve for helping the piratical capitalist wrest the country from the
control of the native people, by
being forced to work on the level
with the coolie. The industrial
earth has made the mistake of its
existence by arousing the labor
force of the 400,000,000 Chinese to
the powers of mechan ical production, bven the American capital
being planted in the Philippine will
have a tremendous effect on the
labor of that country in the next few
years. The Orient, instead
of being a market for American and
European goods, will be an exporter of gigantic proportions.
And the earth will be starved because of that "over-production."
And the workers, who haveall power, remain as stupid to owning the
land and machinery and shortening
the hours of labor, and ought to
starve as being unfit for association.—Ex.
MAN YELLED FIRE
In a Play House and an Awfnl
Panic Ensued.
SEVEN   PEOPLE  KILLED
Pour Children Thrown Over a Balcony By Parents aad Trampled to Death.
ROAR OP A   PHBNCH CANADIAN
< ompialu* That England la Not Doing
the Pair Thing.
La Verite, the recogonized organ
of the ultra Catholic French Canadians, publishes a threatening article against English rule in Canada.
The article says:
"There is a limit to human patience. It is said that England will
always rule Quebec. We say that
she will govern Quebec just as long
as the French Canadians wish her
to and not an instant longer, and if
the fanatics of Ontario and elsewhere were not blinded by passion
they would comprehend it also. If
the insults of which we havo been
made the constant object on the
part of the English element of this
country do not soon come to an end,
and if they continue to reward our
loyalty toward the English throne
by covering us with injuries and
flooding us with threats there will
be an explosion of anger among
the French Canadians which will
astonish those who are accustomed
to regard us as 'good sheep.' And
what will be the inevitable result of
a series of riots, of serious troubles
between the French Canadians and
English? The French Canadians
have only to make a sign to Uncle
Sam and in 15 days an army would
occupy Quebec, Montreal and Toronto. We certainly dn not hope
to see these things, but they will
come if the campaign of insult does
not cease,"
Seven persons were crushed to
death and as many more seriously
injured in a panic which followed a
man's cry of ''fire" late Saturday
afternoon in the West Twelfth
street Turner hall, Chicago. About
800 people were in the place, gathered to witness the performance of
a play entitled "The Greenhorn."
Converted Into a Hob.
The play was Yiddish, and the
audience, comprising for the most
part women and children, were all
Hebrews. The hall stands in a
densely populated district. When
the cry was raised it was only five
seconds until the entire audience
was converted into a frantic mob,
every member of which was fighting for the safety which lay beyond
the door of the building. As soon
as the wild rush toward the doors
began chairs were knocked down
in every direction, the aisles disappeared and the excited people ran,
climbed and stumbled over the
chairs on the way to the  doors.
Children Trampled ta Death
Around the upper part of the
hall extends a balcony, which is
open only at one end. Here were
seated 100 women and children and
the women at the further end from
the stairway, seeing that the rush
toward the exit was blocked to
them, began at once to throw the
little ones over th* railings to the
floor 10 feet below. The children
fell into the midst of the maddened
throng and were at once trampled
under foot. Three of the dead
were children who were thrown
from the balcony and trampled by
the crowd, with no chance for their
lives. Following the children many
ofthe women sprang from the balcony into the crowd below and
others swung over and hung by
their hands before they dropped.
The railing of the balcony was
broken through in half a dozen
places by the pressure brought
against it by the maddened   crowd.
Scene On the Main Plear
On the main floor the crush was
much worse than in the balcony.
The main exit from the hall and
the only one known to a majority of
those who frequent the place are
two doors in the south end of the
auditorium that open on winding
stairs, which eight steps down,
unite into one broader flight leading
to the main door of the Twelfth
street front. Around these two
doors a frantic mass of screaming
men, women and children was
packed, all struggling fiercely to
force their way down the  stairs.
To Pall Was Death.
At the landing where the two
flights of stairs winding down from
the main hall unite a man stumbled
and fell. In an instance a score of
people were down, and before the
rush was over three lives had been
crushed out in a space four feet
wide and six feet long. Within
five minutes after the beginning of
the panic it was all over, and the
police and fireman who came hurrying to the scene ot the disaster,
were called upon to do nothing
beyond carrying away the dead and
wounded.
He Ull ye* Fought Officer*,
Men and women fought desperately with the officers in their efforts
to enter the building and learn if
any ot their beloved ones were
among the dead. The crowd was
so great, so excited and so unmanageable that several calls were
sent for additional officers and firs-
men before it could be restrained.
The alarm of fire was false, there
having been no  fire at any time.
The building is some what defeo
tive and at times sparks pass up
through the registers. It was the
sight of these sparks rising into the
room that frightened the man who
raised the cry of fire.
The hall has several times been
the scene of panics and it is only
a few months since a number of
children were hurt in a rush for the
doors during a juvenile party given
in the place.
THE JAPS MUST GO.
The Chronicle of Spokane is
authority for the statement that
"Jim" Hill of the Great Northern
railway has given orders that all
Japanese employed on his railway
must go as rapidly as white men
can be got to take their places.
The Japanese are employed, so it
is said, through a contracting firm
of Japanese at Seattle, at a rate ot
one dollar a day, the firm paying
the men ninety cents on the dollar. The firm also supplies the
Japanese laborers with all their
food supplies, which the railway
carries free. The Japanese have
worked their way to St. Paul,
where a gang were put at work
one day cleaning up Mr. Hill's
private car. They made a mess of
it, putting ice in the stove instead
of in the water tanks, This displeased Mr. Hill, and the order tor
the "Japs to go" was the consequence.—Tribune.
VAND BRRILT8    WEDDING     DIPT
Hia Bride to Receive Nearlr Ponr Million in SaeniiUea
It has been given out unofficially
by a close friend ot the Vanderbilt and French families that Alfred
Vanderbilt has settled on Elsie
French as her marriage portion one
tenth of his enormous fortune—
namely $3,700,000. This great
dowry is given to her, according
to this authority, not in cash, but
in selected bonds and stocks from
that part of the estate of the late
Cornelius Vanderbilt's fortune
invested in securities paying 4 per
cent. The bride will have an income
of $148,000 a year, or $12,333 *
month.
Hrann'a Opinion or MlllUnatraa.
I can understand every crime in
calendar but the crime of greed,
every lust of the flesh but the lust
of g?in, every sin that ever damned a soul but the sin of selfishness. By all the sacred beasts ot
Egypt, I'd rather be a tramp and
devide my handouts with one more
hungry; I'd rather be a mangy dog
with my kind, than bn a multimillionaire, with the blood of a
snake, the heart of a beast, than
carry my soul in my purse. When
I think of the 3000 children in
Chicago without rags to shield
nakedness from the cold north
wind; of the 10,000 innocents such
as Christ blessed, who die every
year of the world for lack of food;
of the millions every year whose
cry goes up night and day to God's
throne—not for salvation, but for
soup; not lor the robe of righteousness, but for a second hand pair of
pants—and then contemplate those
beside whose hoarded wealth that of
Lydia's ancient kings were but a
beggar's patrimony praying to him
who reversed the laws of nature to
feed the poor. I long for the mystic power to coin sentences that
sear like sulphur flames from hot hell
and weave of words a whip cf scorpions to lash the rascals naked
through the world.— Brann's Iconoclast.
strike In New Mexico
The men employed in the mines
of the Colorado Fuel A Iron company have struck. The men working the mines owned by Senator
Clark and others are still at work.
A telegram from Mr. Mitchell,
chairman of the Mineworkers' association, advised the employes
of the Colorado Fuel A Iron com*
pany's mines to strike, saying' that
they would be supported. Several
hundred men are out.
sstwmstmm ■ t
CHINESE DRILLING
MakiflB Soldiers (hit of 75,000
Celestials.
CAUSING AN EXCITEMENT
Coscossloa to Ruesla by the Chinese   Causes   Much
Speculation.
A Chinaman from Siann Fu,
where the court is at present, says
that within the city 85,000 Chinese
troops are drilling continuously and
the majority of them are armed
with modern rifles. He says that
the feeling of the people there is
bitterly anti-foreign and that they
beiisve that they can meet the
allies in open fight and defeat them.
The ministers are considerably as-
tonished over the Chinese grant to
Russia of a concession north of the
Pei Ho at Tien Tsin. It is compared with the British and French
concessions combined. The grant
according to the Russians was
made voluntarily for services in endeavoring to bring about peace.
The ministers think that the concession constitutes good pay when
considered in addition to the an
nexation of all Manchuria. Li
H * Chang believes he will receive tomorrow a favorable answer
regarding the signing of the agreement. Senor Cologan, the Spanish
minister, thinks the negotiations
will commence at Pekin and possibly end in Europe. M. Degiers,
the Russian minister, thinks the
negotiations will end at The
Hague.
Blaala ProM Ham's Horn
He who rests need not  rust.
It is easy to slip up on an oily
smile.
Long prayers are not always tall
ones.
No one bothers to prune pumpkin vines.
Courage is the cure for discouragement.
Purity is the secret of pleasure in
love.
After all there is no holiday like a
holy day.
There is always hope for a boy
who can blush.
The mart is a good place to de-
ilof the martyr.
A raffle is not redeemed by being
run by religion.
The devil wastes no powder on
stufTed profits.
Destiny is the measure of a man
rather than descent.
A man is not dry the minute he
is saved from drowning.
Tomorrow will obey you more
readily than yesterday.
When tvil men slap you on the
back look into their hearts.
Every man for himself is synonymous with the devil for us all.
The worship of the true religion is not bowing down.but looking up.
True praise is a receipt for
God's faithfulness and a pledge of
ours.
The fall of the sinner is like
that of a meteor, the farther he
falls the taster he is consumed.
The man who measures the
profits of religion in dollars and
cents will never strike a heavy balance.
The man who coins his conscience
into cash will never make a percentage large enough to pay it
hack.
Another new improvement in the
handling of the Wur Eagle ore over
the old tramway will be the addition jf the swing bridge. This
contrivance, when placed in position, will make it possible lo dump
a car of oro in any spot in the ore
bin. It Is being framed at the
Centre Star.
carpenters were engaged the beginning of the week in laying a new
floor in the War Eagle hotel, the
work had to be done at night so as
not to interfere with the house
boardsrs,
■ALKBD OP IT» PBBY.
Leavenworth    CUlsene   Wanted    to
-Ly nt h a Negro.
Miss Eva Roth, a well known
•oung woman of Leavenworth,
Kansas, was assaulted on South
Broadway, the fashionable residence
•treet of that city, on Saturday last,
>y Fred Alexander, colored, who
had followed her for a distance of
12 blocks. Alexander failed to accomplish his object and was arres*-
-•d shortly after the occurrence and
taken to the office of the chief of
>olice, which was quickly surrounded by an angry mob numbering
neaily 1000, breathing threats of
vengeance. Miss Roth is employed
at one of the large stores and was
going to her supper. When at a
point nearly opposite the residence
of Professor Evans of the high
school she was met by Alexander,
who seized her around the throat
and bore her to the ground. In
falling his fingers slipped from her
throat long enough to enable her to
give a cry for help. This cry was
heard by Professor Evans, who responded, when the assailant left the
girl and fled. A crowd had gathered, among them a young colored
girl, who told who the r?sailant
was.
The police were notified and Officer McDonald sent out. When at
Seventh and Cherokee streets the
officer saw Alexander, and upon undertaking to arrest him the negro
attempted to escape, but a blow
from the officei's club reduced him
to submission, when he was taken
to the station.
News of the attempted assault
spread like wildfire and in a few
moments the streets around the
station were filled with a mass of
excited men, determined to lynch
Alexander if he could be obtained.
The police in the meantime spirited
the man away, and when the doors
were broken open no one was found.
Alexander was taken out through
an alleyway by the polii e, placed in
a hack and driven to the Kansas
state penitentiary. He will be kept
there until the officers think it sale
to bring him to the city. Miss Roth
recognized her assailant and identified him to the officers. Alexander
has been watched by the police lately, as he is the suspected murderer
of Miss Pearl Forbes, who was assaulted and killed November 6,
three blocks west of the scene of
Saturday's attempt.
WH1RLE0T0DEATH
Frank Edwards Caught ln Machinery and Was Killed.
MANY    BONES   BROKEN
Fatal Accident at the Oakesdale
Flouring Mills—Victim Leavea
a Family.
Blown tip By T'oveket.
A fatal accident occurred at the
Sunset mine, near Whitewater, last
week, whereby Alex. Morrison lost
his life. He was thawing powder
when it exploded, causinghis death.
He was from Cape Breton. The remains were interred at the Sandon
cemetery by the Miners' Union.—
Drill.
With a match machine jjbo girls
will turn out as many matches as
8000 men could formerly do.
Frank Edward, of Oakesdale,
Wash., aged 29 years, while bending over a countershaft in the flouring mill here in the act of oiling a
journal, had his clothes caught in n
key and was instantly drawn to the
rapidly revolving shaft, running at
a rate of about 300 revolutions per
minute, receiving injuries which resulted in his death within a few
minutes. He made an outcry as
he was caught and the mill was immediately shut down. His body
was found so tightly bound to the
shaft that his clothing had to be
cut to release him. He was alive
and asked to be taken home. Dr.
Smith was 'he first physician on
hand and did all that could be done
in the way of applying restoratives
but the victim was past all human
aid and passed away soon after
reaching  his home.
His shoes were torn off and his
feet were pounded and crushed to
a jelly, while one leg was badly
crushed at the kcee and one arm
was badly crushed at the  armpit.
He was the son of a blacksmith
and leaves a wife and two small
children. They would have been
left in destitute circumstances had
he not been a member ofthe Woodmen and carried a life benefit of
$2000.
Denmark leads the world in thrif-
tiness. Her inhabitants have on an
average $50.00 in the savings
bank.
ASSAYS »HIO,000 TO THE TON
RUSH IT THROUGH
Coast to Kootenay RaLway Fast
Assuming a Certainty.
TO BEAT ALL RECORDS
Dan Maaa Will Soon Commence Ar-
raagmeuta  tor e Construction.
HIGH  R.4TKS ABE SCORKD
Now  Comea   Butte, Montana,   With a
Wonderful Oolden Story.
Once more the Butte district as a
gold producer has come to the front.
The richest streak of gold  bearing
ore ever uncovered in Montana, six
inches wide, almost solid gold   and
assaying $100,coo to the ton,    was
laid     bare     last      week.        The
ground  is   in   litigation   and   the
matter will come up for teview   be-'
fore Judge Clancy.    The claim  lies
south of Rocker, across Silver Bow
creek, where  so   much   gold   was
taken  out  30   years   ago   by  the
placer miners.    A man by the name
of Mertz located   the   land   several
years ago.    Two  months   ago   he
made a proposition to a  man  named McDonald, that he   would   give
him a half interest in the claim upon
the condition that  he   would  work
it.    McDonald agreed and  went to
work, sinking a shaft 26   teet.    At
this depth he ran into the rich   ore.
He notified Mertz   and   when   the
latter saw the rich discovery he flatly relused to   give   McDonald   his
half iStreet    McDonald   came  to
town and tied it up by an injunction.
Men   armed   with   shotguns    are
guarding the locality against jumpers.—Ex
Mr. MacDonnell of Vancouver,
B. C, legal adviser in connection with the Coast to Kootenay
railway, said that D. D. Mann, of
the firm of McKenzie & Mann,
would be in Vancouver on January
20, He added that Mr. Mann when
there would make all arrangements
for thr. building of the road and that
it would be pushed to completion
at such a rate as to beat all records
in railroad building. One year after the British Columbia government renews the bonds the road
will be completed.
POR   SEI/.l HE   OP    A    STEAMEB
Colombia    ProtiiWn   to   Pay  Great "■
Britain #_io,oo0
The indemity to be paid by the
Colombian government to the
Pacific Steam Navigation company
for the seizure and use of the British steamer Tabogatea for taking
troops and munitions of war to
Buena Ventura has been settled at
$30,000, The steamer has been
returned in good condition, The
British flag was again hoisted on
board of her yesterday.
WAS BROUGHT   TO   HEASON
OIL BELTS BEACH  IDAHO
Stone
Nina  Mllllona  shipped
The mines of southeastern   British Columbia shipped   ore   ot   the
value of $9,000,000 during the year
1900, as follows:
Slocan  District  ....   .
Rossland  District....
Boundary District	
Nelson District	
Moyie District	
Kimberley District....
Ainsworth District....
Lardeau District       30,000
Windermere District....        5,000
.$3,000,000
.. a,755,ooo
.  1,000,000
,.  1,000.000
,.  1,000,000
165,000
50,000
Prolaaaor Paraona Talk toCommlaaloa
on Government Ownership
Professor Frank H. Parsons of
Boston continued his testimony
before the industrial commission in
Washington upon government ownership of public utilities. He favor-
such ownership of railroads and
reviewed telephone and telegraph
conditions.
He claimed that the charges tor
both telephone aod telegraph service are excessive and that such
services should be furnished at
greatly reduced rates. He said
that the rates Lin this country are
much higher than iu countries
where telegraph and telephones are
owned by the government. In his
opinion the conditions here do not
seem to justify such higher rates.
The North Star Mine.
Since the North Star mine, in
East Kootenay,commenced shipping
last February, it had up to December 17, shipped 16,000 tons of ore
and development work amounting
to about 3,000 feet, consisting of
drifts, shafts, etc., has been done.
The North Star stands today as
one of the best mines on the American continent, and as yet the extent
of the ore hody is unkown. It is
mines like the North Star, Sullivan
and St. Eugene that are telling the
story of the riches of this district in
a language that is, understood by
every man.—Cranbrook Herald.
Xotal $9,000,000
BIBS PHOM PBICB OP A PIN
POR BBCOONITION   OP I'NION
Km itiirauiiiu Heeogultlon.
The following few lines are encouraging, indeed, ami makes the
poor devil of a newspaper man believe that there is a little appreciation of his  arduous   work,   after
all:
Phenix, Ala., Jan. 1,  1901
Brother Edit01 of the Reveille:
In behalf of the International
Union of Textile Workers, it is
my pleasure to extend to you our
most hearty thanks for the great
benefits our organization has derived from your paper and the
other labor publications during  the
past year.
We fully realize the fact that the
labor organizations throughout the country are vastly benefited
by the labor press, and that the
labor papers are not patronized by
by numbers of labor organizations
as they should be.
Wishing   your   publication    the
prosperity it deserves, and   yourself
a happy New Year, I am,
Fraternally yours,
1'KINIK Grbbnb,
General Secretary-Treasurer.
Millionaire  Tailor of Cleveland Expiree Prom Blood Polaonlne,
A. Reinheimer, a millionaire
merchant tailor of Cleveland, Ohio,
died in terrible agony, the result
of the prick of a pin. Three of
Cleveland's most prominent physicians did everything in their power to save his life, but the merchant died while they were deciding
whether or not to amputate his  left
hand.
The other night he personally
closed his tailoring establishment
in Km lid avenue, as had been his
custom for 33 years. In trying the
rear door he received a slight
scratch from a tailor's pin which
hud been placed there to keep the
knob on the door, ln the morning
his left hand was swollen, and Dr.
Patkind, the family physician, was
called in. The physcian diagnosed
the case as blood poisoning, assuring Mr. Reinheimer that it was
not serious. The hand continued
to swell, and three physicians had
about concluded to amputate the
hand, when he succumbed to a fit
of fainting and expired.
Ntrke at Ploreare, Col.,  Aeetimea Mer-
lona Proportlona.
The people of Florence Col.,
are becoming alarmed over the situation of the Union Gold Extraction company's mill, where the employes are on strike for recognition
of their union. Manager Milliken
is willing to pay the nnion scale of
of wages, but has refused to receive
a committee from the mill and
smelter men's union, nor to discharge non-union employes. Preparations are being made to import
Italian laborers and it is feared
such action will result in   rioting.
A mass meeting of the coal   min- I
ers  working  at   Brookside,     Coal
Creek, Rockvale  and   Bear  Gulch,
where mines  are   operated  by   the
Colorado Fuel and   Iron  company,
has beea  called  for   Sunduy  afternoon  to  discuss    the  question  of
striking in sympathy with the miners
who are on strike in   northern Colorado.    A strike  can   probably  be-
avoided if the company agree not to
ship its coal  to  the   northern Colorado fields.
IndlcaUona    Reported    Prom
Around   Troy.
It is firmly believed around Troy,
Idaho, that the oil and gas
area is not confined to the limits ot
Whitman county, Washington, but
that it extends into Latah county as
well, and if systematic exploration
and scientifiic investigation in Whitman county should result in gas and
petroleum being found in paying
quantities there is little doubt but
that results equally as gratifying
will soon follow in this vicinity.
For over a year J. D. Jolly of
Vollmer Flouring mills in Troy has
known that oil existed within the
town limits, but every time Mr.
Jolly suggested to his friends the
idea of making an investigation
they would laugh him out of it.
Since strong indications of both
oil and gas have been found within
50 miles of Troy, Mr. Jolly may yet
have the last laugh.
In the lower part of Troy, adjoining the bed of the creek which runs
through the town, is a bog from
which an oily substance exudes,
which floats on the water like ker-
osen.
Within a mile  of Troy,   up   the
same creek, there is a formation   of
slate or shale, near which are   several small springs covered with   an
oily substance which is still  further
indication   that petroleum  may underlie this soil, and   the   oily   substance to be seen in the lower  part
of the town, when not covered with
snow, may be escaping between the
strata.    Mr. Jolly states  also  that
the well at the mill, which is withir,
100 feet of where the  oil has  been
so plentifully, has  frequently   been
covered with oil, as if coal   oil   had
been poured into the well.    As soon
as the snow goes off in the spring,if
not   before,   experiments   will   be
made   where   the   strongest   indications of oil and gas exist.
Cigarette  Smoker  Had Hi-   Fortune
Told by the Girl He Adored.
He was out walking with a
young lady who had a decided antipathy to cigarettes, but not being
aware of her prejudice he lighted
one of the little rolls and began
smoking with great gusto, inhailing
the fumes deep into his lungs and
then blowing great rings up at the
moon, which gazed tranquilly down
on his folly, suys the Memphia
Scimitar.
Offended by his presumption, she
said with dangerous urbanity:
"Do you know I can read fortunes in cigarette smoke?"
"Indeed!" exclaimed the unsuspecting youth. "Perhaps you'll
condescend to read mine?"
"Oh, certainly if you wish  it."
Then she gazed up   into  the  air
at   the   delicate   blue wreaths    of
smoke.     She hesitated,   evidently
puzzled about something.
"I am undecided which of the
two things is to befall," she admitted; "your fortune is not so easily   read  as   I   fancied   it   would
be."
•'What are the two thing?"
"Why,I can't determine whether
you are marked out for lung disease
or lunacy," was the answer. "Cigarettes have such diverse effect on
people of your temperament."
A moment later the cigarette
lay glimmering in the gutter and
the fortune teller was listening to
her escort's embarrassed apologies.
Certain to  Cauae  Dlaeord ||
The first day's discussion of the
bill   to  establish   a  department   of
public instruction   at  Manila,   developed  a contest on  the  question
of religion  in public schools.    The
interest centers in the section permitting  priests   and   ministers   to
teach religion for half an hour three
times weekly outside of school hours
provided     the     parents     express
a written desire for such instruction,
and prohibiting teachers from  conducting religious exercises or teaching  religion.    The    Federal   party
was represented by   a   committee,
who,   although    Catholics,   argued
trongly  in favor of the  elimination
of the section.    They declared that
the use ol school houses  for   religious  purposes i.s   contrary   to   the
Uuited States constitution, and   also to the platforms of the Amercian
parlies  and  the Philippine Federal
party, and is certain  to  cause   discord.
It may not be generally known,
but it appears to be a fact that Denmark is the best organized country
.11 the world. Recent statistics
,how that 76.7 percent of the worn-
en are trade unionists.
Allen C. Doucette of Cambridge
Mass., centre for the Harvard university footb all team, died at his
home is Cambridge last night of
typhoid fever, age 18,
The New Dam on Murphy Creek
Preliminary steps have been   taken to construct a big dam on   Murphy creek, about three   miles  from
its   mouth.      Last   Monday   three
pack animals left the  Trail  stables
loaded to the poop deck with  grub,
etc., for the camp, this  simply   being the first installment.    The work
is being done by the smelter people,
Geo. F. Mortin being in  charge   of
the work.    The   first   thing   is to
build a cabin to house the  men,   as
the snow i.s deep up there   and   the
nights cold.    A dam will be thrown
across the gulch at   least   130   feet
wide.    The intention is to bring the
waters of Murphy creek for  use  at
the smelter.    With the enlargement
of the capacity of the   smelter   the
necessity    for a greater water  supply is apparent.    The work will   be
pushed with vigor.—News,
TIME CARD OF TRAINS.
Double Dolly Train Service.
——-' Arrive."   i   l-Spurf
Mi. 11. Weil lloui.d.. .
Nn. 11. Kant Hound	
Ns, L Wwl Hound.  ...
No. », test K"»iwt  •
•Coeur c Ali-ni: brunch
I'aluunr&l.cwistonbrili
•Central W.i«li. branch .
• Local KmuM. am....
• IjK-al Hre vhi.eMt	
9.2i a. m.
0.15 a. in.
10. so p. ro.
11 45P.ro
5 y> P. m.
I.I] p. in
1.00 p. in
S..» p. m
9.15 a. 111.
o.n a. ui.
11.co p. nt.
11.55 P.™.
MS •-. ni.
i.jor. .n.
1.1   '..»:. m.
I   (...to a. 111.
V tw ,'. >>.. .      —
j.'55 p. ni. 1   ?•_?» ro.
•Daily except Sunday
Even Nov casl bnuml
ill others dally,
CITY   llChli   Of r CK,
zhiqi.fr block,
/I     l»<    I     l\      ,M.m*V**sw.-*
Comer Howard and Riverside.
Train- 11 ****** » ru» ",'lil1 "l',W'"'n
Portland snd M. *■■!■ 'Ir"m" :i,."ml 4
r„„ Mild between Portland end lUaisi
City nml st. Leals, viu Billings snd ' Hur-
tlncton Route," without change. ThrouKO
l'ulli.iri. .mil Tmin.it BleepUl uml Uimim
Curs mi »H train*.
I 1 W  HILL, General Anent, «!'<-ktne, Wn.
A.U.0UAKhTON.A.0.P.A..Portl_md,0re. SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
..   _-'.-    -..-
from The Paystreak.   To one not con-
whites of   the  South   resort  to these
nected withany labor organization and   horrible barbarities which alone appear
outside of their ranks it would appear  to strike terror into the  brute natures
j.m. McGregor
that laboring men, as a rule, are too
ready in accusing their leaders of selling out or throwing them down, the.
minuttian opening is made for them to
work in an official capacity.
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this office.
Chit
nicl
one,]
semlj
trati
Phil;
<*j ruts
yest
IK YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
OR   IN  ARREARS    A
§   BLUE   CROSS    WILL
0ifr8,<9*O  BE  FOUND    IN THIS
SQUARE.       SUBSCRIPTION    ARE
PAYABLE  IN   ADVANCE;.     PRICE
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
mumuaamuum'
EDITORIAL Ol'TCROlTIMS.
uumuummumul
ilnnvuniently Situated near
lliilway 8t»tton ond Wharf,
a sott _ —
tivefooD  SERVICE COMFORTABLE
'ROOMS.'   '
mos
was
TulilfA wiphlled with nil the delicacies
wm.  f the season. 	
IENDERS"0N&~GETHING. - Paot's.
SLOOAN CiTY,   ....   B. 0.
lose
for
Asii
Ik*
hon
Fili
ine
has
pie
has
I
cas
he1
the
the
E. M. Brindle,
Jeweler, &c.
.'Hat recommenced business in
ais old stand and is prepared
to "devote his time und skill
to the repair ot all defective
time pieces. The Lakeview
Hotel is his S'lverton tlepot.
disj illW DENVER,
fal(
- B. C
be^ J. O. GORDON.
IINES, REALESTATE,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
1 *§ SILYERTON,
caj
Prf
Of
go
B. C.
Kc
vei
cai
wo
Ea
iy
SP1
spi
•fl
hi,
H«
ne
Si|
P«1
m
L_   -   - GERMAN -   -
AXATIVE COLD CURE!.
....CONTAINS   THE   NEW.
 '.....INGREDIENT	
"When Greek  meets  Greek,  then
comes the tug-of war."
"When thieves fall out, honest men
get their due."
When one monopoly fights another
many truths crop out.
The freight rates charged by tbe Canadian Pacific Railway in the transportation of Kootenay ores never troubled
the Toronto Globe until the moneyed
men back of that journal were pinched
in their Crowe Nest coal dealings. Excessive as the rates have always secuici1,
they never caused a ripple in the editorial columns of Toronto's great
daily until now, although lower at tbe
present time than ever uefore. Jaffray,
Cox tt Co. have declared war on the
C P. R. and (he mine owners of Kootenay stand to reap the benefit
In the fight between the coal company and thu railroad company the
public has all to gain and nothing to
lose and can afl ird to watch with
equanimity tho bringing to light ofthe
private affairs of both concerns.
. If only some cf the Eastern journals
of Montreal or Toronto would fall foul
of some big Chinese employing firm
the folly and harm of Chinese immigration might be threshed out where the
voters are who could put a atop to it
-But.unless an election is in sight or the
directors' pockets touched, abuse* iu
the West do not trouble the press of
the East
lt seldom happens that we are obliged to correct a contemporary for a
too generous crediting of quotations,
the very opposite being indeed the
case. We are obliged however to deny
the authorship of a paragraph credited to us by the Greenwood Miner,
dealing with the Silverton-Sandon
Drain Tunnel, iu which occurs tho fol-
lowms:
"It   has   heen   slated   however  hy
tlioBo who are thoroughly acquainted
wilh the proposition thnt the compuny
Iiuh at its buck nn unlimited amount nf
capital ami Hint the   Uildernikiilg   will
he carried out in every detail."
As far as  our   knowledge goes we
Itnow no one   "thoroughly   acqtiaintt-.tl
»- it It the proposition," ond consequently nre not even in a position tt) definitely State that tho Tunnel will even be
begun, much less "carried out in  every
detail."
We sincerely hope that the quotation given may prove correct in every
detail, but at present we mubt preface
our remark* on the subject of the subject of the Tunnel with an "if."
"f their present black fellow citizens.
Although it is a horrible statement
still it is a proved fact that wherever
in tin' South a nogro has been burned
at the stake it has stricken with terror
the black brutes and it has nevnr been
necessary to repeat the lesson in that
community.
We  meet in  business    and social
relations every   olay   men   who   have
been   raised   and   educated   in these
communities  and   if there is any difference between their  civilization  and
ours we have failed to note it    Before
condemning   the  South   let   ua   look
more closely   into   the   matter.     Put
ourselves  in   the   places of the men of
tho South, where the law   is powerless
to protlct the sacre'duess of the home.
If we did not violate the law to make
a remedy to fit tho crime we would be
less than men.
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY, ....'  B.C.
I
powers aud privileges ae may be wees-
eary, incidental or conducive to the attainment of tue auove objects or  uny of
them. ' "„_.   ~    .
D VTED nt Vancouver, B. C., this 8th
day of December, A, D. 1900,
Davis, Marshall & Macxkill,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE:— "St. Hklena" and "Troy"
Mineral Claims; situate in the Slocan
Minim! Division of West   Kooteuuy
District.
Whore located :—On Four Mile creek,
relocations nf tho "Fisher Midden" i.nd
"Silverton." '
Take notice that I, N. F. Townsend,
acting ns event! for tho Fisher Maided
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company, Free Miner's Certificate' Ntt.
n41153, intend sixty days from tlie date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for ti Certificate ol Improvements, forthe
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grunt of the
NOTICE.
'»
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British
Columbia ut its next. Session for nu Act
to incorporate a Company with Power to
run, construct, excavate anil maintain u
Hwnel through nnd under Ibe land ly-
ihu bt'tween'llin towii of Silverion and
the town of_ Sandon in the District of
Kootenay, in the Province of British
Columbia, from a point on the North siile
of Four Milo Creek ut or near where said
Creek enteis Sloean Lako and within two
miles ot the said lown of Silverion to a ,-— ■
point at or near the town of Sanibii, and above cla.ms.
within one mile thereof; and for the pur- And further take notice that action
poses of the undertaking to run expfor- under section 87, must he commenced
int.' ami branch tunnel* from the main before the issuance of such Certificate a
tunnel; also to sink   or   raise,   mining
"Bnt I don't love you objected the
ynuiiii woman.
"Then why," howled the indignant
youth, referring hastily to divers meino-
ivorking or air shafts along the line or
course fro-i' the limtiel or hrnncbes; to
explore for mini-rala hy the use of drills,
shade or excavations ; to construct, maintain and operate by electricity or otherwise tramways and roadways for the
purpose of carrying ores, w«a1e, mine
products nnd freight or us may pd other
wisei required, to engaue in all kinds of
niiiiiiigtiperniioi'H and to erect nnd maintain crushing, electrical, hydraulic, sampling, concentrating, siueiliriti ami refining works Or other plant ami io ileal in
the products of Ilia same; to supply, sell
Improvements.
Dated this 1st day of October. 1900-
21 | 11 I 0,).
N. F. TowNsitNn.
randa in bis pocket diarv, "ditl vou eat a
total   of  65- pounds   of ^0 rent candy I  ""'!•_!'"'.'t'Tl','f  i'm,,-,n'"l'V1'   *•',. «*»»*
'     ' \    . '*   power uml water and to erect and   plan
bought yon dining   the   closing   year if
the niiitceiith century, if you didn't love
me ?"
"Because," she said, wi'h o rapt expression on her lovely features, ''I do
love candy!"
For Sale at All Druggists.
Sandon Winers' Union
H8SPJTAL
OPEN   TO  THE   PUBLIC
thi
de
■al
w,
${
1    si
ai
tr
et
t
t
ti
t
id
J
I
fc
Subscribers, fl. per month.
Private Patiente, f2. per dey
exclusive of expense of physician or surgeon and drugs.
Dr. W. E. Gomm, Attendant Physician
MtsiB. M. Ciiisiioi-M, Matron.
J. ID. McLaughlin, President.
W. L. Haolkr, Secretary.
Wm. Domahub, J. V. MartinJR. J.
McLian, A.J. McDonald, Mikb Br/.dy
Directors.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
and Spo lioe
Stib^dontinu* To Operate
first-clas* Sleepers on  all trains from
iF,V£L8TOKK& KOOTENAY LDG.
TjUso  TOURI8T  OAB8....Passing
,*    Dunmore Junction——
daily for 8t. Paul, Saturdays for
Montreal and Boston, Mondays
sad Thursdays for Toronto.
Heme cars pass Revelstoke one
day earlier.
NO
TROUBLE
. TO-QUOTE YOU RATES AN,D
GIVE    YOU '
A
.     POINTER
Regarding The Eastern
TRIP   ,
You   Contemplate   Taking
PALL   AN0   WINTER SCHEDULE NOW EFFECTIVE.
vw rates, tickets, and fell information
'ttmtly to Cl. B, Chakdlkh, Agent, Sllver-
lV>,p.C..or
■ ^J.IJOYEV..
A.G.P. Agent,Van ouver
The Sandon Paystreak does not approve of Chris. Foley's presence on the
Chinese Commission, fearing that he
will be loat forever to the Labor party
when once he has tasted government
rations. The Paystreak is unreasonable in this matter. If Mr. Foley was
a proper man to represent his party iu
parliament, b? The Paystreak was
vehement in declaring, he is most certainly a fit person to represent them
on the Commission, in whose work
the Labor party is vitally interested.
If he is a man so easily purchasable as
to ue influenced by a job of a few
weeks duration, as The Paystreak
implies, he was never a proper man to
he supported as a parliamentary candidate. But Chris. Foley is certainly
not that kind of man..
His position on the Commission will
enable him to do more in the one matter of Chineso immigration than his
presence in parliament,   twenty times
over.    The   labor leader has  thrown
i
down neither his party nor hia principles in accepting the position vacated
by Ralph Smith, but has entered upon
a work which should have have the unqualified approval of every man who
voted tho labor ticket in the last election. Re is a man who will see that
the report of the Commission is at
lesst no fake.
It is also taking too much for gran-
ed to predict the evading of the report
by the Laurier government. The appointment of Mr, Foley is conducive
to the opinion tbat the Government
desires a comprehensive report upon
which to act. Otherwise * by should
they pile up evidence against themselves by securing a report such bb Mr
Foley will certainly insist on having
sent in.
The Government hss been as wise in
this selection ss it was in the appointment of Ed. Bremner as Dominion
labor commissioner. In his official
capacity Mr. Bremner baa done more
fnr labor than any officer ot.atiy !»,K)r
organization could ever hope to do, and
li* is in no way deserving of sneers
The burning of a negro nt the stake
in a civiliz'd :onimiitiity gives a thrill
of   horror   to   those   reading   of tin
barbarity   thousands  of miles  distant
from the scene, and at on«e  a band of
*riters, who have no more idea of the
subject   on   which    they   are writing
than our  average war  correspondent,
fill the press with columns of abuse of
the  people   living in the  community
*hero  the   barbarity   oeourrod.    Tin-
people   cf   the   South   have   thar tn
contend with which  very   few   in the
North   can   be made to realize.    The
colored problem, like the "white man's
burden,"  is   a jest wilh us; but, with
the people of the South it is a questioi
if ten   times   more   importance   than
life and death.   It is a quealion of th*
■acred   honor of their   wives, motlicr.-
>nd   (lniigbt is   and'   if   this will nol
drive    whit? men   to  desperation and
cause them to lapse into barbarism  in
an   endeavor   to   protect  themselves,
what   excuse?  can   we  of the Ijjorth
mako wIiomp hands are warm   with the
blood of   women and childienof China
slaughtered in the name of Christaniti
for a few murders committed  hy mob'
of fanatics?    In   a   great   many com
munities  in the  South  the negros far
outnumber   the  whites and, although
there are many exceptions, the av rage
southern negro   is   but  little removed
from  the ape, with all the instincts of
the brute.     Imprisonment as  a  pun -
isliment has about as much effect upoi
him   as  it   would   hive upon a mule
Apparently   nothing   but.  time     and
education will el«vote him   into more
than the   semblance   of   a   man   am
until that time arrives, when it is saf
for their  i bildren   to  walk the street
of clieir town",  just   so   long   will tin
"When I look at yonr country, with its
boundless  riches,  nnd  then look at tbe
pule, tired women on your farms," said
the foreign visitor, "I always think—"
'• '111 fares the land to hastening ills a
prey,
Where   wealth   accumulates  and wives
decay!"
•St. Peter—Who are yen?
Applicant—A miner from the Slocnn.
St. Peter—Did yon nihfcnhe fur The
8 liver Ion I niT
Applicant—Yes.
St Peter—Did ynn pay your suhscrp-
tion ?      I
Applicant—I (urgot.
St. lVtei-
$
place
anv |ti|ies, electiic lii,e, vnhle or ehitri
cal apparatus ahove or lleloiv »'i..iiiid, it-
loin:, over and acioss streets, bridges and
lands:   the   right,   subject   to   existing
water records; to acquire and take iron
Fmr Mile Creek aluresaitlso much of the
water eif said Cn-ek as may he neressan
fnr all or nnv of >he purposes nf the Company, and ibe right to use and utilize fur
snid purposes all wait-r coming (torn 'he
Htiidtimai 1 yr hntiii'hfs,   nnd   to tree*,
Construct and iii/iinlalii anv   dnm,  raie-
miy; llnmeoi uIIut ctiii'.iiv.inrt! ,,r |,|Uu
for dUeriing nml utilizing mud «ate: (unl
to construct nml Maintain all * oiks were
sari' to ohlain mid   make   water   power
available; to take and hold i-lniie.s in nnv
other Company ; lo enter ii In nnv  ayrve
mellls nnd to make (onlincls   Willi   persons or (,uin| ani-s owning anv Interest*
in    milling   Inn.I.s or  otherwise  mid to
charge lolls and   receive  coinpunsafihi'
for ihe list-of ih,- tunnels or woi k_< ut the
I'on.piniv, lor divinage ,„ „i|„.r  l„.„>fiih
del Red fio.n Ihe iiinat I nr  I iHinl.es ; |..
piltrhRMH, I ■•**. ur i HferW.sc H<-t|ilii,< and
luilil palfiHS.'-uViuhii toy. hmtl.-, prcmlMf
building* in,it ull leal end n'r-cioil |.n.p.
tilv ; t .i I.mill, i <wn ami maintain whiuv. h,
■ Inckf a"d ir.iniMMVs in   i-.ii.iiei-tioii  will
llle on.'uitnkings .,f ihe Guiipanv. slid t"
Imllil. equip, iii.iintiin  I'up,',.,!,.  (,.|.
ecr.ivh ...,,,1   in,,,,., .(;j,„,s iL^ ,.„„„,.,._.
■ifii wtmi llifeuttl tunnel niiiR'rsni'beis
niill wild |,,w.r li. ex|.it.|iibi;r la mi tor
il.e p.:i|...ies...i|1^C...i.p1,n» ;;„,„lwi:h
,tii oilier !it-i'i..-s;iu- ur lot menial   ri^i.ts.
CKKTIl'ICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE .•—•Last CiiancbNo. 11,":
(Silver Nugget,! Mineral Claim, situate
in tho  Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenny District.
Where located :-On the divide between -
Eiullt and Ten .Miie C_eeks.
Take Not ice that I, J. M. McGregor,
ncting ns agent for luorge Kydd, Free
Miner,s Certificate No 1.30350, intend
sixty days from the dute hereof to apply
to the Mining Recirder for a Certificate
of Improvement, forthe purpose of obtaining a Ciown Grant of the above
claim,
And furher take notice that action
under section 37, mils' l>e commenced
before the issuance of null Certificate of
Impiovineiits.
Daleil this 8th dnv of Nov. mher. I'. 00t
■I   M. Mi'.iai.fioji.
22—U—CO
tJ"Wbn is Ihat dump pic fac'd-ihiog
tsyi'i'-' doWn lo ihe Hii|i|»T mom wiih tin-
'iiitidsiniie young impliiin?" a»ked lhe
.•iii witn ilo- si,.-,I like ' are.
"I forget her inline." rnjili-,l the girl
with the lovely dimple. "She's an
npsfnrt whose mother cither IlltO sui-it>tv
ill somo wav uilhoot giv ng her iicomiin:
out party "
BATH
HOUSE
AND
LAUNDRY
o
**
8
NOIICETii  DELINQUENT
co owni:::.
To Grs KmiiKii. or fn nny pt-rsinor
persons to whom he may hitvtt linrsfencii;
bis inteesls in ihe f"llow ing Mini me
Claims,Coiipn No. 3 Cioim under ni'if.
Rris'ol on Ked Munis'ii, nun Pilvi rtun>
B. 0 , Slocan Mining l'ivi-i,.n.
YOn nre herehv »■ lilhil ijmt 1 hint,
exi'i'i'ded tl reu hniiiticil .'i.P.irs HUR)
In labor   htnl    iii'|.|.,\.■,.., : -.    njun     ;»,•■•
.iiovi' mentioned ii.f.ii Cihfitia ui
order to hold sip.I mil,, tnl i Isims nmVr
prtiiinlons .f th" Mbernl At I »>,,1 if
Within liiueti tin* !,,„, ||„. d,,n. „| tl.jrt
| notice y,,n d.jj „r „.|„t,. ,,, 1(>|,|rj>„,f„
VOIM pr.'i-oili.iii nt mi id i-xiei tilling
in." ther   wflh   ad   roMs  i,f i.tlv<-rIii-M tr,
11 IIT  Hi   Cll-M*   |jl   K;,i,l   , |, ^,„^ ,, j'|  |,,,,,,,   „
toe   prnpeiiy   ol   ll'innilierillipl'  under
s.-cti""  .}   ..f   „,,  fa\   i,,  Amend iloi
Mil let li I .1,1 i: 0(1
i ::'Ng I.. I'vrits.
1 a'..! ihi- L'ti:!,  ,,„t ,.[ |„ ,.,.|Mhcr i9ft>.
vi-kmu™ jn ivi:i;y i;i:.\..( n.
\\.
sin r
oBJi ii rt ai   I'. .Am.i.jmin'h n-i m
ixM:\v ]>],\vi i: wm. ,.,. v ■
w.iniii.n m \\r. .-.\n nt'vni.Y r>-.:i(*i»
  t
R. 1"* ti or Inn r ii m*
■.* *.** * *,
I'UN.- -
$      BlkVKW
(I.r.pndry Work Called For and 1'eliveinl Wqvklv.j
U V.
S 0 T I C I
To Whom it  Mny Concern.
I hnehv heg to inform those Indebted
to ine tbnt I have handed all neeoiints
due ine over to I he V. in Hunter Co. foi
collection and must insist ou the immediate settlement of same.
H. H. REEVES.
IT
Pays
TO ADVERTISE IN
THE   SI.L VERTON I>,N
Not for a year, but for a lif.'time.
Watches that may he handed from
father to son—heirlooms.
The movement cf a " Ryrie"
Watch is as nearly perfect c.u
possible, nnd yet, it's not expensive.
That is why it has brought to our
store so many bu)crs who arc par-   '
tieular about accurate time.
Let ti» «nd vou our 10m
Catalogue, IDC-Wing Iho
inanyHivtcH ol soiiil f^M,
fine n'd'l fillt-tl, bllvtr uml
ir u n in e la 1 " Kvn» "
\Viiti-1irs in both liullc-l
and gentlemen » nizcu.
The " Ryrie" Monogram Watches   j
arc particularly attractive,
RYRIE BROS.,
Vonfa snd Adelaide Sts.,
TORONTO.
OIAMQKO HftLl   E,i»  bllshot' I3S*.
CALIFORNIA   WINE
COMPANY, LTD.   '
NELSON, B. (J.
■WHOLESALE
___ii__.j____.cL CIG-iiES
TXTISsTES
T# Ms J^' Bcs]yi£i>uM«
**sm**m    r\s*w>    S    ma^ttm       JU       *****
Silverton
B.C
MVMVWV^-^^^^^^
'S/WWV*WW»V>/VVVVV
The
Thistle *x* Hotel.
IS NOW RE-OPENED UNDER THE PERSONAL
CHARGE OF   	
 P AT.    ORIFFI N.	
F*i_r»t«olaa»        aooomr^odation
for flie    JPtitolio*
silverton b. o.
Afients for OAi___,Gc_A_.I<CY BEBR.
Generol Full Line Lumber,
Mining Dry & Mixed! Sash and
Supplies.;       Paints.        ! Doors.
MoCollwm «& Co.,   Slooan, B. O.
SteuTple-
GOOD SADDIJi AND PACK   DORSES  FOR   HIRE   AT   REASONABLE
a\rt.£r-^.,x uENrA«r/McEI(iHTA!vi;^2t..N.JKFR BUSINESS DONK-;   '■
Outside Parti, n . . .-iriiiR Horses in Silverton
Can  Have Them  Reserved Hy  Writing To— •
+ + t t        ' t t      '   *
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON. - - B.
C.
A Seasonable Article.
Of the hundred of medicines on the market
There is none we can recommend more
Highly   to our customers and   friends then
Syrup pf Horehound & Tolu
FOR COUGHS   AND COLDS.
Try it and bo eoiiyinecd of ils merits.
For Null) At
THE    SILVEKTON   BRIO   STORE.
jppin
''__■
._______•___■_______________■

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