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The Saturday World Sep 26, 1903

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Array A
THE SATURDAY WO
Vol. I,     No. 4
.' '■
ROSSLAND, B. C.  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 26, 1903
Price Five .Cents
NEWS IN A
NUTSHELL
Items of Interest  Round
the World.
LATEST TELEGRAPH BULLETINS
The Doings of Conspicuous Persons
Affecting Canadian Interests.
CANADIAN.
Montreal building laborers are
on strike for a new wage scale.
Another slide is reported at
Frank.
Another strike threatened at
Fernie has been happily settled.
Two new senators are to be appointed for the Northwest Territories.
The existence of a large ooal deposit is reported up the Gatineau,
Ont.
The Shamrooks beat the Nelson's
yesterday at lacrosse by six to
three.
Bar silver has advanced to 59
cents per ounoe, the highest price
for over two years.
The Republic oamp shipped 1271
tons last week to Kootenay smelters.
The Lindsay, Bobeaygeon and
Pontypool railway haB been sold to
the C.P.R.
Tbe Gurney .company h«* Attained injunctions against union
officials.
J. Clergae deolares that the
shutting down of tbe Soo works is
merely temporary.
The Glazier expedition for the
exploration of 1 unknown parts of
Labrador haB failed.
The United States Steel Trust is
likely to establish a Canadian plant
at Port Burwell.
The linotypera on the Vanoouver
papers threaten a strike on Ootober
1, if their wages are not raised.
The Consolidated Lake Superior
works at Sault Ste. Marie shutting
down are throwing 3500 men out ot
employment.
It is likely that the Dominion
government will forbid the employment of Asiatics on all railways.
Archie Connor, a miner, was
accidentally killed in an ore chute
on Wednesday in the Emma mine,
Summit oamp.
0. Herman, Liberal candidate
for Skeena is suingjthe Viotoria
Colonist for declaring him to be a
pro-Boer.
The Court of Appeal has decided
the Bell Telephone oompany may
ereot wires and poles without the
consent of tbe civic authorities of
Toronto.
Maopheraon of Burrard haB made
a strong speech in the Dominion
house against the emyloyment ot
Asiatics on the Grand Trunk railway.
IMPERIAL.
Mr. Chamberlain starts in on his
fiscal campaign on Ootober 6.
Cholera has broken out among
the men of the Shropshire regiment in India.
The oase ior Canada before the
Alaska boundary commission has
been presented.
I      The King is said to be aotively
Interfering in the reconstruction of
the Balfour oabinet.
Arthur Elliott haB resigned from
Balfour's oabinet because of tbe
protectionist leanings of the ministry.
Major General Hutton declares
that Australia will lay down a
Monroe doctrine for Australian
waters.
A conference ot workingmen at
Birmingham haB deolared in favor
ot free trade and against preferential tariffs.
General Hunter deolares that the
shooting of the big guns by the
naval brigade at Ladysmith was
atrocious.
The Canadian Manufacturers Association have sent a telegram to
Mr. Chamberlain regretting his
resignation.
Three Canadian officers have
been appointed to the staff of tbe
general directing the autumn military manoeuvres in England.
FOREIGN
British consols have fallen to
89 3-16.
Bubonio plague is prevalent at
Marseilles.
A strike has been declared by the
millers of Minneapolis.
The labor troubles in New Orleans have been adjusted.
Heavy fighting is going on in the
Balkans.
The Venezuelans are making a
crusade against all foreigners.
Non union men are working at
Cripple Creek under protection of
cavalry.
Turkey has been worsted in
several recent encounters in the
iv'.ikans.
Seth Low has been slated as
mayor of New York by the anti-
Tammany forces.
The special session of the United
States Congress convene on November 3.
W. J. Bryan is reported willing
to cooperate with the gold democrats.
The flour millers of Minneapolis
have refused to arbitrate on the
strike question.
Cholera and the bubonio plague
are both raging through Manila
and the Philippines.
The prinoipal mines oi Telluride,
Col., have granted an eight-hour
day to the miners.
An electric oar has attained a
speed of 106 4-5 miles per hour on
the Zossen military road, Germany.
The trade of European countries
with Cuba is increasing while that
of the United States with that
oountry is declining.
A strike is imminent on the
Great Northern railway. The
oompany are said to have withdrawn all concessions.
An attempt by four robbers to
hold up the Oregon express near
Portland was foiled, one of the robbers being killed.
John H. Tillman, accused of the
murder of Editor Gonzales last
January in South Carolina, has at
last been placed upon trial.
IS COMING TO CANADA
Vickers,   Maxim   &  Co.,
Want  to Take Over
Clergue Works
Toronto, Sept. 26.—Vickers Sons
and Maxim, Ltd., the great British
oompany, contemplate taking over
the numerous industries at Sault
Ste. Marie, organized by F. Clergue
and known as the Lake Superior
Consolidated company. The great
gunmaker, Hiram Maxim is a
member of the English company
It was established in 1867, and is
ohief purveyor of armatures to the
British government.
On Tuesday last representatives
of the concern saw Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, and yesterday they interviewed Premier Ross, and at once
left for New York to interview the
bondholders.
THE STRAND is a good place to
spend yonr spare time. Good music
Green & Comerford, Proprietors.
MACDONALD
ANSWERS
Adopts Suggestions   Laid
Down.
MINING   ASSOCIATION  AGAIN
Liberal Candidate   Replies to the
Political  Circular   Sent
Out.
Rossland, Sept. 22.
John Keen, Esq.,
President, Provincial Mining Association, Victoria, B. C.
Dear air. "ihave your' letter of
the 14th inst.. with enolosed copy
of questions to candidates in the
coming election.
It is hardly necessary for me te as-
Bureyouthet Iarnin the closest sym-
phathy with the Provincial Mining
Association and its objects. I will
therefore proceed to deal with the
questions seriatim:
1. I am in favor of the substitution of a kx on net profits for the
two per oent tax. If I were consulting my own inclination in the
matter, I should go so far as to
say that there should be no royalty
at all exaoted until the mining industry is on a more promising
footing, but I fear that the country
is not willing to go that far, and
therefore a fair compromise, suoh
as above suggested I think would
best meet the case.
2. This does not go far enough.
In addition to protection against
forfeiture by reason of lapse of free
miner's certificates, there should be
some protection in the case of failure inadvertently to do or record
the assessment within the year,
3. I quite agree with this proposed amendment to the law.
4. I also agree that the fee for
Crown grants should be reduced
from $25 to $10,
5. With regard to the Boiler Inspection Act, I think there iB imperative need for enquiry at to its
operation and believe that without
increasing the risk in the slightest
degree to those working about
steam boilers, the Act oan be made
to bear very much less harBhly
upon the owners.
6. The amendment suggested
seems reasonable and especially so
with regard to hydraulic plaoer
olaims.
7. I am quite in accord with th
idea of providing some adequate
machinery for tbe settlement of
labor disputes.
8. There are many anomalies in
the Acts in question which Bhould
be removed and the laws simplified.;
9. I agree with this. The opening-of these reserves for mining
purposes should not seriously interfere with the rights of the Indians.
Yours very truly,
J. A. Macdonald.
Lost—A pooketbook containing
some money and papers. A suitable reward will be paid by returning the same to this office.
ELECTORAL
CANDIDATES
Full List of Those Now in
tbe Field.
FOUR PARTIES SEEK FOR VOTES
Progressives, and  Socialists  Have
Put Up a Long List
Men.
Alberni—one~W. W. B. Mc-
Innes, Liberal, Major Hickey, Conservative.
Atlin—one—J. Stables, Liberal,
Dr. Young, Conservative, J. Kirk-
'iarid. Progressive.
Cariboo—two—J. Murphy, H.
Jones, Liberal, S. A. Rogers, W.
Adams, Conservative.
Cbilliwaok—one—C. W. Munro,
Liberal; J. L. Atkinson, Conservative.
Columbia—one—W. C. Wells.
Liberal. Elected by acclamation.
Comox—one—P. MoB. Young,
Liberal, R. Grant, Conservative.
Cranbrook—one—J. H. King,
Liberal, T. Cavin, Coneervative.
Cowiohan—one—J. Evans, Liberal, E. M, Skinner, Conservative.
Delta—one—J. Oliver, Liberal,
W. H. Ladner, Conservative.
Dewdney—one—W. W. Forrester, Liberal, Hon. R. McBride, Conservative.
Esquimalt—oni —J. Jardine.Lib-
eral, C. E. Pooley, Conservative.
Fernie—one—EC. Smith,Liberal,
W. R. RoBS.Conservative, J. R. Mc-
Pherson, Socialist.
Grand Forks—one—W. H. P.
Clement, Liberal, G. A. Fraser, Conservative, J. Riordan, Socialist.
Greenwood—one—J. It. Brown,
Liberal, E. G. Spankie, Conservative.
Islands—one—T. W. Paterson,
Liberal, H. W. Bullook, Conservative.
Kamloops—one—F. J. Deane,
Liberal; F. J. Fulton, Conservative.
Kaslo—one—J. L. Retallaok
Liberal, R. Green, Conservative, S.
Shannon, Sooialist.
Lillooet—one — A. MoDonald,
Conservative. Eleoted by acclamation.
Nanaimo—one — E. Quennell,
Conservative, H. Sheppard, Progressive, J. Hawthornthwaite,
Socialist.
Nelson— one—S. S. Taylor, Liberal, J. Houston, Conservative.
Newcastle—one—D. W. Murray
Liberal, A. Bryden, Conservative,
P. Williams, Socialist.
New Westminster—one—W. H.
Keary, Liberal, T. Gifford, Conservative.
Okanagan—one—T. W. Sterling|
Liberal, P. Ellison, Conservative
Revelstoke—one—J. M. Kellie,
Liberal, T. Taylor, Conservative,
John W. Bennett,  Socialist.
Riohmond—one—J. C. Brown,
Liberal, F. Carter Cotton, Conservative.
Rossland—one—A. S. Goodeve,
Conservative, J. A. Macdonald, Liberal.
Saanioh—one—H. Tanner, Liberal, D. M. Eberts, Conservative.
Similkameen—one—W. A. Mac-
Lean, Liberal, L. W. Shatford.Con-
servative.
Skeena—one—C. W. D. Clifford,
Conservative; P. Herman, Liberal.
Slooan—one—W. Hunter, Conservative^. Davidson, Progressive.
Vancouver—five—Ernest Barns,
A. R. StebbingB, Socialist, J. Edwards, A. G. Perry and F. Williams,
Progressive.R.C.Tatlow, C. Wilson,
J. J. Garden, W. C. Bowser, A. H.
B. MacGowan,Conservative, J. Martin, T. Baxter, Dr. Brydone Jaok,
J. D. Turnbull, C. R. Monk, Liberal
Viotoria—four—R. L. Drury, W.
G. Cameron, J. D. McNiven, R.
Hall, Liberal, H. D. Helmoken, A.
E. MoPhillips, C. Hayward, J.
Hunter, Conservative, J. C. Watters,
L. 0. Charlton, Sooialist.
Yale—one—Stuart Henderson,
Liberal, T, G. McManamon, Conservative.
Ymir—one—A. Parr, Liberal, H.
Wright, Conservative.
THE EIGHT HOUR LAW
Hon. A. S. Goodeve Definitely Declares His
Position.
The returns from the Le Roi for
the month of August are to hand
and show a profit on the month
completely wiping out the small
deficits on tbe mine itself shewing
for July last. ,
The Elmore concentrator is fast
approaching completion and everything is ready for the first turn
over with the exception of the
Blake crusher which is not as yet
to hand. The War Eagle concentrator is about to start on Stoney
oreek near the Columbia and some
progress ought to be able to be reported by next week.
The Le Roi No. 2 is shipping to
Greenwood, the smelter of whioh
place is currently reported to be
after some other of the Rossland
ores
Editor World:
I have learned since returning
home that the opposition have been
circulating a report that I am opposed to the eight hour law, also
that I had said $2.50 |per day waB
enough for any w orkingman. Both
these statements are absolutely
false, and without any foundation, as may be shown by my past
record when working for Governor
Mackintosh in 1900, and when the
eight hour law was a burning issue,
I stated on the public platform
and privately that it had come to
stay, and that I believed it was in
the interest of the workingmen of
this province. I have never had
reason to ohange my opinion, and
it has now, as then, my unqualified
support. In this I am backed up
by the entire government.
Regarding the second statement,
I believe as I have always done
that every man is entitled to the
highest possible wages he oan obtain. In my official oapaoity when
mayor of the city, I always paid tbe
standard scale.
On these and any other questions
that may come up, I shall be pleased to make my position dearly
known on the public platform.
I propose to discuss the policy of
the government at the public meeting on Saturday night, as far as the
time limit allowed me will permit,
and it is our intention to hold one
or more publio meetings during the
ensuing week at one of which tbe
Hon. Richard McBride, premier of
the provinoe will be present, when,
the full polioy oi the government
will be deolared.
I appeal to the electors of Rossland, not on any personal or petty
grounds, but on a clear out, well
defined policy that will inure to
the benefit ot all classes.
Yours obedient servant,
A. S Goodeve,
MINES OF
KOOTANEY
Rossland   and   Boundary
Shipments.
LATEST RETURNS OF OUTPUT
What the Mines Are Doing Over the
District—Rossland   Doing
Well.
WEEK
Le Roi    3994
Centre Star     1620
War Eagle      960
LeRoi No. 2      300
Kootenay     t
Velvet      "5o
Jumbo       90
Giant	
White Bear	
Spitzee."       30
Silica concentrates ....
Homestake	
I, X. L	
0. K	
144,500
59,032
44,3'9
15.892
6,298
4.47*-1
t.9'3
714
250
180
*J
80
60
20
Totals 7,044    277,813
Boundary Shipment!.
Phoenix, Sept, 26.—(Special.) —
This week's Boundary ore shipments exoeed even the new record
made last week; the total being
almost 17,000 tons. One feature
of this week's tonnage was the
reaching of the quarter million
mark by the Granby mines.
Granby mines to Granby smelter,
8,194 tons; Mother Lode to Greenwood smelter, 3840 tons; Snowshoe
to Sunset smelter,2880 tons; Athel-
stan to Sunset smelter,180 tons; Oro
Denoro to Sunset smelter, 583 tons;
Emma to Nelson smelter, 297 tons;
Sunset to Hut,set smelter, 288 tons;
Morrison to Greenwood smelter
190 tonB; Winnipeg to Sunset
smelter 375 tons.
The Granby smelter this week
treated 8899 tonB, making.238,690
tons for the year.
The following shipments were
made by the different mines:
WEEK       TOTAL
Granby  8,194 250,402
Mother Lode  3840 89,631
Snowshoe  2,880 51.442
B. C  19.3"5
Sunset  288 13,735
Emma  297 12809
Oro Denoro  583 °.37°
Morrison.'  19° 2'594
Athelstan  180 1,770
Providence  705
Winnipeg  '80 355
Elkhorn  m
Totals 16,827      449.4'/7
POWDER SMOKE-Did it ever
give you headache? Dr. Scotts
headache powders are a qnick and
sure oure. Sold at Morrows Drug
Store. II
THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 26, .903
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the Magazines are
Saying
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
-Topics Interesting General Readers.
The Smart Set for October is up
very much to its usual form, bright
chatty and epigrammatic as ever,
and containing a fairly good story.
"We of > dam's Clay," by a little
known author, Cosmo Hamilton,
who, by the way, writes very muob
as a woman, the suggestion of sex
being still more apparent by the
very prettiness of the tiom do phime
The Nineteenth Century is a particularly good number, and oon-
tainB more than one article whioh,
will be read with interest. To
those who are of the opinion that
Great Britain is living upon its
capital, an artiole on the great fie
oal problem of the day contributed
by that well known writer, W. H.
Mullock, is recommended. The
Canadian Ioe Carnival, by Bradley
Martin, seems to have nothing
about the Quebec Carnival at all,
and is chiefly devoted to an inept
comparison between the Frenchman of Europe and he of Eastern
Canada.
Ainslee's Magazine, much in the
style of the Argosy, as far as the
literary value of its pages are concerned, perhaps, on a slightly more
elevated, though not necessarily
more entertaining, plane, is much
the same as usual.
The London, one of the cheapest
and best of English magazines, is
as readable ae ever. An article on
the authors of the day, properly il
lustrated, is about the best feature
of the current number.
The Wide World Magazine is as
popular today as at its start. It is
a living exemplification of the
adage that truth is stranger than
fiction. One can only say on reading its marvellous pages, that the
raoe of Mandeville is still extant in
British strain.
"The Mystery of Murray Davenport," by R. N. Stephens, is a story
of New York life, but it is a story
that is not only highly original in its
motif, but also in the manner of its
telling. It is one of the brightest
and cleverest of the new books
which have recently come out, and
' if the author is capable of more in
the same lines, he should have an
assured literary career before him.
"The Sacrifiice of the Shannon,"
by W. H. Hickman, is a notable
book and one that will well bear 8
A tale of Nova Sootian
deed a story of adventure from beginning to end. The impression
left upon the mind, is of a wild
phantasmagoria of incident upon
incident, Oasa piled upon Pelion.
The author haB produced better
bookB and will do so again, yet no
lover of adventurous books will
lake up the present volume to lay
it down half finished.
"A Speckled Bird," by A. G,
Wilson, is a powerful story, dealing with the marriage relation and
its interference by the divorce laws
of the United StateB. The religious
aspect of life is always uppermost
with the author, who, however,
fails in breadth of view and tenderness of feeling, while dealing with
its most sacred aspects. The book
is no ordinary novel, but a problem, and as a problem has its literary drawbacks, which go far (0
neutralize its advantages.
OUTSIDE
MINE NEWS
What Is Being Done Outside the Province.
CONSERVATIVE PLATFORM
[Adopted nt Rovolatoko, September i:uh, 1C02,]
1. ThiU.this convention reaffirms tho policy
of the party in matters of provincial roads and
tniils; the ownership tind control of railways
and the development of the agricultural resources of the province aa laid down in tho
platform adopted in October, 181 J, which In as
follows;
"To actively aid in tho construction of trails
throughout the undeveloped portions of the
province and tho building of provincial trunk
roads of public necessity-
"To adopt tho principles of government ownership of railways in ho far as the circumstances of the provinco will admit, and tho
adoption of 1 In; principle that no bonus should
bo granted to any railway company which
does not give tho government of the province
control of rates ovor lines bonused, together
with the option of purchase.
"To actively assist by state aid in tho development of the agricultural resources of the
province."
2. That in the meantime and until tho railway policy above set forth can bo necomop'sh-
ed, a general railway act be passed giving
freedom to construct, railways under certain
approved regulations, analogous to the system
that has resulted in such extensive railway
construction in the United States, with so
much advantage to trade and commerce.
3. That to encourage tho mil.ing Industry,
the taxation of metalliferous mines should he
on the basis of apcrcentagc on the net profits.
4. That the government ownership of tele
phono systems should he brought about as a
first stcp'in the acquisition of public utilities.
5. That a portion of every coal area here
after to bo disposed of should be reserved from
sale or lease, so that state owned mines may be
easily accessible, If thoir operation becomes
necessary or advisable.
fi. That in tho pulp land leases provision
should bo made for reforesting and that stops
should be taken for the general preservation of
forests by guarding against the wasteful destruction of timber.
7. That the legislature and government of
the province should persevere in tho effort to
secure tho exclusion of Asiatic labor.
8. That the matter of better terms In the
way of subsidy and appropriations for the
province should be vigorously pressed upon tho
Dominion government.
9. That the silver-load Industries of tho province be fostered and,encoumgcd by the Impost*
tion of increased customs duties on lead and
lead products imported into Canada, and that
tho Conservative members of the Dominion
House bo urged to support any motion introduced for such a purpose,
10. That as industrial disputes almost invariably result in groat loss and injury both to the
parties directly concerned and to tho public,
legislation should be passed to provide means
for an amicable adjustment of such disputes
betwoen employers and employes.
11. That it ia advisablo to foster the manu
facture of the raw products of tho provinco
within tho province as far as practicable ;by
means of taxation on tho said raw products.sub-
iect to rebate of the same in whole or part
when manufactured In British Columbia.
Conservative Conventions
life it certainly brings out clear]}
the indomitable persistence of tbe
seaboard Kaatern Canadian. A
description of a yacht race in tht
earlier portion of the tale is as well
written a story as any ofits kind
in the English language.
"Moase Hunting," and "Salmon
Fishing," by T. R. Patillo, is an
bright a book on sport as has beeti
recently presented to the reading
public. Treating on game in Eastern Canada, the story is told with
a lack of literary eff jrt, a verve, a
contemning of the caducity of mere
style that gives the reader hope
for the language.
"The    Adventures   of    Harry
Itevel," by A. Quiller-Couch ia in
At a meeting of the executive of tho Provincial Conservative Association, hold at Vancouver, the province was divided into five di-
v isions for organization purposes. Tho Koote-
nay-Boundary division is made up of tho following provincial election districts: Revel*
s. 3ke. Columbia, Fornie, Cranbrook, Ymir,
Kas'.o, Slocan, Grand Forks, Grceuwood, the
City of llossland and the City of Nelson. At
the same meeting the following resolutions
were adopted:
. 1, That conventions for nominating candidates for members of the legislative assembly
bo mado up of delegates choson as follows:
(al In city electoral districts, one delegate
for every fifty and fraction of fifty votes polled
ai tho provincial election held in 1900. and if
the citv is divided into wards, the proportion
of delegates for each ward shall bo based on
the voto polled in each ward at the last municipal election,
(b> In other electoral districts, one delegate
for every fifty or fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial olection held in 1900, tho delegates to be apportioned to polling places, or as
near thereto as will be fair to the voters of the
different neighborhoods.
2. The election of delegates shall bo at public meetings, held at a designated central placo
in each polling division, or in each ward in city
electoral districts, if tho city is divided into
wards. At such public meetings only those
who pledge themselves to voto for the candidate or candidates selected at tho nominating
convention shall be entitled to a vote for delegates-
3. Two woeks notice shall be given of tho
public meetings at which dolcgates aro to bo
elected, and nominating conventions shall be
held in city electoral districts two days after
'ho day on which delegates aro elected, and in
othor electoral districts seven days after. All
nominations throughout f ic provinco to bo
made at a designated coutral place in each
electoral district, and on tho same day.
4. All notlcos of the date of public meetings
for tho election of delegates to nominating
conventions, tho apportionment of delegates,
and tho place and date of nominating conventions in the several electoral districts shall bo
prepared by tho member of tho executive of
the division in which the electoral districts aro
situate, and issued over tho names of tho president and secretary of tho Provincial Conservative Association
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various  Countries in
the Mining of Precious
Metals.
A mooting of tho provincial executive will
be held at Vancouver within a month, and the
date for holding district nominating conventions will then be fixed.
JOHN HOUSTON.
President of tho Provincial
Conservative Association.
Nelson, Juno 8th, 1903. tf
I Linton Bros., \
Books, Stationery,
Newsdealers, ToyB, Fishing
Tackle, Kodaks and
Supplies.
ROSSLAND,   B. C.
In washing woollens ani uannela, Lever1!
Dry Soap (a powder) will be found very
Utah's five smelters produced
over 4,000,000 pounds of oopper
bullion last month.
The Quilp, at Republic Wash.,
will shortly send 00 tons of ore
daily to Tacoma.
During   the   last   three months
250,000   tonB  of  copper ore have
have been shipped from Newfound
land   mines,   chiefly   to    British
smelters.
The consumption of oopper in
the United States during 1902, is
estimate at 510,951,182 pounds
compared with 386,910,170 pounds
consumed in 1901.
The Chance Creek Mining company has been registered with a
capital of ,£10,000 to acquire and
develop a property in Western
Canada.
A receiver haa been appointed in
the case of the British and Canadian Lead company, which owns a
lead mine in Quebeo.
During the past year the Camp
Bird mine, Colorado,  earned a net
profit of about $1,250,000, with a
production of 67,000  tons, averag
ing $25 55.
Tbere has been a good rainfall at
Broken Hill, ensuring a three
months' supply of water to the
mines.
It is estimated that no less than
three millions of dollars in gold
dust will be taken ont of the Valdez
district during this season.
At the Calumet and Hecla
pockets are being constructed for
supplying Kimberley skips, which
are supplanting the cage and car
system in the Red Jacket shaft
The Brookfield Gold Mining
company of Nova Scotia, have de-
dared a dividend at the rate of 12
per cent per annum for the quarter
ending July 1st.
The gold output of New Zealand
during the month of August
amounted to 30,074 ounces, valued
at ^110,572, as against 35,609
ounce?, valued at £137,456, in the
corresponding month of last year.
Some progress is now being made
in quariz mining in Klondike, and
one property J in the neighborhood
of Eldorado Creek has sunk a shaft
down 70 feet, which is reported to
hi in rioh ore all the way.
Heavy falls of rain in the Dawson distriot have improved the opportunities of the hydraulio companies. The gold yield will, however, be rather less—probably at
least $1,000,000 than that of last
season. Drought during much of
the summer has greatly ou tailed
hydraulioing.
Picked samples of ore from a
vein just opened near Silver Cliff,
Florence, Col., returns 591 ounces
of silver, one ounce of gold and a
great deal of lead. The Btrike is
one of the most important made in
ho belt for a long time.
Very satisfactory returns were
obtained from the last oarload ot
oro Bhipped by the Itepublio Min-
iug company to Nelson. With silver at 65i cents an ounce, the returns totalled $58.47 per ton, with
gold values at $13.70, making
$82.07 iu all. The ore was taken
from an open cut on the Bell
claim.
Some idea of the immense extent
and value of the coal areas in Cape
Breton oan be obtained from the
fact that the ooal measures extend
or a known distance of 46 miles
and it has been estimated that with
ten times the present output the
supply is available for over 200
years.
The Keswiok, Cal,, smelter i
now operating four furnaces, and
all are converters. There are more
men employed today than at any
other time since the strike. This is
partly due to the increased wages
paid, $2.10 being the lowest wage
for ten-hour men, which is 10 cents
more a day than was paid before
the strike. The fire is praotioally
subdued and no longer bothers.
The neighboring mines at Shasta,
Old Diggins, Middle Creek and
Buckeye are now finding a ready
market for their small shipments
of ore at the smelter, and the prosperity that smiles upon Keswick
reaches out to the small producer
and the prospector.
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
PROGRESSIVE PLATFORM
1. No didacnte will be accepted or
endorsed by the pai ly unlesi endorsing the platform and placing   his undated resignation in the hands of the
endorsing body.
2, Government ownership ol transportation.
jj. Compulsory arbitration, of labor
disputes.
4. Absolute reservation of portions
of coal lands by Ihe government. Coal
leases must have a aclaues inserted
governing coal prices.
5. Conservation of forests so as to
produce a revenue and to promote the
pulp industry.
0. Insertion of a clause in all charters forbidding the employment of
orient 1
7. Compulsory sealing of all logs by
government scalers.
8. Free transportation to members
of the legislatures and the judiciary.
0. Gradual abolition of all taxes
upon producers and their products
shifting the burden on land values.
10. Restriction of Oriental immigration on the lines of the- Natal Act
with a provision for reenactment in)
case of disallowance. 1
11. The abolition of property qualifications for public n'Hcera.
12. The establishment nnd opera,
tion of government smelters' and rej
fineries.
18,   All franchises and subsidies
be referred to the electorate.
14. Declaration of election day as ■
public holiday,   with four hours re
served in any case, so as to allow
employes an opportunity of voting.
15. Farm lands and implements lo
be exempt from taxation and wild,
lands to be assessed at the price asked,
by holders.
16. No land subsidies to be grantedll
17. Ten per cent of public lands top]
be set aside for a revenue  for educa
tion and that children up to 18 years}
be given ttee books and  meals and,
clothing when necessary.
18. Municipalization and pabli
control of the liquor traffic.
Call at the Strand for a  fancy drink
Green & Comerford. Props.
The New Woman
Miss Wilhelmina Jameson, an
Edinburgh teacher, who has been
appointed English leoturer in Grenoble University, is the first lady to
receive an official appointment in
a French University.
Canada'sIGreat Illustrated Weekly
In keeping with the progress of
the age, Canada's Great National
Home Newspaper, The Weekly
Globe, will be very materially im \
proved for 1904, Numerous important ohanges are in contemplation, but the leading feature will
be the introduction of an eight-
page illustrated supplement on
calendered paper. This will undoubtedly make it the most popular weekly offered to the people of
the Dominion. For particulars
see advertisement in another
column of this issue.
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
PROGRESS MADE BY NEW PARTY
meeting an   official of the miner
union is granted the   floor,    ar,
addresses the congregation on   tl
strike, and takes  up   a  colleotiojj
for thobe in need.
What is Being Done by Socialists
In Canada and the World
Over,
Information Wanted
"Yes," said the alderman who was
doing a second term. "I believe
n holding up our home industries."
"For how much?" queried the
newly eleoted member, who was a
seeker after the truth.
Fresh Eastern and Olympia Oys
ten at Thomas Embleton's.
Tbe demand for skilled white
labor is steadily increasing in
South Afrioa.
Mine owners of Sonora are arranging to employ Chinese laborers
in i lace of Mexicans.
Mr. Chamberlain's Beat for West
Birmingham will be contested by
the prominent labor leader, W. J.
Davis.
A colored man was eleoted as
international vioe president at the
convention of the longshoremen
held at Bay City, Mich.,  reoently.
It is said that the United Mine
Workers of America are planning
to erect? a labor temple at Pittsburg,
Pa., to oost 8100,000.
The Canadian locals of the
Bricklayers and Masons' Interna-'
ticnal unions have deoided to
appoint an arbitration committee
to settle all disputes in Canada.
It is estimated that fully 50,000
union workingmen and women of
Chioago have secured increase of
wages or shorter hours or both this
year.
The dispute concerning wages
between the shipbuilders of Belfast, Ireland, and the Boilermakers
Sooiety has been settled, concessions
being granted in the notices of
reductions.
The treasury of the Amerioan
Federation of Labor held $62,940
July 1 last, of whioh $55,894 was
oredited to the defence fund and
$7016 to the general fund of the
body.
As an outcome of the recent success at the parliamentary bye-elec-
tions, the Labor party in Great
Britain is organizing contests for
seats in parliament at the next
general elections on an unexpectedly large soale.
The dispute between the Edinburgh, Scotland, District Tramways
company and their oarmen is at an
end, and the men are believed to be
satisfied with the wages to be paid
them and the scheme of working
hours.
Justice Andrew of New York
says: "With or without reason,
alone or together, workmen may
leave their employers. By argument or persuasion, by appeal to
sympathy or prejudice, they may
lead others not to take their va-
caut places. But here they must
stop."
A government contractor fetohed
men from Quebeo to British Columbia and paid them below the current rate, which it was olaimed
was in violation of the Fair Wages
Act. Not so, for the Minister of
Justice maintains that since the
oontract was made in Quebec the
government had no power to interfere.
The Attorney General of New
York state says that the recent decision of the state of appeals, declaring unconstitutional that part
of the eight hour statute making
its violation a misdemeanor, does
not in any sense lessen the duty of
officials making contracts in behalf of the state, for an eight hour
is Btill imperative.
The strikers at Virginia mines,
near Birmingham, Ala., against
whom Chancellor Carmiohael has
issued an injuuotion restraining
them from holding public meetings,
have rented a church near the
mineB, and every day go to the
building with Bibles and hymn
books in hand and proceed to hold I
religous    services.     During   th I
The General Federation of Trat
Unions of Great Britain  has  pre
posed an amendment to   the  con;
cilia tion act of 1896.   It ad vocal;
inquiry into the causes  and oi i
cumstanoes of disputes, the takiii
of steps   to  bring   disputants   t
gether. the appointment of  a co
oiliator upon application of oith •
side or an arbitrator on the  app'J
cation of both parties.   It is   thti
proposed to constitute   a   nation;
board of eight members—three ei
ployers, three  workmen  and  tv
co-opted members, such   board   [
to aot on the  application  of  ai
representative body, to   make  i
quiry and publish results.     Or, ;
the dispute is prolonged, io met'
discuss and  recommend   a  sett) j
ment.
The...
Clothes
And the
Man..
/-S-M-^/-M-
To be properly clean and proper
ly dressed is important to a man'
character and progress.     It is
duty  to himself,  a  courtesy  I
others.   And more and mote t)
neglect of it Is a handicap.   Drc
will carry a fool far, it will enab
merit to gain speedier recognitio
It  will  beguile    prosperity   at
plausibly give the lie to adversit
Your Will Hear
Our Work
highly commended by those w 1
know good clothing when they sj
it. We have the suitings that a]
approved by fashion in textuj
and coloring, and we guarantj
the fit and workmanship.
Taylor 4
McQuarrii
18 and 20 Col. Ave,
{Thomas & Co.,
Wholesale dealers in
Wines,
Liquors
I and Cigars
]!    Cor. First Ave. & Washington St
MORTGAGE SALE
Under and by virtue of Power of Sal
contained in a certain mortgage, whic
will be produced at time of sale, the
will be offered for Bale by Public Auctii
at the premises, Le Roi avenue, in tl
City of Rossland, at 12 o'clock noon, <
the 6th day of October, iqo^, by Walt
J Robinson, Auctioneer, the followii
property, viz: Lot 6, Block 43, accor
ing to Map 579 in the town of Rosslan
Terms of Sale.
Ten per rent of the purchase money 1
time of sale, the balance within thirt
days thereafter. For further particulai
apply to
Macdnei.l, McMaster & Geaby
51 Yonge street. Toronto.
Fresh Breac
PIES AND COOKIES
Home Bakery!
Columbia avenue, next door to Empey'i
Washington St. and Second Ave.
Petch & Schwarlzenhauer Prop:
Allkinds of   summer drinks at tl
Strand.  Green &C6netford, Props. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 26, 1
903
$~
Mining NeWs of the
Outside
Gamps
Week Over the Province and the Upper
Country.
V%*%%r%+i%+ri
On the Kitchener two shafts are being sunk, one of which is now down
25 feet, and the other about 12 feet.
The vein, whioh shows a width of
seven feet on the surface, is well
defined, being a true fissure, whioh
cuts the oountry formation, and
grows stronger with depth. The
ore is heavily charged with galena,
and carries large values in copper,
gold and silver, recent assays showing $69 70 per ton in all values.
The stock of the Roberts-Eitohener
is selling at 30c. per share in Vancouver, although no attempt has
been made to boom the property.
Four miners are working steadily
on the Kitchener claim and the
dump is gradually increasing in
size, every pound of ore taken out
being lit for shipment to the Crofton smelter, which is one and one-
half miles distant. It is tbe intention of the management to have a
similar test of 40 or 50 tons made
at an early date.
BOUNDARY.
A few tons of ore taken   out  of
the Stralhmore in process of devel
opment yielded, a value  return   of
over $100 to the ton.
Tbe platform for loading cars for
the Athelstan mine, on the Winnipeg spur, has been completed, and
Jackpot, as well as rich Athelstan,
ore is being sent out.
Shipments of ore from the Betts
and Hesperus mines to the Granby
smelter have been started by
wagon. The ore body has been
proven to be 20 feet wide without
encountering the hanging wall.
Work is continuing steadily now
at the Morrison mine, Deadwood
oamp, where some 20 men are employed, and ore is being hauled
by wagon to the railway for shipment to the Mother Lode  smelter.
The first installment of coke
manufactured at the Coleman col-
leries of the International Coal
and Coke company, is said to have
been received at the Granby smelter, and that it gave the best of
satisfaction.
The Granby company has a
small force of men at work on the
south side of tbe Grey Eagle olaim
opening up the quarry, from whioh
Contractor Fisher will haul the ore
to the head of tbe'eurfaoe tramway,
a distance of a quarter of a mile.
Five more stamps are to be installed at tbe Waterloo mine, Camp
McKinney, making a battery of
ten. Inside of three months the
mill has produoed $19,000 in gold,
aooording to the report of Seoretary
Wolf. Eighteen men are employed
Clement Vasher,foreman of tbe
Sally mine in the West Forks
country,is building a trail up to the
mine, and work in the mine itself
will resume almost immediately.
Ore will be rawhided down to
Beaverdell and shipped there by
teams to Midway.
KAMLOOPS.
COAST.
Mr. Vaughan-Bbys, lessee of the
Van Anda mineB, Texada Island,
paid a visit to Ladysmith recently
and oonferred with his agent and
the local smeltermen. Mr. Vaughan
Rhys said that everything
was going on smoothly at the mine;
the strike had been settled by the
men themselves deciding to withdraw their demand on the oompany. The mine never looked
better, and its operation is proving
most satisfactory, From now shipments will be made continuously
as no further delays or interruptions are anticipated,
EAST KOOTENAY.
A report from Elko says that two
prospectors have discovered and
located a email body of hematite
on Sand oreek. The parties are
now engaged in driving a tnnnel on
the vein, which is said to be from
three to six feet in width.
Development at Coal creek mines
is steadily going on. At No. 4 the
coal is being wasted on the dump
as the tramway is incomplete owing
to the delay in the arrival of rails.
Two cars are expected shortly and
by October 1 the ooal will be landed at the tipple and several rooms
will be in operation. In No. 5.
three drifts have struck coal. Development work has been commenced on No. 9 whioh is situated close
by No. 1 and by the end of the year
it will be sending out coal, Nob. 6,
7 and 8 will not be developed until
next year.
ISLAND
Hugh Grieve, president of the
Roberts-Kitohener mines, owning
Lord Roberts, Lord Kitchener and
General White on Mount Sicker,
was in Vanoouver reoently, attending a meeting of the company. Mr.
Grieve, who has been aotively engaged recently in superintending
the work at the mine, reports that
very good progress it being made.
No news has been published of
the oondition of matters at the
Slough Creek mines for some time.
The following telegram sent by
Manager Hopp to the London
office on August 8 is the latest information obtainable: "Second
upraise is in 160 feet Face of
seoond upraise is 123 feet south of
face of south drift. Floor 11 feet
below south drift. Water in sec
ond upraise from point 100 feet
from main tunnel to present face of
upraise is continous waterfall. The
rook is soft and required to be
heavy timbered at present, using
face boards. There is every indication that a ohannel ia being ap-
poraohed."
SIMILKAMEEN.
The Cousin Jack ore reoently
assayed at the Granby smelter returns gold, 2 oz9., oopper, 6 per
oent, and silver, in all about $50
per ton. The Cousin Jack and
Niokle Plate seem to be related,
so far as values go. Tbe contract
for a 100 foot tunnel haB been let
to P. Burns.
I The owners of the Myrtle group
1 have laid out plans for a big win
I ter's work. They have installed a
! whim, which will greatly facilitate
j hoisting, and are now hauling in
plentiful supply of timber.
Ymir's ore and bullion ship'
ments last month to the United
StateB were valued at $83,893.
A meeting of the shareholders of
the Active Gold Mining oompany
was held here last week. Senator
Magly, of Cincinnati, Ohio, was in
the cbair. The company will
resume active work.
The carload of ore recently sent
to the Nelson smelter by Bert Porter, lessee of the Atlin mine, went
$27.40 per ton. The ore was not
sorted at all, and is taken from a
width of about five feet across the
bottom of the shaft. The shaft is
now down 50 feet, and drifting
both ways is to be commenced.
The British Columbia Standard
company is preparing to rush work
on the new aerial tramway noii
oommenoing, to conneot the Hunter V. mine with the railroad. B.C.
Riblet, of Nelson, who has the oon
tract, has already a foroe of men
at work, but is finding difficulty in
getting sufficient men to push the
work as rapidly as desired.
NOTICE
THOMAS STOUT, the First Avenue
Diuggist, has resumed charge of his
business and will be pleased to meet all
his old customers as well as many new
ones.
&
LUMBER
Mine Timber a Specialty
GOOD   WOOD   in  large
small quantities.
R.L.Wright
A.R.S M.
(Assayer for Le Roi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
jCustom Assays!;
SLOCAN.
The foroe at
been increased.
the   Rambler has
at
:Sh«rt (n Sheep
The sheep returns from New
Zealand reveal the serious shortage
of 1,300,000 owing to over exportation. A further loss of half a
million is probable through a snow
storm in the South island, the severest for many ye is. In the
oircumstanoes, the government
meat shop scheme is apparently
premature.
FOR SALE
If your want to bowl tiy the Alhambra
Best ally in the city,
Come and see us at   the  Strand, you
will be treated right. Green & Comerford
A big foroe will be employed
the Enterprise this winter.
The owners are prosecuting development on the Neepawa.
W. W.-Warner is again ground
sluicing on the Wonderful.
The force on the Black Prinoe
was inoreased to three men this
week.
Additional supplies were sent up
to the Riverside this week, and development resumed.
A raise has been commenced on
the Blaok Prince. Ore is being
taken both from it and the drift.
New outbuildings are being
erected at the Bank of England
and everything made snug for
winter.
The Noonday was shut down
this week. Thev have no winter
quarters at the properly.
The ore body on the Mercury,
near Sandon, has greatly improved
of late, making it one of the best
things in the camp.
Work was started the past week
on a c. ntract to drive 80 to 100
feet of tunnel to tap the lead on
the Noble Five group.
Con. Murpby got baok his quarter interest in the Black Prince
group from A. York and turned it
over to W. T. Shatford.
The Ivanhoe shipped 61 tons of
ore in the past ten days. The ooal
shortage has been relieved and tbe
mill is working full time.
Howard Thompson and G, McLeod has struck 14 inches of high
galena on the Mountain Con. English experts had condemned the
mine.
TissuePapers
Crepe and Plain
All Colors
Best Quality
OVER 50 SHADES
to select from
On hundred new and
second and stoves. Now
is the time to get a bargain in a good stove.
*■■   I   I   I E-«e ■■
Rossland Bazaar
Alhambra Hotel
RTE.
BOA
,rdyer8 $6.50 per week
The only hotel in the city having
re 3m for miners.   Free Bath I
a dry
oom,
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Burnfture...
Special offering for next
week in Furniture, Carpets, Linoleums, Oil
Cloths, Etc. Below are
a few of the lines : ■ ■ •
SStiJ?UNGES' from $1° 00 *> $20 00
DINING CHAIRS, l
CENTRE TABLES, l
MORRIS CHAIRS,        10
TAPESTRY CARPETS
BRUSSELS CARPETS*   1
LINOLEUMS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
00 to
3 00
SO to
7 50
00 to
20 00
50 to
75
00 to
1 25
SO to
1 OO
30 to
40
20 to
30
If you don't like paying cash
sell you all you want on the
at-a-time-payment plan.
I will
little-
J. Ai Jordan
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Curse
-OP-
Note Papers
All the newest things in shape,
quality and colors.
"Gibson Girl" & "Coon"
Folly and Dinner Cards.
The very latest New York fad.
Goodeve Bros.
Druggists and Stationers.
When vou get It at Goodeve's it's good
DRINK
CURED BV
COLONIAL   REMEDY
No Taste.   No Odor.   Can be given in glass or
water, tea or coffeetwithout patient's  knowledge.
Colonial Remedy will cure or destroy the diseased appetite for alcoholic st'tnulants, whether
the patient <s a confirmed inebriate, "tippler,"
social drinker or drunkard • Impossible lor anyone to have an appetite for alcoholic liquors
after using Colonial Remedy.
Endorsed by Members of W. C.T.'.U.
Mrs. Moore, Superintendent of the Woman's
Christain Temperance Union, Ventura, Cat,
writes: "I have tested Colonial Remedy on very
obstinate drunkards, and the cures have been
many. Iu many cases the Remedy was given
secretly. I cheerfully recommend and endorse
tjlonial Remedy, Members of our Union aie
t* flighted to find a practical and economical
treatment to aid us in our temperance work."
Sold by druegiBts everywhere and by mall,
Price |t. Trial package free by writing or calling on Mrs. M, A, Cowan, (for years member of
the Woman's Christain Temperance Union) 2204
St. Catharine St., Montreal.
SS~T.R,M0RR0WcES
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish, Came and Poultry In Season, Sausages of AU finds.
WM. OONALD, Manager Rool.nd Branch
|ffl^"MIMi>liMiriTf!|fni!TTffTffT^mMf!!f!lfilM|f!!MIH1fTTTL{
For Lunches and Picnics Z :::
Libby, McNeill & Libby's and Armoar's
CANNED MEATS
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R ATLANTIC S.S. LINE
From Montrral
M't Temple Oct. 16 L.Champlain. Oct 22
ALLAN LINE
From Montreal
Tunisian.... Oct. 10 Parisian... Oct. 17
DOMINION LINE
From Montreal
Dominion Oct 10 Kensington Oct 17
From Boston
Mayflower.. Oct 8 Columbus.... Oct 14
AMERICAN LINE
New York...Oct  7 Philadelphia Oct 14
RED STAR LINE
Finland Oct io Vaderland.. .Oct 17
CUN&RD LINE
Ivernia Oct 6 Ultonia Oct  17
ALLAN STATE LINE
Numidian ...Oct 1 Mongolian Oct7
WHITE 8TAR LINE
Celtic Oct2 0cean;c Oct 8
FRENCH LINE
LaTouraine.,. .Oct 8 La Savoie.. Oct 15
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A. P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F.CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt., Winnipeg
O. W. DEY, Agent,
C P.R, Depot, Rossland.
I Fresh Fru its i
Received Daily.
Apples, Crab Apples,
Plums, Watermelons,
Muskmelons. Peaches,
Greapes, Etc.jg"^^
::All Preserving Fruits::
Paulson
Bros.
THE GROCERS
SOLE  AGENTS—Chilliwaok
reamer?   .Butter.
»♦•»*••#•*>>♦♦♦♦•••#♦♦■♦»<
Try MELROSE PATE.
O. M. FOX & CO., irSi
COLUMBIA AVTTMirp _ •?   uiuoeio
COLUMBIA AVENUE
TELEPHONE 65
EXPLOSIVES
Ltd
The Cotton Powder Comoanv.
32 Queen Victoria St., LONDON, E. C.»
 MANOFACTOBE	
Faversham Powder
On the SPECIAL LIS1 of Pcmitted [Explosives., Ootober, 1901
ll'YK I f "T" C"   the beBt e*plosive>r undergronnd;worl ex
■   ^-^ I N I   I   C    olusively used in Severn and Mersey tnnnel
Cordite, Gelignite, Gelatine Dynamite, Blasting Gelatine, De-
tonators *"* °'' *i«»— -* m—i__i ...   . . ..'
for all classes of
ine Charges for the
Explosives,
removal of
Eleotrio Appliances,
Wrecks, Etc.,  Etc.
Works: Faversham, Kent and Melllng, near Liverpool
ESTABLISHED 1849.
GEORGE GREEN.
THE FOUNDRY.
ABERYSTWYTH,        ■:■
ENGLAND.
Manufacturer of Concentrating Machinery.
MEDALS-Royal Cornwall Polytechnic; Gold medal International Mininc Exhl
bitoon, Crystal Palace, 1890.    On/ award for Concentrators.
SPECIALTIES:
&id?^
Trommels, IVanners, etc., all constructed in section
sired.    Patent Portable Crushini
Stonebrealcers, Crushers, Jigs
s for frcility of transport if de
for P
,,  - gand Amalgamating Pans
!ma_-°?"ntratl.n8 P'*".1,0 treaJ UD to five tons erected at the works by "which
or Prospecting,    A
commercial rt.ults can be^ seenVmtining"p"urchasere for a mere" nommaUoit
Estimates for ccnplete plants on application.   Special attention given to Blaiar
engineer's specifications.   Telegrams-"JIGGi:R." Aberystwyth.   ^^ THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 26, 1903
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the  Magazines are
Saying
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
-Topics Interesting' General Readers.
The Smart Set for October is up
very muoh to ita usual form, bright
chatty and epigrammatic aB ever,
and containing a fairly good atory.
"We of /dam's Clay," by a little
known author, Coamo Hamilton,
who, by the way, writes very muob
aa a woman, the auggeation of sex
being still more apparent by the
very prettineas of the nom de phime
The Nineteenth Century ia a particularly good number, and contains more than one article whioh,
will be read with intereat. To
those who are of the opinion that
Great Britain is living upon it>
oapital, an article on the great fiscal problem of the day contributed
by that well known writer, W. H.
Mallock, ia recommended. The
Canadian Ice Carnival, by Bradley
Martin, aeema to have nothing
about the Quebec Carnival at all,
and is chiefly devoted to an inept
comparison between the Frenchman of Europe and he of Eastern
Canada.
Ainslee's Magazine, much in the
style of the Argoay, aa far aa the
literary value of ita page8 are concerned, perhaps, on a alightly more
elevated, though not neoesaarily
more entertaining, plane, ia muoh
the same as usual.
The London, one of the cheapest
and best of English magazines, is
aa readable ae ever. An article on
the authors of the day, properly illustrated, is about the best feature
of the current number.
The Wide World Magazine ia as
popular today aB at its start. It is
a living exemplification of the
adage that truth is stranger than
fiction. One can only Bay on reading its marvellous pages, that the
race of Mandeville ia still extant in
British strain.
"The Myatery of Murray Davenport," by R. N. Stephens, ia a story
of New York life, but it is a story
that is not only highly original in ita
motif, but also in the manner of ita
telling. It is one of the brightest
and cleverest of the new books
which have recently come out, and
' if the author ia oapable of more in
the same lines, he Bhould have an
assured literary career before him.
"The Saorifiice of the Shannon,"
by W. H. Hickman, ia a notable
book and one that will well bear 8
reperuaal. A tale of Nova Scotian
life it certainly bringa out clear)}
the indomitable persistence of the
aeaboard Eastern Canadian. A
description of a yacht race in the
earlier portion of the tale ia aa wall
written a atory aa any of its kind
in the English language.
"Mooae Hunting," and "Salmon
Fishing," by T. R. Patillo, ia as
bright a book on sport as haB beet
recently presented to the reading
public. Treating on game in Eastern Canada, the atory ia told with
a lack of literary eff >rt, a verve, a
contemning of the caducity of mere
style that givea the reader hope
for the language.
"The    Adventures   of    Harry
Revel," by A. Quiller-Couch is in"
deed a story of adventure from beginning to end. The impression
left upon the mind, is of a wild
phantasmagoria of incident upon
incident, Ossa piled upon Pelion.
The author haa produced better
books and will do bo again, yet no
lover of adventurous books will
take up the present volume to lay
it down half finished.
"A Speckled Bird," by A. G.
Wilson, is a powerful story, dealing with the marriage relation and
its interference by the divorce laws
of the United States. The religious
aspect of life is always uppermost
with the author, who, however,
fails in breadth of view and tender
neaa of feeling, while dealing with
ita most sacred aspects. The book
is no ordinary novel, but a prob
lem, and aB a problem has its liter
ary drawbacks, which go far to
neutralize its advantages.
OUTSIDE
MINE NEWS
CONSERVATIVE PLATFORM
[Adopted at Hovclwtokc, September 18th* ICW.]
1.  That this convention reaffirms thu polioy
of the purl y in niiiiiiT-: of provincial roaus mid
U'uIIh; the nwnt'i-.-hip Mini control of railway
and the development of the uyWctiltuml n
sources ot the province aa laid down in the
platform adopted m Ootober, 18C0. which in a
follows;
"To actively aid In the construction of trail
throughout the undeveloped  portions  of the
province and tho building of provincial trunk
roads of public iiocosHity.
"To adopt the principles of government ownership of railways in ho far as the otroura*
Btanoes of the province will admit, and the
adoption of tho principle that no bonus should
ho granted to any railway company which
does not give tho government of the provinoe
control of rates over lines honused, together
with tho option of purchase.
'To actively assist by state aid in tho devol
opmentof tho agricultural
resources of the
provinco.
2. That in the meantime and until tho railway policy above set forth can bo accomplished, a general railway act be passed giving
freedom to construct railways under certain
approvod regulations, analogous to tho system
that has resulted in such extensive railway
construction in tho United States, with so
muoh advantage to trade and commerce.
3. That to encourage the mil.ing Industry,
tho taxation of metalliferous mines should he
on tho basis of apercontago on the not profits.
4. That tho government ownership of tele
phono systems should be brought about, as a
first atep'in tho acquisition of publio utilities.
5. That a portion of every coal area here
after to bo disposed of should bo resorved fnun
sale or lease, so that stale owned mines may be
easily accessible, if their operation becomes
necessary or advisable.
(i. That in tho pulp land leases provision
should bo made for reforesting and that stopi
should bo taken for the general preservation of
forests by guarding against the wasteful de
struction of timber.
7, That the legislature and government of
the province should persevere in tho effort to
secure tho exclusion of Asiatic labor.
8. That tho matter of better terms in the
way of  subsidy and appropriations for the
irovinco should bo vigorously pressed upon the
pro ^^^^^^^^
Dominion government.
9. That tho silver-load industries of the prov
inco be fostered and.oncouragcd by the Impost
tion of increased customs duties on lead and
lead products imported into Canada, nnd that
the Conservative membors of the Dominion
House be ur-ged to support any motion introduced for such a purpose,
10. That as industrial disputes almost invariably result in great loss and injury both to tho
parties directly concerned and to the public,
legislation should bo passed to provide means
for an amicable adjustment of such disputes
between employers and employes.
11. That it is advisable to foster tho manufacture of tho raw products of tho province
within tho provinco as far as practicable ;by
means of taxation on thosaid raw products.sub-
iect to rebate of tho same in whole or part
when manufactured in British Columbia.
Conservative Conventions
At a meeting of tho executive of tho Provincial Conservative Association, hold at Vancouver, tho province was divided into five dl-
v Isions for organization purposes. The Koote-
nay-Boundary division is made up of tho following provincial election districts: Kovel-
sLjke. Columbia, Fornio, Cranbrook, Ymir,
Kaslo, SI0O8II, Grand Forks, Greenwood, the
City of Rossland and tho City of Nelson. At
tho same meeting the following resolutions
wore adopted:
. 1. That conventions for nominating candidates for members of the legislative assembly
bo made up of delegates chosen as follows:
{a) In city electoral districts, one delegate
for every fifty and fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial election held in 1000. and if
tho citv is divided into wards, tho proportion
of delegates for each ward shall bo based on
ilic voto polled in each ward at tho last municipal election.
(b) In other electoral districts, one delegate
for every fifty or fraction of fifty votes polled
at tho provincial election held in 1900, tho delegates to be apportioned to polling places, or as
near thereto as will bo fair to tho voters of the
different neighborhoods.
2. Tho eloctlon of dologates shall be at public meetings, held at a designated central place
in oach polling division, or in each ward in city
electoral districts, if the city is divided into
wards. At such publio meetings only those
who pledge themselves to voto for tho candidate or candidates selected at tho nominating
convention shall be entitled to a vote for delegates-
3. Two weeks notice shall bo given of tho
public moctiugs at which delegates aro to be
elected, and nominating conventions shall bo
held in city electoral districts two days after
<ho day on which delegatus aro elected, and in
othor electoral districts seven days after. All
nominations throughout 1 .to provinco to bo
mado at a designated central place in each
electoral district, and on tho same day.
i. All notices of tho date of public meetings
for tho election of dologates to nominating
conventions, thu apportionment of delegates,
and tho place and date of nominating conventions in tho several electoral districts shall bo
prepared by tho member of the executive of
tho division in whioh tho electoral districts are
situate, and issued over tho names of tho president and secretary of tho Provincial Conservative Association
What Is Being Done Outside the Province.
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various Countries
the Mining of Precious
Metals.
in
A meeting ot tho provincial executive will
ho hold at Vancouver within a mouth, and tho
date for holding district nominating conventions will then be fixed.
JOHN HOUSTON,
President, of I he Provincial
Conservative Association.
Nelson. Juno 8th, 1903. tf
I Linton Bros., \
Books, Stationery,
Newsdealers, Toys, Fishing
Tackle, Kodaks and
Supplies.
ROSSLAND,   B. C.
In wuhing woollens and uannela, Lever*!
Dry Soap (a powder) will b» found very
■tMaWflry. _ .. al
Utah's five smelters produced
over 4,000,000 pounds of oopper
bullion last month.
The Quilp, at Republio, Wash.,
will shortly send GO tons ol ore
daily to Tacoma.
During the last three months
250,000 tons of copper ore have
have been shipped from Newfoundland   mines,   chiefly   to    British
smelters.
The consumption of oopper in
the United StateB during 1902, is
estimate at 51G,951,182 pounds
compared with 386,910,170 pounds
consumed in 1901.
The Chance Creek Mining company has been registered with a
capital of ,£10,000 to acquire and
develop a property in Western
Canada.
A receiver has been appointed in
the case of the British and Canadian Lead company, which owns a
lead mine in Quebeo.
During the past year the Camp
Bird mine, Colorado, earned a net
profit of about $1,250,000, with a
production of 07,000 tons, averag
ing $25 55.
There has been a good rainfall at
Broken Hill, ensuring a three
months' supply of water to the
mineB.
It is estimated that no less than
three millions of dollars in gold
dust will be taken ont of the Valdez
district during this season.
At the Calumet and Hecla
pockets are being constructed for
supplying Kimberley skips, whioh
are supplanting the cage and car
system in the Red Jacket shaft.
The Brock field Gold Mining
company of Nova Scotia, have deolared a dividend at the rate of 12
per cent per annum for the quarter
ending July 1st.
The gold output of New Zealand
during the month of August
amounted to 30,074 ounces, valued
at ^110,572, as against 35,609
ounce?, valued at £137,456, in the
corresponding  month of last year.
Some progress iB now being made
in quariz mining in Klondike, and
one property |in the neighborhood
of Eldorado Creek has sunk a shaft
down 70 feet, whioh is reported to I
ba in rioh ore all the way.
Heavy falls of rain in the Daw-
Bon distriot have improved the opportunities of the hydraulio companies. The gold yield will, however, be rather less—probably at
least $1,000,000 than that of last
season. Drought during much of
the summer has greatly ou tailed
hydraulicing,
Picked samples of ore from a
vein just opened near Silver Cliff,
Florence, Col., returns 591 ounces
of silver, one oance of gold and a
great deal of lead. The strike is
one of the most important made in
he belt for a long time.
Very satisfactory returns were
obtained from the last carload ot
ore Bhipped by the Republio Mining company to Nelson. With silver at 55i cents an ounce, the returns totalled $58.47 per ton, with
gold values at $13.70, making
$82.07 iu all. The ore was taken
from an open cut on the Bell
claim.
Some idea of the immense extent
and value of the coal areas in Cape
Breton oan be obtained from the
fact that the ooal measures extend
and it has been estimated that with
ten times the present output the
supply is available for over 200
years.
The Keawiok, Cat, smelter i
now operating four furnaces, and
all are converters. There are more
men employed today than at any
other time since the strike. This is
partly due to the increased wages
paid, $2.10 being the lowest wage
for ten-hour men, which is 10 cents
more a day than was paid before
the strike. The fire is practically
subdued and no longer bothers.
The neighboring mines at Shasta,
Old Diggins, Middle Creek and
Buckeye are now finding a ready
market for their small shipments
of ore at the smelter, and the prosperity that smiles upon Keswick
reaches out to the small producer
and the prospector.
PROGRESSIVE PLATFORM
1, No dldacnte will be accepted or
endorsed by the paity unlesi endorsing the platform nnd placing   bis  undated resignation in thu hands of  the
endorsing body.
2. Government "wnership of transportation.
8. Compulsory arbitration.ol' labor
disputes.
4. Absolute reservation of portions
of coal lands by the government, Ooal
leases must have a aelauos inserted
governing coal prices.
5. Conservation of forests so ,as to
produce a revenue and to promote the
pulp industry.
0. Insertion of a clause in all charters forbidding the employment of
orient 1
7. Compulsory sealing of all logs by
government scalers.
8. Fire transportation to members
of the legislatures and the judiciary.
0. Gradual abolition of all taxes
upon producers and their products
shifting the burden on land values.
10. Restriction of Oriental immigration on the lines of the Natal Act
with a provision for leenactment inJ
case of disallowance. j
11. The abolition of property qualifications for public officers.
12. The establishment and opera,
tion of government smeltersj and rej
fineries.
18,   All franchises and subsi lies
be referred to the electorate.
14. Declaration of election day as '
public holiday,   with  four hours  re
served in any case, so as" to allow
employes an opportunity of voting,
15. Farm lands and implements to
be exempt from taxation and wild,
lands to be assessed at the price asked,
by holders.
10.    No land subsidies to be grantedl
17. Ten per cent of publio lands to'
be set aside for a revenue  for   educa
tion and that children up to 10 years'
be giyen tree  books  and  meals au.l>
clothing when necessary.
18, Municipalization and pnbli
control of the liquor traffic.
Call at the Strand for a  fancy  drink
Green & Comerford. Props.
The New Woman
Miss Wilhelmina Jameson, an
Edinburgh teacher, who has been
appointed English lecturer in Grenoble University, is the first lady to
receive an official appointment in
a French University.
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
Canada'sIGroat Illustrated Weekly
In keeping with the progress of
the age, Canada's Great National
Home Newspaper, The Weekly
Globe, will be very materially im \
proved for 1904, Numerous important changes are in contemplation, but the leading feature will
be the introduction of an eight-
page illustrated supplement on
calendered paper. This will undoubtedly make it the most popular weekly offered to the people of
the Dominion. For particulars
see advertisement in another
column of this issue.
PROGRESS MADE BY NEW PARTY
What is Being Done by Socialists
In Canada and the World
Over,
Information Wanted
"Yes," said the alderman who waB
doing a second term. "I believe
n holding up our home industries."
"For how muoh?" queried the
newly eleoted member, who was a
seeker after the truth.
Fresh Eastern and Olympia Oya
oi % known distance of 46 miles ten at Thomas Embleton'e.
The demand for skilled white
labor is steadily increasing in
South Afrioa.
Mine owners of Sonora are arranging to employ Chinese laborers
in liace of Mexicans.
Mr. Chamberlain's Beat for West
Birmingham will be contested by
the prominent labor leader, W. J.
Davis.
A colored man was eleoted as
international vice president at the
convention of the longshoremen
held at Bay City, Mich.,  recently.
It is said that the United Mine
Workers of America are planning
to erect' a labor temple at Pittsburg,
Pa., to oost $100,000.
The Canadian locals of the
Bricklayers and Masons' Interna-'
tional unions have decided to
appoint an arbitration committee
to settle all disputes in Canada.
It is estimated that fully 50,000
union workingmen and women of
Chioago have secured increase of
wages or shorter hours or both this
year.
The dispute concerning wages
between the shipbuilders of Belfast, Ireland, and the Boilermakers
Society has been settled, oonoessions
being granted in the notices of
reductions.
The treasury of the Amerioan
Federation of Labor held $62,940
July 1 last, of which $55,89.1 was
credited to the defence fund and
$7016 to the general fund of the
body.
As an outcome of the recent success at the parliamentary bye-elections, the Labor party in Great
Britain is organizing contests for
Beats in parliament at the next
general elections on an unexpectedly large scale.
The dispute between the Edinburgh, Scotland, Distriot Tramways
company and their oarmen is at an
end, and the men are believed to be
satisfied with the wages to be paid
them and the scheme of working
hours.
Justioe Andrew of New York
says: "With or without reason,
alone or together, workmen may
leave their employers. By argument or persuasion, by appeal to
sympathy or prejudice, they may
lead others not to take their vacant places. But here they must
stop."
A government oontraotor fetched
men from Quebeo to British Columbia and paid them below the current rate, which it was claimed
was in violation of the Fair Wages
Act. Not so, for the Minister of
Justice maintaina that sinoe the
oontract was made in Quebec the
government had no power to interfere.
The Attorney General of New
York state says that the recent decision of tbe state of appeals, de-'
daring unconstitutional that part
of the eight hour statute making
its violation a misdemeanor, does
not in any sense lessen the duty of
offioials making contracts in behalf of the state, for an eight hour
is still imperative.
The strikers at Virginia mines,
near Birmingham, Ala., against
whom Chancellor Carmiohael has
issued an injunction restraining
them from holding publio meetings,
have rented a ohuroh near the
mineB, and every day go to the
building with Bibles and hymn
books in hand and proceed to hold
xelJtgoiiB    services.     During   th
meeting an   official of the miner
union is granted tbe   floor,    ar |
addresses the congregation on   tl j
strike, and takes  up   a  colleotioj]
for those in need.
The General Federation of Trat
Unions of Great Britain has pre
posed an amendment to the coi
cilia tion aot of 1896. It advocat-
inquiry into the oauses and oi
cumstances ol disputes, the takii
of steps to bring disputants t
(gether, the appointment of a co
ciliator upon application of eith
side or an arbitrator on the app
cation of both parties, it is thi
proposed to constitute a nation
board of eight members—three ei
ployers, three workmen and tv/
co-opted members, such board
to aot on the applioation of ail
representative body, to make i|
quiry and publish results. Or,
the dispute is prolonged, to met]
discuss and recommend a sett)|
ment.
The...
Clothes
And the
Man,.
H-H«*««>W.
To be properly clean and propel
ly dressed is important to a man']
character and progress. It is
duty to himself, a courtesy
others. And more and more tri
neglect of it is a handicap. Drei
will carry a fool far, it will enabl
merit to gain speedier recognitiol
It will beguile orosperity aa
plausibly give the lie to adversitf
Your Will Hear
Our Work
highly commended by those vi
know good clothing when they sj
it. We have the suitings that al
approved by fashion in textul
and coloring, and we guarantf
the fit and workmanship.
rt-M-rt-H-
Taylor
McQuarrii
18 and 20 Col, Ave.
| Thomas & Co.,
Wholesale dealers in
Wines,
Liquors
\ and Cigars
Cor. First Ave. & Washington St
MORTGAGE SALE
Under and by virtue of Power of Sal
contained in a certain mortgage, whic
will be produced at time of sale, the!
will be offered for sale by Public Audio
at the premises, Le Roi avenue, in tl
City of Rossland, at 12 o'clock noon, 0
the 6th day of October, 1901, by Walt*
J Robinson, Auctioneer, the followin
property, viz: Lot 6, Block 43, accord
ing to Map 579 in the town of RosslandJ
Terms of Sale.
Ten per rent of the purchase money s
time of sale, the balance within thirti
days thereafter.   For further particular]
acdnei.l, McMaster & GearyAI
51 Yonge street. Toronto.
apply to
Presh Bread
PIES AND COOKIES
Home Bakeryl
Columbia avenue, next door to Empey'l
Washington St. and Second Ave.    I
Petch & Schwarizenhauer Proptf
Allkinds of   summer drinks at
Strand. Green &Comerford, Props. ■
THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 26, 1903
,**. •  *       i    Mining News of the
Outside
Gamps j
BOUNDARY.
Week Over the Province and the Upper
LWUUif O      a>    Country.
On the Kitchener two shafts are being sunk, one of which is now down
25 feet, and the other about 12 feet.
The vein, whioh shows a width of
seven feet on the surface, is well
defined, being a true fissure, whioh
outs the oountry formation, and
grows stronger with depth. The
ore is heavily charged with galena,
and carries large values in copper,
gold and silver, recent assays showing $69 70 per ton in all values.
The stock of the Roberts-Kitchener
is selling at 30c. per share in Vancouver, although no attempt has
been made to boom the property.
Four miners are working steadily
on the Kitohener olaim and the
dump is gradually increasing in
size, every pound of ore taken out
being Ut for shipment to the Crofton smelter, whioh is one and one-
half miles distant. It is the intention of the management to have a
similar test of 40 or 50 tons made
at an early date.
A few tons of ore taken out of
the Strathmore in process of development yielded, a value return of
over $100 to the ton.
The platform for loading oars for
the Athelstan mine, on the Winnipeg spur, has been completed, and
Jackpot, as well as rich Athelstan,
ore is being sent out.
Shipments of ore from the Betts
and Hesperus mines to the Qranby
smelter have been started by
wagon. The ore body has been
proven to be 20 feet wide without
encountering the hanging wall.
Work is continuing steadily now
at the Morrison mine, Deadwood
oamp, where some 20 men are employed, and ore is being hauled
by wagon to the railway for shipment to the Mother Lode  smelter.
The first installment of coke
manufactured at the Coleman colleges of the International Coal
and Coke oompany, is said to have
been received at the Qranby smelter, and that it gave the best of
satisfaction.
The Oranby oompany has a
small foroe of men at work on the
south side of tbe Qrey Eagle olaim
opening up the quarry, from which
Contractor Fisher will haul the ore
to the head of tho'surfacetramway,
a distance of a quarter of a mile.
Five more stamps are to be installed at tbe Waterloo mine, Camp
MoKinney, making a battery of
ten. Inside of three months the
mill has produced $19,000 in gold,
according to the report of Secretary
Wolf. Eighteen men are employed
Clement Vasher,foreman of the
Sally mine in the West Forks
country,is building a trail up to the
mine, and work in the mine itself
will resume almost immediately.
Ore will be rawhided down to
Beaverdell and shipped there by
teams to Midway.
COAST.
Mr. Vaughan-Rhys, lessee of the
Van Anda mines, Texada Island,
paid a visit to Ladysmith recently
and oonferred with his agent and
the local smeltermen. Mr. Vaughan
Rhys said that everything
> was going on smoothly at the mine;
the strike had been settled by the
men themselves deciding to withdraw their demand on the oompany. The mine never looked
better, and its operation is proving
most eatisfaotory. From now shipments will be made continuously,
as no further delays or interrup
tions are anticipated.
EAST KOOTENAY.
A report from Elko says that two
prospectors have discovered and
located a small body of hematite
on Sand oreek. The parties are
now engaged in driving a tnnnel on
the vein, whioh is said to be from
three to six feet in width.
Development at Coal creek mineB
is steadily going on. At No. 4 the
ooal is being wasted on the dump
as the tramway is incomplete owing
to the delay in the arrival of rails.
Two cars are expeoted shortly and
by October 1 the ooal will be landed at the tipple and several rooms
will be in operation. In No- 5.
three drifts have struok coal. Development work has been commenced on No. 9 whioh is situated closo
by No. 1 and by the end of the year
it will be Bending out ooal, Nob. 6,
7 and 8 will not be developed until
next year.
ISLAND
Hugh Grieve, president of the
Roberts-Kitohener mines, owning
Lord Roberts, Lord Kitohener and
General White on Mount Sioker,
was in Vancouver reoently, attending a meeting of the company. Mr.
Grieve, who has been aotively engaged reoently in superintending
the work at the mine, reports that
very good progress ii being made.
KAMLOOPS.
No news has been published of
the oondition of matters at the
Slough Creek mines for some time.
The following telegram Bent by
Manager Hopp to the London
office on August 8 is the latest information obtainable: "Second
upraise is in 160 feet Faoe of
second upraise is 123 feet south of
face of south drift. Floor 11 feet
below south drift. Water in second upraise from point 100 feet
from main tunnel to present face of
upraise is oontinous waterfall. The
rook is soft and required to be
heavy timbered at present, using
faoe boards. There is every indication that a ohannel is being ap-
poraohed."
SIMILKAMEEN.
{ The owners of the Myrtle group
j have laid out plans for a big win-
I ter's work. They have installed a
j whim, which will greatly faoilitate
' hoisting, and are now hauling in a
plentiful supply of timber.
YMIR.
Ymir's ore and bullion shipments last month to the United
States were valued at $83,893.
A meeting of the shareholders of
the Active Gold Mining oompany
was held here last week. Senator
Magly, of Cincinnati, Ohio, was in
the chair. The company will
resume active work.
The oarload of ore recently sent
to the Nelson smelter by Bert Porter, lessee of the Atlin mine, went
$27.40 per ton. The ore was not
sorted at all, and is taken from a
width of about five feet across the
bottom of the shaft. The shaft is
now down 50 feet, and drifting
both ways is to be commenced.
The British Columbia Standard
company is preparing to rush work
on the new aerial tramway no»
oommenoing, to connect the Hunter V. mine with the railroad. B.C
Riblet, of Nelson, who has the contract, has already a foroe of men
at work, but is finding diffioulty in
getting sufficient men to push the
work as rapidly as desired.
NOTICE
THOMAS STOUT, the First Avenue
Diuggisr, his resumed charge of his
business and will be pleased to me;t all
his old customers as well
ones.
as many new
ft
LUMBER
M Ine Timber a Specialty
GOOD   WOOD  in  large
small quantities.
*************** * W********
W ——— —	
UL. Wright
A. K. S M.
(Assayer for Le Roi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
: Custom Assays!:
FOR SftLE
The Cousin Jack ore reoently
assayed at the Granby smelter returns gold, 2 ozs., oopper, 6 per
oent, and silver, in all about $50
per ton. The Cousin Jack and
Niokle Plate seem to be related,
bo far as values go. The contraot
for a 100 foot tunnel has been let
to P. Burns.
SLOCAN.
The foroe at the Rambler has
been increased.
A big foroe will be employed at
the Enterprise this winter.
The owners are prosecuting development on the Neepawa.
W. W. -Warner is again ground
sluicing on the Wonderful,
The force on the Blaok Prinoe
was increased to three men this
week.
Additional supplies were sent up
to the Riverside this week, and development resumed.
A raise has been commenced on
the Blaok Prinoe. Ore is being
taken both from it and the drift.
New outbuildings are being
ereoted at the Bank of England
and everything made snug for
winter.
The Noonday was shut down
this week. They have no winter
quarters at the property.
The ore body on the Mercury,
near Sandon, has greatly improved
of late, making it one of the best
things in the oamp.
Work was Btarted the past week
on a Oi ntraot to drive 80 to 100
feet of tunnel to tap the lead on
the Noble Five group.
Con. Murphy got baok his quarter interest in the Blaok Prince
group from A. York and turned it
over to W. T. Shatford.
The Ivanhoe shipped 61 tonB of
ore in the past ten days. The ooal
shortage has been relieved and tbe
mill is working full time.
Howard Thompson and G, McLeod has struck 14 inches of high
galena on the Mountain Con. English experts had condemned the
mine.
:Short In Sheep
The sheep returns from New
Zealand reveal the serious shortage
of 1,300,000 owing to over exportation. A further loss of half a
million is probable through a snow
storm in the South island, the severest for many ye ib. In the
oircumstances, the government
meat shop scheme is apparently
premature.
On hundred new and
secon d and stoves. Now
is the time to get a bargain in a good stove.
If your want to bowl tiy the Alhambra
Best ally in the city,
Come and see us at   the   8trand,
will be treated right. Green & Comerford
i you
rfo
TissuePapers
Crepe and Plain
All Colors
Best Quality
OVER 50 SHADES
to select from
,..THE...
Rossland Bazaar
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Special offering for next
week in Furniture, Carpets, Linoleums, Oil
Cloths, Etc. Below are
a few of the lines : ■ ■ •
5E£;t0IJNGES' fr°m $ JO 00 to $20 00
DINING CHAIRS,
CENTRE TABLES
MORRIS CHAIRS
TAPESTRY CARPETS,
BRUSSELS CARPETS
LINOLEDMS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
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10 00 to
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50 to
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30 to
40
20 to
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will
If you don't like paying cash I Wlli
sell you all you want on the little-
at-a-time-payment plan.
J. M, Jordan
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Alhambra Hotel
Solans $6.50 per week
The only hotel in the city having
re Dm for miners.    Free Bath I
a dry
.oom,
Curse
-OP-
Note Papers
All the newest things in shape,
quality and colors.
"Gibson Girl" & "Coon"
Folly and Dinner Cards.
The very latest New York fad.
Goodeve Bros.
Druggists and Stationers.
When you get it at Goodeve's it's good
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R. ATLANTIC S.S. LINE
From Montreal
M't Temple Oct. 16 L.Champlain. Oct 22
ALLAN LINE
From Montreal
Tunisian Oct. io Parisian.. .Oct. 17
DOMINION LINE
From Montreal
Dominion Oct 10 Kensington Oct 17
From Boston
Mayflower.. Oct 8 Columbus,... Oct 14
AMERICAN LINE
New York...Oct  7 Philadelphia Oct 14
RED STAR LINE
Finland Oct 10 Vaderland.. .Oct 17
CUN&RD LINE
Ivernia Oct 6 Ultonia Oct 17
ALLAN STATE LINE
Numidian ... Oct 1 Mongolian Oct 7
WHITE STAR LINE
Celtic Oct 2 Ocean'c Oct 8
FRENCH LINE
LaTouraine.,. .Oct 8 La Savoie.. Oct 15
DRINK
CURED BV
COLONIAL   REMEDf
No Taste.   No Odor.   Can be given in glass or
water, tea or coffee\without Patient's knowledge.
Colonial Remedy will cure or destroy the diseased appetite for alcoholic stimulants, whether
the patient is a confirmed inebriate, "tippler,"
social drinker or drunkard • Impossible tor anyone to have an appetite for alcoholic liquors
after usinK Colouial Remedy.
Endorsed by Members of W. C. T. U.
Mrs. Moore, Superintendent of the Woman's
Christain Temperance Union, Ventura, Cal.,
writes: "I have tested Colonial Remedy on very
obstinate dnmkards, and the cures have been
mauy. In many cases the Remedy was riven
secretly. I cheerfully recommend and endorse
Ljlonial Remedy. Members of our Union are
d Slighted to find a practical and economical
treatment to aid us in our temperance work."
Sold by druggists everywhere and by mail,
Price $1. Trial package free by writing or calling on Mrs. M. A. Cowan, (for years member of
the Woman's Christain Temperance Union) a»4
St. Catharine St., Montreal.
SS KST.lt MORROW "ttffi
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE
MARKETS
Rossland Nelson, TraU,Sandon(Revelstolce,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RE
Revelstoke, Ferguson and VaEcouverT^
fame and Poultrr in Season, Sausages of All Kinds.
Fish, Game and Poultry in
WM. DONALD, Manager Rossland Branch
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A. P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F.CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt, Winnipeg
0. W. DEY, Agent,
C. PR. Depot, Rossland.
I Fresh Fruits I
Received Daily.
Apples, Crab Apples,
Plums, Watermelons,
Muskmelons. Peaches,
Greapes, Etcig"^^
: All Preserving Fruits::
Paulson
Bros.
THE GROCERS
SOLE AGENTS-Chilliwaok
reamery   .butter.
nffifftifnfnffiffifiaS
I For Lunches and Picnics Z r;
£ Libby, MoNeill & Libby'B and Armour's
I   CANNED MEATS
C Try MELROSE PATE.
I O. M. FOX & CO., GrSI
I COLUMBIA AVENUE W   Yjga^KfflMB
^UiiiiiiiUiUmiiiiM^iiiiiim>iniiiiUiuii^|t/tUiijitj
..EXPLOSIVES
The Cotton Powder Comoanv. Ltd
32 Queen Victoria St., LONDON, E. C.»
^^  MANUFACTUBB	
Faversham Powder
On the SPECIAL LIST of Pe.mitter! {Explores., Ootober, 1901
|^f\N I I "T" EZT   the best rafploriv'tfor ::nderground;work ex
■   ^^ I N I   I   CL    clusively iiEed in Severn and Mersey tnnnel
Cordite, Gelignite, Gelatine Dynamite, Blasting Gelatine, Detonators for all «'»«-«« -<• *—<—•—   w-f-i    ■    ■•'
classes of
ine Charges for the
Explosives,
removal of
Electrio Appliances,
Wrecks, Etc.,  Eto.
Works: Faversham, Kent and Melling, near Liverpool
ESTABLISHED 1849.
GEORGE GREEN.
iTHE FOUNDRY,
ABERYSTWYTH,        -.-       ENGLAND.
Manufacturer of Concentrating Machinery.
MEDALS-Royal Cornwall Polytechnic; Gold medal International Mining Exhl
bmon, Crystal Palace, 1800.    Only award for Concentrator!.
SPECIALTIES:
ua!I1(P!1tJ,!i,h.la!c.VimProvtmen,!'0,uP-,0-da,edesiBn.and with wearing parts of
iwl™..1S ^i'JilTJ. "Jfc* 1255% P" h<i?dV . Stonebreakers, Crushers, J1m
Trommels, ^Vanners, etc., all constructed in section's for f.-cility
sired.   Patent Portable Crushing and Amalgamating Pans fo
of transport if
or Prospecting,
  .ig and Amalgamating Pans
small coacentrating p<«nt to treat un to five tons erected at the work's bv "which
commercial rt.ults can be seen by intending purchasers for a merely nominal cost
Estimates for ccnplete plants on application.   Special attention given to Blniar
engineer's specifications.   Telegrams— "JIGGER." Aberystwyth.   ^^ THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, SEPT. 26 1903.
Tho ^i-itiirdriv \A/Ar|fJ Balfour hasnot<iuarrelled witl1 his
J former   colleague,   but   has-taken
By tbe World Fnbllahing Company.
• Entered at the Rossland, B. C, postofflce for
transmission through the mails,May I, loot as
second class reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATKE-Sl.oo per year lr-
nrUbly In adrance. Adte'tlaing tatea mtie
kaiown on application.
LONDON   RATES-9 a. per   annum
JAMES H. FLETCHER.
GENERAL   MANAGER
, 0. Box 002 Rowland, B. C.
THE ELECTIONS
The Provincial Mining Association has issued a circular asking
eaoh candidate for popular suffrage
his views on oertain questions intimately connected with the weal
ol the provinoe, especially the
Kootenay. Both local candidates
so far apparently are relying upon
the reputation of their party but
party as party has little to do with
Rossland. It is merely a device
for securing responsibility. Party
issues as suoh little affect this
oamp. There are things, however,
whioh vitally oonoern it. The
camp has a right to know how
the men who are asking for their
votes stand on these important
matters. What stand is to be
taken with regard to the Chinese
question. Are Chinese to be intro
duoed into thiB oamp as freely as of
yore and what is every whit as bad
if not worse, despite the declaration in Friday's Miner, are their
place to be filled by Japanese?
Is the Alien Aot to be enforced? Is
the eight hour law again to be
thrown into the politioal balances
to etir up endless strife here and
all over the provinoe? What die
position is to be made of the ooal
lands in reserve, and in connection
with this, what steps will be taken
to see that our smelters and mines
are not to be suddenly deprived
of their ooal and ooke supplies? Is
there any amendment to be made
to clear up the Water Clauses Act
in suoh manner as to prevent a
possible recurrence of that dog in
the manger policy which has kept
back the oamp in the past? The
Would does not expeot the candidates to see eye to eye with it, but
it does expect that both men will
be manly enough to oome out with
a decided utteranoe on these questions and others covered by the
Mining Association. And according to the position taken so will the
electorate be inolined to vote, irrespective of party, just as long as
the man making those promises
oan be judged by his past record as
being likely to keep his pledges inviolate.
THE LIBERAL MANIFESTO.
CHAMBERLAIN RESIGNS.
Mr. Chamberlain's resignation
seemed to have been unezpeoted by
the majority of people,and it may be
taken for granted that had not the
bye elections so unmistakably have
shown the general feeling of the
oountry to have been against his
new imperial polioy, the Secretary
of State for the Colonies would have
retained his position -until suoh
time as a proper appeal to the
country could have been made
The resignation seems to have involved the premier in some little
difficulty, inasmuch as other ministers have followed the example,
and the Associated Press declares
that he will have some trouble in
finding material to refurbish his
cabinet.   It is noteworthy that Mr.
suoh grounds that there will not be
the slightest trouble in the two
men again coming together. It is
true that much has been made of
the fact that whereas the Premier
merely signifies his adherence to a
policy of protection in order that
the English manufacturers shall
not be subjeoted to an unfair competition, the ex-Colonial Secretary
wants  a   preferential tariff.   The
two aims are perfectly in harmony.
The Premier is preaohing the gospel of protection, as it will apply to
inBnlar Britain, and showing how
t will advantage him and the ex-
Minister, the gospel of the Empire.
Much iB being made of tbe cry
of "dear bread," and there is little
doubt but that a tax upon imported
grain will have some influence
upon the price of the loaf. Yet for
all that there are two things working vigorously in the favor oi the
policy, the one being the undoubted
fact that although it can be clearly
enough shown, as reoently by W.
H. Mallock, that Great Britain is
not living upon its capital to pay
the enormouB difference between
its imports and its exports, that
the amount derived from the income tax is yearly increasing, and
the people out of work do not average much more than four per cent
of its population, still the volume
of its manufactures is notinoreas
ing in anything like a similar
ratio and may, indeed,be said to be
almost at a standstill; thus demonstrating to the intelligent working
man that if the population increases and manufactures do not
keep pace, that the time is fast
nearing when many more than
fourjper cent of the workmen will be
minus a job, and therefore a ohange
of policy will be absolutely [neces
sary: the seoond iB that spirit of
imperialism whioh has ever dominated the Briton. Not for long
oan the average Islander be
committed to a polioy of parsi
mony or of parochial affairs. By
sacrifice the Briton has overrun the
earth, and by sacrifice alone will
he hold what he has today. It iB
merely a question of time.   If the
L iberals are eo foolish as to say, le
us have free trade, even if the Em
pire perish, then that day is their
doom sealed. Free trade is well,
b ut fair trade is better. If free
trade destroys the British manufactures, and that whioh goes not
forward goes backward, then it is
no matter as to the cheapness of
the loaf, there will be no money to
p urchase it. Chamberlain's opponents so far have confined themselves to criticism. To win and
retain their hold they must formulate a polioy as broadly imperial as
that oi Chamberlain himself or be
discredited in Britain. And what
oan be that policy?
Issued   to  the   Electorate of British
Columbia
NOTE AND COMMENT
Kootenay's politics today are
neither Liberal nor Conservative, but are essentially Kootenay. We want trails to develop the country, railways to open
it up, mining laws to insure equitable conditions to the worker and
to oapital,legislation that will quiet
the turmoil oi the past low years,
lessened taxation to permit us to
recuperate, and economy to con
serve   our   wasted revenues.
The following manifesto has been
issued to the electors by the executive of the British Columbia
Liberal Association:
At a Liberal convention held at the
city of Vancouver on the 6th and 7th
of February, u 02, the following platform was adopted:
1. The immediate redistribution of
the constituencies of the province on the
basis of population, but allowing a smaller unit of population per seat for the out
lying districts.
2. Government ownership, Dominion,
provincial and municipal, of public services of utilities is sound and should be
carried out in British Columbia.
3. Should it be advisable at any time
t■> grant aid to a railway company such
shall be in cash and not in land and no
bonus of any kind shall be given without definite and effective means being
taken to safeguard the interests of the
province in the management of the road,
control of the freight and passenger
rates, and provision made against such
railway having any liability against it
except for actual cost.
4. Immediate construction of the
Coast-Kootenay railway; the Cariboo
railway, the extension of the Island railway; a railway from Alberni to a point
on the east coast of the Island; a road In
the northern part of the province from
the coast to the eastern boundary with
an extension to the northern boundary;
the railway from Vernon to Midway by
north fork of Kettle river; with necessary
branch lines, ferries and connections.
;. The enforcement of the act now in
force compelling the scaling of logs by
government scalers.
6. That s'ich legislation should be
enacted as will result in making the
lands included in the various dyking
aieas avai able for cultivation as quickly
as possible and secure prompt payments
of assessments when due.
7. That the government should keep
in touch with the conditions in connection with mining, protecting said industry against combines and trusts and if
necessary for the purpose build and
operate smelters and refineries. No
radical change should be made in the
mining laws without full notice to all
parties interested, giving full opportunity
for d scussion and criticism.
8. As the province caa only advance
hy the settlement within its borders of
thrifty and prosperous citizens, and as
Orientals never become cit'zens in - any
proper sense of the word, we declare it
to be the dutv of the government to discourage Oriertal immigration and employment by every means within its
power, and » e appeal to our fellow Liberals thronghout the Dominion to aid us
in our efforts to protect ourselves against
the ruinous competition of men having a
standard of decency and comfort immensely below that of civilized peoples,
and who shirk every duty and obligation
of citizenship which the law will allow
them to escape.
9. The government ought to prevent
the waste and suffering caused by strikes
and lockouts, and an earnest effort ought
to be made to provide some means of
preventing such strikes and lockouts,
and we approve the adoption of compulsory arbitration.
10. The fiscal system of the province
stands in need of revision. Taxation
should bear upon privilege rather than
upon industry, and no addition should be
made to the debt of the province except
for public works properly ehargeable to
capital.
11. The retaining of the resources of
the province as an asset for the benefit
of the people and taking effective measures to prevent the alienation of the pub
lie domain except for actual bo a fide
business or industrial purposes, putting
an end to the practice of speculating in
connection with the same.
12. The construction and maintenance of roads throughout the province
to aid in the development of the mining
and agricultural districts.
Public Meeting.
A publio meeting is called for
this evening in the Miners Union
Hall to whioh the Conservative
oandidate has been invited to speak,
being allowed one hour for that
purpose.
The fii st plank of the above platform
refers to a subject which, though not a
live issue now, was so when the platform
was adopted. In this matter the rights
of the people have been substantially
secured by the efforts of a handful of
Liberal members who, holding the balance of power during the session of 1902,
compelled an unwilling administration
to pass the present Redistribution Act.
The executive of the British Columbia
Liberal Association desire to call your
attention to the following:
The province is on the eve of a general
election, and for the first time in its history the contest is to be conducted upon
patty lines.
fitbHerto contests in the province have
been carried on between aggregations
bound together rather by interest than
by principle, by private arrangement
rather than by public considerations. In
the past the dominant influences in the
several governments of the province
have been Conservative. The Prior
Dunsmuir, Turner and previous governments have been almost entirely composed of Conservatives, supported in the!
house by Conservatives. The present
government,  of which  the Honorable
Richard McBride is premier, is the
natural successor in tradition and policy
that mischievous series of personal
governments which has made this prov-
ince.although the richest of any in natur
al res-urces, the least prosperous in the
Dominion. With our vast mineral and
other resources the progress of our development has been slow and entirely
unsatisfactory. Unwise legislation, principally in the interest of speculation, not
of industry, is responsible to a very large
extent for this condition of affairs. The
public assets, publio franchises end
monopolies, have been given away to
favorite persons and corporations, instead of being utilized for the benefit of
the people at large, and this has been
going on for so long a time that the
province now finds itself compelled to
exact from industry that revenue which,
had our affairs been wisely conducted,
could easily have been obtained from
our squandered heritage.
The last Conservative government,
owing to its maladministration of ibe
public affairs of the province, was
through the efforts principally of a smal'
band of Liberals, dismissed from office
and accident and the introduction of
party lines has placed another Con
servative government in power, and has
placed at the head of that government a
man who was not only an ardent supporter of past Conservative administrations, but was himself a member of one
of them, and shared fully in the responsibility of an attempt on the part of
that government to give away to a rail
way corporation, in direct defiance of the
instructions of the legislature as expressed by statute, two large blocks of
enormously valuable coal and oil lands
in Kootenay.
It is the aim of the Liberal party to
place in the field at the coming election
men pledged to remedy the evils from
which we have so long suffered.
Among the matters requiring immediate attention are the following:
CIVIL SERVICE REFORM,
(a) By taking care that the staff of
officials shall not be maintained beyond
the actual requirements of the service
(b) by making good conduct and efficiency the conditions of tenure of office; (c)
fitness, not favoritism, to govern ap
pointments.
FISCAL REFORM,
(a) By keeping expenditure within
revenue, borrowing money if at all only
for works properly chargeable to capital
(b) wise and provident administration of
tbe natural riches of the province, so as
to bring into the treasury that revenue
which should bed rived from our great
and varied resourceF; we declare oti
convfetion that the proper tixi-s, rents
and royalties can and ought to be.levied
and collected in such a way as to encourage industry, and at the same time
provide sufficient revenue and enable
the government to repeal in whole or in
part certain taxes which now hamper
industry, arrest development and create
dissatisfaction among the people, (c)
In this connection the taxation of mines
will receive that consideration which the
importance of the mining industry to the
province demands. It is not claimed by
those engaged in mining that their property should be exempt from taxation
but they do claim that the present system of levying taxes is unfair, and tends
to discourage the investment .of capital
and the employment of labor in mining
enterprise, thus not only retarding the
development of our mineral resources
but also impeding the prosperity of the
mining community, and preventing the
enlargement of sources of revenue to the
province itself. The present system imposes a tax on wages as well as on profits, and should be readjusted so as to
bear upon profit only,
REFORM IN LAND ADMINISTRATION,
(a) We denounce absolutely the Conservative policy of land grants by way
of bonus to railways, and also tbe reservation of large tracts of land which has
has obtained in the past,
(b) We declare it to be our policy to
bold the public lands in trust for the
promotion of settlement and encouragement of industry. In the case of agricultural lands we favor free homesteads
under conditions which shall effectually
secure the land to actual settlers.
(c) Full and exact information as to
all public lands fit for settlement should
be obtained by the government, and
made available at every government office for the information of the public.
THE FARMING INDUSTRY
(a) Recognizing the importance of
agriculture in the province, we are in favor of placir g the agricultural department of the government on a thoroughly
practical and efficient basis.
(b) Tbe bad management and inefficiency of the government have imposed
upon the owners of the dyked lands a
much heavier burden than they should
have been called upon to bear. We
would enact legislation making the lands
included in the various dyking areas
available for cultivation as quickly as
possible. This whole question calls for
prompt attention and settlement upon a
basis which shall be at once just to the
owners of these lands and fair to the tax-
pave re of the province as a whole.
(c) In the interest of agriculture in
what is commonly known as the dry
belt, the question of the proper utilization of the water supply for irrigation
purposes demands and most receive
prompt attention from  the government
***eeee*eeeeeeaeaaaaae«ataaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaeeaaai
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
—FRE8H—
Eastern and Olympia
Oysters,
Fresh Kippers
and Bloaters..
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
All Kinds of FRUITS for
Canning and Table
Use.
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
.PAIiAOEl
RALPH HARRON, PROP.
»mMmnm
Rossland's
Leadinq
Hotel..
I THE J
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I Finest Grill in Kootenays
^ IN CONNECTION.
* 	
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ttttttttdMH
Sample Room
For Commercial Men.
FIRST CLASS
Bowling Alley
AND
BILLIARD ROOM ]
Continued en fifth page. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND B. C, SEPT 26, 1903.
MINOR MENTION
J. S. Clute is baok from the coast.
Tbe city counoil did nothing on
Tuesday "night.
The Rebekahs propose giving a
danoe on Hallowe'en,
Frank Armstrong is rapidly recovering.
The Burnt Basin wagon road is
being pushed.
There was a alight frost last
night.
The Miner has bad more light on
the political situation.
Flop, floppier, floppiest—the
Miner out Herods Herod.
The trip of the baseball team to
Colville has been abandoned.
The story about MeBBra. Boultbee and Clute is deoidedly racy.
Direotor Allan MacLean of the
Velvet has left for London.
Premier McBride is expeoted in
camp next Wednesday.
Specimens of Rossland ore are
wanted for the Spokane fall fair.
The Rossland Tennis Club are
arranging for their annual danoe.
Somebody has aotually.been getting rid of those oarnival arches.
Th) new master mechanic at the
Le Roi is Goorge  Fraser of Green
wood.
J. J. Gibbons is expeoted here
with the  Manufacturers' Assooia
tion next Saturday.
Says   a     digruntled    politician
"The weather is like the elections-
d— chilly."
The latest is that John Clute
will succeed John Boultbee as Police Magistrate.
Mrs. James Fasken has gone to
Seattle for a month's visit with
friends.
A. G. Creelman has secured a
large railway oontraot for the
C. P. R. near Regina.
A son was born on Thursday to
Mr. and Mrs. Carrithers of the
Great Northern railway.
Mr.  and  Mrs.   M.  Cone have
finally left for New York,going out
of business here.
The glove fight between Mullin
and MoLaughlin ended in a short
victory for the former.
Colonel Jack Egan, well! known
and popular in Rossland, has rejoined the Miner staff.
Ed Clarke, an old time Rossland
newspaper man, was in oamp during the week.
The Deborah Rebekah lodge initiated five candidates on Wednesday last.
An excursion of Masons and
their friends will probably go to
Colville on Tuesday next.
War Eagle voters (?) had better
ohange their committee rooms else
they may get into trouble.
Might form some interesting
reading were the Miner to look up
some of its summer editorials.
Ed Watson, formerly of the
Strand, is lying dangerously ill in
Providenoe hospital, Seattle.
O. Becker, travelling freight
agent of the C. P. R. haa been paying Rossland a flying visit.
C. W. Shoaberg has been sentenced to one month's imprisonment for
attempting to defraud the Hotel
Allan.
The Miner's foreoast as to the result of the provincial elections is
evidently inspired by its independence.
An ore train with War Eagle
Centre Star ore was ditohed at
Smelter Junotion lat.t Thursday.
Lord Lyveden regrets that he is
unable to accept the invitation to
visit Rossland with his party of
parliamentarians.
A party of Great Northern
officials paid a flying visit to Rose-
land last Saturday. Perhaps that
swamp will now be drained.
The Liberals declare that they
captured the Trail people at the
joint meeting held there on Wednesday night.
George TJrquhart or William
Martin, shot a yearling bear near
the Crown Point on Wednesday
last.
R. L. Brooks, an employe of the
Le Roi   mine,  left  yesterday for
Seattle where he will spend his
vacation.
The finale in the Mixed Doubles
at the Tennis Tournament will be
played thiB afternoon, weather permitting.
A commission presided over by
W. J. Nelson is in session today
taking evidence against Whitaker
Wright.
The Ladies of the Maccabees initiated two candidates on Thursday
night, after whioh a banquet was
given to members only.
If R. McBride will insist on handing out polioe magistracies without
consulting the War Eagle organ
he must expect Hades.
The ladies of the Rossland Hive
of the Maccabees have received a
silk banner for baviug tbe largest
membership in their jurisdiction.
J. F. Smith of Toronto is in tbe
oity looking after the interests of
his client, Direotor Hoare of the
London & Globe oompany.
The first clean up of the I. X. L
ore at the 0. K. etamp mill yielded
MessrB. Craven and Pringle 120
ounces of gold for a 13 day run.
R. W. Hinton has severed his
connection with the Le Roi and will
devote his time to the Elmore concentrator and to the Le Roi No. 2
mine.
Paul Wiallard, French immigration agent, is in the city looking
over the capabilities of this province
to support French Canadian settlers.
The first of the dances at the
Miners' Union Hall given by
Messrs. McKinnon and Sohorlem-
mer on Tuesday night proved a
success.
Rossland's' drill hall will be
started this fall. Liberal representations have had their influence,
and the hall will be enlarged over
its original plans.
Mrs. J. M. Fitz-Patrick is trying
to get up a children's opera. A
meeting of all ohildren iB being
held this afternoon in the opera
house in connection.
Spokane Industrial   Fair Oct. 5 to 13
For the above occasion the Spokane Falls & Northern   Railway
will sell round trip tickets to Spokane  at   one  and   one fifth, viz:'
$6:16. Selling dates Ootober 4th to
12th inclusive.   Final limit October 11th.   Children half fare.
H, P. Brown, Agent,
Rossland, B. C.
H. A. Jackson, G. P. A.,
Spokane, Wash.
MARKET
REPORTS
Retail Prices in Rossland
■   Stores.
GROCERIES AND MINE SUPPLIES
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
Churches desiri ng sptcial mention o
their services must present the notices
for publication on or before Friday
morning.
Salvation Army.—7 a.m., Knee
Drill; 11 a.m., junior meeting; 3
p.m., Free and Easy; 8 p.m., Salvation meeting.
Church of the Sacred Heart.—
Rev. M. W. McKinnon ju charge.
First mass 8:30 a.m.; Second mass
10:30a.m.; Sunday School,2:30 p.m.
followed by Benediction of the
Blessed Sacrament.
St. George's Church—Rev. J. A.
Cleland, rector Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity. 8 a. m.,
Holy Communion; 11 a.m. Matins
2:30 p.m., Sunday School;
3:30 p.m., Holy Baptism; 7:30
p.m., Evensong.
Baptist Church—Rev. M. Van
Siokle, pastor. Services at 11 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Sunday school and
bible class, 12:15 p. m.
Methodist Church.—Rev. R. F.
Stillman, B.A., pastor. Services 11
a.m., and 7:30 p.m. Class meeting
at 10:15 a. m. Sunday sohool
and Bible class at 2:30 p.m.
Monday 8 p. m. Epworlh. League.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer meeting.
Morning subject "Sysiemitic
Glory," Evening subject "The Marriage Feast,,'
St. Andrew's Church,(Presbyterian.)—Corner First aVenue and
Queen street. Public worship at
11 a.m., and 7:30 p.m. Sunday
school and Pastor's Bible claBB,
2:30 p.m.
Continued from fourth page.
ROADS.
The present lack of system of constructing and maintaining roads and
'.rails is productive of a serious waste of
public money, and in this connection
more can be done to open up new districts where roads are needed, and at
less cost than what has been done in the
past, under the wasteful and corrupt system which has been so long in vogue.
PUBLIC HEALTH,
The Health Act should be amended so
as to meet the growing requirements of
unincorporated districts in respect of
sanitation and isolation, as to which no
adequate provision is now found upon
the statutes.
PROVINCIAL RIGHTS.
Regardless of all question of party
affiliation, the rights of tbe province under the constitution should be jealously
guarded. While, from the point of view
of Dominion politics, we heartily support the government now in power at
Ottawa, we shall at the same time insist
moBt firmly upon the protection of ot
people by the exclusion of Oriental labor, and we shall also insist upon the
right of the province to make such provisions as it may see fit in all contracts,
grants and leases under provincial control. We shall also strenuously press
upon the Dominion government a read-
usti.ient of our financial relations, and
we claim the full enjoyment of all rights
given us by the letter and spirit of the
constitution.
In conclusion, we appeal to all patriotic voters in British Columbia to seize
the opportunity now presented to them
to rid the province of that Incubus which
haa been so disastrous to its progress,
and to secure sane, progressive and
■table goyernment by placing the Liberals in power at Victoria.
STUART  HENDERSON, Pres.
T. S. BAXTER, Sec.
Vancouver, September 4,1903.
Two prizes will be given at the Alhambra Bowling alley every two weeks for
the largest score made,
Corrected Up to Date by the Lead'
ing Merchants of the
Camp,
For tho balanoe of the season we offer our large stook of Women's
Oxford Ties at greatly reduced prices.   NOTE THE FALL:
THE STRAND is a good pi
spend yonr spare time. Good
Green & Comerford, Proprietors.
lace, to
music
Certificate of Improvement.
NOTICE.
The Gordon and Texas Fraction
Mineral Claims, situate iu the Trail
Creek Mining Division of West Kootenay District.
Where located: North slope of Red
mountain.
Take notice that I, Kenneth L, Burnet, Prov. Land Surveyor of Rossland,
agent for F. R. Blochbe'-ger, free miner's certificate No. B57404, Andrew Suth-
erland.free miner's certificate N0.B73315
and Ner Smith, free miner's certificate
No. B75408, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
a Crown Grant of the above claim,
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, most be. commenced
before the issuance of such Certiticate of
Improvement,
Dated this 21st dayof August ,A,D. 1003
KENNETH L. BURNET
LATEST NOVELS,
SHEET MUSIC,
FRESH BLUEPRINT
PAPER,
TALLY CARDS FOR SOO
AT
M.  W. Simpson's
Harry Mcintosh
DIRECT IMPORTER OF
'PERFECTION'
SCOTCH
Vintage of 1878
Guaranteed Absolutely Pure
Bass' Burton Ale on Tap
—at—
SSHoffman House
MINING   SUPPLIES.
Axes, per doz 17.50-10.00
Candles, per caBe $5.50-6 60
Cape, Bennett, per box 75o
Coal, blacksmith per ton $22.50
Dynamite, 60 per ct, per lb 19^c
Dynamite, 50 per ct, per lb I80
Dynamite, 40 per ct, per lb 16 Jc
Fuse, Bennett per 100 ft 75o
Hammers, per lb 15c
Iron, per lb 3i-5o
NailB, base, per keg $4
Shovels, per doz $7.50-10
Steel, Canton per lb 8}c
MEAT AND POULTRY.
Bacon, per lb 18-20c
Beef, per lb (side) 9 lOo  -
Chickens, each 50-90c
Fish, per lb 12f 16o
Ham, per lb 18-20o
Mutton per lb (side) 13-15o
Turkey, per lb 23c
Veal, per lb (side) 18o
PROVISIONS
Almonds, per lb 25o
AppleB, per 501b box $1.26-9150
Bananas, per dcz 40c
Beans, per lb 6c
Blackberries, per box 15o
Butter, per lb 25-35o
Cheese, per lb 20c
Chocolate, per lb 40-50o
Cocoa, per lb 40c $1 00
Coffee, per lb 25 50o
Condensed Milk per can 15c
Dried Peas, per lb 8c
Eggs, per doz 30-40
Flour, per 501b $1 50-1.65
Grapes, per lb 15o
Honey, per lb 25c
Jams and Jellies per lb 12-13c
Lard, per lb 17^o
Onions, per lb 5c
Oranges, per doz 40-50o
Peaches, per 201b box $1.25
Pears, per 401b box $1.60
Pickles, per qt 20c-25o
Plums, per 201b box 50o      1
Potatoes, per 1001b Back $1.00
Rioe, per lb 8c
Rolled Oats per lb 5o
Sugar, per lb 64c i
Vinegar, per gal 50c-75o
Walnuts, per lb 25c
Watermelons, each 50-60c
FEED
Bran, per ton $27
Hay, per ton $27
Oats, per ton $32
Shorts, per ton $30
MISCELLANEOUS
Coal, per ton, Qalt, $8.50
Keroaine, per gal 50c
Soap, per bar 5c
Wood, per cord $4.50$5.50
Fine Pat. Colt Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Pat. Kid Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Pat. Calf Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Dongola Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Vici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
Fine Yici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
Pine Vici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
$4.00 now $3.20
4.50 now 3.50
4.00 now 2.00
3.00 now 2.00
3.00 now 2.40
2.50 now 1.75
2.00 now   1.60
Do not miss this ohanoe to get nice Summer Footwear at low prices
w.f. mcneill
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR.
Vegetable Hair Renewer
Just what you need if your bair ia faded or turning grey, for it always restores tbe oolor. It keeps
tbe scalp olean and healthy and makes the hair
smooth and loft. The hair grows long and heavy
and does not split at the ends.
PRICE 75C. AT
Morrow's Drug Store
TENNIS    TOURNAMENT
State of the Games in the Principal Series Now Being
Played Off.
Men's Open Singles.
Rose	
Lewer  Rose.
Phipps...
Anderson.
Phipps.
Phipps
Grant ., .
Ouimette Ouimette.
Phipps.
Davis.
Dewdney.
LABOR UNIOPIREGTORY
Officers and Meetings.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. 96, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. Thos. Roynon,
Pres., Frank Philips, Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Un
ion hall. Robert Elliott,
Pres., W. B. Mclsaac, Sec.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. F. M., meets every
Saturday evening in Union hall.
H. R. Parsons, Pres., Geo. F.
Dougherty, Sec.-TreaB,
Pompeian Massage Cream
-,.J,U~-,„
Removes, BlacklieadB, Freckles
and Pimpples and brings color the  Cheeks.    For Sale at
Royal BarberShoo
SUPPLY HOUSE.
W. J. PREST, PROP
Hamilton..,
Davis	
Macdonald.
Dewdney
Buckingham      ,,   ,.   .
Eden Buckingham..
McNeill    _
Morkill McNeill	
Davis.
Buckingham .
Buckingham.
Buckingham,
Claudet.... Bye
Eden & Ouimette....
Bye
McNeill
Men'sTOpen Doubles.
Davis & Rose.
D.AR.
Bye
Falding & Dempster.
Bye
Richardson & Fraser. _   .
Grant & Morkill R. & F..
Dewdney & Phipps ,,
Macdonald & Claudet »■ & P.
Viets & Kamm.
D. & R.
R.&F.
D.4P.
Lewer & McNeill
Bye
Bye
Buckingh'm-Carmc'l.
Bye
D. & P.
D. 4 P..
B. &C.
Mixed Open Doubles.
Miss Fraser * Richardson ,
Miss Falding & Dewdney .. F- & D.
Mrs. Richds'n & Bucking'm
Miss Boultbee & Fraser.... %■■ & B.
Miss Homer & Ouimette .
Miss Shrapnel & Phipps .
Mrs. Scott & Coulthard .
F.&D.
S.&P.
S. it P.
Bye
Ladles' Hsndlcsp Singles
Mrs. Hunter 1-6 15..
Bye
Miss Fraser 1-2 30...
•
Mrs Hunter ...
Bye
Mrs. Richardson -15,,
Bye
Miss Shrapnel 1-6 15 M1U
Mrs. Mackenzie 30 ..
Shrapnel
Miss Shrapnel
Mrs. Scott
Bye
Miss Boultbee .
Miss Boultbee 1-6 15.
Bye
Bye
Miss Falding-i; —
Mrs. Scott.
Bye THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND. B. C, SEPT, 26   1003
OUTSIDE POINTS OF VIEW
What the Outside Newspapers are Saying.
TRADE   GUILDS    RETURHINQ.
Chicago enterprise has almost
reproduced the mediaeval trade
guilds by a combination of employers and employes, says the Toronto
Globe. Capital and labor, the abstract entities supposed to be at
war, have united, and the publio
are made to bear the joint pressure.
The coal teamsters were pioneers
in the new unionism. They fought
their employers lor about five
years over wages, hours, and conditions. The latter formed a ooal
team owners' association, and
where the two grew tired fighting
they entered into an agreement by
which each crowded out non-unionists. The result was peace, good
wages for teamsters, good profits
for team owners, and heavier
charges on the coal consumers.
l'RIVATE OWNERSHIP.
Public ownership never makes a
mistake that is not over advertised,
Hays the Toronto Telegram. But
how about the mistakes of private
ownership? Take the Consolidated
Lake Superior for example. The
newB comes from Philadelphia that
shareholders are to be forced out
unless they pay $8 for every share
of $100 par value whioh stands in
their names. Private ownership
has left this company without available resources other than its ability
to induoe shareholders to redeem
their own shares on the basis'of $8
cash for every $100 par value. It
. is to be hoped thaf the Consolidated Lake Superior will outlive all
troubles, but the moral oi ita misfortune is that private ownership
has its disasters no less serious to
shareholders than the mistakes of
public ownership are to taxpayers.
A   UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE.
"Volapuk," says the Boston Hei-
ald, the fantastic oreation of faddists who fancied they had invented the universal language, seems
likely to have no good excuse for
existing bye and bye, since English
is moving in the direction of the
prophecy that our mother tongue
will some time be spoken the world
over. Within 100 years French
has deolined from the first to fourth
plaoe among influential languages,
although the use of it has increased
64.5 per cent. Spanish has increased 61.5; German and Russian have
advanced 150 per cent, while English, which now stands at the
head, has increased by 550 per
cent. English is taught in all German schools and the Japanese
make it a part of their regular curriculum. Bye and bye not to know
English will be to confess one's
self not a "citizen of the world."
zinc Producers
Zinc producers in the Kooienay
district of British Columbia are
likely to encounter trouble in securing a market which will provide any great returns for their
zino product. Shippers of zinc
from this distriot will be compelled
to oome into contact with the zino
product of Loadville, whioh has
a marked advantage in freight
rates and which will naturally be
given the preference over the British Columbia ores on that account,
all other considerations being
equal. The present freight rate
on zinc from British Columbia is
itself almost prohibitive being $11,
against $3.50 per ton   from   Letul-
ville, to the Kansas gas belt smelters. Until some marked concessions can be secured from the
railroadB of British Columbia the
competition of the Colorado ores
is to prove a very formidable
factor in a competitive market.
The sooner that the zinc produce
of the Kootenays realize this fact
aud take steps to secure the needed
concessions, which will be of advantage to the railroads through
the increased tonnage that suoh
concessions would insure, the sooner they will be able to increase
their shipments. Zinc can be and
is economically produoed in that
district but will hive little market value until existing conditions
are improved.—St. Louis Lead and
Zinc News.
COPPER    PRODUCTION
United  States Geological
Survey's Statistics
Summarized
In his report to the United
States Geological Survey on the
production of copper in 1902, Mr.
Charles Kirohhoff says that the
oopper mining industry of tbe
United States suffered during 1902
from the reaction whioh followed
the unsuccessful   attempt   daring
1901 to maintain the value of the
metal at an artificial level. The
collapse which came toward the
close of 1901 left many producers
committed to sales covering a long
period, at low prioes, with the
menace of heavy accumulations of
metal constantly over the market.
Yet production was heavier during
1902 than it had baeu in 1901, because some of the important mines
were worked to fu 1 capacity and
because some of the enlargements
and improvements previously begun became effective during the
year. Furthermore, a number or
new enterprises first' produoed important quantities of metal. On
the other hand, accidents and labor troubles out down the outputs
of some (of the larger undertakings.
Unless unforeseen events cause
widespread or prolonged stoppage
of operations at the mines, Mr.
Kirchhoff thinks that the production of oopper in the United StateB
will be considerably larger in 1903
than it has ever been. The Lake
Superior districts will yield considerably more copper; Arizona is
expected to return a considerably
product; Utah may reaoh a total
of 35,000,000 pounds; and Wyoming, Nevada. Colorado, New Mexico and the Southern States will re
port an increase.
The consumption of oopper in
the United StateB was enormous in
1902. It was larger also in industrial countries.
As compared with 268,782 long
tons in 1901, the total production of copper in the United StateB
in 1902 waB 294,423 long tonB, of
which the Lake Superior diatrict
produced 76,165, or 25.9 per cent;
Montana, 128,975 long tons or 43.8
per cent; and Arizona, 53,547 long
tons, or 18.2 percent. This is an
inore ase in the total production of
25,641 long tons, or nearly 10 per
oent aa compared wieh 1901.
Utah, is  forging to the front as
SIMILKAMEEN CITY, B. C
Now lis the Time to Buy Lots
in Similkameen City, B. (2.
CAMP HEDLEY is the most talked of camp in the province, and Bituated in the centre is Similkameen City, surrounded by
rich mines whioh will shortly have large payrolls. Over 200 lots have been sold to business people who realize that Similkameen will become the metropolis of this distriot. The Nickel Plate mines have expended $300,000 in development and are at
present building tramways and a 40-stamp mill. Arrangements are being made for the erection of a large smelter at Similkameen City which will oost about a million dollars. Besides the Nickel Plate group of claims being developed by one of the richest
mining companies in North America, there are several other groups and properties which will shortly be developed, among them
being the Kingston Mines, Rollo, Wellington, Winnipeg, Red Chief and Pollock. Situated as it is in the beautiful Similkameen
valley, midway between Princeton and Keremeos, and protected from all opposition in tne valley by adjoining a large Indian
reservation, this townsite will become one of the principal mining camps of the Pacific Northwest. It was only a short time ago
that lots in Rossland, Nelson, Greenwood and other mining centres were selling for the same prioe that they are today being sold
for in Similkameen,   Come in before the boom and double your money.
Similkameen City to Have Two Railways.
The Victoria, Vancouver & Eastern and the Canadian Paoifio railways are starting immediate oonstruotion for the Similkameen,
which will make this town a railroad centre and divisional poiut, aud when these competing lines are completed through to the
Pacific coast tbey will beoome the main through lines, being the shortest route from the interior to the coast. A large sawmill la
running steadily on the west addition, the only available timber for miles around. The main street iB 90 feet wide, being all
cleared and ready for building purposes. All railways, roads, telegraph and telephone lines will have to come through this
townsite, which is located in the oentre of the whole Similkameen valley and will become the largest distributing point and
mining oentre in British Columbia.
Similkameen City Lots Will Make You Rich.
A large agricultural area to draw from.   Pure water, fine climate, rich mines, big payrolls.
Lots for Sale $2 lo $ 10 Per From Foot.    Aeenlsin m Townsrum. c,
For further particulars apply to
FRANK BAILEY & CO., Greenwood and Similkameen
J.[H. YATES, Empire State; jBuilding, Spokane.
JAMES H. FLETCHER, 120 Columbia Ave., ROSSLAND
one of the most important oopper
state?, and it is notably in the
oamp that development has been
most rapid.
Only small quantities of copper
ora have have been shipped from
Alaska to Puget Sound smelters,
but it is known that large deposits
•f copper ore exiBt, whose development is being taken seriously in
hand.
The imports of copper ore in
1902 were valued at $7,921,641, as
oompared with $14,394,663 in 1901,
and the imports of copper in bars,
ingots, pig, and in manufactured
forms were valued at $12,864,021,
as compared with $11,820,459 in
1901. The exports of domestic
oopper in different formB were
valued at $46,811,729 in 1902, as
oompared with $36,071,448 in 1901.
The exports from Baltimore, Md.,
increased from 54,377,355 pounds
in 1901 to 103,607,256 pounds in
1902; and from New York the increase was from 133,540.150 pounds
in 1901 to 236,625,515 pounds in
1902.
In the aggregate the reporting
mines had a stock of 155,665,652
pounds of oopper on January 1,
1903, as oompared with 282,014,297
pounds on January 1,1902, a de-
oline of over 120,000,000 pounds
during 1902.
The estimated consumption in
1902 was 551,088,191 pounds as
compared with 382,761,014 pounds
in 1901, and with 350,891,121
poundB in 1900. The average Bbll-
iug price of Lake copper during
1902 was 11.86 cents per pound.
Publishers' Association
THE
SATURDAY WORLD
$2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO
Mining and Social Matters
Special Columns
Will be  Literature, Current Topic?, Canadian.
Imperial and Foreign Affairs.
A Serial Story Will Run
ALL THE LATEST NEWS
OF THE DAY.
Eight Pages!    Eight Pages!
GOOD SUNDAY READING.
The four daily Vanoouver papers
have formed themselves into a publishers' association for mutual protection and advantage.
THE
SATURDAY WORLD THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND. B. C, SEPT, 26   1903
Le Roi Feed
and Sale Stables
John F. Linburg, Prop.
Best Turnouts in the City.
Saddle horses for fishing'and hunting parties a specialty.
Telephone 39. Rossland, B C
T ieKETS
TO ALL  POINTS
EAST and WEST
VIA
SjoKane Falls & Norffieni B'y
Nelson Si Fort Sheppard Railway
Red Mountain Railway
Washington & Great Northern R'y
Vancouver,Victoria dt Eastern R'y Si
Nav. Co.
SHORT LINE
TO
St. Paul,Duluth,Minneapolis,Chicago
and all points east
Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria,"" Portland
andall Pacific Coast]points
Through Palace and Tourist Sleepers
Dining & Buffet Smoking Library Oars
2-FastTrains Through Daily-2
For rates, folders and full information
regarding trips, call on or address any
agent S.F. & S. Railway.
H.BRANDT, C PAT A,
701 W Riverside, Spokane
A B„C DENNISTON, G W P A,
Seattle, Wash.
H. P. BROWN, Rossland Agent
The only all rail between points east
west and south to Rossland, Nelson,
Grand Forks and Republic. Connects
at Spokane with the Great Northern,
Northern Pacific and 0. R. & N. Co.
for points east, west and south; connects
at Rossland and Nelson with the Canadian Pacific R'y.
Connects at Nelson with K. R. & N.
Co. for Kaslo and K' & S. points.
Connects at Curlsw with stage for
Greenwood and Midway, B. C.
Buffet cars run between Spokane and
Northport.
Effective June 14, 1903
NORTHBOUND.
Leave Spokane 8:45 a.m.
Arrive Rossland 4:35 P-m.
Arrive Nelson 7:20 p.m.
Arrive Grand Forks....   4:00 p.m.
Arrive Republic 6:15 p.m
SOUTHBOUND,
Leave Republic 8130 a.m.
Leave Grand Forks 10:35 a-m
Leave Nelson 7:20 a. m
Leave  Rossland io:4o a.m
Arrive Spokane 6:15 p.m
PHRA
::The Phoenician.
EDWIN
LESTER
ARNOLD
For further information regarding
reservation of berths or price of tickets,
apply to any agent of the above companies, or to
H. A. JACKSON,
Oeneral Pimuiit At t
Spnkana. Wash
H. P. BFCVN,
SOCIETY   CARDS.
FA Tf FRATERNAI, ORDKR OP
• \J. Hi. KAGIKS, Roasland Aerie,
No, 10, Regnlar.meetlngs ereiy Monday eyen-
Inn, 8 p. m, Kaglea „Hall, Carpenter*' Union
Bid's.
k
. Levy, W   ».
'  Daniel W. See «t«rT.
IA A U Meets In Odd Fellows Ha.i
.\J.\J.I: . C3 Queen Street, between
First anil Second rrennes. Regular meetings
each Monday night Viaitlng brothera are cordially Invited to attend and register within |S
days.
W. S.Murphy, Sec.      Jos. Goldswotthy, N.G.
Have you yCE
 If SO US6-
. .on your
POULTR Y ?
Rex Lice Killer
ii)
-For sale by	
The Brackman-Ker
MillingCompany |
ALL KINDS   OF   DRY
W©©D
W. F. LINGLB
Office opposite Great
Northern  ticket offia*
next to Bed Strr
K DR. BRUHN'S   H
OINTMENT
Is pharmaceutically, medicinally .scientifically the
most valuable composition of the century and
marks a new era in tbe preparation of curatives
for the external treatment of humors of the skin,
scalp and blood, including loes of hair, as well as
for sores, cuts, ulcers, wounds, scalds, burns, inflammations, itching piles, eczema, pimples,
chapped bands, chafings, irritations and pain,
soreness and stiffness of the muscles and joints,
and for many other uses whioh readily suggest
themselves. This preparation has been in use for
a quarter of a oentury. Testimonials from thousands testify aB to its ourative qualities.
Directions for use—Ap
ply freely night and morn'
ing, or often as required.
H
MANUFACTURED BY
M Dr. Bruin. Medical 6o. M
rj NEW YORK O
00  Sole agent for Rossland, t.   R. MORROW, The DrUgglSt   Kj
SYNOPSIS.
Phra, who dies and lives again, in
Britain, begins to recount his early adventures—He buys a British slave girl
and sails on a trading voyage to Cornwall and marries a British princess.
CHAPTER II (oontinued)
I yielded, and the long black
winter was worn through among
the British, until, when the yellow
light came back again, I had mar
ried Blodwen before all the tribe
and was rioh by her constant favor,
nor, need it be said, more loth than
ever to leave her. In truth she
was a good Princess, but very variable. Blodwen the ohieftainess
urging her clansmen to a tribal
fight, red hot with the strong drink
of war, or reeking with the fumes
and oruel and bloody sacrifice to
Baal, was one thing; and, on the
other hand, Blodwen tending with
the rude skill of the day her kinsmen's wounds, Blodwen the daughter weeping gracious, silent tears in
the hall of her fathers as the minstrels ohanted their praises, or
bumming a ditty to the listening
blue eyed little one upon her knee
—his cheek to hers—was all another sight; and I loved her better
than I have ever loved any of those
other women who have loved me
since then.
But sterner things were coming
my erratio way. The proud Eagle,
having in these years long tyrannized over fertile Gaul, must needs
swoop down on our brothers along
that rooky ooast of Armorica that
faces our white shore, carrying
death and destruction among our
kinsmen as the peregrines in the
cliffs harry the frightened sea-
mews.
Forthwith the narrow waterB
were black with our hide sailed
boats rushing to succor. But it
was useless. Who could stand
against the Roman? Our men
came back presently—few, wounded, and crestfallen, with long tales
of the foeman's deadly might
by sea and shore.
Then, a little later on, we had to
fight for ourselves,', though scantly
we had expected it. Early one
autumn a friendly Veneti oame
over from Gaul and warned the
Southern Princes the stern Roman
Consul Caesar was collecting boats
and men to invade us. At once on
this news we were all torn by diverse counsels and jealousies, and
Blodwen hung in my aims for a
tearful space, and then sent me
eastward with a few men—all she
could spare from watchiog her
own dangerous neighbors—to oppose the Roman landing; while the
priest Dhuwallon, though exempt
by his order from military service,
followed sullen behind my warlike
clansmen.
We joined other bodies of British
until, by the beginning of the harvest month, we had enoamped
along the Kentish downs in very
good foroe, though disunited. Three
days later, at dawn, came in a
runner who said Caesar was landing to the westward—how I wished
that traitor lie would stick in his
false throat and choke him!—and
thither, bitterly against my advice,
went nearly all our men.
Even now it irks me to tell this
story. While the next young morning was still but a yellow streak
upon the sea, our keen watchers
saw  eaila  ooming from  the pale
Gaulish  coast, and,  by the time
the primrose portals of the day
were fully open, the water was covered with them from one hand to
the other.
In vain our reoalling signal fires
smoked. A thousand scythed
ohariots and four thousand men
were away, and by noon the great
Consul's foremost galley took the
British ground where the beaoh
shelved up to the marshy flats,
which again rose, through coppices
and dingles, to our oamp on the
overhanging hills. Another and
another followed, all thronged with
tawny stalwart men in braes and
leather. What could we do againBt
this mighty fleet that came headlong upon us, rank behind rank
the white water Hashing in tangled
ribbons from their innumerable
prows, and the dreaded symbols of
Roman power gleaming from every
high built stern?
We rushed down, disorderly, to
meet them, the Druids urging us
on with song and saorifice, and
waded into the water to our waists,
for we were as courageous as we
were undisciplined, and they hesitated for some seconds to leave
their lurohing boats. I remember
at this moment, when the fate of a
kingdom hung in the balance,
down there jumped a Centurion,
and, waving a golden eagle over
his head, drew his short sword, and
calling out that 'he at least would
do his duty to the Republic,' made
straight for me.
Brave youth! As he rushed impetuous through the water my
ready javelin took him true under
the gilded plate that hung upon his
chest, and the next wave rolled in
to my feet a lifeless body lapped in
a shroud of crimson foam.
But now the legionaries were
springing out far and near, and
fighting hand to hand with the
skin clad British, who gave way
before them slowly and stubbornly.
Many were they who died, and the
floating corpses jostled and rolled
out among us as we plunged and
fought and screamed in the shallow
tide, and beat on the swarming impervious golden shields of the invaders.
Back to the beaoh they drove us
hand lo hand and foot to foot, and
then, with a long shout of triumph
that startled the seafowl on the
distant cliffs, they pushed us back
over the shingles ever farther from
the sea, that idly sported with our
dead—back, in spite of all we
oould do, to the marshland.
There they formed, after a
breathing space, in the long, stern
line that had overwhelmed a hundred nations, and charged us like a
living rampart of steel. And as
the angry waves rush upon the immovable rocks, so rushed we upon
them. For a moment or two
the Bun shone upon a wild uproar,
the fierce contention of two peoples breast to breast, a glitter of
caps and javelins, splintered spears
and riven shields, all flashing in
the wild dust of war that tho Roman Eagle loved so well. And
then the Britons parted into a
thousand fragments and reeled
back, and were trampled under
foot, and broke and fled!
Britain was lost!
Soon after this all the coppices
and pathways were thronged with
our flying footmen.   Yet Dhuwal
lon and I, being mounted, bad
lingered behind the rest, galloping
hither and thither over the green
levels, trying to get some few British to stand again; but presently
it was time to be gone. The Romans, in full possession of the
beaoh, had found a ohannel, and
drawn some boats up to the shelv
ing shore. They had dropped the
hinged bulwarks, and, with the
help of a plank or two, had already
got out some ot their twenty or
thirty ohargers. On to these half
a dozen eager young patricians had
vaulted, and, I and Dhuwallon be
ing conspicuous figures, they came
galloping down at ub. We, on
our lighter steeds, knowing every
path and gully in the marsh lands,
Bhould have got away from them
like starlings from prowling sheepdog; but treachery was in the
blaok heart of that high priest at
my elbow, and a ravening hatred
whioh knew neither time nor circumstance.
It was just at the scraggy foot
hills, and the shouting Centurion*
were close behind us; the last of
our fighters had dashed into the
shelter ahead, and 1 Has galloping
down a grassy hollow, when the
coward shearer of mistletoe oame
up alongside. I looked not at him,
but over my other shoulder at the red
plumes of the pursuers dancing
on the sky line. All in an instant
something sped by me, and, shrieking in pain, my horse plunged
forward, missed his tooting, and
rolled over into the long autumn
grass with the scoundrel priest's
last javelin quivering in his throat.
I heard that villain laugh as he
turned for a moment to look baok,
and then he vanished into the
screen of leaves.
Amazed and dizzy, I staggered
to my feet, pushed back the long
hair and the warm running blood
from my eyes, and, grasping my
sword, waited the onset of the Romans. They rode over me as
though I were a shock of barley in
August, and one of them, springing down, put his foot to my throat
and made to kill me.
'No, no, Fabriusl' said another
Centurion, from the back of a white
steed- 'don't kill him. He will
be more useful alive.'
'You were always tender hearted, Sempronius Faunus,' grumbled
the first one, reluctantly taking his
heel from me and giving permission to rise with a kick iu the side.
'What are you going to do with
him? Make him native Prefect
of these marshes, eh?'
'Or, perhaps.' put in another
gilded youtb, whose sword itohed
to think it was as yet as innooent
of blood as when it oame from its
Tuscany smithy — 'perhaps Sem
pronius is going to have a private
procession of his own when he gets
back to the Tiber, and wishes
early to collect  prisoners   for   his
chariot tail.'
Disregarding their banter, tbe
Centurion Sempronius, who was a
comely fellow, and seemed just
then extremely admirable in person and principles to me, mounted again, and, pointing with bis
short sword to the shore, bid me
marob, speaking the Gallic tongue,
and in a manner there was no
gainsaying.
So I was prisoner to the Romans,
and they bound me, and left me
lying for ten hours under the side
of one of their stranded ships,
down by the melancholy afternoon
sea, still playing with ita dead
men, and rolling and jostling together in its long green fingers the
raven haired Etrurian and the plea,
white faoed Celt. Then, when it
was evening, they picked me up,
and a low plebeian iu leather and
brass struok me in the faoe when,
husky and spent with fighting, I
asked for a cup of water They
took me away through their  oamp
and a mile down the dingles,
where the Roman legionaries were
digging fosses, and making their
oamp in the ruddy flicker of watch
fires, under the British oaks, to a
rising knoll.
Here the main body of the invaders were lying in a great crescent towards the inland.and crowning the hillock was a scarp, where
a rough pavilion of skinB and sails
form the vessels on the beach had
been erected.
As we approached this, all the
noise and laughter died ont of my
guard, who moved in perfect silence.
A bowshot away we halted, and
presently Sempronius was seen
backing out of the tent with an
air of the greatest diffidence. Seizing me by my manacled arms, he
led me to it. At tbe very threshold he whispered in my ear—
'Briton, if you value that tawny
skin of youra I saved this morning
speak true and straight to him who
sits within'-, and without another
word he trust me into the rough
pavilion. At a little table, dark
with usage and scarred with campaigning, a man was sitting, an
ample toga partly hiding the close
fitting leather vest he wore beneath
it. His long and nervous fingers
were g urginover the tablets before
him a stylus with a speed few in
those days commanded, while a
little earthenware lamp, with a
flickering wick burning in the
turned up spout, oast a wavering
light upon his thin sharp out
features—the imperious mouth that
was shut bo tight and the strong
lines of his dark commanding faoe.
He went on writing as I entered,
without looking up; and my gaze
wandered round the poor walls of
his tent, his piled up arms in one
plaoe, his truokle bed in another,
there a heap of choioe British spoil,
and symbols and weapons,
and there a foreign case, half opened; stocked with bags of ooin and
vellum rolls. All was martial confusion in the black and yellow light
of that strange little chamber, and
aB I turned baok to him I felt a
shock run through me tofind the
blackest and most pieroing pair of
eyes that ever shone from a mortal
head fixed upon my face.
He rose, and, with the lamp in
his hand, surveyed, me from top to
toe.
'Of the Veneti?' he said, in allusion to my dark un-British hair;
and I answered 'No.'
'What, then?'
I told him I was a knight just
now in the service of the British
King.
'How many of your men opposed
us today?' was the next question.
'A third as many as you brought
with you where you were not invited.'
'And how many are there in
arm behind the downs and in this
Boutbern country.' '
'How many pebbles are there'on
yonder beach? How many ears of
corn did we pull last harvest?, I
answered, for I thought I Bhould
ie iu the morning, and this made
me brave and surly.
He frowned very blaokly at my
defiance, but ourbing, I oould see,
his wrath, he put the lamp on the
table, and, after a minute of communing with himself, he said, in a
voice over whioh polioy threw a
thin vein of amiability—
'Perhaps, as a British knight and
a good soldier, I have no doubt, you
could speak better with your hands
untied?'
I thanked him, replying that it
was bo; and be oame up, freeing,
with a beautiful little stiletto be
wore iu hie girdle, my wriste. This
kindly Blight act of soldiery trust
obliged me to the Roman General,
and I answered hie quick, incisive
questions in the Gaulish tongne as
far as honestly might be. He got
little about our forces, finding his
prisoner more effusive iu this quarter than communicative. Once or
twioe when my answers verged on
the scornful, I saw the imperious
temper and haughty nature at strife
with bis will in that stern, masterful face and those keen black eyes.
[To be oontinued.J THE SATURDAY WORLD,'ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT, 26   IQ03
THE LOCAL
EXCHANGE
Quiet Week Generally on
'Change.
FISHER MAIDEN IS STRONGER
The Latest Quotations and Sales
Locally    Upon   the
Market.
There has been a quiet week on
the exohange the chief movers being Fisher Maiden and Mountain
Lion the former being a little strong
er and the latter somewhat weaker
although selling strongly. Stooks
in general with the exception
already noted are lower all round.
Today'i Local QuoUUoni:
Asked
4
•   fa
Bid
4X
American Bar —»<
Ben Hur	
Black TaU	
Canadian Sold Hilda  i% m
Cariboo (Camp McKlnnty) ex-dl* ny, 7%
Centre BUr  22% ao
Crows Nest Pass Coal | $
Falrvlew  4 3
Fisher Maiden  3% 3
Olant  2% iH
Granby Consolidated    J4.50 $3.75
...   .    ...                               iK 1
as
Morning Glory...
Mountain Lion	
North Star (Bast Xootanay)..
Pajnt	
Sullp ...,
ambler-Csriboo	
Ban PoU	
BnUlvan	
Tom Thumb	
War Ragle Consolidated ,
Waterloo (Aaaesa. paid)	
Whit* Bear (Assess, paid) ..
9%
14
34
;g
4M
>3
7
4
n
M
Mountain Lion, 500, 234c; Ram
bier-Cariboo,  1000,   33c;   Centre
Star, 1000, 21c.    Total, 2500.
Week's Quotations.
Highest   Lowest
American Boy  5 4%
Ben Hur  4
BiackTail  3 a
Canadian Gold F. S  5 3!4
Cariboo, Camp McK .... Z'A
Centre Star  23
Fairview ,  4
Fisher Maiden  $%
Giant  2j|
Grai.by Consolida'ed $4.50
Moining Glory  1%
Mouatain Lion  24
NorthStar r. n#
Payne  15
Quilp  18
Rambler-Cariboo  « %
San Foil  5
Sullivan  t.%
Tom Thumb  4%
War Eagle  13
Waterloo  7
White Bear  4
Showing highest asked and lowest bid
during the past week.
The Week's Sales.
Mountain Lion, 2000,1000, 2000,
2000, 500, 23*o., 1000, 23c; FiBher
Maiden, 3000, 2000, 34o.,200O, 3^0.;
Rambler-Cariboo, 1000, 500, 344c,
2000, 334c,   1000, 33c;   Cariboo
Camp McKinney, 1500,   1000,   80;
Centre Star, 1000, 21c;  American
Boy, 1000, 44c; War Eagle, 500,
12o— Total 25,000.
20
3
3
i'A
*375
1
22
9'A
14
32
2
4'A
3H
II
SK
3'A
Greenwood Miners Union
The following are the officers of
Greenwood Miners' Union No. 22:
President, Harry Parsons; vice-
president, Alfred Lind; secretary,
G. F. Dougherty; warden, William
Wills.
The Gold Cup
Work is now in progress at the
Gold Cup mine, Ymir, on a tunnel
whioh ia being run to oatoh the
vein. This tunnel, which is now
in ever a hundred feet, already
shows indication in the face, that
the ore body is nearly reached.
Work is also in progress on grading
the site of laying the foundations
for the new stamp mill, the machinery for which is now on the
road.
Slocan Shlpiuenta.
The total amount of ore shipped
from the Slocan and Slocan City
mining divisions for the year
1902 was, approximately, 30,000
tons. Since January 1 to Sept. 12,
1903, the shipments have been aB
follows:
WEEK,     TOTAL
American Boy  565
Antoine  212
Arlington  40
Black Prtnce  17
Bondholder  2
Bosun  40 8yo
Bluebird  20
Dayton  4
Enterprise  535
FisherMaiden  280
Hartney  42
Hamilton  4
Highland Light  2
Idaho  21
Ivanhoe  41 652
Lucky Jim  105
Mercury  41
Monitor  476
Meteor :  52
Ottawa  126
payne  1714
Queen Bess  204
Rambler  1448
Reco   '      153
Republic  70
Ruth  417
Rio...s  9
Red Fox  <5y
SlocanStar  53 1871
S'ocan Boy  16
Silver Glance  55
Surpnse  5
Vancouver  20
Wonderful  23
Total tons.., 134 10,243
British Columbia
Provincial
Exhibition
New Westminster-Victoria, B.C.
For the above occasion the Spokane
Falls & Northern railway will sellround
trip tickets to New Westminster as follows:   (Children half fare.)
Rossland *,(7 2o
Nelson         16 55
Ymir „,„] ,6 55
Grand Forks  i& 2\
SELLING DATES
Sept. 26,27, 28,20. Limit Oct. 6
Passengers desiring to attend the exhibition at Victoria from October 6 to 10
and who purchase round trip tickets
- from New Westminster to Victorn, will
be granted an extension of eight days on
th- ir tickets by the agent at New Weat
minster,
H. A. JACKSON, G. P. A.,
j.  _"_ Spokane, Wash
H. P. BROWN, Agent, Rowland, 11. C
Removes, Blackheads, Freckles
and Pimpples and brings color  the Cheeks.    For Sale at
Royal BarberShoo
SUPPLY HOUSE.
W. J. PREST, PROP
You Can't
Afford
To pay your money for
Clothes unless you ire
sure of getting your money' worth of Style, Quality, Fit and Workmanship
rt-M-VH-S-
You Can
Afford
Two prizes will be given at the Alhambra Bowling alley every two weeks for
the largest score made.
To come in and look at
Our display of FALL
FABRICS. You make a
selection, and we warrant
the garments to be correct
in every way.
The High-Class Tailors,
Taylor &
McQuarrie
18 and 20 Col. Ave.
The Beat is always
tbe Cheapest....
Sewing Machinea /or Bale or Bent
PROVINCIAL
ASSOCIATION
Issues a Circular to electors
WANT SOME DEFINITE PLEDGES
Legislation is   Desired and Candidates are Asked to Declare
Themselves.
Victoria, Sept. 14
Editor World:
Dear Sir—At the request of   the
Executive Committee of  this   As
sooiation, I hand you copy   of   re
solutions passed by them   at their
last meeting.
In doing so, I beg to  state  em
phatically  that   our  objects   are
non-partizan in politics, but busi
ness ones, solely for the benefit  of
the Mining Industry.   We deBire,
therefore, to elicit from each candidate for   parliamentary   honors—
whether     Conservative,    Liberal,
Labor or Sooialist—his  views  on
the subject matters which en)
tbe attention of  250  delegates to
our last   convention  in   Victoria,
whereat they represented tbe ideas
of some six thousand  persons   de
pendent upon the  success   of   the
Mining Industry and were certain'
ly well posted on the several   min
ing questions.
As an Association, we have no
interest whatever in any party, but
we look to the government of the
day, and the opposition for the
great and increasing industry of
mining.
We ask that the new government
and opposition shall, whioh ever
party tbey represent, not only
refrain from retarding this great
industry, but that the House when
it meets will vigorously proceed to
examine our suggestions and amend
the laws which are proved to be
injurious, when we Bay the mining
industry will rapidly become the
the greatest revenue producer, indirectly and directly, in the Pro
vince.
This Association includes all
classes of the mining industry:
Bankers, lawyers, mineowners,
miners and muckers; blacksmiths;
engineers—civil, mechanical and
electrical; timbermen; farmers and
ranchers; smelter and refinery men,
mine managers; clerks; teamsters,
et al, whose politioal views include
Conservatism, Liberalism, Industrialism, and the rest of the political parties, large and small, fi 11
are, however, unanimously of the
opinion that each party member
eleoted shall be placeduponastand
hedged round by his publio utterances, which will be impossible for
him to escape from as heretofore,
for he will represent, not himself,
but Borne distinot party whioh will
feci the responsibility and see that
he who is eleoted to represent it
will do bis duty, bearing in mind
that the mining industry iB a Provincial question and not a party
one in any sense whatever, I am,
yours truly,
John Kkbn,
President.
O.IJB8TIONB TO  (ANDIDATKH  FOR   LEQ.
IH1.ATUHK.
Whereas, The Provincial Min-
ing Association of British Columbia is a non-political organization,
oomposed of men of all parties and
olasses:   And whereas,
The speoial objects of the said
Association are to protect, develop
and foster the mining industry of
British
all    its
branches
The Association
Columbia    in
And whereas,
considers that
the welfare of the said mining industry, and therefore of the Province, demands that the reforms
recommended at the convention in
February, 1903, are of prime importance to be promptly passed by
the provincial legislature: Be it
therefore,
Resolved by the executive 00m-
mittee of the said Association,
assembled at Rossland by special
call of the president, that every
candidate for election at the provincial elections about to be held
should be interrogated before the
said eleotion with a view to ascertaining whether such oandidate
favors the recommendations of the
said Association, and whether, in
case he be elected, he will support
the said recommendations by his
vote and Influence in the legislature in order that tbe electorate may know what stand
such oandidate will take, if elected,
in regard to suoh recommendations:
And be it further,
Resolved that the members of
the executive committee be and
they are hereby requested to undertake that each candidate, of
whatever party, shall be publicly
interrogated as to the stand whioh
such candidate, il elected, will take
in the legislature regarding the
said recommendations, and partic
ularly the following:
1. To repeal the two per cent
tax:
2. To amend the Mineral Act so
as to provide that failure to keep
up a free miner's certificate shall
not operate as a complete forfeiture
of rights acquired under it, but
that some reasonable provision * be
adopted for extension of time with
in which the certiticate must be re-
3. To entitle the owners of mineral claims to the use of the timber
thereon for mining purposes on
suoh olaims, without the imposition
of the royalty which is now enforced:
4. Reduction of   fee   for  Crown
grant of a mineral olaim from   $25
to $10:
5.-To enquire into  the operation
of the Boiler Inspection Aot, with
a view to ascertaining to what extent the said act works unnecessary
hardship upon the owners and
operators of steam boilers, and to
remove by amendment any just
grievances  imposed  by   the  said
aot:
6. To amend the Plaoer   Mining
Aot so as to enable the holders of
placer claimi to secure title thereto
by Crown grant, as in the case of
mineral olaims:
7. To pass a Conciliation Aot
for the settlement of labor disputes:
8. To revise and consolidate the
the aots relating to quartz mining
and plaoer mining, in order to remove the numerous anomalies now
existing under said acts, and to
simplify the laws relating to both
classes of mining:
9. The desirability of opening
Indian reserves throughout the
provinces   for   mining    purposes:
And be it further
Resolved that the seoretaiy be
instructed to send a oopy of the
convention proceedings to each
candidate nominated for election:
And be it further,
Resolved that copies of this resolution be forwarded to tbe newspapers of eaoh distriot in the Province.
The Wilcox
Asuceeseful millrunhas just been
concluded at the Wilcox mine
Ymir, and in addition a considerable quantity of high grade ore has
been got out for shipment. The
last car of crude ore shipped from
the Wilcox went over $70 per ton,
netting the company a clear profit
of $1100. President Bywater, who
is now in temporary oharge, states
that he expect:, to send out several
carloads of similar ore, whioh will
form a goodly addition to the profits made by the mill,
Coal Prospectors.
J. Fred Ritohie, P. L. S. and
James Fisher of Rossland, British
Columbia have been in the city the
past few days outfitting for an exploration trip into the East Kootenay district. They have been
backed by a local syndicate of
capitalists interested in securing
coal locations in that section of the
province.—Spokane PreBB.
MORTGAGE  SALE
Under and by*virtue of Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage, which
will be produced at time of sale, there
will be offered for sale by Public Auction
at the premises, Le Roi avenue, in the
City of Rossland, at 12 o'clock noon, on
the 6th day of October, 1903, by Walter
J Robinson, Auctioneer, the following
property, viz: Lot 6, Block 43, according to Map 579 in the town of Rossland.
Terms of Sale.
Ten per cent of the purchase money at
time of sale, the balance within thirty
days thereafter. For further particulars
apply to
Maconell, McMaster & Geaby.,
51 Yonge street. Toronto.
Spokana Fall* and Northern  Railway
Exouralon.'Stevens County Produce Association!; Colville
For the above occasion the Spokane Falls & Northern Railway
will sell excursion tioketo to Colville for one fare and one-third for
the round trip. Children half fare.
Selling date, September 27, to October 1st, inclusive. Limit October 3rd.
H. P. Brown, Agent,
Rossland, B. B.
•H. A. Jackson, Q. P. A.,
Spokane, Wash.
CONSERVATIVE
RALLY!
A Mass Meeting of Electors of Rossland City
Electoral  Distriot, will be held at
Miners' Union Hall
On Monday Night at 8 o'clock, nnder Che auspices
of the ROSSLAND LIBERAL-CONSERVATIVE
ASSOCIATION.
Hon. A. S. Goodeve
Will ai idress the electors, and an invitation to participate has been extended to Mr. J. A. Macdonald,
Liberal candidate.
A cordial and hearty
to all electors.
invitation is extended
MONDAY NIGHT.
God Save the King.
I The Big Sale & Season
ag   at the Big Shoe Store
On TUESDAY, September 8th, and
following days we will offer the balance
of this year's styles of Ladies Extension
Sole Low and High Shoes in Patent
Leather, Patent Kid, Vici Kid. Box Calf,
etc , AT COST AND BELOW
COST,     tome and see for yourself
C.O. Lalonde
\ THE SHOEMAN
Miss Humphries will open a
danoing olaaa for children on Ootober 1.
^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦£
Watches::
OF ALL SORTS and at all prices for man, woman or
child, all alike, however, in being good timekeeper!—we insist on that. We have low priced watches which are not
toys but good timekeepers. From these our assortment
runs up to the most beautiful examples of the watchmakers ait,	
EWERT BROS.
JEWELERS
AND
ENGRAVERS.
BOSSLAND, NELSON AND TRAIL.

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