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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 1, 1915

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 <*
■1
The Journal
$5.00
a Year
tine* ftajred
VOL. V.
PRINCE RUPERT-, B. C,   THURSDAY, JULY 1, 1915.
Price  5  Cents.
No.   196.
PRINCE RUPERT WILL
CELEBRATE THE DAY
Dominion Day Will Be Honored By
A Programme Of Sports To Be
Held At Acropolis Hill Grounds
This city has always celebrated
Dominion Day, and In spite of the
fact that the war has created an air
of depression the day is to be honored again this year. The celebration
will not be on as magnificent a scale
as has been the case In former years,
but there will he a good programme
of sports. These will be held at
Acropolis Hill. »
The Ketchikan Baseball team has
arrived in the city and will play two
matches today. This team, which
is regarded as second to none in the
whole north, will again contest with
the local players for honors.
This afternoon at 1 o'clock there
will he a procession formed, and on
arrival at the grounds the school
children will join in singing national
airs, after which a series of competition? will take place.
The programme for the day is as
follows:
10:30 a.m.—Baseball: Ketchikan
vs. Prince Rupert.
1 p.m.—Procession forms on Sixth
Street between Second and Third
Avenue and parades to Recreation
Park.
2 p.m.—Races: Little tots, boys,
3  prizes;  little  tots, girls, 3  prizes.
Hoys' Races.
Six years and under—3 prizes.
Seven and 8 years—3 prizes.
Nine and 10 years—3 prizes.
Eleven and 12 years—3 prizes.
Thirteen  and  14  years—3  prizes.
Fifteen and 16 years—3 prizes.
Eighteen    years    and    under—8
prizes.
Girls' Races.
Six years and under—3 prizes.
Seven and 8 years—3 prizes.
Nine and 10 years—3 prizes.
Eleven and 12 years—3 prizes.
Thirteen  and  14  years—3  prizes.
Open Races. '
■    Sack race—16 years and under.
Three legged race—16 years and
under   (3   prizes).
BRITISH WAR ORDERS
OO  THROUGH   GOVERNMENT
Lord Curzon Explains How Canadian
Orders Arc Placed.
Lord Curzon, In the House of
Lords, gave an indignant denial to
the assertion that Canadian munition
makers were or have been snubbed.
Offers have been received from time
to time from Canadian firms, and referred to the Dominion Government.
Direct negotiations have not taken
place with the firms, as it was arranged such negotiations should proceed through the Canadian Government. The contract with Morgans
was enlered into because direct dealings with firms in the United States
proved satisfactory. Morgans had not
a 'Complete monopoly even in the
States.
Lord Curzon added that the government desired to procure all possible material from the Dominions.
Canadian makers, though, did not
make shells complete, but had to go
to the United States for component
parts.
 o	
Baseball Excursion.
Potato race—18 years and under
(3 prizes).
2:30 p.m.—Best costume representing "Canada."—Open to girls and
boys, 16 years and under. Three
prizes, $5, $3 and $2.
Best comic costume, any character
—Three prizes, $5, $3 and $2.
Singing "Maple Leaf"—Open to
school children. Prizes $3 and $2.
Playing three different military
calls—Open to boys 16 and under.
Prizes $3, $2 and $1.
3 p.m.—Men's Open Races.
100-yard dash—3 prizes.
220-yard dash—3 prizes.
Running broad jump—3 prizes.
Standing broad jump—3 prizes.
Running high jump-—3 prizes.
Putting shot—2 prizes.
Fat man's race—2 prizes.
I in- Ladies.
Ladies' race—3 prizes.
4 p.m.—Baseball—Ketchikan vs.
Prince Rupert.
6:3,0 p.m.—Football—Drydock vs.
Callies.
MADE TRANSFERS
AT WASH OUT
DELAY ON G. T. P. IT IS EXPECT-
ED IS OVER
NOW
General Superintendent Mohan Is At
The Spot Superintending
Repairs.
With the arrival of the delayed
train over the G. T. P. early yesterday, and the arrival today of another delayed train, the road will be
in shape for the regular schedule.
The trouble was caused by a sudden
rise in the Athabasca River, with a
washout in Jasper Park.
The passengers and mail had to
be transferred for the distance of
about what a block would be In the
city.
General Superintendent Mehan is
on the spot, and is superintending
the carrying out of repairs. Temporary repairs are expected to have been
got In place before this.
The Princess Royal has been
specially fitted for the excursion to
Ketchikan on July 2nd. The party
will have an opportunity to visit
Granby on the return trip, time being
allowed to visit the smelters.
FISHING BOAT
COMPLETE WRECK
GEORGE W. NICKERSON HAS LO__
HIS   SCHOONER
NORTHERN
The Crow  Are  All  Safe, Bul  Vessel
Wns   Knocked   To
Pieces.
The fishing boat Northern, owned
by G. W. Nickerson, of this city, has
been completely destroyed. It struck
a rock about eighteen miles from
Massett and while Capt. Crowell and
the crew of five have all saved their
lives, there Is nothing of the boat
left.
The information conveyed to Mr.
Nickerson by wire, is meagre. The
captain reports that a rock was
struck and that nothing could be
done to save the vessel. She was
broken Into matchwood he says. All
the crew escaped with tlieir lives, and
walked eighteen miles to Massett,
where they are without, supplies.
The Northern had been fishing for
spring salmon and had taken on otlier
catches. She had about 1,800 pounds
on board. The vessel cost $2,n00.
She was Insured for only $1,500.
Dominion Day,
Today the Dominion of Canada is celebrating the forth-eighth
anniversary of confederation. Few will now say that the joining
together of the different parts of the British Empire In North
American, now know as the Dominion of Canada, was not a wise
move. There is no demand in any part now for a breaking of the
bonds that bind the country as a federal power.
Canada, In honoring her natal day as a confederation, does so
this year with a much more sober feeling than in any previous year.
The shadow of a gigantic struggle has cast Its gloom over the
country. Loyal Canadians—her sons by birth and by adoption-
are serving the cause of Empire and sacrificing their lives in that
service. It is but natural that there should be lacking, much of
the joy that usually attends the celebration. There are none who
begrudge what is being paid in the cause of Empire by this Dominion. They could hope that such sacrifices were not necessary.
They will all agree that Canada should do her full share to maintain the Empire, of which all its citizens are so proud.
There will be a general hope that, when the next Dominion Day
comes round, this country may no longer be experiencing the depression which comes from a condition of war.
0»"H*)>i"HKHSl"H""lW<^^
RUSSIA  TAKING
STEPS TO PROVIDE
UNLIMITED   MUNITIONS
London, June 30.—Russia's reply
to the series of Austro-German victories in Galicia is to form a board
of inanitions empowered to spend unlimited money, having unrestricted
powers over all private industries.
This is an indication that the repulses
suffered by the Russian troops were
largely due to munition shortage.
 o	
FINAL  MATCH OF
CITY FOOTBALL  SERIES
The  Callies  And  The  Drydock  Will
Meet This Evening.
The Callies and the Drydock Football teams meet, this evening at 6:30
in the final match for the City Cup.
The lineup of the teams will be as
follows:
Drydock—Woods, McCrate, Mc-
Duff, Campbell, Dixon, Mclnch,
Jones, Bruce, McWilliams, Mcllravey,
Neilson.
Callies—Macdonald, Martin, Murray, W. Murray, Foote, Abbott,
Wllliscroft, Smith, Dowther, Mcintosh, Dennis, Black, Hunter, Dunn.
 o	
No Paper Tomorrow.
This being Dominion Day, there
will be no paper tomorrow morning.
GERMANY   SUFFERS
- FROM SHORTAGE
OF  COTTON NOW
Berlin, June 30.—The military
authorities have prohibited the manufacture of cotton fabrics after August
1. The presumption is that Germany needs all available cotton for
explosives.
 o	
PATRIOTIC SOCIAL  BY
DAUGHTERS OF EMPIRE
A Programme Of Speeches .And Musk-
Will Bo Given.
The Daughters of the Empire will
give a patriotic social in the K of P
Hall this evening, commencing at
8:30. There will be an admission
fee of 25 cents.
Patriotic speeches will be given by
Rev. H. R. Grant, Rev. Canon RIx, T.
D. Pattullo, C. N. Crowell and Fre_
Stork. A muslca' programme will
be given also, and there will be refreshments.
 o	
Unique Design.
George   Frizzell,   by   the   use   of
b
colored sawdust, has worked out on
the floor of his butcher shop, a large
Union Jack, using the correct colors
in all details.
YOUR KING AND COUNTRY
NEED YOU!
Recruits Wanted for 62nd Overseas Battalion
Canadian Expeditionary Force
Recruiting Station at Provincial Government
Office-OPEN NOW
In view of t"c recruiting wliich is in progress nt present
throughout lho province, It is apropos to answer n few of
tlie questions which are considered hy those who contemplate
entering tin- service. The following Is n list of tho pertinent
queries, together with tin- information which each elicitsi
QUESTIONS ANSWERED.
1 How long nm I to serve? Until tho end of lho war,
and six months after if required,
2 What pay shall I receive'.' Your pny lis n private will
lie $1.00 per day ami 10c field allowance, Bosidos this you
will he clothed, equipped and subsisted by the government.
:* What will my wife receive during my absence? Every
month there will he paid her a   separation allowance of $110.
(also part of your pny), nnd if this ho not  enough to  iifoit-
ably maintain your family, tho Canadian Patriotic 1'uiiil will
further assist 1 hem.
4 What will happen if I am wounded or sick? You will
he oared for hy the government and your pay continued until
you are discharged. If you are permanently disabled nn allowance will be paid you, varying according to tlie extent of
your injury or disability.
B What will be done for my wife and children if 1 die
while on Active Service? Thc government will provide an
adequate pension, that will enable the family In live comfortable until tho children are old enough to look after
themselves. The widowed mother of a single man .il' the son
he bore solo support, is treated in tlie same way ns u wife.
i#}t"B""<aH"H>_"l>l"BW
IMPORTANCE OF WORK BEING
DONE BY SHELL COMMITTEE
What The Manufacture of Munitions
Of War Has Meant to Canada Explained By Colonel Bertram---Busy
Centres Have Been Created Turning Out Shells For Use In the War
At a luncheon given at the Royal
Canadian Yacht Club, in connection
with the annual meeting of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association,
the principal guest was Brigadier-
General Alexander Bertram, formerly
of Dundas, but now of Ottawa, chairman of the Dominion shell committee. By special request General Bertram spoke on the work of the important organization over which he
presided. General Bertram said:
"My chief object in addressing you,
in my capacity as chairman of the
shell committee, is to let the people
of Canada know what the Dominion
is doing in the manufacture of munitions of war. It is surprising what
little knowledge men have of our
work, men of ordinary istelligence
who, through the public press should
certainly be cognizant of the situation
as it exists today in this country. For
instance, I read In an Ottawa newspaper last week a long editorial written by a gentleman in his office, which
is situated within two blocks of the
headquarters of the shell committee,
te'"r.g the government what should
be done to organize the manufacturers of Canada. Although we have
been at work for several months, and
so far have produced and shipped
650,000 shells, evidently it has not
dawned upon this gentleman that the
government, as well as the manufacturers of the Dominion, were alive to
the necessities of the situation and
were doing their respective parts
loyally  and  enthusiastically.
Praise for General Hughes.
"I am not here as an opologlst for
Major-General Hughes. He needs no
opologist. To the Minister of Militia
and to him alone belongs the credit
of initiating the work for the organization of the manufacture in
Canada in a way that they were
never organized before in oi_»
peculiar industry. General Hughes
is the pioneer of this work in the
Dominion, the members of the shell
committee are simply the means by
whicli ho is carrying out 'his effective work and splendid service for the
Empire. I say nothing of the zeal
and enthusiasm with whicli he mobilized, equipped and despatched 88,-
000 men from Canada in seven short
weeks after the declaration of war,
and since then lias sent across the
seas an equal number, Thai in itself
Is a magnificent achievement and
only In slightly lesser degree will Hie
credit accure to hi in for showing the
way to the engineering firms of England, Ireland, Scotland, as well as
oilier portions of the Empire, to the
manufacture of those munitions without which no war can be successfully
carried on. You all read Ihe other
day the stirring words of Mr. Lloyd |
George at Manchester. I am glad to
know that lhe factories of Britain are
now being systematically organized
for the production of ammunition,
even after the lapse of so many
months. General Hughes was the Hist
man   in   Canada  to  grasp  the  Idea.
How-  Men  Originated.
"Shortly after tlie war broke out
the minister received an order from
the Britisii Government for supplies
of arms and ammunition, Contracts
were placed for these both in Canada
and Tinted States, and then the question for 200,(  shrapnel shells, unloaded, in equal numbers of 15 and
18 pounders, Canada possesses In the
City of Quebec a modern plant for
the manufacture of shells, but Its
capacity is limited. It can only produce 75 shells per day, which we now
see was quite Inadequate to meet the
demand. There w-as only one thing
to do. The Minister of Militia conceived the idea of utilizing the engineering factories throughout the
Dominion for shell manufacture and
to secure the co-operation of employers and employees in the engineering trades to take up this patriotic-
work. As a manufacturer myself, I
am free to confess that it was with
some reluctance that we responded
to General Hughes' suggestions, even
though at that time many factories
were  practically  idle.
Committee Appointed.
"Several manufacturers met the
Minister In Ottawa on September 2.
At this meeting there were also present Col. C. Greville Harston, Chief
Inspector of Arms and Ammunition
for the Dominion arsenal at Quebec.
We discussed the whole situation
freely, and after hearing explanations
hy Col. Lafferty as to the manufacture
of shells and their component parts,
and the examination of drawings and
specifications, whicli were fully explained by both these officers, we
came to the conclusion that the
manufacturers of Canada could and
should engage in this work. Accordingly the following week at a meeting called by General Hughes at the
Dominion Arsenal at Quebec, a committee was appointed to organize the
movement throughout the Dominion.
Tho members of this committee are
Messrs. Thomas Canlley. of New
Glasgow; Geo. XV. Watts, Toronto;
E. Carnegie, Wetland; General T.
Benson, Master-General of Ordnance;
Mr. J. W. Borden, Chief Accountant
and Paymaster-General; Col, Harston and Col. I.afferty, the latter four
representing I lie Department Of
Militiia and Defence. 1 had tlie honor
to be named chairman of this committee. I accepted tlie offlce, because
I felt il to be my duty.
"I had the additional satisfaction
of knowing that there were associated
with ine enthusiastic colleagues who
would do tlinir utmost to make tlie
undertaking a success. lu this I
havo not been disappointed. I cannot
speak too highly of the Bplendld work
of my associates,
Col. Lafferty undertook tbe technical instruction of the manufacturers while to Col, Harston was all..it. -I
Uu- equally Important duty of super-
Intending tlie examination and Inspection. Before the end of the
month we were fortunate to secure
tlie services of Mr. Hai id Carnegie,
who is one of the recognized authorities on steel and munitions of war,
was for many years in charge of the
shell factory at Woolwich Arsenal. He
is a Follow of the Royal Society,
Edinburgh, and an active member of
the most Important engineering Institutions In the Motherland, Col.
Carnegie took up his duties Immediately, and since September last
lias been on tlie work day and night.
Made In Canada.
"Qeneral Hughes was careful to
Impress upon the committee that to
tho utmost possible limit, the component parts of the shells should be
'made in Canada.' This principle we
(Continued on rage Two.)
6 Thursday,  duly   1,  1915.
PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
prince Hup ert journal
Telephone 138.
O. II. NELSON', Editor.
Offlce: 12S Third Avenue East,
■•ar McBride ^Street. Telephone 138;
Postofflee Box'607.
DAILY   EDITION.
Published    every  morning   except
Monday. Delivered by carrier in the
city at the following rate, lf paid in
advance:—
One  Year    -"5.00
Six   Months    $2.50
Three  Months    $1.25
If   not   paid    In    advance,
per Month    $0.50
WEEKLY EDITION.
Published every Friday for circu
lation outside the City of Prince
Rupert at $2.00 a year, addressed to
points in Canada; or $3.00 a year to
all points in tbe United Kingdom
the United States or ol*er foreign
countries.
Advei-tisinir  Bates  Upon Application
_jS
 ii i —i	
Thursday, July l, 1915
IMPORTANCE OF
WORK BEING DONE
(Continued  frum Page   One.)
have constantly kept in mind and I
am satisfied that when the war is
over and these establishments cease
manufacturing munitions, certain industries will have been created in the
Dominion of a lasting character, from
which the country will receive permanent benefit. For instance, I may
mention that today the quantity of
copper refined and smelted is a mere
bagatelle, although in 1914 the
country exported approximately 30,-
000 tons of copper ore in matte
form. On the other hand, Canada annually imports 21,000 tons of the refined product. "Why should not-the
work of smelting and refining our
native crop, per ores be done in Canada? You will be pleased to learn
that as r .'irect outcome of Hie work
of the shell commitee this will be
made   possible.     Our   experience   in
nine   months   has  demonstrated   tlie
fact that the development of this industry in tlie Dominion, while it
wou'd undoubtedly benefit every
manufacturer who uses copper, is
above all things a military necessity.
"Canadn will not have to remain
long under the reproach of having to
import its refined copper, and 1 can
assure you this, that within three or
four months we expect to he making
in this country, from the native product, all the copper bands required in
the product of shells. At the outset
our work was largely of a Annual ive
character. We wanted Canadian steel
for Canadian shells. Heretofore none
such had been forthcoming. Col.
Cantley was entrusted with this work
and the country is under deep obligation to him for having rapidly installed and equipped a plant for producing the first steel made in Canada
for shell manufacture. It was agreed
to supply free of charge to those
manufacturers who would undertake
the work of finishing and assembling
the complete she'Is all the component
parts antering into the construction
of the shell. In this way many of the
smaller manufacturers were relieved
of the financial burden of carrying a
heavy stock of raw materials, and
which very largely contributed to the
success of this huge undertaking. It
was further decided to eliminate unhealthy competition by paying uniform prices for the same article.
Inspection Company Chosen.
"An inspection company was chosen
to deal with all shell components,
thus relieving the assembling manufacturers of the responsibility of inspection, while at the same time
satisfying the shell committee beyond
question that the component parts of
shells were correct in every particular
before the finished article passed into
the hands of the government inspector.
"Starting with the first order for
200,iiuii shrapnel, we have since
placed orders aggregating 9,000,000
shells, consisting of t."> and 18
pounder shrapnel, 18 and 4.5 and 60
pounder high explosive shells. In
addition, we have placed orders for
100,000 cartridge cases, 5,000,000
fuses, 2,000,000 primers and 1,000,-
000 friction tubes.
"Before awarding a contract, careful investigation is made as to the
ability of the firm to carry out the
particular work assigned to it. If
there is any doubt as to the plant being unsuitable, a competent inspector
is sent to report upon the state of the
factory. You will quite understand
that in order to safeguard the interests of the country the committee
'had to stipulate that contracts placed
would be subject to cancellation.
Each manufacturer adjusts his own
machinery to tlie particular work assigned to him, and is furnished with
a set of inspection guages as a guide
in making tlie manufacturing gauges
required. The preparation of tlie
drawings for the various parts and
the preparation of gauges and their
distribution and use involved considerable labor, hut. we got,.it done
and done well. To give yon an idea
of a certain feature of our work, I
may mention that the inspection of
the various component parts, including the analysis of material and
physical test call for the employment
of over .100 inspectors, besides several  chief inspectors.
"Most of the Inspectors are experienced machinists and tool makers.
The final inspection of the finished
shell is carried out by nearly 300
examiners and district inspectors
under the direction of Colonel Harston. Such an army of inspectors emphasizes the care which is being taken
to produce satisfactory results, and
which have been highly commented
upon by the officials of the war offlce.
Upon Colonel Harston also devolves
the actual proof tests, these being
carried out at a certain place, the
average number of shells fired daily
being 300. As soon as the shells
have passed examination, and have
been packed ready for shipment, the
manufactures receives his cheque.
Work Split l'p.
"Ill no single establishment in Can-
|ada except Dominion Arsenal at
IQuebec, is tlie complete shell made.
One hundred and thirty firms from
Halifax to Vancouver are engaged iu
the work of machining and assembling. Others are occupied in the
manufacture of blanks, bullets discs,
cartridge 'cases, buckshot, primers,
tubes, tin cups for shrapnel, grub
screws, sockets and plugs, steel base
plates and boxes. At the present time
no less than 247 factories are engaged in tills work in seventy-eight
cities and towns in the Dominion. In
.Montreal alone thirty-five factories
are employed, Toronto has twenty-
eight, Hamilton seventeen, and so on
throughout the Dominion from coast
to coast. Practically every province
of Canada is participating in this
enterprise.
(Continued     om Page Three.)
The Home of the Jk and the Eagle
Here I'isitors are cordially welcomed and are shown the result of
over fifty years unswerving loyalty to the highest ideals of Quality
and Purity.   Here they learn the reasons why
"The Old Reliable"
Budweiser
King of all Bottled Beers
stands alone at the top of the world's best brews.    Its mild and exquisite
flavor remains always the same — hence its POPULARITY EVERYWHERE.
Bottled only (with Corki or Crown Capt)
at the
Anheuser<*Busch Brewery
St. Louis, Mo. .... ..<-C
FREDERICK PETERS. K.C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Publl.
Offlce ln
EXCHANGE BLOCK
DRS. GILROY & BROWN,.DENTISTS
OrownN and Bridge Work a
Specialty
Office:  Smith   Block,   Third   Avenu.
Phone 454.
J. H. HILDITCH
Contractor and Builder
Estimates given on all classes ol
work, whether small or large. Per.
sonal attention given to every item
PHONE GREEN 321
A. FAULDS, M.I. M.E.
Consnltirg Mining Engineer
Examinations   and    development    ol
Coal, Metal, Oil. Etc.
709 Dunsmuir St.      Vancouver, B.C
A. E. W!UGH T
Provincial  nnd   Dominion  Land  Surveyor—Surveying  and  Engineering.
Fourth Street.
Phone 85. P. O. Box 10.
P.O. Box 1714 Telephone 44*
RITCHIE,   AGNEW   &.   CO.
Civil Engineers and Surveyors
Prince Rupert,  B.C.
Waterworks, Witter Power, Wharl
.onstruction, Reports, Plans, Doniln-
on and Provincial Land Surveying,
_-lectrie Blue Printing, Negatives and
White Trlnts
The Queen Charlotte
Oil Fields Limited
Oilice will open  today in Law'-Iiutlei
Building for sale ol n limited
mm.urn  of   Treasury stock
GEO. F.   MACDONALD,   Bec.-Treau,
HE HIGH  COST OF   LIVING  RE-
DlCI.li BY BUYING YOUR
Besl  Quality    Domestic   Lump   Conl
$».50 Per Ton
Besl  Qualitj   Washed   Nm  i oal
$.'*.7.*. Per Ton
DELIVERED
—THE—
Union   Transfer  Co.
IVince Rupert, B.C., Phono.8fl
'"'"W'BKHKHKHKHSWKW*^^
' Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD    OFFICE:   MONTREAL ESTABLISHED   1809
Capital     $  11,500,000
Reserved   Fund $ 12,500,000
Total   Assets     $185,000,000
Savings Bank Department—$1 will open uu account
Branches   Throughout   Canada and Banking Connections With All
Parts of tlie United States. ..gents Throughout the World.
H.  P. WILSON, Manager        - -. Prince    Rupert    Branch
0<BKH»»a"8ftKH-Ot'BK^
CLEAN UP AND PAINT OP NOW
O-CEDAR     MOPS, O-CEDAR MOP  POLISH
A1/ABAST1NE   SANITARY WALL  COATING
WATER HOSE, GARDEN TOOLS, WATERING CANS
MARTIN-SENOUR  100   PER  CLNT. PURE PAINT
PAINT  BRUSHES,  LAWN  .MOWERS AND GRASS SHEARS
CARPET    BEATERS,  GARBAGE  PAILS
WINDOW   SCREE*<?S, SCREEN DOORS
.      —AT THE—
KAIEN HARDWARE CO.,eos Third Av
LUMBER
Coal, Cement, Plaster and Brick
AND A COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD.
First Avenue      Prince Rupert       Telephone 186
t*t-f*s«4-»'"am'BHHK>^
Prince Rupert Transfer Co.
—FOR-
Coal, Furniture Moving, Baggage
and Heavy Teaming
W. J. .CRAWFORD, Manager
PHONE 566
Office and Residence:
lOOO THIRD AVE.
0•»_^»__B-^1H-t-a_H-^^ ttl-_<H-<KH>_-H-tt_«_at-a«l»
SHINGLES, MOULDINGS, SASH, DOORS
Prince Rupert Lumber Co.
FIRST AVE. AND McRRIDE ST. PRINCE RUPEItT
Phone 25 Branch Yard at Smithers, B.C.
lP{la__a*j___W'*a'l--a--^
Engines   Installed   nnd   General
Repairs
O.vy-Acetylene   Plani   in   Connection
IPhone lied 150 Third Avenue
_
6. C. Undertakers
Funeral Directors nnd Bin.
liiilniciK — Satisfaction Guar*
wilei-d •— Open Day and Night
117 S'-ennd Street Phone 11
Bruce Morton    -    -   Manager
*«H""l"H"H"l-i»l3^^
I
Send for Five Roses
COUPON
•Vl'nlc N_n.c and Aildirn plainly
Don't large- K> endow Ten Cent •
in .tamps
•■•"• ii
Cook Book—
BEING A MANUAL OF GOOD RECIPES carefully
chosen from lhe contributions of over two thousand
■uccessful users of Fly*. Rosea Flour throughout Canada.
Also Useful .Notes On the various classes of good things
to eat, all of which have been, carefully checked nml
re-checked by competent authority.
Address your Envelope to LAKE Of THE WOODS- MILUNS CO. LIMITED. WIHNI'Efi
DistributorB Prince Rupert, B.C.
STEWART & MOBLEY KELLY, DOI/GIaAS ft CO.
NaWE Of D_UXIl _
r PRINCE   RUPERT    JOtlWNAl.
Thursday, July  1,  lfll"
Is Business
Slow?
It probably serves you right
You are not letting the pub-
lie know what you have
Advertise!
Advertise!
Advertise!
*     That is the Solution
That manufacturers should increase tlieir advertising nppropria-
liims during ;i period of business depression mid curtail during the years
of prosperity, was the opinion advanced by Roger Babson, the i'iiuui-
i-iiil nnd business statistician, «t n
meeting of the Technical Publicity
Association, held in Xew York.
"Directors of jour company regard
advertising us 11 luxury io be rut
down when business is poor," said
Mr. Babson. "They give yon orders
what <i> do rather than you giving
(lieiii orders.
"If you solved this advertising
problem in u scientific way you
would tell them wlini to do, tin- sninc
ns tlieir lawyers and Iheir bunkers
loll them.
"Iu 11 year of prosperity they ore
willing to give you n bin advertising
appropriation, and when tbe reaction
ooiiies they cut down to almost notli-
Ing. Take the big appropriation in
the fat years and salt it away for use
in the lean years.
"If you nil did this tlie business, of
tho country would move along more
evenly; the business boom would be
le'ss, and tlie iviulii.ii, the nren of
business depression, smaller."
Follow the Advice of
Experts
The Journal
\    Is the Best Medium for Advertising
In the City
News of Prince Rupert's Waterfront
LAUNCHES   IX   FROM
KETCHIKAN LAST  EVENING
The Hi Paso And The I.aku Brought
' Crowd  Foi' Holiday.
Last evening the two powerful
launches, El Paso and Lal.ii arrived
from Ketchikan with the baseball
team and others who have come to
celebrate Dominion Day here.
There were about fifty arrived by
the launches. They expect to leave
tomorrow morning early for the return trip,
IMPORTANCE OF WORK
(Continued  from Page Two.)
-"The manufacture of shells in this
country is giving employment to between 60,000 and 70,000 artisans,
while the total weekly wage bill easily
amounts to $1,000,000. From these
figures you will see what the shell
making industry means to the workingman as well as to the manufacturers of the Dominion. The changes
which are necessary in the equipment
of the various factories by adding
new machinery, or in the readjustment of plants were made by the
manufacturers themselves and at
their own expense. In a very short
time now we shall be producing
from between 40,000 and 50,000
shells per day.
"For the contracts already placed,
it may interest you to know that
170,000 tons of steel, about 30,000
tons of lead and several thousand
tons of other materials are required.
In referring to the various industries
'covered by the sphere of operations
of the shell committee I cannot but
make allusion to the investigation
conducted   at   the   instance   of   the
.Minister of Militia in connection with
the supply of pr&pellants and high
explosives. In addition to the manufacture of several thousand tons of
cordite and powder in connection with
the present contract, through his instrumentality and important new industry has been initiated in the Dominion, viz.: The utilization of the
by-products from tlle coke ovens of
the Dominion Iron & Steel Company
at Sydney, N. S., for the manufacture
of tlie high explosives, trinitro
toluene.
Value nf Industry.
"Tlie revenue alone from the conn-act placed with this company will
be nearly $5,000,000. I mention this
so an to give tlie gentlemen present
an idea of what has been accomplished in one direction only, but I think
you will agree with me that tlie
value of having such an industry in
Canada far outwelghts any monetary
consideration wliich may be named.
We have endeavored to discover the
ability of tbe various manufacturers
to undertake the' work, and it has
been most gratifying to find not only
a readiness to produce ammunitions,
but an eager desire amongst all to
assist the committee in carrying out
its duties. The cordial co-operation
of both employer and employee has
been one of the finest features
throughout the strenuous times in
which we are now involved. I wish to
emphasize here in particular that
the backbone of the whole situation
is the mechanical ability of our workmen, we have done wonders in developing methods of manufacture,
which have hastened the production
of the finished material. I am sure
you will give the shell committee
credit for having done iis best in
this national crisis."
THROUGH TRAINS TO AND
FROM PRINCE RUPERT
Tlie G. T. P. operates a train service to and from Prince Rupert its
Pacific terminus, with electric lighted standard sleeping cars, dining cars
serving all meals and day coaches.    On Mondays an electric lighted tourist car is attache 1 to the through train.
The trains irom here give a fast direct service with Prince George,
Edmonton and Winnipeg; with close connections with all prairie centres,
as well as with St. Paul. Chicago, ancl all eastern Canadian and United
States points.
MONDAY
Xo. 2.—Eastbound leaves at 10:30 a.m.    reaching   Winnipeg    2:25    p.m.
Thursday.
No, 1.—From tlie east arrives at 0:15 p.m., laving   eft Winnipeg fi p.m.
Friday.
WEDNESDAY
No.   I.—From  the east  arrive  at  0:15  p.m.,  having  left  Winnipeg  nt   C
p.m.   Sunday.
THURSDAY
No, 2.—Eastbound leaves at 10:30 a.m., reaching Winnipeg at 2:25 p.m.
Sunday.
Fill HAY
No. 1.—From the easl, arrives at 6:15   p.m.,  having 'left   Winnipeg  at   fi
p.m. Tuesday.
SATURDAY
No. 2.—Eastbound leaves at 10:30 n.iu., reaching  Winnipeg at 2:25 p.m.
Tuesday.
Tug ' GLEN ROSA "
Travellers' Guide to Steamer Sailings
Regular Vessels plying out of Prince Rupert
To Coast Points
In addition to intermittent and irregular sailings of vessels to and
from Prince Rupert, there is an excellent service in and out of this port
by the steamers running ln their different Bervicos.
MONDAY
To Arrive:—G. T. P. steamer from Vancouver,   Victoria   and   Seattle   at
6:30 a.m.
C. P. R. steamer from Vane niver in forenoon.
Union steamer Venture in  forenoon.
''W'*<r'*''f'*1:'  _!*■  ■      -       ,
V"V~-\.|*.:'a *aT   a.       ,  ■
• ..     --
To Depart:—G. T. P. steamer for Anyox at 10 a.m.
C. P. R. steamer for Skagway at noon.
Union steamer Venture  for Anyox and northern B. C. points.
TUESDAY
To Arrive:—G. T. P. steamer from Anyox at 3 a.m.
Union steamer Venture from Anyox and way ports at 8 p.m.
To Depart:—G. T. P. steamer for Vancouver,   Victoria   and   Seattle   at
10 a.m.
Union steamer Venture for Vancouver at 9 p.m.
THURSDAY
To Arrive:—G. T. P. steamer from Vancouver,   Victoria and   Seattle at
6:30 a.m. .*  .       v._w»,,.[,.aJW'aa»«-. • ■
To Depart:—G. T. P. steamer for Vancouver,   Victoria   and   Seattle     t
10  a.m.
. a*<•.■«■ - FRIDAY
To Arrive:—C. P. R. steamer from Vancouver in afternoon,
to Depart:—C. P. R. steamer for Anyox and other points in erenin"    (:
"•■*-■". SATURDAY '       •- -'   *'**»'
To Arrive:—G. T. P. steamer from Vancouver,  Victoria   aud   Seattle   at
6:30 a.m.
C. P. R. steamer from  Skagway in forenoon.
C.   P.   R.   steamer   from  Anyox  in  evening.
To Depart:—G. T. P. steamer for Vancouver,   Victoria   and    Seattle  at
10  a.m.
C.  P. R. steamer for Vancouver at noon.
SUNDAY
To Depart:—C. P. R. steamer for Vancouver at fi p m.
■•'■'■■*"   ■ V-a «'
..^'s'.'Uv*
t
-^±
InuSill    Summer Excursions
To The East
FROM  PRINCE  RUPERT TO
Winnipeg and return .    880.00 New  York and return- $110.70
§   St. Paul and return S<l""" Toronto and return  . .     $02.00
ihicago and return  ...  872.50 Humilton'and return        S!r.!.i><>
Montreal and return . . $105.00 Boston and return $110.00
I
Correspondingly low rales to oilier points. Trains leave
Prince Rupert at 10:30 a.m. on Mondays, Thursdays nnd Saturdays,
making close connections at  Winnipeg for all Eastern centres.
G. T. P. Steamers
I Prince Rupert and Prince George
sail at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle. Through tickets to San Francisco, Sun
Diego  and  other  southern   points on sale al Q. T. P. tlckel offlce.
For  full   information,   reservations and through  tickets, apply
G.    T.    P.    TICKET    OFFICE, THIRD AVENUE, PHONE -.(ill
AGENCY   ALL  ATLANTIC   STEAMSHIP   LINES
-SAIL'S*-."«*_"-^^^
llll iiillllllll-WH   I HI I I   II       I    llll
K^*T-mi---^*—;-
j aKKKKKKKt-tftK-*"^^
FOR HIRE OR FOR
CHARTER
Oil  burner—carrying (]iuilificd  m
nl <■'.  I".  I', wharf, ni . Murine Iron-
CAP l*M.
• ■'O-oi-atHKi-r.'.
.',0__a«.ii_WaKH"' ..-•'... .   1000000000 OQ0
I  THE IMPERIAL WATER HEATER COIL
5 Pat. nti d in Canada.
EOR STOVES, RANGES AND FURNACES
Is made to meel the demand!   foi   Instantaneous  Hot  Water,  for
baths, etc., without extra use of fuel.
7<i IN I Si: IN   PRINCE RUPERT
Canadian Pacilic Railway
Lowest rales to nil l.asi.-iii points   via   steamer  lo  Viuicouv.     nml
Meals and  ii.-.u.  Included   on   hIciiiiipi-,
OPlil.l I'l'.NI),
In
I-i,IV i:s-*  UO. \I    -i.i   I In',..i ND,
Siindiij II p.in.
j, c. icml Agent, i orncr   11.inl    Ive,   and   l■■ m
y
WARN1NG
Purchasers of any Infringements on
this coil lay themselves liable to
prosecution, equally wifh the parties.
making and  installing same.
_MM__M_M___________I
HO 0_« 4444 0044O4O O HO 40 O O 0 O &»&!»« ay »OlKiaDOOOI.0O0Ot>aKiaac>O
THE UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C. LTD'
S.S. VENTURE
Southbound Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Sailings for Granby, Simpson and the Naas
Sundays at Midnight
>  -,r * t      Eor further particulars apply to
JOHN   BARNSLEY,  AGENT        ::        681 Second Ave., Plione 508
Agency   Atlantic    Steamships.
3   _*-»l_*'H-«WiKt.KKra^ " * 0 * OOOC IS -".-'"11H8S.C l>trt-_-C-CH-*KHK>«-^^
Absolutely guaranteed (<> give satisfaction.
Prices for coil including   connections   $20
COIL ONLY $15,   LESS CONNECTING
THE   RELIABLE  PLUMBEH
Phone ISO        I*.  O.  Box  805
HARRY HANSON Thursday. July  1,  1915.
PRhNCE    RUPERT    JOURNAL
GRANITE
GRANITE  of best quality and thoroughly tested  for sale
Cut Stone or Crushed  Rock in
Quantities
NEIL J. McLEOD   Phone Green 217
New Wellington
Coal
The Favorite Household Cool
Cleanest, Brightest and Best
Rogers & Albert
Second Aveuu*
Phone 116
PHONE 5S4
P.O. BOX 60
P
FOR
APERHANGING
AINTING
OLISH1NG AND
WALL TINTING
HIGH-GRADE    INTERIOR
DECORATING   A    SPECIALTY
Martin Swanson
SECOND AVE. MEAR MeBRIDE
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES
For Rent
REASONABLE    RATES
THE
Continental Trust
Company
I Capt. J. McGee 1
M.M.S.A.
Masters and Mates prepared
for examination. Compass ad- '
juster. ;
Phone Red 502 j
"NAUTICAL   ACADEMY"      j
Helgerson Block, opposite
Royal  Hotel }
CANADIAN STEAM
LAUNDRY
NOW OPEN FOR  BUSINESS
,| Latest and Approved Methods
HOnly   Skilled    Operators  Em-
ployed
Phone us and we will call for a
trial  bundle
Note   our   address:
515   SIXTH   AVENUE   WEST
Phone No. 8
Canadian Steam  Laundry
C*CrC-l-l-_-t__-C .-MHliKH»i'HKHS_*t-*--_.
NOTICE   OF   CANCELLATION    O-
RESERYE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Reserve existing   on    Detention
Island by reason of a Notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on
he "IOtli of May, 1912, is hereby can
•lied.
R.  A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister cf Lands
lepartment of Lands,
Victoria, B.C.,
SYNOPSIS     OF     COAL      MINING
REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and a portion
of the Province of Britisii Columbia,
may be leased for a term of twenty-one years at an annual rental ef
$1 per acre. Not more than 2,560
acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for a lease must be
made by the applicant in person to
the Agent or Sub-Agent of the district in which the rights applied for
are situated.
In surveyed territory the land
must Le described by sections, or
legal subdivisions of sections, and
in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant himself.
Each application must be accjm-
panied by a fee of $5, which will be
refunded if the right* applied for are
not available, but not otherwise. A
royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine
shall furnish the Agent with sworn
returns accounting for the full
quantity of merchantable coal mined
and pay the royalty thereon. If the
coal mining rights re not being operated, such returns should le furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal
mining rights only; but the lessee
may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be
considered necessary for the working of the mine at the rate of $10
per acre.
For full .nfurmation application
should be made to tl.a Secretary of
the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent
of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
NOTICE.
The Canadian Patriotic Fund.
Will those who need assistance
from the above fund, resident ln the
city or district and whose breadwinner is on active service with tbe
forces of the Empire or her Allies,
kindly notify tbe secretary of the
local organization,
tf W. E  COLLISON,
P.O. Box 735.
Phone Blue 183        Res. Phone lii
UP-TO-DATE
LINDSAY'S CARTAGEaSTORAGL
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
126  FOURTH  STREET
JINGLE POT COAL
lo handled by us. All orders recelvi
prompt attention   Phone No. 68.
CHKHKtf«HmH»a"HS_<HK^^
RUPERT MARINE IRONWORKS AND
SUPPLY CO., LIMITFD
WATERFRONT,   PRINCE   RUPERT
ENGINEER8,    MACHINISTS   AND MACHINERY CONTRACTORS
Specialists  in  Marine Power  Plant*   Oil, Steam, or Gasoline.
II. ('. Coast Agenttc I'or the British I'l-oinboiit Si-mi-DicscI Oil Engine—tin- most reliable and economical, nml the cheapest
power for fishing bonis, tugs and passenger vessels,
Standard Gas Engine Company's Engines niul Parts in stock.
Steel, Iron, Oils, Wire Hope, Balata Beltln, B. ('.     Wood   Pulleys,
Columbian  Bronze Propellers, Storage Batteries, Dynamos nnd
Marine Accessories,
pairs—First-Class equipment    and staff for machine and ship re
pairs.
P.O. BOX 515
TELEPHONE 313
a^3^aH-^>^-_-_^-_-8-«_^Ml WW*
GOVERNMENT   WEATHER
REPORT.
Furnished by F. W. Dowling.
For  24  hours ending 5  p.m.
Wednesday, June 29, 1915.
Bar. reduced to sea level . . . 30.187
Highest temperature 71.0
Lowest  temperature     55.0
ANOTHER BALL
GAME ON MONDAY
THE CIVIL. SERVIOE TEAM WILL
PLAY THE CLERKS A
aMATCH
Challenges   Have  Resulted  In  Meeting Being Arranged
For.
Monday evening another ball
game is to be played at Acropolis Hill,
as a benefit for the Hospital. The
Civil Service team that has been
looking for trouble, has teen met by
an acceptance from the clerks of fhe
city and the match arranged for.
The Civil servants will line up as
follows:
Pitcher—Vallquette.
Catcher—Weston.
First  base—Saint.
Second base—Cross.
Third  base—Falls.
Rightfield—Lake.
Leftfield—Morgan.
Centrefield—McMaster.
Utility Man—Homer.
Pitcher—Jarvis McLeod.
Shortstop—Howitt.
Leftlield—Gammon.
Rightfield—Williamson.
Third  base—Whitely.
List of Officers.
Manager—J. H. McMullin.
Captain—Buck Irwin.
Booster and Handy Man—J. R
Beatty.
Bat Boy—Sheriff Shirley.
Utility Man—XV. E. Burrlt.
Trainer—Lochy McDonald.
Publicity—Hugh   Dunn.
Treasurer and Legal Adviser—
Harry McLeod.
Coach—R, O. Jennings.
Bucket Man—C. L. Cullin.
The Clerks have a lineup as follows:
Catcher—Bob Frizzell.
Pitcher—Hugh Scott.
First base—Leo Ives.
Second  bast?—Babe Fortier.
Third base—A. Astori.
Shortstop—Harold Nickerson.
Rightfield—R. H. Pillar.
Centrefield—W. G. Barrie.
Leftfield—Ed.   Gillingham.
 o	
INVESTIGATING WANTS
IN THI-a MATTER OF SERVICE
Officials   Of   Tlie   Mail   Service   Are
Now In Tlie City.
There has arrived in the city, B.
M. Armstrong, of Ottawa, who Is the
controller of the train mail service
for the Dominion. He is accompanied
by Mr. Glover of the same service. J.
O. McLeod, of Vancouver, who is in
barge In the west of the railway
service Is also here, meeting these
officials.
Wlille here they are investigating
the service in nnd out of Prince Ru-
pett.
 o	
Choice Groceries—Fair Prices.
Mussallen & Company, Limited,
42,'! Fifth Avenue offer the best
classes of groceries at fair prices.
Try an order and be convinced.
Phone  123.
Skeena Land District — District cf
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Mc-
Mann, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Carpenter, intends to apply for permission to prospect the following described lands for coal and, petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
at the mouth of the Andrews River
where it enters Victory Bay, at the
north end of Seal Inlet, thence west
80 ohains, thence north 80 chains,
tlience east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains to the point of commencement.
HARRY  McMANN.
Dated February 24th, 1915.     ap22
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Albert Scott
Lock, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Stock Salesman, Intends to apply for
permission to prospect the following
described lands for coal and petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
forty chains west and ten chains
south of the south-east corner of
Port Channel, thence east 80 chains
tbence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains to
the point of commencement.
ALBERT SCOTT LOCK.
Per J. W. Connell, Agent.
Dated February 23rd, 1915.       ap22
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John Wesley
Connell, of Victoria, B. C, occupation Broker, intends to apply for
permission to prospect the following
described lands for coal and petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
120 chains east of the south-east
corner of Kiokathla Inlet, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains to the point of commencement.
JOHN WESLEY  OONNELL.
Dated February 22nd, 1915.      ap20
Dated February 20th, 1915.       apl8
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Dows
well, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Hotelkeeper, intends to apply for
permission to prospect the following
described lands for coal and petrol-
mm: Commencing at a post planted
10 yards south of the mouth of Con
nell River in Burgess Bay, Port
Channel, thence 80 chains south,
thence 80 chains west, thence 80
chains north, thence 80 chains east
to the point of commencement.
ROBERT DOWSWELL.
Per J. W. Connell, Agent
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of Prince Rupert, occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for per
mission to prospect the following
described lands for coal and petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
240 chains east of the mouth of West
River, thence east 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
the point of commencement.
GEOKGE   W.  KERR,
Dated February 20th,  1915.      apl8
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that 'Albert Scott
Lock, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Agent, intends to apply for permission to prospect the following described lands for coal and petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
80 chains north of the north-west
corner Of Lot. No.  2435, thence : ~
chains west, thence 80 chains nortli,
thence 80 chains east, thence 80
chains south to the point of commencement.
ALBERT   SCOTT   LOCK,
Per J. W. Connell, Agent.
Skeena Land Districl — District of
Queeu Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Mc-
Mann, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Carpenter, Intends to apply for permission to prospect the following described lands for coal and petroleum: Commencing at a post planted
160 chains east and 80 chains south
o€ coal licence No. 10020 (south-east
corner), thence east 80 cliains,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains to
the point of commencement.
HARRY McMANN,
Dated February 20th, 1915.     apl8
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Ernest Cross, of Calgary, Alta., occupation Rancher, intends to apply
for permission to prospect the following described lands for coal and
petroleum: Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains north of the centre
of Freemen's Island, tlience 80
chains north, tbence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains south, thence 80
ohains west to the point of commencement.
ALEXANDER  ERNEST  CROSS.
Per J. W. Connell, Agent.
Dated February 23rd,  1915.       ap22
JANES GILMORE
ARCHITECT
8econd Ave. Near McBrlde St.
HAYNER BROS
Pioneer Funeral Directors and
Enibaliiiers.     Open    Day    and
Night.    Ladies'    Assistant    in
Attendance.
PHONE 86.    710 THIRD AVE.
Genuine Wellington Coal
OUR   COAL LASTS   LONGER—IT'S THE BEST.
Phone 15—Prince Rupert Coal Company
68th Regiment, E.G.O.R.
REGLMENTAL   ORDERS.
Orders by  Major J.  H.  McMallin,
Commanding:
June 26,  1915.
Appointments.
Lieut. R. I. Van der Byl is appointed acting-adjutant vice, Lieut. A.
Carss on leave.
Parade.
"A" and "B" Companies will parade as one company at the assessor's
office, Monday 28th inst. at 8
o'clock sharp.
B.O.
B. I. VAN DER BYL,
Lieut.,
Acting Adjutant.
GARDEN COMPETITION.
EMPRESS HOTEL
3. Y. Rochester V. D. Ca.le_
Third Ave. Betwe.n Sixth and
Seventh Sts.
European Plan; 50c to $1 Per Day
The Provincial Department of
Agriculture Is offering cash prizes In
the following classes. Three prizes
to be given in each class.
1. For House Garden, where occasional employment of labor tak.*s
place for garden work. lst. $12,
2nd. $8, 3rd. $5.
2. House Garden, where all work
has been done by occupant and
family. Carpentry work may be done
by the owner or hired. 1st. $15,
2nd. $10, 3rd. $5.
3. Ordinary lot, without house,
under cultivation. To be judged
mainly from the standpoint of utility.
Area under cultivation to be not less
than one thousand (1,000) square
feet.    lst. $25, 2nd. $15, 3rd. $10.
An entrance fee of one dollar, ($1)
will be charged. Competition open
to all citizens of Prince Rupert.
Final judging to take place in
August, according to the season.
Plots must be staked out properl--,
or the lines of the garden clearly defined.
Apply by letter to
A. H. TOMLINSON,
Department of Agriculture,
Box 1693. City.
Garden owners or lot cultivators
are urged to send in their names and
make this a successful competition.
The department reserves the right to
cancel prizes not properly competed
for.
NOTICE  OF  SHERIFF'S  SALE
IN    THE    SUPREME    COURT    OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Between
MICHAEL SEEBURG, Plaintiff
and
W. J. KENNAUGH, Defendant.
PURSUANT to an Order of His
Honor, Judge F. McB. Young, dated
the 4th day of June, 1915, I will offer
for sale by public auction at my offlce
in the Court House, Prince Rupert,
B.C., on MONDAY, THE 20TH DAY
OF DECEMBER, 1915, at the hour of
ELEVEN O'CLOCK in the forenoon,
the following described lands: —
Lot Fourteen (14), Block Twenty-
one (21), Section Six (6), in the City
of Prince Rupert, Province of British
Columbia, subject to a Judgement for
tho amount of $1,519.74; interest
thereon at the rate of five (5) per
cent, per annum from the 22nd day
of December, 1914, and costs Incidental to the sale.
Dated at Prince Rupert, B.C., the
7th day of June, 1915.
J-9-6. JOHN SHIRLEY
Sheriff of the County of Atlin.
NOTICE TO MARINERS
Mariners are hereby notified that
the lights on the following buoys
have been changed from occulating
red, to occulating white:
Sand  Heads,  (Roberts Bank).
White    Rocks,     (Browning     Entrance).
Vancouver Reck, (Mill bank
Sound).
Hodson  Reef.
This   effects   Notice   to   Mariners
(No. 17 of 1915.
( F. T. SAUNDERS
Sub-Agent.
HOTEL DIRECTORY
Members of the Prince Rupert
Licensed Vintners' Association
WINDSOR HOTEL
Cor.   of First   Ave. and   Eighth  St.
W. H. WRIGHT, Prop.
HOTEL CENTRaAL
First Ave. and Seventh St
European ani American Plans
81.00 to 32.50 Per Day
Peter Black, Prop.
KNOX HOTEL
First    Ave.    Between    Eighth    and
Ninth
European Plan; Bates SOc to $1.00
Per Day
Besner & Besner, Props.
BOYaAL HOTEL
Corley & Burgess, Props.
Third Ave. and Sixth St.
European Plan Steam Heated
BEAVER     WHOLESALE     LIQUOR
CO., LIMITED —
Second Ave. and Sixth St.
Phone 102
PRINCE RUPERT IMPORTING CO.",'
LI.MITED
Fraser nnd Sixtli Sts
Phone 7
Phone 93.
P.D. Box 38.
Pacific Cartage Limited
General  Teaiii.ng **ot
Furniture  Moving a Specialty.
When you buy COAL buy the BEST
— Ladysmith  Lump or Comox
Washed Nut.
THE MOST CO..: ORTABLE
TOURING CAR
IN THE CITY
Answer* all calls day and night
Phone 99
Stand:    Hotel   Prince   Rnpert
GUABANTaEED
American Silk
HOSIERY
WE   WANT   YOU   TO   KNOW
THESE  HOSE
They stood the test when all
others failed. They give real
foot comfort. They have no
seams to rip. They never become loose and baggy as the
shape is knit In, not Bresssd ln.
They are GUARANTEED for
fineness, for styls, for superiority of material and workmanship, absolutely stalnl s.aad to
wear six months without holes
or replaced by new pairs free.
Our Free Offer
To every one sendlag us 60c
te cover shipping charges, we
will send, subject to duty, absolutely free:
Three pairs of our famous
men's A M E P. I C A N SILK
HOSE with written guarantee,
any color, or
Three pairs oi our Ladles'
Hose, in rllack, Tan or White
colors, with written guarantee.
DON'T    DELAY—Offer    expires when  dealer ln your   locality Is   selected.   Give   color
and size desired.
The International   Hosiery Co.
21 Blttner Street
Dayton, Ohio • U.S.A.
00000000044444444444444440
Change of Business
To whom concerned:
Having disposed of my interest In
the New Wellington Coal Company,
to Mr. M. P. McCaffery, who in connection with Mr. M. Albert will continue In the coal business ln Prince
Rupert. I take this opportunity^',
thanking the public for their tirade
and patronage during the pa3t seven
years, and bespeak for the new firm,
the continuance of your good will and
valued orders.
Very respectively,
J. H. ROGERS.
Prince Rupert, B. C, June 12, 1915.

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