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Prince Rupert Journal Nov 11, 1910

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Array ■HaI
New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Print* $i»i#et Suwrta
19
WO
High.-Claas
Job Prinfrng
u In all Lines
VOLUME   1
'jiblished Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,   FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11,  1910.
Price,  Five Cents
NO. 43.
\
CONTRACT IS LET
Gurvitch  Will  Do the  Work on
Third Avenue at a Low
Rate.
Council   Decides That  it Would Not
be Wise to Award to Anyone Else
... but the Lowest Tenderer
M. Gurvitch has been awarded the
contracts for grading sections D and
G on Third avenue. It will be remembered that his tender on each of
these pieces of work was far below
any other received. The streets committee at the Monday evening meeting of the council recommended giving him the contract. Aid. Hilditch
took exception, basing his objection
on the fact that his tender was so
much below the others and so materially below the city engineer's estimate that It was Idle to think the
man could carry it out.
Other aldermen agreed it might
be left over, but when the council
met last night Aid. Pattullo stated
that Mr. Gurvitch had secured bonds
and he felt the contract should be
let to him as the lowest tenderer. It
would be a dangerous precedent to
introduce that any one but the lowest tenderer could secure the contract. He moved that the contract be
awarded him.
Aid. Hilditch continued his objection. He argued that the man could
not be expected to carry the work out
at the price and conform to the regulations as to labor conditons. He
contended that it was the duty of the
council to look to the interests of the
city. If the man could carry out the
contract he favored its being let. It
should be looked at just in the same
light as if it were their own business.
Aid. Pattullo did not favor the
view taken by Aid. Hildltch. He was
not favorable to opening up the avenue of the lowest tenderer not being assured of the contract. He
would rather lose the $1,800 than
run that risk. „.-
Aid. Naden did not see any way
out of It other than to *ote for the
contract now that this man had put
up the bond. If the man had come
through with the statement that he
had made a mistake he would not
have been against passing It over.
Aid. Harrow thought the city was
not taking much risk. By letting
station work at present the contracts
were not being lived up to, he believed.
Aid. Pattullo said that if the contracts were nol being lived up to this
could be soon  righted.
Aid. Lynch said the letting of subcontracts was no violation of the contract. He was himself in favor of
station work. He was in favor of it
on tiie same basis as Foley, Welch
& Stewart were, that it encouraged
ambitious   men.
The motion carried and the Contract was awarded to M. Gurvitch.
The acting mayor, Aid. Mobley
called attention to the fact that It
had been brought out that the bond
was not high enough to allow the
stopping of work at any time, and
yet ensuring that the city would not
be placed at any loss. If that were
the case the bonds should be increased. That was only a business proposition.
Aid. Hilditch pointed out that the
cost of the bond was to be taken into
count. He though It would be better
to show common sense in granting
these contracts.
Aid. Lynch thought that by the
system of keeping back twenty per
cent on the amount due each month
the city was safeguarded. In this
case the contractor would have to go
behind to the extent of $5,000 the
first month before the city would be
at a loss.
Aid. Hilditch moved that all
monthly estimates relative to contracts should be referred to the
streets committee before coming before the council.
The motion carried.
The flrst groundwork of religious
life Is love—love to God and man—
In the bosom of the family.
o
Let us live with our children; so
shall their lives bring peace and joy
to us; so shall we begin to be and
to become wise.
 o	
Man must be able to fail In order
to be good and virtuous, and he
must be able to become a slave In
order to be truly free.
BASKETBALL LEAGUE
Under
Kaien  Island Club  Gymnasium
Committee Five Teams are
Entered.
Schedule Will be Arranged Later—
Social Organization Playing Important Part in the City
The need of a gymnasium and
place for recreation has been for
sometime seriously considered by
many young mn of this city. The
Kaien Island Club, which has recently been established in this city and
which now has a membership of
about one hundred and fifty, saw the
need of this and while the building
in which the club now makes its
home was being erected, they made
ample preparation for a gymnasium.
The result is that the ivaien Island
Club has today one of the finest gymnasiums of the north; all modern appliances both for exercise and for
pleasure are there ready to be taken
advantage of by any of the members
who may so desire it. Up to this
time a large number of the members
have taken a great deal of interest
in the gymnasium, and have used
their spare moments to good advantage.
It was never the intention of tbe
executive or the members to make
the club purely an athletic club. .The
gymnasium was not intended for that
purpose but. rather as a means of
recreation to many of tbe members
who have been in the habit of exercising in this manner in other cities.
An excellent committee has been
chosen to look after the gymnasium
in all its branches, of which Leo
IVaugh is the chairman. Other members of 4bat commitee are Ralph Har-
rnp, II. A. Sprague, Dr. J. P. Cade, T.
H. Arneil, Arthur Ryan and Jervis
.McLeod.
Basket-ball seems to have interested a great many of the members of
the club and already as many as thirty have expressed the desire to play
the game during the winter months.
The committee has arranged for a
basket ball league and five teams
have already entered, and are now
practising very hard so that when
the games start there will be nothing lacking to make the contests very
interesting. The captains of the various teams that have been formed
are:. Ray Dowers, Max McLeod, Jervis McLeod, Ramsey and Mclnnes. A
schedule of games has not been arranged as yet, still the teams are
working in earnest to prepare for
the events, and each one intends to
carry off the trophy which is to be
provided for the wining team. It remains to be seen, however, which
loam will win out, for they are all
very evenly matched and the various
(Continued on P.ige Eight)
SCOn ACT CRUSADE
A Vigorous Campaign is Being Waged to
Close up Bars of the
City.
Voting Is to Tnke Place on December
22nd—Forces Organized For
the   Fight
The date fixed for Ihe voting on
the Scott Act hns been fixed as December 22. The opposing sides are
organized for the fight which has
been in progress for sometime. Those
in favor of the license system of controlling the liquor business will take
pains gbefore the date arrives to
put the situation clearly before the
public, urging tbe system as in the
best interests of the public.
On the other hand, the supporters
of the Scott Act are vigorously at
work pushing the campaign for the
introduction of the Dominion measure. The latter held a meeting on
Wednesday evening in the Presbyterian church when, with C. V. Bennett in the chair, speeches were delivered by Rev. W. H. McLeod, Rev.
Charles Sing, F. J. Davidson, I). McLeod and G. R. Naden.
It was decided to fully organize
for the campaign. An adjourned
meeting will be held In the Presbyterian church at 8 o'clock Monday.
LOCAL  NEWS ITEMS
James Whitfield, who took a city
lantern from its place on the street,
estreated his bail of $20 yesterday.
Charged with using obscene language on the street, a local young
man was fined this morning in the
police court.
—o—■
The marriage of Mr. D. H. Mclnnes and Miss Emily J. Newington
took place on Tuesday, ihe ceremony
was performed by Rev. F. W. Kerr,
pastor of the Presbyterian church, at
bis home. The wedding was a very
quiet one. The bride was given
away by Mr. David Anderson. Mr.
and Mrs. Mclnnes are spending their
honeymoon in the south.
—o—
International Temperance Sunday
will be observed in the Methodist
church next sabbath, Nov. 13. The
pastor will speak in the evening on
"The Two Bars, the Licensed Bar
and the Bar of Science." Services
will be held at 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m.
Temperance lesson study in Sunday
school classes meeting at 2.30 in the
afternoon. Everyone is cordially invited.
Dr. N.  M.  McNeill  returned  from
a trip south on Wednesday.
—o—
J. McGrath of this city is one of
the party who has gone to Goose Bay
to work on the Hidden Creek property, bonded by the Granby smelter.
Services will be held in the Baptist
church as usual next Lord's Day.
In the evening Rev. to. II. McLeod
In continuing his series of November sermons, will preach on the subject, "Jesus—The Great Prophet,
Are His Phophecles Being Fulfilled
Today?"
,—o—
Under the streets bylaw which was
passed last evening provision was
made to give perambulators the right
of way on the sidewalks. To Aid.
i-attullo is due the credit for noticing that as at first drafted baby carriages might be forced to the middle
of the road and he protested strongly
against it. Aid. Barrow seemed to
have some dread of the carriages being made to take up a position across
the sidewalks while those In charge
looked at hats in the windows. It
was readily agreed to give baby carriages full  rights  on  the sidewalks.
PLANS SMELTER FOR
OBSERVATORY INLET
Granby Consolidated Company is Making Investigations
Into the Value of the Ore on the Hidden Creek
Group of Mines Bonded From
M. K. Rodgers
COUNTY COURT CASES
Actions   to   Be   Tried   Before   Judge
Young at Next Week's
Sitting.
this
Will    be    the    Last    Regular
Court Before the Law
Vacation
TO OBEY THE RULES
Members of City Council Taken to Task
for Violation of
Regulations.
Aid. Hildltch Has Some Sport nt Expense of His Brother Aldermen on Hoard
The attention of the Granby Mining & Smelting Company has now
been attracted to the north and by
next spring active work may be commenced upon a smelter on Observatory Inlet. This is the result of the
deal recently completed by which the
Granby company takes a bond on the
Hidden Creek group of mines controlled by M. K. Rodgers. The representatives of the Granby company
together with Mr. Rodgers, reached
the city by the G.T.P. steamer Prince
Rupert on Wednesday afternoon. On
reaching her they transferred to the
steamer Venture, which was awaiting
their arrival and a little later left
for Goose Bay where the mines concerned in the transaction are located.
The property will be subjected to a
thorough test in order to satismy the
holders of the bond. Should the results be up to the expectations, a
smelter will be constructed, and the
ore will be treated on the ground.
The matter will be sent to the Granby smelter at Grand Forks. A force
of about twenty-five men will be employed at the mines and the most of
these who are under the charge of
Mr. White went north on the Venture
last evening with the ermainder of
the party.
Interviewed upon their arrival
here the officials of the Granby and
Mr. Rodgers gave the information
contained above. There was no attempt on the part of any of them to
exaggerate the position. The matter
Is one of business purely, and the
Granby company is undoubtedly well
satisfied with, the outlook or they
would not have taken the steps they
did. Tite development that will follow upon the proving of the worth of
the mines will mean much for this
pari of the province. The establishment of a smelter by a company like
known mining men on the coast. He
was for years in charge of the Nickel
Plate at Hedley in which mine he
is still interested. He represented the
Marcus Daly Investments for years
ai.<ii At one time practically controlled all the properties at Portland
Canal. These were allowed to slip
by the Daly Interests and for two or
three years Mr. Rodgers has been developing his mine at Goose Bay.
About $250,000 has been expended
in opening up the ore bodies, erecting
wharves and installing a sawmill and
an eight-drill compressor plant. According to the report of the Granby
expert on which the bond was placed,
the Hidden Creek group has now in
sight 400,000 tons of copper ore
averaging three and one-half per
cent, with subsidiary values in gold
and silver equal to those occurring
in the Granby mine.
Two of the ore bodies have been
proved to have a width of thirty-five
and one hundred feet respectively.
They have been tapped by cross-cut
tunnels at a depth of 200 feet. Several ore shipments haev been made.
The deal was put through by Jay
P. Graves, president of the Granby
company as a result of the examination made by O. B. Smith, Jr., of
Phoenix, who has gone north to take
charge of the work.
Mr. Smith is a graduate of the
Boston Institute of Technology and
although a young men stands high
in the profession. He expects to
spend the most of the winter In the
camp, but before the next payment
comes due In June a decision will
likely be reached as to the character
of the property.
to. Yolen Williams, consulting engineer of the Granby corporation and
who laid out and for years directed
On Wednesday next the regular
county court sitting will open in the
court house before Judge Young. As
this is the last regular sitting of the
court before vacation it is expected
considerable business will come up
and will be disposed of before the
judge leaves for the south.
The list of cases includes the following appeals from J.P.'s which
were adjourned from the October
court.
Rex vs. Dorsey.—Fisher & Wharton for defendant.
Rex. vs. Astoria.—C. V. Bennett
for the defendant.
Civil  List
The civil list, which is adjourned
from October court is as follows: —
Hopkins vs. Harper.—L. V. Patmore for plaintiff; A. T. Sanders for
defendant.
Watson vs. Flewin & Sons.—Williams & Manson for plaintiff; Carss
& Bennett for defendants.
Dudoward vs. White.—Fisher &
Wharton for plaintiffs; L. V. Patmore for defendant.
Stephens vs. Scheiman & Gottstein
—L. V. Patmore for plaintiff; Carss
& Bennett for defendants.
Loiselle vs. Beaudoin.—Williams
& Manson, for plaintiff; Fisher &
Wharton for defendant.
Wesley  vs.   Alexeee.—Williams  &
Manson    for    plaintiffs;    Fisher    &
Wharton for defendant.
New Cases
The new cases in the civil list contains the following:—
Wark vs. Richards.—L. V. Patmore for plaintiff; Fisher & Wharton
for defendant.
Robinson & Clayton vs. Gibson.—
A mechanics lien action.
Canier vs. Gibson.—Williams &
Manson for plaintiff; Carss & Bennett for defendant.
Sloan vs. Foley, Welch & Stewart.
—Wiliams & Manson for plaintiff; L.
V. Patmore for defendant.
There  are  a   few  judgment  summons also to be heard at the sitting.
 o	
A CHURCH SUPPER
At the council meeting last evening a little spice was thrown into
whal was otherwise a very quiet
meeting, when Aid. Hilditch suddenly remembered lie had a little objection to raise. lie called attention
to the fact that they had just passed
a bylaw to regulate the streets^ and
the thought had occurred to him .iiat
members of the council should be the
last to violate any regulations of the
city. He had seen work going on oa
Third avenue at a property where he
was informed no permit had been obtained for the undertaking. The
work was being done for a company
in which quite a few of the council
were interested. The members of
the council should set an example.
The reference was to the building
being overhauled for the Libera)
newspaper organ and Aid. Pattullo
at once took  exception.
He wanted to know of Aid. Hilditch who were the interested parties
on the council, and what authority
Aid. Hilditch had for such a statement.
Aid. Hilditch said he would name
those whom he had been informed
were shareholders and instanced Aid.
Lynch as authority for part of the
information. There was the mayor,
Aid. i'altuiio, Aid. Lynch, Aid Naden
and  possibly more.
Aid. Pattullo still in an impassioned strain said he never heard such
cheap clap-trap. If this was a joke
by Aid. Hilditch he could overlook
it. Because members of the council
were shareholders in a corporation
it did not follow that they knew all
that was being done.
Aid. Hilditch said his attention
had been drawn to it by a shore-
holder. Aid. Pattullo was such a
"stickler" on precedence that l.e
thought  he would just bring it up.
Aid. Mobley said he was glad they
were being watched so closely. Ho
was in the city hall that day and had
heard an application made in tha
matter.
The matter ended with a laugh
all round nnd threats thai Aid. Hilditch would be watched to
he left no lumber on the streets.
that
St. Andrew's Hall   Was Scene of   Excellent Entertainment Last
Night.
Young  Men  of  Anglican  Congref
tion Given an  Enjoyable
Banquet
...e vast operations of the cnmpanv
the Granby corporation will cause a | flt PhoenlXi w„s a membe'r of th(,
boom  among  the  various  proper!les
held In the coast camps of the north.
The smelter will afford a means for
the disposal of the ore produced and
party. He has gone north to see
the work well under way. Mr. Williams    has    a    splendid    reputation
among   the   mining   men   of  Ihe   In-
wlll  help  out  the  smaller  concerns | |(..
to a very marked degree.
It Is reasonable also lo expect tbat
Ihe company will seek other proper-1
ties close to the holdings  that they
have now acquired so as to enlarge!     A ;i) l)er epnt ,,;'"'       N '"    nlP"
the supply for the smelter.
If the bond is taken op a smelter
will be erected at lidewater near the
iroperty.
The bond which lias been given by
Mr. Rodgers is for $400,000, and represents a four-fifth Interest in the
Hidden Creek mines. These have
been worked for some time by Mr.
Rodgers, who has the greatest faith
in them himself. In connection with
theme there is a splendid water
power which it is estimated will furnish at a evry nominal outlay about
one hundred  horsepower.
Mr.   Rodgers   Is   one   of   the   best
ped to the converter in the company's smelter in Grand Forks. It
will then be converted into a 99 per
rent matte, virtually pure copper and
this product, in turn, will be shipped
to a New York refinery In order to
extract the gold and silver values by
tbe electrolytic process.
The Venture carried some machinery north for them also. Supplies
were Included in the freight and
compressor drills. Work will commence at once.
A supper was given last evening
In St. Andrew's Hall tor the young
men of the congregation of the
Church of England. The hall was
prettily decorated with flags and
bunting under which three long
tables fairly groaned Willi their
weight of good things furnished by
the ladies of the church.
Misses Alice Du Vernet, Emilio
Craig, Ethel Thompson, Pindar, New-
ton, (linn and Mebius were very
much appreciated for their presence
as well as their attention to the
During the evening Gray's orchestra
furnished a continuous conceit ol
most excellent  music.
Toasts were offered, according to a
well prepared programme, with Rev,
H. A. James presiding. The speeches
made wer,. very appropriate, and In
.i general way a most delightful evening of a least of reason and a flow
of soul was heartily enjoyed.
The following was the list of
toasts and speeches arranged for and
which with few exceptions was carried out, and was very much appre
elated by the audience:—
"The  King."-   The  National
them.
QUESTS OF THE (LI 1!
Ladies   Invited  to  Share  Hospitality
at Home ol Business .den of City
All-
The ad ion of the members of Ihe
Prince Rupert club In throwing open
tiie doors of their rooms on Wednesday evening is something which has
won for i hem the everlasting honor
of the ladies. The preparations for
the event were all that could have
been asked for. The floor was in
excellent condition for dancing while
the decorations including cut flowers
and bunting was of the most artistic
design.
The invitations were limited to
the club members and their lady
friends for the most part. Gray's orchestra furnished the music, while
the catering was under the charge
of the Tea Kettle Inn.
Among the ladles present were: —
Mrs. V. to. Smith, Mrs. VV. M. Law,
Mrs, Brandt, Mrs. li. Ollmore, Mrs.
Christie, Mrs. s. H. Johnston, Mrs.
Flexman, Mrs. R. Ross, Mrs. P, to.
Anderson, Mrs. Arnold, Mrs. C, II.
Wark, Mrs. McCaffery, Mrs. Hugh
Dunn, Mrs. Mclntyre, Mrs. a. Brown,
Mrs. Bondeau, Mrs. C. H. Newton,
Mrs. Clements, .Mrs. McLennan, Mrs.
II. II. Clarke, Mrs. .1. .1. Sloan. Mrs.
Frlzzell, Mrs. A. Ilrooksbanks, Mrs.
Hildebrand, Mrs. Craig, Mrs. McCoskrie, Mrs. 11. H. Morrison, Miss
Rochester, Miss Hazel Rochester,
Miss Mercer, Miss McMaster, Miss
Sawle, Miss Barker, Miss Gleeson,
Miss McPherson, Miss Craig, Miss
Helen Dunn, Miss Dudsle Dunn, Miss
Brodle Dunn, Miss Davis, Miss llan-
nalin, Miss (iiiin, Miss Thompson,
Miss  Elliot,  Miss Oliphant.
"The Anglican
City and Diocese.'
net.
"City     Roads,
Parks." Colonel
Church
—Bishop
1'av.
Davis.
ml
I m
the
Ver-
and
'The Development of the Country
tContinued on  Page Eight)
The Conservative Association will
meet In Mclntyre's Hall on Tuesday'
evening at 8 o'clock. Tite meeting Is
for the election of officers for the
year. Before the election members
j will  lie enrolled.
MpHHM ■ma
THE   PRINCE  RUPERT   JOURNA*
Friday, November 11, 1910.
THE PANAMA  CANAL
Progress on the Great Undertaking is
■ Fully Described by Well
Known Writer.
Interesting Facts Relative to the Big
Ditch  Which  is to Connect
the Two Oceans
Although we live in an age accustomed to marvel in the scientific
world, the greatest engineering feat
of the greatest engineering enterprise ever undertaken by man—the
digging of the Panama Canal—
namely the mammoth task of blasting the channel through the congested mountains thereby forming the
famous Culebra Cut, is the one
American work, if no other, that will
unquestionably stand on tlie pinnacle
of mae regardless of time, writes B
of fame regardless of time, writes
Blaine Patton in the Los Angeles
Times.
The Culebra Cut, or rather the cutting through the great layers of
•strata which forms the backbone of
the isthmus, always has been the
perplexing problem of the possibility
of a canal ever since the idea was
first conceived, more than 300 years
ago.
However, American ingenuity has
solved the puzzle, and the most recent figures show that this nine-mile
stone-encased section of the canal is
68.46 per cent finished, with 41.54
per cent to be completed. In cubic
yards 45,624,605 have been excavated, leaving 32,418,690 cubic yards to
be removed.
The new figures which have just
been compiled, and showing ithe number of cubic yards removed in the
Culebra Cut since operations began
in  1904, by years, follow:
1904     243,472
1905     914,254
1906         2,702,991
1907         9,177,130
1908       13,914,326
1909       14,579,838
1910 (three months)...     4,092,594
Grand  total       45,624,605
"1915 or Bust"
While the slogan of "1915, or
Bust" is echoed from the entrance of
the canal at the Carribean Sea to the
outlet at Balboa, on the Pacific coast,
it is interesting to note that the
grand total of excavation in the Atlantic, Central and Pacific divisions,
both wet and dry, in round numbers
has been 103,000,000 cubic yards.
This means that approximately 71,-
000,000 cubic yards of excavation
are still necessary to complete the
canal, half of the remaining work
alone being in the Culebra Cut, which
in itself is practically three-fifths
finished. Of course, these figures
do not include the work to be done
on the locks and breakwaters.
When the wedding of the two
oceans takes place—and there is no
• question but that it is a certainity
now—the mounded bed of the canal
as it penetrates the rugged jungles
of the interior will be at a sea level
of forty-one feet, the water standing
at an average of some eighty odd
feet through the Culebra Cut and
extending from the Gatun locks of
the Atlantic to those which are under
construction at Pedro Miguel in the
Pacific division.
To fully appreciate the enormity of
the task of making the nine-mile
Culebra Cut, the maximum elevation
of which is 550 feet, and which at
no place is less than 300 yards wide
one must either see the work or be
an experienced mining engineer.
The remarkable Galera tunnel
down in Peru, and the wonderful
Trans-Andlne tunnel, granting the
fact that its construction was carried
on tit an elevation of 100,000 feet
above sea level, and for that matter
any tunnel which lias ever been made
by man, can be drawn in comparison
to the greal work at Culebra. The
blasting ul' a tunnel only forms what,
could he compared 10 a small strip
or slice of the Culebra Cut. Any of
these tunnels In the form of a huge
glock would be lost in the channel
formed by the Culebra Cut.
Efficiency of the Labor
That the efficiency of the labor
used is constantly on the upward
grade is shown by figures obtained
at the office of the central division
engineer, who has charge of the operations at Culebra Cut. The total
amount of dynamite consumed during one month of this year as compared with the same month of last
year shows 375,000 pounds used In
excavating rock as against the 1909
figures of 625,1511 pounds. Even at
this more rock was excavated with
the smaller quantity of dynamite, the
average being 3.02 cubic yards of
rock per pound of explosives for this
year   as   compared   with   1.66   cubic
yards per pound last year.
This gain in efficiency in handling
dynamite amount to 82 per cent In
rock excavation por one pound of explosive, and means a great saving to
the government. The results are
highly gratifying to the official in
rharge.
Along the Culebra Cut, where the
ponderous steam shovels are at work
vomiting their contents into dump
cars, a sort of rivalry has sprung up.
The operators of the shovels endeavor to break records, and the Interest is keen, and in a measure, it
works to considerable good in accomplishing the great goal—getting
rid of the dirt and stone.
To see the gigantic steam shovels
at. work as they are today is to realize the impossibility of completing
a canal across the isthmus through
any other means. Even the tools
which were available thirty years
ago would not bo sufficient to perform the mighty task of cutting the
Culebra Cut through the stone and
dirt.
A record made during the month
of March, this year, by one steam
shovel working in the Culebra Cut
shows that 70,290 cubic yards of
rock were excavated in twenty-six
days, a wonderful feat in itself. The
best accomplished in a single day
was 4,823 cubic yards. This is equal
to the work of a small army of men
where pick and shovel furnish the
tools. The Suez canal was built by
natives carrying the soil out In sacks
but not so down there.
Excavation Figures
A record of eighteen steam shovels
which worked eight hours a day for
twenty-six days, one month this year
In the Culebra Cut, showed a total
excavation of more cubic yards of
dirt and rock than any previous
month. On April 11, these shovels
accomplished the most when in all
29,201 cubic yards were excavated.
In a recent issue of the Canal Record, the official weekly published under the authority of and supervision
of the Isthmian Canal Commission
at Ancon, figures were presented
which showed that the canal as originally planned in the report of the
minority of the International Board
of Engineers and adopted by Congress had been dug. This was a
total of approximately 103,000,000
cubic yards. Changes in the plan
made subsequently by order of the
president brought the total up to ap.
proximately 175,000,000 cubic yards.
Two slides of earth and rock Into
Culebra cut have caused considerable
inconvenience to the Americans.
These are located at Cucaracha, and
the village of Culebra. Three steam
shovels are necessary to handle the
material which falls into the cut,
where the steam shovels dump the
mixture of dirt and rock into cars to
be carried away.
It is said that this movement of
the hillside into the cut began as
early as 18S4, when the French were
at work on the canal. In all, close
to ,850,000 cubic yards have slid as
a result of the movement which Is
caused by a mass of rock and stone
slipping on a smooth substratum of! cade
rock, the movement being perceptible at all times of the year.
THE COAL DISTRICT
Optimism   of John G. Johnston,  Promoter of Big Company.
Graham Island's   Prospects   Will be
Developed by Capitalists
of Note
Some of those who have been
there profess to see in the recent announcement in the daily press of the
projected opning of large coal mine
workings on Graham Island, at the
northernmost end of the Queen Charlotte group, the first decisive step
towards the opening up of a section
of country which wil do much to
make the future of the Last Far
West great. Among the enthusiasts
is John G. Johnston, who is well
known in the whole of the north, Including Prince Rupert, who although
he is still a young man, is a pioneer
of the outposts, having struck them
first when he was eight years' old.
Cynics might say that Johnston is
prejudiced because he Is one of the
members of the big million-dollar
syndicate recently incorporated as
the Queen Charlotte Islands Collieries, Limited, to operate the new
fields. But that is not right. John-
ston was an enthusiast before the
syndicate was ever thought of. He
knows Graham Island, and, Indeed,
the other islands as well, from stem
to stern and amidships, too. He has
travelled the length and breadth of
this continent and been in the Old
Country and ln Europe. Yet Johnston swears by the climate of Graham Island. "Why," said he naively
the other day, "It is just like the
climate around Victoria. The Island
is level and covered with rich soil
of good depth. Almost the whole of
It will be excellent for mixed farming. You just watch Graham Island
grow!"
Surely, if the development promised by the new syndicate is carried
out,  Graham   Island  will  grow  and
grow  fast,  and   we  may  expect  to
have     another    star  In  our  Pacific
Islands constellation in the very near
future.    As for the syndicate, Johnston had his part in the building up
of that.    News had come down that
there  had  been  discoveries  of rich
coal  lands at  the  northern  end  of
the Queen Charlottes.   Johnston had
been a miner and   prospector    for
years;  he knew the north, too. Consequently, he was commissioned  by
his associates to' take a crew of experienced stakers and make investigations. A small book might be writs-
ten truthfully about the adventures
the stakers had, for looking up new-
coal fields in the wild north is not
as comfortable a game ns croquet on
the greisn.   One of the first incidents
was a narrow escape from drowning
during    the   voyage-,  in  a gasoline
launch,    to    the    island.   The party
could  go neither  forward nor back,
and finally landed at great peril in
a cloud of spray, the aftermath of
one of the- greatest storms of a de-
water. Taking everything into consideration—and I had the best to
choose from—I consider that you
have the pick of the lands on the
island."
The programme of the new syndicate, to be carried out in the near future, according to report, includes
the building of big collieries as soon
as possible. Shipment to Vancouver
will be begun at once, and shipments
are also to be made to other Coast
cities. There is also a movement for
the establishment of an Admiralty
coaling station near Masset Inlet.
The new syndicate includes: Walter
C. Nicol, of the Province, Vancouver;
MacDonell, Gzowski & Co., contractors, Vancouver; James A. Moore,
president Western Steel Corporation,
Seattle; Charles G. Pennock, manager Bank of Ottawa, Vancouver;
Walter F. Evans, of Dyke, Evans &
Co., Vancouver; Andrew Laidlaw,
capitalist, Spokane; H. L. Simmons,
capitalist, Vancouver; R. P. McLennan, of McLennan, McFeely & Co.,
Vancouver; Charles H. Allen, barrister, Vancouver; John G. Johnston,
miner, Victoria; James E. H. Barnet,
capitalist, Renfrew, Ont.; R. C.
Hodgson, hardware merchant, Vancouver; J. H. Senkler, K.C., Vancouver; George M. Gibbs, fiscal agent,
Western Steel Corporation, Vancouver.
 0	
REBUILDING DESERT
Lord  Kitchener Tells  of What Has
Been Done in the Soudan
SAVING SEALS
Method  Adopted to Cnre  for  Young
Whose Mothers Have Been Killed
The revenue cutter Bear, the latest steam vessel to leave Behring sea,
brought tn orphan fur seal pups
whose mothers were killed by Japanese poachers. The pups, reared by
hand by sailors on tire Bear, will be
sent to Washington, D.C., where further experiments in feeding them
will be made. The seal mother will
nurse only her own baby, and formerly when the mother went to sea
to feed on fish and was butchered
the infant on the shore starved to
death. Last year a boatswain on a
revenue cutter found that he could
raise abandoned seals by feeding
thoin  with   milk  from  a  bottle,  but
hhls    was   very   troublesome.      This
•.ear men on the Bear discovered that   among the best in the world
Later 011 Johnston alone was up
against a stiff proposition. He had
no big boat to work with, and ordinarily his "stunt" would have been
thrown over by the average prospec7
tor. Johnston was at Masset Inlet;
thirty-eight miles away, across a
stretch of the open Pacific, were
some properties which he wanted to
stake for the- syndicate'. Others who
were interested didn't bother to keep
track of Jonston's movements. They
didn't think he would try to make
those northern properties. Johnston's best arilable craft was- a sixteen-foot "dugout" owned by a si-
wash. When he made up his mind
to go, the Indian begged him to give
up the idea. Johnson's insistence
prevailed, however, and leaving the
Indian behind and taking a twenty-
day outfit with him, he covered the
thirty-eight miles of nasty sea, toyed with doath a dozen times, staked
his claims, and came back.
When Johnston and his crew finished their work, they had staked
out for the syndicate 48,620 acres
of  coal land  which  is   said    to    bo
Then
If a ligament hampering the baby's
tongue were lanced, the teeth would
be available at once and I lie pup
would eat fish. The interior department hopes to be able to save the deserted Infants on the rockeris, but
dos not purpose, as stated in certain
eastern newspapers, to domesticate
the fur seal in fresh water and stock
the great lakes with them. Captain
F. to. Barthoff of the Bear, reports
the condition of the Arctic Eskimos
greatly improved by the mission
work and the annual visits of the
cutters. They no longer live in igloos,
bul in framed dwellings. Whalers
who spread whisky, vice and disease
among the natives, are now excluded
from corrupting the Eskimos.
Johnston went to Prince Rupert and
paid the licenses. When the report
of the stakers was turned in, a portion of It read; "Your large tract
east of Masset Inlet and south of
Dixon Entrance Is of a gentle rolling
nature, with everything in place. Old
coal miners are of the opinion that
we will find the largest tract of unbroken coal lands on the Pacific
Const. It has also great advantages,
being only eighty miles from Prince
Rupert, on the route between British
Columbia and China and Japan. The
shipping facilities will also be excellent, as'there is a fine waterway run
nlng parallel to the eleven miles o"
coal lands on Masset Inlet, while the
two other tracts are situated on the
The rebuilding of Khartoum and
Omdurman In the Soudan were told
of by Lord Kitchener at the town
planning conference in London.
"In comparison with former conditions," said Lord IKtchener, "a
revolution has been effected; the old
Khartoum was an African pest house
in which every tropical disease thrived and was rampant. Now malaria
is almost unknown, though mosquito
curtains are not in use, and last year
there were only eleven cases of malaria in a town of 50,000 inhabitants.
"I do not think that such results
have been achieved in any other British dependency, and this excellent
work in Khartoum does not stand
alone in the Soudan, wher sanitary
conditions generally prevail, and demonstrate to.the thorough efficiency
of the administration of the country.
"I claim to have sketched out the
rough outline of this scheme. The
work itself has been carried into ef-
LOTS FOR SALE
IN
Ellison
AND
Prince Rupert
Houses, Stores, Offices to Rent.
MONEY TO LOAN
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate       Exchange Block    Notary Public
feet and adapted to varying conditions by my successor, Sir Reginald
Wingate."
"I well remember," he added, "the
difficult problems which had to be
determined after the conquest of the
country; how best to evolve out of
the ruined remains left by the dervishes a practical scheme for the reconstruction of Khartoum on sanitary lines, and it is a matter of gratification that the plans decided on
have proved serviceable and have
stood the test of time.
"It is also most satisfactory that
they have been found to be in general accord with the principles of
sound development as laid down in
the recent Town Planning act of
1909.—principles which it is the first
object of this conference to popularize throughout the world."
The lovingly cared for, and thereby steadily and strongly developed
human life, also the cloudless child-
life, is of itself a Christ-like one.
NEW DOCTORS
Result of the Examinations for Medical Men
As a result of the semi-annual examinations of the British Columbia
Medical council the following have
been admitted to practice as physicians and surgeons in British Columbia:—
Doctors C. S. Bastln, J. H. M. Bell,
A. D. Bechtel, M. B. Campbell, H. H.
F. Coulthard, D. W. Davis, D. Donald, to. F. Ewing, E. P. Fewster, J.
M. Fowler, S. Holman, A. W. Hunter,
O. S. Large, H. C. L. Lindsay, W. F.
McDonald, to. F. McKay, R. McKen-
zie, H. McMillan, M. H. McNaughton,
J. J. McNaughton, H. B. Marchant,
W. D. Murray, J. Nay, K. J. O'Neill,
L. A. Patten, S. B. Peele, A. G. Price,
A. G. Ridewood, J. K. Shaw, B.
Shaw, R. Shimlein, A. C. Sinclair, N.
Telfords, S. T. Wilson.
As recently as 1837 forgery was
punished by death ln England.
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interest in the coming Metropolis of the North. Friday, November 11, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
THE SPORTING WORLD
NELSON  AND  MORAN
Promoter James W. Coffroth, of
San Francisco, has announced that
he has signed Battling Nelson and
Owen Moren to fight twenty rounds
before his club on the afternoon of
November 26 in the open air arena
at Eighth and Howard streets. Jack
Grace, Nelson's manager and trainer
said that the former champion's en
gagements in Kansas City had been
cancelled temporarily, and that Nelson would stay on the coast indefinitely.
SWIMMING  CHAMPION
While C. M. Daniels, of New York,
stands supreme among sprint swimmers, it Is the opinion of many good
judges that Frank Beamepane is the
best all-round performer in the world
today. His lengthy list of championships since he arrived in England include the 100, 220, 440, 500
and 800 yards and one mile. Besides
this, he has broken the 400 metres
record, his time at Brighton recently being 5 minutes 27 seconds, the
previous best being 5 minutes 34 4-5
seconds by H. Taylor at the Olympic
games in  1908.
Battersby has had to play second
fiddle to the Victorian all through
the season, but there is some excuse
for this, as he has never been quite
himself, having had a lot of ill luck
ln his early training. Possibly Battersby will regain his honors next
year, and on last season's form, he
should be bard to beat. His record
for 440 yards is 5 minutes 26 2-5.
seconds, which is now more meritorious than Beamepane's 400 metres
(437.4 yards)  best.
This has not been a good year for
native swimmers, and two other
championships have been won by
visitors during the last few days.
The first of these was the 150 yards
back stroke championship at Brighton, which went to M. Weckesser,
Circle de Natation de Bruxelles, who
beat F. A. Unwln, holder, to two
yards. The Belgian also had the
satisfaction of beating the record,
his 1 minute 57 1-5 seconds being
2-5 of a second better than the previous best by Unwln.
The 200 yards breast-stroke championship  at  Sunderland enabled  the
second visitor to score, the race go
ing to H. Julin, of Sweden, in 2 min
utes 53 seconds, though had P
Courtman been able to compete, h«
might have retained the honor, his
time last year being 2 minutes 46
1-5 seconds.
GAME PRESERVE
A booming expedition on which
H. H. Heatley, a young Englishman,
has just started for America Is of a
very new fashioned sort.
British East Africa is the country,
and Colonel Roosevelt, erstwhile
mighty hunter in that region, Is a
godfather to Heatley's enterprise.
For it was on the Englishman's hunting grounds, Kamiti ranch, just off
the Uganda railway that the strenuous nimrod bagged his first "rhino,"
his first leopard and his first lots of
other animals. Colonel Roosevelt
was Heatley's guest for three or four
of the "bulllest" weeks of his whole
trip before he passed on to Ju-.Ia
ranch further north, owned by the
tropical St. Louisan, W. N. McMillan.
These two ranches, Kamiai and
Ju-Ja, where Colonel Roosevelt got
the bulk of his big game, are now
to be united into a big shooting reserve, containing some 50,000 acres
of the best country in upland East
Africa and Heatley has started for
New York to induce other American
sportsmen to follow the strenuous
lead of the ex-presldent.
The developments that follow
should be unique. It is proposed to
organize a club of American big
game shooters who shall take over
a permanent charter to this section
of the East African domain. There
hunters will enjoy big game shooting de luxe. From the elegantly ap-
pointed shooting boxes which it is
hoped may be established over the
country, it will be as gilt-edged and
harmless a pastime to pick off lions
and leopards in Africa as it is to
shoot grouse on the moors of Scot
land.
With the exception of tigers and
elephants, every important species of
game in Africa will be found on this
ranch, which is in the centre of the
richest game country of the world.
Lions, leopards and other members
of the cat family are so plantiful
that they are classed as vermin, and
a man may shoot as many as he likes
without a license.
CANADA AFTER CUP
Even at this early date, and before
the first fall of snow, the Ottawa
Rowing club is looking for a suitable
niche in yon senate chamber in
which to place the grand challenge
cup. All of which goes to show that
the O. R. C. anticipates trimming
those blokes across the water. And
who can tell it, but what the much
despised Canuck stroke may turn up
trumps, though up-to-date, however,
our style has hardly been noticeably
successful in the Motherland?
Winnipeg was fortunate to capture
the Steward's Cup last July, after
which Mr. George Gait hired a brass
band and paraded the streets of the
prairie city, reminding the populace
thereof that the result was a splendid argument in favor of the Canadian stroke. Thls was the flrst time
the cup had been captured by an ut-
side crew since it was put u.j io.
competition.
Winnipeg's win is no particular argument in favor of the Canuck method. A crew from either Oxford or
Combridge that trained faithfully
should wallop the Westerners at any
stage of the game. Winnipeg's win
was a mere matter of training rather
than a matter of stroke.
Canadian crews for years have
been treated rather as a joke at Henley, Leander, London, Thames Rowing clubs, etc., looking upon we
colonial muckers as "pie" when they
get us on the classic course, and
made a mistake of holding Winnipeg too lightly. The westerners'
stroke is identical with that used by
the Argonauts.
Argos maintain that it is the best,
and so it may be for this neck of the
woods, but. you'll notice they haven't
yet been able to develop a stroke that
could catch the judge's eye on the
classic lienly course. There is an
old saw relating to the proof of the
pudding, and If Mr. George Gait considers he has at last unearthed a
stroke that can win abroad, why not
return to England next July and
demonstrate the fact? Why not return and demand the trophy?
On the principle that two heads
are sometimes better than one, why
not include Buck Jackes in the Henley invasion of next July? The
Yonge street banker certainly showed well at Washington, and many of
his friends think he has the speed
to bring home the bacon.
LA Ml PURCHASE NOTICES
PHONE
Letter Heads, Envelopes,
Statements, Business Cards
Visiting Cards, etc., etc.
Prince Rupert Journal
Coast  l.aud District—District of
G 1/ ppTl D
TAKE ."OTICE that I, J. Adolprr
Perry, oi' Vancouver, B.C.. occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence soutii 40 chainB to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th. 1910. Jy22
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ANTI-ORIENTAL
Toronto   (.'lobe   Backs   up   the
Stand Taken by Premier
.McBride
*
In common witli many other eastern paper the Toronto Globe has
come to realize that the sentiment
against Oriental imlmgration in tliis
province is interwoven in the very
life of the people, and in a recent
issuse the Toronto paper felt constrained to endorse the action of the
McBride Government in its refusal to
grant the Grand Trunk Pacific per-
misison to employ labor of this class
on its construction work.
Here is what the Globe has to say
on this subject:—
"A valued friend of The Globe,
writing on 'Our Undeveloped Country' in another column, supplies the
text for some remarks that require
coninent to be made. Mr. Orr says
he can hardly bear to write calmly
of the stupidity of the Government
of British Columbia in refusing the
application of the transcontinental
railways to bring In the laborers
from East India, so much needed in
hurrying forwaid the construction of
those great arteries of commerce between the East and West. Mr. Orr
regards it as 'wickedness thus to
prolong the condition of arid waste
in which so great a portion of North
America has so long existed' when
'our gigantic and brawny fellow-subjects from northern India are willing
to lend us their aid in turning our
rocky and thickly-timbered back
country into a land of plenty in half
the time it will take with the present
dearth of labor.'
"In this one can almost hear again
the arguments that led to the intro
duction of the African negro Into
the Vlrignia plantations. It was
hard work growing tobacco with
labor so scare. To open up the back
country would be a slow process. The
negro was brought in, and it is not
unlikely that there was a promise
to re-export him "after serving us
for five or six years.' Today the
greatest race problem that has ever
confronted mankind is before the
people of the United States as a result of their haste in nation-building.
It, will perhaps take another century to determine whether or not
the Southern States are ultimately to
become a black's country, but already the negro question has cost a
great war and the shedding of much
blood and many tears.
"It may be said that the yellow
man and the brown man on the Pacific slope will never multiply as the
negro has done in the South, and
that no peril to the principle of a
white man's Canada is involved in
admitting several thousand Oriental
laborers, alien in speech, customs,
and ideals. How can we be sure of
that? The Jap and the Chinamen
and the Punjaubee are not fools.
They know the land of promise when
they see it just as quickly as the
Russian Jew. The Chinese quarters
of Victoria and Vancouver are
swarming with almond-eyed children. Why should not a fresh invasion, even a supposedly temporary
one, give us like permanent Oriental
settlements in Calgary and Edmonton and Winnipeg, and the great
cities of the East? There is only oi a
way of safety.    Keep the door hut.
"Canada is not an old man in a
hurry who must make haste because
the long night cometh. The nation
is but in Its opening manhood.
There are centuries of progress before it. Far better will it be to
build slowly and to build well, even
if we of this generation can but lay
the foundation, than In a frenzy ot
unnecessary haste introduce men
and women from Asia who may become as great a menace to the
Anglo-Saxon on the Pacific as tiie
negro is In the South. The Globe
finds no klckedness but much to
commend in the action of those in
authority who labor to maintain
barriers against he peopling of the
Pacific Coast from the Orient."
 o	
One day little George's father
brought home some Rocquefort
cheese. Upon being asked how he
liked it, George replied with all seriousness, "Papa, it tastes just like
the animal cages at the circus."
The one hundred and sixteen mile
extension of the Mexico Northwestern Railroad, now In progress, will
connect the city of Chlhua Hua with
El Taso, Texas, and open up large
tracts of valuable timber land in
'•'.•(■stern Chihuahua.
THE FRUIT INDUSTRY
Remarkable Development of This Important Branch of Business in
British Columbia.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given  that application will be made to the Legislative  Assembly  of  the  Province  of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with    power    to    construct,    equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of  railway  of  standard   guage   with
any  kind   of  motive   power   for   the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and   with   all  the  powers  contained
in the "Model Railway Bill":  Commencing from a point at   or    near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, in
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River;   thence up the North side of
the  Skeena  River  to  a  point  near
Hazelton;   thence to the junction of
the   Bulkley   River;   thence   up   the
right  bank  of  this River  eight   (8)
miles to the Suskewa River;  thence
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north   end   of   Stuart  Lake;   thence
north  of  McLeod  Lake  to  the  Mis-
nlchinca  River;   thence  up  the  Mis-
nichinca River  by  Summet Lake  to
Pine River Pass;  thence north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
this   River  to   Moberley   Lake;   and
thence   by   the   Peace   River   to   the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British  Columbia;   and  with
power   to    construct,   operate    and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and  ferries;  and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks  in  connection  therewith;   and
to   build,   acquire,   own,   equip   and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats,  and to operate the same on
any  navigable   waters;     and     with
power  to  build,  equip,   operate  and
maintain   telegraph    and     telephone
lines  in   connection  with    the     said
Railway and branches, and to transmit  messages  for   commercial   purposes,  and to charge tolls therefor
and to generate and to sell electricity
for  the   supply  of  light,   heat  and
power;  and with power to expropriate   lands  for   the   purposes   of   the
Company;   and   to    acquire     lands,
money   bonuses,  privileges  or  other
aids from any Government,  munlci
pal corporation or other persons  or
bodies;  and to levy and collect tolls
from  all  persons  using,  and  on  all
freight  passing over  any   of    such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels  built  by  the  Company;   and
with power to connect with and make
traffic   or   other  arrangements   with
railway,   steamboat,   or   other   companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this  11th
day of August, 1910
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
COAL NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to pur-
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-!ctlase the following described lands.
Innes, of Prince Rupert,' occupation Commencing at a post planted on the
mariner, intend to apply for a north bank of the Skeena River at
license to prospect for coal and petro- the south-east corner of oeo. T
leum on the following described Church s pre-emption, thence north
lands:—Commencing at a post plant-i4,0 chains, thence east 40 chains,
ed on the south shore of Crow Bay, thence BOUth to the bank of _ the
thence north 80 chains, thence west;
80 chains, tlience south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.E. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Bay,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
figures Quoted by Hon. \V. J. Bowser nt National Apple Show
Held in Vancouver
Hon. to. J. Bowser, acting minister
o fagricullure, speaking at the National Fruit show in Vancouver, said
in part: —
"I might state for a few moments
the great progress that has been
made in fruit growing in this province within the past few years. A few
years ago, the acreage under fruit
was very small, but here in 1910 we
have 120,000 acres under fruit culture. We have been successful at
five Royal Horticultural shows in
London in carrying off the gold medal
in competition with the whole British Empire, and these medals will be
on exhibition here today. Eight years
ago, our fruit values were less than
$400,000, and in 1910 they are over
$2,000,000; and after the consumption of fruit In this province we expect to ship out over a thousand carloads to the northwest, and other
provinces. We have shipped already
one carload consigned to the British
Isles for exhibition only, and after
this show we expect to send another
car-load for exhibition there. I understand that eleven out of fourteen
car-loads In this exhibition are from
British  Columbia."
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Smith,
of    Fort William, Ont.,    occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7  miles south  of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
5%   miles west from the shore line,
thence   SO   chains   west,   thence   80
chains south, thence 80  chains east,
thence  SO  chains  north  to  point  ot
commencement, containing 640 acres.
MARY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  HOENY, Locator.
to.  A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along to. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, tbence west SO chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640. acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HOME GRANT.
Frank R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Frederick
Babe, of Fort William, Ont., occupation  barrister,  intends  to apply  for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing  at  a
post  planted  about  five  miles  soutii
of  the  southeast  corner of Lot  227
and two miles west from shore line,
thence  80  chains  east,     thence     80
chains south, tlience 80 chains west,
thence  80  chains  north   to  point  of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
FREDERICK BABE.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. O, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence soutii 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian   Fish   &   Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J.  H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena  Land   District—District cf
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE  NOTICE   that  James   Murphy,  of  Fort  William,  Out., occupation coal merchant, intends to apply
Ifor permission  to  purchase the  fol-
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants, [lowing described  lands:—Commencing at a post planted about live miles
soutii  from   the  southeast corner  of
Lot   227,  and   two  miles  west  from
shore   line,   tlience  east   SO   chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence south 80 chains to
point   of   commencement, containing
640 acres.
JAMES MURPHY.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot   443,   thence   west    20     chains,
Skeena  Land   District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE   that    Arthur    A.
.,    „„    ,   . .  Vickers,   of  Fort  William,  Ont.,  oc-
thence south 20 chains, thence east:culali .   mtenn- ,,, „..,,,' tnrl-  -•-*    =.   .....-....=
5 chains, more or less to high water, *„ ™ »K«tkS lb fl, forty c'"ains' thenoe southerly
mark, thence following along the !descilbed 1, nds Commencini -I ^-f?ll0WlnK "'" sl»"opi,ieK of 'he fore-
ui-i. —. ,..„.,. ._, .. |(t...iniM it   i.iud.-.     (.iimiio-i,     at  a. iR),ore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the fol--
lowing described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mils south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
to. A. Ronev, Agent.
Dated July 7th,  1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occu-
ation manufacturers, Intend to apply
or permission to purchase the fol-
owlng described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains soutii of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty eiiains,
thence     north    forty  chains,   thence
high water mark to the point of com-:      t    lanted  ab        f „
mencemeiR and containing 20 acres|?rom £he 80Uthea8t oorner of LBotT27D
and two miles west from shore line,
jthence west 80 chains, thence south
J 80  chains,  thence    east    80  chains
more or less.
The  Canadian  FiBh  and  Cold
Storage Company,  Limited,
Dated JuneJ20th   1910bUry' Ajtia Itn9nce  north  80   chaltlB  l0  P°lnt  of
'  ' '"""   -'"'• '•'"■ ini I commencement, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR A. VICKERS.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
LAND  Pl'RCHASE  NOTICES
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena—Range   Five.
TAKE   NOTICE   that  I,   Chas.   F.
!   Skeena  Land   District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation ;     TAKE NOTICE that John C   Mur-;'I''ii'Til"'1'  lands:— Commencing  at  a
Queen  Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited.
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th,  1910.
Rose  Harbour, Q.C.I. A5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE   NOTICE    that    Arthur    A.
Wilson, or Fort William, Ont., occupation  banker,  Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following
contractor, intend  to apply for per- K8?'  of  Fo1',1  William,  Out.,  occupa-
post      planted   about   7   miles   south
PRINCESS ADELAIDE
Despatches state that the Canadian Pacific steamer Princess Adelaide, on her way to this roast from
the Clyde, was at Monte Video on
October 81. Owing to her limited
coal capacity, she is making a comparatively slow trip and is expected
in Victoria about the middle of December.
Shortly after her arrival the Adelaide will replace the Princess Royal,
which, after making one trip to the
north, will relieve the Charmer. The
Charmer is not to be sold, as rumor-
mission to purchase the following de- i,lon £?"■"?■ lnt°nd8 £ W? ,for ■.nd"/'/" mtb^TestTrom .Wl.nJ
' ° permission to purchase the following  '"l(1   '   -   nines  west   hum shore linn,
scribed  lands:—Commencing   at    a described  lands:—Commencing  at  a thence  west  sn  chains, thence north
post planted on the north bank of the  post  planted  about  live  miles  south   k"  l!iai"s-  thence  east     80    chains,
Skeena  river  at  the  southwest  cor-i'rom the southeast corner of Lot 227   tne«ice  south   80   chains  to  point   of
ner    of   Lot 530, thence north  40 f,ud tw° miles west from shore line. Il'"""""nr*^*1 Tl^lXJ"*
.   .       ,. '.    .     ,,.....       tlience west SO chains,  thence north1 ",IMl  '     v        "    "
chains, thence west about 40 chains 80  chaillSp     thence  eaBt  g„   oha,nSi
to line of Cassiar Cannery, thence thence soutii 80 chains to point of
south to the Skeena River, thence commencement, containing 640 acres.
east about  40  chains  following  the! JOHN  C.  MURRAY.
, .   ..     ,., „, .i Arthur Robertson, Agent,
shore    of   the Skeena  River  to  the       hated August 20th, 1910. S30
place    of    beginning, and containing	
about 160 acres. j  skeena Land  DIgtrlct—District of
ARTHUR  A.  WILSON.
Arthur Robertson, Asent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
CHAS. F. PERRY, Locator
R. F. Perry, Agent
Dated Sept. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, William
David Allen, of Victoria, B.C.. agent,
intend to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
Queen  Charlotte  Islands.
;ent. I     TAKE NOTICE that Alexander C.  northwest corner of "Lot "r>4 2" Range
018   .Moffat, of Fort William, Ont., occupa-  5  Coast   (Skeena),  thence   e'aRt     60
_ tion agent, Intends to apply for per-  chains to the Inner part of Klnnealon
mission    to   purchase   the   following ; Inlet, tlience south 80 chains to south
,,,s  described   lands:—Commencing  at  a east  corner of said  lot,  thence west
ed, but will be fitted with new boll
and employed In the coast service as  post planted about seven miles'soutii   80  chains  to" 'westerly"limit"Of  said
rrom southeast corner of Lot 227 and lot, thence north and'at right angles
1V4 miles west from shore line, : to the southerly limit of said lot to
thence east SO chains, thence north th i shore l'ne, thence north along the
SO chains, theme west 80 chains, shore line of said Inlot to place of
thence south SO chains to point of ibeglnnlng: containing about 600
commencement, containing 640 acres, acres, more or less
ALEXANDER C. MOFFAT. WILLIAM DAVID ALLEN
Arthur Robertson, Agent, j Robert Mason, Agent
Dated August 20th, 1910. 830       Dated Sept. 23. g.2J
an  extra vessel
The Adelaide Is credited with a
speed  of eighteen  knots.
In all things works one creative
life, because the life of all things proceeds from God. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Priday, November 11, 1910.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada. $2.00 a year: to points outside
of Canada. ?i.'i.0U a year.
Advertisingjrate furnished on application.
(i. II. NELoON,
Editor.
Friday, November 11, 1910.
SMELTER CENTRE
The arrival in the city two days
ago of a party of men who are engaged in the mining industry on
their way to investigate the desirability of installing a smelter is an
Important move as far as this part
of tiie country is concerned. Men
of tiie class of those interested in the
Granby company is a sufficient guarantee that there will be no exploiting
on mere "hot air." The Granby Is a
..usiness proposition and when those
interests have seen fit to take an option on uoose Bay there is every
reason for believing that the prospects are bright.
The building of a smelter, which,
it is stated, will follow as soon1 as it
is proved that the mineral is there
in the quantities in which it is believed to exist, must have its effect
it. the development of the north.
That industry, which will be about
1 ■ < ■ > miles from Prince Rupert, must
be tributary to this c-ity in a business
sense. It is from the warehouses of
this city that the supplies for that
camp must be obtained if the business men of the city lint put forth an
effort to win and hold it. The wholesale houses here will be the natural
source of supply.
The establishment of a smelter
will mean the building up of a lively
little settlement which must have its
effect upon the business life of Prince
Rupert.
 o	
PROMPT ACTION
The leaving of J. Fred Ritchie on
Wednesday njght for Stewart to lay
out the work for the provincial government staff relative to approaches
from the city to the wharf, is an instance of prompt action on the part
of the Government. Premier McBride
on his visit here realized the need of
this through the representations of
the delegation of citizens from Stewart. He did not wait until he went
south, but telegraphed Instructions
to Victoria to have the work done,
and $2,500 was at once placed at
the disposal of the staff.
While In no wise wishing to be
uncharitable, the Dominion Government's action with respect to the
wharf is in most striking contrast.
All summer long there has been one
steady cry going up from Stewart
with respect to this, urging action.
The business men and all travellers
have been subjected to endless inconvenience while the attempt to
move Ottawa has been in progrss.
WORK AT STEWART
Engineer Will  Lay Out Approach ot
the Wharf From City
■I. Fred Ritchie left on Wednesday
evening for Stewart to do the engineering work in connection with the
provincial government's extension of
the approaches to the wharves there.
The deputation from Stewart that
met Premier .McBride here urged this
and the Premier becoming impressed
with the need of immediate action,
telegraphed to Victoria for the authorization of the work.
No time has been lost, and Mr.
Ritchie has gone north to lay out
the  work.
 o	
Pe
rsona
Is
j ii.
tin ilness,
McMullin   is  in  Stewart  on
ROUND UP GAMBLERS
How Provincial Authorities Made   Example of Sealey Gaming
House
Laws .Must be Enforced is Mandate
From  the  Attorney-General's
Office in  Victoria
The way in which the provincial
authorities see that the lews relative to the sale of liquor and against
gambling are enforced Is shown in
the case of the raid recently made al
Sealey, near Hazelton. The Omineca Herald, now to hand, gives particulars of the raid, it says with
reference to the matter: —
Monday was gamblers' day at
court and If the police had cought
one more one their Saturday night
raid at Sealey they would have had
an even dozen. There were all classes
and conditions of gamblers; the
proprieto r of the place, some who
were gambling; some who were just
looking on and counting their winnings in imagination; and one who
was very drunk and asleep and only
awoke to find himself and the whole
bunch in irons. The police had descended on Sealey shortly after midnight and pinched "The Mule's"
place. All of the inmates, three in
number, who could muster a hundred
dollars were allowed to go on the
strength of their collateral and the
remaining eight were seated along
the wall, handcuffed together. A
team brought them to Hazelton Sunday evening and the next morning
they were all lined up before the
magistrate, with one rounded up in
town.
Of the Sealey bunch, David
Chevreir, "The Mule," was accused
of keeping a gaming house and the
fine assessed was one hundred dollars with ten dollars costs and two
months in jail. He is also registered
as a regular boarder at the Hotel
Maitland. William Lewis pleaded
guilty to a charge of gambling and
was fined fifty dollars and costs,
which he paid. Clifford Collins was
not guilty to hear him tell it, and he
paid a hundred and costs. T. Allan
admitted his guilt and got off with
paying $50. James Crocker was not
guilty, but he touched the century
mark too. Nicholas Mackie helped
out the good cause by pleading guilty
and paying $50 for freedom. Mick
Dottledge, Matt Jackobsen and Fred.
Sparling—Freddie's name has been
in this column before—were just,
plain rubbernecks, and that helped
them out so far that they had to pay
only $20 each, with costs. Alex
Boyd was very drunk and asleep
and did not know anything about any
game but he was fined $15. The
sum of one hundred and twenty-
three dolalrs, ofund on the table, was
confisticated, with the table, chairs,
chips, etc.
 o	
CITY DELIGHTED HIM
Hon.  Richard   McBride Pleased
Prospects in Prince
Rupert.
With
Me
Speaks    in    South    in    Highest
Terms of the Future of the
Place
HOME  RULE  POLICY
British  Politicians are Now Concerned
With Constitutional
Changes.
i'be Question of a  Federation Will
Shortly Play Important Part
in Imperial Affairs
Mr. Alex Vaughan, local traveller
for Wilson Bros, of Victoria, left last
nighl on the Prince Rupert for"the
south.
»     »     *
Mr. Andy George, assistant st.eam-
Bhlp and railway ticket agent in .1.
II. Rogers' office, left for Seattle on
tli,. Humbolal Wedesnday last to
spend a few weeks holidays among
friends and relations in Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver.
*    *    *
Mr. Cambell Johnston, accompanied
by Mrs. Johnston, returned from a
trip into the Klsplox country about
Hazelton. He Investigated ihe prospects for coal near Ground Hog
mountain. Further drilling will have
to he done before the true extent of
the body is known. Mr. Johnston
has gone south.
Hon. Richard McBride, on his return south from Prince Rupert, took
occasion to describe something of the
marvellous progress that is being
made at the northern port.
"Since I was last at Prince Rupert,
about fifteen  months ago," said  the
Premier,  "the  population  lias more
than  doubled   and  general   Improvements have increased In a still greater proportion.    The buildings under
way and already completed are for
the  most  part  substantial   business
blocks,  one  of  Ihe  most  prominent
being the cement and steel structure
which will be occupied by the Bank
of Montreal.    In Ihe residential section   of  Ihe   town   there  have  been
eiected  many attractive and  beautiful  homes,  many  of them  on  sites
that permit an unobstructed view o£
the harbor and surrounding country."
A  number of people from the interior whom the premier bad met on
former ocacsions were in the city and
according   to   their   reports   time   is
proving tiie vast potential wealth ol
i his province   In  Mr. McKride's opinion, there can be no question of the
future of Prince Rupert.
In conclusion the Premier complimented in tne hlghesl terms Captain
Johnson of the steamer Prince Rupert, and the Grand Trunk Pacific
company, for the very efficient and
enjoyable service now given to passengers for the northern port.
A further step has been taken in
the direction of "home rule all
round," now the leading issue in
British politics.
It is announced that the government will take measures to bring the
whole question before the country.
Whether the method adopted will be
the usual one of a general election
is not as yet clear, but no doubt now
remains that the Liberal party in
future will adopt federation of the
United Kingdom as its principal
plank.
A curious situation will thus be
created. For decades the Unionist
party has been fighting home rule
for Ireland. Should the leaders of
the Unionist now concede, as a result of the veto conference, the settlement of the constitutioual dispute
on federal lines they can hardly escape the reproach of having turned
their political coat in very remarkable fashion.
Imperial Federation
The imperial aspect of the scheme
of course appeals to the Unionists.
Imperial federation is one of their
planks and to be forced to oppose
it in order to cling to their principles
of no home rule for Ireland would
place them in an entirely false position before the country.
How they will get out of this dilemma remains to be seen. A probable solution is that they may refuse
to be parties to any federation
scheme devised for the good of the
empire as a whole.
That the imperial conference in
London next year will deal with the
question is not by any means certain.
The programme as already published contains no hint of a discussion
of federation. Whether later developments will lead to a revision
of the programme is as yet unsettled.
It is considered probable that if the
subject is broached at all it will be
in purely tentative fashion and with
a view to elicit merely hints and
suggestions for future guidance.
Sir Ackland Hood
Sir A. Ackland Hood, the chief
Unionist whip, speaking on the federation question, declared that the
electors of Great Britain had repeatedly shown their 'repugnance to any
form of home rule, and they were
not now going to be caught in the
specious trap which had been set for
them—home  rule  all  round.
"It is a curious situation," he said,
"to see the government proposing to
set up four parliaments—the same
government which only nine months
ago set forth with avowed intention
of destroying one great historical
house of parliament. Now they have
another scheme for dismembering
the other house. That is probably one
of the strangest things that has ever
been seen in the history of this
country.
"The next general election will be
no ordinary election for on it will de-
pend not only the future of this
country, but the future bf the empire."
In Labor Party
The attitude of the Labor party is
one that may affect the political situation very considrably. That party
is opposed to compromise with the
house of lords and will do its utmost to defeat the terms of any settlement that may be made. As the
Labor men may be largely reinforced
in parllamnt after the next general
election their threat is not one to be
dismissed as unworthy of attention.
In Ireland difficulties are sure to
arise over a scheme of home rule
in any shape or form. Ulster will
oppose home rule tooth and nail;
Mr. William O'Brien's party will
probably accept it; but the attitude
of Mr. Redoinnd's followers cannot
be forecasted with certainly.
Rival Nationalists
The rival Nationalists are still al
each other's throats, Mr. O'Brien, alluding to Mr. T. P, O'Connor's tour
in Canada and Mr. Redmond's
repudiation of an interview in New
York in which lie accepted "home
rule all round," declares: —
"The sugegsfion that Mr. Redmond's interview identifying himself
with devolution and home rule all
ound was an invention can deceive
nobody. The fact thai Mr. Redmond
did not loanfully repeat his declaration In his public speeches in Amer-
ica, while Mr. T. P. O'Connor was
ilnglng 'God Save the King,' and
pouring out imperial sentiment of
the most blatant order to his Cana-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A'. Bevan, and F.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIEL0==F0BE1ST EVER SINCE
:SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA"
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
mm
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
NEW TWIN SCREW STEAMSHIP
Prince Rupert
For Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle
Connecting with all Eastern Points, THURSDAY, 8.30 P.M.
STEAMSHIP BRUNO
For Stewart.—Sails after arrival of the Prince Rupert Wednesday.
For Port Simpson, Nnas and Stewart.—1 p.m., Monday.
For Porclier Island, Qneen Charlotte City and other Moresby Island
points.—10 p.m. Thursday.
Tickets, reservations and Information   from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
i   LOOK AT THESE 3   !
■ SPECIALS WHICH I
i OFFERING FOR
i 10 DAYS ONLY
L«—«...
<l
I
i
i
.J
per lb
Nabob Coffee
35c
Lipton's
Celebrated Tea
3 lb. CAN
$1.00
Five Rose Flour
401b. SACK.  . ty k4»\j\J
WATCH THIS SPACE FOR SPECIALS
IN FUTURE
Merryfield's
CASH GROCERY
ARE YOU GOING TO SPEND
XMAS
WITH THE OLD FOLKS AT HONE ?
ON NOVEMBER  26
The Northern Pacific Railway
Will run a special Pullman Tourist
Sleeping Car, "Eighteen Section,"
electric lighted, from VANCOUVER,
B.C., and SEATTLE, WN., direct to
PORTLAND, MAINE, connecting
with the White Star S.S. "LAURE.-.-
TIC," sailing December 3rd. Conned ions also made wit.i the White
Star S.S. "CELTIC," 20,000 tons,
sailing December 3, from New York;
American Lino S.S. "NEW YORY,"
sailing December 3 from New York.
Make reservations early and get
Ilrst choice. Only a small deposit
required.
J. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sun-
day nt 0 a.m.* for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—0—
Office  ln    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
ilian audiences only increases tlie discredit of the transaction."
Altogether developments In the
situation Invite and receive the closest attention of politicians and public alike.
hection with the production of the
Loudon Gazette for a hundred and
sixty years past, for In 1748 the journal bore the imprint of "Thomas
Harrison in Warwick lane."
NIOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—-o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,, etc.
J.  to. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
The long-standing contract for the
priming of the London Gazette, held
by Messrs. Harrison & Son, printers
in ordinary to his majesty, has been
given to another Arm. Messrs. Harrison and Son have been in close con-
LADYSMITH
I H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street I
• •   Paints. General Hardware,    . >
y     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot   and
Cold Water
Kates, $8.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs,   Annie   McGrath,   Proprlctoress
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;   right down town;   good
table board all  round
KATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week :•- | w
Friday, November 11, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ROGERS' ADDITION TO
ELLISON!
ROGERS' ADDITION TO
ELLISON!
The future commercial centre and distributing point of the Bulkley, Kispiox and
Skeena River Valleys, is now platted and lots offered to the
investor on the most liberal terms.
Rogers' Addition to this new G. T. P. Town of Ellison is located on
high level land only seven blocks from the propscd station and depot
grounds.
The G.T.P. Railway Company expects to reach this town early next
summer with the rails and property will then advance by leaps and bounds.
'There is no investment like Real Estate; it is safe, certain and profitable. We have all had tills experience ln the past and have but recently
experienced the marvellous Increase made on investment here ln Prince
Rupert.
TERMS:
Cash $10.00; Balance
Easy Payments
Another opportunity Is now before you.    Do not fall to take advantage of this; get in on the ground floor and reap the benefit of advance.
A limited number of these lots arc now offered at the low price of,
$100.00 TO $125.00
for corner lots
Size of lots are 33 by 120 feet, street  alleys  and   blocks  all   conform
to the Main Townsite of Ellison.
FOR MAPS AND FURTHER PARTICULARS CALL OR ADDRESS
The Christiansen-Brandt Company
Financial Agents
Corner 3rd Ave. and 5th St.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
* .j.»;..;. ♦;. .;. .j..;. »> <. »> ►> »>»:«.> ►> »>»!«»>»;«»> ♦> »> 4> •> *
*
MARINE NEWS
•(•*****+*#*** 4"t-'*4"t< .K<$.$.*****
To Arrive
Friday,    Nov.    11.—Camosun from
Vancouver.
Saturday, Nov.  12.—Princess Royal
from Skagway.
Sunday,   Nov.   13.—Camosun   from
Stewart.
Prince Albert  from  Porcher  and
Moresby Islands and Queen Charlotte City.
Monday, Nov. 14.—Princess Beatrice
from Vancouver.
Wednesday, Nov. 16.—Senator from
Seattle.
Prince Rupert from Vancouver.
Prince Albert from Port Simpson,
Naas and Stewart.
Thursday,   Nov.   17.—Prince   Albert
from Stewart.
Humboldt from Seattle.
To Depart
Friday, Nov. 11.—Camosun for Stewart.
Saturday,  Nov.   12.—Princess  Royal
for Vancouver.
Sunday, Nov. 13.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Monday, Nov. 14.—Princess Beatrice
for Skagway.
Prince Albert' for   Port    Simpson,
Naas and Stewart.
Tuesday, Nov. 15.—Princess Beatrice
for Vancouver.
Wednesday, Nov. IC.—Prince Albert
for Stewart.
Senator for Skagway.
Thursday,  Nov.  17.—Prince Rupert
for Vancouver.
Prince Albert    for    Porcher and
Moresby sllands, and Queen Charlotte City.
Humboldt for Skagway.
MARINE  NOTES
The Princess Beatrice will arrive
here Monday evening from Vancouver, and will sail Tuesday morning
for the same port. The Beatrice is
making a short run this trip, as she
Is not scheduled lo leave Vancouver
for Skagway again until November
19th. She will be the only C. P. R.
passenger steamer on the Skagway
run  during the winter months, and i
took Ave whales of the bowhead
species in six days, which is said to
be a remarkable haul for such a
short space of time.
The cruise was marked by two serious accidents. On August 31st, when
out after the first whale caught,
Boatsteerer Manuel Pena met with
a painful experience. He had fired
one tonite bomb into the whale and
was about to let away another when
the gun was discharged and the
bomb passed clear through his right
arm, making a hole as large as a
half dollar through the-flesh. But
for the medical skill of Captain
Foley the harpooner would probably
have lost his arm, but the skipper
rendered efficient treatment, removing the heavy wad from the wound
with considerable difficulty.
The next mishap occurred when
the second whale was being captured.
Boatsteerer Tarry Guptail's gun went
off prematurely. The bomb blew out
the bow and forward side of the
khaleboat and exploded. Guptail's
breast was pierced by twenty-one
pieces of brass. It required several
days for Captain Foley to probe for
and remove the pieces of metal, but
ft sally he pulled the boatsteerer
through.
Captain Foley's medical supplies
ran out and he decided to make for
Point Hope. He paid natives twenty
pounds of tobacco and ten sacks of
flour to take a message ashore to
Dr. Hawley, a missionary, asking for
some carbolic acid and other necessities with which the missionary sup-
sionary supplied him.
DECLINES PASTORATE
llcv. R. Milliken Will Not go to Victoria Owing to Lack of Harmony
will make from two to three trips
each month. The Princess Royal
will be used on the run between Victoria and Vancouver during the winter In place of the Charmer, which
has been taken off.
The Prince Rupert was somewhat
late in leaving last evening, owing
to the Bruno arriving late from Stewart. The Bruno pulled out for Porcher island, and Moresby Island
points at 11.30 last evening.
The Princess Royal is due here
tomorrow morning southbound. This
will be her last trip on the northern
run for the winter.
WHALING IS ACTIVE
Reporting a successful cruise, netting 12,000 pounds (if whalebone,
valued at $60,000, the whaling brig
Jeannette has arrived at San Francisco from the Arctic. The Jeannette
Rev. Robert Milliken, pastor of
Wesley Methodist church In the city
of Vancouver, stated yesterday
that he had written positively declining the call to the pastorate of
the Metropolitan church in Victoria.
Rev. Mr. Milliken said he had heard
that there was more or less division
in the church on the question of his
appointment and that he had written
lo them that lie would only accept on
condition that the congregation
would work harmoniously with him.
To this he had received no reply
and he had again written positively
declining to accept the call.
It was generally understood tbat
some of the congregation of the Met-
tropolltan church did not see eye to
eye with Mr. Milliken on questions
of religious doctrine, and lie said he
had no desire (o get mixed up in a
controversy with them that must
work to the injury of the church.
He said he was not surprised at
the people of the Metropolitan
church taking the action they had, as
It was only last sumemr, during the
general ('(inference in that church,
that a great deal of time had been
spent over the orthodoxy of Rev. Dr.
Jackson, The attack was led by the
Rev. Dr. Cleaver, at one time a well
beloved pastor of the church, and
It was perhaps no wonder that they
viewed with suspicion one who seemed to favor the side of Dr. Jackson
and  progress.
INTEREST IN NINES
Hazelton District  Properties Continues
to Attract Attention of
Investors.
Claims  Have  Been  Taken  Over  by
Angus Stewart and A. L.
McHugh
Angus Stewart and A. L. McHugh
have taken over four claims from
Sam Long and George McBain near
Hazelton, for $35,000, making a
cash payment of $3,500 at the time
of signing papers, says the Omineca
Herald.
George McBain has been retained
as foreman and went out to the rpop-
erty the next morning with three
men to build cabins for winter quarters. This will take about thirty
days and after that the force will be
increased to bIx men.
The claims were staked in August
of this year and have, consequently,
been held by the locators less than
ninety days. The discovery of the
cropplngs was largely accidental and
one more instance of-the luck that
surrounds the prospector's calling.
Both McBain and Long, who have
spent several summers prospecting
in various parts of the Omineca Mining Division, where engaged in building a bridge across Salmon creek for
the British Columbia government
when the big strike was made on
Four Mile Hill and they discussed
the possibility of there being any
mineral in the low hill between Salmon creek and town. When their
bridge contract was completed and
before leaving they concluded to
spend one day on the hill, taking
what they considered a long chance.
That day they found enough float
to justify them in looking closes and
camp was moved to the hill, less than
five miles from town, ; nd prospecting commenced in earnest. Within
the week, four veins, varying in
width from one to four feet, had been
found, and two groups of claims were
staked. The hill demanded close
prospecting owing to the fal'en timber and the depth of soil, One of the
veins was found through an upturned tree having a piece of galena, not
larger than a walnut, held in the
roots. This ledge was uncovered by
digging a trench up the hill, encountering it in less than twenty feet.
Clean galena ore shows values
around $150 a ton; when the black,
high-grade silver mineral appears in
it the values are more. There is
more or ess gray copepr In all the
ore and it also carries high silver
value in this vicinity; but has been
found nowhere In quantities.
Since the claims were staked the
owners have worked almost continuously and they have the showing in
surface trenches In many different
places  along  the  veins.
From Hazelton the properties are
about four and a half miles distant
In a direction almost due north, and
about two miles from the Skeena. In
elevation they are not over four or
live hundred feet above town with
| good  timber covering much  of  the
surface.    The formation is sedimentary, considerably altered.
Altogether, the property is almost
ideally situated for cheap and easy
mining.
The purchasers are well-known
through their connection with railway construction work along the
Skeena for the past two years and a
half. •
 o	
ALASKA   SCANDALS
U. S. Government Will Probably Con.
eel All Coal Land Filings
Of the six men indicted in Spokane
for alleged conspiracy to defraud the
United States of Alaska coal lands,
only one is in Seattle, Mr. Charles
A. McKenzie, a real estate and loan
agent. He had not heard of the
finding until told by the Associated
Press, and expressed surprise, saying that his attorney had assured
him there was no possibility of Indictment. His cousin, Mr. Donald A.
McKenzie, a promoter, is now in
Washington, where he is well known
as an Alaska lobbyist.
Mr. Charles M. Doughton is at his
home in Pearson, Kitsap county. Mr.
Harry White was mayor of Seattle
fifteen years ago, and resigned suddenly after serving a few months.
The allegations of fraud in the
Spokane indictments are similar to
those made in the Tacoma indictments of Mr. Charles F. Munday and
other promoters. It was stated at
the time of the Tacoma indictments
that there was no intention of prosecuting the claimants aside from those
indicted, many of whom acted in
good faith.
It is understood to be the purpose
of the government to cancel all the
coal land filings In Alaska and release land estimated to be worth one
billion dollars.
Counsel for Mr. Charles A. McKenzie said after the trial:
"Mr. McKenzie has been guilty of
no wrongdoing. He purchased fifteen coal claims from the original locators and violated no law in doing
so. Tiie locators lived in and near
Spokane, and Mr. Charles Doughton
acted as their agent in the sale."
NOTICE
In the County Court of Atlin, holden
at Prince Rupert.
In   the  matter  of Francis   Patrick
Murphy, deceased, and in the matter of the "Official Administrator's
Act."
Dated 24th day of October, A.D. 1910
UPON reading   the   affidavits   of
John Hugh McMullin, and the certificate of death of the deceased, it is
ordered, that John Hugh McMullin',
Official Administrator for the County
Court    District   of Atlin embracing
Skeena    and   Queen Charlotte Divisions, shall be Administrator of all
and singular the estate and effects of
Francis   Patrick   Murphy,   deceased,
intestate, and that this Order Is published in the Prince Rupert Journal
for two issues.
J.  McB.  YOUNG, J.
APPLICATION  FOR LIQUOR
LICENSE
(Form "A"
FASHION  MINTS
Grays, browns and borbeau blues
are dominant in the fashionable
color world of tailored suits.
Cheviots, serges, fine woven homespuns, and broadcloths i ie in popularity for tailor made suits.
Ostrich plumes are more plentiful in millinery lint it is the shorter
ones that  are  most  fashionable.
The scarf is replacing the one of
satin or chiffon, and it must be large
and rich to be fashionable.
I.ouis XVI slmiies, with high bandeaux, trimmed with flowei.-. wing -.
or bows, are prominent In millinery,
Whatever the shaj .    f the ne
it nuts: 1,-an forward over I hi  faci  lo
a marked degree to be fashioi
The suede glove lias not lost caste,
but the smooth gloves are more fashionable than they have been for some
time.
Short   sleeves,   long   sleeves,   and
NOTICE
In the County Court of Atlin holden
at Prince Rupert.
In the matter of the "Official Administrators Act," and in the matter of
the estate of Joseph Pregent, deceased, intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honour Judge Young made the
9th day of November, 1910, 1 was appointed Administrator of the estate
of Joseph Pregent deceased. All parties having claims against the said
estate are hereby required to forward same properly verified to me on
or before the 22nd day of November,
1910, and all parties indebted to the
said estate are required to pay the
amount of their indebtedness to me
forthwith.
Dated the 10th day of November,
1910.
JOHN  H.   McMULLIN,
Nil Official Administrator.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
IN THE  MATTER  of  the  estate  of
Charles   Henry    Gilroy,    deceased
intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honour Judge Young made in
Chambers the 5th day of November,
1910, it was ordered that Marie Victoria Gilroy, or her solicitor, It. I, i
13. Warton, shall be allowed to swear I
to the death of the above-named deceased as occurring on the 31st day
of September, 1910, al the expiration
of two weeks from the first pub'lca-
tinn of notice of the said Order unless in the meantime proof is furnished thai the said Charles Henry
Gilroy was alive subsequently to the
:: 1st day ol September, l i'l 0.
Such proof may be given In writing to the Registrar of the County
Courl of Atlin holden at Prince Ruperl at the Court House, Prince
Rupert, li. C.
I, J. Y. Rochester, of the City of
Prince Rupert, in the Province of
British Columbia, real estate agent,
hereby apply to the Board of License
Commissioners for the said City of
Prince Rupert for a Hotel License
to sell intoxicating liquors under the
provisions of the Statutes in that behalf and the by-laws of the City of
Prince Rupert, and any amendments
thereto, for the premises known and
described as The Empress Hotel, to
commence on the fifteenth day of
December, 1910.
And I hereby agree that in case a
licence is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or be permitted to be upon said premises, other than in the
capacity of a guest or customer, nor
shall Asiatics be mployed off said
premises to do any work to be used
In or in any way connected with said
premises, and 1 hereby agree that I
shall accept said license subject to
this agreement, and that any breach
of this agreement shall render me
liable to all the penalties provided
for in Section 11) of th Prince Rupert
Liquor License  By-law,  1910.
My postoffice address is Prince Rupert.
The name and address of tlie
owner of the premises proposed to
be licensed is AI. Tliorsch Sons, Vienna, Austria.
Dated at  Prince Rupert,  this 8th
day  of November,   1910.
Nil .1. Y. ROCHESTER.
APPLICATION  FOR LIQUOR
LICENSE
[ Form "A")
Corley & Burgess, of the city of
Prince Rupert, in the Province of
Britisli Columbia, holelkeepers, hereby apply to I lie Board of License
Commissioners for the said City of
Prince Rupert for a hotel license to
sell intoxicating liquors under the
provisions of the Statutes In that behalf and the by-laws of the City of
Prince Rupert, and any amendments
thereto, for the premises known and
described as The Royal Hotel, to
commence on the fifteenth day of
December, 1910.
And I hereby agree that In case a
license Is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or be permitted to be upon
said premises, other than in the capacity of a guest or customer, nor
shall Asiatics be employed off said
premises to do any work to be used
In or in any way connected with said
premises, and I hereby agree that I
shall accepl said license BUbjei i to
this agreement, and thai any breach
of this agreement shall render me
liable to nil the penalties provided
for in Section 1D of tie- Prince Ruperl  Liquor License By-la w,  1910
Our postoffice address is Prince
Rupert, B.C.
The name nnd address of the owner of the premises proposed to be
licensed Is Christiansen & Brandt,
Prince Rupert, B t
Dated al  Prince Ruperl this tenth
day  of  November,   1910.
\ I I colli HY &   BURGESS.
three-quarter Bleeves, all seem equally popular, bul al sleeves are Bome-
whal fuller.
If ;i pinked iiiffle on a silk under*
skirt, has begun to fray, trim it off
nil' fully and add a band of ribbon
of   harmonizing  color,
Tin   sailor collar Is    popular    for
Isses' tailor made costumes,  whi'e,
some have small  yokes with jabots     ■  prayers ne always madi  one well-
■ frills of chiffon, lace or silk. . ,   „.,. pHssage ,„„.
Many  misses  will  wear    military       .. , ,
. • 'Surely    goodness    and     mercy
turbans of  the  hussar  type.     I hey
are   brlmless.   of   iaiintv   style,   nnd   Bha11   f"""vv   "l0  a"   ""'  lIil>*  °f  W
"David   Lloyd   George,"   said   the
miner from Wales, as he emptied Ills
glass,    "David Is a very witty s] k-
er.    I've heard liim many a time in
Carnarvon.
- aklng In Welsh, he once
ridiculed in Carnarvon the Housi of
Lords. He said the average peer
thoughl  so t li ol   himsi II  al   fam
ine brlmless, of Jaunty style, and
have looped braid nnd cord ornaments.
life, and 1 will dwell in the House of
Lords forever."
/■ PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, November 11, 1910.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
SAWMILL  DEAL
Nanaimo.—A deal has been completed whereby the Ladysmith Lumber company has purchased the Red
Fir Lumber Company's holdings in
this city, Mr. .1. to. Cobnrn, manager of the Ladysmith Lumber company, on being asked regarding his
company's Intentions, stated that the
mill would be overhauled, additional
and new machinery installed, so that
the plant would be a modern one.
On or about January 1 the entire
plant would be started up with the
expectation of keeping it in operation the year round, at its full capacity.
SHOW ACCOUNTS
New Westminster—There has been
much criticism during the last few
months about the manner in which
the affairs of the Royal Agricultural
& Industrial Society are being conducted. It has also been claimed
since the controversy about the annual grant to the society arose, that
no audit had been made of the books
for several years, also that no financial statement for the year 1909 had
been adopted by the board of directors. According to Aid. Welsh, who
represents the city on the board of
control, and who is in a fair position
to know, there is an auditor's report
for every year from 1900, except this
year, which is now being prepared.
The society had a debt of $9,000
In 1903, but this has, under the able
management of Mr. to. II. Keary,
all been paid off and buildings to the
value of about $50,000 erected, all
of which belong to the city.
ate in the sixth volunteer battalion
of the oGrdon Highlanders in Dufftown, Scotland. Served six years, at
which time he left for Canada, locating in Vancouver in 1889. There
being no militia corps in Vancouver
at that time, and until 1894, Major
Stuart was compelled to forego his
ambition  for soldiering.
JOHN OLIVER REEVE
Ladner.—Mr. John Oliver, the old
warhorse of the Liberal party in British Columbia and formerly leader of
the Liberal opposition in the provincial house, has been elected reeve of
the municipality of Delta 'by acclamation. He succeeds J. H. Hut-
cherson, the former reeve, who resigned recently on account of ill
health. Mr. Oliver's name was the
only one put in nomination. He
was proposed by Mr. G. O. Dennis
and seconded by Dr. J. Kerr Wilson.
Immediately after being declared
elected, Mr. Oliver took the oath of
office, merely remarking to the small
crowd in attendance, "Gentlemen, I
hope you will not be sorry."
mountain between Greenwood and
Phoenix. The resumption of work
on this great enterprise will soon
focus the eyes of the mining world
upon Greenwood.
 o	
CROSS-TIE INDUSTRY
Business in 11)00 Amounted to Something Over Sixty Million Dollars
CAPTURED HAD MEN
Nelson.—After a five-mile tramp
through the mountains, Provincial
Constable Wightman, accompanied
by John Whitehead, an old trapper,
surprised Eugene Martineau, of Montreal, and Charles Morrison, of Spokane, in the bush, and, covering them
with their revolvers, took them into
custody.
Martineau made an aUenipt to escape but fell over a bush, and was
quickly overpowered. The two men
were brought into Nelson and charged with burglary of the Yale Columbia store at Westley.
Thieves dynamited the safe and secured forty dollars and clothing. The
prisoners are believed to be wearing
some of the stolen clothes. The police
believe them to be desperate characters and both were heavily armed,
one carrying two revolvers and the
other, one. They also carried a quantity of dynamite and fuses.
At Trail last month the safe of the
depot was dynamited and twenty-five
dollars and a revolver stolen. The
police will investigate with a view
to establishing the prisoners connection with this crime also.
LOOKS LIKE ELECTION
Victoria.—After placing the life
saving stations on the west coast of
Vancouver Island in commission,
Commander Thompson, who is in
charge of the life saving work in
Canada, has returned to Victoria. He
commissioned the stations at Ban-
field, I'cluelet and Clayoquot and
inspected the steamers Quadra and
Newlngton. After securing crews for
the west coast stations he made a
trip across the straits to visit the
United States life saving station at
Neah Bay where the superintendent
had a drill carried out for his entertainment.
CHANGE IN COMMAND
Vncouver.— Following the resignation of Col. F. to. Boultbee as commander of the Sixtli Regiment, Duke
of Cannaught's Own Rifles, who has
asked to be transferred to the reserve list after having command of
the Vancouver regiment for the past
three years, comes the announcement
that Major .1. Huff Stuart, who has
been second In command since the
retirement of .Major Reynolds Tile
last year, assumes command of the
popular regiment.
The new commanding officer has
taken since the days of his youth a
keen interest in military matters. A
good rifle-shot, he has had the distinction of representing not only his
regiment al the Dominion Rifle
matches In Canada, but also Canada
for some years at IBsley. He has
always had the welfare of the load
corps at heart, working at all times
to keep It up to a high state of efficiency.
Major J. Duff Stuart commenced
his military career In 1882 as a prlv-
FORESTRY REPORT
Victoria.—During the past week
the members of the special commission on forestry and conservation,
consisting of Mr. Fred J. Fulton, K.
C, chairman; Mr. A. C. Flumerfelt,
and Mr. A. S. Goodeve, M.P., has
been busily engaged with the completion of its report, which it is expected will be laid before the government shortly.
The report goes into all matters
touching forest protection, development and utilization most comprehensively, and it is expected it will
form the basis of the legislation to
be submitted to the house by the
government during the course of the
January session.
The work of the commission on
the revision and consolidation of tho
statutes, composed of Messrs. Chas.
Wilson and A. P. Luxton, K.C.'s, is
also well advanced toward completion, and the greater part of the revised statutes is now in the hands of
the King's printer, whose staff is
busily at work thereon. The combined statutes, it is expected, will fill
three volumes of approximately
1,500 pages each and will be ready
for presentation to the legislature at
its assembling.
SMUGGLED OPIUM
Vancouver.—At 2 o'clock on Sunday morning Police Constable Ritchie held up and arrested at the point
of his gun at the corner of Jervis and
Pender streets, two men carrying
between them SO tins of prepared
opium. It is thought the men, who
give their names as Hans Nelson and
S. Connolly, smuggled the drug over
the stern of one of the snips in port
and landed with It at Coal Harbor.
The patrolmen noticed the pair
coming along the street with the
large parcels under their arms, and
thinking there was something suspicious in their appearance, he asked them what they were carrying.
Nelson replied that their parcels contained tinned meat off their launch
in Coal Harbor, but the officer was
not satisfied with this and asked to
see the contents of the packages.
They deposited the bundles on the
ground and immediately moved offl
but the policeman covering them
with his revolver, ordered them to
stand or be shot. That argument
was strong enough to prevent any
further attempts at escape, and after
ringing for the pal roi wagon, the
constable the men and their parcels
to the police station.
On investigating the suspicious
packages they were found to contain
eight one-half pound tins of prepared opium.
THE BIG TUNNEL
Greenwood. — Duncan Mcintosh
has received a wire from Chicago
stating that all financial matters relating to the Big Tunnel had been
satisfactory settled, and Instructing
him to make a draft for all the
money that be required. At least
$70,000 has been placed in the
treasury of the company in Chicago
and the stockholders In that city are
jubilant over the prospects of Ihis
great enterprise. Preparations are
being made Ibis week to resume active operations, and the two big machines will soon be pounding the rock
at the rate of ten or more feet a
day. .This tunnel, when completed,
will be the largest and longest mining tunnel In Canada. It will be
driven  over  17,000   feet  under  the
There was a substantial increase
of about ten per cent in the number of wooden crossties purchased
for consumption by the steam and
electric railroads in the United States
in the year 1909, as compared with
the number purchased In 290S. In
1909 the total number of crossties of
all kinds of wood reported as having been purchased was 123,754,000
costing $60,321,000 at the point of
purchase, as compared with 112,463,-
000 costing $56,281,000 In 1908, and
153,700,000, costing $78,959,000, in
1907. The latter year does not, however, represent the true standard of
comparison, as it was one of unusual
development. The decrease in 1908
was about 26.8 per cent, but in 1909
the balance swung back to 80.5 per
cent of the 1907 record, and was, as
stated, an increase of about 10 per
cent over 1908.
While there was considerable variation in the number of cross-ties purchased during the three years the
average cost per tie remaind close to
50 cents. A significent feature Is the
fact that in 1909 there were 16,437,-
000 cross-ties reported as purchased
for new track, as against 7,431,000
in 1908, and 23,557,000 in 1907.
The oaks continued in 1909 to
lead by a wide margin all the other
kinds of cross-tie material. Moreover, in the general return of the
industry toward the 1907 record, owing to renewed activity in railroad
extension, the oaks have come back
faster  than  any  other  species.     In
1907 the total number of oak cross-
ties   reported   was   61,   757,000;   in
1908 it was 48,111,000; and in 1909
it was 57,132,000. During these
years the proportion of oak cross-ties
in the total number purchased ranged from 40 to 46 per cent. Southern
pines, which numbered more titan
half as many as the oaks ln 1907,
dropped to considerably less than
half in 1908 and decreased a little
further in 1907; 21,529,000 in 1908;
and 21,384,000 in 1909. In each
year the oaks and southern pines together formed about two-thirds of
the total number purchased. Douglas
fir, while showing a material gain
over 1908', was in 1909 stil short of
the number purchased in 1907,
which was 14,425,000. In 1908 the
total was 7,987,000, and in 1909 it
was 9,068,000. From third place
In the ranking order in 1907, Douglas fir dropped to fifth in 1908, but
came back to third in 1909. In
1907, cedar, with 8,953,000, was
fourth in rank; in 1908 it rose, with
8,127,000, to third place, displacing
Douglas fir; but in 1909, with 6,778,-
000, it gave way to western pine, and
took fifth rank. In 1907 chestnut
was fifth, with 7,851,000; in 1908,
fourth, with S,074,000; and in 1909
sixth, with 6,629,999. Cypress held
the sixth position, with 6,779,000 in
1907; seventh, with 3,457,000, tn
1908; and seventh again, with 4,-
489,000, in 1909. Western pine was
seventh from the top, with 5,019,000
in 1907; ninth with 3,093,000, in
1908; and fourth, with 6,797,000, in
1909. Tamarack was eighth in rank
in 1907 and 1909, but sixth In 1908.
Hemlock was ninth in 1907 and 1909
held tenth place every year,
but  eighth   in   1908.    Redwood   has
A marked increase is noticeable in
the use of gum and beech woods. Of
the former, there ewre 15,000 cross-
ties purchased In 1907; 262,000 In
1908; and 378,000 In 1909. The
total number of beech cross-ties purchased was 51,000 In 1907; 103,-
000 ln 1908; and 195,000 ln 1909.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the island back
to the point of beginning and inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910. A19
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Samuel Smith, of Fort William, Ont., occupation contractor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7 miles
south of the southeast corner of ot
227, and 5% miles west from shore'
line, thence east 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
64 0 acres.
THOMAS SAMUEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Ru-
bidge Dunsford, of" Fort William,
Ont., occupation retired, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles south of the southeast
corner of lot 22,7 and \y2 miles west
from shore line, thence east SO chains
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
CHARLES RUBIDGE DUNSFORD.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 2,0th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman 'M.
Patterson, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7
miles south from southeast corner of
Lot 227, and 1% miles west from
short line, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres|
NORMAN M. PATTERSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE  that Nelson  Noel
Smith, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
contractor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:—Commencing    at    a
post planted about 9  miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
5 y2   miles  west  from     shore     line,
thence west 80 chains, tlience south
SO   chains,   theuce   east   80   chains,
thence nortli  SO  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
NELSON NOEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Robert Wayland, of Fort William, Ont.,
occupation grain merchant, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles south from southeast corner
of lot 227, and 3% miles west from
shore line, thence east 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
EDWARD  ROBERT WAYLAND.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth N.
Kerr, of Victoria, occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one 'mile west
from the southwest corner of Timber
Limit 31S33, thence west 80 chains,
tlience north SO chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
04 0 acres, more or less.
ELIZABETH N. KERR,
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated October  6th, 1910.       ,N11
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John W.
.Maxwell, of Vancouver, occupation
engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the northeast corner
of Timber Limit 31S54, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains, thence north
80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 040 acres, more or less.
JOHN to. MAXWELL.
Arthur Robertson, Agent
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Benjamin Os-
trander, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7
miles south from southeast corner of
Lot 227, and 3y2 miles west of shore
line, thence east 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containinn
640 acres.
BENJAMIN OSTRANDER.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that E. N. Ens-
worth, of Fort William, Ont., occupation accountant, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a post planted about 9 miles
south of the southeast corner of Lot
227, and 5% miles west from shore
line, tlience west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, tlience south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
E. N. ENSWORTH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent..
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupr'ion
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south short of Crow Bay,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.E.  corner.
Dated August ISth. 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wllllani Curtis Lillie, of Fort William, Ont., occupation agent, intends to apply for
permlsison to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing at  a
post   planted   about   7   miles     south
from   southeast  corner  of  Lot   227,
and 3 v.  miles west from shore line,
tlience west SO chains, thence south
0   chains,   tlience   east   80   chains,
tlience north  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
WILLIAM CURTIS LILLIE.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John Russel
Smith, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about seven
miles south from southeast corner of
Lot 227, and 3% miles west from
short line, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
JOHN RUSSEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Omineca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that E. Lucas, of
West Carnie, Ont., occupation banker,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of lot
22S7, District of Coast, Range Five,
and marked E.L.'s N.W. corner,
thence east 80 chains, thence south
8" chains, thence west SO chains,
thence north SO chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
E. LUCAS,
Steven McNeiii, Agent.
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27.
Omineca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. White-
sides, of South Bend, Ont., occupation bank clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the southeast corner
of lot 1729, District of Coast, Range
Five, and marked G.G.W.'s N.E. corner, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40
chains, thence north 80 chalnB to
point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
W. G. WHITESIDES,
Steven McNeill, Agent.
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Joseph
Nolt, of Victoria, occupation sjeani-
fltter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
liost planted about the southwest corner of Timber Limit 37039, thence
west 80 chains, thence nortli 80
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT   JOSEPH   NOTT.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated October 7th, 1910. Nil
Dated  October  0th,  1910.
Nil
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Wilkerson, of Victoria, occupation stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile west
from the southwest corner of Timber Limit 31833, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains, thence south
SO chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
JENNIE WILKERSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated Oct. 6th, 1910. Nil
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:-—Commencing at a post planted on the soutii shore of Crow Lake,
thence soutii 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north SO chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.W. corner.
Dated August ISth, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at. the
north-west corner and about 614
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south SO
chains, thence east 80 chains, tlience
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Agnes Smith,
of Fort William,    Ont.,    occupation
widow, intends  to apply for permission  to  purchase  the  following  described lands:—Commencing    at    a
post     planted   about   9   miles  south
from the southeast corner of Lot 227,
and 3y2  miles west from shore line,
thencfle east 80 chains, thence south
80    chains,    thence west SO chains,
thence north  8 0  chains  to point  of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
AGNES SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Smith,
of  Fort  William,    Ont.,     occupation
gentleman, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  lands:—Commencing at  a
post planted about nine miles south
from the southeast corner of lot 227,
and 3 y2 miles west from shore line!
thence east SO  chains,  thence north
80   chains,   thence   west   80   chains,
thence south  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
SIDNEY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Dated  May  30,  1910.
Jy8
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern: —
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
Icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-eaBt corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence Bouth 80 chalnB to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned   Intend  to  apply  for  a
icense to prospect   for    Coal    and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated  on  Graham  Island,  one of
the  Queen  Charlotte  group,  ln  the
Province  of   British  Columbia,   and
move  particularly  described  as  follows, viz:—CoL.emncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates'   Claim   No.   1,   and   marked
Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains,   thence    west    80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
ilace of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM. PENMAN.
By his  Agent,  Wm.  Kdward  Laird.
At
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Ardagh Smith,
of Fort   William,    Out.,    occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission
to  purchase  the  following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted     about    nine   miles   south   from
southeast corner of Lot 227, and 3V2
miles  west   from   shore  line,   thence
west   80   chains,   thence     south     SO
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north    SO   chains  to  point of commencement, containing 640 acres
ARDAGH   SMITH
Arthur Robertson, Agent
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    John    L.
Davidson, of Victoria,  B.C., occupation agent, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 9 miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
3 y2   miles  west   from    shore     line,
tlience west 80 chains, thence north
80   chains,    thence  east  80  chains,
thence south  SO  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JOHN L. DAVIDSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Josephine J.
Davidson, of Victoria, B. C., occupation married woman, intendB to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 9 miles
south of the southeast corner of Lot
227, and 5y2 miles west from shore
line, thence east SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
JOSEPHINE J. DAVIDSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Henry
Smith, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
agent. Intends to apply for permission  to purchase  the  following described lands:—Commencing    at    a
post planted about 9 miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
5%   miles west   from    shore    line,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
80 chains, thence west    80    chains,
thence south  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JAMES HENRY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30 Friday, November 11, 1910.
THE   PRIKCE  RUPBWT  JOURNAL
HIGHER  CRITICISM
Baptist  Denomination  Deals With the
Question of Divine Inspiration.
Convention in Torpnto Takes up the
Subject and Makes Pronouncement
The Baptist convention of Ontario
and Quebec, meeting in Toronto, after a long debate, decided the question of the teaching of the so-called
"Higher Criticism" in McMaster university by favoring the report of the
senate and board of governors of
that institution.
The report was presented by Chancellor McKay and concerned the
charges of Rev. Dr. Elmore Harris
against the teaching of Prof. Matthews.
The decision means that the report of the faculty of McMaster university to the senate and board of
governors ln December, 1909, should
represent the attitude of that Institution towards the Bible. The report
included excerpts from a reports of
the professors embodying dectrinal
statements and its essential features
were as follows:—
"The divine inspiration of the
scriptures of the Old and New Testaments and tlheir absolute supremacy
and sufficiency in matters of faith
and practice."
"The scriptures of the Old and
New Testaments were given by Inspiration of God, and are the only
efficient, certain and authoritative
rule of al saving knowledge, faith
and obedience.
"The divine Inspiration of the
scriptures of the Old and New Testaments as a complete and infallible
rule of faith and practice.
"That McMaster university should
be organized, and developed as a permanently Independent Christian
school of learning, with the lordship
of Christ as the controlling principle.
"In Christ all things consist.
"Each member of the theological
faculty hereby declares that, according to his best knowledge and belief
he is teaching in harmony and sympathy with that attitude; and they
agree that, while complete freedom
should be accorded In the Investigation and discussion of facts, no
theory should be taught in McMaster
university which falls to give their
proper place to supernatural revelation and inspiration, or which would
impair in any way the supreme authority of the Lord Jesus Christ, our
God and Saviour."
The executive committee of the
convention recommended that the
next place of meeting should be at
Montreal.
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
Prize of Twenty Dollars in Gold for
the Most Appropriate Name for the
New Town In Pleasant Valley to be
Put on the Market by Messrs. W.
S. Benson and the Lnw-Butler Co.
Messrs. to. S. Benson and the Law-
Butler Company have acquired a
piece of land for TOWNSITE
PURPOSES in the famous Pleasant
Valley, (a valley within the greater
Bulkley), on the line of the G. T. P.
Railway, about thirty miles east
from Aldermere, and eighty-five
miles from Hazelton, at the junction
of the Bulkley and Buck Rivers. It
is the natural townsite for Pleasant
Valley, which Is one of the richest
valleys, and contains some of the
best land ln the interior of British
Columbia. The land in this valley Is
all taken, and the greater portion
settled on. The trail to Francois,
Fraser and Ootsa Lakes runs within
a mile of the Townslte, and will be
diverted to this town. The site Is
surrounded by the richest agricultural lands, as well as coal lands, Is
only five miles from the famous Barrett Ranch, conceded one of the best
in British Columbia. Engineers and
surveyors are now on the ground
platting the site, and the above firms
anticipate putting the lots on the
market by January 1st. They have
not, however, quile decided on a
name for the town, and believing
thoroughly in the old adage that
"everythlnk's in a name," are going
to offer a prize of TWENTY DOLLARS ($20.00) IN GOLD, for the
most suitable and appropriate name
for their new town.
Conditions are as follows: Contest
open to the world. The name must
be one word, not to exceed ten letters, and a reason given why the
contestant considers it an appropriate name. The contest closes on Friday, November 25th, at six o'clock
p.m.
Address all communications to
either W. S. Benson, or the Law-Butler Company, Prince Rupert, B.C.
FIRING EFFECTS
The new Dreadnought battleship
Neptune returned to Portsmouth harbor a few days ago after a successful series of gunnery trials on the
previous day. She will need a new
supply of glass and crockery, and
much of the furniture in the cabins
will have to be replenished, for when
her full broadside of ten twelve-inch
guns was fired in concussion shook
the ship from stem to stern. Before
she left port for the trials all the
scuttle lights were removed and were
filled In with wood and other precautions were taken for the safety of
fragile articles on board.
The hull of the Neptune, however,
stood the strain admirably, according
to the experts from Whale island,
who supervised the trials and noted
carefully the effect of each discharge.
Th guns were flrst fired singly, then
in pairs, next six ahead, and so on,
half charges being flrst used and
then full charges.
The Neptune marks quite a new
feature ln Dreadnoughts, as she is
the first of the class to have her beam
barbettes en echelon and superimposed turrets. The effect of this is
that the vessel has a broadside fire
of all ten twelve-inch guns and an
astern fire of eight, the Inmost stern
barbette gun  firing  over  the outer
OUTPUT OF YUKON
F. T. Congdon Says Four Millions of
Placer Gold Was Taken Out
This Year.
Member for District Tells of Conditions Prevailing in the Northern Country
"The placer gold output in the Yukon this season will exceed $4,000,-
000, a figure considerably In excess
of that of last year. The country
around Dawson is now in a transition
stage owing to the introduction of
more modern methods of hydraulick-
ing and dredging. Next year will
see a still larger production and the
time is not far distant when the lode
and placer gold output of the Yukon
will exceed the banner years of the
Klondike during the nineties. Each
season sees the installation of new
plants and an increase of the electrical power for pumping water for
mining operations. There Is still
untouched sufficient ground to keep
the present plants occupied for the
next one hundred years."
This was the way Mr. F. T. Congdon, M.P. for the Yukon, summed up
the mining situation in the Yukon,
while in Vancouver on his way to Ottawa to attend the coming session of
parliament.
"Next year the Granville Power
Co., Ltd., a new corporation will be
in a position to supply 20,000 horse
power of electrical energy," continued Mr. Congdon. "This will enable operations to be continued on an
extensive scale on such well known
pioneer creeks as Dominion, Upper
Hunker, Last Chance, Gold Run,
Quartz and Sulphur, where very little
work was done during the past season. From power derived from the
power plant at the coal mines, the
Northern Light and Power Company
has now available a supply of 15,000
horse power, most of the supply going to the Yukon Gold Company, a
corporation controlled by the Gug-
genheims. In former seasons mining
operations usually ended about Oct.
10, owing to the fact that the water
supply drawn from high altitude
would freeze up. Now, under the
new order of things with electricity
capable of pumping water from the
creeks, hydraulicklng and dredging
operations are still in progress and
it is expected that they will continue
until the end of November. This In
itself will tend to increase the gold
production."
Mr. Congdon added that the recent
reduction in rates on the White Pass
*; Yukon Railway had greatly stimulated lode mining in the White Horse
district where rich copper and silver
properties are being developed. On
the Big Thing, a silver proposition
near Carcross an 1,800-foot tunnel
is being driven to tap ore bodies on
the lakeside near a point where the
railway pasess. The same property
has already been developed on the
other side of the mountain on which
it is located. At White Horse Green-
nough Bros, of Spokane have purchased the Pueblo mine, a copper
property, and have installed a plant
and erected substantial quarters for
the miners.
PLEASED WITH ORE
S. S. Fowler the Well Known Engineer
Gives Impressions of Queen
Charlottes
He   Considers   Development   of   Deposits Will be of Great
Advantage
S. S. Fowler, the mining engineer
who visited the Queen Charlotte Islands some little time ago in a professional way, has given an interview
on his return to Nelson as to the
prospects.
"I am thoroughly convinced that
Moresby Island is practically a reservoir of low grade coper ores," he
said. "The many claims I examined showed quantities of copper ore,
chiefly of a low grade, though in
some instances there are deposits of
bornite, or peacock, copper ore of a
much higher value. These latter
bodies of ore, however, are of relatively little importance compared
with the main deposits of pyritic copper ore.
"I think that the value of the
Queen Charlotte Islands copper deposits will in the future be developed, but at present it appears likely
this result must ultimately be achieved by the reduction of the ores on
the spot by means of the coking coal
of Graham island. Graham island
is the largest of the group and also
the most northerly and contains ex
tensive coal deposits which are at
present attracting the attention of
capitalists and will probably be developed very soon.
"Physically Moresby island is an
intricate mass of high and precipitous mouutains.
"I am very well pleased with the
result of my visit," continued Mr.
Fowler, "and consider that the development of the copper deposits of
Moresby island will be of enormmis
advantage to the province of Brltjh
Columbia.
NOTABLE  WEDDING
Daughter of Mr. Moreton Frewen is
Married in London
Myer.—Why don't you patronize
that deaf and dumb barber?
Gyer.—Huh! A fellow might as
well shave himself.
A notable Anglo-American wedding recently solemnized in London
was that of Mr. Moreton Frewen's
daughter, Miss Claire Frewen, niece
of Mrs. George Cornwallis-West (formerly Lady Randolph Churchill), to
Mr. Wilfred Sheridan, brother of
Mrs. Hall-Walker, and a direct descendant of Brimsley Sheridan, the
actor. Mr. Moreton Frewer Is well
known here owing to his frequent
visits in connection with the G. T. P.
enterprise of which he was a director. Prior to her marriage, Miss
Frewen was the guest of honor at
a luncheon given at Farnborough by
the Empress Eugenie, Mrs. Frewen
being a privileged friend of the ex-
empress and a frequent quest at the
Tullleries during the period of the
second empire. A distinguished assembly, including the Crown Prince
and Princess of Sweden, the Countess Torbay and Zie Torby, the
Marchioness of Dufferin and Ava and
many other prominent society people
gathered for the marriage at St.
Margaret's. The retinue of the
bride's attendants—six bridesmaids,
two tiny maidens and a page—presented a most picturesque appearance, their frocks of the Cavalier
perior were of pale carnation pink
satin with Vandyke1 collars and cuffs
of oxidized silver lace, the tabs of
the bodices outlined with the same,
and their little silver lace caps had
borders of pink coral. They wore
sapphire and diamond brooches, the
gifts of the groom, and carried
stalks of'pink tiger lilies. The page
wore a silver-gray velvet tunic trimmed with oxidized silver, with hose
and shoes en suite. Miss Frewen's
robe was fashioned In semi-empire
style of soft Ivory-tinted charmense
with mantemi an cour of the same,
the surplice bodice swathed with fine
lace and the front of the skirt embroidered from hem to bodice In a
giant. Madonna lily design carried out
in silver, paste and silk. Her magnificent Old lace veil was arranged
in Marie Stuart fashion with strands
of pearls ending in jewelled plaques
towards the base of the coiffure. An
overveil of fine tulle was held by
sprigs of myrtle and orange blossom.
She carried a sheaf of Madonna lilies. The reception following the
ceremony was held at Hyde Park
House, the palatial residence of Lady
Naylor-Leland, lent for the occasion,
where the magnificent array of wedding presents was on view. The
bride's travelling gown copied from
an old picture, was of deep stone-
gray cashmere de sole with grauntlet
cuff and ruffles of Lille lace, and
her turban toque   of    fraise-colored
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
PAINTS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, *+.
^0@@@0000@0[li00000@000[n][s][n
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
to. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Portland Canal Short Line Railway
Pursuant to Section 7 of the Navigable Waters Protection Act (R. S.
Can. cap 115) notice is hereby given
that there has been deposited In the
office of the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and a duplicate in
the Office of the Registrar of Titles
at Prince Rupert, plans and description of the site and side elevation of
a proposed railway wharf and trestle
approach thereto to be constructed
near the mouth of Bear River at
Stewart, British Columbia, and that
one month after the first insertion of
this notice the Company will apply
to the Governor-in-Council for the
approval thereof.
Dated at Victor*, British Columbia, this 16th day of September,
1910.
GERARD RUEL,
Chief Solicitor.
EBERTS ft TAYLOR,
S23 Agents at Victoria, B.C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT ATLIN
—THE-
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn  upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected  typewriter on  the market
youi'B for  17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history-—yours for 17 cents
day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers".—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
In the matter of the Estate of Thomas D. Kearns, deceased, Intestate
All parties having claims against
the above Estate are required to forward the same, with full particulars
thereof, duly verified, to the undersigned, not later than the sixteenth
day of February, 1911, after which
said date the Estate of the said deceased will be distributed amongst
those entitled thereto.
Dated at Atlin,   B.C.,   this    nineteenth day of August, A.D. 1910.
PATRICK FOLEY,
AG-OS Administrator.
NOTICE TO  CONTRACTORS
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice M.
Tovey of Vancouver, B.C., married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at. the N, W. corner of
John Furlong's pre-emption and near
Lakelse Lake, thence east 4 0 eiiains,
thence north 40 chains, tlience west
40 chains more or-less to the shore
line of Lakelse Lake, and thence
soutii 40 chains along the shore of
the Lake to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
ALICE TOVEY.
Dated October 17, 1910. N2
Grnhain  Island  School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
'Tender for Graham Island School,"
will be received by the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works up to
and including Monday, the 10th day
of October, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a small one-room
school building at Graham Island,
one of the Queen Charlotte Islands,
Skeena  Electoral  District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 12th day of September,
1910, at the offices of John L. Barge,
Secretary to the School Board, Queen
Charlotte City; the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; the Mining
Recorder, Jedway; and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheqte
or certificate of deposit on a chaptered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $125,
which shall be forfeited if the partf
tendering decline to enter into con-
trac. when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit, of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution  of the contract.
Tenders will nol be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
tlie tenderer and enclosed In the envelopes furnished.
The    lowest    or    any    tender    not
.necessarily accepted.
V. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria,  B.C., September 7, 1910.
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting  Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TTjc.
EXAMINATION    FOR   INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
OLIVER
T^peWri-fer
The Standard Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that 1b
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done aud money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every   Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made tin Oliver supreme ln
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
•onquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
j Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor in the
liome training of young people An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts tlie
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America, Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver  catalogue,     Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert  Agent
General   Offices:    Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago,  111.
velvet was bordered iwth a band of
aluminum embroidery on vieux blue
satin and adorned with a cabochon
and  tassels of silver.
"You can't keep a good man
down," quoted  the moralizer.
"Hub!" repoined the demoralizer.
"If he's any good you can't get htm
down."
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act, 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing November 7th,
1910. Application and Instruction
forms can be had on application to
the undersigned, to whom the former
must be returned correctly filled In,
Lot later than October 24th, 1910.
Salary $130 per month, Increasing at
the rate of $5 per month each year
to a maximum of $1 80.
JOHN PECK,
Chief  Inspector  of  Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C.
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands ln
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June .10th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, 1«
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B, C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 5.) THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, November 11, 1910.
PARTY IS AGITATED
Liberal Defeat in Quebec Election Causes
Consternation Among Faithful Followers.
Bowossa's  Strength Among   French
Section, it is Admitted, Has
Been Gaining
The Arthabaska election defeat in
which A. Gilbert, Nationalist, signally defeated J. E. Perrault, the Laurler nominee, is the one topic in political circles in Ottawa, says a despatch. Political opponents of Sir
Wilfrid Laurier do not hestitate to
proclaim that his power is passing
and that the election is the "writing
on tiie wall" proclaiming that lie has
been weighed in the balance nnd
found wanting not only in one constituency in Quebec but in all of
them.
R. L. Borden, discussing the result
of the election, says, "Laurier, leader of the opposition in 1890, has defeated Sir Wilfrid Laurier, prime
minister of 1910. The Nationalists
in Drummond and Arthabaska used
exactly the same arguments, proclaimed the same policy and exercised the same strategy that. Laurier
himself used in 1896 and for many
years before in the province of Quebec. The master has been beaten
by his own disciples and by his own
teachings. The pupils learned their
lesson too well and refused to forget it. There is a homely English
proverb that chickens always come
home to roost. This has never been
better exemplified in a political sense
than by the result just announced
from Drummond and Arthabaska."
According to the Toronto Globe
the election of Mr. Gilbert means
that the Bourassa propaganda has
made more progress than had been
imagined and most vigorous steps
must be taken towards putting the
actual conditions as to naval defence
before the electorate all over the
province.    The Globe says:—
"The Nationalist - Conservative
Uutramontane coalition has won a
victory that will in the end prove to
be Its undoing. The most indefensible position is that of the Conservatives, who in their eagerness to aid
Mr. Bourassa's candidate have gone
to lengths by arousing hatred of
Great Britain that will shock the
country when fully disclosed."
The Mail and Empire hails the result as a case of retributive justice,
Sir Wilfrid Laurier having been, it
declares, the founder of the Nationalist principle.    The journal says:
"The disaster to the government is
ominous. It means that the prestige
of Sir Wilfrid in Quebec Is shaken. It
means that the general policy of the
government is not sufficiently satisfactory to nullify the adverse sentiment which the naval scheme has
evoked. It suggests that in a general election the slump from the
government all over the province
would be so great as to make its defeat certain and a realignment of
parties imperative."
In Le 'Devoir. Mr. Henry Bourassa
writes: " 'It is the beginning of the
end.' Such is the phrase which has
burst from every mouth. It is not
tiie mischance of circumstance which
forced upon the prime minister the
fight in which he has just succumbed.
"He himself designed In advance,
and in secret, the hour, the place,
and all the conditions of the fight;
then he imposed these upon his adversaries with the autocracy of a
despot, the craft of a Machiavelll,
and the corrupting power of a chief
of state who is without scruples; he
wished to force the passage of his
naval law under the authority of his
name, and the charra "f his personality
"He has, therefore, no cause for
complaint if, today, from Sydney to
Victoria, everybody, friends, adversaries,  or  neutrals,   know   that   the
defeat of Mr. Perrault constitutes a
double and a formidable check to
Laurierism, to the naval law, and to
the person and policy of the prime
minister. Sir Wilfrid Laurier must
now understand the views of the personal regime which he has allowed
to be erected around him and his
government and policy, above all, in
the province of Quebec."
 o —
DEATH  FROM  FOIL PLAY
Hall' Bleed's  Body  Found in  Fraser
River
New Westminster.—as a result of
the inquest into the death of William
Bernard, a half-breed, whose body
was pulled out of the Fraser at
Ewen's cannery last week, the arrest of several Indians is expected to
follow. The jury brought in a verdict that Bernard had come to bis
death from foul play, by some
means and  manner unknown.
Bernard was last seen on the
night of September 20. He and some
Indians got into a light at the foot
of the Tenth stret slip and when last,
seen by Harry McKay, Bernard was
down, with the Indians kicking him.
McKay ran for police assistance and
when the officers arrived they saw
the Indians pulling away in a boat
and found a quantity of blood on
the wharf. The police dragged the
river that night and next day and instituted a search for the Indians.
They were informed afterwards,
however, that Bernard had been seen
aliev in Vancouver and dropped the
search.
At the inquest Emma Martin, a
woman who has lived with Bernard
for the past year, swore that he had
not been seen since the night of the
fight in September. The body was
loo badly decomposed for the doctors
to state what was the cause of death.
 o	
ON FOUR MILE HILL
COAL NINE IS RUINED
Terrific Explosion   in   Colliery
Seattle Levied Toll of
Lives.
Near
BASKETBALL LEAGUE
Work  Will  Probably  Never  be  Re
sinned in the Workings After
Bodies Are Tuken Out
Good Vein it is Reported Has Been Un
Covered on Dyer-Stephenson
Group.
Work   is   to   be   Continued   There
Throughout the Winter Uncovering the Ore Bodies
The first result of the surface
stripping that has been going on at
the Dyer-Stephenson group of claims
on Four Mile Hill is the uncovering
of a three foot vein, from which the
foreman, Wm. Dalton, has brought
some fine looking ore, says the Omineca Herald.
Alost of the vein filling is decomposed, the only parts left solid being
the streaks composed mostly of
quartz. Now that the vein has been
proven at this point the crew has
been started on a tunnel to tap the
ledge at a depth of fifty feet. There
is a strong flow of water into the cut
and this, with the heavy overburden,!
makes further stripping as expensive
or more so, then underground drlV-|
ing.
On the original showing, where
some four feet of mixed ore was uncovered by the locators, a tunnel is
being driven to tap the vein and already while still some distance away,
kidneys of galena are appearing in
the rock.
The group, consisting of five
claims, is under bond to a syndicate
of Vancouver men, of which E. to.
McLean is a member. G. L. Faulkner has acted as their agent locally
and it was he who arranged the deal
for the property. Eight thousand
dollars was paid down on a forty
thousand dollar bond.
Work was delayed considerably in
starting and a month was consumed
in building cabins but it now going
ahead at a good rate and before
spring it should be up in the front
rank for the quantity of ore in sight.
Besides the showings uncovered the
group adjoins the Erie on two sides
and should have the extentlons of the
Erie veins.
With a detonation heard for miles
around, followed by a stream of
heavy timbers, rocks and debris that
spurted forth as if from the mouth
of a cannon, the explosion mentioned in last Issue as taking place In
the Lawson mine at Black Diamond,
thirty miles southeast of Seattle,
which undoubtedly levied a toll of
fifteen lives and wrecked probably
belond repair, a property valued at
$2.ri0,000, one of the deepest mines
in the United States.
The catastrophe is the second of
the kind in the history of the luckless mine, twelve men having lost
their lives in an acicdent of a similar nature in 1902. So terrific was
the explosion that it shook the countryside as far away as Revensdal
and carried fear to the inhabitants of
the mining district. From out of the
mouth of the stope running into the
bowels of the ground, belched tons
of earth, rocK and debris. Huge timbers and stone supports flew skyward, timbers measuring two feet in
thekness and twenty feet in length
being hurled through the air. A great
steel pipe was thrown half a mile
with such terrific force that when it
struck the earth is imbedded itself
five feet deep. The explosion blew
fiom the mine the hoisting plant
and the mine immediately began to
cave in.
The fifteen miners who were entombed by two explosions in the
shaft of the Lawson mine, have been
given up for dead. Ten of the miners were unmarried and the wives of
two of the five married men were in
Europe. As there was not the remotest possibility that any of the
men in the shaft when the explosion
oceured had escaped instant death,
officials of the Pacific Coast Coal
company, which owns the mine, decided not to sacrifice the lives of
other men by hazardous efforts at
reaching them. Instead the men
will set to work clearing the choked
shaft. The bodies of the dead will
be reached ln time and brought out
for burial.
The mine is so badly wrecked that
It will probably never be worked
again. The operations had reached a
depth of 2,200 feet, making the colliery one of the deepest in the United
Slates. Already the supports were
being placed in preparation for the
abandonment. The mine has been
one of the most profitable in the
Northwest, turning out 10,000 tons
of coal a month, it had been reported free from gas only an hour before
the explosion. The prevailing theory
is that the disaster was caused by
dust explosion.
 o	
RESTRICT THE C.N.
(Continued from Page One>
games no doubt will be of intense interest.
Although basket ball has takn a
fairly large grasp on the members,
still the other forms of recreation are
not neglected. Handball courts
have recently been marked out on
the floor, many members taking the
opoprtunity to play this game, which
is new to many, and is a favorite
with old-timers. Boxing, wrestling,
and other forms of sport still hold
good. The bath room in connection
with the gymnasium is one of the
main features. Hot and cold shower
and lub balhs have been a great help
to the members, and have been kept
In almost constant use.
It is the intention of the directors
and executive of the club to institute
a ladies' day. One afternoon a week
will be set aside for ladiesli only, to
come in and have the freedom of the
club,  gymnasium  and  other rooms.
The Kaien Island Club, although
it has been in existence for only a
few months, has risen to be one of
the main factors in the social circle
of the city. The monthly dances instituted by the club have been very
well attended, and have made great
success. The next dance, which will
be held on the 25th of this month, is
in the hands of a very energetic committee and promises to be in every
way as good as the ones already held.
As far as fittings and furnishings
are concerned, the club is found to
be lacking ln very few particulars
whicty make a club comfortable and
practically a home for its members.
The room as a whole look very inviting indeed.
During Premier McBride's visit to
this city lately, he was entertained
at the club, and was presented with a
life membership card. The Premier
was very pleased with the progress of
the club, and wished it every success
in its undertakings.
Notice!
To Our Customers:
On and after December first CASH
must accompany all orders for COAL
or it will be delivered C.O.D. ONLY
We are compelled to adopt this
system, the same as in vogue in all
the cities on the Coast, on a strictly
CASH BASIS—and trust that our
customers and friends will appreciate
the necessity of this rule in the
proper spirit.
Yours  for  business,
Rogers & Black
A CHURCH SUPPER
(Continued from Page One)
Must Not Pass Through G.T.P. Townsite
on the Western
Route.
Minister of Railways Makes  Ruling
on the Point of Parallel
Tracks
THE   GENUINE
Red Oak Coal and Wood Heater |
All castings made of pure pig iron, body made of *
boiler plate, lias cone cenlre grate  forcing coal to JJ
sides of lire |«>l: hot blast around lire pot: it burns all %
gases and black smoke; it cokes the coal, making an •>
even, steady Are; feed' and draught doors ground on '?
and all   joints air tight.   The most durable and eeo- %
nomlcal Stove ever put on the market, and a reputn- *
tion of nearly 40 years behind it.   Shovel, Poker and %
Ash run furnished with each Stove, *
OUR BONA FIDE OFFER delivered f.o.b. wharf Prince |
Rupert, at our Victoria prices as sold in our showrooms ';'
No. 12,  (25.00; No. 14, (30.00; No. 16,  (35.00; No. 18, (40.00 •!•
CASH   TO  ACCOMPANY   EACH   ORDER *
Watson & McGregor I
647 Johnson Street                         VICTORIA, B.C. |
*
Hon. George P. Graham, Minister
of Railways, had before him a few
days ago for approval a number of
railway route maps from the west.
There was opposition to the application of the Canadian Northern railway for approval of tbe proposed
route through townships fifty-three
and fifty-five, ranges seven, west of
tiie fifth meridian to range three
west of the sixth meridian, Yellow-
head Pass.
Mr. Kelllgher, chief engineer ot
the Grand Trunk Pacific, pointed out
that for seventy-five miles west of
Edmonton to Yellowhend Pass the
route paralleled that of the Grand
Trunk   Pacific.
It would be possible, he said, for
the Canadian Northern, if no restriction was placed on the company, to
build Its line through Grand Trunk
Pacific townsites. Mr. Graham agreed
that, it would not be fair to allow
this and approved the route mop
wilh the stipulation that the line
must not pass through the Grand
Trunk Pacific's townsites. The route
approved is from the end of the St.
Albert line, northwest of Edmonton
westerly to the pass.
 ;—o	
For Job Printing or all kinds see
'he Journal man.
by the Provincial Government."—J.
H.  McMullin.
"The Safe-guarding, of the Boys
of the City."—Messrs. Browne*
Flexman.
"The Educational Problem in
Prince Rupert."—Dr. Clayton.
"Reminiscences of the Pioneer
Days."—Dr. Tremayne.
"Fraternal Lodges and the
Church."— F. W. Dowling.
"Military Experiences in South
Africa."—Captain 1-Iamor.
"Church Organizations."—Rev. T.
C. Des Barres and Rev. N. G. James.
"The Ladies."—L.  Crippen.
Municipal Notice
TENDERS POR PLANK ROADWAY
SEALED TENDERS endorsed
"Tenders for plank roadway, etc."
will be received by the City Clerk until Monday, November 14th, 1910,
twelve o'clock noon, for:—
The construction of a 16-foot
plank roadway on Eighth avenue, be
tween McBride street and Hay's Cove
Circle.
Plans, profiles and specifications
may be seen and form of tender obtained at the office of the City Engineer, from 10 a.m. to 4.30 p.m;
daily.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily  accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineed. N4-8-11
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
Chas. Gyr, a native of Switzerland,
who accidentally shot himself last
Monday afternoon, was buried yes-
terday afternoon al Garden Island.
Haynor Bros, were in charge of the
funeral.
CONSERVATIVES!
Take notice that the Annual Meeting
of the
PRINCE RUPERT CONSERVATIVE
ASSOCIATION
will be held In the
Mclntyre Hall, 3rd Ave
Tuesday, Nov. IS.   1910
at 8 o'clock p.m.
The first part of the meeting will
be for the enrollment of new members and afterward for the election
of officers for the ensuing year, and
such other business as may come
before the meeting.
All Conservatives are requested to
attend. M. M. STEPHENS,
Acting Secretary.
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
: ipllcatlon will be made by the City
of Prince Rupert at the next sitting
of the Legislative Assembly of the
Province of British Columbia for an
act amending the City of Prince Rupert Incorporation Act, 1910, so as
to enable the City to borrow and
raise money by the Issue of Inscribed
stock to convert debentures already
issued into such stock, and to consolidate debts provided for by individual, by-laws bo that consecutive
debentures or inscribed stock may be
Issued for such debts as consolidated.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this 14th
day of October, 1910.
WILLIAMS & MANSON,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
TAKE NOTICE that the Council
of the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prinre Rupert intends to
make the following local improvement:—
A 4-foot plank walk on Alfred
street, between Hays' Cove avenue
and Ninth avenue and to assess the
final cost thereof upon the property
fronting or abutting thereon or to be
benefitted thereby and that a statement and diagram showing the lands
to be so especially assessed for the
said improvements or work Is now
filed in the office or the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of ths work is
$160.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 8th
day  of  November,   1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. N8-11
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE tbat the Council of
the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prince Rupert intends to
make the following local Improvement:—
A 10-foot plank roadway on
Seventh avenue from Fult"n street
lo a point 140 feet west of Dunsmuir
street, and to assess the final cost
thereof upon the property fronting
or abutting thereon or lo be benefited thereby and that a statement and
diagram showing the lands to be so
especially assessed for the said improvement or work is now filed in
tiie office of the City Clerk and is
open for inspection during office
hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$3,870.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 11th
dav of November, 1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. Nll-15
The Next 2 Months
Will be a busy season with us, as we
are getting goods from Eastern and
European markets.
COMBINATION COPPERED WIRE
SPRING BEDS AND BED STEADS
Are amongst our new arrivals at
THE
BIG FURNITURE STORE
F. W. HART
Complete House Furnisher
Entrance Gth St., near cor. 2nd Ave
Prince  Rupert  Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald,  Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies and individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Stt lis For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PR1NGE RUPERT,
B.C.
4 A A t|| »Jt A **« ♦*« *•« »»» A A A A &_ tiff A A A »J, A A A tj« t op
*
or I
Don't Forget
THAT CLARKE BROS.
Importers and Wholesalers
Wines and Liquors |
Are making a specialty of the  J
FAMILY TRADE     We a*e sole   |
agents in Northern British Columbia for
Bud weiser
the acknowledged champion of
American Beers. For those
who prefer a local beer we have J
Nanaimo Beer t
•5*
the   best  local   beer    on     the *
market.   We also carry a coin- !••
plete   stock   cl    all   standard 2
brands of *
WHISKY,  BRANDY. GIN, *
etc.. etc., and our +
WINES J
are    selected    by    an    expert.  X
  *
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
Third Avenue
.;. •>.;..». $.;..;..;..;..;..;. * •>.;..;..;. .;■ •;..;..;..;..;. .;.$
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Council of
the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prince Rupert intends to
make the following local improvements:—
A 16-foot plank road on Ninth
avenue from the junction of Eighth,
Ninth and Comox avenues to the
junction of Eighth avenue tind
Young street, also on McBride street
between Eighth and Ninth avenues,
and to assess the final cost thereof
upon the property fronting or abutting thereon or to be beneMtted
thereby and that a statement and
diagram showing the lands lo be so
especially assessed for the said Improvement or work Is now filed In
the office of the City Clerk and is
open for inspection c' tring office
hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
$12,000.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 11th
day of November, 1910,
ERNEST. A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. Nll-15
TENDERS FOI! STREET GRADING
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the City Clerk until 12 o'clock
noon, Nov. 28th, 1910, for the grading of sub-sections A, B, C, F, and H,
section one.
Plans and Specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer from
10 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. dally.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. Nll-25
LINDSAYS CARTAGEaSTORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office nt H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION   OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 6, CoaBt District, notice of
which was published in the British
olumbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled ln so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1601,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1641,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1647,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1661.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 6.)
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district 1b its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
(

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