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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 26, 1911

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Array The Journal
$2.00
a year
Ptinu Mnpett Journal
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.  TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1911.
Price, Five Cents.
NO. 28.
DECISIVE VICTORY
AGAINST RECIPROCITY
Liberals Suffer Very Heavily in Ontario-Many Supporters of Late Government Went Down to Defeat
on Election Day-Quebec also
Makes Great Change.
The election returns for Canada
show a sweeping change in favor of
Conservatism. In no part of the
Dominion was this more noticeable
than in Ontario. Only one seat, that
had formerly been represented by a
Conservative was won In that province by the Liberals. That was Norfolk, where W. A. Charlton was the
Liberal candidate. On the other
hand, Ontario Conservatives wrested
from the opposing party twenty-one
seats that were formerly Liberal.
The result of the polls outside of
British Columbia show the follol.-ing
elected, with the majority in each
case:
ONTARIO
Conservatives
Algoma E—W. R. Smythe. 64.
Algoma W—A. C. Boyce, 500.
Brant—J. A. Fisher, 200.
Brantford—W. F. Cockshutt, 700.
Broekville—J. Webster, 125.
Bruce N—Col. H. Clark, 92.
Bruce S.—J. J. Donnelly, 105.
Csrleton—E. Kldd, 1000.
Dufferin—J. A. Best, 1000.
Dundas—A. Broder, 675.
Durham—C. J. Thornton, 517.
Elgin E.—D. Marshall, 400.
Elgin W.—T. W. Crothers, 836.
Essex  N— O.  J.  Wilcox,   250.
Frontenac—Dr. J. W. Erwards, 40
Frontenac—Dr. J. Edwards, 400.
Grenville—Dr. J. D. Reid, 1200.
Grey E.—Dr. T. S. Sproule, 1200.
Grey N.—W.  S.  Middleboro,  150.
Grey S.—R. J. Ball, 17.
Ha'dimand—F. R. Lawlor, 500.
Halton—D. Henderson, 600.
Hami'ton E.—S. Barker.
Hamilton W.—T. J. Stewrrt.
Hastings E.—W. B. Northrup,
1000.
Hastings W.—E. G. Porter, 1200.
Huron E.—J. Bowman, 137.
Huron S.—J. J. Merner, 300.
Huron W.—E. N. Lewis, 160.
Kingston—W. F. Nickle,  345.
Lambton E.—J. E. Armstrong,
375.
Lanark N.—W. Thoburn, 135.
.     Lanark   S.—Hon.  J.  G.  Hag'S.t,
' .*000.
Leeds—G. Taylor, 1100.
Lennox and Addington—W. J.
Paul,  200.
Lincoln—E. A. Lancaster, 1200.
London—T. Beattie, 1898.
Middlesex E.—P. Elson, 651.
Middlesex N.—G. Elliott, 300.
Muskoka—W. Wright, 800.
Nipissing—G. Gordon, 100.
Northumberland E.—H. J. Walker,  350.
Northumberland W.—C. A. Mun-
son,  4.
Ontario N.—Major S. Sharpe, 190.
Ontario S.—W. Smith, 56.
Ottawa   (2)—A.  E.  Fripp,   1112;
i-,Dr. J. L. Chabot, 641.
Oxford S.—D. Sutherland, 6.
Parry Sound—J. Arthurs, 400.
Peel—R.  Blain, 250.
Perth N.—H. B. Morphy, K. O,
250.
Perth S.—Dr. M. Steele, 71.
Peterboro E.—J. A. Sexsmith, 700.
Peterboro W.—J. H. Burnham, 83.
Prince Edward—R. R. Hepburn,
260.
Renfrew N.—G. V. White, 600.
Simcoe E.—W. H. Bennett, 300.
Simcoe N.—Major J. A. Currie,
200.
Simcoe S.—H. Lennix, 1800.
Stormont—Dr. D. Algulre, 120.
Toronto Centre—E. Bristol, 2124.
Toronto E.—A. E. Kemp, 2389.
Toronto N.—Hon. G. E. Foster,
3242.
Toronto S.—A. C. MacDonnell,
2325.
Toronto W.—E. B. Osier, 5685.
Victoria and Haliburton—Col. S.
Hughes, 1000.
Waterloo N.—W. G. Weichel, 475.
Waterloo S.—G. A. Clare, 650.
Wellington N.—W. A. Clarke, 50.
Wentworth—G. C. Wilson, 200.
York, Centre—T. G. Wallace, 448.
York N.—J. A. M. Armstrong, 76.
York S.—W. F. Maclean, 200.
Liberals
Essex—A. H. Clarke, 175.
,J\   Glengarry—J. A. McMillan, 300.
m
Kent E.—D. A. Gordon, 250.
Kent W— A. B. McCoig, 25.
Lambton W— F. F. Pardee, 250
Middlesex W.—D. C. Ross, 130.
Norfolk—W. A. Charlton, 145.
Oxford N.—E. W. Nesbitt  507.
Prescott—E.  Proulx,  200.
Renfrew S.—T. A. Low, 300.
Russell—Hon. C. Murphy   1000.
Welland—W.   M.   German   (Anti-
Reciprocity), acclamation.
Wellington S — H. Guthrie, 615.
QUEBEC
Conservatives
Argenteuil—G. H. Perley, 550.
Berth ier—J. A. Barrette.
Brome—H.   G.   Baker,   24.
Bellechasse—J.  O.  Lavallie.
Chambly and Vercheres—J. H. R.
Rainville   (Nat.),  178.
Champlain—P. E. Blondin, 400.
Charlevoix—R.  Forget,  530.
Compton—F. Cromwell, 124.
Dorchester—A. Sevigny, 47.
Hochelaga—L.  Cordere,  1330.
Jaques Cartler—F. D. Monk, 1200.
Jollietle—J. P. O. Guilbault. 36.
Labelle—H. Achim, 133.
L'Islet—E. Paquet, 440.
Maskinonge—A. Belmare, 111.
Missisquoi—Dr. Plckel.
Montmorency—R. Forget.
Montmagny—D. O. Lesperance.
Montreal—
St. Anne's—C. J. Doherty.
St. Antoine—H. B. Ames.
Pontine—G. Brabazon.
Quebec County—L. P. Pelletier.
Rimouskl—H. Boulay.
Shefford—J.  Davidson.
Sstanstead—C. W. Page.
Terrebonne—W. B. Nantel.
Three Rivers and St. Maurice—Dr.
L. P. Normand (Nat.).
Yamaska—A. A. Mondoux.
Liberals
Bagot—J. Marclle, 107.
Beauce—Hon. H. S. Beland, 6.
Beauharnois—L. J. Papineau, 36.
Bonaventure—C.   Marcil,   900.
Chateauguay—J. P. Brown, 43.
Drummond    and    Arthabaska—O.
Brouillard,   317.
Huntingdon—J. A.  Robb,  151.
Kamouraska—E.   Lapointe,  90.
Laprairie-Napierville—R.  Lanctot,
168.
L'Assomption—P. A.  Seguin, 300.
Laval—C. A. Wilson.
Levis—B. Bourassa, 800.
Lotbiniere—E. Fortier.
Malssonneuve—A.  Verville,   2000.
Megantic, L. Pacund.
Montcalm—D. A.  Lafortune.
Montreal—
St. James—R. A. Lapointe.
St. Lawrence—R. Bickerdike.
St. Mary's—M. Martin.
Nicolet—Dr. G. A. Turcotte.
Portneuf—M. S. Delisle.
Quebec  Centre—A.   Lachance.
Quebec East—Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
Quebec West—W. Power.
Richelieu—A. Cardin.
Richmond and Wo'fe—E. W. To-
bin.
Rouville—Hon. R. Lemieux..
St.  Hyaclnthe—L.  J.  Gauthier.
Sherbrooke—F. N. McCrea.
Soulanges—Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
St. Johns-Iberville—J. Demers.
Temiscouata—C. A. Gavreau.
Two Mountains—J. A. C. Ethler.
Vaudreuil—G. Boyer.
Wright—E. B. Devlin.
NEW  HRUNSWICK
Conservatives
Charlotte—T. A. Hartt.
Kent—F. J. Robldoux.
Kings and Albert—G. W. Fowler.
Northumberland—D. Morrison.
St. John City and County—Dr. J.
W. Daniel.
York—O. S. Crocket.
Liberals
Carleton—F. B. Carvell.
Glouchester—O. Turgeon.
Restlgouche—J.  Reid.
Sunbury and Queens—Col. H. H.
McLean.
Victoria—P.  Mlchaud.
Westmorland—Hon.   H.   R.   Emmerson.
NOVA  SCOTIA
Conservatives
Colchester—J. Stanfield.
Cumberland—E. N. Rhodes.
Digby—C. Jameson.
Halifax (2)—R. L. Borden; A. B.
Crosby.
Kings—A. De W. Foster.
Lunenburg—Dr. D. Stewart.
Shelburne and Queens—F. B. McCurdy.
Liberals
Annapolis—S. W. VV. Pickup.
Antigonish—W.  Chisholm.
Cape Breton North and Victoria—
D.  D.  Mackenzie.
Cape Breton South—W. F. Carroll.
Guysboro—J. H. Sinclair.
Hants—Dr.  J.  B.  Black.
'Inverness—C. W.  Chisholm.
Pictou—E. M. McDonald.
Richmond—G. W. Kyte.
Yarmouth—B. B. Law.
PRINCE   EDWARD   ISLAND
Conservatives
Queens   (2)—A.   A.   McLean;   D.
Nicholson.
Liberals
Prince-;—J. W. Richards.
Kings—J. J.  Hughes.
ALBERTA
Conservatives
Calgary1—R. B. Bennett,'K. C.
Liberals
Edmonton—Hon. F. Oliver.
Macleod—Dr. D. Warnoek, 600.
Medicine Hat—W. A. Buchanan.
Red Deer—Dr. M.  Clark, 835.
Strathcona—J. M. Douglas.
Victoria—W.  H.  White.
SASKATCHEWAN
Conservatives
Prince Albert—J. McKay.
Liberals
Assiniboia—J. G. Turiff.
Battleford—A. Champagne.
Humboldt—Dr.  D.  B.  Neely.
Mackenzie—Dr. E. E. Cash.
Moose Jaw—W. E. Know'es.
Regina—W. Martin.
Saltcoats—T.   McNutt.
Qu'Appelle—L. Thompson.
Saskatoon—G. E. McCrahey.
MANITOBA
Conservatives
Brandon—J. A. M. Aikins.
Lisgar—W. H. Sharpe, 16.
Macdonald—W. D. Staples.
Marquette—Dr. W.  J. Roche.
Portage   La   Prairie—A.   E.   Mei-
ghen, 300.
Souris—Dr. F. L. Schaffner.
Winnipeg—A. Haggart, 3800.
Liberals
Dauphin—R. Cruise,376.
Provencher—Dr. J. P. Molloy.
Selkirk—A.  R. Bredin.
Clements Elected
The majority for H. S. Clements,
the Conservative candidate in Comox-Atlin, is likely to reach about
125. He has now a lead of over
100, with several places to hear from.
The figures stand as follows:
Skeena District
Clements Ross
Prince Rupert     226 397
Port Simpson  10 6
Georgetown         1 6
Digby Island      2 12
Hsrdserabble         3 5
Goose  Bay     20 13
Cedar Vale      7 5
Kitselas      19 17
Kitsumkalum     17 9
Hazelton     98 81
Aldermere     15 17
Sealey          3 19
Skidegate         7 5
Jedway         4 6
Queen Charlotte City . .     7 14
Stewart      63 44
Telqua      12 11
Kispiox    7
Mile 44    10 23
Shsndilla         7 8
Breckenrldge         4 2
Red Cliff        7 9
Copper City         9 11
Littleton     26 11
The Big Tunnel       1 12
Skeena Crossing      4 7
Twenty Mile      8 10
Lome Creek      8 5
Glentana        4 9
Bitter Creek  12 3
Port Esslngton  28 36
Lawn Hill      4 4
Inverness         7 1
Splller River         4 7
Jap Inlet, Refuge Bay. . 10 10
Chicken  Lake         4 4
Pleasant Valley        8 7
Massett    11 16
Bella Coola     18 12
Hagensborg     24 9
Sloan     5 1
Hartley  Bay         1 2
North  Francois         0 2
Claxton       9 2
Tel-El   River   .      2 2
Welcome Harbor        2 6
Lawn Hall         2 6
Kitamaat          3 4
Pacofl        1 0
Sandsplt         3 4
Lockport      4 6
Kincolith          1 2
Port Nelson         1 2
Whiting Bay      4 8
Namu         6 2
Rivers Inlet (Wndhams)     9 3
Rivers Inlet   (Victoria)
Ocean  Fails   	
Total
Comox
Cumberland   . . .
Courtney	
Denman Inland .
Hornby Island .
Valdez Island . .
Powell River . .
Campbell River
Cortez Island . .
Union  Bay
Van Anda	
Lund 	
803
112
141
16
8
30
65
14
13
21
33
22
Total     475
Atlln District
Atlln     21
Telegraph Creek     3
Discovery     16
Bennett  2
Boulder Creek    2
Spruce Creek    5
Wynton     1
Total  49
Alberni District
Parksville      42
Alberni     87
Port Alberni  70
Estevan Wireless  1
Pachena     1
Uclulet     8
Wellington     38
Tofino   13
Coombs   2
Nanoose     16
Kyoquot     0
Nootka     1
Banfield    2
Total 281
Richmond
Brackendale    10
Squawish      4
Gibson's Landing  17
Bowen Land  10
Total  41
923
131
69
14
6
4
7
2
26
15
15
295
22
16
17
1
3
13
1
73
24
63
15
2
4
13
32
33
4
6
4
1
13
241
3
4
6
6
19
McBRIDE'S VIEWS
Hon. Richard McBride, premier of British Columbia, in an
terview given since the election
said:
^''T^ result of the election has
proved what many Independent
critics have expected within the
last few weeks—that the great
silent vote in Canada would be
against reciprocity. This, of
course, must be looked upon as
proof positive that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier had absolutely lost the
pulse of the Canadian .people.
The great victory which Mr.
Borden has achieved means that
Canada is forever done with reciprocity and that she is more
than ever prepared fo continue
along the line of cultivating the
home and imperial markets,
first, last and all the time. No
one can venture to deny that
with the splendid pronouncement that the independent electorate of Canada has made, our
our American cousins more than
ever will have the sincerest regard and deepest respect for
their Canadian neighbors.
"Mr. Borden may be expecter
to give the people of Canada a
more energetic government than
that which has just besn dismissed, as wel1 as to strengthen
the assurance that more than
ever have we reason to feel satisfied with the great future that
lies before the Canadian people.
While we have pronounced ourselves a nation within tbe Empire, at the same time we have
the right to say that we have
set the seal upon our fixed determination to be in the end the
very nerve centre and mainstay
of the imperial structure.
As a Canadian, I would express the hope that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier may be induced to continue in public life and to give
that service ss leader of the
Opposition in the Canadian parliament which his long experience and ability easily command."
.............
CELEBRATED VICTORY
Conservatives Narked   tbe  Return
H. S. Clements by Parade
and Speeches.
of
Member-Elect   for   the   Riding'  Left
for   South   ny   Princess
, May Yesterduy
While there was every assurance
that Comox-Atlin would prove to
have gone Conservative, there remained a little uncertainty on Thifrs-
day night as to whose fight it might
be. The supporters of Mr. Clements
therefore postponed the celebration
of his election until Saturday night,
when there was no doubt as to the
fact that he was elected.
With torches, flags and mottoes
and headed by the bagpipes some of
the principal streets were covered by
the procession. Mr. Clements himself was hoisted onto horseback and
put in front.
Following that a rally was held in
the Empress Theatre, where William
Manson presided.
Speeches, necessarily short, and in
most  of cases  delivered  in  a  voice
SIR WILFRID'S POSITION
* Sir Wilfrid Laurier says that
* he will call the cabinet ministers
* together at  once  and   expedite
* all  business which  it  is neces-
* ssry   to   deal   with   before   the
* resignations of the ministers are
* placed in the hands of His Ex-
* eellency  Earl  Grey.     Owing to
* the  early  date  fixed   for  Earl
* Grey's departure,  no  time  will
* be lost.
* Asked if he would continue to
* lead   the   Liberals,   Sir   Wilfrid
* Laurier intimated that he would.
* I would feel like a deserter," he
* said, "were I to drop out now."
*
.............
Boxing Contest
The contestants for the boxing
match to be held In the Kaien Island
Club gymnasium tomorrow night are
training hard for the event. Joe
Bailey of Victoria and Oscar Nelson
of Vancouver will engage in s fifteen-
round match, which should prove a
most Interesting one.
James Llpscombe, who represented the White Pass Company In Atlin,
went south yesterday.
that revealed trie fact (.hat there had
been some strong cheering participated in beforehand were given. John
R. Beatty's voice failed to work, and
he was forced to confine himself to
gesticulations alone but his actions
were most eloquent. Other speakers
other than the member-elect were
Mr. Kirby of Port Essington, Dr.
Clayton, J. A. Kirkpatrick, O. H.
Nelson, Ed Clarke, J. H. Hilditch, J.
Alford of Pacofi, G. R. T. Sawle, W.
Lniley, Joseph Traficant, H. H.
Clark, L. Crippen, J. G. Scott, George
Tite, A. Carss and L. Bullock-Webster.
Mr. Clements expressed his warm
appreciation of the work done in his
interest by the committee in Prince
Rupert. He had never met with a
more loyal or a more willing body of
workers. He recognized the importance of Prince Rupert in the constituency and would serve the city
well.
Club's   Welcome
Following the meeting an invitation was extended to Mr. Clements
and bis committee to visit the Wanderers' Club, where refreshments
were served by tlie members in honor
of the member-elect.
Warm appreciation on the part of
the supporters of Mr. Clements was
expressed to the Wanderers for their
thoughtfulness In the matter.
The Kaien Island Club, having extended a similar invitation, the rooms
of that body were visited and then
the member and his friends were
again entertained.
Leave Taking
After lunch yesterday at the Central Hotel Mr. Clements and the committee were joined by Hon. Dr.
Young, on his way back from Atlln,
and by Mr. Black, on bis way nortli
to take part in the campaign in the
Yukon. Short speeches, with cheers
for Mr. Clements, Hon. Dr. Young
and Mr. Thompson, the Conservative
candidate In the Yukon, were given,
after which all marched to the wharf
and gave the campaigners a hearty
send-off.
Mr. Clements will return to Prince
Rupert in a few weeks' time and
spend a short time visiting some of
tne outlying districts before leaving
for Ottawa.
CONTEST IN YUKON
Dr. Thompson Will Contest Seat in the
Interests of Conservatives
.Mr.    Congdon   Has   Gone   North   to
Take Active Part in the
Campaign   There
Dr. Thompson of Dawson, formerly
member of the House of Commons
for the Yukon, is contesting the
northern seat in the interests of the
Conservative party in the coming bye-
election there. His opponent, Mr.
Congdon, went nortli yesterday to
contest the seat for the Liberals.
Among those who went north on
the steamer was Mr. Black, who ran
against Mr. Congdon in a previous
election and who has gone in to help
Dr. Thompson.
Dr. Thompson is a brother of F. H.
Thompson of this city.
Through the thoughtfulness of Mr.
Black Mr. Congdon avoided being
left here yesterday. The Liberal
candidate had gone up city, not expecting the steamer to leave as soon
as it did. Just as the gangplank
was being hauled In Mr. Black discovered that Mr. Congdon, his political enemy, was not on board. He
according went to the captain, and
on his representation had the steamer delayed until Mr. Congdon could
be got down to the wharf and take
passage.
The action of Mr. Black is rather
in striking contrast with what was
done with Hon. Dr. Young while the
latter was on his way to Atlin. Refusal was made to allow Dr. Young
to proceed on a small steamer owned
by Mr. Ruffner on the technical
ground that it was not licenced to
carry passengers, although the provincial secretary was proceeding
purely as a friend on the steamer
and no such refusal had been made
before.
Dr. Young had to delay his trip
three days but after considerable
trouble got a steamer to make a
special trip and so reached his destination.
Box Social
A very enjoyable box social was
given by the Baptist Church last
evening. The proceeds were large
and a very pleasant time was spent.
Judge Young, who has been in Atlln, returned hy the Princess May
yesterduy. He had the opportunity
of coming south with his brother,
Hon. Dr. Young.
An Election Wager
R. Angers, who took such an active
part in the election campaigning for
the Liberal party, is reported to have
lost in a wager with "Dad" Weeks
at Kitsumkalum as to tlie results of
the election and as a condition will
have to wheel "Dad" from the Kitsumkalum Crossing up the bill to his
home on the Kitsumkalum Road. If
the conditions nre required to be
lived up to there will oe pe.y felt for
•Mr. Angers even by his opponents.
 o '■	
Chinese Gambling
In the city police court this morning, evidence was taken in the Chinese gambling case arising out of the
raid last Saturday night when rooms
alleged to be used for gambling in
King Tai's place was Invaded by the
police and arrests made.
The evidence for the prosecution
was put In this morning, it being
alleged that the game was fan tan.
The defence will be beard tomorrow.
Fred Peters, K. ('., represented the
city In the prosecution, nnd L. W.
Patmore appeared for the defence.
\v. Yolen Williams, the Granby
smelter expert, Is back from a trip
to Skagway. He will visit Goose Bay
and then proceed soutli.
VOICE OF B.C.
In no uncertain way, British Columbia has spoken relative to recl-
proi'ity. Hon. Richard McBride gave
an assurance before the election that
the province would go solid for the
Conservatives. The returns show-
that he spoke correctly. The majorities are as follows:
Comox-Atlin   (Clements)      104
Victoria  (Barnard)      484
Vancouver   (Stevens)    2991
New Westminster (Taylor)...   1763
Niinainio   (Shepherd)     419
Kootenay   (Goodeve)      496
Yale-Cariboo   (Burrell)     536 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
THE HUB OF THE HAZELTON DISTRICT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ON THE MAIN LINE OF THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
THE PROSPERITY OF EVERY GREAT CITY IS DUE TO ITS GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
CO
CO
C5
CO
a
CO
o
CD
The most important Townsite! The most talked of Townsite along the line of the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY
NOTICE
New Hazelton Townsite Section 1
Now being offered for sale Is Not n
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought tlie land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the Mines, the Distributing
Centre for hundreds of miles, and
many other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful  men  known  to  you  all.
Your profits should eclipse the
story of Edmonton, Calgary, Reglna,
Moose Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures who will say, "I wish I had
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
on Real Estate while you reap
nothing hut your salary. Put your
savings lo work in that sure coming
City—NEW HAZELTON.
NEW  HAZELTON   is   out   of  the
damp belt, and many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe—
plenty of sunshine and dry air.
Taken-from Official Bulletin, B.C.,
No. 22, Page 23: —
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 50 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE YOU CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased by
the keenest business men of Hazelton (Olel Town). "lieu can safely
follow the judgment of such men.
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was tin average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week,
We are all here to share In this
most wonderful prosperity., We offer
you an opportunity to participate in
the progress of the best town tor
Investment on the line of the Grand
Trunk  Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country.
Railroads have been the great
feature In the growth of Western
Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand   Trunk    Pacific   Railroad   is
attracting the attention of the whole
world, as all important towns do on
the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant now moving on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store( Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity is
In that part of the Townsite known
as Section  One.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
Townsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
positively no Railroad Company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in the land. Trie owners have
undertaken to make NEW HAZELTON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable pity
to the Grand Trunk Pacific along Its
main lines.
Offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart,
contractors building tbe Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad, will be located in
NEW HAZELTON. The Chief Clerk,
Paymaster and Purchasing Agent are
preparing to, and will, build homes
in NEW HAZELTON, Section One.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to
be the most active and sensational
new city in the fastest growing part
of the world today on account of
the wonderful Lead, and Zinc Mines,
the Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields,
the Vast Agricultural Country tributary to the coming principal city In
Britisii Columbia on the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad
is now running regular trains over
100 miles out of Prince Rupert. The
G. T. P. Officials, and also the
G. T. P. Contractors, say that the
Railroad should be running to Mile
164 this winter, and will reach NEW
HAZELTON next summer. Grading
is now under way as far along the
line as 30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON. The grading is about finished from Prince Rupert to NEW
HAZELTON. Many mines are getting ready to ship ore. Some of tlie
mines being developed are:—Silver
Cup. American Boy, Silver Standard,
Sunrise and Sunset, Lead King, Erie
Babine.     Most  of the  ore  in  XEW
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
RIGHT KIND OF COUNTRY
RIGHT KIND OF RESOURCES
RIGHT KIND OF PEOPLE
will surely be big paying
investments. This is the
kind  of town you  find at
New Hazelton, B.C.
HAZELTON mines is high grade
Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Siocan District in East Kootenay,
B. C, and similar to some ores found
at Leadville, Col.
Buy Lots
TERMS ARE EASY
Look them over again, and think
of this money making investment.
OUT OF OITJT INVESTORS
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots
and number required, and we will
make the best available reservation
for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite and when you
buy a lot in it you are investing your
money on (Ire business judgment of
the most successful men in British
Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had over
a Quarter of u Million Dollars Invested by a few Business Men before
the Lots were offered for sale. NEW
HAZELTON is a* Business Man's
Townsite. All the G. T. P. and Local
History was carefully considered.
The Engineer's Reports as to grades,
opportunities for Side Tracks necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
I bey invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZEL-
TON  and   nearby   Lands  over  Two
Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars.
That is a wonderful sonnet written
by elohn J. Ingnlls on the subject of
Opportunity, but the real fact is,
Opportunity does not knock once on
each man's door. Opportunity plays
a continual anvil on every man's portals—but, of course, if he is knocking at the time he will not hear
Opportunity when she knocks.
Clipping from Omineca Herald,
Saturday, September 9, 1911: —
JUST ONE  NEW HAZELTON
THE  SPOKANE  OF CANADA
All Interests Combine to Boost the
New Town—Campaign Has Started—Natural Resources Guarantee a Big Population—Contractors' Headquarters.
The New Hazelton campaign has
started. For the next few months
the very best efforts of some of the
greatest advertising men and real
estate firms in British Columbia will
be devoted to Boosting New Hazelton. The different interests have
combined to make this town one of
the foremost in the province. A careful study has been made by experts
and they are all agreed that there
cannot be too much boosting. The
natural resources are here and they
are now being developed in a way
heretofore unknown. Everything is
now on the move. Mining has this
week had a stimulation that was not
dreamed of. During the two previous
weeks several big deals were put
through which meant the bringing In
of mining men known the world
over. Agriculture has been very successful this year and the farmers
have had bigger crops than ever.
They are all getting on their feet
and buying machinery as fast as it
can   be   brought   into   the  country.
This week Charles S. Meek, president of Standard Securities, Ltd.,
Vancouver was in town and completed   arrangements   with  the  sur-
$10 Down
$10 a Month
veyors to lay out his company's
property. This work has already
been started and it will be finished
in another ten days.
It is on the Northern Interior
Land Co.'s property that so many
of the old Hazelton business men
have purchased lots and are prepared
to build, many this fall. It Is from
this point that the business section
will start and grow, and where high
values will prevail.
There    will    be    the    one    town
instead of several as might have
been. This means a great deal; in
fact, many hundreds of dollars to
the people of the old town, who have
been wondering where the town
would be. From now on New
Hazelton will be introduced to the
world in a manner that no other
town  can  equal
The gentlemen associated in the
homing of this New Townsite they
now call NEW HAZELTON, paid out
in actual cash before a lot was sold
Over a Quarter of a Million Dollars.
NEW HAZELTON
Wliere the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-
way and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available
spot in the Skeena or Bulkley Valleys
for many miles each way where it
would be possible to have Railroad
Yards large enough to handle the
Hazelton District's business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level stretch of land suitable
for Immense Yards, which will be
required to handle the thousands of
cars of ore and coal that will be
shipped from the mines In the
Hazelton District.
TheG.T.P.
Capital of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems,  I)I447,808,0:{2.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T.
and G. T. P. Millions of people boost
for Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21
feet to the mile, oue-flfth of nny
other Trrineontinental Railroad In
Canada or the United Stntes.
.NEW HAZELTON Is the Town
that everybody is talking about, and
there are no two opinions as to Its
opportunities for investments. The
reason is obvious.
XEW HAZELTON Is Situated near
the junction of the Skeena and
Bulkley Valleys.
The Northern Interior Land Co.
Ltd., paid cash for and own (Section One) NEW HAZELTON TOWN-
SITE and guarantee to deliver to
purchasers of lots an Indefeasible
Title upon receipt of final payment.
i
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C., P. 0. Box 1515
PRINCE RUPERT OFFICE FOR SALE OF LOTS
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER. LTD.
2nd Avenue Between 5th and 6th Streets Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOUUNAL
FOREIGN SPIES
Espionage charges, now common in
England and Germany, have convinced the erstwhile incredulous of the
existence of spies in peace time, but
the vast scope and activities of the
world's secret service are still only
partially understood, says the London Standard. In England at the
present moment there are at least
two hundred persons—men and
women—professionally engaged In
secret work on behalf of different
foreign governments. They are supported here by organizations whose
numbers extend to more than a thousand.
Hundreds of secret service agents
of the great military powers are
scattered throughout the world.
Everywhere they are eavesdropping,
sketching and photographing. Immediately after Lloyd George delivered
his surprisingly patriotic speech upon
the Moorish situation there came to
England from Germany reinforcements for the battalion of German
spies which is always secretly working in this country. By this move
the German secret service was not
initiating a new custom.
When news was first circulated
that the government was building
the naval airship at Barrow much
interest was awakened in Germany,
where the dirigible and its future
posess the strongest champions. Two
aeronautical experts were immediately despatched to Barrow to discover the secret of its construction.
These men are still in the town.
Speaking fluent English, they move
about without suspicion. Evidently in
their mission they have been partly
successful, for some details of the
airship's construction, and the reason why it has not yet flown, are
known in their own country, while
to most Englishmen these items nre
still a mystery. Probably the English secret service is aware of their
abode and their mission, but greater
hesitancy to prosecute is shown in
this country unless more tangible evidence that mere suspision Is procurable.
That every important country has
Its own secret service and is represented In all lands is no secret. But
it is only in countries with which
there are possibilities of war that
there is special concentration. Thus,
.though France and Germany knew
mosrof each other's secrets through
sustained and exhaustive inquiries,
there are in this country very few
"silent watchers" attached to the
French secret service. Much surprise,
too, would be manifested in English
well Informed circles st the news
that the American espionage system
was represented here by more than
one or two spies. There are many
Russians in this country, but few
,!'» attached to the secret service. In
Geimany, Russia is well represented,
as are most of the other countries.
Capable spies are not easily obtained, though their calling does not
inevitably mean a life of discomfort.
Usually they are ex-army or navy
men, whose experience of war preparations is invaluable. They must
be good linguists and of exceptional
appearance. "Professionals" are
paid not for the information gained,
but a regular wage, sufficient to
maintain them comfortably, whether
men or women in the country to
which they nre sent. The continuance of the salary depends upon the
-egnlar transmission of secret in-
.ormation. Wherever they stay a
principal task Is to scan every news
paper for scraps of information concerning fortifications, manoeuvres
and nrmaments. If there is a new
bolt being experimentally tried for
the service rifle, the spy may accidentally learn of It by staying at a
good hotel and patronizing the bar
selected by visiting officers. Sketching fortifications Is not often at
tempted, particularly in a public
place, unlesB by novices. But all picture postcards, photographs of landscapes Including views of fortified
positions, are sent off to be treasured
in the archives of the foreign war
department. At Portsmouth, Dover,
and other well guarded positions
there Is always some one on duty,
simply alert for possible items of in-
Bide Information. Operations at the
new Rosyth naval base have not proceeded without the assiduous attentions of plausible "tourists."
The outside of government offices
Is well observed, and a person suspected of possession secret plans Is
shadowed with unflinching determination. In this way all governments have become dispossessed of
Important documents. Largely to
avoid this, and also to prevent those
representatives of other nations who
tyejih to dispose of secret information
from being observed, private houses
are maintained in streets far removed
from government offices. Letters
are  addressed  to  these  institutions
to some fictitious person supposedly
resident there. In this way the risk
of detection is greatly lessened. From
the spy's point of view his first object is to escape detection. To prevent detection, if apprehended, the
spy posts his information to his own
country Immedately he obtains it)
and to prevent suspicion when It
passes through the post, he usually
sends the letter to a fictitious business firm at his own private address.
Then, when he returns to his country, he can safely draw up a report
of his discoveries and pass it on to
tlie offocial  magnetic receptacles.
The information thus laboriously
obtained is filed, and becomes obsolete in a very short time. But it
has served its main purpose; the war
authority has known what was the
exact type of weapon in use, what
were the methods adopted for fortifications, what new type of battleship was on the stocks and so on.
Thus the authority knows whether
its country is keeping pace with, or
is sufficiently well in advance to protect herself or to overcome the other
nation if war were declared. The
greatest advantage gained is more
negative than positive, for by this
method the authority knows exactly
how much it is necessary to spend,
and has no need to waste money to
protect itself against non-existent
dangers.
But the importance of secret service work may be exaggerated. Most
of the details of warships, armor and
guns are published through their discussion in the various parlaments of
the world. Secrecy in naval construction barely exists. Every civilized
country publishes the strength of Its
army to a man.
GOLD  FINDS  IN  B.  C.
Encouraging Reports Received From
Chilcotin and Yellowhead
Districts
Reports are received from Ashcroft
of a genuine stampede into the near
Chilcotin country, wliere discoveries,
promising well, have recently been
made of gold-silver ledges, evidently
of unusual size and continuity. A.
H. Shepard, manager of the Tatlay-
ako Lake Gold Mines, Ltd., and J. T.
Morris are regarded as the original
explorers and pioneers of the district
in which the new field is located.
Mr. Shepard says:
"This summer considerable development work has been prosecuted
and several veins of gold-silver ore
have been discovered, the largest of
wliich will average four feet in width.
The ore lies exposed on the surface
for 1,000 feet without a break. The
average gold and silver values carried by this vein are from $25 to
$435 a ton. For the entire length
of the vein the values average $40.
There Is a base ore in the composition of these veins, and this base
ore is antimony, which will run as
high as 70 per cent. On the gold-
silver vein 600 feet of tunneling has
been completed, and nowhere has ore
been met with carrying less than $23
in gold to the ton. On the face of
the tunnel the average samples assayed ran $127 to the ton. The face,
moreover, showed four feet of clear
ore. The vein has a depth of 200
feet.
"A crew of men are working on
this vein, and are gaining depth rapidly," continued Mr. Shepard. "We
have yet to go some distance before
we reach the rich ore which showed
$435 values on the surface. Our mining engineer, E. Ehrenberg of Spokane, estimates that we have $500,-
000 of ore blocked out nt present.
There Is no doubt whatever in my
mind that the Tatlayako Lake country is one of the richest, if not the
richest, gold district in BritlBh Columbia. Those who are interested
In properties In that district are making every effort to have n road opened up from Bute Inlet. With the
communication thus afforded the
properties located would Immediately
be placed upon a paying basis."
Another rich strike has just been
made In the Yellowhead district by
an old Kamloops prospector. A big
find of gold, copper and sliver ore
has been made on Moose River, Yellowhead, by the Teer Brothers, who
for years were prospecting in the
Lardeau. Another old timer of the
Lardeau who has made a good strike
in the same district is Billy Holla-
woy, who, it Is claimed, has located
one of the biggest showing of gold
and silver ore ever made in the North
country. With hlsm In his new locations are associated Mr. and Mrs.
Nelson and W. Douglas. The ore
samples from these properties nre
now In Nelson being assayed, and
arrangements are being made to develop the property this winter.
Skeena Land Listrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply io the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ss follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty  days
from  date,  I, Austin  M.  Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and  petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner   of   C.L.   4472;   thence   east   80
chains;    thence    north    80    chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
l.lace of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince itupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44/0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE  that  thirty   days
from date, I, Austin  M.  Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as   follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner   of   C.L.   4470;   thence   east   80
chains;    thence   north    80    chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b, C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing nt post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; tlience west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal nnd petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chain;:;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4473; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chalnB; thence east
•!0 chains; thence south 80 chrlns,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena    .and  District—District  of
Qui   n Charlotte
TAKE VOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Ri.pert, B, C, by occupation
sadler, in end to apply to the Chief
Commissii ner of Lands for a license
to prospe' t for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of!
C.L.4475; thence north 90 chains;
thence enen 80 chains; [Jence south j
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of ceemmencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of   I
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE  that   thirty   days'
from   date,   I,  Austin  *i.   Brown,  of)
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation I
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect  for coal and  petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on j
Graham    island    described    ss    follows:—Commencing st post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner  of  C.L.   4477;   thence   west   80
chains;    thence   south    80    chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cliains, to lj^ace of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911. ,
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tt| Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 Chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ss follows*—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, oy occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; ihence east
80 chains; luence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Qrreen Charlotte
■ TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing st a post planted on the
west shore of \vest River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; 'hence south SO chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeenn  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64o acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. O, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C. N. Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26, 1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ss follows:—Commencing at post planted
at .he southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing nt post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
tlience nortli 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911. 	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that *S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of' ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S. BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated July 21,  1911. i
Skeens   Land   District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver In
the Province of British Columbia,
occupation, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an Island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at ' high tide;
tlience south three chains; thence
east ten chains- thence north tliree
chains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Daled  July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under uiO acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence no-th 80 chnlns, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dlst.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
soutli to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
5 0 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred  Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June  14.  1911. 6-23
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C., by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; tlience north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, Intend to npply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—■ Commencing nt n
post planted about 30 o.alns In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. . 6-2
Prince Rupert  Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and  Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 80.1 — Phone 210
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, .Nebraska, U. S. a., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted ahout 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
tbence north 80 chains; u.ence east
80 chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16    i911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hattie Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, O. S. A.,
occupation housewife intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 60 chains; tlience
north 80 chains,' thence east 60
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HAt'TIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16   1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing st a post planted about
5 miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 cnains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent
Dated July 16, 1911. A-15
Skeena   Land    district—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. f., occu.
pation housewife, intends fo apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted abor" 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west 80 chains;
tbence south SO chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
seres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de- ''
scribed lauds:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
40 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
JAMES  .MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.   1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NejTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for. permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence nortb
SO chains; thence west so ehains;
thence south So chains; thence east
su chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Nans Harbour,
occupation constable, Intend to npply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. II., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY  HICKMAN.
Dated June 7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena  Land   District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE thut Victor H
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intend* to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land: —Commencing at a post planted nt high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Islnnd, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
less.
VICTOR H.  REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
O. T. P. CARTAGE AGENT8
OITice at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Pbone No  68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point In
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
H. S. CLEMENTS
In the newly elected member for
Comox-Atlin the constituency has an
excellent representative and the Conservatives a party representative of
whom they may well be proud. The
workers who are associated very
closely with a candidate throughout
a political fight have unexcelled opportunities to find out the true worth
of a man. Among the members of
the campaign committee of Mr. Clements, who had the best opportunity
to study the man during the campaign, there is not one who has not
the deepest respect for him. .Mr.
Clements has the qualities that go
to make up a first class party representative. He is never discouraged
and is never heard to complain.
He put up a plucky fight against
tremendous odds and was always the
first with encouragement when there
was any disposition to feel downhearted  by any of the workers.
Mr. Clements has won a warm
place in the heart of the Conservative
party in Comox-Atlin. He has likewise won the deepest respect of his
Liberal opponents.
CLAIMS   UPON   OTTAWA
H. S. Clements, the Conservative
candiddate, is now safely returned
and the Conservatives of Prince Rupert have celebrated the victory. It
was not left to Prince Rupert itself
as a part of the constituency of Comox-Atlin to give the new government s majority. A feeling prevailed here that Sir Wilfrid was to be
returned and for that reason the
supporters of Mr. Ross found it much
easier to influence the vote of the
wavering. Tbe argument was freely
used by Liberals that Prince Rupert,
with so much to expect from the government at Ottawa, could not afford
to be against the government there.
Following the argument to a logical
end, those who were thus led aside
from what they believed would have
been the proper course made a fatal
mistake as far as the city's interests
were concerned.
With the election over recriminations are not in order. It is now up
to the men of both parties to forget
the fight and unite in the interests
of Prince Rupert. The details of the
policy of the Borden government has
yet to be evolved. As the representative of a party that stands for stability in all matters pertaining to
government it is safe to promise that
there will be no sudden upheaval in
matters of public policy. Changes
will be made, but these must come
gradually, so as not to affect any
interests.
Prince Ruperl Iras much to expect
from Ottawa in the years to come.
Under a Conservative government we
expect to see even more done for this
part of the province than would
have been done by the Liberal government. In Mr. Clements the city
has a good friend, lie is thoroughly
impressed with the opportunities for
business here. Conversations with
him when the question of politics and
party advantage was not entering
Into his mind revealed tlie fact that
he sees a most wonderful future for
the city. He bus lived here, lie
knows Hie needs of the place and
win look after the interests of the
city to the fullest degree.
in Mr. Clements the constituency
baa an aggressive fighter for its
rights. He will make his influence
fell in the party ranks in Ottawa,
and has the happy faculty of making
himself liked by all with whom he
conies I'll contact. He is well able to
present the claims of the constituency before his fellow-members In
tbe House of Commons so that the
rights of Prince Rupert, it Is safe
to say, will be well looked after by
the member-elect.
time for the elections. The telegram
guaranteed the expenses of each
member of the party up to $75.
HAD LARGE FUND
The Evening Telegram of Portland, Oregon, said some days before
the election that Canadian residents
of Portland were being urged to
return home to vote for reciprocity
at the then forthcoming elections.
A former resident of Prince Rupert,
who is not named, for obvious reasons, received a telegram asking him
to gather together as many Canadians as possible to return  home in
FIXED   CALENDAR
Movement  Started  in  Old  Land  for
Change  in   Arrangement  of
Days of Year
Sir Henry Dalziel, leader of the
Ultra-Radicals in the House of Commons, the father of the bill which
aims at giving Scotland local self-
government, has just had prepared a
bill to alter the calendar.
This bill, known as the Fixed Calendar Bill, contains some novel features. As the memorandum which
accompanies It explains, the bill purposes to substitute for the present
irregular calendar a fixed calendar
having regular periods of which the
week Is the common measure.
In this, ss in other features, It
differ from the calendar reform bill,
introduced in the House of Commons
in 190S, but which never got beyond
the second reading stage. That bill
sought to make the months as uniform in length as possible, but as a
difference In this respect is unavoidable In a year with twelve months,
it is thought better to increase that
difference so ss to allow of the week
being a common measure of all
months. This arrangement makes
it possible for each month to begin
on a Sunday and end on a Saturday.
,A table giving the proposed fixed
calendar shows that the months of
January, February, April, May, July,
August, October and November
would each consist of twenty-eight
days, while the remaining months of
March, June, September and December would each have thirty-five days
"New Y'ear Day" is set apart, thus
bringing the total of days up to the
requisite number of 365, while for
leap year a special day is set apart
as "Leap Day," which is to be intercalated between the last day ol
June and the first day of July, as reconstituted- by the bill.
A clause in the bill lays down
that the New Year Day and Leap
Day shall neither be accounted days
of the week, and shall not, except
where specially mentioned or provided for, be held to be included in any
computation of days but shall otherwise be public bank holidays. The
conditions of labor on those two days
and the remuneration therefor under
the bill would conform as far as
possible to what prevails on Sundays. A fixed date, April 15, is selected for Easter Day.
Finally, the bill, if passed by parliament will not become operative
until the government decides that sufficient international concurrence has
been obtained.
RAILROAD   TRAFFICS
Provincial   Minister of Railways Approves of Rates on Canadian
Northeastern, Line
The standard passenger and freight
tariffs adopted by the Canadian
Northeastern (Portland Canal Short
Line) Railway as chargeable between
Stewart station and the wharf have
just been filed with and approved
by the provincial minister of railways as follows:
Boats, canoes, not over 17ft    $2.00
Boats, canoes, over 17ft....       2.50
Boats, canoes, over 20 ft Special
Coal,      through      warehouse,
skd., ton           1.50
Furlture,  per  ton           2.00
Livestock—
Morses or cattle, each ....       1.00
Hogs or sheep, each   .... .25
Lumber, per M ft., B.M        1.50
Laths, per M  .50
I Entirely exclusive of handling and must be removed
immediately after discharge
from steamer)
Hay, inns, and feed, per Ion. 1,00
Merchandise, general, per ton,
weight of measurement ns
per ship's manifest;   N.S.O.
in packages        1,60
Mining nnd milling equipment
iiini machinery (to apply on
articles not weighing more
than one ton per piece) per
ton            2.00
Passengers, between dock and
Stewart station; first class,
one way, adults  .26
First class trip, adults  .... .50
Baggage,   150   pounds   legal
baggage   checked   free   for
each   passenger   presenting
legal transportation.
On  the  new  road,  as  far as yet
completed,  the minimum  charge on
any one shipment is to be 50 cents.
Rates as  quoted  above  include  the
cost of handling from dock to cars.
Demurrage charge at the rate of $2
per day or fraction  thereof will be
made on any cars not unloaded within 24 hours.    The company reserves
the right to refuse dockage and also
the right to order steamers, away at
any time.    For small steamers, tugboats, etc., using the wharf but not
unloading or discharging freights,
the charge will be $3 per day or fraction thereof. Small revenue steamers
of the Canadian or the United States
government are permitted the use of
the company's docks, subject to the
company' convenience, without
charge.
 o	
FOR  NEXT  POTLATCH
Seattle Colony of "Sourdoughs" Will
Take Active Part in
Celebration
For the purpose of completing an
organization of Alaksa "sourdoughs"
who will arrange the principal part
of the next Potlatch pageant, a meeting of old time Alaskan has been
held In Seattle.
It Is planned to get the organization busy for several months before
the next Potlatch celebration, so that
it will be possible to Introduce some
of the best features of Alaskan life.
Already it has been decided that a
number of novelties will be introduced.
 o	
ATTRACTIVE COUNTRY
Mountain Section Along G. T. P. Will
Bring   Tourists  From
All Parts
After spending nearly three
months exploring the mountains and
country in the vicinity of the Yellowhead Pass and the famous Mount
Robson, J. N. Collie and A. L. Munn
of London, England, accompanied by
M. Inderbinem, a Swiss mountain
climber and guide, John Yates and
Allan McConachle of Lac Ste. Anne
and Fred Stephens of Lacombe arrived in Edmonton and left for the
Old Country.
The expedition was purely for
pleasure and was very interesting,
especially from the poinnt of view of
these two gentlemen, who have visited the Canadian Rockies at Banff
and Field, on the Canadian Pacific
main line, the Alps, and famous
mountains in all parts of the world.
Asked if the Canadian-Rockies nre
equal in grandeur and .size to the
world famous Alps, Mr. Collie replied that in his opinion it was mere
ly a matter of choice, some preferring
the Alps, but a large increasing number favoring the Rockies. He thought,
however, that the mountains through
which the G. T. P. are building their
main line will in time become fully
as well known as the Selklrks, which
are near Field, B. C.     r
The party left Edmonton via the
G. T. P. early in July. They were
able to travel by rail as far as Hin
ton, Alta., which is about fifty miles
west of Edson. They proceeded on
horseback and foot as far as the
Athabasca River, which they crossed,
after which they went north, following the Smoky River. Here they
explored the divide, and found a
group of high mountains and large
glaciers.
They crossed a pass which is said
to have no name, 30 miles north of
Mount Robson, into British Columbia, and came to several mountains,
some of them 11,000 feet high. The
whole country is one grand panorama
of magnificent mountains, glaciers
and rivers, and beautiful lakes,
which Mr. Munim believes in a few
years, when the country gets transportation facilities, will become the
mecca of mountain climbers, sportsmen and health seekers from all
parts of the world.
The weather was exceptionally fine
during the whole of their stay; in
fact, the country is an ideal spot for
summer visitors, in the vicinity of
the Yellowhead there are several hot
springs, as at Banff, but said to be
even warmer. The Dominion government and the G. T. P. will develop
and advertise these wonderful natural
parks, and these gentlemen believe
their possibilities as resirts are illimitable.
. o —
COAST WHALING
Another whaling station is to start
work with stations on the coast of
Washington near the entrance to the
Straits of Juan de Fuca. Contracts
for construction of three steam whalers, oil-burning and built of steel,
recently were let by Alexander Bailie, Pacific Coast representative of
Balfour, Guthrie & Co., to the Moran Company of Seattle. Work will
be commenced at once.
The new craft will be identical in
type with the steel whalers Paterson and Moran, launched a few
months ago at the Moran Company's
shipyards. These vessels are already
in commission. They have a speed
of better than eleven knots an hour,
and when they were put in commission they were fully equipped with
whaling guns and all necessary paraphernalia.
The whalers to be built by the
Moran Company for Mr. Baillie will
go Into commission dnurlng the winter and will operate in the waters of
the North  Pacific,  off the coast  of
Washington, British Columbia and
Alaska. They will cost about $185,-
000 in the aggregate.
The tug Resolute, which has returned to Seattle from the coast
whaling stations In Southeastern
Alaska, reports that the whalers had
a good season. This year the whalers operated principally in Alaksa
Bay, Marmot Bay, Yakutat Bay and
off Cape Omaney, Port Armstrong
and Kodiak Island, which includes
territory that is practically virgin for
whalers. Whales were found unusually plentiful in Aletak Bay, where
the steaers sometimes killed as many
as eight a day.
 o	
A gypsy, upon release from jail,
met a friend.
"What were you In for?" asked
the friend.
"I found a horse."
"Found a horse? Nonsense! They
wouldn't jug you for finding a
horse."
"Well, but you see I found him
before the owner lost him."
**************************
* £
* *
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Fergusons
The Most Popular
WHISKEY
in the World
•:* Sole Agents for British Columbia *
CLARKE BROS.
| Melntyre Block,       3rd Ave. *
*
We have secured, direct
from the manufacturer, the
selling agency for this very
superior line of Gloves, thus
saving the Jobber's profit, and
can sell them very much
cheaper than they are ordinarily sold for. A portion of
our stock has just arrived, including Men's Tan Dressed and
Mocha Undressed Kids, both
lined and unlined.
Cadet Tan and Mochas,
Suede and Full Dress in men's
sizes, as well as a complete
line of Wool Lined and Wool
Gloves and Mitts for winter
use. Remember, we buy these
direct and sell them for
less than they are ordinarily
sold for.
SLOAN & CO.
Sixth St. Alder Blk
PRINCE  RUPERT
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.:: PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts ai Executors, Administrators, Transferee! and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 218 Carter-Cotton Bnilding,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
fes
iSi
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
*J
The Graham Island Oil Fields, Limited.
CAPITAL   STOCK,   $1,000,000.00
We are offering for sale a very limited amount of shares of stock
25 CENTS PER SHARE;  PAR VALUE, $1.00
These shares are going quickly, and will soon be off the market
The Mack Realty & Insurance Co.
SELLING AGENTS
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.    Start saving today by opening an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C.
J
' Replenish '
the
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Pantry
■■■■■■■■■■■■MM
1 High-Class....
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Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
I MERRYFIELD'S S
■      CASH GROCERY      !
L..................J Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
PRINCE RUPMRT JOURNAL
SPORTS
TENNIS  CHAMPIONS
Now that it has been decided that
the leading American tennnis cracks
will go to Australia to compete with
the holders of the Davis Cup for the
world's championship there is a
strong probability that Victoria will
have the opportunity of seeing some
of the finest tennis that has ever
been played on local courts.
When B. P. Schwengers, the Victoria crack, and the winner of the
Canadian championship, returned
from the east he announced that he
had the promise of W. Lamed that,
should he and his portner be successful in triumphing over the Britishers in the preliminaries, they
would make a short stay in Victoria
en route to the Antipodes. Mr. Lar-
ned, It was stated, was anxious to
obtain a little shooting In this vicinity and agreed, provided the
weather was suitable during his sojourn here, to play a number of
games for the benefit of local enthusiasts and incidentally, no doubt,
to obtain some practice. Accompanying him, it is expected, will be Beals
Wright, another of the eastern
stars.   He also may be seen in action.
While nothing definite is known
as yet, Mr. Schwengers is expecting
to hear from these players any day.
Before leaving Newport he exacted a
promise from them, they agreeing to
inform him of the date of their departure so that arrangements might
be made for their reception here and
for the proposed games. Of course,
everything depends on the weather.
If it is -.t all possible, however, the
visitors will be induced to make an
appearance on the Cadboro Bay
courts.
L1PTON  MAI   CHALLENGE
The recent interview with Sir
Thomas Lipton has aroused much
interest in Great Britain. The Evening Standard prints a further interview with Lipton inwhich he repeats
his statements, and adds: "Why
should the New York Yacht Club
thus refuse to accept my challenge
under their own rules? The freak
type of boat which they wish me to
sail against was built in Long Island
Sound, and, of course, sails in smooth
water, and until the race is finished
has sailed within sight of land. The
late great designed, George Watson,
and William Fife both refused to
build boats of that type, as they said
the danger to the lives of the men
who sailed them across the ocean was
too great. The cup, owing to what
it represents, is worth fighting for,
but under present conditions it's perfectly safe with its present custodians."
The Standard, commenting on the
interview, says: "The opinion in English yachting circles is that the New
York Club, ns a sportsmanlike body,
can no longer refuse to accept the
challenge under the rules which prevail at their regattas. It Is believed
thae they will be compelled so to
alter the conditions which have governed former races as to make a new
challenge possible."
The Standard also says it understands that the majority of yacht
clubs in America, with the exception
of the New York Yacht Club, have
expressed a wish that in the next
contest for the historic cup, the universal rule already adopted should
be allowed to govern the conditions
of the race.
The Daily Mirror publishes a telegram from Lipton in which he says:
"The America Cup, under present
conditions, does not represent sport."
I.O.ST MONEY
Echoes of financial losses in connection With the Northwestern Baseball League's present pennant race
are heard on every hand. California
papers are printing their usual sharp
raps at this circuit, and over in Montana they arc anxious to make out
that the Union Association is faster
and stronger, ns well as being better
patronized.
Now there are the facts: Three of
the clubs In this league will all make
money. Brown estimates that he
will do at least a $10,000 profit on
the year and Cohn's figures will not
fall far short of that. The Seattle
magnate, D. E. Dugdale, has not disposed of so many players to major
league clubs, but his ledger will show
s balance in black figures easily.
The Spokane club has been the big
road card of the whole season, out-
drawing all other clubs on the road
from 20 to 100 per cent. Cohn got
a cut of all three of the season's big
weeks, the week on the Queen's
birthday, In Vancouver, when he got
nearly $3,000; the Potlatch celebration week in Seattle, when his check
from Dugdale was $2,254 (the writer
saw it), and Labor Day week In Spokane, when his share was not a cent
less than $2,600. Tncoma's biggest
week of the entire season  was late
in July with the Spokane club. Victoria's best week of the season was
its opening series with Spokane early
in  May.
Judge McCredie says the Portland
team will quit loser, and there is
little doubt but that the Victoria
management will drop some money.
Still, Victoria is operating this year
with the cheapest club the league
ever had. <
Will W. H. Lucas come back to resume the direction of the Northwestern League In 1912? The despatch
in the Salt Lake paper a few days
ago Indicated that there was some
dissatisfaction with the expensive administration of the A. U. this year.
Expense was one of the very few
objections to the Lucas regime In
this circuit, although the principal
obstacle was, of course, that Dugdale
and Brown found they could not control the stubborn veteran on points
of. especial Interest in their case
Brown secured, the dismissal of
Ralph Frary over imcas' protest. Tacoma fought for Lucas to the finish,
Shreeder's being the only vote cast
for the ex-presldent. No, Mr. Lucas
will not be back at the head of the
Northwestern League in 1912.
 o	
LADY   LAWYER
Young Woman of Vancouver Wants
to  He  Given   Standing  as
Barrister and Solicitor
An application which, should Mr.
Justice Morrison see fit to grant it,
will give Vancouver the distinction
of possessing a woman lawyer, was
made in supreme court chambers
when J. A. Russell of Messrs. Russell, Russell & Hannington appeared
in behalf of Miss Mabel Penery
French, who desires to be granted
authority to practice as a barrister
and solicitor in British Columbia,
«ays the Province.
The young lady has been a resident
of the Terminal City for some time,
having been engaged in the office of
the firm now making the application
on her behalf. She was formerly a
member of the New Brunswick bar,
and is making her application on
these grounds. She has already appeared in supreme court chambers
upon several occasions in support of
various applications during the time
she has been in this city.
L. G. McPhillips, K. C, representing the Benchers of Vancouver, appeared in chambers to oppose the application.
"Will this application take very
long to dispose of?" asked Mr. Justice Morrison.
"For my part it can be disposed
of in a very few minutes," said Mr.
McPhillips, "but if my learned friend
For Sale
One lot, Block 22, Section 5 Seventh
Ave.     Price  $800;   $400  cash.
One left, Block 7, Section 6, Fourth
Ave.    Harbor view.    Price $1,350.
Two lots, Block 24, Section 8, Eleventh Ave. Price $300 each; $50
cash; balance $25 per month.
Two lots, Block 24, Section 8, Eleventh Ave. Price $600 pair; half
cash.
Two lots, Block 51, Section 8, Kelliher St. Price $175 each; $100 cash.
One lot, Block 7, Section 8, Tenth
Ave.    Price $300;  half cash.
Two lots, Block 3S, Section 8, Justin St. Price $500 pair; $300 cash.
One lot, B'ock 1, Section 8, next to
corner, Eleventh Ave. Price $475;
$3 00 cash.
Houses lor Sale
4-rooni   house;    plastered,   painted;
best harbor view In city;  on Ambrose   Ave.     Price   $1,837;   cash
$500;  balance $30 per month.
For Rent
Offices and stores on Second Ave.
and Sixth St. Prices $3 5 to $75
per month.
Nicely furnished flat, 4 rooms and
bath, hot and cold water, corner
Fulton St. and Sixth Ave. Price
$50 per month.
Land  for  Sale
5 and 10 acres for garden trucking
at Kitsumkalum. Price $65 per
acre.
10-acre tracts garden trucking at Kitselas.    Price $50 per acre.  Terms.
For Lease
Three  lots  on  Third  Ave,  close  to
business section; level; good lease.
Lots in New Hazelton
$10 cash and $10 per months buys
you a homeslte.
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
**************************i
I Customs Broker |
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f   STORAGE   1
% *
* Forwarding,   Distributing   and y
* Shipping Agent *
* *
t   Special attention given to stor- ?
* age of  Household  Goods  and J
* Baggage     l '♦
|    DOUGLAS  &  SUTHERLAND   J
I   First  Ave.   Near  McBride  St.  *
* P. O. Box 007 Phone 202 J
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THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts an
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
persists In his application it will In
all probability take some consltTer-
able time."
"I have authorities to quote in
support of our opplication," said Mr.
Russell, producing a formidable
stock of legal literature. "I do not
see why any objection should be
made to the application. New Brunswick and Ontario have granted the
power to women, and I cannot see
any reason why British Columbia
should refuse the same privilege.
However, if Mr. McPhillips has serious objection to the application I
will submit a written argument,"
said Mr. Russell, after consulting his
fair client, who sat beside him.
The application was accordingly
adjourned for a week to give Mr.
Russell an opportunity of placing before Mr. Justice Morrison his written argument.
"There is no reason why this matter could not have been settled in
the proper manner," said Mr. McPhillips, when asiced upon what
grounds the members of the legal
fraternity objected to the request
of Miss French for power to practice
in Vancouver. "Miss French was a
member of the bar in New Brunswick
and she obtained the right to practice there by an act put through the
local house. In Ontario Miss Martin obtained permission In the same
manner, and if Miss French wants
to practice here there is no doubt
the legislature of British Columbia
will grant her the same privilege.
If permission was granted to her in
any other way, anybody could prevent her from practising if they so
wished."
 o	
DEAL  WILL  GO
Mr.   Trible  Received   a   Wire   From
Mr. Cowan to the Effect That
the Deal Would Go Through
It wih be learned with general Interest that the reported deal by
which Rochemr de Boule mine was
to pass into the hanas of J. F. Cowan of Salt Lake City will go through,
says the Omineca Herald. Mr. Cowan took some samples of ore home
with him and had them assayed by
his own assayers and wired to Mr.
Trimble on Monday that the assays
were satisfactory and that the deal
would go through. Every one interested in the camp will be glad to
have Mr. Cowan and his associates
in the camp as they will get the
property developed in a way that is
impossible except for big operators.
Mr. Trimble and Mr. Pemberton are
still in charge, of the property and
the work.
 o	
DREDGE   FOR   OMINECA
G.  H.  Knowleton Is in  the Interior
Looking Over Hhis Properties
With Experts
G. H. Knowlton of Vancouver, who
has a force of men at work under
H. E'. Bodine on Silver Creek prospecting twelve miles of placer ground
with an Empire drill, passed through
here a short time ago. With him was
Mr. Lafferty of Cripple Creek, Col.,
a mining engineer. They made dose
connections with a pack train for the
Silver Creek camp, where they expect to remain about thirty to thirty-
five days, dining which time the
work of tbe Empire drill will be carefully measured up. This is the second season Bodine has been operating the drill, and although he only
got It on the ground August, 1910,
he managed to sink eight holes In
a short time after he had it in operation, when he had a breakdown and
had to go out for extra parts for
repairs. The cores taken from the
drill while sinking those boles showed the ground to run a 'Ktle be'te1*
than $2 per cubic yard.
Last March he took In parts to
repair those of the previous season,
and also parts to guard against delay
in event of breakage this season. By
this time should have a large area
prospected, and although Mr. Knowlton would not talk for publication It
can easily be surmised that he has
received most favorabzle reports from
Bodine of the results of thi3 season's
work or he would hardly be making
this trip with an engineer.
In addition to holding the twelve
miles   of   placer   claims   on    Silver
Xfiica  ' Crete "  Greece New Zealaod
Arabia Cuba Holland Norway
Argentina Republic Denmark Iceland Panama
Australia EffTpt India Persia
Austria-Hungary Faroe Islands Ireland Peru
Belgium Finland Italy Philippine Islands
Brazil Formosa Japan Portugal
Bulgaria France Java Rouenania
Cesba Fr'cfa Cochin China Malta Russia
Chili Germany Manchuria Senria
China Great Britain Mexico Seam
"Sift amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United Statas
Uruguay
West Indies, ■
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas and Stewart, Wednesdays, 1 P. M.    For Masset and Naden Harbor, Thursdays,  12
P. M. For Skidegate, Rose Harbor, etc., Saturday, 1 P. M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    tralnB from
Prince Rupert Mondays, Wednesday and Saturdays, 1  P. M.;
returning Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, 4 P. M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM,   connecting   with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec,   Halifax,     Portland,    Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenuk—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
ttf
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD& BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan.      Flrst-clas service.
AH the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps   only    the    best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and nn
First Avenii"   Prince Rupert
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that I, George M.
Wilson, of Mountair, New Mexico, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the northwest
corner of Lot 698; thence south 70
chains, more or less, to Hell's Gale
Slough; thence westerly along slough
following edge of. island around to
point of commencement; containing
220 acres, more or less.
GEORGE M. WILSON.
A.  Wilson, Agent.
Dated  August 26,   1011. 0-21!
The
World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
Trip East
OR TO
Europe
We like to answer enquires.
Agent for all Atlantic lines.
Call on or write:
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines.      Take    any    Steamer    from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Free Employment
Office
Skeena   Lnnd   District — Districl   of
Coast,  Itiingc  6
TAKE NOTICE thai I, Charlea M,
Wilson, of Prince Rupert, is. ('., occupation broker, Inlend to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following described land:—Commencing
at a post planted at ihe northeast
corner of Lot 084; Hience west 30
chains, more or less to the east line
of Pete Deboer's surveyed pre-emption; thence north 40 cliains, more
or less, along said Deboer east line;
thence west 4 0 chains more or less,
to the shore of Lake Lakelse; tbence
following the lake shore north 20
chains; thence 70 chains east; tbence
south 70 cliains, more or less, to
place of beginning.
9-26 CHARLES M.   WILSON.
Dated September 24,  1911.
Creek, Mr. Knowlton also took over
the ground on Tom Creek last year
owned by Jim May and Condlt Bros.
He expects to put dredges to work
on both creeks as soon as the G.T.P.
is completed to Stuart River, from
which place the dredges can be taken
on floats up the Stuart River and
by lakes to within a few miles of
the ground.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Wallers
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly  filled.—see   ub
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
J
Skeena Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post plante-
ed at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; elreiic-* 40 chains
soutli; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for per.,
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains soutli from
the southwest corner of Lot 173S;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement; containing 160 acres
more or less.
THOMAS STEWART.
John Klrkaldy,  Agent
Dated  September 22,  1911.       s26
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division  of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. O.J prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (If unnamed, the
description Is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, ripe line and
power plant.
(1) The premises on w'li.h tne
water is to be used (den-i'lbe **:"<•)
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes lor whfift ::. >
water is to be us-eil—Ce:*r,..:'.; .;
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe '.'. i
land to be irrigated, giving acre.nsa
(i) If the water Is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water Is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
fo be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.   C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.   Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Queen Charlotte Islands Land Dislrict—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Aimee Merrill, of .Massett, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal anil petroleum over the following described
area:—Commencing at a posl planted
on the west shore of Kundls Island,
Massett Inlet, five miles soutli of the
most northerly point of said Kundls
Island; thence east 80 chains; theuce
south su chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north su chains, to
point or commencement; containing
U4n acres, more or less.
AIMBE MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated  Augusl   28,  1911-,
Queen  Charlotte   islands  Land  DIs-
Irlci    District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE thai Margarel A.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, occupation housewife, Intends to apply fur
permission to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described area:- Commencing nt a post
planted on the west shore of Kundls
Isliinel, Massett Inlet, live miles
south of the most northerly point of
said Kundls Island; thence cast 80
chains; thence north 80 .chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing (>4H acres, more or
less.
MARGARET A.  MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Augusl  28, 1911,
LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone IIS PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
LABOR CONGRESS
Some of the Resolutions Brought Before
the Canadian Body at    ,
Calgary.
J. 0.
Walters nl   Victoria   Has
Elected  President   for
the Year
Been
J. C. Watters of Victoria was elected president of the Dominion Trades
Congress by a majority of thirty.
The vice presidency went to Bancroft. The congress voted down the
proposal to form a Canadian labor
party. It was decided to bold the
next annual convention at Guelph.
Matters pertaining to the constitution of the congress were taken up
al considerable length.
A large number of Important resolutions were considered. The reports
of several committees were received
and adopted after brief discussion.
The committee appointed to consider amendments to legislation of
the criminal code bearing on moral
and social reform failed to arrive
at an unanimous report, although
they explained what the concensus of
opinion of that body was in regard
to such matters.
Dealing with gambling at race
tracks "the amendments to the criminal code which seek to reduce to
tbe minimum admitted vice, and
while worthy of endorsement of the
trades and labor congress of Canada, we believe it necessary to point
out that gambling in its various
forms is an indispensible instiution
in the existing economic order of
things and to deal with gambling
with an end in view of abolishing it,
would mean a social upheaval."
The matter of social vices or the
so-called "social evil" was easier to
agree upon and the committee reported that it bad agreed that such
amendments to the present laws as
would provide for proper control of
the segregated district and also to
protect girls and women working in
factories and the like from vicious
attendant officials in charge were
desirable.
Only Attack Effects
The suppression of the social evil
as provided for by the existing laws
was condemned as superficial and
not getting down to the causes, but
merely attacking the effect. Some
of the real causes of undesirable
conditions and things wliich were
militating against the social and
moral welfare of all kinds were mentioned, and among them was the
"mere pittance" of wages paid in
big factory centres. This, the report
stated, was leading many of them to
lead the "short and merry life."
In conclusion, the report stated
that the only solution of the social
evil problem lay in the ultimate social and economic equality of the
people.
In the meantime, the committee
exhorted the congress to do all in
its power to further any movement
or any legislation which would tend
to stop the "terrible conditions" under wliich women and children have
to work in the larger manufacturing
centres.
The matter of representation was
taken up and discussed at great
length on presentation of a motion
that certain changes be made in the
constitution that would permit internal organizations to have representation at the congress. The
amendment was rejected by an
almost unanimous vote when put to
the convention, which means that the
constitution remains unchanged
practically, and that Internal organizations will have representation
providing the delegates are from
Canada.     Resolution   No.   4 0,   which
asked that a parliamentary committee be appointed to draft a platform
for the guidance of,the congress, so
that il could take an active part In
political matters, next came before
the committee be appolncd to draft a
platform for the guidance of the congress, so that it could take an active
part In political matters, next came
be-fore the committee. It was practically a suggestion to form a separate Liberal party. Some of the
English delegates did not think the
congress should be embroiled in poll-
tics at present. Secretary Draper explained that the resolution was the
only one of Its kind that could be
properly brought before the public.
Others of a similar nature had been
referred to the laws committee. In
1906, the congress, while in Session
at Victoria, had specifically relegated
political matters to the provincial executive. This congress was a legislative body, purely and simply. If
the congress was going to take part
in political matters another legislative body would have to spring up to
take its place.
On a vote, the pnrlluinently resolution was thrown out.
Another     esolution     to
smoking during the sessions of com-
Ittees was also thrown out amid
laughter.
May Talk Politics
Resolution No. 25 was that all International unions rescind any
clauses in their respective constitutions which prohibited the full and
free discussion of political issues.
This resolution was concurred in.
Resolution 26, regarding the use of
private locks on switches by car
workers, was also concurred in.
No. 27, to exempt unions from the
payment of customs duties on supplies shipped from headquarters in
the United States, was concurred in.
No. 28, demanding an increase In
the number of factory Inspectors, was
also concurred in.
No. 29, calling for the establishment of free municipal or provincial
employment agencies, received the
concurrence of the convention.
No. 31 was a resolution to ask
legislation to close all barrooms on
Labor Day.    It was snowed under.
No. 44, to appoint a man for each
incoming executive of the congress
from each province to follow provincial legislation as soon as the
finances of the congress should per-
mit. Delegate McVeittie pointed out
that the present constitution gave
power to do this without any further
resolutions. In view of this, it has
no desire to pressing it, since the
present constitution covered it.
 o	
PROMOTION MADE
Canada costs 1 l-2d. a gollon, whereas gasoline is worth lOd. Her fuel
oil is carried like ballast, as water
is carried in other great freight
boats. The advantages of this new
type of carrier are extra hold space,
extra deadweight carrying capacity,
extra economy of fuel and of labor;
no stokers are necessary.
The Journal (twice a week), only
{2.00 a year.
Skeena   Land   district — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Burton Vivian
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the nore/.east corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chaias; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 8G
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640  acres.
BURTON VIVIAN BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
J. L. PARKER
J. A. Thomson of Hudson's Bay Company Will Become Land
Commissioner
The office of land commissioner of
the Hudson's Bay Company in Canada has been filled by the appointment of J. A. Thompson of Victoria
to that position. The headquarters
of the commissioner are in Winnipeg,
and the post is one of the most honorable and lucrative in the entre service of the "Gentlemen Adventurers."
Mr. Thomson is well known here,
having been in charge of the river
steamboat service for his company
while represenatltive at Victoria. He
was here a few days ago on his way
south.
Mr, Thomson had just returned
from his annual visit to the northern
posts of the company, having cut
short his visit owing to telegrams received when at Fort Liard offering
him the position. He deferred acceptance until he had time to consult
with the officials at Winnipeg.
Mr. Thomson does not suggest the
veteran in his appearance, but he
is one of the oldest and most valued
members of the Hudson's Bay staff.
Up to the present time he has been
manager of the British Columbia fur
trading district and of the Hudson's
Bay steamship service in this province, as well as administrator of the
Hudson's Bay lands in British Columbia. He has control, too, of the
Hudson's Bay stores in Victoria.
.Like the great head of the company,
Lord Strathcona, he comes from the
northern part of the British Isles,
being a native of Orkney Islands. He
has resided for many years In Victoria, and by his annual visits by
steamer, canoe and dog train to their
far north posts, has kept actively in
touch with the frontier life which
has flavored the whole history of the
company and in which it had its
origin.
The post he is now called to fill is
in part that held by C. C. Chipman,
the commissioner of the company
who recently retired. With the reorganization of affairs last year the
stores department was placed under
Mr. Burbidge of Hnrrod's great London stores, who has actively taken up
this department of Its work and will
make It a formidable rival of the
company's land department. Thlls
latter, which Mr. Thomson will control, will continue n most important
section of the company's work, ns
It still owns about five million acres
of land In Canada, and the value of
those has been Increasing tremendously year by year.
To bis work Mr. Thomson brings
ripe experience In nil departments
of the company. He Is in the prime
of life nnd is one of the most widely
respected men in the west.
His appointment to the premier
post in the service fittingly rounds
out his long career with the Hudson's Bay Company, and Is a compliment to this province, which supplies for the first time the commissioner in question.
MINING ENGINEFR
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAjl-L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetici
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H. Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14        PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen  ...rarlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar J.
Young, of Vancouver B. C, occupation painter, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; tlience west 80 chains; thence
nortli 80 chains; tbence east 80
chains; thence south 80 cnains; containing 640 acres.
EDGAR J. YOUNG.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about'one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore Of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated August 12, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three
miles west, and one-half mile north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains; thepce east 40
chains; thence north 60 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
240 acres, more or less.
MARGARET MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 3 miles west and
one-half mile north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
80 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
60 chains, to point of commencement; containing 480 acres, more or
less. ARTHUR W. NELSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August '/, 1911.
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  In   the   Westenhaver   Block
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
USES OIL
A novel cargo vessel for the Canadian Great Lakes has been despatched from an English yard across the
Atlantic under Its own power, which
those who know say will revolutionize the carrying trade. This vessel
is equipped With a Diesel oil engine
and measures 241 feet, has a 42 1-2
foot beam, a draught of 14 feet, and
burns or explodes nbout 1 3-4 tons
prohibit of  crude  oil   a  day.     Crude  oil   in
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Eliza Sutherland, of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 2 yz
miles north and 5 % miles west from
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence east 60 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point commencement; containing 480 acres.
ELIZA SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Almee Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 Mi miles north
and 5% miles west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east
60 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north
8 0 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 480 acreB.
AIMEE MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Gray,
of Blair, Nebrasaka, U.S.A., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west and
% mile north from the southwest
corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
FRANK  GRAY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Norman
Hurst, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-
half miles north and one mile west
from the northwest corner of Lot
992; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres. NORMAN HURST.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that C. Verne
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted three and one-half miles
nort]f and one mile west from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
C. VERNE BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Datedo July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John Henry,
of Vancouver, occupation contractor,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two and one-half miles north of
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence west SO chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320 acres.
JOHN HENRY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.
Stevens, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two
miles west and one and one-half
miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
WIRT A. STEVENS.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Martin, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
artist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
the point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
HARRY MARTIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   uistrict — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation carpenter,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a poBt planted three and one-half miles north
and one mile west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ALLAN ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; .thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Robert Little, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mason, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two and one-half
miles north from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
40 chnlns, to point of commencement;   containing  320  acres.
WILLIAM ROBERT LITTLE.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
I, Andrew Christian Skjelbred, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
farmer, give notice that on the 24th
day of September, I Intend to apply
to the Water Commissioner at his
office in Prince Rupert, for a licence
to take and use 3 cubic feet of water
per second from hot springs on the
border of Lake Lakelse in the Skeena
Land Division of Coast District. The
water is to be taken directly from
the springs and is to be used on Lot
8279, for sanitarium purposes.
Dated August 24, 1911
AND.   CHRISTIAN SKJELBRED.
9-6 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marlon Mc-
Diarmld, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant In
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION  McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a post
planted on the soutli bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mi'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the souih
bank of the said river; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence west
forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence ea-t forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and wliich land was located by me
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Jackson,
of Vancouver, B. C„ occupation painter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two miles north from the
northeast corner of Lot 993; thence
west 80 chains thence north 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
FRED JACKSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte IslandB
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ives, of
Masset, B. C, occupation housewife,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles north from the
northweBt corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ELLEN IVES.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph C.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation retired, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four and
one-half miles west and one-half mile
north from the southwest corner of
Lot 991; thence north 20 chains;
tlience west 60 chains, more or less,
to the Ain River; thence following
shore, of river In a southerly and
easterly direction to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
JOSEPH   C.   MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 2. 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Hol-
brook, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chalnB; thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres.
STANLEY HOLBROOK.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 78 on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
from Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the said right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
south eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) chains; tlience east forty
(40) cliains to point of commencement, and containing thee hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
tho 26th day of August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP  T.   CHESLEY.
Dated  August  28,  1911.
TO WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Patrick O'Connor, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
foreman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640    acres.
PATRICK O'CONNOR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 81, 1911.
Skeena Land District — District of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant In a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8u chains
south, more or less, to the shore of
Lakelse Lake; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Dated  August  12,  1911.
NOTICE is hereby given that on
the eleventh (11th) day of October
next application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by retail in and upon the
premises known as The Copper City
Hotel, situated at Copper River,
Skeena District, upon the land described as Lot A, Block 312, Copper
Cily, Skeena District, B. C.
Dated September 11, 1911.       s-5
HARVEY CREECH,
Applicant.
LAND   FOR   SALE
TAKE NOTICE that I will receive
tenders for the parcel of land known
as Lot 1105, Range 5, Coast District,
Province of British Columbia. This
is one of the choicest pieces of land
lying along the Skeena River and
contains about 155 acres. The land
Is Crown granted. Terms cash. Tenders must be in before the 5th day
of October, 1911. The highest or
nny tender not necessarily accepted.
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.
D.   G.   STEWART,
Assignee of H. C. Breckenrldge.
Box  225,  Prince Rupert,        s-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
4J
-x Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
AT TRANQUILLE
Some Details of the Work Being Done
at Tuberculosis Sanitarium.
/>
Statistics  Relative  to  the  Carrying
On of the Institution
At a general quarterly meeting of
the directorate of the Tranquille
Sanitarium, held at the offices of the
secretary of the provincial health
board In Victoria, an extended report was presented by Dr. Fagan,
covering the business and operations
of the sanitarium dulng the past
three months. From this report the
following excerpts are made:
"In May, 64 patients were treated
(49 male, 15 female); 7 (5 male, 2
female) were discharged as apparently cured; 1 male was discharged as
incurable, and 2 male patients died,
leaving 54 receiving treatment on
June 1. . The total number of his-
pital days wase 1,7.07! of these 691
were for 30 pay patients and 1,016
were for 34 free patients. The
amount received from patients in the
sanitarium during May was $907.10.
"In June, 64 patients were treated
(50 male, 14 female); 7 (5 male
and 2 female) were discharged as
cured, 6 (3 male and 3 females) as
incurable, and 3 (male) died. The
total number of hospital days was
1,510, and of these 615 were for
31 pay patients, 155 were for 6 patients paid for by municipalities and
740 were for 27 free patients. The
amount received from patients in the
sanitarium during June was 1,658.26.
"In July, 56 patients were treated
(47 male and 9 female); 6 (4 male
and 2 female) were discharged as
cured, 1 male as incurable, and 2
male patients died. The total number of hospital days was 1,516, made
up as follows: 694 for 24 pay patients, 127 for 5 patients paid for by
municipalities, and 695 for 27 free
patients. The amount received from
patients in the sanitarium during
July was $908.30.
"The maintenance accounts presented to the finance committee
amount to $1,062.02. Notwithstanding that $700 was by authority of the
board transferred from building to
maintenance, and $700 was loaned
by the Victoria Auxiliary". Society,
there is for the last three months a
shortage of over $1,700 and payment
of some of the accounts has to be
withheld each month until such time
as there may be sufficient funds in
the bank to meet them. For July,
the milk and meat account, $709.15,
has not yet been met.
"Last year the cost per patient per
day was $2.10; to date this year it
is $1.9S. Every effort Is being made
to reduce expenses, but it must be
remembered that the treatment largely consists in supplying good, plain
food in large quantity. We are now
over $3,000 in arrears for our maintenance, and I would ask the board
to appeal to the public and to societies for assistance. We cannot
curtail the needed supplies to our
patients, and I am sure the public,
when they know the conditions, will
not hesitate to meet your request.
"Building accounts amount to
$2,537.79. The work on the construction and installation of the
electric plant has begun, and will
be completed within the nex* month.
Furniture accounts amount to the
sum   of  $1,064.47."
ENDS ITS TREATY
Canadian Government Cannot Agree
With the United States As
to  Fisheries
Tlie Dominion government has had
an unpleasant taste of American reciprocity in the fishery regulations,
says an Ottawa despatch, In order
to end what Is declared by government officials to be an Intolerable
situation, the government has made
up its mind to withdraw from the
food fisheries treaty of 1908. That
the treaty regulations as agreed to
so far by the United States government will not be accepted by Canada may be stated with absolute certainty.
The situation Is this: In April of
1908 a treaty was drawn up between
Great Britain and the United States,
whereby the fishery regulations in
waters contiguous to the two countries should be made uniform, for
which purpose each country was to
appoint a fisheries commission. This
took the United States fisheries regulations out of the hands of the state
governments, and placed them In the
hands of the International commission. The regulations were to be
ratified and enforced by federal authority.
The treaty was signed on April 11,
1908, at Washington. The Canadian
government appointed Prof. Prince,
and the United States Dr. Starr Jor
dan as commissioners. These two
men drew up a "set of regulations covering the territorial waters of Passa-
maquoddy Bay, the St. John and St.
Croix Rivers, Lake Mempramagog,
Lake Champlain, the St. Lawrence
RiveF (as boundary water), the Great
Lakes, the Niagara River, the St.
Clair River, Rainy River and lake,
Lake of the Woods, Straits of 'Juan
de Fuca, parts of Washington Sound,
Gulf of Georgia and Puget Sound.
The regulations affected the object of the treaty, namely, uniformity. They were not as good as the
old Canadian regulations, but better
than the old American. The Canadian parliament in 1910 authorized
the government to give effect to the
regulations by proclamation. The
United States Senate, however, under
powerful pressure from the fishing
Interests of Michigan and the State
of Washington, refused to sanction
any of the regulations except those
affecting the waters east of the Great
Lakes, thus to all intents and purposes nullifying the treaty.
The Canadian government now refuses to accept this remnant of an
arrangement, and It is announced
that unless the United States will
agree to bide by the spirit of the
treaty, Canada will withdraw from
tlie scheme entirely.
 o	
FOREST  PROTECTION
Result of Application for Establishment of Fire Patrol System Made
in Behalf of Government
H. A. Maclean, K. C, formerly
deputy attorney general for British
Columbia, appeared in behalf of the
province before the railway commission in connection with an application hearing an important bearing on
the protection of the timber areas of
this country from bush fire waste.
As a very large percentage of the
forest fire lass of British Columbia
is attributable to sparks from locomotives and the operation of railway
trains in general, it is being urged
upon the railway commission by the
forestry branch (for whom Mr. Maclean has been acting), that systematic
patrol of the railway lines should be
made obligatory by the commission,
which virtually controls all railways
now operating in British Columbia.
The experience of the other Canadian provinces was cited by Mr. Maclean as indicating that the only way
by which an end may be made of
railway line fires is by the establishment and maintenance of patrols behind each train. A rule of this nature has been found In Ontario to
work out most advantageously in
practice; and in that province during
1909 no fewer than 187 fire wardens
were thus employed during the danger season, at a cost of $66,172,
which amount was subsequently proportionately refunded by the several
companies.
The Ontario practice Is to assign
two wardens, together, to a beat of
ten miles, these following up all
trains. Here in British Columbia, it
is contended, there is especial necessity for a similar patrol along the
railways, our dry season being a long
one, our forests large and valuable,
and the percentage of fires attributable to railway locomotives a very
appreciable factor in the total.
A suggestion by Chairman Mab'ee
of the commission that the railways
were probably held blameable for
more than their due share of forest
destruction was promptly answered
by Mr. Maclean from the recorded
statstics.
The final outcome of consideration
of the application and related questions was a request from Chairman
Mabee was that the provincial authorities present in concrete form
their proposal as to the amount of
patrol necessary and requisite along
the various railway lines in the province, at the same time drafting and
submitting recommended regulations
and describing the areas to which. In
the opinion of the province, this patrol system should apply.
The forestry branch has already
iii'Kiin the preparation of this Important memorandum, and upon its receipt, copies will be furnished to each
interested company and the railway
commissioners will hear what they
have to say upon the proposals advanced and the regulations submitted. Direct and specific investigation by the commission will follow,
If there is—as it is most probable
there will be—any conflict of view
between the province and the roads,
and on the strength of their Investigations the commissioners will subsequently Issue regulations governing all pahases of the matter, which
regulations will have the full force
and effect of law.
 o	
"Lady," began Hungry Hlggins,
"I'd thank yer for a meal "
"Ah!" exclaimed the bright housekeeper, "you're one of those after-
dinner speakers."
"Not exactly, lady, or I wouldn't
be so hungry. I ain't got, so much
as a chestnut about me."
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing over Crown lands on
the Morrice River, Range 5, Coast
District, notice of which bearing date
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
the Br'tlsh Columbia Gazette of May
5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as
it relates to the lands surveyed as
Lots 3881, 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885,
3886, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3902, 3903,
3904, 3905, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
and 3910.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
September 12, 1911. s22-d22
"PUBLIO  INQUIRIES  ACT"
HIS HONOR the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased to
appoint the Honourable Albert Edward McPhillips, K. O, President of
the Executive Council; the Honourable Price Ellison, Minister of
Finance; Charles Henry Lugrln, of
the City of Victoria, Esquire; and
William Harold Malkin, of the City
of Vancouver, Esquire, to be Commissioners under the "Public Inquiries Act" for the purpose of enquiring into and reporting upon the
operation of the "Assessment Act,
1903," with respect to its practical
bearings on the financial requirements of the Province.
The said Commissioners will hold
their meetings on the dates and at
the places mentioned hereunder,
namely:—
Victoria at the Executive Council
Chamber, Parliament Buildings,
Monday and Tuesday, 25th and 26th
September at 10 a. m. At the Courthouse or the Government Office at
the following places:—
Nanaimo, Wednesday and Thursday, 27th and 28th September.
Vancouver, Friday and Saturday,
29th and 30th September.
New Westminster, Monday, 2nd
October.
Revelstoke, Wednesday, 4th Oct.
Golden, Thursday,  5th October.
Cranbrook, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie,  Monday,  9th  October.
Nelson, Wednesday, 11th October.
Rossland, Thursday, 12th October.
Grand Forks, Friday, 13th October.
Princeton, Saturday, 14th October,
Merritt, Monday, 16th October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Summerland, Thursday ,19th Oct.
Penticton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna, Saturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday, 23rd October.
It is requested that all persons who
are interested in the matter aforesaid,
and who desire to be heard, will not
fail to be present at the meetings
of the Commisioners.
PRICE  ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury Department, Victoria, B. C.
September 13, 1911. s22-o23
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared In the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25fh of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. O., April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads In
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    Jyl8-ol8
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the   issue  of  a   duplicate  of  the
Certificate  of  Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  Is  my  intention  to  Issue  at  the
expiration  of  one  month   after  the
first  publication  hereof  a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described Iands In the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of  Title  is  dated
25th   November,    1909,   and   numbered 44 1.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District  Registrar.
Land Registry Office,  Prince Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. al5-sl5
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in tbe British* Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and tbe lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will bo open
for pre-emption only under tbe provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-wsy of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
ilay of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of tbe City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence north eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D.
1911.
GEO.  W.  KERR.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nicholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted about tliree hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; thence
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty 1.40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to place of commencement and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
73 on the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (80
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A. KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and en the south
bank of said river; thence south
eighty (80) ehains; thence west forty
(40) cliains; tlience nortli eighty
(80) chains; tbence east forty (40)
■ halns to the point ot commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less,.and
which land was located by ine on the
25th day of August, A. D. 1911.
ALEXANDER FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated  August  2.".,  1911,
Hazelton   Lanel   District—District  of
Coast, Range ■>
TAKE NOTICE thai Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospect or,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal ami petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east and two miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south SO chains; tlience east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described I.-nds:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
south 80 chains; tlience east 80
chains; thence north 8 0 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL   Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and four miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 cliains; thence east
80 chains; tlience nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. O, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles
east and four miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
west 80 chains; tlience south 80
chains; tlience east 80 chains; tbence
nortli 80 chains, to point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10, 1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted tliree
miles east and tliree miles north
from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east and three miles nortli from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 3 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 cliains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence soutli 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B, C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River; tbence south 80 chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence north
80 chains; thence cast 80 ehains, to
point of commencement,
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator,
Dated July 8, 1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, theuce
south SO chains; theuce east 80
rhains; thence north 80 cliains,
tlience west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN* GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911 sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayawka River;
tlience north 80 chains; thence west
80 cliains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence north SO cliains; tbence east
80 chains; thence south 80 cliains;
tlience west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated   July   9,   1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and one mile north from
the moutli of Kitnayakwa River!
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tbence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal ami petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayawka
River; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains; tlience west SO cliains, to
tlie point of commencement.
JOHN (IAMRIEL, Locator.
Dated   July   10.   1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and two miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. i]j
Hazelton  Lund  District- District of
Coast, Range 5
take NOTICE thai Vivian
O'Brien of ( opperClty B.C., prospector,
Intends n> apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:-
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and one mile south from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south SO chains; thence west
SO chains; thence north SO chains;
tlience east 80 chains, to point of
commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the l ol lowing described lands:—■
Commencing al a post planted four
miles cast Hum the moutli of Kitnayakwa River; thence south 80 chains;
thence wesi so chains; thence north
80 chains; ihe ine. easl 80 chains, to
I point eel commencement,
vivi.w O'BRIEN, Locator.
iiiiie.ii July i". 1911
Hazelton  Land  District    District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE     NOTICE     thai     Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
liiiteiiels to apply leer a licence to
prospect for coal ami petroleum over
lhe following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted five
'miles easl from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence east 80 ehains;
tbence south 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence north SO chains,
to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated .Inly 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a lieence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Com-
iireneing ut a post plutited four miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
east 80 chains; theuce soutli 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
tbence nortli 80 chains, to point of
commencement,
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  9,   1911. sl
Hazelton   Lane!   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B, ('., Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at B post planted 6 miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east x" chains, thence south
80 ehains; tlience west So chains, to
point of commencement.
JOHN* GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10, 1911. sl PRINCE RUPERT JOLRNAL
Tuesday, September 26, 1911.
THE MONEY MARKET
Strike in Old Land Failed to Effect Fi
nancial Natters Very
Nuch
Praise Given for the Way in Which
Panic Was Avoided During
Trouble
Not the least remarkable feature
about the labor troubles in Great
Britain has been the coolness of the
hard-hit London Stock Exchange,
says the Daily Mail. Frequently In
peril of dire disaster, never once
have members lost their heads. Nowhere were the sensational developments of the labor unrest followed
with keener interest or closer attention than in the House. And naturally so, considering how much the
Stock Exchange has at stake on the
Issue between  capital and  labor.
It has had to bear the first brunt
of each successive attack on the Industrial capital of the country. The
revolt of the seamen, then that of
the dockers, next that of the carmen and lightermen, and, lastly that
of the railway men, have been so
many shocks to the stock markets,
which were none too strong to begin
with. The Board of Trade returns
for July had shown that our staple
exports were beginning to feel the
natural effects of the labor revolt.
The tying up of the railways was
regarded as the finishing blow for
the industries on which these exports depend, and every active industrial  stock  suffered  accordingly.
Though home stocks were the
principal victims of the strike no
market wholly escaped. It may be
noted as a condition of affairs almost
without a single precedent that for
a whole week not a single symptom
of bullishness was observable. It
was not attempting to "boom" anything. Every one stood still watching with nervous eye his own particular stocks, thankful when they
did not fall too fast.
What  Might Have Happened
As an exhibition of moral courage and self-control the strike crisis
was most creditable to the London
Stock Exchange, and above all, to the
home railway market. No foreign
bourse, and least of all Wall Street,
could have come through such an
ordeal so quietly and courageously.
Though losses were accumulating day
by day there was never the slightest
approach to a scare, still less to
panic. The differences which had
to be met at the end of a dismal
nineteen-day account were disastrous
to many, but with two unimportant
exceptions everybody struggled
through. If the leaders of the railway unions had launched their thunderbolt two days sooner, that is, on
Monday, the carry-over day, instead
of Wednesday, which was payday, the
effects on the Stock Exchange might
have been a great deal worse than
they were.
The difficulties of the carry-over,
already bad for most members,
would have been greatly aggravated.
Many of the smaller dealers and
brokers could not have carried over
at all. Any stock they had open
would have had to be sold out against
them. A "slump" in prices would
have been almost inevitable, and the
dreaded hammer might have fallen
frequent'}*. Unwittingly, the strike
leaders saved the country from this
catastrophe by delaying till Wednesday what, from their point of
view, might have been equally well
done on Monday. By Wednesday tbe
carry-over was all arranged and any
fresh fall In prices could have no
practical effect for another fortnight.
British   Self-Control
But, after all, among many remarkable features of the strike crisis
in Capel Court, the most mpressive
is the calm enilurnnce with which It
has been borne. In this respect there
is nothing lo compare with II In the
history of the Stock Exchnnge, much
less In that of any other stock market. At the height of the crisis Berlin made more fuss over the liquidation of two or three overgrown bull
accounts in Canadian Pacifies than
our home railway mnrket did over
an org"nizcd revolutionary attack on
fourteen hundred millions sterling
worth of British property. Scare
after scare took place in Wall Street
over rumors about what this, that
and Ihe other millionaire gambler
had done or was about to do. While
American speculators were taking
fright at their own shadows the British railway market calmly faced Industrial anarchy.
Why these remarkable contrasts
tween the three great International
markets? Did they arise out of different conditions or out of psychological peculiarities among the men engaged in I hem? It may have been
both causes. Undoubtedly Englishmen can be cooler-headed In emergencies than most other people.  This
is as true of speculation as of other
fields of danger, and It was once
more demonstrated last week on the
Stock Exchange. But there was also
inherent strength in the markets
which rendered it possible to them
together in the teeth of the most
alarming risks and dangers. There
was evidently not much rottenness
anywhere, or that terrible week
would have found it out.
The Railway Market's Attitude
As for the home railway market,
which had to stand in the breach for
five critical days, It displayed a degree of inherent strength hitherto
unsuspected. The public had for
years been accustomed to hear home
railway stocks sneered at and discredited. Everything connected
with them—directors, managers and
shareholders — was supposed to be
out of date and only waiting to be
transformed on thoroughly modern
and democratic lines. It was, therefore, a revalatlon to the world when
they stood up firmly against the
worst possible kind of attack.
After all, the explanation may be
very simple. This particular danger
had been long foreseen and anticipated. A fight to a finish with the
socialistic section of railway workers
had been generally recognized in the
market as inevitable. It wasr ather
welcomed when it came as an agreeable change from the sporadic spirits
of mutiny which had been a continual
worry to stockholders. They frightened timid holders out of their
stocks and kept new buyers from
coming in.
But now there was to be a final
settlement with the mutineers and
firebrands, and there could, In the
nature of things, be only one end
to it. The market had no misgiving,
except on one point. It was doubtful if the railway directors as a body
had the requisite amount of hack-
bone for dealinng with a national
emergency. When the prompt and
definite action of the various boards
had reassured it on that point It
looked forward to the result with
confidence. The railway crisis was
over for the Stock Exchange on Friday night. Obvious proof of that
was given by the closing of the House
on Saturday in order to release the
waiters for their annual holiday.
From first to last the bogey of
labor unrest has been treated most
coolly and sensibly by those who had
most to lose by it. The Stock Exchange took the true measure of the
strike and declined to go into hysterics over it.
 o	
PLANS OF CEMETERY
City Council Receive   From Landscape
Gardeners Scheme for Laying
out Burying Grounds.
Brett & Hull Send the Details of the
Proposition Prepared for
the G.  T.  P.
This is Julius F. Rochau, who left
Kansas City, Mo., July, 1910, and
whose relatives desire to get in touch
with him. For any information concerning his whereabouts and leading
to his location, Charles H. Frye,
Ninth Avenue and Columbia Street,
Seattle, Wash., U. S. A., will pay a
reward of $200.
If Mr. Rochau sees this, it will be
to his advantage to communicate
with Mr. Frye at once, as everything
is all right and there is no reason
why he should not return to his
family immediately.
 o	
ARRESTED IN VICTORIA
VICTORIA—Oran E. Hess, who
has conducted an employment
agency for the past six months at
592 Johnston Street under the name
of Mac Hass, was arrested on the
charge of embezzling from the Farmers' Grain & Supply Company oB
Elba City, Howard County, Neb., a
sum of $3,500 while managing one
of their elevators at that place. The
arrest was made by Chief of Detectives Perdue and associates, from Information contained ,ln a circular
with a photograph which came to
hand a few days ago. Oddly enough,
only a few days before, Hess was
arraigned In the police court for
obtaining maney under false pretences from persons seeking employment at his present place of business.
 o	
At a banquet held In a room, the
walls of which were adorned with
many beautiful paintings, a well
known college president was called
upon to respond to a toast. In the
course of his remarks, wishing to
pay a compliment to the ladles present, and designating the paintings
with one of his characteristic gestures, he said: "What need Is there
of these painted beauties, when we
have so many with ns at this table?"
The city council last evening received a letter from Brett & Hall,
the landscape gardeners of Boston
who laid out the townsite of Prince
Rupert, and with the letter came
detailed plans prepared by them for
the Fairview cemetery. This came in
reply to a letter written by the mayor
to Charles M. Hays relative to plans,
it being known that the railway company had prepared somewhat elaborate plans.
Mr. Hays sent the letter on to
Brett & Hall in Boston, and the
plans were sent forward.
The letter accompanying it stated
that if these were deemed suitable
they would dispose of the detailed
ones prepared for the railway company.
- The bounds of the cemetery are
Circuit Road, Fair View Road and
Omineca Avenue.
Attention was called while the
plans were being examined to the
fact that the cemetery site was exceedingly close to Laurier Square.
The plans show winding driveways
and shrubbery space the whole making up a very complete design.
These plans were referred to the
public works department.
 o	
THEATRE CIRCUIT
Prince  Rupert May  Be  Included  in
the  New  Circuit  to 'Be
Started in Canada
Vancouver to be the headquarters
of . a large United States-Canada
vaudeville circuit, with Seattle only
a branch office for the transaction
of the American end of the business
—such is the news brought to Vancouver by Mr. Hampton, senior member of the well known firm of Hampton & Edgar, the financial agents for
Canada of Alexander Pantages, head
of the chain of playhouses bearing
his name, says the News-Advertiser.
Mr. Hampton returned last evening
to this city from Seattle, where he
had gone to complete the arrangements with Mr. Pantages to launch
forth this gigantic enterprise, and
brought back with him complete
plans for the Vancouver hou§e,
which will be the most pretentious
edifice or the circuit in this country,
costing approximately half a million
dollars. Messrs. Donlan & Donlan
of this city will be the architects,
while a Montreal firm of contractors
will handle not alone the construction work in Vancouver, but also
over the entire chain of Canadian
houses.
"I have with me," said Mr. Hampton, "the signed plan and contract
for the new Victoria theatre, which
will cost $200,000, and will be named
the Lols-Pantages, after Mrs. Pantages, after Mrs. Pantages, while his
Edmonton house will be called the
Carmen-Pantages, after his little
girl. Mr. Pantages is a great family
man, who, unlike most theatrical
magnates, finds his greatest pleasures and joys with his wife and
children, and two other houses are
to be named after his two boys. The
All-Canada circuit, so far as mapped
out now, includes, besides Vancouver, where Mr. Pantages will maintain his general headquarters and
residence, Victoria, with a $200,000
building; Montreal, $250,000; Winnipeg, $250,000; Quebec, $250,000;
Toronto, $250,000; Edmonton, $200,-
000; Calgary, $200,000; Kamloops,
$200,000; Regina $175,000; Moosejaw, $150,000; London, $150,000;
Hamilton, $150,000; St. Catherines,
$125,000, and several minor places
In which houses ranging from $75,-
000 to $125,000, will be erected,
This Canadian circuit means virtually
an investment of from $6,000,000 to
$7,000,000, and actual work will be
started without delay. When Mr.
Pantages gets here he will make a
tour of all the cities in which his
houses will be located. Prince Rupert may also be linked to the Pantages chain, but that is not certain
yet, as negotiations regarding that
place are still pending. Mr. Pantages Is determined to give Vancouver the best house on his circuit
without exception, as he Intends to
make this city his home."
 o	
A parson was applied to for advice by a member of his congregation, who complained of a continual
noise made on a trombone by a next-
door neighbor. "Can a man," he
asked, "who practices on such an
Instrument from morning to night be
a good Christian?" "Such a man
might possibly a good Christian,"
the parson replied, "but his next-
door neighbor couldn't."
G. T. P. EXTENSION
Branch From   Edmonton  to  Calgary
May  Be  Completed
•        This  Year
Direct train service over the Grand
Trunk Pacific between Edmonton
and Calgary is still a possibility for
this. year. It was expected by the
company that th.e new line would be
ready for fast passenger traffic this
fall, but some trouble was encountered In getting the grades built
through the Canadian Pacific irrigation lands, as the latter company
secured an injunction restraining the
G. T. P. contractors from building
through their lands, and although the
injunction has been withdrawn, it
delayed construction for some weeks.
Considerable trouble was also encountered In getting supplies, notably
steel for the big bridge over the Red
Deer River, near Alix, but now this
bridge is finished and the construc-
tural steel gang has gone to a bridge
on the Brazeau coal branch. Steel
laying south of Alix is proceeding at
the rate of two or three miles a day,
and the grade is finished far enough
toward Calgary, to keep ahead of the
tracklayer. If entrance Is not made
into the southern city this fall it is
certain that the branch will be ready
for traffic early next year, and that
trains will be running over this picturesque route between the two metropolises of the west next summer.
 o	
HEADLINE VOCABULARY
Type  Exigencies   Are  Creating  Two
Divisions of the English
Language
No careful observer, says the Chicago Inter-Ocean, of linguistic things
who is also a reader of newspapers
has failed to note that the English
language, as used in the United
States, is gradually but surely dividing into two separate and distinct
branches—ordinary English and
"headline"  English.
Headline English is distinguished
from ordinary, or King's English,
first, by its supreme contempt for it,
and, secondly, by its fondness for
strong monosyllabic words that fit
into the column nicely, and that are
perfectly willing to have their meaning twisted in any desired direction.
It is also remarkable for a catholicity of taste that permits 'It to
assimiliate words tnat are not of
current use in the English of the
country, but which by reason of being monosyllables, and hence useful
for headlines in largo type, where
only a few words can be crowded in,
appeal particularly to the headline
writer's soul.
All the foregoing reflections were
inspired, and justified in part, by
seeing in large type in several newspapers the announcement that the
"lift" in the Masonic Building had
fallen eighteen storeys. The next
day further confirmation, If further
confirmation be need, was furnished
by the following headline in a newspaper's follow-up story—"Probe
Lifts After Crash."
The essential unintelligibillty of
headline English to one unacquainted
with it, or with the facts to which
it is supposed to refer, could hardly
find a more striking illustration. Just
imagine some American who knew
nothing of the accident, and as little
about the Englishman's way of referring to an elevator, trying to unravel that mysteryej
The first idea that he would get
would naturally be that a "probe,
or "inquiry" had lifted or ceased,
after a crash of some kind or other.
And if tald that "lift" was the Britisher's word for elevator he would
be in much better shape. Even the
idea of anyone probing an elevator
Is not particularly perspicuous.
How far the line of division between ordinary English and headline
English    will    go   is  an   interesting
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
K Tun In I
CafJtuI and ReMrre Over $7,300,000
Letters of Credit
For our customers' convenience
we issue Letters of Credit payable
in Pounds Sterling for use In
Great Britain and all parts of tlte
world, and payable in Dollars for
use in Canada, United States,
Mexico, Bermuda, Bahamas, Cuba
and the West Indies.
We buy and sell Drafts on
France, Germany, South Africa,
Australia, New Zealand, India,
China and the West Indies.
Prince R-apert Branch —
F. S. LONG, Manager.
1*tu*St*y SiUsfauory Rie\£t
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a. Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such Joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and  stove putty.    It's
important to every  one  using or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 6, Sec. 1,   $4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE In old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS       INSURANCE
Office! Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
HBaBBlasaBBEaSBBBBBHBBBBiBaB
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
a a a a e aia a a hie a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
^F YOU RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  .COMPLETE   LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P1Q
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
philological question. But It may
safely be assumed that If it continues
at the present rate for many years
the two languages will have to be
taught in the public school-;.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board  and  lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $8 Per Week
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.

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