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Prince Rupert Journal Oct 31, 1911

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Array Ptinu %nptxi
.^S" —_„  ^'/)A
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II.
Published Twice a  Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,  B.   C.   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1911.
Price, Five Cents.
NO. «< j7
GRANBY STARTING ON
GIGANTIC SCHEME
Mr. Sylvester has Arrived Direct From New York and
Will Lay Out Work at Goose Bay for Wonderful Development in Connection With
Mining and Smelting of Ore-
Work WiU Start
at Once.
F. M. Sylvester, the general manager of the Granby Copper Company,
arrived in the city on Saturday morning by the Prince George on his way
to Goose Bay. Mr. Sylvester has become quite a familiar figure in
PrincePrince Rupert since his company became interested in the Hidden Creek mines. He will become
still more familiar to the city now
that the Granby company has decided
upon a course of wonderful development in Northern British Columbia.
He went to Goose Bay by the Vadso.
Mr. Sylvester came to Prince Rupert direct from New York after the
annual meeting of his company,
when a final decision was reached to
build the smelter which is to handle
the ore of the Hidden Creek mines
at Goose Bay.
Speaking to the Journal, Mr. Sylvester says that the plan has not
fully been decided upon with respect
to carrying out the work. He will
spend about two weeks at the works
investigating the conditions that prevails and initiating what he considers is necessary to be done this fall
in connection with the scheme of development.
Starting Wharf
There are 250 men at work now
and Mr. Sylvester hopes, if possible,
to keep that full number at work
all winter provided the snow does
does not interfere with operations he
has in view. He will start work on
tho wharf that is to be provided and
with bunkers for hi.jdllng ore. These
will be at the wharf, so as to be
able to ship the ore that is to be
sent to outside smelters during the
time that the company's own works
are being built.
Speaking of the shipping of ore
to outside smelters, Mr. Sylvester
said that no arrangements had been
made as yet with respect to what
smelter would be patronized by his
company.
Start With 2,000 Tons
The Granby company is developing the Hidden Creek mine in such
a manner as to provide for a daily
production of 2,000 tons. This is
to be the initial output of the mine,
which will be ready by the time the
smelter is built. There will be a
production constantly during the
development stage which will be
shipped to some outside smelter.
At the period of low water which
is now approaching a start will be
made on the foundations for the dam
on Falls Creek, which is to furnish
the power for the entire works. The
dam will be a wooden one, the company having a mill and a large supply of timbers available for the purpose. From the dam, water will be
carried a distance of 7,200 feet by
pipe line to the power house. The
pipe will be a stave one, shipped in
in stave lengths and put together on
the grc.ind.
It Is possible that the foundations
tor the power house will be started
this fall or winter also. It will be
near the yvorhs at the mouth of
Falls Creek. The company has
abundance of power available from
the creek for all purposes.
Transporting Ore
The line of transportation from the
mine to the wharf and bunkers will
be started probably at an early date,
but Mr. Sylvester has not fully decided just what system to install.
The distance to be covered is about
one mile and the grade is an easy
one. An incline railway of some sort
will be used, this to be decided upon
after he has fully looked into the
situation. The way is cleared and
a roadway built.
Communication
The general manager says that arrangements have been made for a
postoffice and for regular communication with the place. This will be
welcome news to merchants and
others here, affording, as It will, a
means of communication with the
new mining centre which is to be of
such importance to this port.
Speaking of the report made by
W. Yolen Williams, who explained
the various ore prospects in the whole
northern part of British Columbia,
Mr. Sylvester said it was a very gratifying one. The development of the
country In a mining way has yet
much remaining to be done but the
report of Mr. Williams was of a most
encouraging character.
That this was the case is borne
out by the fact that the Granby company is taking such a decidedly forward step In its policy—namely, the
erection of a smelter of the capacity
that is planned.
Mining  Centre
The policy of the Granby company, in common with most of the
large institutions of that kind, is to
proceed with Its plans with as little
noise as possible. Mr. Sylvester,
therefore, has not a great deal to say
with regard to the work that his
company has in view. He, however,
in conversation, admitted that the
northern part of the province of
British Columbia was to be the attractive point for this province in
the matter of mining enterprise. This
Is indeed good news for Prince Rupert, which with the development of
raining, as in all other branches of
industry, must reap the great benefits that are to come from an era
of activity.
The mining centres within reach
of the Granby smelter will have reason to be thankful that the policy
of the company Is to build immemnse
works at the mines. Undoubtedly
the Granby will be in the market to
buy all kinds of custom ore to supplement the prodigious body that
there is at the Hidden Creek mines.
The effect of active operations by
a company like the Granby will also
have the effect of attracting capital
to this part of the country that would
not  otherwise  come  In.
EARLY ELECTION
Ontario Will Vote on November 21-Sir
James Whitney Taking an
Appeal
Promised Reforms of the Government
as to the Administration
of Affairs
(Special to The Journal)
Toronto,   Oct.   31.—The   Ontario
elections   will   be   held   on   November 21.
A letter to the electors from Sir
James Whitney, the premier, promises a new portfolio to do the work
previously done by the hydro-electric
commission. He also promises reforms as to the immigration policy
with respect to New Ontario.
HORRORS OF WAR
Arabs are Massacred in Numbers by Attacking Parties of Italians in
Tripoli
Women  und  Children Suffer in  the
Onslaughts  Upon  the
Fortresses
Tripoli, Oct. 31.—For three days
the Italians have been systematically
slaughtering Arabs. In the bombardment of Benghaib immense damage
was done. Three hundred civilians,
one-half of whom were women and
children, were killed by the attacking  forces.
 o	
C. A. McNIchol], superintendent of
the G. T. P. went south yesterday.
He will be absent only a short time.
POWER IS BROKEN
Chinese  Imperial Headquarters Grants
Constitutional Government in
Country
Pardon  to  Be Given  to Those Concerned in the Rebellion of
Late Years
(Special to The Journal)
Pekin, Oct. 31. — The throne of
China has granted a complete constitutional government. An imperial
edict was issued yesterday apologizing for past neglect and granting immediately a cabinet from which nobles were to be excluded.
The second edict pardons the political offenders since the rebellion
of 1898.
Hankow Captured
Hankow, Oct. 31.—The rebels are
now in undisputed possession of the
entire city of Hankow, including the
powder factory.
PLEASED WITH CITY
W. W. Foster the Deputy Minister of
Works Delighted With Prince ,
Rupert
Citizens Present Their Views Before
the  Official  on   Wharf
Proposition
W. W. Foster, deputy minister of
public works at Victoria, left yesterday morning, after spending near'y
a week in the north looking over
conditions as they affect his department.
On Saturday afternoon he met business men and others in the city at
the suggestion of William Manson,
M.P.P., and discussed with them the
question of the best methods of handling the government wharf.
The discussion was a very free one
and resulted in those present passing resolutions against the wharf being turned over to any private company or individual.
The suggestion was made that the
city might handle it, taking it over
from the government.
The meeting also favored a local
commission being named by the government to act as a body to which
any appeal could be taken in case of
dispute.
Mr. Foster expressed his pleasure
at getting the views of the citizens,
and will report on the whole subject to the government at Victoria
before a decision is reached.
On Sunday afternoon Mr. Foster
visited the hospital and was shown
round by the president, D. G|. Stewart, Mr. Manson and other members
of the hospital board.
He expressed great satisfaction at
the way in which the institution was
fitted up and sympathized with the
task the board had in copinng with
the needs of the district in this regard.
Mr. Foster left Prince Rupert delighted with the climatic conditions
and the general situation.
 o	
CAPTAIN  OLIVER   HURT
Members of Crew of the Mission Bout
Homespun Suffered From
Explosion
Captain William Oliver and Engineer John Woodward of the Methodist Mission boat Homespun are lying In the hospital In Vancouver suffering from serious burns as a result of a gasoline explosion which
wrecked the craft as she was lying
on the beach near the Hastings Mill.
Neither man Is in danger, but the
burns are painful. The men are well
known here, where the Homespun
was regularly employed. The boat
nad sunk to the bottom of the Inlet.
Later the Homespun was hauled away
and out on the beach at Hastings.
There the water was pumped out of
her and a fire was lighted to dry
her out. Captain Oliver and the engineer were working on her at the
time. In some manner the fire
caught some gasoline lying in the
bottom of the boat, and the flames
quickly spread to the tank. There
was a tremendous explosion. The
bottom was blown half out of the
boat and Captain Oliver and Engineer Woodward were stunned and
burned. They were at once taken
lo the hospital, wliere they are making good progress.
ENJOYED BANQUET
Methodist Church Held Fourth Annual
Thanksgiving Festival Last
Evening
Excellence Attendance at the Gathering Held in Church Last
Evening
Last evening the Methodist Church
held its annual Thanksgiving banquet. This is the fourth one of its
kind and was In no sense less enjoyable than Its predecessors.
The place was crowded, the offering amounting to about $170.
After a sumptuous Thanksgiving
meal a toast list was proceeded with
and a very pleasant evening was
spent. During the evening several
allusions were made to the new
church planned and already under
way by the denomination at an estimated cost of about $18,000. The
faith of the church in the city, it
was held, was equal to that of the
business men.
Dr. Kergin and others took occasion to compliment Rev. Mr. Sing
upon his part in the undertaking, it
being acknowledged that he was
more reasonable than anyone else
for the building being proceeded
with.
Throughout the speeches of Rev.
Mr. Sing, the pastor; Rev. Mr. James
of the Anglican Church and Rev. Mr.
Kerr of the Presbyterian denomination were breathed the most friendly interdenominational spirit, and all
expressed the hope that there might
soon be union among the denominations.
Vocal selections were given by Mr.
Alex. Clapperton and Mr. Meth
Davies.
Speeches were made to the various
toasts by Rev. Mr. Sing, Dr. Kergin,
Mr. Arthur Alliston, Rev. Mr. James,
Rev. W. Deans of Copper City, Rev.
Mr. Kerr, O. H. Nelson, Mayor Man-
son, Aid. Douglas, Aid. Newton, Aid.
Clayton, Mr. H. Murdoff, Mr. J. S.
Cowper, Mr. E. L. Fisher, Mr. M. M.
Stephens.
JAPANESE  MENACE
H. H. Stevens, Member for Vancouver, Gives Details of the Hunger
From   Foreign  Fishermen
Fuller details of the charges made
by H. H. Stevens, the member-elect
for Vancouver, relative to the Japanese menace in the fishing industry
are contained in the exchanges from
tne' southern city.
That the coast and deep sea fishing In the province of British Columbia is controlled by a Japanese
secret society, pledged to promote the
interests of the members to the detriment of white fishermen and that
they have a practical monoply of the
fishing industry in British Columbia,
was the declaration of Mr. Stevens.
According to the Vancouver member of the Dominion House of Commons the association in question is
almost 10,000 strong, counting In its
membership nearly every Japanese
interested in the fishing Industry in
British Columbia. It has its headquarters at Steveston and according
to Mr. Stevens held a meeting there
recently. Furthermore, one of the
articles in the constitution of the society states that death shall be a
penalty for any member of the brotherhood who betrays the secrets of
the organization.
Mr. Stevens said that the Japanese
employed by white firms do not work
as hard as they do for employers of
their own nationality and as a result
the total catch or the white company
Is much less than that of their rivals.
Hospital Meeting
The hospital board will meet tomorrow afternoon in the police courtroom, where business of Importance
Is to come up for consideration. The
hospital is crowded to its capacity,
many of the patients being from outside points. The directors have several Important matters of policy to
discuss.
E. L. Stover of this city, who suffered   the   sad   bereavement   a   few
weeks ago in the death of his wife,
has returned to the city.
*    *    *
Among the arrivals by the Prine-e
George on Saturday were Rev.
Charles R. Sing and Mrs. Sing. They
had been In attendance to the missionary gathering that was held in
Vancouver.
WORLD'S COAL SUPPLY
IN THE FAR NORTH
R. C. Campbell-Johnson   After  Spending   Summer  at
Groundhog Mountain Returns With a Glowing
Report of the Rich Deposits That are to
be Found in the Interior of the
Province—Unlimited
Supply of Coal.
R. C. Campbell-Johnson, accompanied by his wife and young son,
are In the city on their way to Vancouver after spending the summer
in the coal area commonly known as
Groundhog Mountain. Some Idea of
the distances he covered can be found
when it is known that twenty-six days
were occupied in making the trip
out to Hazelton.
The report which Mr. Campbell-
Johnson brings, however, is one of
the most encouraging for this northern portion of British Columbia. The
area is not yet fully explored. There
Is an immense area with coal of the
best quality, hard and smokeless. All
that it lacks is transportation facilities to make it the greatest known
anthracite area in the world. The
quality is equal to the very best
Pennsylvania hard coal.
Mr. Campbell-Johnson puts an estimate of the production possible as
far as the district has so far been
explored by himself and others who
have gone in at 300,000 tons a day,
or practically 300 collieries working
full blast. He prophesises for it the
greatest colliery centre of anywhere
in the world..
At present there are four companies with projected railways Into
the country. These include Mackenzie & Mann, Mr. Campbell-Johnson's
own company, the Alaska Central
and Norton Griffith's company.
Within the next few months Mr.
Campbell-Johnson will take up the
proposition of the road with which
lie is identified and it is more than
liltely that funds will be available
for an .early start on several of these
Engineers for the Mackenzie & Mann
and the Norton Griffiths company
have been at work this summer on
the surveys.
The G. T. P. will assuredly build
also into that country by way of the
Kispiox so that the handling of the
output Is to be solved before long.
Describing the area, Mr. Campbell-
Johnson says:
"There are many miles of territory
up there that I believe contain as
much and as high grade coal as any
I have ever been over. It has not
been covered yet by any means. We
know It Is all coal there. Nature
lias done the work of the diamond
drill and we can start mining coal
on the surface. There will be thou-
sond-foot shafts to sink, or long tunnels before the coal is reached. The
creeks run through the country giving cross geological sections and
snows up the true nature of the rock,
which is all sedimentary, without a
trace of the volcanic which is so
prevalent in many districts where
coal has been found.
"The coal on Groundhog is a
smokeless, non-coking, hard, high
grade coal, giving 84 % per cent fixed
carbon, and equally good for all purposes for which the Pennsylvania
hard coal is used. It is particularly
good for marine use and we will
command the entire market for the
Pacific fleets, naval and commercial.
"During this season's work we
have uncovered and worked eleven
big commercial seams in which there
is enough coal to justify us in proceeding with the construction of the
railway for which we got our charter
last session of parliament. Our railway will be the Naas & Skeena Rivers Railway and there will be very
little delay in  constructing .it.
"As for the tonnage available from
the Groundhog coalfields, it will
equal the Pennsylvania coalfields
with a dally output of 300 000 tons,
and the supply will last for centuries.
There are already five charters for
railways into that country and  four
(Continued on Page Eight)
SIMPSON AWAKENS
Rumors  of Railway Connection With
That Port is Having Effect
There.
Too Free Use of Liquor Lends to Reference to the Courts in Nearby
Town
(Special Correspondence)
Port Simpson, Oct. 30.—There has
been a series of "hilarious" times
here during the week that has just
closed. Two prospectors named Carson and Nelson, citizens of the U. S.,
upon arrival here and while waiting
for the steamer proceeded to make
things hideous. When Interfered
with by the provincial police officer,
Deane Carson, who Is a giant In size
and strength, resisted and overpowered the constable. The Indian constable, Mr. Tait, then took part In
the affair and placed the man under
arrest. The two were tried before
G. II. Raley and found guilty of creating a disturbance. They were
fined ?lii and costs each.
W. II. Ulty, charged with being
drunk on the Indian reserve, wiih
brought before C. C, Perry, the Indian agent, and being goiind guilty
was fined $1.1 and costs. It Is said
that he will appeal tbe case, taking
it before Judge Young.
C. C. Perry, the Indian agent, has
been in the town this week meeting
the Indians of the reserve and discussing matters pertaining to the settlement preparatory to the meeting
of the band for the council elections
in January.
The town of Port Simpson is
awakening to new life, It would appear. There Is more decided activity
here than has prevailed for some
years. There are rumors of rail connection with this port from time to
time and the activity thai prevails
seems lo bear out the theory that
there is to be a line find Its outlet
at this point.
NO FOOD SHORTAGE
C.T.
P. Was Able to Empty its Sheds
of all Interior Freight
This Fall
Hazelton   Is   Well  Supplied   for  the
Coming   Winter   With
Necessaries
There should be no shortage of
supplies at points in the interior this
winter as every ton of freight that
reached Prince Rupert within the
time prescribed by the company for
accepting It reached Its destination.
As a result, the G. T. P. freight sheds
at the close of navigation on the
Skeena looked quite empty as compared with previous years. A. E.
Mi-Master, the general agent, however, looked hupper is n result, having no troubles to adjust with those
looking for freight that they could
not get.
From all the reports received from
up the river there Is every prospect
that the winter will not be far advanced this year before there is communication wiih a point very cloae
to Hazelton by rail. This Is conditional upon the winter being a normal one, which will enable work being done on the rail-laying within the
next two  months.
All freight for Hazelton which
reached Prince Rupert before the
first of October was brought up the
river, nnd there Is no danger of
scarcity In any of the necessaries of
life during the coming winter. In
some commodities, however, merchants in the interior were unable to
obtain as large stocks as they desired. The principal line in which
there is a shortage is canned fruits
and vegetables. The producers of
these goods were only able to fill
from 60 to 7fe per rent of the orders
received.
C. II. Keane has returned to the
city from a visit  to Vancouver. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, October 31, 1911
r*>*<J
«e^|^      	
Provincial Elections Act
Skeena Electoral District
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objection ii. \ [he i tion ol  i1     follow-
Istei  ol for the
Skeena   Eh   toral   Di   rlct,   on   the   grounds
stal  d bel
AND  TA1       NO     IE  thai   al   a   Courl   oi
Re be Id   al   the   Court
1 B. C,   on   tl e   Oth   day   of
?V' em I at ten   i'i lock  In t;
noon, I  shall  be
I: ,       or so nie
I Voter 'in ii" 'r :
tl i
fe Ike such  -e;1 tin
.
J. II.  McMULLIN,
r of A
her, 1911
Th     followin ■   reported   absent
from the District:
Tor
NAME
1 7 .\ lexander, .lames.
I Ier, John . .
34 Alice! ert M.
40|Anderson, James.
i 6 Ai derson,   On ille.
53 Apple ... Frank
oliArl erl	
do Archer, Fred	
56 Armsl rong, A	
59A ihn B.. . .
Tee ', ]    j.	
71 Auld,  Peter	
Edward
81 Baih y, John	
S4|B orge M	
	
;io Ball, Geoi ge Alexander.
96 Banville,  Leouis	
11 5 Basker, John Daniel. . ■
lateman, Herbert V.. . .
12 '   Baxter,   Druirl	
li.'" Baylay,  Francis	
l 2 i ■    eul eus, Leouis	
1:; I Beamish, John	
i i    I ergin, D. .1	
161  Bermingham, ?.l
PLAi
I    ::   -e   R
. ... Pri
... .Prlnc
. . . 1'e luce     ' I
 Georgi town
. .   . .Pori -■
m's Landing
.... Prince Rupert
. . . .Prince Rupert
i ince Rupertl
.... Prince Rupert|
Prince Ruperl
'i ince Rupert
Pi Ince Rupert
I tupe
Prince   i
Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
Prince I
Prine
 Por    E. slngton
 Prim e Rupert
 Prince Rupert
 Prince Ru; ert
Cornelius	
 Klun  Kowi  Bay
-
MlJ-.Vll,
28    Brown,
2Sl,Bi
2    I'
erteaux, Henry S . . . .
1 68 Bianco, Victor	
17" Birch, Hugh Bernard. .
1 7 ! Birnie, 1 . unas Carfrae
177 Black, William David. .
I i bin n,  Sainuel....
!      Blanchfield,  VV. J	
i 59 Blenklnsop, Alfred W.
191 Blue.   Alexand    ...
1 9 5 Bond,   Richard  .lames
200 Bo    h, Ick  I)	
207eBoucher, Eugene Ernest,
2 lourdon, Eli	
2! 1 Bourgon, Joe	
224 Brag -. William Thomas.
22i Bi a onibe, Frank ....
228 Brawn, Wilfrid Percival
232 Bromner, John	
rendon,   E n sl	
241!Bre\     er,   Gilbert	
n, Aril ur It	
: K	
i    ' ,   -i ' ur St.C. . .
2   ' '■'■•■ uai	
25." Bl
'■'■• ■■•■■;.,   Arthur	
Brown, Edi  rrd	
2C9 Brown,   Harold	
Hen-..   II
ert	
Samuel A	
lam	
^^^^^^^ William	
2S7'Brownb!idge,  William. .
         i   ley W.. ..
■      -   .  .;        .i	
2 :-	
.;:- nes	
:, Fi ed	
lenrj	
.vash, Pi ter  	
:   C	
322 Bu le    	
325 Buttimi r.  George  Allan
32 i <';ei'u. Jose] li	
an V Prince  Rupert
:::;.. e -li;1 than,   Pati Ick Prince  Rupe rl
8 I ' Cameron, James Prince Ruperl
tmeron, John Prince  R   , i rl
r Cai      on, 1    vrle VV Maplt   B   ■
ell,   '■■'■   Dugald.     . Rupe
bell, John Alexandei  Pi
: ..  Campbell, John Allison ...!'; ... i  r
: -    . ehn Joseph .. .Prince Rupi   I
Ci  npbell, Murdoch Pri    i   Rupi   :
369'Capn '  -"; Pi ince
.    . i' , Al   ed SI   1.1 I er. . Prim e       pi i:
301 Carti r,  Alfred Thomas Ha:   lton
40; C:   ey, G       i       Prlnci
an, J    i Pi Ince Rupert
■ ! ■■ Chai Idi .  i eorge Prince    Rupe
Chn : len,  Franl Prince Rupert
133 Christie,   William. . . .
I 13 Clai   - .   Fred	
li!1 Clarke, Fred Leon. . .
■..   i ilazue, . erberl Naden
! is Codj. Patrick	
481 Coles, Thomas	
n	
I     Collins, W, .1	
l!t7;Gon\   .-. John	
502 Cooler,   Sinn on	
50 I Coons, Marrj	
. i lopli y, Cliai l".- Stanley. .
i     est... Hole
■ ourt,  Frank	
■ I   I'i.ie: II,    Gil    ID    I       \	
 Cowell ens	
..   i' alg, Thomas	
.'.■I l Cramb, Henry	
I   Cr ..ii .  I !hai i.	
553 (in ... Jen. es VV llllam .
557,'Cruieksliunk, Alexander
. Prince Ru]   .1
. i rince Rupert
.Prime Rupert
. Prince Rupert
.   Prince Ru] i rl
. Port  Essington
. . Prince Rupert
.Port Essington
. .Prince  Ruperl
. . Port Simpson
.Prince Rupert
. Pi im e Rupert
. Prince Rupert
. Princi ri
. Prince Rupert
. Port E toi
:   i   Ruperl
.Prince  Rupert
 Vld
 Cai lyle
ceB
■ Ruperl
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i
. Pi luce
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. * ■ ' ■ ■
. . . .Sui E   In!  :
 il;        on
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. Pi Inc !
I
. Prince   I
.  'rine
. Prince    taper!
. Princi ■   '
. Pi Ince
 3ui f  Inlel
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 e'.
. Pi iii"   Ru
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. Prim e
. Prince
NO.
NAME
PLACE
655 Dlmsdale, Henry George. .Prime Rupert
656 Dineen, Lionel S. C Port Simpson
,;"    Dinsmore,  Isaac A Stewart
■    Dleney, Joseph Port Essington
eiei:: Dobing, John G Prince Rupertl
1 ey, Georgi   Ernest, .Prince Rupert 1436iLandry,   Leo Prince
869 Dourly,   James Hazelton 1443 Langllle   Alex. Douglas.'.'Princ
(eiODolan,   llrouias Prince Rupert|1475iLawi*y,   Robert  Roy Prince
NO.
NAME
PLACE
1417 Kroman,  Edward	
1420 Kyle, Arthur	
1428 Laidlaw, Jas. Turnbull.
1429 Laing,  John  Charles..
1434iLamb,  Walter J	
Don, John	
I  .laieies. .
ue, Jan es Prince Rupert
.   ' i nnis Prince Rupert
:. i Prince Rupert
low, II Prine-e Rupert
row, Jack . Pi Ince Rupert
is Pi Ince Ruperl
loyle, John Pi ince Rupert
i'     st J Prince Rupei i
■     ■   .'     -    Edward l lole in the Wall
1      rge Ud.er   i I
712iOi     . ' 'rancis. . . i rine e Ri  -
lil Pril :
re Crichton.Pi lm    Rupert
rle   ...   Mai tin   Garvis I lazeltozi
'•■■  i' i lazelton
i*22:Dunn        .      ipher Pi ince   H
, J           Inci
a'i S Pril i i
ry ,. . . Pi ;;.i.   Ruper!
Ham Jol ii ....
i   ■ irles, . . e . . . . ri Ince Rupert
er th,  Loren Prince  Rupert
El An     sl   v\ llliam...!'; Il . i      :ii     i
,    I .,, Alex i'ein Simpson
i, Fi edertck Pi Ince Rupei I
Wrick on,   John Pori   Sil
1    . rrd Call In. .. .Pi ince Ruperl
.  i larold Charles. Prince  I
- ,*j d on,   Olaf Prince Rupert
. ■       les Vernon. . . Prince Ruper
Refuge   Hay 1477 Lawson,
Port Simpson     19    Lekvold,
 Hazelton
Prince Rupert
. Port Simpson
Prince Rupert
 Hazelton
Rupert
Rupert
Ruperl
George Prince Rupert
Peder  P Porcher Island
1495 Leonard, Harry M Prince Rupert
1507 Levesque,   Alphonse Prince Itupert
1509 Levy,   Julius Prince Rupert
1 Lewis,  John  William. ... Prince  Rupert
Lii i.i     William Hazelton
: e i:; Lincoln,   William Prince Ruperl
I '■• 14 Lincoln,    William Prince Rupert
3 Little,   Sam. Prince Rupert
i■      John	
8 i ■', Farand, ! lector. . . .
I 5 Farquharson,   Wm.
324 Ferguson, Fred C	
825 Ferguson,  Ivor	
i 26 Ferguson, John W	
8 27 Fi rguson, It	
•: ijl  irris, Herbert William
: Filinio i    Albert	
135 i 'indlay,  Duncan  II.. . .
. ' ; i zgerald, Godfrey. . . .
844 Fitzsimmons, John	
: 'lanagan, Frank John .
846 Flanagan,   Frank	
; lint, William	
.:...:.    .'.  ues	
860 Foran,  .James	
.Prince  Ruper!
 Prince Rupert
Franklin	
. . . .Prince    Ruj
 Prince Rupert
. . . .Prince  Ruperl
 Prince' Rupert
.... Prince Rupert
 Surf Inlet
.Prince Ruper!
.... Surf Inlet
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Ruper!
.Prince Unpen
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
Prince  Rupe
SUlJForbes, Alexander Prince Rupert
862 Forbes, Alex. Duff.
Forster, Joseph	
879 France,   Benjamin....
S83 Franuk, Harry	
,. William	
896 Freeman, Barnabas C..
i 'reeman, .lake	
899 Freeman, Hanson O.. .
900 Freeney,  Frank  R	
902 Fritchett,  It	
903 Frith, F. W	
906]Fritchet!   Emilus	
91    Gagne, Bernard	
922 Galbraith, .lames	
924 Gall, James	
926 ua'lloway, Everett. . . .
127 Galorne, Peter	
93 i Gammie, John	
932 Gardener, Robert S. M.
935 Gaudette, Robert G.. .
- laudi ■ au, Josr   h. . . .
938 Geardner, John	
-corge ^^^^^^^^^^
ison, William	
I   oi.:    rhomas	
Ill ile, ; ,   Alexander, . . .
959   lilies] ie-,   Hie iiael	
|
: ines . .	
973 Gilniore,  William  Dawes
I igras, Fred	
979 Godreau, Louis	
old,   John	
991|GosIing, Joseph	
. . Prince Rup : i
. . Prince Rupert]
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. . Prince Rupert
.Port Essinglon
. . Port Simpson
Tele graph  Point
 Stew ari
, .Prince Ruperl
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. . Prince Ruperl
. . Prince Rupert
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. . Prince Ruperl
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. Prince Ruj erl
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Pol I Essington
ough,  Ei lest Hairy
mild, Archie it	
■ ' ■   eule  . .i<   - ph Eugene. .
ahi n .  Fred  William.
rant,  Albi rl   Edward . .
.;:■     HU   '	
1014eGrant. Rob ! ixander
F,
P li   -
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:
Ruperl
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Pril
I'ii. t  El toi
. Pi Ince  Rupi
. I'i mi e-  Ruperl
lull: Grasset, Gordon
,   William
L023      I       John	
' i .'     "1)0(1,     P	
■ em  rod, Peter	
riffin, Fred	
:.'iffith, .le aeph Allan. .
Hoy ird	
luilbault, Ormond	
! 047 Gunning,  .lieine.-	
, 005 I laley, Berna el Ste ivai I.
'.    Hall,     , omas	
079 1 lamilton, William	
' "N" Hamilton,  William	
i 06 Harrap, Ralph 10	
e ! I 2,Harris,   Harry	
larrison, Fred Richard.
:: I larstone, John lirunton
.. one, Ralph	
i 25 i larstwood,  William A..
32 I lastle,   I'avid	
liHastie,   David	
• ■ ■"• l lathav. ay,   Ge orgi	
; H   -.-kesford, V\ 1111
I 53 i lelgi son   liana	
.i-i ne, 'i'1 ie 5  n eh te r
I 69 He rstick,  John	
.      lewltt, B    ii O	
176 Heyward, •   orge
on.Prince  Rupert
.Prime Rupert
.Prince
. Pori  : :'
. Pi Ince    El    •
 Haze Itoi
. . Port Siui]
: -    graph  Pofnl
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.Prince Rupe rt
.Prince Ru  ■
. Prince Rupi rt
Prince Rupert
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Prince
Prince
Prince
Prim e
Prince
. Prince
1525 Littlejohn,  William  11..
'   -ii Livingstone, U.. . .
, i Logan,  William  N
IE Loiselle. Wilfrid. .
I Long,    Bert Prince
Thos. Leslie. .Prince
I.  bbock,     i .ia Gordon
maid, A'lan Orr. .
.  .i     o	
,..! !■ .i..,  .!. . es  Alexander. . . .
 Prince
9 MacKay, James Beattie. . Pi Inr e
■     i    tvay, Rob rt Flndlayson...
 Prince    Rupert
1602 M tay, William John. . run E   :> [ton
i 605 MacKenzie, An,-.: a Prince
elacKenzie,  Hector Prince Itupert
ni  elacKenzie,    Norman.... Prince Ruperl
1618 MacKie,    James Irving
"MacLean,   Don   d Prim e  Ruperl
acLeod, Murdock Princfe  Ruperl
i l46|Macpherson,   John prince  Ruperl
Lii31  Macpherson,    Joseph.... Prince Rupert
1640|Madden, John 11 Port rslrapson
Prince Rupert
Prime Ruperl
. . .Surf Inlel
Prince   R
Rupert]
^^^^  I
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Princi
Prince
Ruperl
i
J.
ck.
HliMadigan, Charles L..
1644 Madsen, Nicholas. .
I 645 Magar, George ....
L649 Mairs, Charles W.. .
: 650|Malrs, James II.. . .
655|Maloney, William. .
lansell, Thomas A.
1669 Marin, Anionic. . . .
L672 Marsh,  Rueben. . . .
1680 Martin, John	
Martin, Stewart
| 085 Mason,  John. . . .
I696|Matheson,  Hugh.
i 70] Matheson,   Roderi
i 707|Matthews, Edward  U.f
I i 09 Matthews    Morton. . . .
L712 llaxwell, Alex P	
, r I 7 Meade, James	
! 72 I Meekin, William	
17 !" Miles, George C	
' I  Wilier,-Frank John	
i74!i .Miller, Levi Alfred. . . .
I >•*■  Hills, 1 tenrv Andrew. .
'61  Mitchell,   David P	
, ii- Moffatt, R. It	
. . i    Molloy, Joseph James.
1781 Moore, John Smith ....
Moran,   William	
1789 Moreau, Octave	
.... Morgan   George Winter
i    rlorkeberg,  Helger. .. .
Morrill,  James M	
'  '    Morris,  John   M	
: ' Morrison,  Daniel	
1814 Morrison,   George	
1 ., Morri on, Geoi  .1.. . .
1818 Morrson, John David. .
i ni ison, John	
Morrison,   Richard....
IS18|Mori oie. George W.. . .
■    ,   fowatt, James	
i ■ 38 Mowl, John	
Mullen, Dan	
Vlulliu    Arthur	
. - ! I Munday,   Thomas	
1848,'Munro,   Duncan	
NO.
NAME
PLACF
2225|Newell, James Prince Rupert
2226 Newell, Robert Port Simpson
2232]Nicholas,   John Prince Rupert
2233 Nichols, James Daniel. .. Prince Rupert
2236 Nicholson, Donald Port Essington
2237 Nicholson, Roderick A. ..Prince Rupert
2240 Nicol,  James Prince Rupert
22-11 Nicol,  John Prince Rupert
22 13 Nightingale   Robert Port Essington
2255 Norris,   Charles  Henry. .Bulkley Valley
2263 O'FIynn, James Thomas. .Prince Rupert
2270 O'Hanley, Stephen Surf Inlel
2273 Oliver, .lames Herbert. .   Prince Rupert
2284 O'Myrrho, Peter Prince Rupert
2288 O'Regan, John Graveyard Point
2294 Ostor,   Edward Refuge   Bay
. i Oulette, Joseph S. C Prince Rupert
10   Palmer, Leander Alphonse
Prince Rupert
2310 Paradls, Alfred.
13 I 2 !'a. Igeau,  .lenry
2321 Parrott,  Hobart . .
2322 Pa sons,   Edward
aterson Lew ia. .
2327 Pascoe, Thomas. .
2330|Patte ... .   iieorge
 Prince Rupert
D Prince Etjupert
 Prince Btapert|
C Porcher island
 Pril
 Sui i Inlel
Patrick	
m>- ■ .Prince Ruperl
23311Patterson, John Prince Ruperl
.    Pattullo, Thomas  Dufferln	
. : Prince Ruperl
ea i on, Alfred Prince Rupert
It, G   erge Prim e  R iperl
v, rault, George Prince Rupert|
i..-..   Ro ter F Prime  Ruperl
etei        Hoi alio Nelson. Prince Rupert
2372JPhllpOtt, Georgo William . Prince   Rupertj
.::;7:; Plcaut, John Prince Ruperl
.;, , i'insein.   Louis Prince Rupertj
2382 Poirier   Harry Prince Rupertj
3 Pollard, John Henry. . . .Port Essington
2390]Potts,   Douglas Hazelton
2391|Powell, James	
Prince Rupert|23l 2 Power, James	
Prince  Rupi 't 21   3 Pretty, Arthur Walter
Pori Simpson 2412 Pruneau, Adelard...,
Prince Rupert 2413iPulvis,  Alberl	
.Prince Rupert 2419|Quinn, Hugh	
.Prince Rupert 24 2ft|Quinn,   Joseph
. Prince Rupert 2430Raisliecl
.Prince Rupert 2436 Rapkins, Thomas....
.Prince Rupert !436eRathier,  Emil	
.Prince Rupert - lijS Ravelhal,  Henry. . . .
.Prince Ruperl  1446 Re edy, Joseph J	
.Prince Rupert2454 Rhodes, Clarence...
.Prince Rupert 21 (id Richardson, Harry. .
.Prince Rupert 2-161 Richardson, Henry..
.Prince Rupert 2463lRicher, Alphonse...
.Prince  Ruperl      :' Richer, Henry Ovide
, Port Essington 2469|Riffon,  Fred	
.  Port Simpson 2470]Riley,   Charles	
.Prince Ruperl 2471 Riley, Harry   	
.Prince Ruperl 2-172 Riordan, Michael. . .
.Prince Rupert 2474 Rivet, Louis Honore.
.Prince Rupert 2 176 Roberge,  A	
.Prince Rupert247" Roberge, Amedee. . .
.Prince Rupert 2484!Robertson,  James
. I 'rince  Ruperl 	
.Prince  Ruper! 24! 6 Robertson,  Horace
.Prince Rupert        | :	
.Prince Rupert'249i:Robichaud,  Louis.
.Prince Rupert
.Prince  Ruperl
 Lalkelsej
.Prince Ruperl
.Prime Ruperl
. Prince Rupert
m}. , . Hazelton
Thomas Prince Ruperl
 Oceanic
Prince Rupert
Prince Ruperl
. Prince
.Prince
. Prince
. Prince
. Prince
Rupert.
Rupert
Rupert
Rupert
Rupert
Prince Rupert
. Prince
. Prince
. Prince
.Prince
. Prince
NO.
NAME
PLACE
2883|Todd, Donald Port Simpson
2884,Tolan,  William  H Prince Rupert
2886jTomlinson, Richard Meanskinisht
2887|Tomlinson, Robert, Sr Meanskinisht
2888 Tomlinson, Robert, .Ir Meanskinisht
2S94 Toynbee  Albert Victor. . .Prince  Rupert
895 Toynbee. Charles A Prince Rupert
2896 Tracey,   Dole Hazelton
2900 Tremblay, Hector Prince Rupert
2902,'rremblay, James Port Essington
2905Trevett,  Heibert Surf  Inlet
2908 Tronif, Angel Prince Rupert
2916 Turnbull, Alex Prince Rupert
29 1 6 Turnbull, John Port Essington
2917|Turnbull,   Robert Prince Rupert
2924|Twaddle, James D Masset
2928 Tweedie,  Fred  M Surf Inlet
2927 Urquhart,  William Watson	
i   Prince Rupert
2932 Valleau, Fred W Hazelton
2936 Vandall, Frank Port Simpson
2943 Vent,   Edward Surf  Inlet
2944 Verdan, J.  M Prince itupert
2952 Vincent, George Armstrong	
  Prince Rupert
2953 Vizina,   Fred Prince Rupert
964 Vuklcivich, Louis Prince Rupert
ade, Samuel Prince Eluperl
2957   i akefii Id, George Ootsa Lake
2:iC2iWall,   (ie.'errgl
2967 Wallace, James Andrew
Prince Rupert
ti	
Prince  Rupert
 Hazelton
.Prince  Itupert
2969 uallace, Joseph	
2987 Ward, Lawrence P. D.
3000 Watson, i larry Port Simpson
3014 iVatts, Charles W Prince Rupert
 Watts, William Frederick PrinceRupert
2018 Wawrecker, Konrad Prince Itupert
;;"2ie rVebber, John Pori  Essinglon
3027 Walls. Alfred A Prince  Rupert
3034 Wessels, Arthur W Prince  Rupert
i1    eVhebell,  Creawlck Prince Rupert
3046 White, Robert Prince Rupert
3062 Williams, Benjamin Port Simpson
3063 Williams,  Gwillin  Treherne	
  Prince Rupert
30651 Williams,  Hugh	
3070 Williams,  Robert Pearce
3073 Williams,  William	
o076 Williscroft, William E...
3082|Wilson,  Hugh S	
.... \\ llson, Janiei	
3084 \, ilson, James Yule. . . .
3085|Wilson, James Yule. . . .
3088 Wilson,  Thomas	
3091|Wilson, William  Henry.
3094 Winter, Albert  O	
JteWi Winter, Albert Oldham. .
3100 \\ ood,  Jerrold  J	
3101|Wood, Joseph	
3102 Wood, Leonard	
)3|Wood,   Leonard  T	
mil, "Walter W
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Rupert
. Prinfce Rupert
. . . . Lowe  Jnlet
 Surf  Inlel
.Prince Rupertj
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Ruperl
. .Port Simpson
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Rupert
. .Kitsumkalum
DiMurdoch, Henry William.Prince Rupert
180.0|Murdoch,  Hugh Port Simpson:'
2492jRobins,   William John.
:.' 197 Robinson, Robert	
25 l 0 itose, Robert R	
27.12 Ross,   Albert	
2515 Ross, Edwin Cameron.
■toss, William Edward.
2."e1 9|Rosseau, Jos	
2523|Rowat,   Joseph	
 Prince Ruperl.
Bremner	
....   Prince Rupert
Buchanan	
....  Prince Rupert'
 Prince  Rupert]
Prince' Rupert
Prince Itupert
Prince  Rupert
Rupert
Rupert
Jedway
Rupe
Ruper	
RupeHJ3iu7eWoodhouse, Geoffrey.
2 i2S Roy,  Abraham
2540 Russell, William.
25 I l Ryan, John	
, St.Davis, Albert.
2548 Salmon, Alfred J.
2f 54 Sanders, George.
:367 Scadden, Fred. .'.
Ichofield, Beverly
257l!Schreiber, Charlei
■. ■    in: i. Clemen!
i'i 6 .-'-"ii.  Geor -,
Rupert
Ruperl
Rup rl
Rupert
Rupert
Rupert
Ruirertj
Rupert
Prince Ruperl
.Little Caujon
.Copper River
Prince ita1 er!
63 Murphy, Edward	
■■'..' Murphy, John Herbert.
16 Murphy, Joseph   W. R,
Ii n ;        Ilchael	
: : . lurj by,  \: '"'■ am	
Murphy,   Arl bur	
, Mi >.uley,  Alexander. .
:  Bi th,  Edward V.. .
.  McCallum,   D	
MeCale,   icier   Willis. .. Por!   Essington
[e i . uliffe,   Patrick Prince  Ru ei I
3 Me    ourt, John Prince Rupert
McCreary, James Wallace. Prince Ruperl
lavid, Daniel Prince Ruperl
i ■ 26 Mi Donald, Alphonse Prime Rupei i
1927 McDonald, Arthur Prince Ruperl
1930 McDonald, Daniel Prince  Rupert
L933  McDonald, Daniel Prince   Ruperl
L934 McDonald, Francis Lee. . .Prince  Rupe I
1942 McDonald, John A Prince Rupert«|
1943 McDonald, John Dan Rivers Inlet
1949|McDonald, John Simon. .Prince  Rupert
1950 McDonald, John W. Alex. Prince Rupert
1956 McDonald   Robert  It..
I9i 9 McDonald, Donald . . .
I 96 1 McDonell,  Alexander-.
1962|McDonnell,  Alexander
Aldermerej25SljScott,   John
Port Esslngton 2587iScripture,   '.
. . . . Aldermerel        |	
Prince Rupert le     . . .'• leph	
Pi Ince  Ruj ert 2  94 Shade, Georgo Adam. .
Prince Rupert 259S]Sharles, Charles John.
Pri   Rupert       ■  S  aire  Thomas  Dalby
P Ince    1 i] i    . hore,  Hairy Watts. . .
Prince Rupert!2C18;Shulion, Owen
Prince Ruperl
Prince Rupert
.... Kitamaat
 Prince Rupert
 Prince  Ruperl
 Prince  Rupertj
 Prince Rupert'
 Prince  Rupert
 Prince Rupert
 Graham City
 Prince  Ruperl
 Prince  Rupert.|
igreen. Prince Ruperl
Brymer	
   Prince  Rupert
Charles. . .Prince  Ruperl
 Swanson   Bay
 Prince Rupert
omas   Nelson	
 Port   Si
Prince Rupertl
Port Essington
 I fazelton
Prine-e '-' I] erl
Prince  B
114iWoollam, John.
i , i ee'orsley, Arthur	
3118 Wright, Alford E	
3124 Wuckicivich,   it	
3 125 Wyatt, George Henry.
.  ■ : i oung, Clement	
:; i 38 Young,  Herbert	
.: l l l Young, Leslie Bruce.
31 15 Ve.eirig,  William	
. Prince Itupert
Prince itupert
.Prince Rupert
. .Port Simpson
 Balmoral
.Prince  Itupert
 Hazelton
. .Port Simpson
.Prince Itupert
.Prince Rupert
 Kitselas
 It i I solas
.Prince Itupert
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. Prime Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Itupert
. Pori Essington
. Pi Ince Rupert
.Port Simpson
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Rupert
rhe  Following
cated em Hi-
Persons Are
List:
Reported  l.'upli-
NO.
NAME
PLACE
1 rerl h n :r. James
limms,  Jo..u	
2634 Sinclair, John	
Sinclair, Robert C.
264S|Slavin, Jack	
!6   0 Sloan,  William P..
2667 Smith,   James.
i .
i^H^
560 Cullen, James Edwin. . .
563 Cuilon,   Hartiey	
586 Dann, Alfred John	
590 Dault,   William	
.".:il Dans,   Ian  Gordon	
594|DavId, Clemen!	
595 Hav ielson, .lames II. (!.. .
:.:iN   ihe Vie s,    Elall    l.CWiS   II. .
605 Davis,  John	
607 Davis,  Wilfrid Wolfe. . .
62 I  Deaville, Gi orge William
623 Deletang,   Roland	
628 Demei est,  Roberl   Bertram. .
■HHir^B. 11
Hie   Wall
 h
 We . doen
 Hazelton
. . Pi In
. . Prince Ruperl
 Wadhaina
Qui : i C h arl o 11 e
. . Prince Rupe rl
. . I'i im e Ruperl
. . Prince Rupei i
  Kispiox
. . Prince Ruperl
. . Prince  Ruperl
  Claxton
. . Prince Ruperl
. . Prince Rupert
. . Prince  Rupert|
 I '!..
. . Prince Ruperl
Naas Harbour
Prince Itupert
the   Wall
631  lie-Mill.-,  Willard	
633 Demray,  Dai ie!	
642 Dosautels, Alberl 10.. . .
643 Deslongchamps, Charles
649peWolf, Paul Alexander
6B4|Dllworth, VV. McG	
. Prine e Rup
.Prince Rupert
. Prine-e Rupert
. Prince Rupert
Pori Essington
. . Port Simpson
: W2 Higglns,   William	
Richard	
'  :l  Idi i in    I, Rtl    .'! S.. . .
Ilrst, Wil I ini Henry. . .
i Holt,      ink i-l	
: 2 -.' i i       i   ■ Carson E..
;ii   John	
II, .le 	
	
33.Hi     i  . Andrew	
■ ..'• 'in    '- , Thomas J	
l 249 Hunter   Peter	
!:;.'.! Hynds, William  Bishop,
12! 6 in  ram,   William	
.,, i i'ii., We: ley Ernesl....
Innc .   William   H	
200 i: ri;,. Donald	
' 266 !.. ,. Fred	
,207 11 win, T. G	
: 275 Jacobs,  Gi orge	
1282'jae ques, A: thur  Win.. .
86 Jenkins, Alex	
i 289 Jenns,  Percival R	
1302 Johnson, John	
loin n, John Alexander
l::i l Johnston, A. Edward. . .
l :!12 Johnston, ('has. I lenry. .
■ 31 ei Johnston    Harry  L	
1320 Johnston,   Peter	
1333 Jone,,  Richard  It	
I '   "ei'. William ':'	
1361 Kendall, Daniel	
1.371 Keough,  Thomas	
.::: 5 Kimball,   Lester	
le King, Joseph M	
1412 Knight,  Herbert	
. Prince Rupi rl
. Prince Itupert
. Prim e Ruperl
. "' lm e Rup ::
Poi I   Essingl   i
 Haze lton
.Prime Rupe
 Prince Ruperl
Sergei   I	
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupe   I
■ Ruperl
.Prince  Ruperl
. Prince Ruperl
, 1 ni: Slmpsoi
Ruperl
Rup    i
. . . I ifce  Rupei I
196:   McDougall, John H	
1973 McEwan,  Edward  A., .
1977 McFeat,  Walter	
1983 McGillis,   Daniel   James
e    illlvray, Angus D..
;        McGowen, John	
le Grath, John	
L99SiMcInnes, George Leslie
2004 Mclnnes, Paniel D	
!l 35 McKay, John  	
!0 10 McKi i liiiie,  James. . . .
20 i I McKee, William John. .
Me It. en, A. VV	
1045 McH i ., le,  Alexander. .
I McKi nzie, George Rod.
.   'i-i       . . John	
Kenzie,  Mae leod....
056 McICe iw a, !>:rv id	
1   ,  '.ii ,   ,:!, y.   Andrew   B..
(Hit; McKinnon, Geo. W., . .
 Telkwa
Pi Ince  Ruperl
 Hazelton
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
Prince Rupert
Prince Ruperl
Prince Rupert]
Prince R upeij
Prince Ruperl
Prince Rupei 1
I'rince  Rupert
 Hazelton
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
Prince Rupei i
Prince Ruperl
. Poi I Simpson
.Port Simpson 11
Rupei i 2]
071|McLaughlin,   George
McLaughlin,  Hubert P..
2074 McLaws, Da i iel Douglas.
2079 McLean,  George	
m ! i McLean, John	
2083 McLean,   William	
1 Mi Leod,  Alex. A	
2094|McLeod, Angus	
Donald	
Henry J	
Roderick	
Walter	
Alexander.. .
I!.. . .
2 100 McLeod
1104 McLeod
2120 McLeod
2 122 McLeod,
2131 McMillan
2137 McMillan,  George
McMillan, John T	
2 117 McNaughton, Abner. . . .
2MM Me Naughton,  Donald  C
i! McNeil, James Alfred. .
-i,McNeil, John	
.Prince  Rupert|2174jMcPherson, Daniel..
,' Hazelton 2! i'i; McPherson, Donald .
.Cribble Island 2178 McPherson, John. . .
• Porl Simpson 2179 McPherson, William
. Prince Ruperl 2193 McRae, William. . . .
.Prince  Rupert2194 McTavish, Duncan ..
. Pi Ince Ruperl 22-12 Neal, Sydney	
.Prince Rupert 2219|Nesbitt, John C	
Prince Rupert
. .Prince Rupert
 Hazelton
Roy..J
. .Prince Rupert
. .Prince Rupert
. . Prince Rupert
. . I'' ince  Itupert
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
. Port Simpson
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
Prince Ruperl
 Jedway
. I'on Simpson
Porl Esslnj I on
Prince Ruper
. . Rivera Inlet)
. . . Prince  Rii] ert
. . . Prince Ruperl
. . . Prince Rupei 1
.... Prlnc- Rupert
 Hazelton]
Edward. .
... Prince Ruperl
• Prince Rupert
. Poi 1 Essington!
• Prince Rupertl
Port Essington]
.Prince Ruper
• Prince Rupertl2
• Prince  Rupert'"
• Prince Rupert]
. Prince Rupert
• Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
• Prince Rupert
• Prince Ruperl
.Prince Rupert
, .Port Simpson
 Hazelton
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Ru] ei I
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Ruperl
llulkley Valley
. . . .Surf Inlet
. Pi Ince Itupert
.Prince Ruperl
. Prim e Rupert
 Kitamaat
.Prince  Rupert
161 Smith, John.
• Princess Royal Island
167] Smith,  John  Forshaw. .
2674 Smith, J.  M	
26 , -: Smil b, Joseph	
2677 Smith, Kenneth M	
2684 Smith,  Waller J	
2685 Smith, William	
2686 Smith, William	
268 .* Smith,   William	
2689 ;natsiuger, Edward. . .'.
2691]Snider,  Edwin  Percival
.Prince  Rupert
.I'rince Rupert
23 Allan, John. ........
1112 Barger, Emory	
1111 Barger,  Robert	
494 l.'olligan, Peter	
530 Covert,  VV.   il	
739 Dussault, Lucine	
786 Erie ki on,   la  iel	
"1 Harnie r, Alfred  B	
: I 58 He nderson, Alec	
1206 Holma, W llliam John.
12 17 Hunter,   Charles	
121.2 Hyatt, Mark	
MLei ;e,  Louis  L	
1492]Lenfesty, William D..
.Prince  Rupert
 Aldermere
 Vldermere
 Stewairt
.Bulkley Valley
.Prince lta.;.<ort
. -. . . 1. i:.-.-las'--
. Pi Ince Ru] ert
. . . i.eei ne Creek
. Bulklej Valley
. Prince Itupert
.Prince Rupert
. I'rince Rupert
.Q. C. Townsite
2692 Snowdon, Watson	
2693 3obey,  William	
2698 So,ile,   Cornelius  N	
2699 Sourkes,  Harry  L	
2702 Sparrow,  Robert	
2708 Spenser, George	
27 1 I Sprague, Allan Wllmot.
2716 Stacey,   Peter 	
27 1", Staino, John	
:'7 I 8 Stalnsby,  I larry	
2724 Statham,  Charles S	
2726 Statham,   Roland   .1	
2121; Startup,   Benjamin	
272', Steele,   Alfred	
,. Leeli .  James   I.	
272 I Stephens, Ai thur John . .
13 Stephens,   Jack	
27:;ei Stephenson, Edward....
27-11 Stephenson,  James	
27-"eii Stowai 1. Duncan	
2756 Stewart, John  Clarence.
2 i.'i ■■ Stewart, Roberl	
2700 Stewart, Roberl  Mushct
27112 Stewart,  William	
2763 Stiles,  II	
27112 Stooke,   Samuel  G	
2767]Storing,   John	
2771|Straln Thomas Bernard.
Strathy, Everett Kent. .
2780 Striethorst,  Harry	
2788 Sludily, John  C	
27:il Sullivan,   Jerry	
2809 Swanson, John T	
2832 Taylor, James	
2834tTaylor,  J.   W	
2836eTessier,   George	
2837 Tessier, Herman	
2 - i3 Thomas,   Harry	
284 I Thomas,  Henry John. . .
22'Hi Thomas,   Walter	
2S47 Thompson   Alfred
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
Port Esslngton
. Prince Ruj erl
. Co] per River
.Prince Itupert
.Prince Ruperl
2851 Thompson, George
2858 Thompson, John. ..
2V7I1 Tichette,   Stanislas.
2S74iTiege, William John
. . . . Prince Ruper!
S.. .Prince Rupert
. . . . Prince  Ruperl
.. . . Prince Rupert
. . . . Prince Rupert     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
....Prince Rupert'2880|Tlnsley, Bernard 1
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Ruperl
. Prince Ruperl
 Kitamaat
. Pi Ince Rupe : I
. Prince Ruperl
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Ru] erl
. Prince Ruperl
. Prince Ru] ei I
.. .Totem Pole
 Stewart
. Prince Rupert
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Ruperl
.Prince Rupert
. Prince Itupert
Port Essington
.Prince Rupert
.I'rince Rupert
Port. Essington
.I'rince Rupert
.Prince Ruperl
. I'rince Rupert
Drince Rupert
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
 I'rince Rupert
Wil'iam	
 Port  Essington
Foster	
   Prince Rupert
.Prince Ruperl
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
• Prince Rupert
. ...;2 1.in! w oriel. Prank... Bati a Landing
.Prince Itupert
.... .Alden rre
. Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
. I'rince Rupert
.Prince Itupert
llulkley Valley
. Kluukowl Hay
 Hazelton
.Prince : erl
.Prince  Rupert
... .Aldei mere
.Prince Ru :rl
. i'i Ince Rupert
 Kitamaat
. Prince Rupert
. . Rivers Inlet
.i'rince it a pert
. Prince Rupert
. Prince Rupert
. P.rlnce itupert
.Lakelse Lake
.Prince  Itupert
 Hazelton
. Prince Rupert
. Porcher Island
. Prince Itupert
. Prince Rupert
 Kitselas
..... .Stewart
Little, Henry Hyslop
1568 Macdonald,   Uex*.  Rod.. .
1576 MacDonald, ,1. il. L	
;. 12 MacDonald,  Jo  0   F	
91   Mae    . )    ii.   Reiel	
1'.      elacKei zie   I lonald	
. Maldmont,   Harry	
■ 65! Mann, John	
1687 Mason,  Leonard  A	
i , ii I Molloy, Jose ih Jam
I 846 Muunls,  Jan.es   McN.. . .
1 866 M ttrphy, Joseph  VV. R.. .
1870 Murphy,   Robert   11	
I s7;■! Murray, John Alexander
I ,22 McBeth,   Murdock	
1940|McDonald,  James
.Prince Rupertjie)43:McDonald,   John   Dan.
1 985 Mclnnes, Angus D	
2141 McMordie,  Robert A.. .
2146 McNab, John Q	
2151 McNeil, Daniel	
2169 McPhee,  William	
2171 .McPherson, Alexander 1
.Prince Rupert
.Port Simpson
.Prince Rupert
.Prince Rupert
.Prince  Ruperl
  Claxton,
''         2602|Sharpe,  Henry  VV	
Prince Ruperl 2798 Sutherland, ...onglas. . .
.Porcher Island2823 Tallai der, S. Alexander
. I'rince Rupert2S92 Tompkins, Victor John.
.I'rince Rupert 2998 Watson,   David	
.Prince Rupert|3051 Whitlow, Frank M.. . .
3144|Young,  it.  Bord.
lire
■   Following
ceased:
"ersons   Are   Reported   l>e-
NO.
NAME
PLACE
74 Alexson, Ad	
127 Beadier, Lionel Fane
: 1 a Beaudoln, Joseph . ..
487 Colin, Frank	
50S Corimer, John L. I)	
787 Hi ie kson,  Frederick. . . .
839 Fisher,   Harry   Che en. rs,
857 Flynn, Th as	
1017 Grant, William	
I 007 (Ir amaii,   John	
1063 Haines, Charles E	
124] Humphrey,  William  II..
Iuh7 King,   James	
1862 Murphy,   Edward	
1880 McAdam, Logan Edward
LSS!   McAvoy,  Wm	
1946 .McDonald, John Georgo.
2102 McLeod George	
2207 Nellson,  Neils   Peder. . .
2254 Norris, John A	
2311 Parent,  Joseph	
2376 Pierce,  William   Henry.
2404 I'rezent, Joseph	
2414|Purdy   Wallace  A	
217:. Roberts, Thomas Joseph
2533 Rudland,   William	
2545 St.Aubin, Joseph   	
2580 s.e'Oii, John Herbert. .. .
2682]Sniith, Thomas Nash...
2eiNS Smith, William Rudolph
2795 Sutherland, Daniel VV...
2809|Sutlferland, William G..
2867 Thornh'Ul, Thomas J...
2876 Ttlley, Seth	
293 I Valpy, Henry George. ..
 Irving
Klun Kowi Bay
.Prince Ruperl
Cl ill!  I'
Prince
Prince
Rupert
Rupert
 Rupert
 Massel
... .Aldermere
• Prince Rupert
 Ha.-1 lion
. . .Naas River
 Aberdeen
.Little  Canyon
. I'rince Rupert
 Skidegate
 Aldermere
. Prince Itupert
.Prince Rupert
 Jedway
. Hulk-ley Valley
.Prince Rupert
 Kispiox
. Prince Rupert
 Masset
 Hazelton
. Prince Rupert
  Kitselas
. . .Metlakahtla
.Prince Itupert
 Stewart
. . .Lorne Creek
.Prince Itupert
 Kilselas
. . .Bella Coola
. Port Essington
(Continued on Page Three)
.y
■le^wnn-niriMriii ir 1. riia.Maw>l^1^^"p"l*^'*W>i^wwp»'«*»p"i*'«ww* www* Tuesday, October 31, la 11
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
The New York Medical Journal
says it is wise to give plenty of pure
sugar to the young and that the raids
of children on jam pots'and sugar
bowls are instances of obedience to
an instance implanted by nature. The
writer goes on to say: "There was
a story written about 1865, by a then
celebrated English author of tales
of boys in which the hero returned
to his school Eton, after graduating
from the university." Among the
other things he found lo criticize
were the lack of appreciation of
sound clarets among the schoolboys
(!J and an 'unmanly' taste for
sweets. The amiable author, who
was thus voicing his own ideas, died
only some twelve years ago, probably
a very bewildered eelel gentleman ai
the changes in tasto and polnl of
view Ural were taking place about
him. A schoolboy of lire present day
who should manifest a critical attitude toward the' bouquel of wine
would he an object of acute interest
to old  ladies : nil  alienists alike.
"A Hopewell Smith in bis communication to the British Medical
Journal on 'The Abuse of Sweetmeats,' still seems to retain his hostile attitude toward candy; his slnte-
mciit that sweetmeats as a food are
practically of no benefit lo the nation, is in contradiction to tlie opinion of modern physiologists and dl-
etltions, Hutchinson, in his latest
edition of his authoritative work,
'Food ami Dietetics,' speaks highly
the value of sugar as a muscle food
and recommends it to captains of
football teams as a promoter of endurance. He says, indeed, lhat it.
should not replace vegetables in the
child's dietary, and thinks there is
an increase in the number of eases
of diabetes owing to its abuse, out
his general tone is mosl favorable to
the free use of sugar.
"We are only beginning to realize
lhat tlie lo\e. eef camiy and jam in
children is an instinct Implanted by
nature. The thrashings given to
children past for raids on the pantry
cupboard form an ugly monument to
our ignorance of one of nature's
beneficlent plans. Sugar is a valuable muscle good as well as a necessity to the child's large proportion of
adipose tissue. it is wise to give
pure sugar freely to the young,
avoiding simply the purcnase of the
I'liihper kinds of candy, which e-on-
tain adultiirants. added to give consistency and color. The best time
to gi\e il is immediately after a
meal. Coincident with the general
abandonment of alcoholic beverages
or the substitution of moderation for
excess in their use, the American
public has become devoted to candy
and other sweets.
"The connoisseur of wines or whiskies is never a candy lover; in some
way the alcohol does the duty of
sugar In his organism. Sugar- and
chocolate form . o . of tin . oldier's
ration, and, since the abolition of
the sailor's daily grog, Jack has become such a lover of candy that tons
of II are carried in 11 Ip i of the
navy and a large pari of his pocket
money goes in the purchase of wholesome bonbons. A sherbert before
ih,- game Is universal at our dinners,
the demand for sugar refusing to be
delayed till the end of the meal.
Fortunately the cosl of sugar has
been greatly lowered during the past
few decades, and sugar is no longer
a luxury on the fanners table, while
the penny candies of harmless barley
sugar to be found in every village
grocery and stationer's shop, whatever effeel sugar' may have on the
teeth is probably local, and is m be
counteracted by cai iful in u
The systi m  re.- ents toe I      i]
lily he- a peculla of repl  lion
anil Hie chilel ihai eats obviously teeee
much candy should li" m.'.eh' tiie suli-
je'i'i of a clinical examination."
CONSERVATIVES  ORGANIZE
Mnsset   llns  a   Live  Organization   to
Look After tire Needs of
Districl
A meeting was held in Mr. Orr's
house at Masset recently for Hie' purpose of forming a Conservative Association ami io consider a prograi li ie
of requirements for lhe north of
Graham Island, to be submitted t"
the Dominion nnd provincial representatives on their forthcoming visit
to Masset. Forty-five persons representing lhe different settlements
were present and the meeting was
a great success, The following officers w*ero elected: Charles Harrison,
presldenl; James Martin and O. E.
Ruck, vice presidents; ('. Al. Wilson,
secretary-treasurer; G, Whittell, V.
Vigelius, R. Dow, east coasl repre-
seiitaiiws no the executive; il. Holland, R. O. Davis, L. Williams, .Mas-
set lnlei representatives on the executive; S. C, Ruck, executive representative for Naden Harbor.
APPEAL FOR MISSIONS
peakers .*.! Gntheiing iv  '..-•- -rouver
: '■'-.   the ' lie:;   ol Hie ■" ■"*.--
W    -e     ...ee.l  i.f,
A vigorous appeal to Christian men
to get into the battle line of the
men's missionary . movement was
sounded at the missionary convention recently in Vancouver. Stirring
addresses were delivered by Dr.
John 11. Mott, Rev. R. J. Wilson and
Sir Andrew Fraser.
"It is not the number of people;
It is not advantageous geographical
situation nor the great and successful commercial enterprises that spell
success or failure of a nation," said
Dr. Moll. "II is tlie character of
ihe people. And in associating themselves wiili the missionary mi re ul
young men blend the dictates of i a-
trioiism wiih tlie highest church-
manship."
"The great trouble at (he pri
time," continued Dr. Molt, "is thai
wo are missing Chlist's likeness and
presenting to the world a fractional
Christ. Men of wide powers of discernment; men of balance, not fanatics, .wore required at the p '
time."
The racial problem was one of the
greatest that confronted the church.
Jt could not be dealt with by segregation or by amalgamation, nor by
domination. II could only successfully be coped with by tho spread of
Christianity in lhe purest form. II
would take great men lo lead the
forces in Ihis campaign of friendliness with men of a different race
and color.
"We must have men In Canada,
great men in Canada, to develop a
base from which to wage a world
wide war," he continuned. "The
present opportunity for leadership
was an unique and a pressing one
and called lor the best thought of
ti'e- best men."
"For every mora] height we have
a corresponding deplh," said Rev.
...r. Wilson. "We have no finer men
in Canada than ..rose who have found
their way to the Pacific seaboard.
Yet side by side with the finest and
most heroic manhood was discovered
a more flambuoyant degradation tnan
anywhere else in Canada. There were
certain conditions particular to British Columbia which made the missionary movement particularly a necessity in this province. Development work was proceeding apace.
Links of Ihe second transcontinental
line' were being opened up, and there
wns promise of a great growth in
population within tlie next lew years.
Vice was too often winked at. Tlie
home touch was lacking in many of
the communities of this province."
"Thi' growing unity of the church
of Christ," was signifiance of Hie
World Missionary Conference al Edinburgh, according to Sir Andrew
Fraser.
"Ir was an exceptionally wonderful convention, after so many .'-ears
passed in ihe east," said Sir Andrew.
"There were gathered together men
known as I lie foremost of the age
In Chris!ian work and they wer all
gathereod from so many different
churches to discuss one subject be-
fore which all other minor differences of creed pale into insignificance, the propagation of the gospel
of the lii ing Cud."
WILL   WEAR   BUSBIES
VANCOUVER—At the first meeting of lhe officers of the Sixth Regiment, D. C. 0, It. of Vancouver lor
the drill season of 19] 1-12 an Importanl sti'p was taken when it was
unanimously resolved to discard the
white- helmets anil outfit Ihe regimen! with the regulation rifleman's
head dress, the busby, for which
an order is to lie senl ai once le' a
leading linn eif mllitary a\ ■''IItoi In
London, England.
LOSS OX ITLl'WOOD
-o—
Ottawa leas a real live "white
hope." lie is Earl Cassidy, a big
husky amateur and ihey say he can
del   er I n   goods
United St:.:
I'Y<
■■■  Increases  lis Imports
niCunada  Until
Year
The exportation of pulpwood in a
raw form from Can: da into the United States is Increasing yearly, and
by just so much as this is so does
Canada lose the benefits to be derived from a anufacture and the increased avlue of raw products. The
forestry branch of the department of
the interior lias compiled statistics
. bowing that over a million and a
hall' i orris of pulpwood were cut in
Canada during L910, worth nearly
el" i llllon ' Ighi hundred thousand
dollars. Over (Id pin- cent erf tills
amounl v..is sent oul of Camilla without further labor being expended on
it. The United Stales manufactured
eulp i ad | : per.    From United
S!   tl      fO  ' .!:,''     iielle'tins,   i!   is
seen thai appri ..: . - ly two-fifths of
.'ile- piiipw ood impoi ted hy i '.o.i e oun
try 1 :, anufacl tired into m chanicai
pulp, and three-fifths into sulphite
pulp, and tha.' a cord of wood produces one ton of mechanical pulp
or one-half ton of chemical pulp. This
means thai of the nine hundred and
forty-three thousand cords of Canadian pulpwood sent Into the United
Slates in 1910, three hundred and
seventy-seven' thousand ions of me-
chani . pulir and two hundred and
eighty-throe thousand tons of chemical pulp were made. The value of
this pulp, for which Canada received
six million, two hundred and ten
thousand dollars at the average
pri es paid in ir>]u by United States
importers of pulpwood. Thus Can-
ada did not get one-half the amount
she should have received if all pulpwood were converted into pulp on
Canadian soil. As the United States
does not export 2 per cent of what
it imports, a certain and steady market would be found for all the wood-
pulp of Canadian production.
French ■ Reception
Premier Borden was given a very
cordial reception when he travelled
to Quebec city to welcome to Canada the Duke and Duchess of Connaught. At every station crowds
gathered to catch a glimpse of the
new prime minister, and more than
once, it is reported, Mr. Borden was
obliged io leave his car and shake
hands with his enthusiastic Quebec
fellow citizens.' At Quebec lee was;
lionized, and the popular greeting ex-
tended to the new ministers. Of
the Franr-h ministers, Mr. Nantel
seemed mosl popular, hut Annand
Larergne was cheered above all.
Then, to quote a report in the Ottawa Citizen: "Next to him, strange to
say—for Quebec—the man who most
caught the public Imagination was
lhe gallant Colonel Hughes, minister
of militia. Possibly his reception
was irr part flic result of a fine
French sense of courtesy; at any
rate, Hie usually monastic quiet of
the Cha, :,u rang with lii-s name and
the cry, 'Vive La Hughes,' ami -Long
live the colonel' Mi. Perley, Judge
Doherty and Hie others all received
their mead of popular- approval."
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that Hie
reserve existing over Crown lauds on
lire Morrice River, Range 5, Coast
Districl, notice of which hearing dale
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
ihe Br'tish Columbia Gazette of May
.".th, 19111, is cancelled in so far as
it ielates to the lauds surveyed as
Hols 3881, 3SS2, 3883, 3884, 3S8T.,
3880, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 2- 97,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3! "2, 3903,
nan-!, 3906, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
a nl  3910.
ROBERT   \.  RE ," . ICK,
Deputj  Minister of Lands.
Dei irtmi nl of Lands, Victoria, B, 0.
September 12, 1911. s22-d22
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coast
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Hugh    A.
Gourlay,   of   Vancouver,   occupation
■   .intends to apply fe .
mission to purchase tiie follov e-
Bcribed lands:—Commencing . I
post planted about 10 chains distant
and in a northly direction from the
nortbwesl corner of Lol 370, and on
tire southwesterly end of an I: id;
thence   following   the i te ly
shore to the northeast end of island;
thence following the northwest shore
of said island to the point of commencement; containing fifty acres,
more or less.
| ■':   '..  GOURLAY.
Mancell Clark,  Age at.
Dated Oct.  12,  191 1. o-2u
LIQUOR ACT, 11)10
(Section 42)
NOTICE Is hereby given that, on
e first day of ] ber next, appl
cation will I. . ...
tendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel licence to sell
liquor by retail In the hotel known
as lhe' Big Canyon Hotel, situate al
. In the Pi oi Ince of Bi Itish
Columbia.
J.  VV.   PATER -"v.
Applicant.
Dated October 6, 1911. old
Skeena Land DI ti Iel District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE tnal I, Anion Sal-
berg, lab i er, of Pri ice Rupei t, intend io apply for pi on to purchase tl i' s Ilowing described lands:—
Commencing al i po , planted on the
wis: side of Lakelse Lake; forty
(40) chains north and aboul two
(2j chains east of A.P 18787, and
two miles south of Lot 1733; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; 11 en :e noi th 40 chains;
thence easl 40 chains, to point of
comi encement; containing 320
- res, me  er or less.
ANTON  SALBERO.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept. 18, 1911. o-20
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTlejE that 1, Hans Rus-
tad, laborer, ol Prince Rupert, intend to apply for permission to purchase lire following described
lands:—Commencing at a jrosi
planted on the east side of Williams
Creek, which flows into Lakelse
Lake, about one (1) mile from Kitamaat Branch right-of-way in a
southerly direction, and five (6)
chains from the creek bank; thence
soutli 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 1G0
acres, more or less.
HANS RUSTAD.
Fred  E.  Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sent.  15, 1911. o-20
Skeena    Land    Uistrict—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that  Eliza Sutherland, of  Blair,  Nebraska,  l*.  S. A..
occupation housewife, Intends lo apply   for  permission  to purchase'  the
following    described    lands:    Commencing at a i osl ; lanted ahout 2'.
miles north and •">",  miles west from
the   northwgsl   corner   of   Lot   992;
b nee ■ asl  60 chains;  Hience north
80  chains;   thence  west  60  chains;
thence south 80 cliains, to point e-onr-
" i -   ,    ent;  containing 480 acres.
ELIZA   SUTHERLAND.
George S. M ij r r, Agent.
Dated Augusl 25, 1.911. s22
Skei na    Li ad    Districl    District   of
I "      .   Charlotte  Islands
take  NOTICE  that   Aimee  Merrill,    of    Masse;.   B.   0.,   occupation
'    Ife, Intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  lands:-  Commencing a!  a
post planted about 2>,   miles north
and  5%  miles west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east
CO  chains;   tlience south  80  chains;
thence west 60 chains;  thence north
SO   chains,   to   point   of   commencement;  containing 48(1 acres.
AIM EE MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Paled Augusl 25, 1911. s22
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Lars Anderson, of I'rince Rupert, occupation
laborer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
peest planted on tire east side of Williams Creek, a tributary of Lakelse
Lake, one and one-half (1 1-2) miles
in a southerly direction from the Kitamaat Branch right-of-way and ten
(Ih) chains from the creek bank;
thence south -lu chains: tlience easl.
■lu chains; tlience north 40 .chains;
tlience west 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 160
acres, more or less
I...Its  ANDERSON.
Fred E.  Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept. 15, 19 I I. o-20
Skeena    Land    District—Districl    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Gwendolen E.
Burrowes of Prince Rupert, B. c.,
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tho following
described land:—Commencing at a
poi I planti d aboul one mile wes
post nine keel !.. 1 i 12, nortl .ve I
corner; thence south SO chains;
Ihence easl 40 chains; thence north
80 chains; thi ace west ■' 0 r lial is, to
point of coinmencenienl; e ontaining
320 acres, more or less. Said laud
is situated between T.L. 42913 and
A.P. 1 1679.
GWENDOLEN E. BURROWES.
Gilbert   Dun-owe s,   .','■ el
D  ted  October 11, 1911. 0-24
Ski ei .    Land    Disti lei     :" itrict   of
Queen  i lands
VKE NO       E thai Jens Ham    i,
of Masset, B. ('., occupation farmi r,
to   apply   for
purchase    the    following    ei
land :     12"i men t a po
ed ;n the   oulhv Timber
Limil  No.  3091 I;  then       io th, fol-
o wi n g the d t lm be
80   '■ alns;    thi nee   wesl   aboii
chains   to    Coal    Claim    No.    35S2;
tbem e south to the
following the shore Hue in a northeasterly direel ion te
nn ncenient;   containing   300   acres,
more or less.
IENS  HANSEN,
Dated Oct.  16, 1911.
Provincial Elections Act
Skeena El' icioral District
(Continued  from  Page Two)
B*ttH>«-SHW ftljfi ft <HKH**ft £rt
Prince
Rupert
Journal
The   Following   Persons   Are   Reported   Indians and Nul Entitled to Be on the List:
NO. | NAME i.VClii
760 Edenshaw, Henry Massel
7.11 Edgar, George China  Hat
782 Edgar, Louis Fort Simpson
753 Edgar, Magnes Porl  Simpson
75-1 Edgar, Mark George Port Simpson
The   Following   Persons   Are   Reported   Noi
British Subjects:
NO. I NAME PL \('li
6SljDorsey, John .' Bulkley Valley
I .".il."e l.evenliagi'ii,  Henry A.... Prince.   Ruperl
1 706 Matresse,  Joseph .' Glentanna
2498 Robinson, Sheldon George. . . .Hazelton
ceei a    Land    Disti Id     District    of
,  Range 5
TAKE   NOI ICE   I I,   Mitchell
A "'■      of Prince Rupei I   r
:.    . ; ,   'nil lid   tO  .'       :'    foi
e  purchi
lands:—Ce
 :  nted on I lie i    >    hore of tl
Rlvei,   .nn!   bell
ertherl'
of   ihe  saId   : er,
pOSi     Is    abOUl     fori;.
north   rrom  e      ike  planted  on  the
Exchumsik    River    and    known    as
"E9";    thence    no: '■     10
i  enci   easl  80 chains;  thence i
80  chains;   thence  wesl   10
i hi in i   uorl h  i" chains;  i he nee ivesl
40 chains to the, pli ce of
ment;   containing   480   acres,   more
or less. MITCHELL Al BE
John  R.  IP,i
Dated  October  I.  1911. ol7
$2.00
a year
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range fe
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at r.
post planted 40 chains soutli from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
tbence west 40 chains; tlience south
40 chains; thence east 40 cliains;
thence  north   40  chains  to  point of
Form of Notice  (Section  34)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Ches-
el   the  City  of  Prince  Rupert,
•   '<■"   I       i   in,  intends
to apply        pen .   Ion to purchase
tl ,■ follov i '   d scri     : :,': ;':    Commencing at a post ! lanted ahout half
way  between  Mile  Post   77   and   Mile
' .   7*-.   on   the  Main   Line  of  the
Grand   Trunk   Pacific  Railway  from
Prince  Ruperl and ahout fifty  (50)
I'." i   we'.-:   of the right-of-way of the
Railway;   thenci   north   eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains;    thence   south   eighty    (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the polnl of co n m   inenl;  and
Ining threr hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less ie.iid which
land was locate d by me on the 26th
day ee:' August. A. D. 1911.
EDWARD  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 191 I sS
i in of Notice i Section !7)
Skeena Land Districl District of
Coast, ii autre e"e
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of i'rince Rupei t, dry goods merchant by occupation, Intends to appl) for permission
:o le a: e the follow Ing describi ei land,
hound eel as follows:—Commencing
al a post planti d aboul i (in e hundred i 301 i yard ve il of Mile Post
ui the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway trae ■. fi ■ '■'< ince
Ru] rt; thenci norlh eighty (SO
chains; thence west forty (40)
i : thence south eighty i 80
chains; thence eaBl forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
wliich land was located by me on the
26th day of Augusl A.D. 1911.
JOHN A.  KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Hated August 29, 1911. so
Form of Notice (Section 17)
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Fl lids, of the City Of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, hounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows:—■
Co mencing at a post planted
on the south hank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) aboul three-quarters
"i a mile wesl from the Grand Trunk
commencement; containing 160 acres Pacific   Railroad  and   un   the  south
nore or less.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John   Kirkaldy,  Agent.
Dated  September  22,  1911.       s2C
Skeena   Land   District — Dislrict   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, George M.
Wilson, of Mountair, New Mexico, oc-
'■i.i pal ion farmer, intends to npply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the northwest
corner of Lot 668; thence south 7"
chains, more or less, to Hell's Gate
Slough; thence westerly along slough
following edge of island around to
point of commencement; containing
221) acres, more or less.
GEORGE AI. WILSON.
A. Wilson, Agent.
Dated  August  25,  1911. 9-26
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena Land District—District of
Coasl. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nlcholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the foliowii Ibed
bank   of   said   river;    ihence   south
eighty (80) cliains; Uience wesl forty
(-10)   chains;   thence   nortli   eighty
(SO)  chains; theme east forty  (40)
litiins to the point ot commencement,
and   containing   three   hundred   and
twenty ( 320) aires more or less, and
which land was located bv me on the
25th day of August, A. ih  1911,
ALEXANDER   FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley. Agent.
Dated  Augusl   25,  L911.
Form of Notice I Section 47 )•
Skeena   Land    District-   Districl    cf
Coast, Range 6
TAKE   NOTICE  thai   George   W.
Kerr,   of   II e  City  of   Prince   Rupert,
iccupation  butcher, intends to apply
for permission  lo lease the  following described land:—Commencing at
a posi  planted about throe hundred
i)   rards  wesl   of  Mile   Post   79
ni',   line of I he Grand Trunk- Pa-
• iir Railv, ''rince Ru
pert;    thence    south    eighty    I    ■>
cliains;    the nee    iveal     oi ty       I   I
chains;    tlience   north   eighty   (80)
s; thence east forty (40) cl ains
, ■ | i   piae e of i and
320) ' or  less,   e:id
land:—Common'''-   i    ti    o       Ian!    which   land   wai   ' ■'■   > i    on
ed about three hundred  (3( - 6tb  d Vugust inst. A. D.
west of Mile Post Si), on the line of   ian
the   Grand   Trunk   Pacific   Railway I  El      VV.   KERR,
track   from   Pri  co   Rupe: I:   thence       Dated 911. sa
north   eighty   (80)   chains;   tlience	
'■: -ty  140) c  all s; the   ce WATEH  NOTICE
eighty (80) cbai: s; thence le    i .... ... ...
, I,,,   Chai, 3 . . IH"- AIN     .
-     and  coi tali I  ••  I   rei I J-1 "■
d t« | 120) •
!. aei vi i locatei
V.   D   1911
GEORGI i    [CHOLL.
'      ley, Agenl
Dated  August 29   1911
'""   __1 ! '.'. . —   if wai
'
the   outlet I et 1
i
■
■
of
T.
re   7.'. 	
Form of Notlcr      ec! 1)
Skeena    l.aad    Disl   ■
Coai I
TAKE I hat    Philip
;•
iii-i upa! Ion |        ecte id:  to ap
ply  for    i Ion I b the foi
lowing   ; land,  1 ed
follows:     Co t    at    I
i       i    i bank  of  I he      The
'   ■■ ,.   ',.
I ee-quarti
and 1
■
0   ''
■    i)    id) a Ins;    tb en ci <      '■
forty    (40)    i
'
(40)    •■'-:>   ;       in   '   ■ ...
nent, and Ired
and twent: aci
and  which  land
* 1). 1911. i
,
:
PHI]
Dated i I      ,1911
. io    i    nd    Districl     DI
lange
TAKE thai    Philip
■ i!
eloctrlcl
■
The Thompson
Hardware Co. j
Second .\\ enuis
____
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
* -whmhs a a e«-fifitKi-ttfi*HHW
Chesle: he Cl!    of Prlnci    Ru- ter-power available fi
occupal loi    prospector, i lion   ai
i Inter '■ Ion  to reaslni
land:    Common      ; at n post planted I
MIlC     i'e.'l    '■    ■
77 and Mile- Posl 7'  on the main line
■
ince Rupert, bi t;
i 50)  feet west off the
....      i
BOiith (80) i* he required
i
.
iicc-: altering,   renewli :
ment, and containing lb ee hundi ed
and i" i'ii: •■' i 320 l acres more or le
and which land was locate d by mi  on  THE      IN   RIVEI    '   . .
i dl    '  .   u It, A. D   H'l !. CO.,   LTD.
PHILIP  T   CHESLEY. Bj I  - nl
Dated  August 28, 1911. Hat. el October 1, 1911, olo
 J .'RINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, October 31, 1911
prince iSupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point In
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, |3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, October 31,  1911
THE  CRANUV
The announcement by Mr. Sylvester that the Granby company is to
begin in an active way with the
smelter at Goose Bay is welcome
news. Nothing will have a more
stimulating effect upon the mining
operations in the north than the introduction of capital by conservative
corporations like the Granby. It will
be the best means of convincing outside investors that there is something substantial In the country.
New B. C., as the country is known
which is to be opened up by the
G. T. P. and other means of transportation that are following in rapid
order, is to be the great mining centre of British Columbia for many
years to come.
NEWSPAPER POLICY
The valedictory of the New York
Herald on closing its bureau at Ottawa will be worth storing away as a
fine sample of unconscious humor.
A few years ago the Herald took an
office at the Capital and established
there a representative. In response
to a well circulated bulletin from
the Herald the Canadian press published courteous notes of welcome,
pitched a little strong, perhaps, but
not supported by affidavits. These
were reproduced by the Herald with
fully adequate display, and some
trace of patronage towards its Canadian contemporaries.
Now the Herald has closed its office, explaining that it opened the
Ottawa bureau with the idea of improving commercial relations between
the two countries, says the News-Advertiser. It has done what was possible In that interest. But Canadians
have decided that they will not have
closer relations. Therefore the Herald says that it will withdraw until
the Canadian people reach another
frame of mind. There seems to be
a suggestion that when the Canadian people see the doors of the Ottawa news bureau close they wil] be
sorry they did it.
It is fair to say that the New York
Herald is not a Hearst paper. It did
not publish special Canadian campaign editions, wildly and offensively, supporting reciprocity, and send
them into this country by carloads.
The Herald supported reciprocity and
its Canadian representative led his
readers to suppose that the treaty
was popular and would prevail in
Canada. But it did not forget that
it was a newspaper, and gave some
good accounts of the campaign, even
if they were not impartial.
It is singular that the Herald
should have taken itself so seriously
as an international mediator, and
have supposed that Its office at Ottawa could affect the judgment of
the people of Canada on such a question as reelprocty. The fact that a
leading New York paper should
choose to keep an office at Ottawa
while Sir Wilfrid was premier, and
should close it when Sir Wilfrid was
retired, might suggest that the paper had, or conceived Itself to have
some sort of diplomatic relations
with the late Canadian government
But the people of Canada do not
require their prime minister to maintain any such relations, or even to
be supposed to have them. They nre
glad lo find leading journals of other
countries Interested in their affairs,
but they cannot vary their national
policy for the sake of cultivating
that interest, if the Herald bureau
in Ottawa had any importance to
i_anadinn people It grew out of the
belief lhat the Herald was there entirely and only in the capacity of a
newspaper.
lands and works, intends to have
work rushed on the clearing operations, according to the statement of
a prominent official of that department. Already the tenders, which
were called for some time ago, are
in the hands of the public works
department. Eight prominent firms,
who have made a reputation for
themselves In other large clearing
operations in the province, submitted tenders for the work. These tenders were opened for the work.
These tenders were opened in Victoria Saturday and are now being tabulated preparatory to being submitted to the executive for final action.
It Is expected that one or several
contracts—for some of the bids were
only put in for a specific portion of
the 175 acres—will be awarded in
about a week's time. The clearing
can be practically completed by the
spring. Plans are now being prepared in the provincial engineer's
department for the first three of the
dozen or more university buildings.
In fact, according to the plans there
will be more than a score of buildings eventually on the university reserve. For it is the announced intention of the education department
to house the students in a number
of semi-detached cottages rather than
have several hundred housed in one
large dormitory.
INTERESTED  IN  LUMBER
REVELSTOKE—J. M . Kelly of
Revelstoke is given as authority for
the announcement that a syndicate
of Montreal and Ottawa capitalists
have purchased for $1,000,000 the
timber holdings of the British Columbia Timbers Ltd.. on the south fork
of the Fraser River above Fort
■jeorge. The right-of-way of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway is said
to pass through the timber. It is reported that the amount of timber on
the Fraser River licences is estimated at four billion feet.
ENLARGNIG MILL
VANCOUVER—That the Powell
River Paper Company will double
the capacity of their present plant
at Powell River within the coming
year Is conceded to be almost a certainty. It is expected that the work
on the enlarged plant will begin
some time this winter or as soon as
the present plant, which is to be put
into operation in the course of the
next five weeks, is In good running
order. The increase will cost about
one million dollars, making the total
expenditure on Powell River about
three million five hundred thousand
dollars. The capacity of the present
plant is about one hundred tons of
paper; with the additional two machines (there are two in now) the
plant will be able to manufacture
200 tons of commercial paper daily.
This will make the plant rank well
up with any on the Pacific Coast.
President D. F. Brooks of the company is expected at any time to consult with the directors regarding the
installation of the additional equipment. The power plant was put out
of commossion a few days ago
through the bursting of one of the
penstocks. This has delayed operations and made the starting of the
mill impossible on the day set. As
It Is, commercial paper will prob-
baly be put on the market from this
factory within the next two months.
* * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
I      News of the Province      *
* *
***************************
CLEARING FOR UNIVERSITY.
VANCOUVER—Work is to be
started this fall on the clearing of
the site for the University of Britisii
Columbia, located at the western extremity of the Point Grey peninsula.
Anticipating no further dispute with
the Dominion government over the
site and anxious to make up for the
delay already occasioned by the
claim made regarding the site by
the Laurier governmenl when In
power, the provincial depart ment of
AID TO HORTICULTURE
VERNON—There is much satisfaction in the Okanagan Valley over the
announcement that Sir William Mackenzie will start the construction
next spring of an electric railway
in that * alley. During a recent visit
there the railway magnate acquired
control of a charter as well as a wa-
terpower capable of developing sufficient electrical energy for all requirements. The news was especially
gratifying to farmers and fruitgrowers, as the proposed line, when completed, will greatly facilitate the distribution of the products of their
farms and orchards. A careful estimate shows that there are 1,500,000
apple, peach, cherry, plum and pear
trees In the valley and new orchards
are constantly being planted. Stini-
merland alone Is credited with 300,-
000 trees, it bus the best donicctic
waterworks system in tbe valley, the
Installation having taken place seven
years ago at a cost of $75,000. The
assessed value of the fruit farms in
that vicinity, at a low valuation, Is
$2,000,000 , exclusive of irrigation
systems worth an uddional $300,000.
If conditions prove favorable during the winter there is no reason,
in view of the increased acreage coming Into bearing, why the valley
should not ship 1,000 carloads of
fruit next season. Quite a large shipment of selected apples was sent to
Australia this fall.
 o	
INCREASED CAPITAL
VANCOUVER—Another increase
in capitalization—the second within
the eurrent year—will be voted on
by the shareholders of the Vancouver
Power Company at a meeting to be
held on November 7. The Vancouver
Power Company is a subsidary organization of the B. C. Electric Railway
Company. It is planned to increase
the capitalization of the company
from $4,000,000 to $7,000,000 by
issuing three million new ordinary
shares of the nominal value of $1
each. This additional capital is required for the purpose of completing
extensions and improvements to the
company's plants at Lake Buntzen
and Coquitlam, where the big dam
at the outlet of the Coquitlam Lake
and the enlargement of the tunnel
connecting the two lakes are the
principal undertakings rendered necessary by the increasing demand for
hydro-electric  power.
 o	
SPORTS
VACHT MEET
The greatest gathering of yachts
and repsentative owners ever assembled anywhere at any time in the
world's history wil1 be witnessed in
San Francisco Bay during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition
in 1915 snouid the suggestion presented by Miller Freeman, the well
known Seattle yachtsman and publisher meet with the approval of the
exposition management. Mr. Freeman, who is at present in San Francisco, has outlined the plan to the
exposition authorities and a committee has been delegated to perfect the
details.
-iir. Freeman says that the yachtsmen everywhere would respond enthusiastically to the invitation to
make the trip through the Panama
Canal to be present at the exposition. He has suggested that formal
invitations be sent to the yacht clubs
of all countries. The exposition management may even decide to send invitations to the crowned heads of
Europe to send their yachts commanded by representatives of royalty.
Mr. Freeman believes that such an
invitation would receive the most favorable consideration.
The exposition management is also
considering the feasibility of obtaining the transfer to this coast for the
year 1915 of the America's Cup race.
If so, it is not likely than an enery
may be provided from the Pacific
Coast, designed and constructed on
the coast and commanded and manned by Pacific Coast sailors.
Such a gigantic yacht regatta
would furnish the Opportunity for
world-wide exploitation, according to
Mr. Freeman. The yacht fleet in
San Francisco's harbor would be one
of the most dazzling features of the
exposition. The yachtsmen from the
Atlantic Coast and foreign countries
who come will find the largest, most
wonderful and varied cruising
grounds of any section of the globe.
They will be able during the summer
to visit Hawaii and the North Pacific Coast, including British Co'um-
bia and Alaska, with its great
stretches of inland waters and magnificent scenery.
SCULLER   CHAMPIONSHIP
Constance S. Titus, twice champion single sculler of the United
States and one of the greatest oarsmen America has produced, is to return to the rowing game next summer after an absence of five years.
He will row in the national regatta
in an effort to recapture the tile of
champion single sculler that he forfeited by failing to compete. Since
his retirement Titus has rowed for
the pleasure of it and has kept himself in fine condition. He declares
that two months' work in a shell
will bring him back to his old form.
The return of the former champion will be a seven-day wonder in
the rowing world. There are many
of his friends who believe he is the
superior of the present champion E.
B. Butler of the Argonaut Rowing
Club of Canada. Titus Is convinced
that he can defeat Butler, but frankly admits he considers Butler one
of the mosl finished and ganiest oarsmen that Canada has produced. Titus
believes, too, that he still has the
speed and stamina to enable him to
triumph over his former rowing rival, Frederick Sheppeard, and the
later wonder in sculling Samuel F.
Gordon of the Vesper Boat Club of
Philadelphia and George Carter of
the New  Rochelle Rowing Club.
Plans are now being worked out
by the former champion for a shell
that be will have constructed this
winter, with the stipulation that it
be delivered to him by the first of
April. He declares It will be the
lightest and the best shell ever constructed in this country. It will not
be over twenty-five feet In length
nnd will have a beam of about twelve
inches. It will be about six inches
deep.
During the winter Titus will keep
In condition by doing gymnasium
work. Early In the spring, as soon
as the weather permits, he will get
to  work  In  his single.
Square Timber Exported
Year by year the export trade of
Canadian square timber becomes
less, due to the inadequate supply
of clear timber suitable for squaring
and to the increased home demand.
From a bulletin shortly to be published by the Dominion forestry
branch, it will be seen that the exports as given by the department of
trade and commerce in 1910 did not
amount to 8 per cent of the quantities exported from 1871 to 1880,
when the trade was as its height and
when an average of nearly five hundred thousand tons worth over five
million dollars was exported annually. During 1910 thirty-eight thousand tons were exported, or three
thousand five hundred tons less than
in 1909. Ninety-seven per cent of
this went to the United States. An
Increase in the price per ton of $2.03
partly compensated for the decrease
in volume and made the total value
nine hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars, or only six thousand
dollars less than In 1909. As first
quality white pine is the chief species exported in 1910, forming fifty-
seven per cent of the total. Ontario
Is the province mostly drained for
square timber exportations. White
pine commands the highest price of
the seven exported species, and the
1910 price was 031.22 per ton, a
ton containing approximately forty
cubic feet. Birch was the second
species in importance, although the
eight thousand tons shipped out was
only sixty per cent of the 1909
amount. The six thousand tons of
elm exported was nearly four times
as much as in 1909, and white pine
and birch made up ninety-five per
cent of the exportations in square
timber. Small quantities of oak, ash,
maple and red pine made up the
remainder.
****************** *********
*
*
*
Fergusons
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
in the World
Sole Agents for Britisii Columbia *
CLARKE BROS.
| Melntyre Block,
et
♦
3rd Ave. *
Phone 39
P.O. BOX 319
* *
* *
**************************
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
&ftW*&ft&0r^^
Contractors
We shall be pleased to quote you on all your requirements
for Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Window Glass
and Supplies for the
building trade.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretory.      :•:      :•:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts •• Executors, Administrators, Transferees aad
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues mads on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Bnllding,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL ESTABLISHED  1869
Surplus         97,200,000
Capital         $6,200,000
Total Assets $100,000,000
Savings   Bank   Department—?1 Will Open an Account
Branches Throughout Canada and  Banking Connections With All
Parts of the United States
Agents Throughout the World
H. P. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
S*WHKHWK«H»*BK8KH&*-'^^
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.   Start saving today by opening an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Replenish
the
I
I
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S i
i
■
L
CASH GROCERY
I
I
.J
• Tuesday, October 31,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
I    MARINE NEWS   |
* *
**************************
WEEKLY SERVICE
The departure of the G. T. P.
steamer Prince George yesterday
morning will mark the coming into
effect of the winter schedule for the
palatial liners of the company on this
coast. The Prince George will be
taken off the run on her arrival in
the south, and will remain off for
about two months undergoing her
annual overhaul. Following that she
will be put back on the run while
the Prince Rupert is overhauled.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Steamship Company has awarded a contract to the British Columbia Marine
Railway company at Esquimalt for
alterations to the steamships Prince
George and Prince Rupert, costing
approximately $50,000. The work
includes the converting of the vessels Into oil burners, which will be
followed by alterations which will
give the liners an entirely new appearance. Eight feet Is to be cut
off each of the three funnels of the
steamships, which will make them
•look more like fast armored cruisers
than passenger vessels. Captain C.
W. Nicholson, manager of the steamers, made a trip to San Francisco,
where he arranged for the purchase
of fuel oil to be used in the operation of the two vessels.
Officials of the company say that
there will be no need of the long
funnels which produce the great
draught for the coal-burning engines
after the vessels are converted into
oil burners. The change will also
result In a reduction of twelve men
In the crew of the two steamers.
LINE   FOR  INDIA
It was officially announced a few
days ago In Montreal that the Canadian Pacific Railway steamship officials have under consideration at the
presentn time a proposal for an In-
do-Canadian steamship line. It is
further stated that there is every
likelihood of the scheme being
adopted immediately. Montreal, it
is said, will be the summer port and
St. John the winter station, with Calcutta as the Indian port. With the
Durbar coming on, and the present
prospects for trade, the new line
looks to have a bright future.
FIRING ON WARSHIP
The new battleship Orion, on September 26, completed a series of
trials that prove her to be a credit
to the skill of our naval constructors.
As is generally known, the Orion is
the first man-o'-war to be armed
with the 13.5-inch gun.
This weapon is so much more powerful than the 12-inch that some
trepidation was felt as to the effect
of its recoil upon the hull of the
ship. The result, however, showed
the fears to be groundless. First,
four rounds with full charges of 293
pounds were firmed from each of
the big guns.
Inside the barbette the guns'
crews experienced no discomfort, and
the effect of the recoil was barely
noticeable. Then the guns were
trained on an extreme bearing and
three rounds fired from each.
Hardly a tremor was felt in the
structure of the ship, but the force
of the concussion played havoc with
windows and wooden doors.
Next, the supreme test was applied. All ten of the Oron's huge
guns were trained on the broadside
and fired simultaneously.
There was an ear-splitting shriek
of missies as the ten monstrous projectiles, each weighing 1,250 pounds,
tore through the air with tremendous
velocity.
By this discharge the hull of the
Orion was subjected to the greatest
strain ever thrown upon the hull of
any warship. The huge vessel staggered a little under the shock and
heeled over slightly, but a careful
examination make immediately afterwards revealed that the structure of
the ship had not suffered in the
slightest; not a single rivet had
started in her plating.
So well did her new fire control
instruments work that the whoU. ten
projectile fell within a very close
radius of each other, and would in
action have struck a blow that no
ship could have withstood.
The pair of guns mounted in a
raised barbette, so that they can
fire over the after pair of 13.5's,
were then fired, and it was then that
the greatest havoc was wrought on
deck. So powerful was the blast
from these weapons that it smashed
four boats that were lying in their
sea stowage.
Some such results as this was expected, although the gunneris hardly
anticipated to make so much firewood as they did. But the boat
smashing was counted as of no importance beside the fact that the
mountings of the raised guns showed
no signs of weakness, nor was any
discomfort felt by the men in the turret over which the guns fired.
Subsequently the anti-torpedo armament was subjected to trials, and
the Orion tested her torpedoes. The
latter are the newest type, propelled
by heated air, which gives them higher speed and a great effective range.
"Highly satisfactory" is the verdict of the experts who put the ship
through official tests. And the encomium is deserved, for not only
has she proved a remarkably sound
and steady gun platform, but her engines are capable of propelling ber
at 22 knots per hour this being a
knot above her stipulated speed.
The Orion has now gone into
Portsmouth dockyard to prepare for
her maiden commission. She is to
serve this as flagship of the Second
Battle Squadron, in place of the Hi-
bernia, and carry the flag of Rear
Admiral King Hall. So much importance did the admiralty attach
to the Orion's gun trials that they
placed the assistant director of naval
ordnance in command of the ship
whilst she was undergoing her series
of official tests.
COAL RESOURCES
INCREASING
In 1865 the publication of "The
Coal Question" first attracted the attention of alarmists to the conceivable exhaustion of the world's coal
supplies, says the Mining and Engineering World. Coal at that time
was the world's leading commercial
fuel. Oil and gas, hydro-electric
power, etc., were not even conceived
of among the power users of thoss
days; nor did practical minds consider ought but the best grades of
coal as minable and salable. It Is
easy to see, therefore, how the question of coal exhaustion and conservation should have aroused considerable anxiety. But modern conservation does not date from this beginning. With the Increased use of the
so-called lower grades of coal of
those days in gas works, in electric
power plants, vessels, etc.; with the
discovery of new coal fields; with
the increasinng use of hydro-electric
power, gas and crude oil, the coal
exhaustion scare soon died out; this,
too, In spite of a vast, mushroomlike expansion in coal consumption
the world over.
Coal Exhaustion
The gigantic growth in the consumption of coal caused Professor
Fritz Freeh, the leading geologist of
Germany, to revive the question of
possible coal exhaustion. This was
done in his paper, "When Will Our
Coal Deposits Be Exhausted?" published in Berlin in 1900. From this
stimulus dates the growth of the conservation movement of today, with
which we are more or less familiar.
The movement has since spread to
Iron ore, to oil and gas, to phosphate
rock and potash, to timber, etc.
The coal conservation works of
1865 and of 1900 attempted to sum
up the resources of the nations in
grades of coal "available" under the
conditions existing in those days;
then, by dividing the tonnages by
the annual consumption, direful results were obtained as to the number
of years the world's coal supplies
would last. Freeh computed not only
the annual consumption prevailing;
but, taking cognizance of the steadily
Increasing rate of coal consumption
in recent years he computed a future
rate and based his exhaustion computations on such a rate of future
Increase In consumption.
One Side of the Question
Such computations as to the exhaustion of our coal supplies would
be quite legitimate were it not for
several factors which have uniformly
been disregarded by most conservationists. They see only one side of
the question—namely, present resources and present or future consumption. They persistently refuse
to allow for past, present and future
Increase or probable increase in tlie
coal resources. Increases In coal resources may take place In various
ways; by the discovery of new fields;
by developments in existing fields
rendering available coal which had
previously been too thin or too deeply buried to be minable; by Improvements in boilers, gas-producers or
other burns rendering utllizable the
previously inferior and worthless
grades of fuel; the development of
other sources of fuel and energy, viz.,
oil and gas, hydro-electric power,
wave and tidal power, etc.; tbe use
of central power station at the mine
mouth; and in 'other ways may our
own measures be increased. What
is more, they have been, are being,
and will continue to be, so Increasing; and what Is still more, the rate
of Increase of the coal resources In
Its bearing on the future exceeds tbe
rate of Increase In coal consumption.
The Real Need
What the world really needs on
the conservation question Is reliable
WEEKLY SERVICE
TO
Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
S. S. PRINCE RUPERT
SAILS   FRIDAYS   8   A.M.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas and Stewart, Wednesdays at 1 p.m. For Masset, Naden Harbor, every alternate
Thursday at 10 p.m., commencing November 9. For Skidegate, Jedway, etc., every alternate Thursday at 10 p.m., commencing November 2.
RAILWAY SERVICE to Vanarsdol—Mixed trains from Prince Rupert, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 1  p.m., returning Thursdays and  Sundays at  4  p.m.
On your Christmas VISIT EAST.    Travel via the Grand Trunk
Railway System from Chicago. The   finest  and   best   service   over
Double Track Route.    Connections with all roads east and  west.
Atlantic steamship bookings arranged.
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
a. e. Monaster
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
and official statistics, compiled, let
us say, every twenty years or oftener.
Such statistics would show the rate
of increase In our coal resources or
fuel reserves, in the world's iron ore
supplies, etc., and would not leave
such statistics to the personal vagaries of the different authors.
It is, therefore, of special significance to the coal conservation question that in 1912 the congress of the
world's geologists, to be held in Toronto, Canada, will assemble statistics of the nation's coal resources as
submitted by the various geological
surveys and others. It will be remembered that the last International
Geological Congress, held in Stockholm in 1910, compiled similar figures for the iron ore resources of
the world. That congress laid to
rest the bugaboo of possible exhaustion of iron ore supplies in the discernible future. The congress at Toronto will apparently do the same for
coal. But the greatest service of
such statistical compilations will lie
in their enabling future generations
to authoritatively settle the conservation question by precise figures of
past, present, and future increases
in our coal and fuel supplies, as well
as In our coal and fuel consumption.
 o	
FOR GOOD ROADS
General Meeting of All Interested to
Be Held in New Westminster
Next Month
An Important step towards the improvement of existing roads in Western Canada will be taken on November 3 and 4, when meetings of all
interested In this movement will be
held in New Westminster, B. C. The
meetings are called by Mayor John
A. Lee, and will be attended by a
large number of the members of
the Westminster Automibel Club, the
Vaucouver Auto Club, the Seattle Automobile Club and other motor car
associations.
The Pacific Highway Association
will be represented by a strong delegation, Including prominent San
Francisco, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle,
Bellingham and Spokane men. These
men will come prepared to urge the
extension of the Pacific Highway,
which now strentches from Vancouver, B. C, to Tlajuana, Mexico, a
distance of 2,000 miles. The scheme
favored by the highway enthusiasts
Is the building of the Pacific High-
Mr. Non - Resident
Write us regarding the value of your
Prince Rupert property.    We will be
pleased  to  keep  you  posted   as   to
conditions here.
0. M. HELGERSON, LTD.
REAL ESTATE AND RENTALS
Offices: Helgerson Block
1836 1911
The Bank of
Britisii North America
n Ton la ftutMM.
Capital and Rmm Over $7,300,000
A Complete
Banking Service
Collections made in any part
of Canada. Negotiable paper discounted. Money advanced at
reasonable terms to finance your
busings. Local and foreign
Drafts bought and sold. Money
transmitted by Money Order or
Telegraph Transfer. Letters of
Credit issued payable in all the
leading cities of the world.
We invite your account.
Frtaee Rupert Branch—
F. S. LONG. Meuafcr.
way through British Columbia, via
Hazelton, and on to the Yukon.
The extension of the Canadian
Highway with the object of eventually making it a good road from the
Atlantic to the Pacific will also command much of the attention of the
meetings. Resolutions asking the
federal government to assist in this
scheme will be introduced during the
convention.
Other matters to be discussed Include the placing of signs and guide
posts along all travelled roads, the
standardizing of legislation regarding the speed of automobiles and the
m)
The
World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
Trip East
OR TO
Europe
We like to answer enquires.
Agent for all Atlantic  lines.
Call on or write:
J.  G.  McNAfi,
General Agent.
MINING ENGINEnt
i-.-ince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
Now ■"•■•• Time
To arrange for that trip EAST or to
the OLD COUNTRY
THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
Offers the Rest Service
First   and   Second   Class   Sleepers,
Observation   Cars  and   Dining  Cars
by their celebrated
ORIENTAL LIMITED
Atlantic  Ocean  tickets  by  all  lines
from New York or Montreal
ROGERS STEAMSHIP OFFICE
Phone 116 Second Ave
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation frea.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
New Wellington
COAL
FREE FROM DUST
DOES NOT CLINKER
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-Inforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
ROGERS & BLACK
SECOND AVKNUE
PHONE 116 PHONE 110
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, wait-
ers, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at tbe
FREE EMPLOYMENT OPPIeOE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
"rule of the road," and the planning
of a campaign in favor of better
roads.
"Charley, dear," said young Mrs.
Torkins, "the cook we took without
a recommendation has left us."
"I suppose," was the weary reply, "that is because we are among
the things she didn't consider of sufficient  value to take with  her."
E. L. FISHER
Funeral  Director & Enibalmer
CHARGES   REASONABLE
THIRD  AVE. PHONE  356
OPEN DAY AND MGHT
J. L. PARKER
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Publlo
Office In
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAiA,, L. D. S. D. D. S
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
nickerson-rokrk; company
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents.
Storage, etc.
H.Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14        PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS -     M
and '«
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
 Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER ft MONROE, Phone US
*************************
*
! Customs Broker
STORAGE
Forwarding,   Distributing   and
Shipping  Agent
Special attention given to storage of  Household  Goods  and
Baggage
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND
First  Ave.   Near  McBride   St.
P. O. Box 007 Phone 202
t
...*****************
*
*
********
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGBNT8
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
For Neat Job Printing
**
.ee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
V
J
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
I
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD A BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan.      Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps  only   the    best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8  p.m.     Excellent cuisine;   flrst-
! class Bervlce.
| Ronrd, Sl a Dny — Reds, 50c nnd ap
1       First Aven"-   Prince Rupert PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Puesday, October 31, 1911
HIIII'HWIIIIlU'i I'll II
NORT
ANTHRA
HAS    BEEN   KCOEPO RATED   WITH   THE   POL [.OWING   OFFICERS
11. R. YOUNG HAS CONTI!
\< T-
ED   KOI
1  THE  I'll!
CHAS!
: of
TWO BLOCKS OF SHARES OF
100,000
SHARES   1-
\( II,
AND
Til ION*   .
IftE   BEING
SOLI
BY
\.     i:.
KEALEY
FISCAL
AGENT,
FOR      T
IE
•I Ii-
CHASE]
T. S. Gore, President, Victoria, B.C. A. S. Innes, Victoria, B.C.
J. C. Keith, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C.
1
j-     Consulting Engineers, Vancouver, B.C.
Arthur E. Hepburn
Christian F. J. Galloway    J
F. H. Hepburn, Secretary, 317-317 Winch Building
Kenah & Nesbit, Auditors
$86.00 Profit
IN SIX MONTHS ON AN INVESTMENT OF $15.00 IS
GOOD ENOUGH FOR ANYONE
33,000   SHARES   HAVE   BEEN
ALREADY  Sl BSCRD3ED  FOR
The Diamond Dr
Limited Amount
'     \   m    JfflR* EWWHi
oday
5 Cents Cash
Read this offer over carefully. Be
sine that it Is right, then don't wait.
The owners lake a chance with you.
They put up the coal lands and you
put up the money to prove the coal,
one-half of the stock for yon, and
one-half for them. This is one of
lire.1 fairest and best offers ever made
to the public under ironclad condition.--. A business proposition from
start to finish, there is nothing on
the market like it. Leases and Crown
grants to over 3,500 acres of the best
coal lands on Queen Charlotte Islands
are being conveyed free from all en-
cumbrances to the Northern Anthracite Collieries, Ltd., capital stock
1,500,000 shares, par value of $1.00
each; one-half of this stock for the
treasury and one-half for the owners
of the land. The first 100,000 of
these shares of par value of $1.00
each, non-assessable and fully paid
up, are to bo sold at 15c, 5c with
application, 5c in 30 days and 5c in
00 days. The proceeds from this
block of stock will be used proving
these coal lands with a Diamond
Drill under special contract, and in
charge of competent management. It
is  expected  that  the  proceeds   from
this first block of stock will bo sufficient io put down at least three or
more boreholes of 1,000 feet each.
This will undoubtedly cut one or two
seams of splendid coal—then see
your slock jump. Satisfactory tenders have been accepted and a contract let to the Diamond Drill Cou-
tracting Company of Spokane, Wash.,
for the boring and drilling operations. As an emergency, and to be
absolutely on the safe side, a further
block of 100,000 shares of treasury
slock will be offered at 25c per share,
."il- on application and 5c per month
until paid, as soon as the first block
has all been subscribed.
Now, use your own judgment, but
consider carefully what your chances
are of making $85.00 on air investment of $15.00 in six uroliths, or
$1,000 on an investment of $150.00,
for as sure as the sun rises and sets
this stock will go to $1.00 at least as
soon as the drill cuts through the
seams of splendid coal that are surely
there, according to all experts' reports of the highest obtainable authority, who have reported on tho Queen
Charlotte islands coal measures as
follows: T. R. Marshall, F.C.S., 1902;
Dr.     George     iM.     Uawson,     1).  S.,
AaR.A.R.S.M., F.G.S., 1878; II. E.
Parrlsh, John J. Langdale, 1SG7;
James Depns, 1872; James Parkinson, 1888; P.. W. Ellis, 1906; T. B.
Cory, of the State of Washington,
U. S. A., and our- own expert, C. F. J.
Galloway, B.Sc, who is among the
best authorities in B. C.
These reports cover first the Wilson-Robinson e-or-.l fields, three miles
north of this coal land; second, the
Old Cowgate coal fields, almost adjoining on the west; third, the Alfred
Bay coal fields on the south; and
fourth, the company's own coal, all
of which are positive evidence that
this is one of the best coal fields on
the Queen Charlotte Islands. Situate on Graham Island, Bearskin Bay,
one of the best harbors in the nortli,
at the gateway of transportation to
all points of tire world, and at the
very doors of Queen Charlotte City;
in fact, a portion of this coal underlies the townsite. No railroads to
build—just load the coal from the
mines to the boats. These are facts
that defy contradiction, and within
five days the Diamond Drill will be
on the ground and In operation. This
is the only way anyone can tell how
many millions of tons of real  I here
is in the property.
All applications will be filed in
order received, and only 100,000 will
be sold at 15c.
How many times in your life have
you had a chance like this? A square
deal for once at least In a stock
proposition, with almost a certainty
of the stock being worth $1.00 before
you have made your third payment
at 15c. Do not hesitate. Send in
your application  today.
For further information call or
write to the head office of the company, 506 Pacific Building, where the
report of C. F. J. Galloway, B.S.C.,
oir ihis coal land can be seen. His
report is all that could bo asked,
practically saying that the coal Is
there beyond a doubt, with sufficient
evidence In sight to warrant drilling
and development work at .once.
Paragraph From Mr, Galloways
Report.
"The easiest seam to prove will ho
the Cowgitz, as its irorizon is known.
I should, therefore, recommend you
to put down a borehole near the eastern end of your easternmost section.
At the point marked C on the map
the position of this seam should be
passed through at a depth of about
500 feet, the Cam]) Anthracite seam
being probably passed through in the
same hole, if it occurs at all in this
locality."
All promoters' stock Is to be pooled
until $200,000 has been raised for
the purpose of developing the mine.
In conclusion', you will have the
satisfaction of knowing that your
money is all golnng into proving the
coal is there, not into the promoters'
pockets nor to pay for a dead horse
of any kind, as the coal leases and
titles are all paid for and Clear of
all encumbrances and will always be
a valuable assel. Fill out the application form for any number of
shares you want, and address your
application ire il. t-\ McRae it Co.,
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, who
are the authorized agents to receive
applications and receipt for same.
All cheques or money orders should
be made out to them. You are requested to make any enquiries not
answered in this advertisement,
which will receive a prompt answer.
The solicitors for all concerned are
Burns et Walkem. 415 Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital $1,500,000—1,500,000 Shares of $1.00 Each
ARNOLD   E.   KEALEY
Fiscal Agent, Registered office, 506 Pacific
Bldg., 743 Hastings St. West, Vancouver,
B.C.       H. J. Heal, 125 Pemberton Block,
ria,
EF.McRAE&C0.^r'Avenue'
Prince Rupert.
APPLICATION   FOR   SHARKS.
To Arnold  E.  Kealey, Fiscal Agent.
Vancouver, It. *'.
1 hereby request you to obtain r
shares in the NORTHERN ANTHRA
par value of $1.00 each at the net p
now hand to you the sum of §	
ments of five cents on each share n
pay as follows: Five cents on each s
five cents orr each share in sixty d
hereof; neing payment in full, and I
shares or any less number of share
same; and I hereby authorize you t
allotted to me.
This application is made by me s
shines being subscribed  for and pu
or me 	
CITE COLLIERIES   LIMITED, of the
rice to he of  15c poi' share, and   I
   being the  first  pay-
ow applied for; balance I agree to
hare in thirty days from dale hereof;
ays from date hereof; being payment
hereby agree to accept the said
s allotted to me, and also pay for
o register me the holder of the shares
ubject   to   fifty   thousand   (50,000)
rchased.
.5*.".'.;-'-.:r".'.:■.'.,' '.s^^v^"''""'■'-■&" -■■ ■ -
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coasl. Range  \.
TAKE NOTICE thai Aline .Munro,
of Vancouver, 11. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for per-
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and aboul one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, Districl ot ('oust, Range 5;
them e wi sl 40 cl ains; thence north
•)ei chains; ihence i asl 60 chains,
more en- less io the shorr of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
Bald lake to polnl of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more en- less.
ALICE Ml NRO.
Date ei  Augusl   12,   1911.
WATER   NOTICE
Skeena   Land    District--District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by bccupatlon
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of 1.anils for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of ('. L.
4471, Graham Island; thence south
80 chalnB; thence wesl 80 chains;
thence norlh 80 chains; thence easl
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN   M.   BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOi'ICE that thirty days
from date, 1, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, by occupation
sr.elel'-M-, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a lieence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on .-ind under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows: Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner- of C. L.
4469, Graham island; thence soutli
SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Daled August 20, 1911. s-27
I, Henry Newton Boss, ol Victoria,
11. :'., occupui Ion broke nol ice
thnt on      el No
vember,   19.11,  I   Intend  to apply  to
the- Water Con 1 1     om     it hi   oi (Ice
in Prince Rupe       13. C,
lee take and  use three cub :.
« -ie-. ei ■ ond from the Laki Ise
ed on the 1 ssl side
oi Lakelse Lake In 1 be Coasl District,
Ranee, iv.e. Tl 0 ■•■ b 1 r to be taken
directly  from   the sal .   and
is  to  lee-   rise el   on   Lol   6   I   for  illrlus-
pose
ol t-nl I       HENRY NEWTON  BOSS.
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,   Prop
Rooms, $3 Per Week
Skei ua    Land    Districl     I Ustrlcl    of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE thai I Irty days
from date, 1, Austin M, Brown, of
e Rii] ert, B. C, by occupation
sadd'er, Intend to apply to the Chief
mis doner of Lands for a licence
lei prospeel for coal anil petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ns follows: -Commencing at posl plained
ai (ho Bouthwesl corner of C. L.
1172, Graham Island; thence north
SO chains, to place of commence-
i bencr south 80 chains; thi nee e tsl
80 hcalns, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE.
A  hook Is kept, in the City Clerk's
Office  !n  wliich  to  enter  the names
: and   addresses,  etc.  of    citizens     of
^ i'rince  Rupert  desiring  employment
on City work.    All desiring employ-
; ment should register ac once.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk
TAKE NOTICE thai 1, Charles M.
Wilson, erf Prince Rupert, B. C, oc-
cupation broker, give notici that on
the 25ili day of October, 1911, 1
Intend to apply to the Water Commissioner ee' his ofi Ice In Prince Rupert, for B licence to take and use
3 cubic feet of water per second
from hoi springs on the border of
Lake Lakelse In the Skeena Land
Division of Coasl District. The wa-
ie-r is lo be taken directly from the
springs and is to lie used for sanitarium purposes em the rollowing de-
Bcribed land: Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of
Lot 684; thence wesl 30 chains, more
or less, to the easl line of Pole De-
boers suveyed pre-emption; thence
norlh 40 chains, move or less, along
said Deboer easl line; tbence wesl
in chains, more or less to the shore
;! Lake Lakelse; thence following
the hike shore, north 20 chains;
Uience east 70 chains; thence south
70 chains, more or loss, to place of
beginning.
CHARLES M.  WILSON.
Dated September 25. 1911,
Skeena    Land   District—Dislrict   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Martin Peterson, of Towner, North Dakota, intends to apply tor permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post, planted on the easl bank of Williams
Creek, a tributary of Lakelse Lake,
forty (40) chains In a southerly direction from John N. Kuhl's inilial
post; thence wesl 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thenco south SO chains, to
polnl of commencement.
.MARTIN   PETERSON.
Fred B. Cowell, A.gent.
Dated Sept. 15,  1911. o-20
Skeena   Land    District—Districl    of
Queen Charlotte islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Theone
Gange, of Lindsay, California, occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles
easl, and 14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; tlience north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 cliains; thence west SO
chains to iroint of commencement;
containing  040  acres.
THEONE  GANGS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daled September 13, 1911,      olO
Skeena Land District—Districl of
Queen Charlol te
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
m prospeel for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at tlie southwest corner of C. L. 4470,
Graham Island; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
soulh     SO     cliains;    thence   easl    80
chains,  to place erf commencement.
Al STIN M.  BROWN.
Dated Angus! 20, 1911. s-27
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres .of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4475, Graham Island; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena land Districl—District of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty 'lays
from date, I, Austin M, Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B, C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospeel for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Grahum Island described as follows:—Commencing at pbst planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4473, Graham Is'and; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence soulh SO chains; Ihence east
SO chains, fo place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.   BROWN.
Daled August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena    Land    District—Uistrict    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAIvEi NOTICE that Miner Converse, of' Peabody, Kansas, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
scrlbed lands:—-Commencing at a
post planted about S miles east and
14 miles soulh of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thenco south SO chains;
I..once west So chains; Uience north
Nei chains; thence east. 80 chains to
polnl of commencement; containing
040 acres.       MINER CONVERSE.
A. s. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12. 1011.       olO
S;*eena Land Dislrict—District of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE thai thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4476, Graham Island; thence south
..0 chains; tlience west 80 chains;
tlience north SO chains; thence east
SO chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena    Land    Districl     Uistrie-i    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE    NOTICE    Hurt     Oscar    M.
Brown, of Vancouver, B. c, occupation salesman, Intends lo apply for
permission to purchase tne following
described  lands:  -Commencing al  a
post planted about s miles easl anil
14 miles soutli  of (he bouI   - or-
ne-r- of Indian Reserve No I ' flra-
ham Island; thence south so chains;
thence east SO chains; thenco north'
So chains; ihence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
040 acres. OSCAR Jj. BROWN.
Dated September 13, 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotto
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
trom dale, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on nnd under 040 acres of laud on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4471, Graham Island; thence south
SO chains; thence west SO chains;
tlience norlh SO chains; thence east
80 chains, (o place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1811. s-27
_*T_
,:; ;. .      .   re....,      .■..■■■■ »   ■>.. Tuesday, October 31, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
LAND NOTICES
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Howard K.
Dutcher, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 11 miles east and
100 chains north from ';he southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. '11,
Graham island; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
soutli 80 chains; thence west SO
chains to place of commencement;
containing 040 acres.
HOWARD K. DUTCHER.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daled  September S,  1911.        olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Josephine
Sommervllle, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east
and 140 chains south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham island; thence soulh 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
nortli 40 chains; thence west SO
chains to place of commencement;
containing* 320 acres.
JOSEPHINE SO.er.MERVILLE.
a. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  9,  1911.      oil)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotle  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Lancelot A.
Wilson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase (he following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted ahout 11 miles east
and 100 chain's norlh from the south-j
easl. corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence west. 80 cliains; thence
south SO chains: tlience east SO
chains to place of commencement;
containing (14 0 acres.
LANCELOT A. WILSON.
A. s. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   S,   1911.       olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Orniond Stitt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for pennission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 miles east and 100 chains
north of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains to place of
commencement; containing 640 aires.
ORMOND STITT.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Alvena Converse, of Peabody, Kansas, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted ahout 7 miles east of
the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO
cliains; thence south SO chains;
thence .west 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 040 acres.
ALVENA CONVERSE.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Daled September S, 1911. olO
Skeena    Land    District.—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Ralph   Converse,  of  Peabody,  r\.ansas,  occupation   farmer,   intends   to   apply   for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
.post  planted  about   7  miles cast of
tbe  southeasl   Corner  of   Indian  Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; (hence
north    SO    cliains;   tlience   west   SO
chains;    thence    soulh    SO    drains;
thence east 80 chains to lire place of
commencement; containing 640 acres.
RALPH   CONVERSE.
\. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. oil)
Skeena    Land    District- -District    of
Queen  Charlotte islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Lloyd Converse, of Peabody Kansas, occupation fanner, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe- following described lands:- -Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east of the
southeast corner of Indian. Reserve
No. 11 Graham Island; Ihence
soulh 80 cliains; thence east SO
chains; thence north so chains;
thence west. SO rhains to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres. LLOYD  CONVERSE.
A. S. Chris!ir-, Agent.
Dated September S, 1911.        o10
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE .NOTICE thai Edith Dernier,
of Vancouver, B. ('., occupation clerk,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing'al a post planted about S miles east anil 60 cliains
south of the southeasl corner of Indian Reserve No, 11, Graham Island;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 cliains; thence soulh 80 chains;
th nee west so chains to place of
commencement; .mel containing 640
aires. EDITH   DENNER.
A. S. Christie, A ;i tit.
Dated September 8, 1911.       oio
Skeena    Land    DIstrli l     Districl   of
Que.-.:  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE ileal Fern K. Converse, of i lo Iva, lown, oce upal Ion
farmer, Intends 'ee apply for pennission io purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a
posl planted aboul 8 miles easl and
60 chains south of tho southeasl corner of Indian Reserve N'o. 11. Graham Island; thence SOUth 80 chains;
tlience easl 80 chains; thence north
80 ehains; thence wesl SO chains to
place erf commencement; containing
Oil) acres.     FERN K. CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agenl.
Dated September S. 191 I. oil)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTIt i0 lhat, Nona (''inverse, of Galva, Iowa, occupation
housewife .intiuiris to apply for permission lo purchase the following
desoribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about S miles east and
1 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; Ihence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north
80 chains; Ihence east SO chains to
place of commencement; containing
040 acres. NONA CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September S, 1911.        olO
Skeena Land District—District ol
Queen Charlol te Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Nash,
of Vancouver, l'.. C, occupation shoemaker, intends to apply for- permission io purchase the following de-
scrlbed lauds:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
2 miles south of tire southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thenco north su chains;
tlience wesl 80 ehains; theuce soutli
.0 ehains; thenco east SO chains to
Place of commencement; containing
040 acres. JAMES NASH,
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September !>, 1911. olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena    Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Mattie Curtis,
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about S miles east anc1 5 miles
south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island;
thenco soutli SO chains; thence west
80 cliains; thence north SO chains;
Ihence east SO chains to place of
commencement; containing 040
acres MATTIE CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   9,   1911.       olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Whittaker, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation salesman, intends to apply for
pennission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
3 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; Ihence soutli SO chains;
Ihence east 80 chains; Ihence nortlr
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
0 40 acres.
CARLES J. WHITTAKER.
. A. S. Christie, Agent,
Dated September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
T '■ ! E NOT1 IE Hurt Elizabeth
. i te us, of Vancouver, 15. C, occupation widow, intends lo apply for
permission to purchase tiie following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
7 miles seeiith from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence norlh SO
cliains; thence easl i'' cliains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 40
chains to place of commencement;
containing   320   acres.
ELIZABETH  WHITECROS.
A, ri. Chi Istle, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911. olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICii that James Mitchell Dryden, of Vancouver, 15. c, occupation casemaker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7 miles
east and 3 miles soutli of the southeasl corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; thence south SO
chains; thence west 80 chains; tlience
north SO chains; thence east SO
chains to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
JA.MES .MITCHELL DRYDEN.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daled September 9, 1911.        oil)
Skeeua    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlol ie islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Edg-
erly, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
salesman, intends to apply for permission lo purchase the following de-
se ribed Iands:—Commencing at a
posl planted about 6 miles easl and
3 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence norlh
50 chains; Ihence oast 80 chains to
place of commencement: containing
6 in acres.     WlLI.IA ',! EDGERLY.
A.  S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hush C. Nelson, of St. Paul, Minnesota, occupation salesman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
7 miles south of lire southeast corner
of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham
Island; tlience north SO chains;
thence west 80 cliains; tlience soutli
80 chains; thence east SO chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.        HUGH C. NELSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daled September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Nellie Nelson,
of St. Paul, Minnesota, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted ahout S miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast corner of Indian rieserve No. 11, ira-
ham Island; thence south 80 cnains;
thence west SO chains; thence north
SO chains; thence east SO chains to
point of commencement; containing
640  acres. NELLIE NELSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September  9,   1911.       olO
Skeena    Land    Districl—District   of
Queen  Chaflotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Ladysmith, occupation
rnncher, Intends lee apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing al a
lanted about 6 miles cast and
a miles south of the southeasl. corner of .Indian Reserve No, 11, Graham island; thence north 80 chains;
Ihence west SO cliains; thenco soulh
80 cliains; thence east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
(MO acres. WILLIAM WALLACE.
A. S. Christie,   Igent.
Dated September 9,  mil.        olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotle Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Margaret Wallace, of Ladysmith, B. C, occupation
widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase tlie following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
5 miles soulh of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north SO chains;
thence easl 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains lo
place of commencement; containing
640   acres.
MARGARET WALLACE.
A.    . Christie, Agent.
Daied  September  9,  1911.      o10
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Amelia Nelson, of Windsor Park, Illinois, occupation housewife, intends lo apply
for permission to purchase Hie following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about S miles
east reiki 7 miles south from tire
southeast corner of Indian- Reserve
No. 11, Graham island; thence south
Se) chains; thence easl 80 chains;
thence north SO cliains; thence wesi
SO chains to point of commencement;   containing  640  ai  -
AMELIA   NELSON.
A. S. Christie,   \ ;enl
Daled September fl, 1911.        olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Clarissa Merrill, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase (he following described lands:—Commencing at a
rosl planted about 7 miles east and
fl miles south from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence soutli SO chains;
Ihence east SO chains; thence north
80 chains; tlience west SO chains to
joint of commencement; containing
040 acres.   CLARISSA MERRILL.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated September 1", 1911.      olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena    Land    District- Districl    of
Queen   CbO   lb        :  .
TAKE   NOTICE   thai    Ellham   D.
Converse, of Esl hervllle, Iowa, oi cu-
I ,eiIon  fai i i,-. Intends tee apply tor
permission to pun fl.":-.
dusciIbed  i i; Is.    i ommeuc i ■■■■
posl plant; i aboul  7 miles i ■ i
fl miles ^' uiii from tin. sum'.'
ner of Indian Reserve No.   li, Graham Island; ihence north s'11 chains;
; hence e; .    80 drains;  thene - I fl
Si) chains; thence wesl 0 ■■ ill to
polnl of commoncement; contalnnii*;
!■ 10 ai
EL'! HAM   D,   CON1 ERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated S ip onioer l 0, i fl. i.      oio
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Agnes War-
nock Cross, of Masset, Q. C. I., occn-
paiioii housewife, intends to apply
for , emission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about S miles
east and 11 miles soulh of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; tlience south SO
cliains; (hence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO
'hains to place of commencement;
containing 640  acres.
AGNES WARNOCK CROSS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11, 1911.      olO
TAKE NOTICE Ural Guy Nelson,
of Windsor : ark, Illinois, occupation
bank clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
e -. e ■ Ibed lands:— Commencing at a
posl planted about 6 miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Island; thence north SO
cliains; thence easl 80 chains;, tlience
south 80 chains; tbence we I 80
chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
GUY   NELSON.
A. S. Chris ;- .   \gr ;
Dated September 10, 1911.       olO
Skeena   Land    District—Districl    eel'
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Retta Gray, of
Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase (he following described
lands:—Commencing at a posl plant-
e ei ahout C miles cast anel 7 miles
south from tire southeast corner of
Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south SO e-hains; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO
cliains; thence west SO cliains to the
point of commencement; containing
040 acres, RE'i I'A GRAY.
A. S. i'i 11 tie,
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land   District-   Districl    'if
n Charlotte islands
TAKE NOTICE Hint Horace Curtis; of Vancouver, li. ('., oce •
carpenter, intends to apply for per-
mli ilon to purchase the following described lands:- Commencing al a
post planted about H miles east ami ;,
miles south of tlie southeasl corner
eel Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham
Island; thence south sn e-imins;
thenee east so cliains; thence north
SO chains; Hience west SO chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres. HORACE CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911. olO
Skeena    Land    Districl ■   Districl    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai  Herman Aye,
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation attoi -
ney, Intends to apply for permir
ne purchase ihe- following de scribed
lands:—Commencing al a per. i planl
ed  about   ei  miles east  and  7   mlh
south  from  the     uitheasl   corner  of
Indian   Reserve Nee.   II, Graham  Island; thence south 80 chains; thence
west  Su   chains;   thence    north    su
chains; thence easi 80 chains i <> the
point -*r commencement;  containing
640 acres. HERMAN Al I-:.
A. s. Christie, Age nt.
Dated September 10, 1911.      oio
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Sydney Curtis,
of   Vancouver,   B.   c,   occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission
i'i purchase lhe following described
lands:—Commencing at a iron planted  about 8 miles east and  5  miles!
south of the southeast corner of In-'
dlan  Reserve No. 11, Graham Island: '
thence nortli SO chains; Ihence west!
su  chains;  thence south  SO chains;
thence  east   SO   cliains   to   place   of
commencement; containing 040 acres.
SYDNEY CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agenl.
Dated  September 9,  1911. olO
Skeena    Land    Districl     Districl    of
kfueen  Charlotte Islai '
TAKE NOTICE lhat W. It. I.lnss-
e-oi-k of Missoula, .Morel:'.:1:', occupation real estate, IntendB lo apply for'
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing al n
peesi planted about 6 miles cast nnd
7 miles soulh from Hie southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11. Graham Island; Ihence norlh SO chains;
thence west sn chains; thence south
'.n chains; Hience east so chains to
point of commencement; containing
Oio acres.       W.  It.  GLASSCOCK.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daled September 10, 1911.      oio
Skeena    Laud    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Isl i
TAKE NOTICE that Fielder W.
Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles cast and
fl miles BOtlth from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. tl, Graham Island; thence norlh so chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
SO chains; thence east SO chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
FIELDER W. CONVERSE.
A. s. Christie, Agent,
Dated September 10. 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE (hat Effie D. Converse, of Estherville, l.iwa, occupation housovr 'fe., Intends to apply I ir
permission to purchase the following
described r.ands: — Commencing nl ;i
p:e-t plained ahout 7 miles easl and
fl miles south from t! c son; lie asl corner of Indian Reserve Ni. II, Graham Island; thence soutli S'l chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
SO cliains; thence easi So chains to
point of commencement; containing
64 0 acres.   EFFIE D. CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10,  1911.       olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE  NOTICE   thai   Emma  Con-
e'erse,  of Estherville,  Iowa,  occupation housewife, Intends i" apply for
I'.mniss on to purchase the followioc
Ir icrlbed lands:—Commencing at a
; oi e  planted about 8 miles east and
i seruiir from the southeast corner of Indian  Reserve No.  Il, Graham Island; theni>  north 80 chains;
thence east SO cliains:  thence south
er chains;  tlience wesl  mi chains to
point i>f commencement;  containing
ii-iii acres.       EMMA CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dalerl September lo. 1911.      olO
I  |  !:.:       i    ' 'i.i        | DiSl rlCl       Of
I  I harlotte islands
TAKE    NOTICE    thai     El b
Brown Ro.ws, of Vancouver, B. ('.,
occupation housewife, intends to appl] foi pi : rission to purchase the
following described lands: Com-
a posl planted about S
miles easl and l-' miles soutb of
he soul ieasl i oi ner erf Indian Reserve >'■'>■ 11. Graham Island; thence
soulh sn chains; tin ui a oast so
e-hains; thence north 80 cliains;
thenci wesl 80 chains tee place of
commencement;      containing      640
■ ''le-;.
ELIZABETH   BROWN  BOYES.
A. s. Christie, Agent,
Date ■ !  Se pte mb ir 11, 1911.      olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeeua    Land    District.—District,    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands •
TAKE notice that Alexander
McEwan, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation manufacturer, intends to apply fur permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Com-
meni Ing at a post, plained about 4
miles can ami 12 miles south of
e.lee southeasl corner of Indian Reserve No. 1 I, ' raiianr Island; tlience
•".Hi ' 0 i hi -. ; r bene e west 80
as; thence north so chains;
; e easl 10 chains to point of
commencement; containing 040
acres.       ALEXANDER McEW IN.
A.  S. Cl        - .   Vgent.
Dai' - 12,  1911.       olO
i    ■ i    Land    District- District    of
Queen I h i rlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE lhat Bella Wilson
Cross, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the. following described lands:—Commencing at a
posl planted about s miles east, and
. senile of the semi!). : st e
ner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south sn chains;
thence wesl 80 chains; thence north
80 ehains; thence east SO chains to
place of commencement; containing
ei 10 acres.
LEI.LA   WILSON   CROSS.
A.  S.  Chrislic,  A   -
Dated September 1 1, 1911.        olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAPE NOTICE thai Clyde Edwards, of Vancouver, li. C, occupa-
tion machinist, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at. a
post planted about (i miles east and
! 2 mile':- south of ihe south: I
ner of Indian Reserve N'o. 11, Graham Island; thence north 8,0 chains;
thence easl st! chains; ihem'e south
SO chains; thei c wesl I 0 chains to
place of commencement; containing
040 acres.        CLYDE EDWARDS.
A.   S.   Christie,  Anem!,
Daled September  11, 1911.      nil)
:     . ' ;    of
.
NOTICE    ' Me-
-'.. a < upa-
to apply
ilon  to  pur .'   fol-
lenc-
' bout 4  miles
' and 12 mile l    i    the south-
No.
i I. Graham Island;  tlience south SO
■   ■ pee
■   Su  chains;    tin-ue- ■   west    so
.   cement;
'
THOMAS   McEWAN.
'.. .'   Chrl itle, Agent,
Dated September 12,  1911.     olO
■   ,i    Land    Disti Id     Disti Id    of
i liai lotte  Isi
TAKE NOTICE thai Nora Keenan,
if     Ei the n llle,     Iowa,    occupation
widow, Intends to apply for permission   to   purchase the following de-
Ibed    I inds:    I Ing   al   a
planted ahout   I  miles east and
outh of tire southeasl corner of Indl       :       re No.  l I, Gra-
1 nee north SO chains;
:e west SO chains; thence south
SO chains;  theiice easl  80 chains to
of commencemenl nnd containing 640 acres.     NORA KEENAN.
A. S. Chrisl Ie, Age nt.
Daiod September  12,  1911.      olO
Skeena    l and    l Hsl rlcl    l ilstricl    of
Que n  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE I     t      Bruce Con-
b, of Missoula, Montana, occupa-
tate, Intends to apply for
to   pin'    •      the    following   described   lands;— Commencing
al a po I  | le  .■I'd about   l mlh s easl
and  li  miles south of Co- southeast
!   Ilan Resei -<■ Ne.. I i. Graham Island; thei   e i i     Ins;
it 80 chains;  thi nee south
1 .a chains;  thence wesl  80 chains to
polnl   of coi     ei       ent;   containing
640 acres.   L. B
'.       :     e I     , , I
Date ■ !   '       I ber  12,  1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    Di. I  : . ; rid    of
Que in Cl     lotte 1        i
TAKE  NOTICE   that   Fay   F.  Con-
. -' se,  of  Esthr rvllle,   Ir   - .   eccu
tlon   si Inster,   Intends   to  apply   for
to pi ■ '       llowin i
■'   cribed  lands:—Commencing at a
I  nted about 8 miles easi and
.' miles south from the southi        co
tier of Indian Reserve No.  l t, Graham  Island;  Cone',' south 80 cliains;
tin i" e ' ast 80 cliains;  thence north
1     ■ Ins;  thenci   w st 80 chains to
oint of commencement; and containing  „ IP acres.
FAY   F.   CONVERSE
A. S. Chri .
Dated Se   e uber 10   I' 1 '.        <j\ J
Skeena Land District -District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai John P Curtis, of Van™ '\*er, ii. C, occupation
imi" '-ei, lute 'ids ■■ apply foi pmiii's-
sior. io purchas • the follov iuk rh -
ici Ibed    lands:    Co .  ug   at   a
post planted aboul ■* mlh s ea l i id
11 miles south of the southeast corner erf Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 8 i cl ains;
tbence east 80 e-hains: thence south
sn cnains; thence eves! so chains
1 c of commencemenl; contain-
1 10 acres.   JOHN P. CURTIS.
A. S.  Cirri- -ie .   Vgent.
Date el September 11, 1911.       oio
Skeena    Land    Districl    District   of
Q ''.; rlo
. ' KE   NOTICE   th tl   Walter   W.
.   il   Mai  et, Q. i      . . tlon
ier, Intends to apply for   e     :
sion   in        chase
lands:    Comnn t
i  planted aboul Hi    sasl  and
I]     '■       outh of I :
in r of Indian  ;;■  ei ■ < No.  i I, Gra-
land; thence north 80 chains;
tbence west 80 .'!;-::'i i; tin
SO cliains;  thence easl  80 cl
plae i   of coi mi !.        nt;   containing
640 acres.      WALTER 0 . CROS
A. s. Cl ri. tie    Vgent.
Dated September  II. 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land    District-  Districl    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE Ural Frank Taylor,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation shoemaker, Intends to apply for p i
sion io purchase tin- followii le -
i lands:- Commencing | i
post planted aboul 6 miles ea , nd
12 miles south of the Boutheasl corner of Indian Reserve No, 11, Graftal : Island ' ■' hains;
I hence wesl s" chains; theuce south
sn chains; I bi n .- easl ! J chains to
point of commencement; contalnig
6 10 aci s. PRANK TAYLOR.
A. S. Chi:
Dated :- eptembe i   i l. 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    Dlstrie I     Dlsl rlcl    of
Qui       '     irl il ■■   I
TAKl Cora .1   Con-
ICCU-
ly for
mission to i 'ing
Comm i.e i ig ;ii  a
i-    ed r I ou es easl  nnd
14 mil itin rr-
l '. Graham I ns;
■   south
Ins to
ilng
V VI
nl
Dated ,1911       olO
Ski ".M    Land    Dlsl Districl   of
l   . I
:       !■' NOTICE t'l.'ll  TV   '•' .-!•* -ii-
Vane B,  C,
etlred, to apply I
u to purcl
:-e-i Ibed   lands: Ing   at   a
nnd aboul        ..   .- ■
1 2 miles Boutb ee.  i  ■■ soulfl   ist coi
■ i i   .if Indian  Re sen e No,  l i. ' Ira-
ham Island; then	
I lien .-: i   80 chains;  them e    orl
80 chains; thence we sl 80 i'huins to
polnl of commeni en enl | containing
fl in acres,      T. C. McKENELLEY.
A   S. Christie, Agent.
Dai..el September  11,  1911.      olO
e ■       cl rift   ot
...        Isl
Myrnr   Con-
upa-
'.    for
roil iwlng
■   ii
and
I mil i-ier-
! I. Gra-
lalns;
■ ' ,'lr
lo
ning
■ I RNE CONVEB   E
\. S. Christie , Agent.
i'i'   ■ i   September  Li,  1911,      olO
Sl eeno    Laird    Districl    Districl    of
take NOTICE thai Harry Fogg,
of Vancouver., B. ('.. occupation shoemaker, Intends to apply for- ripls-
sion lo purchase the following described lands: Commencing al a
posl planted iho u fl m I
i■; miles Boutb of lhe southi ■
ner of Indian Re rve No. I I. Graham Island; thei ill Ir 80 chains;
l.. nee wesl
." chalni ii;1'-      • ■       ' ns ti
point  of i i-i.  ■
640   ri' , HARRY   FOGG.
A. S. Chi
Dated September 11, 1911.      olO
;i ' - "■'    Land    District    D; trlcl    of
harlotte  Isli
TAKE    NOTICE    thai    John    1!
'     ni' Vi ouver,  B. C, oi
lion laborer, iniemtls to o
mtsi i'ui io purchase Hi" foil ewing described    lands;- -Coiumi n In
posl planted aboul  s miles easl and
1 I   miles south  of the soul ben
ner eef Indian  Reserve  No.   IL  Graham island; thence Bouth 80 chains;
Mo in o easi  mi cliains;  thi ne e north
so chains; thenee. wesl sn chains to
ilace  of commencement;   containing
l" acres. JOHN  K.  BOYCE,
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11, 1911.       olO
i      . 1 ie I       Of
Que Islai
TAKE      ,'OTICE
el ouver, U   C, i
oemake     Intend
II u tl
. 2   mill :■   se, ith   of   till
,'." nf  Indian P, 11, Gra-
i     nd i chains;
thence easl e soul
chains;  the   ce west S(
Df conn       ement;
VM1N TAYLOR.
• ' - '   le,
Dated er  12,  di i.      olO
District   of
Islai
IS. Lyons,
of Sterling, 1 edi
tor, Intend i mi apply for en
■ bed
Commeni plant-
si  and   1 I  miles
"f Indian       ■ e      ' . : ml;
I
sn chains;   tlience i e hains;
■     . I   I : i    of
commence! 040
.ier-.-.-- REED  s,   LYONS.
V. S. C    Istle, Agi io
Dated Sr 13, 1911,      olO
'       eef
i . i :
'
■        .   i
II i, 'i:i    I . i,-;    Districl     Di
l
TAKE N'OTICE  Urn   Willi
son, 'if Vai        er,       C,
il  .'Hi! ],.
Rowing de-
I inds.   Commenting at a pi
planted about 4 miles e
mile's south of ihe. southeasl corner
of  Indian   Ri   i N'o.   I I.  Graham
i land;    thi m i    north    Vi1    chains;
'in me  " e   '   80 cl iiins;   thence soulh
- ei chains; them e easl 80 chains i»»
point io   ' nn.' • n. e'me'nt;  containing
640 acres.        WILLIAM  WILSON.
\   s. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12, 1911.     oio
■   i ast
11    ' "■ I   : ellis;
''     ' flip., -     iii lilil     of
e; In
RUTH LYONS.
.   I
A.  S    i \-.-, en
Dated Si .   i: l i       olo
Lnnrt    DIstrli Id    or
■' ,       ■
TAKE     NuT;   . Cbarle
. occu-
iner. li y for
li sion in purcln Be the   following
described land I      ■   :it a
and
I I  miles soulh eif tin '  i eir-
• ■ r oi   Indian  Resei i e. Nee.   i i, Graham Island; tin nee north ' •• • hains;
nee wesl        • hains; them      outh
SO chains;  Ihence easl        ■    ilns to
"in!  of conin pin ement;    ainlng
'■ i" a- re ' .i mii.i:.  G VNGE.
A   s   Christie   Vgent,
Dated   Sr ; ti mber  i'i,   1911.   olO PRINCE RUPERT JOLRNAL
Tuesday, October 31, 1911
A RICH COUNTRY
Northern Interior of British Columbia
Described is its Most Productive Area
One Who Has Investigated the Area
Tells Something of Its
Wealth
"That country along the line of
the Grand Trunk Railway Is right in
the heart of British Columbia," said
George Hammond of the Natural Securities Company in Vancouver, "although we are In the habit of referring to It as far to the the north.
Port George is about the centre of
British Columbia, north and south,
and a little east of centre, and all
that country, from Tete Jaune Cache
to Hazelton, Is the most wonderfully
rich In natural resources of any like
area on the American continent.
"All this country Is now tributary
to Vancouver, by way of Ashcroft,
but before spring the railroad will
be in operation over the Yellowhead
Pass and that vast territory wi'l be
tributary to Winnipeg, Calgary and
the east. To hold the trade, Vancouver must have the north and
south railroad line and the sooner
this road is built the better for Vancouver.
"That lake country extending
from the mountains to within a short
distance of Prince Rupert, is the
greatest agricultural district of the
province, and In addition to agriculture this district is wonderfully
rich In timber, coal, minerals and
all natural resources. It may not
be generally known, but the largest
deposit of anthracite coal on the
American continent, with the possible exception of the Pennsylvania
field, is in the country to the north
of Hazelton. This coal is now being
exploited by some of the great coal
operators and will soon be the scene
of great activity, where thousands of
miners will be at work.
"All the country in Peace River
section must come to Port George
for an outlet to the south and west.
"Thousands of people will be going into that, country in the spring.
Freight rates mill be at least 4 or
5 cents a pound less than at present, and Vancouver must have this
road to keep her trade."
 o	
BURIED IN NEW WESTMINSTER
WORLD'S COAL SUPPLY
(Continued From Page One)
Funeral of Mrs. C. L. Stover in the
Southern City
The funeral of Mrs. Katherine Ann
(Cassie) Stover, wife of E. L. Stover
of Prince Rupert, was held yesterday from the residence of the parents
of the deceased, Mr. and Mrs. John
Quible of South Westminster, says
the News-Advertiser, referring to the
funeral of the late Mrs. Stover, who
passed away here a few weeks ago.
Services were held at the Roman
Catholic Cathedral by Rev. Father
O'Boyle, which were attended by
many of the friends and acquaintances of the bereaved family. The
remains were laid to rest in the Roman Catholic cemetery, Sapperton.
The pallbearers were Messrs. Percy
Rushton, Harry Bilodeau, Bert Galbraith, V. Bigger, James Murphy and
H. Biggar.
Among  the  floral  tributes  were:
Large heart—Husband.
Pillar—R.  Brenchley of Victoria.
Wreaths—F. R. Stewart, Vancou-
Vlctoria; Mrs. T. Biggar and family;
E. Rushton, Mr. and Mrs. T. H.
Grant, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Biggar.
Crosses—Mr. Luster and daughter,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Stevens, Mr. and
Mrs. Peters, Mr, and Mrs. A. Brenchley, Vancouver; Mrs. W. E. Brenchley and family, city.
Sprays—Mrs. Alice Stevens, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Dixon,
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Murphy
and family, city; Mr. and Mrs. A. J.
Mercer, city; Mr. and Mrs. John
Wise, South Westmlnscr; Mr. and
Mrs. A. Peterson, J. Johnscn, Mr.
and Mrs. William Turnbull and family, city.
Much sympathy Is expressed for
the bereaved parents and the sorrowing husband in their sad bereavement.
Mrs. Stover's death was the end
of a sudden attack of inflamatlon
of the brain, and a home is deprived
of a loving mother, the youngest of
the family of three being a babe four
months old. Mr. Stover will return
to Prince Rupert, and may possibly
take up his residence again In this
city.
of them will go down the Naas. The
Grand Trunk Pacific, which will have
to get their coal from there, will
build in from Hazelton, going up the
Skeena and Kispiox to the lakes at
the head of the valley and follow this
chain over to Black Water Lake,
which is one of the headwaters of
the Naas River. From there they
can get through to the headwaters
of the Skeena or Stikine Rivers, or
follow one of the forks of the Skeena to Bear Lake on the way to the
Peace River country. This will give
the Grand Trunk Pacific a productive
route right through from Hazelton.
All the railway grade can be kept
down to one per cent. The passes
on the Courier and Biernes Creek
are 4,100 and 4,300 feet above the
sea level respectively, while the elevation of the coal fields Is from 3,000
to 3,600 feet.
"That there is sufficient tonnage
for all railroads is beyond the guessing or estimating stage. Such an output as mentioned means the operation of 300 independent collieries
and the running of 300 trains daily
to the seaboard. The importance of
the development of these coal fields
is immense both from the standpoint
of the vast army of men employed
and the railway activity, to say nothing of the wealth being added to the
country from the product.
"Beyond the groundhog coalfields
lies another immense country of
which very little is known owing to
the difficulties of exploration. This
new territory is drained by the Turn-
again River, which flows into the
Liard River and empties into the Arctic Ocean. It is up there where all
the cariboo make their winter quarters, so that the climatic conditions
must be as favorable and even more
so, than around here.
"In days to come an all-Canadian
trunk line will run up from the Skeena River along the Stikine and on
to Dawson through to Alaska and
then connect with the Siberian railway, thus serving an immense country and at the same time realizing
the dreams of the greatest and most
optimistic railway men of America.
With the development of Northern
Eritish Columbia the possibilities of
this great road are increased and
the day of necessity rapidly approaching."
. o	
Underground  Wires
City Engineer Latornel of Edmon
ton sent a communication to the commissioners recommending that the
paving of lanes be held over until
next year because of the fact that
the lectric light department was con
considering the Installation of a concrete tunnel to carry their wires for
distributing purposes. In view of
this, Superintendent Ormsby has requested the engineer to defer any action that might conf'ict with such
work.
 o	
Lord Rosebery and Libraries
Lord Rosebery opened the new
Mitchell Library in Glasgow recently.
The library cost $500,00, and will
accommodate 400,000 volume. In
his address Lord Rosebery said the
subject of libraries had been exhausted by 320,000 platitudes, uttered at
the opening of the 2,200 libraries
given by Andrew Carnuegie. His
lordship said he was not disposed to
give libraries his qualified benediction. These enormous collections
filled him with hideous depression.
An enormous collection like that of
the Mitchell Library had a stupefying and paralyzing rather than an
encouraging effect. Without being
able to discriminate, Lord Rosebery
said it was futile to provide libraries
NOTICE
Commencing Monday, November
6, train No. ri8 from Prince Rupert
Mondays, and No. 57 from Vanarsdol
Tuesday, will be cancelled. See
regular advertisement for schedule.
A. E. McMASTER,
o31-n3      Superintendent G. T. P. Ry.
Imports of Automobiles
There is no other Industry in the
world which is such a sure indication of a nation's prosperity as the
automobile trade. It Is the first to
be affected In times of depression
and us quickly improves when times
are good, so no more positive proof
of Canada's general prosperity can
be given than the following extract
from a leading New York financial
paper: "Canada is by far the largest market for automobiles exported
from the United States. Of the practically 9,000 machines exported in
the seven months ending with July,
3,724 wentn to Canada; 1,875 to the
United Kingdom; 938 to British
Oceania (chiefly Australia and New
Zealand); 477 to Asia and Oceania
other than British; 444 to South
America; 273 to France; 175 to the
West Indies and Bermuda; 147 to
Mexico; 137 to Italy, and 73 to Germany. These figures do not include
the shipments to non-contiguous territory of the United States, the number sent to Hawaii In the seven
months In question being 202; to
Porto Rico 154, and to Alaska 2.
NORWAY'S TRADE
Report Upon the Main Features of the
Export Business of That
Country
Local Representative of the Norwegian  Celovernment Is Able  to
Furnish Information
John Dybhavn, the acting vice consul for Norway at this port, has received from headquarters, Norway's
Directory of Exporters for the year
1911. It is Issued by the Trade Intelligence Bureau of Norway.
The directory contains six different languages, a complete list of the
articles manufactured in and exported from Norway, and alBO a list of
the principal exporting firms.
This book is of great value as a
guide for all importers, and Mr. John
Dybhavn, who Is temporarily looking after his country's Interests in
this city, will be pleased to furnish
further detailed information.
The introduction of the directory
contains the following information:
'It may be of interest to enumerate
briefly some of the principal
branches of Norwegian manufactures
and articles of exportation. There
are a few main groups of Norwegian
goods, which have been known and
prized for a long time in foreign markets, especially wood pulp, timber,
and fishing products. These still
play a prominent part in the exports
of this country; but on looking
through the list of Norwegian articles
we export, we cannot but notice the
many sided character which at present stamps Norwegian industry and
exportation. The present book gives
the best proof that this is tbe case,
both by variety of articles and the
number of firms mentioned.
"Norway's long coast line has at
all times led her inhabitants to carry
on a lively intercourse with the other
countries; and thanks to improved
means of communication, the exports
of the country have rapidly increased,
both to European and Transatlantic
markets. Experience has proved that
Norwegian goods, under otherwise
similar conditions, are fully capable
of holding their own In the market.
With the natural resources of the
country, we cannot but suppose that
this development will continue. The
forests of Norway form the basis of
her high class wooden articles, wood
pulp and paper industries. The utilization of the immense quantities of
fish contained in the sea also plays
a very Important part in the economy
of the country. Agriculture has undergone a steady development, which
has found expression In the export
figures; and the vast sources of power of which this country is possessed
In her waterfalls will give her industry a strong support in her competition on the articles of the world.
"We can here only draw attention
to a few of the articles of exportation, and for the others refer to the
index.
"Of the vast area of the country
21 per cent is covered with forests,
and it is therefore very natural that
Norway should play an important
part in supplying the markets of the
world with timber. About one and
a half million cubic metres of timber are exported annually. The
greater part Is exported as planed
timber, but considerable quantities
are also sent as hewn, mining and
round timber, etc. Further, considerable quantities of wooden articles
in a more finished form, such as
joinery, coopers' work, moulding,
etc., are exported. We may also
here Include matches, which are sold
even In the most distant Transatlantic markets. This manufacture is
an old and famed branch of Norwegian industry, and the export
amount amounts to more than 5,000
tons per annum. Special mention
must be made of mechanical and
chemical wood pulp to countries in
and beyond Europe. The production
of paper, chiefly printing paper,
packing paper and wood cardboard,
Is also of very great Importance. In
1910 the exportation of paper
amounted to about 138.500 tons.
"The regular important coast fisheries yield the greater part of the
fish products exported. First come
the well known articles of consumption, klipfish and stockfish. In 1910,
30.3 million kilogrammes of klipfish,
and 23.5 million kilogrammes of
stockfish were exported. A cheap
and valued comestible Is salt herring, of which about 1,050,000 hectolitres were exported as well as salt
mackerel. The tinned goods industry has undergone a very great development. This is a branch of Industry for which the country seems
specially adapted, chiefly as regards
preserved fish. Tinned goods are annually exported to the amount of
more than 14 million kroner, and
anchovies for about 900,000 kroner.
With the constantly improved means
of communication, fresh fish has also
become a very Important article of
exportation. In 1910, the exportation of fresh herring, cod, mackerel,
salmon, etc., amounted to more than
10 million kroner. Among the other
products of fishing and whaling, we
may mention fish oil exportations for
the last few years, 150,000 to 170,-
000 hectolitres per annum—roe,
whalebone and fish guano. Altogth-
er the exported products of sealing,
whaling and ordinary fisheries
amount to about 80 to .90 million
kroner per annum.
"The cultivation of land has Increased very considerably, and of agricultural products considerable
quantities are exported. Special attention has been given to the development of cattle breeding and of
dairies. Norwegian butter is much
appreciated in the British market.
In 1910 the exportation amounted
to 1,242,000 killogrammes, besides
561,000 killogrammes of margarine.
Another article which is produced
and exported In large quantities Is
condensed milk, of which 15,600 tons
were exported in 1910.
"As regards mining, we would
name iron pyrites and '•■copper. In
1910, 316,000 tons of iron pyrites
were exported. Among other articles, we may mention feldspar (exportation of about 39,500 tons). The
stone industry is also of great importance, both as regards pavings
and stone for building purposes in
rough and polished qualities. About
200,000 tons of hewn stone are exported annually.
"The other branches of industry
that deserve to be mentioned here
are tbe metal and machine industries,
which in many respects have reached
a remarkable degree of development,
such as shipbuilding, the manufacture of horseshoe and other nails
and the manufacture of machines and
electrical appliances.
"Among the exported articles may
also be Included calcium caribde,
which is largely produced and of
which 50,600 tons were exported in
1910, and nitrate of calcium (Nor-
gensalpet) the manufacture of which
is a Norwegian invention.
"It Is the chief aim of this directory to show in detail what productions our country can offer, and by
practical arrangement and grouping
to facilitate the formation of connections between foreign buyers and
Norwegian producers and exporters
in the various branches. We hope
that the book will prove serviceable
for this purpose."
WANT  CONFIDENCE
J. J. Hill's Solution of the Financinl
Difficulties  in  the  United
States
J. J. Hill appeared unexpectedly
before the monetary commission at
St. Paul to give his opinion on a
financial plan for the country. Mr.
Hill discussed the entire financial
situation. He suggested that for the
purpose of borrowing money first
class bonds and industrial securies
snould be recognized as proper security for loans by banks.
Members of the commission suggested that good notes as now legalized should be included in the plan.
Mr. Hill cited an instance during a
recent stringency when he had wanted to borrow money. - When the
banks were refusing loans on notes
which it other times he considered
first class security, he went to New
York with a lot of railroad bonds
and borrowed what money he
wanted.
"We have money enough in the
country now," he said; "what we
want Is more confidence. When the
people have confidence the business
of the country goes ahead."
Mr. Hill advocated a modification
in the plan for the organization of
the central reserve association, which
is now under consideration, with an
authorized capital Increase from
$300,000,000 to $400,000,000. Each
bank holding stock In the organization should have only one vote, and
no vote for stock ownership; that
there should be no government directors on the national board; that
the national reserve association
should be permitted to make loans
to member banks on security consisting of first class bonds of railroads and first class industrial corporation bonds.
He also advocated that the reserve
association should pay the government interest on government deposits, and that notes of the association should nont be taxed except after
they had been in circulation for sixty
or for ninety days.
Congressman Bonynge asked Mr.
Hill: "With such modifications and
changes in the plan that the committee has under consideration, as
you have suggested, would you then
favor the organization of a central
reserve association,"
"Unqualifiedly, ' Mr. Hill replied.
"It is a necessity and the country
cannot postpone it safely for any
length of time."
1*M*SUy SMlsfacwry'Bat^«
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel Is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and stove putty.    It's
important to every  one using or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BIT THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance,
Investments
Insure in Companies with many years of successful and unquestioned reliability In writing Insurance, and unstained reputation for
paying their claims, whose policies are taken as collateral by all
banks. ■
FIRE, LIFE,  ACCIDENT,  MARINE,  PLATE  GLASS,
EMPLOYE US' LIABILITY
Insure before it Is eternally too late.
Office Third Ave. P. O. Box 275.
Phone 222. PUINCE  RUPERT, B. C.
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USB IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
Oj
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BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB.BBB\3BB3
THE BIG
FURNITURE STORE
-WE SELL-
DRESSERS, CHIFFONIERS, DESKS, BABY
CARRIAGES, BUFFETS, DINING SETS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS, BEDDING,
BLANKETS, COMFORTS, DRAPERY, POR-
TIERS, CURTAINS, (in variety), CARPETS,
MATTING, LINOLEUMS, PICTURES, MIRRORS, MIRROR PLATE, CROCKERY of all
kinds, GLASSWARE in great variety, CUT
GLASS, CUTLERY, STOVES, ENAMELWARE, and GENERAL HOUSE FURNISHINGS  COMPLETE.    Largest Stock in tht North.
F. W. HART,
HART BLOCK
Entrances 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
•SHjWtMHJlttHj'JttttW'H'^^
Queen  Charlotte  Islands   Land  District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret A.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, occupation housewife, Intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described area:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west shore of Kundis
Island, Massett Inlet, five miles
south of tbe most northerly point of
said Kundls Island; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or
less.
MARGARET A. MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Queen  Charlotte Islands Land  District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Almee Merrill, of Massett, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
area:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Kundls Island,
Massett Inlet, five miles south of the
most northerly point of said Kundls
Island; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; tbence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
AIMEE MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated August  28, 1911.
^MIIWIIIIIIMWWIIII
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