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Prince Rupert Journal Apr 21, 1911

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 w
New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
Print* Hupert Jowrtutl
OKI a   3. °v^
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,    FRIDAY,  APRIL  21,  1911
Price,   Five  Cents.
No.  89.
CLEARING RESERVE
Question of Removing Shacks is Again
Brought Before the City
Council
The Rat Menace Is Also Before tlie
lioai-d for Consideration
The question of clearing the
Grand Trunk Pacific reserve has
again come before the council. It
first arise at the meeting of the
council on Wednesday evening when
a report was received from the
health officer going into the rat
question, came up. This report
went on to state that the Prince Rupert rat was really a fine type of
the family and in a fine condition of
health apparently. There was the
danger that he might become affected with disease from the landing of less desirable rodents. The
good work done by the rats as scavengers on the Grand Trunk Pacific
reserve was also referred to by the
LONG SESSION
* (Special to The Journal)        *
* LONDON,      April      21.—The  *
* House of    Commons  sat  until *
* 3:35 Friday morning.    A num- *
* ber of opposing amendments to *
* the  clause in  the  bill  limiting *
* the powers of the    House    of *
* Lords over measures other than *
* money bills being rejected. *
> *
health officer, who acknowledged
that a debt was due to his ratship
on this score. In conclusion it was
recommended that the best methods
of grappling with the question was
by the appointment of an official rat
catcher or by the use of the virus
used formerly.
On this report, Aid. Clayton
moved, seconded by Aid. Morrissey,
to have the Grand Trunk Pacific
reserve cleared at once. At the
present time there was no system of
collecting garbage. These rats fed
on the garbage. If the reserve was
cleared there would be much done
to settle this rat question, as the reserve was a breeding place for these
rats.
Aid. Newton thought Aid. Clayton did not really deal with the rat
question. He proposed that the
health officer's report be referred to
the health committee.
The rat report was referred to the
health committee.
It was decided that Aid. Clayton's
motion was not quite in order here,
to which the alderman agreed. It
was decided to take it up later.
When it was again brought up,
Aid. Kerr wanted to know if it was
the intention of the mover and seconder to clear all the reserves of
the Grand Trunk Pacific.
Aid. Kirkpatrick wanted to know
what authority the city had. Some
of these buildings might be rented
from the Grand Trunk Pacific.
Aid. Clayton argued that the action was proposed on tbe ground of
public health.
It was pointed out that the city
rented its hall, which was on the
reserve. The effect of the motion
might be to drive the city out of
its hall.
Aid. Morrissey contended that the
shack section was a menace to
health. Many of these strikers who
affected the situation now, lived
there. Some of these people who
lived in these shacks paid no rent,
but had property elsewhere which
they  rented.
His Worship said it appeared to
him that these places would have
to be dealt with on their merits.
One place might be clean while the
one next to it might be a menace
"to health. The council could only
deal with those that were unsanitary.
Aid. Morrissey called attention to
the assurance given by the Grand
Trunk Pacific that the reserve was
to be cleared in six months. Business men had to get off the reserve
and why should these others not.
Aid. Clayton, after discussion,
amended his motion, making it read
as a request to the Grand Trunk
Pacific that steps be taken to clear
the reserve of shacks.
The motion carried.
POWER, GAS AND STREET RAILWAY FOR CITY
Tsimpsean Company Proposes to Make Agreement With Prince Rupert and in Doing so to Abandon Rights Claimed
Under Special Charter Given by Legislature—R. Brutinel Representing Organization Puts
His Proposition Before Citizens for Consideration—Will Not Interfere
With the Municipality's Desire to Look After i
Distribution of Light.
The city of Prince Rupert has
now a proposition placed before it
from R. Brutinel, of the Tsimpsean
Light and Power Company. In effect the offer is made by him to set
aside the charter obtained by the
company from the legislature In
1907 in so far as the city of Prince
Rupert is concerned, and in lieu of
it substitute an agreement to be entered into between the city and the
company. The charter of the company has been the subject of considerable criticism in this city. If
a workllng basis can be agreed upon
these objections may be overcome
and something more acceptable to
the city obtained. While Mr. Brutinel does not state so in as many
words, there is little doubt that,
failing a settlement with the city
the company will rely upon its charter and go back to it as a means by
which it may carry on operations
here.
On another page are published
the tentative agreements which Mr.
Brutinel has prepared. These agreements have been submitted to the
council and form a basis upon which
negotiations will be conducted. The
head of the Tsimpsean company
has asked the council to go fully
into these agreements and study the
different aspects of the proposition
so that when the time comes for
action the subject may be discussed
in an intelligent way.
Tlie Tsimpsean company, apparently realizes that this city is to become a great industrial centre and
desires to be in a position to act
quickly in the matter of meeting the
demands to be put upon it in the
supplying of power, etc.
Mr. Brutinel, who ranks high as
an electrical engineer, has prepared
the draft agreements himself. He
prefers to work independent of lawyers to a large extent, and so draft
ed the agreements that are put before the council and which appear
on another page.
Separate Agreements
He has divided the propositions
into three separate departments, the
gas supply, the electrical power supply and the tramway service.
Backed up by plenty of capital, the
Tsimpsean company is prepared to
bring each of these up to the fullest
requirements of the time. His plans
are far advanced and before he left
this morning for the south, Mr.
Brutinel had made all arrangements
for the necessary surveys in connection with the water propositions
held by the company and the route
for the transmission wire.
He will return to the city in a
short time and go fully into the
questions raised with the council,
when a settlement will be sought
and the company will then be in a
position to proceed with the actual
work deemed necessary. The first
work will be that of a gas plant,
followed by a power plant and in
turn the tramline service.
Mr. Brutinel was accompanied to
the city on this trip by Mr. Hay-
ward, the engineer in charge of the
Western Power Company, which is
developing the Stave Lake proposition near Vancouver. Mr. Hayward
has looked into the various schemes
with Mr. Brutinel and is well satisfied with  the prospects.
Addressed the Council
On Thursday evening Mr. Brutinel appeared before the council and
briefly outlined the objects he had
in view.
Mr. Brutinel, before the city coun
ell, explained that his company
would first instal a gas plant. About
1,200 people had agreed to take
gas. The proposition he would submit would be a simple one. The
company would ask to lay the pipes
along the streets and make connections. The city would have the
right to buy the undertaking under
the Municipal Clauses Act conditions after forty years. The Tsimpsean company would agree to waive
the special rights given by the act.
of Incorporation. The company
wanted to work in harmony with
the city.
In connection with the power department the company did not quarrel with the city handling its own
power. Power in large quantities
at a reasonable rate was a most valuable asset to a city. To develop
power by steam was out of the
question where expensive coal and
high labor was continued. All industries nowadays were seeking
electric power. His company was
ready to make a start to develop
power. If they reached Prince Rupert in accordance with an agreement entered into, they would be
willing to make an arrangement to
sell power to the city.
Valuable Asset
The company would ask the city
to buy power from them. This
would be a matter to decide whether
the council would purchase power
or develop it themselves. The company in this power proposition also
was ready to give the city the privilege to purchase the undertaking in
the city under the conditions of the
Municipal Clauses Act after forty
years.
Aid. Clayton asked if this purchase proposal applied only to the
works in the city and not to the
source  of supply.
Mr. Brutinel said it did not apply to the source of power. This
would be a long way out of the city.
He did not think the Municipal
Clauses Act gave the city the power
to hold such a proposition.
Street Railway
In the matter of street railways
Prince Rupert would very shortly
have a need. His company proposed
to begin by building a line from one
end to the other. He proposed to
offer a~very special agreement.    He
did not propose to have one of those
cast iron agreements. The company proposed to take care of the
roadway between the tracks and on
each side which would equal about
one-third of the road. It is proposed to share the profits with the
city on a sliding scale by giving
from 3 per cent to 10 per cent on
the gross earnings, according to the
amount of these earnings.
With respect to the propositions,
Mr. Brutinel said he would have
them ready for the council the next
day.
Time for Consideration
He desired the city to go very
fully into the proposed agreement.
He was not trying to take any advantage of the city and only wanted
careful consideration.
Aid. Morrissey wanted to know if
each of these propositions were separate, if the city could take the gas
proposition, for instance, and reject
the others.
Mr. Brutinel said they were all
independent.
Asked as to the time when the
propositions could be in working
order here, he said that the gas
could be delivered in about six
months after the agreement was
entered  into.
As to the power, that could be
working in about nine months from
date. The tramway service would
depend upon the population. He
should think that with 15,000 of a
population it would be necessary
As to rates, he quoted $1.50 for gas
for cooking and heating; $1.75 for
lighting; while if the city wanted
gas to supplement the electric lighting it would be put in at $1,25 a
thousand.
No better advertisement, he said,
could be had by a city than a prosperous company doing work in it.
Vancouver had profited by the success of the B. C. Electric Company
and  its subsidiary  organizations.
LIBERAL CAMP SPLIT
Frank Oliver is Not Held in the Highest
Favor by Whole of Western
Party.
Appeals   Are   Being   Made   to   Get
Together ami  Heal up
Sores
(Special to The Journal)
EDMONTON, April 21.—Frank
Oliver concluded on of his liveliest
visits to Edmonton yesterday when
he left for Lethbridge, where he
will once more speak on reciprocity.
Mr. Oliver's paper, the Bulletin,
comes out with an appeal to Edmonton Liberals to "Get Together."
The Bulletin further openly de-
dares that there is a faction In the
Liberal camp here that seeks the
political death of the minister of the
interior.
11 is quite apparent that the party
is not by any means a united one
heroic methods will have to be resorted to to bind up the disagreement!! that exist.
TO EXPEDITE WORK
Contractors are Advised by City Council to Make all Haste
Possible.
Question of Extensions of Time Will
Receive Attention of the Board
nnd lie Communicated
EXPECT MORE VEINS
Promising Outlook at Silver Cup Nine
is Reported by the Superintendent.
Work   Closed   Down   Awaiting   Supplies—Will Start up.with
Early Spring
Superintendent Rod McCrimmon,
of the Silver Cup Mine returned to
Hazelton with all the crew on April
1, closing down the property on account of a shortage of supplies. It
will probably be a month or six
weeks before work can be resumed.
Mr. McCrimmon confirmed statements that have been made that the
property is capable of turning out
ore of good grade in sufficient quantities to guarantee dividends for
many years, once given something
better tHian pack-mule transportation off the mountain.
He said: "Owing to a shortage
of supplies, we have been compelled
to close down for a short time. Since
I took charge in January operations
have been contined to the Duke
claim, where a tunnel was driven
112 feet, having more or less ore
all the way. This ore will average
from one to two feet in width and
over 100 feet of depth has been obtained at the face. I got into the
tunnels on the Silver Cup vein and
was pleasantly surprised at the
showing there. When the transportation question is worked out a little better the company will be in a
position to go ahead and make
money out of their ore."
Samples of ore from the Duke
claim sent to the office at Prince
Rupert yielded $136.21 a ton in
silver and lead.
Mr. McCrimmon is of the opinion
that further prospecting on the surface of the Silver Cup group Is very
likely to result in the discovery of
more veins.
COMING TO OUR CITY
Fred Peters, K.C. of Victoria, Will Practice Law in Prince
Rupert.
Prominent Legal Light Has Decided
to Follow Profession
Here
(Special to The Journal)
VICTORIA, April 21.—Fred Peters, K. C, of this city, is about to
give up practice here and move to
Prince Rupert, where lie will follow
his profession. He expects to leave
for the north early in May. Mr.
Peters has been prominent not only
as a lawyer but also in the politics
of tlie county. He was premier of
Prince Edward Island before coming
west many years ago.
....
THE  DOIKLE SKR\ ICE
Tomorrow morning (he Grand
Trunk Pacific steamer Prince
George will arrive In port, thus
beginning the double weekly
service for the company which
is to continue during the summer. The company is taking
sleps to see that the best of service is provided the north this
year.
.   .   •   »
•   .   .   .   .
L. Bullock-Webster has submitted
to the council a revised price for
numbering houses in the city. He
explained in his letter that he did
so because of the decision which
seemed to have been reached to
adopt the block system. This would
take more figures than the consecutive system. He was willing to do
the work for 20 cents a house under
the new system.
HE FOUND NO COAL PROGRESSIVE FIRMS
Prominent Vancouver Investor Had Fruitless Trip to Lignite
Beds.
R. C. Campbell Johnstone in Search
of Mineral  Had Hard Trip
for No Purpose
R. C. Campbell Johnstone of
Vancouver, who is interested deeply
in coal propositions near the headwaters of the Skeena, northwest of
Kispiox, arrived in the city yesterday from Bella Coola, leaving again
this morning for Vancouver.
Mr. Johnstone has just come In
from a search for coal reported almost 45 miles from deep water, in
from Bella Coola. His trip involved
the covering of a distance of 17 ■">
miles, which was made under ex-
ceedlngly bad conditions. To add to
the vexations of the trip, the coal
reported was not to be found.
Instead of coal deposits there was
only lignite and the trip was consequently a fruitless one. Tlie location where the coal was supposed to
be in place was described by Mr.
Campbell Johnstone as exceedingly
inaccessible.
Within easy reach of Bella Coola,
he says there is every indication
that there are good copper and gold
propositions to be developed.
Speaking of the coal of the Skeena headwaters, however, Mr. Campbell Johnstone has no doubt. Last
session of the legislature an act was
passed incorporating the Skeena
and Naas Valley Railway. This line
it to be the means by which the
coal is to be brought to the coast.
It will tap the mines and proceed to
deep water by means of the Naas
Valley.
The coal, he says, Is anthracite,
the only coal of that quality on the
coast. In consequence there will be
a ready sale.    The line of railway is
J.H. Kugler and J. H. Rogers Will Put
Down Sidewalk in Front
of Offices.
Grade  Will  Not  Be Changed  Near
the Market Place in Interests of Teaming
Some business affecting street
work was disposed of at last
Wednesday's council meeting. The
request of The Continental Trust
Company and .1. II. Rogers for the
building of a sidewalk in front of
their new offices on Second avenue
had been referred back to them
with tlie information that such work
was only done as a work to be paid
for by those directly interested.
They had consented to do this and
the engineer recommended permission  being given.
The report was adopted,
A petition wns read asking for tbe
calling for tenders and the not letting of It by day labor, for a plank
roadway on Seventh avenue from
Fulton to Dunsmuir.
Tills was referred to the streets
committee.
The city engineer reported
against the raising of tlie grade of
Third avenue and First avenue, opposite the Market Place, as petitioned for, on the ground that il
would be a disadvantage to increase
the grade by this means from tlie
Grand Trunk Pacltlc yards and the
waterfront.
The report was adopted.
not difficult to build nnd an    early
start will  be made.
It is not the intention of his company to ally with any other line.
Its object Is to open up the coal
properties and develop the district
through which  It runs.
Several of the city street contractors wrote the council on Wednesday evening with respect to the extension of time. The council in reply has stated that the matter Is
receiving consideration and that in
the meantime the contractors should
use all diligence to expedite the
work.
S. P. McMordie & Co. wrote, asking if it was the intention of the city
council to apply the penalty clause,
and asked an immediate answer.
J. R. Morgan wrote that he had
been delayed in consequence of a
change in grade, awaiting the building of a retaining wall and the
strike.
S. II. Watson & Co. wrote that
tbe firm had been delayed awaiting
the engineer's stakes being placed,
by extra grubbing, awaiting a culvert and by the strike.
His Worship thought the council
would have to go into the subject
fully  before  deciding.
Aid. Morrissey moved to inform
the contractors- that the question of
extension of time was only now receiving attention. When a decision
was reached it would be communicated to them. In tlie meantime the
contractors should be advised to
proceed with all due haste.
The  motion  carried.
 o	
TO CLOSE DEBATE
Liberal Party Decide That They Will Cut
Off Discussion in
House
Prorogation Seems  ill Siiilil  hy  .Maj
•_>l—Steel Bounties I'n-
d«-i- Discussion
i Special iii The Journal i
Ottawa. April 31.— The Liberal
caucus has decided em the suggestion of Sir Wilfrid I.Hurler that tlie
debate on reciprocity from the Liberal siii|. can now be wisely cut short
in tbe belief thai the agreement
needs little further vindication before tlie country.
The onus of continuing the debate
and thus delaying prorogation, will
bo left with the opposition speakers,
but it is expected they will not continue the fight much  longer.
A vigorous effort will be made to
reach a vote early in May and wind
up the remaining business before
May  24,
Iron Bounty
There has been some discussion
upon tbe renewal of the bounties on
iron and steel rods for eighteen
months from July I, when, according to the present legislation, they
will expire. It Is not Improbable
that some measure of temporary assistance will be granted along the
lines suggested. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 21,  1911
TIMBER  OF  NORTH
Interesting   Report   Made   by  Cruiser
Upon the Forest
Wealth.
Need of  Preservation of Wealth of
Interior Wooded Lands
Portion
An interesting and exceedingly
informative report has just been
made to Hon. Mr. Taylor, Provincial
Minister of Public Works and Railways, by that veteran prospector
and timber cruiser, Mr. D. D. McPhail, who has presented in concise
form the results of his personal observation and intimate knowledge of
the country comprising the valleys
of Stuart River and Lake, Thatcher
River, Trembleur Lake, Middle River, North Tacla Lake and Driftwood
River—in fact, of all that long navigable waterway stretching north
from a point on the line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific opposite the
mouth of the Stuart River to approximately fifteen miles up Driftwood River, a distance altogether of
about two hundred miles.
Throughout a portion of this distance, or between the mouth of
Stuart River and Trembleur Lake,
the land has been surveyed to the
extent of about two hundred thousand acres, with probably as much
more "blocked out" for future surveys. From Trembleur Lake north
to Driftwood River, and including
the lower valley of the latter stream
250,000 acres would be a conservative estimate of the arable land, so
that to say that there is 500,000
acres of desirable land suitable for
settlement adjacent to these waters
and lakes would, in Mr. McPhall's
opinion, be a reasonable estimate.
This land, he states, will compare
most favorably with that of other
sections of the same district con-
taning large areas, such as the Nechaco and the Bulkley Valley.
Rivers Navigable
Referring more particularly to
navigation, Mr. McPhail reports
that when this water stretch is
spoken of as navigable, it may be
said that a steamer was n early days
taken through to Tacla Lake—the
hull is now to be seen on Trem
bleur Lake—and very recently
steamers have gone through from
Fort George to the first of the canyons on the Stuart River. From the
viewpoint of commercial facility,
however, the adoption of this waterway as a transportation route is
said to be contingent upon works of
improvement being carried out at
various points. These, going north,
and their approximate cost would
be needed improvements.
On tlie Stuart River, first about
five miles above its mouth or junction with the Nechaco River at
Chinlac, there is a widening of the
river and rapids. The trouble here
is lack of water, and the remedy
prescribed, confining the channel,
which work would require the construction of two wing dams and a
removal of a number of boulders, at
a cost of approximately $10,000.
Again, above Chinlac, for about
twelve miles, swift water prevails,
requiring tlie removal of boulders in
places and the provision of one wing
dam about ten miles from the river
mouth, Which would cost about
$5,000. For the next thirty-eight
and a half miles the Stuart is a
slow-flowing, "even" river, a beautiful stream traversing a fine country, more especially to the east. At
fitty-flve and a half miles from the
mouth, there is a short canyon with
abundance of water, but requiring
the removal of boulders at a cost of
$2,000. This Is the last obstacle,
Stuart Lake being entered about
fifty-eight  miles from  Its mouth.
Tatcher River, fifteen and a half
miles in length, although smaller
than the Stuart, runs plenty of water for small steamers. Improvements are required to provide safe
navigation at two points. The difficulties are short rapids and would
be very simply eliminated by the removal of the boulders. The first of
these rapids occurs about two and a
half miles from Stuart Lake, and
the second ahout ten and a half
miles from tnat body of water, expenditures of $5,000 and $2,000 being necessitated.
Middle River, connecting Trembleur and Tacla Lakes, with a
length of approximately twenty
miles, Is an easy-flowing stream,
upon which no improvements are
requisite. Driftwood River is navigable for ahout foru miles, In which
distance no improvements are necessary beyond  the cutting out of a
log jamb about one and a half miles
from North Tacla Lake.
A Possible Waterway
It was thought last year by those
engaged on the project that steamboat communication could be maintained between Fort George and
Stuart Lake, and that experiments
proved a failure, should not be considered detrimental to the ultimate
use of this waterway as a most advantageous factor in settling the
lands adjacent to it. Mr. McPhail
does not think that the difference in
elevation between the mouths of the
Stuart and the Driftwood Rivers
will reach one hundred feet, and it
is his opinion, further that this
route could be made easily available
for five months in the year with a
nominal  expenditure.
There is at present a wagon road
constructed from -Milne's Landing
on the Nechaco River to within a
few miles of Stuart Lake, communication with Fort St. James, across
the Stuart River being secured by
Indian ferry. An extension of this
road northerly would undoubtedly
cross the Stuart River by a bridge
at the "Little Canyon," one mile
below the lake, the present ferry being a long one worked with oars and
poles. Thence the road would follow generally the route taken by the
old Omineca or Manson Creek trail.
In Mr. McPhail's opinion, owing to
its advantageous position along the
waterways just described, the adjacent lands will be rapidly settled.
There wolud, however, be required
some means of communication otherwise during the winter, and more
especially during the spring and late
autumn months. This, he thinks,
would best be provided by diverting
the road from the old Omineca trail
before reaching Tezzeron Lake, and
traversing generally south of that
lake and the Kuzkwa River, this
stream being crossed to the east of
Trembleur Lake. This road would
traverse a good country and give
access with short branches to the
lake and river settlements.
Lying to the north of such a line
of communication is the Nation
Lake and River country, in which,
according to Mr. McPhail, exploration will disclose the existence of excellent areas. An extension of the
road from Trembleur Lake, or from
some point further south as may be
found expedient, into this region
and eventually to the Peace River
is only a question of time.
Rouds Displace Trails
"It occurs in my vocation in this
Province," says Mr. McPhail, in
conclusion, "to travel considerably
over the trails in the first instance
and the wagon roads which are rapidly taking their place, and it Is a
source of satisfaction to me to be
in a position to testify to the care
apparent in the location in those
latter and the good work put in
upon them. The north country,
especially, is yet to be made. It is
a land of grand distances. Your
policy of providing reasonably good
communication throughout a comparatively unknown country will be
abundantly justified in the response
of homeseekers when shown the
way before the advancement of
what will be one of the Province's
greatest districts, and an everlasting source of satisfaction to those
who dictated it. I would, however,
bring to your consideration the fact
that wagon roads fall short of utility where communication thereby is
dependent upon the uncertain ferry.
Touching upon road building, the
advantages from the use of donkey
engines in construction work in
the heavily timbered districts of
Vancouver Island is most noticeable."
 0	
VANCOUVER   LACROSSE
CORONATION DETAILS
Arrangements to be Carried Out at Interesting Event in
London.
The Part Which the King Will Piny
in the Ceremonies In
J line Next
Newsy Lalonde, the greatest home
player in the lacrosse game, lias
signed a Vancouver contract along
with Don Phelan, the Cornwall
home fielder, who was the find of
the season In the N. L, U. in 1910,
and the pair have started for the
coast.
Following the example set by the
New Westminster club in strengthening up by securing outside talent
of repute, the officials of the Vancouver club have set about to build
up a strong team this season, and
they have already signed up the
majority of last season's team and
now have secured the signatures of
Lalonde and Phelan to 1911 contracts.
In addition to signing up Lalonde
and Phelan, Mr. Con Jones, president of the Vancouver Club, has
signed Harry Pickering, the big defence fielder; George Matheson, the
hardworking defence man, and Archie Adamson, the tricky inside
home player.
Job Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
Details connected with the coronation of King George and Queen
Mary are practically settled. The
actual crowning will be performed
by the Archbishop of Canterbury,
while the Archbishop of York will
preach the coronation sermon. In
every feature, the ceremony will at
least equal In brilliancy any previously held. King George, with his
consort, on entering the Abbey, will
proceed immediately to chairs of
state on the south side of the altar.
Presentation of the King to the people for recognition, a survival of the
ancient Teutonic usage of popular
election, will be performed by the
Archbishop of Canterbury. Then
His Majesty will proceed to the
other corners of the thaetre, receiving the acclamations of the congregation.
Next comes the Litany, sung by
two bishops, after which the Archbishop begins the communion service, followed by the sermon. Upon
its conclusion, the King, already
having made the declaration from
which has been eliminated the
clause anathematizing the Roman
Catholic belief, takes the oath
kneeling at the altar.
The follows the anointing and the
King sits in the chair of Edward I,
containing the Lia Fail or Stone of
Destiny, brought from Scone by that
monarch, which legend tells was
"Jacob's Pillow."
After the anointing, the King is
solemnly blessed. Investiture follows. The "Colobium Sidonis," a
surplice of fine white linen or silk,
is put on first, then comes the pall
of cloth of gold with a girdle of
the same material. The King's
heels are touched with the great
golden spurs, and he Is girt with
the sword, which he afterwards
offers upon the altar, whence it is
redeemed for the sum of 100 shillings— an assertion of the independence of the secular arm.
After the armill, or stole, has
been placed on the King's shoulders,
with prayer, His Majesty is invested
with the royal robe, and to him are
handed the orb, the sceptre with the
cross and the sceptre with the dove,
"the rod of equity with mercy."
The placing of the crown, received with cries of "God Save the
King" within the Abbey and sounding of trumpets and firing of guns
without, completes the coronation.
Skeena  |L.and   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanus:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM  H.  HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or lesB,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres more  or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th,  1911.
For Sale
155 % Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McLACHLAN.
Box 324.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for Bale
at $15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southweBt quarter
section 6, township 63, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O. Box 324     Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. FlrBt-cIas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m.    Excellent cuisine;  first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and up
First Avenue.  Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKIXGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean O C
White Sheets   -    -    ADC
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 18fl
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly Bide of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
Skeena Land Districl—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Pills-
bury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described Iands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent
Dated Feb. 19, 1911.
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
Interest In company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office In Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer 1539 Prince Rupert
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to the 22nd day of
April, 1911, at 5 p. m., for the purchase of Block 27, Subdivision of
Lot No. 541, Group 1, New Westminster District, situated in the City
of Vancouver, and being the site of
the old Provincial Court House.
Each tender must be enclosed in a
registered letter and must be addressed to the under 'gned, and
plainlv marked " 'cnder for old
Van"oiv3r Court House Site," and
must be accompai ied by an accepted
cheque for ten per cent of the first
payment of the purchase money.
Payment for the property will be
accepted in instalments of one-
quarter of the purchase money.
The first of such instalments to be
paid within thirty days after the acceptance of the tender, and the other
three annually thereafter, with Interest at the rate of 6% per annum.
In the event of the person whose
tender is accepted failing to complete the first instalment within
thirty days of the notice of such acceptance the sale to him will be
cancelled and his ten per cent deposit forfeited. The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The highest or any tender
will not necessarily be accepted. No
commissions of any kind will be allowed.
WM. R. ROSS.
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.   C.
March 7th, 1911.
Prince Rupert  Private
  Agency —
Detective
N. McDonald, Manager
AH kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
WM. S. HALL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKKRSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lnforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on its Easterly
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
ehains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb.,  1911.
Skeena   Land   |DIstrIct—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
ORAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Re-
viow," Masset, Q.O.I
DR.  W.  B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.3 V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing »t a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; tlience east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT  A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
NOTICE
TENDERS for the installation at
the Prince Rupert School of twelve
(12) Red Cross Sanitary Closets,
furnished by the Government, will
be received by the undersigned up to
noon on Wednesday, March 22nd,
1911, for transmission to the Public
Works Department. The successful
tenderer will be called upon to furnish a bond in two sureties in a
sum equal to 50 per cent of the contract price. Specifications can be
seen at the Government Agent's Office, Prince Rupert. The lowest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. H. McMULLIN,
Government Agent.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that' Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore In a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogilvie, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; tlience east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tlience south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
64 0 (lores
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138 •
vr '•■ ■ v-
Friday, April 21, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
     0N THE BANKS OF THE SKEENA	
The Only Main Line Townsite in British Columbia in which the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company has Announced its Joint Ownership
Look at the Nap
Ellison, you will find, occupies
the strategic commercial point which
seems hound to command all the
trade of the Interior tributary to
Prince Rupert. It is where the steel
rails of the transcontinental railway from the Atlantic touch the salt
waters of the Pacific on the navigable waters of the Skeeno River.. As
a port it will be second only to
Prince Rupert in the northern part
of this province and is also second
to this city as the only other town-
site in which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and the Government
are jointly Interested and in which
lots are now offered for sale.
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What are We Here For ?
We .are all Pioneers. Not here for our health, but to make money. No man ever
saved more than a competence on a salary; few do that. To get a footing on "Easy
Street" you have to invest. DOLLARS don't grow in your pocket, or in a stocking.
They must be put to work. Old Russell Sage said: "Plant a few in a new country
and see how fast they grow." That's what your Uncle is telling you, and here is
the biggest opportunity of this kind that is likely to knock at your door this year.
// You Own Ellison Lots List  Them   With  Us.
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Read Current History
Prince Itupert lot speculators do
not need to have pointed out to
them what magic lies in the announcement that the great railway
company and the government arc
partners in the Ellison townsite.
That should be enough to bring
them a-iuiining. But not everybody has the time to read the newspapers -s closely as your unrlc. In
the Manitoba Free Press of April
5th, for instance, there was a big
headline reading: "Hundred and
Seventy New Towns to be Bot'n in
Western Canada During the Coming
Year." Reading the list one finds
many are Grand Trunk Pacific
towns, but not one in British Columbia. No, Ellison and Prince Rupert
are the townsites in this province in Welch the railway is directly
interested at this time.
ELLISON—Where Atlantic Locomotives will toot salute to Pacific Steamers on the Skeena River—ELLISON
WHY ELLISON SHOULD GROW
ONE of the most popular of all
the official reports published
by the British Columbia
Columbia Government is the one
bearing upon its title page the caption: "New British Columbia,"
which has become generally known
as "Bulletin No. 22," that being the
official number of the report. It has
been widely distributed and you
will have little difficulty in finding
one. On one page of this popular
report you will read this official
declaration: "Upper Skeena will
become one of the garden spots of
British  Columbia."
ELLISON, from its advantageous
position, with the Skeena River
navigable for large steamers at Its
front and a great transcontinental
railway intersecting -it, should naturally become the metropolis of the
wonderful garden spot of British
Columbia referred to in the official
report.
ELLISON lots are ready sellers.
Why? Just study the map a minute
or two.
ELLISON is a townsite in which
the Government and the Grand
Trunk Pacific are active partners.
There can, therefore, be not even a
shadow of doubt as to its future success. You are invited to share in
this certain success by investing in
a few town lots while they are at
bottom prices. There are only a
few on sale anu unless you are
Johnny-on-the-spot on the day announced as the Opening Day of our
sale you may be disappointed. Better make your deposit as soon as
possible and we will get you in on
it at the prices fixed for our first
offering.
ELLISON should, within a short
time, have a regular train service,
as it Is but a little distance from
l^Ile 104, to which point It is expected that trains from Prince Rupert  will  be  running  this  summer.
ELLISON may not be the only
pebble on the Skeena River beach,
but it certainly is the only townsite
on that navigable water In which
the railway company have announced themselves interested. No
doubt next year there may be other
additions and sections put on the
market, but by that time prices will
Ask
Uncle Jerry
For reservation of lots in Ellison or
Rogers' Addition to Ellison, write
or wire
J .   H .   KV G L E It
Prince   Rupert,   II.   C.
have gone  up.     Now  you   have   a
chance to be in on the ground floor.
DOLLARS invested in good
ground, rapidly grow. Did you look
at that map?
WHERE the Grand Trunk Pacific
and the Government are Joint owners in a townsite the lots should be
regarded as a safe invest nent. Your
money invested in ELLISON, or in
Rogers addition or any section that
may be offered later, is safeguarded
by every legal method human foresight can conceive. Where one
might and properly should hesitate
before investing in townsites promoted by individuals or town-promoting companies, there can be no
hesitancy or misgiving as to town
lots in  which  the Government and
the Grand   Trunk   Pacific   Railway
are jointly interested.
ELLISON is different.. Do you
catch on? What better guarantee
can you possibly look for?
ELLISON lots should double and
treble and then go up some. It Is
believable that they will soar four
or five times above present prices.
You are a lucky chap today if you
own even one. If you should think
of selling it and want quick action,
list It with us. We feel confident
the demand for these lots will exceed the number wc have at present
to offer.
PRINCE RUPERT'S brief history
will be repeated in the sale of
ELLISON town  lots.
ELLISON should have the most
rapid growth of any new town in
British Columbia or anywhere else.
Lots in the sections we are now
offering for sale, as well as such
additions and sections that may be j
offered later, may be calculated to
bring investors similar returns to
those resulting from the first sale
of Prince Rupert town lots.
ELLISON, where the Grand Trunk
Pacific Transcontinental trains from
the Atlantic will first strike that
wonderful Skeena River.
ELLISON is probably the greatest
opportunity for Investing a few dol
lars on a reasonably certain chance
of winning big profits you are likely
to see this year. But don't forget
that the number of lots is limited
and you will have to hurry some if
you want to pick out one of the
choicest locations.
ELLISON needs at present merchants, hotel men, "the baker, the
butcher and the candlestick maker,"
more than 'nt speculators, but they
will com ■ la er all right, as they
did in Prince Rupert, and pay BIG
RENTS.
ELLISON trades people  will  live
TIME TO GET A "HONCK
wiMnviaf
in a town where railway freight
rates will always be regulated by
the competition of water transportation, as Ellison will be the last Important landing up the Skeena
River. It Is where the railway leaves
the Skeena Valley to follow that of
the famous Bulkley Valley.
ELLISON is your opportunity.
GRAB IT. "Opportunity knocks at
every man's door.". Knocks all the
time but some people are sleepy.
ELLISON is on the market NOW.
It is very doubtful if any other
Grand Trunk townsite in Britisii
Columbia will be on the market this
year. Better come in early and get
a little Ellison in your list of holdings. Start a few dollars to work
there and see what they will earn
E
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DO YOU SEE THAT HUMP?    THAT'S ELLISON.
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
Sale Begins Wednesday Morning, April 26th, 1911
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER °"^2^
Prince Rupert
British Colombia
Trunk Terminal
ELLISON is destin 1 to be the
principal shipping point not only for
the agricultural belt in the Bulkley
and uujacent valleys—just glance at
the map again and see what a vast
country will depend on ^llison for
its supplies and transportation for
its products. And then, when Grand
Trunk officials announce the fact
that it is THE townsite in the Hazelton di.trict in which their company
is interested, you are reminded of
the great mining activity thpt district is promised this season, the
machinery to go in and the rich ore
to come out.
ELLISON, the metropolis of "The
garden spot of British Columbia."
Remember that railway townsites
cannot be chosen 'ii British Columbia like they are on the prairie between Winnipeg and Edmonton—
every eight miles a tewn, every hem-
dred arj 'hirty miles a divisional
point. In British Columbia there is
great engineering ability required to
lay out a 'oute. many natural obstacle.- to contend with, and towns
must be Rented where the engineers
can find suitable land for sidings.
Ellisoi > an iieeal spot for a town
outside of its superiority geographically. Like grape nuts, "There's a
reason,' wliy It should be at the
point where the railway leaves the
Skeena  Valley.    Look at your map.
ELLISON is the first spring opining of Grand Trunk Pacific offering.'
in the way of town lot opportunities.
There may be others later, but
there's no certainty when. Jump in
and take n flyer. Money will not
grow in your pocket. It should
grow eveiy month this summer If
you plant it in ELLISON. How can
you lose? You don't hnve to put up
the whole.' price, you know. Come
early ind selct Ellison lots, 20%
cash, jnlanee easy terms, 7% Interest. Sel"e-t " gers Addition lot:e
10% cash, 10% per month, no Interest. A few lots In Ellison Town-
site for j»le—Inside lots $250.00
each; orne'r lots $350.00 each. A
few lots In Rogers Addition to Ellison Townsite for sale—Inside lots
$150.00 e'ach; corner lots $250.00
each.
Ask
Unci a Jerry
I'm- reservation <if lots in Ellison or
Rogers' Addition tei Ellison, write
or  wire
I .    II .    K C G L E R
Prince   Rupert,   IJ.   (\
^ft PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 21, 1911
prince Kupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, April 21, 1911
FRED PETERS COMING
The announcement that Fred Peters, K. C, of Victoria, is to take
up the practice of law here, indicates that the outside is still alive to
the possibilities of ibis city in every
business and profession. .Mr. Peters
has passed the stage of life when
he is to be stirred simply by a love
of a change. His coming can only
be actuated by the prospects which
Prince Rupert has in the immediate
future.
He will be welcomed by the legal
fraternity of the city no doubt, as
he is a solicitor of long practice and
high repute. He is known through
out the province and, in fact,
throughout Canada in connection
with his profession. His opinion, in
fact, on more or less knotty questions was sought last year, it was
generally understood, in connection
with the city's legal business.
A reference has been made to the
possibility that he might be "an
attorney general in embryo." Mr.
Peters has been attorney general in
fact in one of the provinces of this
country, Prince Edward Island. For
some time he was premier of that
province but found the call of the
west too strong and so came a number of years ago to the farthest west
nad proceeding to build up a practice in partnership with Sir Hibbert
Tupper.
He represented the Dominion
Government as counsel in the Ben-
ring Sea arbitration and has filled
many other important positions, so
that Prince Rupert is acquiring in
Mr. Peters a man who is an honor
to his profession. He was at one
time prominently mentioned as a
probable successor to Hon. James
Dunsmnir as Lieutenant Governor
of the province.
The presence of Mr. Peters, with
the wide and varied experience
which he brings to bear, will be to
the advantage of the whole legal
profession of the city.
railway policy those who should
have been friendly had maligned
him and endeavored to destroy
whatever character he had in his
adopted home. On a motion proposed by Mr. Leonard Tait and seconded by Mr. J. J. Bittancourt, the
name of Mr. Jardine was placed on
the membership roll.
FAVOR SINGLE TAN
NEW WESTMINSTER—In the
referendums the ratepayers decided
by a small majority that they did
not want a high school erected on
Tipperary. They voted down the
proposal to exempt the sites of
churches, colleges and schools from
taxation. The proposal to exempt
improvements from taxation was
carried   by a  large  majority.
DELAYED ACTION
City Council   Has   Not Acted  Upon
the Resignation of Aid.
Pattullo
MUCH   PAVING
STUDY AGREEMENTS
The Tsimpsean Power Company
has placed before the city council
three propositions with respect to
gas, power and street railways.
These have been presented in the
form of tentative agreements, which
the council will have to thresh out
with Mr. Brutinel and reject, revise
or confirm. The citizens, in any
event; will have to pass upon the
agreement reached.
The questions involved are important. The fullest consideration
should be given lo these so that the
best agreement possible may be
made for the city. It is a duty
which every citizen owes to the
place that he study these questions
to the fullest extent and be prepared
to give a ripe judgment when the
time comes to vote on the propositions. This is the people's business
and  should  be carefully studied.
By taking a rational view of the
situation, and giving the propositions careful study it will be possible, undoubtedly for Prince Rupert
to reach a good agreement with the
Tsimpsean company. The agreements should not be rushed into
without full consideration. There
should on the other band be no unnecessary delay. Tlie utilities concerned are essential to the life of
the city. They will likely be required before most of us realize.
The present is a time to study the
situation and so be prepared for a
ripe decision  when the hour arrives.
VICTORIA—What Victoria is doing in the way of assisting the good
roads movement is indicated by the
fact that the purchasing agent is
now calling for tenders for the construction of approximately 600,000
square yards of asphalt pavement—
no less than thirty-six miles of pavement. This work, in addition to
that already let—some 200,000
yards—calls for an expenditure of
nearly $2,000,000. The demand
for improved streets, constructed
under the local improvement
scheme, is so great that with all
the large amount of work projected
still another call for tenders will
probably soon  be made.
 o	
ENGINE IS HERE
City  Will  Not Take  It  Over  Until
Agreements Are Forth-
coining
The combined hose automobile
and chemical engine has reached the
city and is being subjected to a
test under Mr. Lee, representing the
supplying company. It has been
discovered that the agreements and
specifications have never been returned to the city after execution
here. Pending the arrival of these
the council will refuse to formally
accept the engine. Temporary
quarters will be found but it will
be without prejudice to the city
that this accommodation is afforded.
DEATH  OF  W.  8.   McDONELL
Well-Known Hotel Proprietor in the
Interior, Pusses Away at Ha.
zclton   Hospital
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|     News of the Province     %
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ENROLLED    AS    CONSERVATIVE
VICTORIA — Conservatives at
Esquimau elected officers as follows for the ensuing year: Honorary presidents, Mr. Richard McBride, Mr. C. E. Pooley and Mr,
H. D. Helmcken, K. C.; president,
Mr. R. H. Pooley; vice president,
Mr. Duncalf; secretary, Mr. J.
Saunders. Being invited to address
the meeting, Mr. John Jardine said
that simply because lie saw fit to
support     Hon.     Richard     McBride's
W. S. McDonell, the well-known
Telkwa hotel keeper, and son of R.
J. McDonell, of Hazelton, died at
the Hazelton Hospital Friday afternoon at four o'clock, after nearly a
month's illness, says the Omineca
Herald, of Hazelton. The cause of
his untimely demise was heart failure. He was first taken ill at Jiis
place of business in Telkwa, nearly
a month ago, with inflammatory
rheumatism and he was brought to
the local hospital for treatment.
Since his arrival here relatives and
friends have hovered between fear
and hope for his ultimate recovery
but a turn for the worse carried him
off.
The young man was born in Victoria and lacked four days of being
23 years old at the time he died.
Besides the sorrowing father, two
brothers, George and James, and a
sister, Mrs. Robert Burns, of Fort
George, are left to mourn his loss.
He was a member of Omineca Aerie,
F. O. E., and was secretary of the
Conservative Club at Telkwa.
"Billy" McDonell, as he was
known by a host of friends, came to
the interior from Port Essington
nearly a year ago wliere he had resided with his father for a number
of years. To give a start In life his
father purchased and gave to him
the New Telkwa Hotel at Telkwa
early last summer, which he was engaged in conducting up to the time
of his illness. As one of the thoroughly popular young men of the
district, and of a wide acquaintance
the news of his demise will be
learned with regret by one and all.
The body has been embalmed and
will be taken to the coast for burial
as soon as navigation opens.
The city council has not yet acted
upon Aid. Pattullo's resignation.
The letter of Aid. Pattullo came up
at last Wednesday's meeting for the
first time, but in view of the fact
that the election must be brought
within ten days after the acceptance
of the resignation, action was deferred.
Upon the reading of the letter of
Aid. Pattullo, His Worship said he
felt all would regret that Aid. Pattullo found it necessary to resign.
He supposed the only thing to be
done was to accept it. If deemed
wise it might be left over as the
act required the holding of the election within ten days from Its acceptance.
After some discussion it was decided to leave the matter of the acceptance of the motion over.
With respect to the forfeit to be
collected in case of a resignation,
about which Aid. Pattullo asked for
a decision, some discussion took
place, when it was interpreted by
the mayor that the infliction of a
forfeit was optional.
Aid. Newton felt that under those
circumstances the forfeit should not
be collected.
This was acquiesced in by the
other members of the council, but
action was delayed until the resignation is dealt, with.
 o	
SPORTS
KILLED BY FREIGHT CAR
George W. McMillan, one of the
best-known football players on the
Pacific Coast, was i u over and almost instantly killed by a freight
car in front of his grain warehouse
at Thirteenth and Irving streets in
Portland. McMillan's body was severed just above the hips. He was
US years old. In crossing the track
McMillan was forced to pass within
a few inches of the end car. At
this instant a locomotive in coupling
on to the cars, shoved them along
several feet. McMillan was knocked
down and ground under the car
trucks.
AUTOMATIC    GUNS    PROHIBITED
first
guns
use
By an order-in-council just
passed by-the provincial executive,
the future use of automatic guns by
British Columbia sportsmen has
been prohibited as from the
of September next. These
have only come into general
during the past few years and have
been particularly favored by duck
hunters, who with them have been
enabled to slaughter the ducks by
wholesale. The genera] opinion is
that their use is the reverse of
sportsmanlike and the action taken
by the government will meet with
the cordial approval of true sportsmen in all parts of the country.
By a second order-in-council a
closed season for sheep during the
ensuing two years has been prescribed in the districts of Yale,
Okanagan and Similkameen, and
another year of immunity has been
granted the wapiti in all parts of
the mainland as from September 1.
The wapiti of Vancouver Island already are under similar protection.
Rev. J. P. Westman of Nelson has
been appointed a field secretary for
the Methodist Sunday school and the
young people's societies, and will
have charge of the work in Alberta
and Saskatchewan. He will assume
his new duties in June. The growth
of the work demanded the appointment.
WANTED
WANTED—An assistant in the furniture business. Apply to J. F.
MacDnnald, Second avenue.
C. H. Sawle and Mrs. Sawle have
returned from a trip to Victoria,
Vancouver and New Westminster.
J. W. Stewart, head of the Foley,
Welch and Stewart Company, Is In
the city on business connected with
the season's work at this end of
the line.
The evidence in the "strike" cases
before the magistrate, is all in. The
judgment will be given by Magistrate Carss tomorrow morning at 10
o'clock.
BOARD WANTED
Gentleman desires board and room
in private family; $10 to $15 per
week. State conveniences. Address
R. A. M., "Journal."
If you want the honey
That comes from the hive
Take up the phone and
Call one, double five.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAH) UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 21S Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■tMMa
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEEEFOREMOST EVER SINCE
:SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA -
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
New Twin Screw Steamer
Prince Rupert
For Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Fridays at 8:00 a. m.
I High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
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EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious Housewife
1 MERRYFIELD'
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CASH GROCERY
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S. S. "PRINCE RUPERT" sails for Stewart, Thursdays, 8:00 a. m.
Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, Fridays, 8:00 a. m. '
S. S. "PRINCE ALBERT" for Port Simpson,   Naas   hiver   Points,
Massett, Naden Ht.rbor, every Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.
and for
Refuge Bay, Skidegate, Queen Charlotte City, Lockeport, Pa-
cofi, Jedway, Ikeda Bay, Rose Harbor and return    via Queen
Charlotte City, ee-e.-y Saturday, 1:00 p. m.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAi-VAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Information and tickets obtainable from the office hereunder
mentioned. Trans-Atlantic steamship bookings by all lines arranged
A. E. NcNASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING MATERIAi,    CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIB-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW  WELLINGTON  GOAL
All   orders  promptly  filled—see  us
for prices.
PHONE 116 PHONE 116
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCV
Through tickets to,all points in the
United States and Canada by
The Northern Pacific Railway
The finest train across the continent.
Connecting at NEW YORK, BOSTON
PORTLAND and HALIFAX with ATLANTIC STEAMERS for all point* In
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, GERMANY,
FRANCE, ITALY, NORWAY and
SWEDEN, by WHITE STAR. RED
STAR, AMERICAN - DOMINION,
WHITE STAR DOMINION, CUNARD
FriENCH LINE, NORTH GERMAN
LLOYD, HAMBURG AMERICAN .and
CANADIAN NORTHERN Steamship*
For all Information write me, or
call at office:
J. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
f
FAMOUS
Princess Line
^F^
Princess
May
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
FRIDAY, APRIL 21
3. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  r'.gbt down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGBNT8
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
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iRemember
*
1 That we
I Import
A
Our Wines
*
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* direct from Europe; and that
*
...   no house in Prince Rupert can
*
* equal   them   for  quality.     No
T
* better can be bought anywhere
* In the Province.
*
* specialty  of
We make a
j Family Trade
*      and guarantee satisfaction
*
*
*	
'?
+       We  also  carry  a  complete
J   stock of other
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
The best local beer on the
market.
CLARKE BROS.
*    Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
I Telephone 30
*
*
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Third Arenne
nH Friday, April 21, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tentative Agreement
BETWEEN:
THE  CITY  OF  PRINCE   RUPERT,
of    the   first   part,    hereinafter
called the "Corporation."
AND
R. BRUTINEL, of    the    Tsimpsean
Light and Power Company, of the
second part, hereinafter called the
"Company."
Whereas the Company is now developing Hydro-Electric Power to be
delivered in the vicinity of Prince
Rupert and is desirous of entering
the City of Prince Rupert for the
purpose of supplying various industries and the inhabitants with electricity for heat and power purposes.
And whereas, the Corporation
deem it to be in the best interest of
the City that a plentiful supply of
cheap electrical energy be made
available to the citizens and the industries located in the City of Prince
Rupert, they therefore enact as follows:—
The Company subject to the
conditions hereinafter mentioned
is hereby empowered to establish,
set up, maintain and operate,
pole lines, wire lines, substation
and all necessary appliances and
appurtenances necessary for the
manufacture and regulation of
Electricity and for the sale of the
same to consumers within the
City of Prince Rupert.
Duplicate Line
To avoid the duplication of
pole lines the Company shall
wherever it is possible to do so,
carry their wires on the pole lines
of the Municipal distribution system, and if the Company establishes their lines in certain portions of the City not yet reached
by the Corporation System, the
Corporation shall have the right
to make use of the Company's
pole line. And the Company shall
pay to the Corporation or the
Corporation to the Company as
the case may be, a rental based
on the rate of 2 5c per arm per
annum for each pole used and
each occupant of the pole will
look after the upkeep and maintenance of their lines and cross
arms the upkeep and maintenance
of the pole resting with the
owner.
Underground Lines
Whenever the Corporation will
decide to carry their own lines in
underground conduits the Company agrees to place their lines
underground simultaneously without any compensation whatever.
Light and Small Power
The Company shall not have
the right to sell electricity for direct lighting, nor for power in
units of five horse power or less
standard rating, within the limits
of the City of Prince Rupert, the
Corporation reserving the exclusive right to supply current for
light and power consumers using
five H. P. or less.
All Demand
The Company shall use their
best efforts to meet al! demands for power at all times and
the prices charged for power
shall be according to the following scale of prices:
From 10 to 50 H. P., not exceeding $45 per H. P. per year.
From 50 to 100 H. P., not exceeding $40 per H. P. per year.
From 100 to 200 H. P., not ex
ceeding $38 per H. P. per year.
From 200 to 300 H. P., not exceeding $36 per H. P. per year.
From 300 to 500 H. P., not exceeding $34 per H. P. per year.
From 500 to 1000 H. P., not exceeding $32 per H. P. per year.
Over a 1000 H. P., not exceeding
$30 per H. P. per year.
Corporation
The Corporation shall purchase
from the Company all the electric
energy required for the lighting
of the streets, houses, shops, establishments of the inhabitants of
Prince Rupert and also for the
supply of energy to all consumers
using five horse power or less and
the Company shall sell to the
Corporation all the electricity required for lighting and small
power use as hereinbefore specified. And the Company shall reserve for the use of the Corporation and the Corporation shall
buy from the Company power on
the minimum basis of 30 K. W.
per annum per each thousand Inhabitants residing in the City of
Prince Rupert, and the Corporation agrees to purchase and the
Company agrees to sell such electrical energy according to the
scale of prices stated.
Measure
The power shall be delivered
and measured at the City limits
or at the substation to be provided by the City at some convenient
place and the measure of power
supplied shall   be based   on   the
maximum load to be registered by
meters supplied respectively one
by the Corporation and one by the
Company.
Time
The Company shall proceed to
the development work with all
due diligence and be in position
to supply electricity to the Corporation and other power consumers within nine months from
date, when the Corporation will
enter Into a contract for the
minimum - of 200 E. H. P. at
prices  hereinbefore  mentioned.
Section 284 of chapter 48 Statutes of British Columbia, 1909,
shall be deemed to be part of this
agreement.
Not Exclusive
The powers, rights and   privileges granted to the Company by
this  agreement shall   not  be  exclusive and the City reserves the
right at  the expiration  of  forty
years, after giving one year's notice and at the expiration of every
period of five years thereafter, to
take over  the pole lines,  substations or power plants the    Company may have within the    City
limits and  the basis of the compensation  shall be arrived at in
the manner and procedure provided by Section  284 of Chapter 48,
Statutes    of    British     Columbia,
1909, and no other.
Ratification
The Corporation shall have the
right to obtain ratification of this
agreement by the Legislature  of
the  Province and  the    Company
does by the acceptance    of    this
Franchise  waive absolutely    and
without  any   reservation   whatsoever any special right    and privileges which may have been granted to them by the Act of Incorporation, being Chapter 60, S. B. C,
1907, having reference only and
solely to the manufacture and distribution  of  electric energy    for
light and power within the limits
of the City of Prince Rupert.
 o	
Tentative Agreement
BETWEEN:
THE   CITY  OF   PRINCE   RUPERT,
of  the  First    Part,     hereinafter
called "The Corporation."
AND
R.   BRUTINEL,  of    The Tsimpsean
Light and Power Company, of the
Second    Part, hereinafter    called
"The Company."
1. The Company shall have the
power to establish and operate, subject to the conditions hereinafter
mentioned, lines of railway for the
conveyance of passengers in the
City of Prince Rupert by means of
cars propelled by electricity, upon,
along and across the streets which
may be determined jointly by the
Council and the Company.
Powers
2. The Company shall enjoy all
licenses, rights and privileges necessary to operate their cars in the
manner successfully in use elsewhere, including the right to open
said streets for the purpose of constructing, laying down and maintaining railway ' tracks, lines and
poles, and do all things incidental
to the building, operation and maintenance of a Street Railway System;
Provided, that the Corporation be
not bound to supply any land, water
or other property whatsoever.
3. All the works necessary for
constructing and laying down the
said several railway tracks, including the location of the tracks and
rails in the streets, shall be made
with care and according to the rules
of the act under the supervision of
competent Engineers.
Gauge
-I.    The gauge of the said railway
shall be four feet eight    and    one-
half inches.
Rails
5. The pattern of rail to be used
by the Company shall be of an approved type.
City Grades
6. The Company in the construction of the said railway tracks, shall
conform to the grade of the various
streets through which the said
tracks will run, as furnished by the
City Engineer, and shall not In any
way alter the same.
Paving Repairs
7. The Company shall at their
sole expense pave, maintain and
keep in good state of repair that
portion of the street lying between
the two rails in the case of a single
track and also a strip not exceeding 12 inches in width outside of
the said rails. And in the case of a
double track that portion of the
street lying between the two tracks,
but not including a strip of twelve
(12) Inches outside of the two inside rails of the said    double   track
the Corporation and the Company,
the Corporation paying one-half of
said cost, and the Company paying
the other half.
Repairs
8. In the construction of said
railway, the Company after having
made the excavations and laid down
the rails and other apparatus belonging to the road, shall remove all
surplus of grounds and other material arising from said excavations,
and reconstruct the street without
unnecessary delay and the City shall
have the right to reconstruct at the
expense of the Company that part of
the street wherein the Company
shall have made excavations for the
construction of said railway in order
to place the same in the same condition it was at the time the excavation was made.
9. Material used by the Company
for paving between their rails shall
be of the same kind as that already
used for paving the part of the
street excavated for the purpose of
laying the track or appurtenances
thereof, or of any other material
satisfactory to the City Engineer.
But the Company shall not be required to pave their portion of the
street if the street has not yet been
paved or is not being paved by the
Corporation. But upon receiving
from the Corporation a written notice that the paving of the street
will be proceeded with by the Corporation, the Company shall make
all necessary preparation to pave
their portion of the street simulta-
neoujly with the Corporation. Failing which, the Corporation shall
have the right to pave that portion
of the street incumbent on the Company at the sole expense of the
Company.
10. The Corporation shall have
the right to take possession of and
use any of the streets traversed by
the rails of the Company, or any
section thereof that may be required, for constructing or repairing
drains, or for laying down or repairing water or gas pipes, or for
other purposes within the province,
and privileges of the Corporation,
without the Company being entitled
to claim any compensation or damage therefor; the tracks in such
cases to be relaid by and at the expense of the City.
Speed
11. The speed of the cars shall
not be more than ten (10) miles an
hour, nor more than six (6) miles
an hour when turning street corners and at the intersecting lines of
the routes on which the Company
may establish and operate its passenger electric railway. When a car
is to stop at an intersecting street,
the said car shall be stopped before
crossing the said intersecting street.
Stops
12. The cars shall be stopped at
crosswalks and not in front of any
intersecting street, except to avoid
collisions or accidents.
Fores
13. The Company shall not be
entitled to charge any rate exceeding five (5) cents for the conveyance of a passenger from one point
to another (either going or returning). A passenger on paying his
fare, shall be entitled to a transfer
without further charge from any
one of the Company's cars to another, at a point where routes connect or intersect, so as to enable
him to make one continue"" trip
from one point to another; children
carried on their parent's knees shall
be conveyed free of charge.
Tickets and Rebates
14. The Company shall also be
held to sell tickets in all their offices and cars, at the rate of six for
twenty-five (25) cents and twenty-
five for one dollar ($1.00), and to
provide tickets for school children
at the rate of eight (8) for twenty-
five (25) cents, and the Company
shall also sell eight (8) tickets for
twenty-five (25) cents available between the hours of six and eight
o'clock In the morning and between
the hours of five and seven o'clock
In the evening, on all week days.
Running Time
15. The time for tunning the
cars'shau be from six a. m. to twelve
p. m. on all the lines, with the
privilege of running to 6 a. m. After
12 p. m. the Company shall have the
right to charge ten cents for each
passenger, without transfer.
16. Cars shall run at intervals
as may. be agreed upon from time
to time by the Company and the
Corporation.
Damages
17. The Company shall be liable
for all damages which may be occasioned to any person by reason of
the construction, maintenance, repairs or operation of the railway.
Line of Building
18. The Company shall submit to
the City Council for their approval a
plan showing the lines they propose
shall be paved and   kept  In    good  to build, and the Corporation    shall
state of repair at joint  expense   by have the right to ask for the imme
diate building of the lines upon the
approved route, whenever the said
streets shall be graded.
19. When the Company shall begin work in any street, they shall be
held to pursue the same diligently
and without any interruption.
dealing of Track
20. The Company shall, under
instructions from the City, keep
their track free from ice and snow,
and the City may at its option remove the whole or such part of ice
and snow from curb to curb as it
may see fit from any sueet or part
of street in which cars are running,
including the snow from the roofs of
houses, thrown or falling into the
streets, and that removed from the
sidewalks into the streets with the
consent of the City, and the Company shall be held to pay one-half
of the cost thereof.
Right of Way
21. The cars of the Company
while in operation on the said railways shall have the right to use the
said railways as against all other
vehicles whatsoever, and all other
such vehicles using the railways
whether meeting or proceeding in
the same direction as the said cars
or carriages, shall turn out of the
said trackof the railways, and permit the said cars'and carriages to
pass, and shall in no case and under
no pretence whatever obstruct or
hinder the passage thereof, and the
free use of the said railways by the
said cars of the Company.
Taxes
22. The Company shall pay to
the Corporation in lieu of taxes and
other charges a percentage of their
gross earnings arising from the operation of the said street railway
within the City of Prince Rupert,
and the said percentage shall be on
a sliding scale as provided hereunder.
3 per cent of the gross earnings
up to $600,000, or any portion
thereof.
4 per cent on the next $400,000
or any portion thereof.
5 per cent on the next $500,000
6 per cent on the next $500,000
or any portion thereof,
or any portion thereof.
7 per cent on the next $500,000
or any portion thereof.
8 per cent on the next $500,000
9 per cent on the next $500,000
or any  portion  thereof,
or any portion thereof.
10 per cent on the next $500,-
00.0 or any portion thereof.
Statements
23. The said Company shall render quarterly a true and just account and statement in writing of
the whole of their gross earnings,
and allow proper inspection of all
books, accounts, returns and vouchers for the purpose of checking and
verifying such accounts by the City
Treasurer, City Auditor or other accountant appointed by the City
Council, such accounts to be rendered and to date from the
, and to take place
every three months on tne
and in
each succeeding year.
24. The statements rendered by
the Company of their gross earnings
shall be so rendered, accompanied
by a Statutory Declaration to be
made by the President, Vice-president, Treasurer or other authorized
Officer of the Company verifying the
correctness thereof.
Not Exclusive
25. The powers, rights and privileges granted to the Company by
this agreement shall not be exclusive, and the City reserves the right
at the expiration of forty years after
giving one year's notice, and at the
expiration of every period of five
years thereafter, to take over the
Street Railway System and appurtenances thereto that the Company
may have within the City limits, and
the basis of the compensation shall
be arrived at in the manner and following the procedure provided by
Section 284, Chapter 48, Edition
1909, Statutes of British Columbia,
and no other.
Ratification
26. The Corporation shall have
the right to obtain ratification of
this agreement by the Legislature,
and the Company shall by the acceptance of this agreement waive
absolutely and without any reservation whatsoever any special right or
privilege which may have been
granted to them by their Act of Incorporation, being Chapter 60, Statutes of British Columbia, 1907, having reference only and solely to the
building, operating and maintaining
an Electric Railway within the limits of Prince Rupert.
 o	
Tentative Agreement
BETWEEN:
THE   CITY   OF   PRINCE   RUPERT,
of the First Part, hereinafter
called "The Corporation."
AND
R. BRUTINEL, of The Tsimpsean
Light and Power Company, of the
Second Part, hereinafter called
"The Company."
Whereas, the Company are desirous of installing, building and operating a gas plant with the necessary distribution pipes, for the purpose of supplying the inhabitants of
the City of Prince Rupert with gas
for heating and other uses.
And whereas, the Corporation
deem it expedient to grant the powers, rights and privileges necessary
for building, nad operating a gas
plant and the distribution of gas to
the inhabitants of the City of Prince
Rupert, they therefore enact as follows:
Rights, Powers and Privileges
The Tsimpsean Light and Power Company, subject to the conditions  hereinafter    mentioned,    is
hereby empowered    to   construct,
maintain  and  operate gas works,
pipe lines and necessary appliances and to manufacture and    supply gas to  consumers within the
City of Prince Rupert.
Laying Pipes
The Company shall    have    the
right, liberty and privilege of laying  down,     relaying,   connecting,
disconnecting  and   repairing    all
gas pipes along and through, under and  over all streets,    alleys,
lanes and thoroughfares    in    the
City of Prince Rupert that may be
requisite or convenient for    supplying gas to consumers.
Repair of Streets
The Company having made the
excavations   and   laid   down     tlie
pipes and other apparatus belonging to the gas works, shall remove
all the surplus of    grounds and
other  material  arising  from  said
excavation and reconstruct, repair
or replace the street in the same
condition as it was at the time the
excavation was made, using    for
that purpose material of the same
kind as that already used for paving the part of the street so excavated at the time such excavation  was  made.    The  said  work
shall be carried on with all necessary  speed   avoiding   unnecessary
delay and the City shall have the
right to reconstruct at    the    expense  of  the  Company  that part
of the  street  wherein  the    Com
pany shall have made excavations
for the laying of the    said
pipes  if,  in  the  opinion  of    the
City Council, the work of reconstruction  is  not carried  on  witlt
sufficient rapidity.
Temporary Location
Pending the grading and con-
construction of the street the
Company shall have the power to
lay down temporary pipe lines
along such street, alleys or lanes
as may be convenient; provided,
that:
1. The said pipes shall In no
way interfere with the traffic nor
constitute a danger or inconvenience to the public.
2. That where they will not be
buried under ground these pipes
shall be cased in lumber casing,
the depth of such casing shall not
be less than twice the diameter of
the pipe enclosed therein, and
shall be filled up with sawdust or
other convenient  material.
3. That so soon as any street
or portion of a street shall be
graded the Company shall then
place their pipes in their permanent location at a depth of not
less than two feet from the surface or top of pavement.
Service Pipes and Meters
The Company shall, subject to
the provisions hereinafter contained, introduce into and through
the walls or tnclosures of the
houses, shop, establishment or
residence of any person requiring
the same a proper service pipe,
with stop cock, the service pipe
and (he cost of laying the same
under the street and sidewalk to
the boundary of the property shall
be paid by the Company, and
within the boundary by tbe petitioner. If so required a gas meter
for accurately measuring the supply of gas to the person requiring
same shall he supplied by the
Company on terms to be agreed
upon by the Company and consumer, provided that the Company shall not be compelled to
connect any house, shop, establishment or residence distant
more than seventy (70) feet from
any mains.
Notice
The Company shall, before
opening or breaking up any
street, lane, alley, bridge, sewer,
drain or tunnel, give to the City
Council notice in writing of their
intention to open or break up the
same, not less than three clear
days before beginning such work
except In case of emergency, aris
ing from defects In any of the
pipes or other works and then as
soon as possible after the beginning of the work or the necessity
for the same shall have arisen.
Price
The rates for gas to be charged
by the Company shall be subject
to the approval of the Lieutenant
Governor  in  Council as  provided
by other legislation, but the Company do hereby agree that in no
case the said  rates  shall  exceed
$1.50 for one thousand cubic feet
of gas for heating   and    cooking
and $1.75 per thousand cubic feet
for lighting.    Provided, also, that
should  the    Corporation    require
gas for the lighting of streets, alleys or  lanes  the    Company    do
hereby undertake to supply whatever amount of    gas will be required for the lighting    of    said
street, alley, lanes or other public places, not being buildings, at
a rate not exceeding    $1.25    per
per thousand cubic feet.
Contract
The Company may from time to
time enter into any contract with
any person  or    Corporation     for
lighting or heating or    supplying
gas for any   purpose    whatsoever
within the City of Prince Rupert,
or for providing any person with
pipes, burners, meters, stoves and
heaters and  for    repairs    thereof
and the Company may as hereinbefore mentioned let for hire any
meter for ascertaining the  quantity of gas consumed or supplied,
and any fittings within any buildings for gas  for such  remuneration in money as shall be agreed
upon between the Company    and
any    person     or   corporation     to
whom the same may be let.
Inspection
The    Clerk, Engineer or other
Officer duly appointed    for    the
purpose by the Company may at
all reasonable  times    enter    any
building or place    supplied   with
gas  by the Company  In  order to
inspect the meter,    fittings    and
works  for  regulating  the  supply
of gas consumed or supplied, provided that    the    Company    shall
publicly exhibit and keep    exhibited in their office the names of
all persons appointed to enter and
inspect as aforesaid.
Collection
If any person supplied with gas
neglects to  pay the charges  due
for the same to the Company, the
Company shall have the power to
stop  the gas from entering    the
premises of such persons, by cutting off the service pipe or    by
such means as the Company shall
think fit, and recover the charges
due from such person either    by
lawful  procedure  or  by  applying
the guarantee deposit or any portion   thereof  to   the  payment   of
such charges. The Company, their
agents   or  workmen  after  giving
twenty-four hours'  previous    notice to the occupier,    may    enter
into such house, building or premises between the hours of nine in
the forenoon and four in the afternoon and remove and carry away
any pipe, meter, fittings or other
works, the property of the Company.
Not Exclusive Right to Tukc Over
The powers, rights and privileges granted to the Company
shall not be exclusive and the
City reserves the right at the expiration of forty years and upon
• giving one year's notice and at
the expiration of every period of
five years thereafter to take over
the gas works of the Company
and the basis of the compensation
shall he arrived at in the manner
and procedure provided by the
Section 284, Chapter 4S Statutes
of British Columbia (1909) and
no other.
.Starting of Work
The Company shall, Immediately after the acceptance of the
(onus of this fnine-lii.se by the
ratepayers, proceed with due diligence to build nnd establish their
gas work, and they shall be In
position to supply gas to consumers within a year from the date of
this franchise.
Failing to comply with (bis
provision the said franchise shall
at the option of the City Council
cease and determine.
Ratification
The Corporation shall have the
right to obtain ratification of this
franchise by the Legislature of
the Province of British Columbia
and the Company does by the acceptance of this franchise waive
absolutely and without any reservation whatsoever any special
rights and privileges granted to
them hy their Act of Incorporation, being Chapter 60, S. B, C,
1907, having reference only and
solely to the establishment of gas
works in the Northern part of
Kaien  Island. *■"■»
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 21, 1911
FURNITURE REDUCTION SALE
A A A A A A A A A A A £ A * £ *> * $ •> <* •> $ »> ♦ <■ * * #
I 15&20percent J
* i
| OFF FROM REGULAR VALUES f
* i
****************************
GEO. D. TITE
»>*>♦>*>*>•> ►;« a a *i*aa A.-tA (;„Xv;*»;.»;. .;*»>*;*.;« <.<<•>
| 15 & 20 per cent *
* *
I   OFF FROM REGULAR VALUES  !
**************** ************
Is giving the people of Prince Rupert their opportunity now to buy High Grade, Medium and Cheap Furniture, Carpet Squares
and Drapery at this Special Offering never equalled here. Our car of 600 Iron Beds is fast going at our special prices.
Order now and secure the choice designs for the few remaining days of our April Sale.
See our great values in Carpet Squares, Hearth Rugs, Door Mats,
Rubber,   Coco,   or  Flexible   Iron.
We have just what you require
for Spring renovating—if you cannot come yourself, Phone 20, nnd
we will do the rest.
GREEN OR RED BURLAP, Sale Price, per yard 17c
TABLE OILCLOTHS,  white  or colored, Sale Price, per yard . .80c
THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF VALUES DURING SALE DAYS:
Iron Beds
Regular $4.50 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 inches—
Sale   Price    $3.80
Regular $6.00 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 inches—
Sale  Price    $5.00
Regular $8.50 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 inches—
Sale  Price    $7.25
Regular $10.00 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 Inches—
Sale   Price    $8.00
Regular $11.00 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 inches—
Sale   Price    $0.00
Regular $12.00 Iron Bed, size 3 feet;
3 feet 6 inches; 4 feet 6 inches-
Sale   Price    $10.00
Regular $13.50 Iron Bed, size 4 feet
6 inches only—Sale Price..$11.25
Regular $17.00 Iron Bed, size 4 feet
6 Inches only—Sale Price..$14.00
Regular $17.50 Iron Bed, size 4 feet
6 inches only—Sale Price. .$14.50
Regular $18.50 Iron Bed, size 4 feet
6 inches only—Sale Price..$15.50
All our heavy Iron Scroll Decorated Beds and Brass Beds receive our
Special Twenty Per Cent Reduction.
Springs and Mattresses
Regular $5.00 Wood Fiber Cotton
Top Mattresses, size 4 feet 6
inches—Sale Price $4.00
Regular $4.50 Wood Fiber Cotton
Top Mattresses, size 3 feet 6
inches—Sale Price $3.75
Regular $4.00 Wood Fiber Cotton
Top Mattresses, size 3 feet—Sale
Price $3.35
Regular $6.50 Wood Fiber Cotton
TOp and Bottom, extra heavy ticking, size 4 feet 6 inches—Sale
Price $5.50
Regular $6.00 Wood Fiber Cotton
Top and Bottom, extra heavy ticking, size 4 feet 6 inches—Sale
Price $5.00
Regular $5.75 Wood - ioer Cotton
Top and Bottom, extra heavy ticking, size 4 feet 6 inches—Sale
Price $4.60
Plain Excelsior Mattress, slab style,
size 4 feet 6 in.—Sale Price $3.00
Plain Excelsior Mattress, slab style,
size 3 feet 6 in.—Sale Price $2.25
Plain Excelsior Mattress, slab style,
size 3 feet—Sale Price $1.75
Plain Excelsior Mattress, slab style,
size 2 feet 6 in.—Sale Price $1.25
All our high grade Bestmore Mattresses, pure Cotton felt with fancy
Art Tickings, receive the 15 per
cent reduction during the month of
April.
Springs
Regular $4.00 Spring, cable support,
any size—Sale Price   $3.00
Regular $5.50 Spring, hoop iron and
Helical spring support, wire rope
edge, any size—Sale Price. .$4.00
Regular $7.00 Dominion or Perfection Spring, maple hardwood, size
3 feet 6 inches and 4 feet 6 inches
only—Sale Price    $5.75
Mattresses for Baby
Cribs
We manufacture  Mattresses  here
in    Prince    Rupert to fit any crib.
Your choice of tickings in fancy art
colors or plain tick.
Excelsior Cotton Top Crib Mattress
—Sale   Price     $2.75
Excelsior  Cotton  Top  and    Bottom
Mattress—Sale   Price    $3.50
Fancy Tick  Moss and  Kapock Crib
Mattress—Sale   Price     $5.50
Fancy Tick  Hair  and  Kapock  Crib
Mattress—Sale   Price    $8.50
Fancy  Tick  All-Hair  Crib  Mattress
—Sale   Price    $10.00
Baby Folding Go-Carts
Four different styles to be sold at
our Special Fifteen Per Cent Reduction for remainder of this month.
Regular   $12.50   Folding  Go-Cart—
Sale   Price    $10.50
Regular   $13.50   Folding  Go-Cart—
Sale   Price    $11.50
Regular $13.50 Folding Go-Cart,
different shaped hood — Sale
Price $11.50
Regular $8.00 Folding Go-Cart—
Sale   Price    $5.50
Baby Iron Cribs
Four new designs with sliding
sides, made extra high to protect
baby from danger of failing out.
Regular $10.00 Iron Crib, size 2 feet
4 inches by 4 feet 2 Inches, swing
side, iron frame spring—Sale
Price   $8.25
Regular $14.00 Iron Crib, brass
trimming, sliding sides, Iron
frame, woven wire spring—Sale
Price   $11.75
Regular $18.00 Iron Crib, size 2
feet 4 inches by 4 feet 2 inches,
sliding sides, iron frame, woven
wire spring—Sale Price   . .$15.25
These Cribs are the product of the
leading manufacturer of Canada; .
for looks and durability they have
no peer.
Baby Carriages, Wicker
Regular $26.00 Baby Carriage, extra heavy rubber tire, rainproof
hood, cravenette, plush lined—
Sale   Price,   each $22.00
Regular $30.00 Baby Carriage,
plush lined, extra heavy tires,
rainproof hood—Sale Price $20.50
Kitchen Requirements
Regular $19.50 Kitchen Cupboard,
bottom consisting of double doors
and two drawers, top has double
glass doors with 3 shelves, neat
golden finish—Sale Price  .$16.00
Regular $18.00 Kitchen Cupboard,
straight front, 2 drawers and
double doors; 2 glass doors and 3
shelves above; neat golden finish
—Sale   Price    $15.00
Height of these Cupboards 7 feet,
width 3 feet 6 Inches.
Regular $25.00 Kitchen Cupboard,
Imitation quarter cut oak, double
drawer and doors at base; top, 2
glass doors and three shelves—
Sale  Price    $20.00
Regular $18.00 Kitchen Queen, consisting of 2 flour bins, bake board
and drawer; top 3 small drawers,
2 glass doors and 3 shelves; gold
finish—Sale Price   $15.00
Kitchen Tables
Regular $5.00 Drop Leaf Table, deal
top—Sale Price    $3.75
Regular $3.00 Kitchen Table, without drawer—Sale Price   . . .$2.50
Regular $3.50 Kitchen Table, with
drawer—Sale   Price    $3.00
Regular $6.50 Rounu, Deal Top
Table, 50 inches wide, large square
mission  legs—Sale Price   . .$5.00
Regular $5.50 Round, Deal Top
Table, 36 inches wide, square legs
—Sale   Price    $4.00
DRESSERS—QUARTERED OAK
$65.00 Dresser, Early English, large
bevel mirror, size 40 x 30; 3
small drawers top, 2 large drawers   bottom—Sale  Price. . .$52.00
$25.00 Dressing Table to match
above dresser, Early English; size
of mirror 20x24—Sale Price $20.00
$25.00 Dressing Table, golden oak
wax finish, size of mirror 20x24
—Sale   Price    $20.00
$65.00 Princess Dresser, quarter-
cut oak, golden finish, with 6
small side drawers and 1 large
drawer at bottom; oval British
mirror, size 46x20—Sale   .$52.00
$55.00 Dresser, quarter-cut oak,
golden finiBh; 2 small top drawers and 2 large bottom drawers;
oval front shape with large British bevel mirror—Sale  . . .$44.00
$60.00 Mahogany Dresser, wax finish; large oval mirror, size 30x40;
2 top drawers and 1. large drawer
—Sale   Price    $48.00
$45.00 Mahogany Dresser, wax finish, large shaped mirror, size 38x
19; serpentine front; 2 small
drawers and 1 large drawer—Sale
Price    $36.00
CHIFFONNIERS   —QUARTER-CUT
OAK
$45.00 Chiffonnier, golden quarter-
cut oak, 6 drawers, shapely British mirror, size of glass 21x18—
Sale   Price    $30.00
$45.00 Chiffonnier, same as above,
with 5 drawers and oval mirror—
Sale   Price    $30.00
$38.50 Chiffonnier, golden quarter-
cut oak, 5 drawers and hat compartment, oval British mirror—
Sale   Price    $30.80
$35.00 Chiffonnier, quarter-cut oak,
with 6 drawers, fancy oval mirror—Sale  Price    $28.00
SURFACED OAK  DRESSERS
CHIFFONNIERS
$18.50 Dresser and Stand, surfaced
oak, hardwood golden finish,
bevel mirror, 3 drawers—Sale
Price    $15.75
$19.50 Dresser and Stand, surfaced
oak, golden finish, size of mirrbr,
bevel, 16x20; 3 drawers to dresser—Sale  Price    $17.50
$25.00 Dresser and Stand, surfaced
oak, golden finish, oval mirrors,
3 drawers to dresser—Sale $21.00
$34.00 Dresser and Stand, surfaced
oak, golden finish; 2 top shaped
drawers, and 2 large drawers at
bottom; large oval British mirror
Sale   Price    $20.00
$42.00 Dresser and Stand, surfaced
oak, size of top 42x20; serpentine
front, with 4 drawers; oval British mirror, size 24x30—Sale
Price   $35.50
$17.00 Combination Dresser, surfaced oak, size of mirror 14x24;
3 drawers and commode compartment; size of tops 18x39; towel
bar side of glass—Sale  . . .$14.50
$14.50 Combination Dresser, surfaced oak, size of mirror 14x24;
1 top drawer and double commode compartment; towel hanger
side of mirror—Sale Price  .$12.50
$20.00 Chiffonnier, surfaced oak, 5
drawers and hat compartment,
square bevel mirror—Sale $17.00
$22.50 Chiffonnier, surfaced oak,
golden finish, oval British mirror, 5 large drawers; size of top,
34x20; serpentine front — Sale
Price    $10.00
$24.00 Chiffonnier, surfaced oak,
golden finish; same as above,
with larger shaped mirror—Sale
Price    $20.50
$11.00 Washstand, with mirror attached, surfaced  oak—Sale $8.50
FOR  THE  DINING   ROOM
BUFFETS
$30.00 Surfaced Oak Buffet, early
English or golden oak finish,
shelf above mirror; 3 drawers
and double cupboard compartments, size of glass beveled
36x12—Sale   Price     $25.50
$50.00 Buffet, solid quarter-cut oak,
4 different styles for choice, some
leaded light fronts and others
with solid oak swell front panels,
three drawers and cupboards—
Sale   Price    $40.00
$55.00 Buffet, quarter-cut oak,
leaded light and mirror top, plush
lined drawers and cupboard compartment—Sale   Price   ....$44.00
♦ uO.OO Buffet, quarter-cut oak, In
either Early English tor golden
oak finish; large bevel mirrors;
3 drawers, 1 lined for silverware
and cupboard compartment—Sale
Price   $48.00
$70.00 Buffet and China Cabinet
combined, golden quarter-cut oak,
glass sides and oval leaded light
door and front, with three drawers at bottom; reflection mirror
inside and British bevel mirror
top—Sale Price    $56.00
$20.00 Dinner Wagon In golden
quartered oak or Early English,
highly polished with long drawer
and shelf at bottom—Sale $16.00
DINING ROOM TABLES
$15.00 Dining Tauie, pedestal leg,
surfaced oak, golden finish; 6-
foot extension, round top—Sale
Price    $12.55
$15.00 Dining Table, surfaced oak,
golden polished; turned legs; 6-
foot extension—Sale Price $12.75
$12.00 Dining Table, elm, golden
finish; 6-foot extension — Sale
Price    $0.50
$20.00 Dining Table, solid oak, polished, turned legs; 6-foot extension;  golden finish—Sale  .$10.00
$30.00 Dining Table, quarter-cut
oak, round top; 8-foot extension;
Early English finish—Sale $24.00
$35.00 Dining Table, quarter-cut
oak; square top; golden finish;
legs of this table quarter-cut; 8-
foot extension—Sale Price $28.00
$40.00 Dining Table, large pedestal
centre support; Early English,
quarter-cut oak throughout; 8-
foot extension—Sale Price $32.00
$45.00 Dining Table, large pedestal
centre support; 8-foot extension;
Early English quarter-cut oak-
Sale   Price    $30.00
$60.00 Dining Table, pedestal centre, large claw foot; 8-foot extension; Early English finish, quarter-cut oak—Sale Price ..$47.00
These    Pedestal    Tables are the
highest grade goods on the market
and at their reductions   cannot   be
beat.
CARPET SQUARES—ALL GRADES
Tapestry, Brussels, Velvets, Ax-
minsters and Wiltons. These goods
we import from the Scotch and English manufacturers and at the price
stated will convince you of the values—
$7.50 Tapestry Square,  6 ft. 6 In.
x 9 ft.—Sale Price   $6.00
$9.00     Tapestry     Square,     better
grade,   6  ft.   6   In.  x  9  ft.—Sale
Price    $7.50
$10.00 Tapestry Square, 9 ft. x 9 ft.
—Sale   Price    ,...$8.00
$11.0 d     Tapestry     Square,     better
grade, 9 ft. x 9 ft.—Sale . . .$0.00
$14.00   Tapestry   Square,   No.   1-A,
9 ft. x 9 ft.—Sale Price . .$11.00
$16.00 Tapestry    Square,    No. 1-A,
9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in.—Sale . .$12.00
$18.00 Tapestry Square,    No.    1-A,
9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in.—Sale . .$14.00
$20.00 Tapestry Square,    No.    1-A,
9 ft. x 12 ft.—Sale Price . .$16.00
The above list of Tapestry Squares
we carry in all colors to harmonize
with your room treatment. We invite you to see our new squares just
opened out.
AXMINSTER    CARPET    SQUARES
You all know the wearing quality
of the heavy Axminster. We have
them in all sizes at prices lower,
where quality Is the consideration,
than has ever been offered in our
city before. Come and inspect them.
$22.50 Axminster Square, 6 ft. 9 In.
x 9  ft.—Sale Price   $18.00
$27.50 Axminster Square, 9 ft. x 9
ft.— Sale Price   $23.00
$30.00 Axminster Square, 9 ft. x 10
ft. 6 In.—Sale Price   $26.00
$32.50 Velvet Carpet Squares, 9 ft.
x 12 ft.—Sale Price   $27.50
$5.00 Axminster Hearth Rugs, 54 in.
X 27 in.—Sale Price $3.75
$3.75 Velvet Wilton Rug,  54  in. x
27 in.—Sale Price $3.00
$3.00 Dudley Rug, 54 in. x 27 in.—
Sale  Price    $2.25
$2.00 Velvet Rugs, 54 in. x 27 in.—
Sale  Price    $1.50
Space in this advertisement will
not allow us to enumerate all the
values we have to offer. The prices
quoted on these rugs are for spot
cash.
DRAPERIES FOR SPRING
CLEAN-UP
Regular 40c yard Madras, plain
white, double width—Sale Price,
per  yard    30c
Regular 50c yard Madras, light
green with dotted muslin effect—
Sale Price, per yard 40c
Regular 65c yard Madras, light
green ground mixed with dark
green effect for relief—Sale Price
per  yard    50c
Regular 70c yard Madras, gold
ground, and deep gold and green
relief—Sale Price, per yard..55c
Regular $1.00 yard Madras, ecru
ground with green stripe, black
fleur de lis centre—Sale Price,
per   yard    75c
Regular 45c reversible Scrim, ecru
ground, deep brown and gold effect and a dozen other different
patterns and colors—Sale Price,
per   yard    30c
Regular 25c Fancy Colored Muslins
—Sale Price, per yard   18c
Regular 45c Shallays cream ground
and floral pattern In centre—Sale
Price, per yard   30c
750 MEDICINE CABINETS, mirror on   door;   Early   English  or  White
Enamel—Sale Price   $6.75
WALL BURLAPS, Green or Red, 1 yard wide—Sale Price, per yd.. 17c
TABLE FELTS, Green or Red, 2 yards wide—Sale Price, per yd 75c
How about a nice, comfortable Upholstered Easy Chair for your Den
or living room?    Many different designs covered with genuine Leather
No. 1 Grade—20% deduction for tills month.
If you have a couch or chair to repair or rocover just say the word
to us and we will return it to you like new.
Phone 20
P. O. Box 1502
Prince Rupert, B.C.
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
Third Avenue
Prince Rupert, B.C.
WmtWm***U*m■.;,<■(!■!■.-.,,.-. |Mj MWHMMmOMBMMtt
Friday, April 21, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
*****************************************************
|     AMONG THE MINES     I
; *
* *
*******&** ******************************%**%,%,%,%% $,$,$**
GOLD PRODUCTION
Canada   Produced   About   Nine
Cent More Last Year
Than in 1900
Per
While statistics of gold production in Canada last year are as yet
incomplete, a preliminary bulletin
shows a production of approximately $10,244,910, an increase of about
9 per cent over the 1909 production.
The production of the Yukon is valued at $4,550,000, the total exports
on which royalty was paid during
the calendar year, according to the
records of the Interior Department
being 275,472.51 ounces. The Yukon production in 1909 was $3,960,-
000, the exports being 239,766.35
ounces. The British Columbia production in 1909 was: Placer gold,
$477,000; bullion from free milling
ores, $329,655; smelter recoveries,
$4,367,924. In 1910 the placer production is estimated by the Provincial Mineralogist as $482,000. An
estimate of free milling bullion
shipments and smelter recoveries is
made of $4,850,000, or a total production for the province of $5,432,-
000. The Nova Scotia production
shows a falling off of about $20,000,
while Ontario showed a slight increase on account of the gold recovered in development work at Porcupine, of which a record has not yet
been received.
The production of gold in Ontario last year, $60,918, though small,
Is nearly double in value that of
1909. More than half the yield
came from the new camp of Porcupine, where active developments are
in progress, and where large stamp
mills are being erected at the Hol-
linger and Dome mines. A branch
of the Temiskaming and Northern
Ontario Railway—the Ontario Government line—is being built into
Porcupine from the main line at
Mileage 222, near Kelso. At Long
Lake, on the Sault branch of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, gold Is
being obtained by the Canadian Exploration Company from an arsenical ore. The old Mikado mine at
Shoal Lake, Lake of the Woods and
the Havilah, formerly the Ophir, in
the township of Galbraith have been
reopened. In Hastings County the
Cordova or Belmont mine, long Idle,
has recently changed hands, and it
is understood will soon go again
into  commission.
The following table    shows    the
value of gold production in Canada
for the past quarter of a century:
Year. Value.
1886     $    1,365,496
1887            1,187,804
1888            1,098,610
1889            1,291,159
1890            1,149,776
1891      930,614
1892      907,601
1893      976,603
1894            1,128,688
1895           2,083,674
1896           2,754,774
1897           6,027,016
1898         13,775,420
1899         21,261,584
1900         27,908,153
1901         24,128,503
1902         21,336,667
1903         18,843,590
1904         16,462,517
1905         14,159,195
1906         11,502,120
1907           8,382,780,
1908            9,842,105
1909           9,382,230
1910         10,224,910
Why the Figures Fluctuated
The high production in 1899,
1900, 1901 and 1902 was due to
the extraordinary output from the
Klondike. The British Columbia
placers were also producing heavily.
In 1899 Ontario had its maximum
production, but as it only amounted
to slightly over $400,000, it did not
have much influence on the total.
The gold production of Nova Scotia
has declined somewhat, that of Ontario has almost ceased, though
Porcupine should prove a favorable
factor during the next few years.
That of BritiBh Columbia lode mines
has steadily increased, so that the
Pacific Coast province has now the
greatest production in its history.
The production of the Klondike is
again increasing.
THE  WORLD'S  PLATINUM
Production of the Urals Shows Signs
of   FnlUng  Off—Other
Small Finds
hausted. Almost all the platinum
produced in Russia is refined in
England, France and Germany.
During 1909 some progress was
made in the platinum bearing districts of Colombia, the exports of
this metal to the United States in
that year amounting to 2,392 ounces
in comparison with 1,092 ounces in
1908, according to the Bureau of
Statistics. A little platinum was
won In British Columbia; a production of 440 ounces was recorded
from New South Wales, and Sumatra and Borneo are believed to have
yielded about 500 ounces.
The actual production of crude
platinum in the Urals In 1909 Is
estimated at 190,087 Troy ounces.
This output was smaller than usual,
and It is probable that the reserves
of workable (areas   are    being   ex-
LEAD  PRODUOTION
Estimate   Made  by  Bounty   Super.
visor Upon  What  Has  Been
Produced in  Province
That the sum distributed by the
Dominion Government in lead bounties during the fiscal year ending
on March 31 will be in the neighborhood of a quarter of a million
dollars, was a statement recently
made by Mr. G. O. Buchanan, lead
bounty supervisor. The amount of
lead produced In the Kootenay district upon which the bounty is paid,
will total approximately 17,000
tons.
 o	
ADVERTISING   OUR  APPLES
British     Columbia    Fruit    Attracts
Much Attention In Birmingham
Canadians who have visited Midlands recently have had an opportunity of seeing some oi the valuble
work performed by the Canadian
commercial agents resident in the
large cities. In New street, the
principal Birmingham business thoroughfare, in one of the principal
shops, the sign "British Columbia
Apples" attracted attention. These
apples were in excellent condition,
though part of the consignment of a
carload which was exhibited at the
Royal Horticultural Show in London over three months ago. The
point is, however, that owing to the
influence of the resident Canadian
commercial agent, Mr. Mackinnon,
they were advertised for what they
were instead of being sold as Amer
ican, or even  as English  grown as
it is said is often the case.
In places like Manchester, Leeds,
Sheffield and Glascow, the appearance of such advertisements attracts
more general notice to Canada than
in London, where the immensity of
the city and its numberless thoroughfares do not, except here and
there, offer the same opportunity
for such an exhibit. Even where it
is installed it does not attract the
same attention . At present Mr. B.
Mackinnon is looking after the Manchester agency as well as his own
in Birmingham pending the appointment of another Canadian trade
commisioner in sucession to the late
Mr.  Macnamara.
It is remarkab'e how many enquiries reach the British Columbia
and other provincial offices for information about fruit lands as a
result of these exhibits. The new
Birmingham agency has received
many enquiries owing to its window display and recent exhibits at
Westminister.
 o	
Twenty dozen song birds, comprising six dozen goldfinches, six
dozen brown linnets, a like number of green linnets and about two
dozen English robins, will be imported hy the Natural History Society of Victoria, B.C., from London, and will be liberated in the
vicinity of Victoria.
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
LAND  PURCHASE   NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4 mlleB north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
EDWARD SINGER.
M. A. Merrill Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
IF YOU RUN A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. O.
- PRINCE RUPERT
Subscription
The Best
Publicity j$2.00
Channel «•
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
lt'4^4'*^»»4>*itee<ieti<t,et,4i)fr^4M|e^^^^4i^l^^^^^^4.4i^^^Mt,4i4ieti4i^^^»^H|,^<eH|.4Mfe
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation . contractor, intends to
apply to the .Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6 V«
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M, Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
.    CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7'A
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
P n r* o | Q y
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 >n
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains
West; thepce 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:-
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J, Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 8 0 chains
West; thence 80 chains South
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES .1. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
ihence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; tlience 80 chains
South; thence 80 cliains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect, for Coal and
^etroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at u post planted ahout
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of tlie Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; tlience 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or  less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
of
Skeena   Land   District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. ,1. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 64 0 acres mora
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of tho
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 64 0 acres moro
or less.
CHARLES  .1.  GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1»09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. O,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (If unnamed, the
description Is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
ill) if fen- irrigation, describe
ihe land  Intended to    be  Irrigated,
let—District    of!«ivlng  a,'rnaKP
(I) If tlie water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
(lie place where the water Is to be
returned to sonic natural channel,
and  the difference  in  altitude    be-
Skeena   Land   Disti-
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that   Charles   .1.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. (.'.,
occupation   contractor,   intends   to
apply to the Minister of Lands for ,„.,;,   p,)in,  ,)f lliv,.,.Rion  an(1  polnt
a   lcense to prospect   for Coal and   f     t «;   _u ,„. (llp m01|ln of
Petroleum over 040 acres of land:-- th   M    R|        ftb    t ,no feot ,   ,ow
Commencing at a post  planted  t%       ,„, of (livcI.s|on.
miles N.  E.  of  the mouth   of While i „ „ .      .  .  .    *
River and the junction of the Naas,! <J) Area of Crown land Intend-
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. ic(1 t0 ue occupied by the proposed
Corner; thence 80 chains North; works—10 acre's more or less,
thence 80 chains West; thence 80! <k> Tnls nMee wa« ',ostc<1 "»
chains Soutli; thence 80 chains East "'p 28,h dav ot November, 1910,
to point of commencement and con-l*""5 application  will be made to the
tainlng 640 acres more or less
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.   Huff, Agent.
Dated March  ith, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Ruperl, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect, for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and  the junction of  tlie Naas
Commissioner  on   the   1st     day    of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names nnd addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second Is equivalent to 15 5.71 miner's
Inches.
iii,.'i     ,iiiu     in.'    ii   iv eeuei    ue i'      ...i.i: T ,     .,      , ,   , ,
River  on  Canyon    Creek,     marked1     The Journal (twice a week), only
Chas. J.  Gillingham's S.  E.  Corner;   *2-00 a year- Ir
"^*
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 21, 1911
MONEY   IN   FRUIT
Kettle Valley Lands Concerned in Im
portant Deal for Commercial
Horticultural    Sections    of    British
Columbia    Are    Developing
into Important Factors
That fruit growing Is one of the
most productive sources of investment in the Province of British Columbia, is proved by a recent deal
put through at Grand Forks, which
has only within a comparatively
short time become known as a fruit
centre. The Skeena River Valley,
with its contiguous reaches of first-
class fruit lands has, therefore, a
great promise.
The largest deal in fruit land yet
put through in the Kettle Valley
was consummated when the final
papers were signed transferring to
the Grand Forks Fruit & Nursery
Company, the 225-acre tract of Martin Burrell, M. P., and the 160-acre
tract of J. D. Honsberger.
The Grand Forks Fruit & Nursery Company, was organized some
three years ago, and purchased one
hundred acrei- in the west end of
the valley. At th^.t time it was the
intention of the company to go in
for fruit raising and nursery stock,
as well as the raising of vegetables.
60 successful were Mr. Tweddle aijd
his associates in their first undertaking, that last fall they com-
pienced to look around for additional holdings, with the resu't that
after several months' work J. D.
Honsberger was instrumental in securing an option on the fine ranch
of Martin Burrell, M. P., some five
n^les east of the city. Along with
this option Mr. Honsberger turned
over to the Grand Forks Fruit &
Nursery Company his own property,
which gives the present company
485 acres of the best fruit land in
the valley.
Of this acreage twenty acres are
planted on the Burrell ranch, 120
on the Honsberger ranch, and sixty-
five acres on the company's own
ranch. It is the intention of the
company to increase this acreage
planted to fruit to 330 within the
next year. Fruit packing sheds will
be erected at each of the points of
the valley in which the three properties are located, and expert men will
handle the crop. Transportation facilities could hardly be wished any
better for the economical handling
of the crops, as each of the proper
ties are practically traversed by one
of the railways of the district.
The old company nad a capitalization of $25,000, while the new capitalization is $200,000. The officers of the company are as follows:
President, J. D. Honsberger; secretary -treasurer and managing director, A. B. Tweddle; general manager, J. D. Honsberger. In addition
to the above officers, the following
compose the directorate: G. in.
Hill, Jos. Tweddle and H. W. Collins.
FIRE  ESCAPES
HOjSpitnl   Board   Will   Instal   System
at the Institution—Business Transacted
The hospital board at its meeting
he'd on Wednesday afternoon considered the question of fire escapes
at the institution. The president,
D. G. Stewart, introducing tlie subject, said his attention and lhat of
several others of the board had
been called to the necessity for
some means of escape, He thought
It was imperative to act quickly.
It was decided to refer the matter to the executive committee with
power to act, after conferring with
the fire chief.
The fire equipment in tlie hospital, it was reported had been
tested and found in good working
order.
It was decided to have the president have all tlie books and documents of the hospital placed in the
office of the institution.
A communication from tlie government agent relative to the admission of a provincial government
patient, Moffat, was referred to the
house committee.
Hon. William Pugsley, minister
of public works, has issued an order
to the effect that the Union Jack
must he flown from every public
building in the Dominion on every
day of the year except Sunday. A
short time ago an order was issued
authorizing the flying of the flag on
the public buildings of border towns
and seaports, and this has now been
extended over the whole Dominion.
rTEL. 187
2nd Avenue & McBride^
Fancy Groceries
Family Groceries
Fresh Groceries
Green Vegetables
Fresh Fruits
Special Attention Given to Family Trade.
You Will Find Our Prices RIGHT.
STALKER & WELLS
2nd Avenue & NcB ride
MARRIAGE   LAWS
Peculiar Statute Has Been Brought Into
Effect in Provincial
Case.
Local News
A complaint received at the council meeting from Alex Douglas,
against the fast driving of an auto
was referred to the chief of police.
Man   May   Not  Marry   Wife  of   De-
censed   Brother  and   Keep
Within  the  Law
A case in the criminal courts
which will be followed with peculiar
interest by both the legal profession
and the general public is that of
Rex vs. Herbert Baker, at New
Westminster, concerning which Mr.
W. Norman Bole, K. Q., who was
acting for the crown, telegraphed to
the attorney general's department
that a committal has been secured
and the defendant released by Judge
Lampman on suspended sentence
on payment of all crown costs. Baker was charged with a violation of
the Marriage Act of British Colum
bia, which follows closely the matrimonial law of Great Britain, his
offence consisting in that he has
contracted a marriage with his deceased  brother's widow.
That this is contra to law—even
although marriage with a deceased
wife's sister has been recently legalized—may not generally be known,
but such is the fact.
Mr. Baker, it is alleged, did not
make his brother's widow a bride
in ignorance of the law, his first application for a license to Registrar
Pottenger at Vancouver having been
refused and the obstacle in law
clearly pointed out. Baker instead
of accepting the seemingly inevitable, went to New Westminster and
in the temporary absence of the
sheriff secured a license from that
official's deputy.
That a marriage may not be legally contracted with the widow of
a deceased brother is in strict accordance with the canons of the
Anglican church, but nevertheless
will possibly appeal to the majority
as unnecessary and unwarranted restriction, scarcely defensible on the
ground of consanguinity or for
other reason. Quite possibly the
Marriage Act may be amended to
remove the restriction at a future
session of the legislature, but meanwhile the legal impediment remains.
As further illustrating the wonders of the law, it is stated authoritatively that although the offender
who marries a brother's widow in
defiance of ihis provision of the
statute may, upon conviction, be
visited with the prescribed pains
and penalties of tlie act, the courts
are not empowered to interfere with
or invalidate the marriage, which is
it tlie same time, therefore, both
legal and illegal.
 0	
VADSO TOWED IN
Tug   William   Jolliffe   Brought   the
Freight Candor into
Port
The steamer Vadso, which met
with a mishap which rendered her
propellor useless, reached port yesterday with the tug William Jolliffe
of the British Columbia Marine
Railway Company, of Esquimau,
towing.
The Jolliffe will convoy the Vadso
south. The accident happened near
Rivers Inlet.
 0	
The final provisional census returns give the total population of
India as 315,000,000, this being an
increase of 26,500,000 as compared
with the 1901 census.
The only offer the city received
for the old copper wire lines was
tha: of C. B. Lockhart, who offered
six cents a pound, which offer was
accepted.
For printing specifications for the
engineer's department the council
received the following tenders:
Empire. $13; Journal, $23; Optimist, $22.7 5. The tender of the
Empire was accepted.
The popular St. Andrew's Society
of this city will in about two weeks
hold a social evening for the closing of the season. The details are
being worked out and will include
a programme of games with dancing
at the conclusion.
Police Magistrate Carss has asked
the city council to recommend an increase of salary for the office to
$2,000, as he will otherwise be
forced to resign. He explains to
the council that the filling of the
office interferes with his legal business. It was referred to the finance
committee.
The Lord's Day Alliance Sabbath
will be observed in the Methodist
Church next Sunday, April 23, the
pastor preaching in the morning on
the subject, "The Un-British Columbia Sabbath." The evening subject
will be "Barbarous People Showing
Kindness." The Sabbath school will
meet at 2:30. Strangers are welcomed to all services. In connection with the Epworth League, the
annual election of officers will take
place next Wednesday evening at 8
o'clock. All members of the league
are expected to be present. A report
of the work will be given by the
president, and the league charter
scroll will be presented.  "
 0	
ENJOYED  CONCERT
Entertainment Given at the Baptist
Church Was a Decided
Success
A large audience gathered at the
Baptist church last evening and
thoroughly enjoyed the entertainment provided hy the Ladies' Aid
of the church. They watched with
interest and pleasure the many excellent tableaux given by the children and young people of the Sunday School. Several adults assisted
with songs and readings. Among
these may be mentioned a piano solo
by Miss froude, a duet by Mr.
Fletcher and Mrs. Magar, a solo by
Mr. Davey, a solo by Mr. Russell, a
solo by Mrs. Gray and a reading hy
Mrs. Morgan. Many characters
were represented in the tableaux,
such as Tom Thumb and his .wife,
The Sleeping Beauty, The Pretty
Milkmaid, The Seasons, Little Miss
Moffat, Little Mrs. Gamp, Three Lit.
tie Kittens, Little Boy Blue, Little
Jack Horner, Little Red Riding
Hood, a grandmother washing a
dirty boy. Queen Elizabeth, Little
Bo Peep, Robin Hood, Topsy Turvy,
Three Old Maids of Lee, Blue
Beard's Wives, and the Nations (a
Scotch lassie, a Welsh maid, MiBS
Canada, Uncle Sam and John Bull).
The Nations led the audience in
singing The Maple Leaf Forever, and
thus ended one of the best entertainments ever held in Prince Rupert.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable Waters Protection Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. C, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General in
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
TRUST  COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of Britisii Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided in
section 4 of said Act.
W.  U.  RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
aud second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
NOTICE  TO  CONTRACTORS
STEWART SCHOOL.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Stewart School," will
be received by the Honourable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Monday, the 1st day of May,
1911, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school
with basement, etc., at Stewart,
B. C, In the Skeena Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract,
and forms of tender may be seen on
and after the 7th day of April, 1911,
at the offices of J. H. Smith, Esq.,
Secretary to the School Board, Stew-
are, B. C; the Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; and the Department
of Public Work*;, Victoria.
Each proposal must be   accompa-
SHERWIN &WILLIAMS
^PAINTS-
^HHBIHHHBHBSHHHHaiE
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dum, m*.
BBBBBBBEBEBBBEEHHEBEHEBBHE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
offer the following bargains in real estate subject to   prior   sale
or change in price:
SECTION 1
Lots 3 and 4, Block 5, Terms $4,500.00
Lots 33 and 34, Block 5, Terms $3,750.00
Lots 18 and 19, Block 7, Each   $1,500.00
Lots 33 and 34, Block 29, Terms $4,250.00
SECTION 5
Lots 5 and 6, Block 37, Terms $1,800.00
Lot 7,  Block  32      $700.00
Lots 43  and  44,  Block  27, each    $600.00
SECTION O
Lots 19 and 20, Block 4, %-cash, each $1,680.00
Lots 10 and 11, Block 21, Terms $3,000.00
Lot 11, Block  22      $850.00
Lots 8 and 9, Block 26,   Vi  cash $2,500.00
Lot 20, Block 27,  % cash '   $000.00
Lots 1 and 2, Block 29,  %  cash $2,625.00
SECTION 7
Lots 27 and 28, Block 5, % cash $000.00
Lots 21 and 22, Block 10, Each   $450.00
Lots 11 and 12, Block 21, % cash,   each $450.00
Lot  15,  Block  39    $500.00
Lot 16, Block 35,.%  cash   $600.00
Lots 35 and 36, Block 50, each $250.00
SECTION 8
Lots 28 to 31, Block 15, each $225.00
Lots, stores, offices nnd dwellings for sale and lease in ail pints
of the City.     Insurance  of nil  kinds.
PHONE 222 P. O. BOX 275
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT  IS  TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
laundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
BLOCK LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
11    1-2-3-4-5-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 f 21-22
18    1-2
LOTS
 3-4
19 15-16
20 19-20
34   36-37-38
34    42
27    9-10
27 42-43
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 22-23
SECTION SIX
'3 7-8-9-10
Ti T      *~s       TJ jrp \JC/~\ \f    The Atlantic Realty and Improvement
W.    O.    DllilV\J\JlV     Company Ltd. P.O. Box 51
nied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
bank of Canada, made payable to
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for the sum of $250
which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be    returned    to    them
upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered
unless made out on the forms supplied, signed with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. '3RIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 3rd April, 1911.
4-14—5-2
SiXimm*

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