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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 15, 1911

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VOLUME  II.
Published   Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.   C.   TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1911
Price, Five Cents.
No. 17
THE CITY INSURANCE
AM. Hilditch and Aid. Newton Exchange
Compliments Over the
Subject.
Returns   Showed   Thnt   Only   Smiill
Amount Wns Placed With
Members of Council
A special meeting of the city council was held on Saturday afternoon,
with Acting Mayor Kirkpatrick in
the chair. This meeting was made
necessary owing' to the fact that several of the aldermen expected to be
out of the city on Monday and a
quorum   would not  be  possible.
Aid. Douglas objected to the woodpile on McBride street beyond Fourth
avenue, and asked if permission had
been given to put wood there.
The acting mayor knew of no permission being given but wanted to
know what such a pile could do. It
interfered with no one.
The application of L. W. Patmore
on behalf of clients for permission
to rebuild the Chinese laundry on
Fifth street was received. It was
suggested that this should stand over
until the laundry bylaw was passed.
Insurance   Itcport
A return was presented in compli.
ance with a motion at the previous
meeting showing the insurance now-
held on city property.
Upon the reading of the return
as prepared by the city clerk, Aid.
Hilditch said that it had been stated
that patronage was thrown by last
year's council to certain aldermen.
The report showed that there was
no ground for such a charge as had
been made by Aid. Newton, it was
clear ex-Aid. Pattullo and ex-Aid.
Naden did not attempt to bring patronage their way. He did not approve of placing insurance with C. D.
Newton because he did not represent
any insurance company as far as he
knew. He did not approve of taking
the insurance away from Aid. Pattullo after it had once been placed
with him. As he said before, Aid.
Pattullo, with others, had contributed to the funds whereby the telephone was secured for the city. The
returns, he said, showed that the
insurance placed with Aid. Naden
and Aid. Pattullo had been placed
before the council came into power.
Aid. Newton was surprised to hear
that C. D. Newton was not an insurance agent. He had been under
the impression that the insurance
was placed with ex-Aid. Pattullo and
ex-Aid. Naden after they became
councillors, if he had wrongfully
charged these men he would be only
too glad to withdraw.
The city clerk said that Mr. Newton was an agent, and mentioned the
company represented.
In reply to questions, it was found
from the city clerk that $1,000 insurance was last year placed with
ex-Aid. Naden and $500 with ex-Aid.
Pattullo after the council came into
power.
Withdraws  in   Part
Aid. Newton thereupon said it appeared that he had charged these
men correctly. The only difference
had been that he had charged too
much against them. He would, therefore, to be fair to himself, withdraw
a part only of the charge.
Aid. Hilditch said it went to show
what a trivial matter this was that
Aid. Newton was making so much
out of. He had never seen any aldermen try to take advantage of his
position to draw business.
Another K\ planaIiim
Aid. Hllditch further wanted a
matter cleared up In which the News
had made a serious charge on the
strength of a [Statement by Mr. Mortimer. It was that Aid. Newton had
said he took away city insurance
from the firm of G, R. Naden & Co.
because the latter firm ceased to
advertise in the Empire.
Aid. Newton charged Aid. Hilditch
with trying to get his knife into him.
He was not withdrawing all the
charge he made last week. He would
be willing to rectify any wrong he
did anyone. It seemed a part of the
insurance had been placed with these
gentlemen after they became aldermen.
Aid. Newton said he did not care
how many took advertisements out
of the Empire. He never made such
a statement to Mr. Mortimer as was
reported, and went on to explain
what took place and the conversation with Mr. Mortimer, when, after
some discussion he (Aid. Newton)
had said that the Liberals had been
the   first   to   try  to   bring   business
within certain lines and they should
not feel hurt if It came against them.
Aid. Hilditch suggested that as
there had been a discrimination
against men who had put up their
money and secured the telephone for
the city he thought any future Insurance might be put their way.
Aid. Clayton objected to the idea
being created that these men secured
the telephone. They had done what
many others had done in helping to
secure It.
The matter was then dropped.
To Look After Garbage
The city council at a special meeting held Saturday afternoon decided
to engage a man to look after the
dumping of garbage on the scow at
not less than $60 a month. It was
explained that under the system
whereby private owners may dump
their own garbage on the scow carelessness is shown and a large part
goes into the water. Another objectionable feature is that there is a
lot of space taken up with boxes, etc.,
that could be burned. The attendant will look after this.
 o	
TWO YEARS IN JAIL
James Mull Who Fired Shot Through
Windsor Hotel Mirror is
Convicted.
He  Is  Found  Guilty  of  Using  Gun
and Is Sentenced by Judge
Lnnipinan
James McCull, who elected for
speedy trial before Judge Lampman,
was yesterday found guilty of firing
a gun in the city, thus endangering
life, and sentenced to two years in
jail.
McCull was a fireman on the
Prince Rupert and according to the
evidence he got drunk and refused
to return to work. A companion
was arrested by Police Officer Hamblin and after leaving the accused,
in the presence of witnesses, he had
proceeded to load a gun he had,
stating that he had a notion to shoot
the officer. He was stopped in this
and later consented to go on board
the steamer and turn to work.
Later he made himself obnoxious
at the Butte Cafe, and after leaving
tjiere fired the shot which went
through  the mirror of the Windsor.
The defence which the prisoner
offered was not a very convincing
one. He contended that the shot
went off my mistake, and he also
denied that he threatened to shoot
Officer Hamblin.
Judge Lampman, however, was
convinced of the malicious intent of
the man and in view of the danger
attending such action he sentenced
him as stated.
The prisoner was overcome upon
receiving the sentence.
Crown was represented by W. E.
Fisher, while W. E. Williams defended the prisoner.
 o	
Superintendent of Police
Colin S. Campbell, chief of provincial police at Vancouver, has been
appointed acting superintendent of
provincial police for the province in
the place of the late F. S. Hussey.
 o	
WELL   SATISFIED
Robert Kelly of Vancouver Hade an Inspection Tour to the
City.
lie   Is   Pleased   With   the   Progress
Which  Ik Being Made in
Prince Itupert
Among the visitors to the city last
week was Robert Kelly of Vancouver,
the active head of the firm of Kelly,
Douglas & Co. of that city and of
Prince Rupert. He came north, he
said, to look into the business here.
He says that the results from the
warehouse here are quite up to the
expectations he had for the time it
has been In operation. He has as
firm a faith in the future of the city
as he ever had and was pleased to
see the amount of work that had
been accomplished on the streets
since he last visited the place.
On Sunday Mr. Kelly went nortli
to Stewart, returning to the south
by the Prince George yesterday
morning.
NEARBY OIL FIELDS
UNDER DEVELOPMENT
Graham   Island   is   Being Exploited   With    Excellent
Promise for Good Returns From the Petroleum
Deposits on the West Coast.
The wealth of this northern half
of Britisii Columbia seems to be confined to no particular line. It is
proving itself a treasure house in the
matter of natural resources and there
can be little question hut what Its
development will follow with a rapidity far in excess of the older portions of the province.
Graham Island is attracting an
immense amount of attention now
owing to the indications that exist
there that oil is to be found in quantity. The west coast of the island,
where the fields are, is the most
inaccessible part of the island and
on that account has been kept sealed
to a considerable extent until recent
years. ,
The B. C. Oilfields, Ltd., of Vancouver is at work developing their
property and the boring being carried out gives the best of indications
for the complete success of the enterprise.
A syndicate made up of local men,
with whom are associated a few from
the Queen Charlotte Islands, have
secured immense holdings adjoining
the B. C. Oilfields claims and are
preparing to do something in the
way of development, waiting only the
final results of the boring now being done on the ground.
A correspondent who has visited
the   place  writes   as   follows:
Your correspondent paid a visit
recently to the plant now boring for
oil on the west coast of Graham
Island and consulted with an independent expert on the possibilities
of the future. The oil derrick
stands seventy feet in the air, and
the boring machine is down sixty feet
from the surface, with every indication that oil will be struck within
sixty days. The shale encountered
is superior to that of the California
and Utah oilfields and the tar and
asphaltum exposed are the best indications that can be found of a
superior class of oil. The plant installed cost over ten thousand dollars and the company operating now
owns over twelve thousand acres.
The west coast of Graham Island
was reported on by Professors Dawson and Ells as rich in oil, and It
was decided to take a man to the
property, who was an independent
of all concerned in the work and
have him express an opinion on the
formation or the country and the
prospects from the standpoint of a
practical mining man. From tlie
north end of Graham Island, to Otard
Bay, stops were made at numerous
places and the ground thoroughly
exploited. Tar and asphaltum were
found in several places, oozing from
the basalt and shale, and the opinion expressed that oil would be
struck, at from two to tliree thousand feet, beneath a capping of limestone. That the results of the boring operations now in progress will
develop a large extent of territory,
practically uninhabited at the present time, will be understood when it
is known that the only residents of
the whole of the west coast of Graham Island are the men employed
in this work.
There are few harbors, from Lan-
gara Island to Rennell Sound, Otard
Bay, and the place where the oil
plant has been erected, afford the
only safe landings on the wave swept
coast. It will be easy to transport
the oil, by pipe liJees, to Naden Harbor, or Massett Inlet, wliere vessels
may load at all seasons of the year.
While making the trip stops were
made at Nortli Island, Frederick Island, West River and several other
places, and two days were spent in
the interior. There are numerous
streams, and a few rivers. The timber and agricultural lands are not
of any commercial value. A wealth
of fish inhabit the waters in the vicinity of Parry Passage. The Indians captured Hire thousand king
salmon with trolling lines, one of
the fish weighing ninety-two pounds.
The halibut banks and whaling will
| give employment to a large number
ot men, and the herring fisheries off
North Island cannot be excelled.
At the present time the west coast
of Graham Island is comparatively
unknown. Small vessels have great
difficulty in navigating the waters,
through the dangers from sudden
storms and the lack of harbors In
which to take refuge. Two more oil
planes will be placed at Otard Bay
in the near future and there is every
possibility of the springing up of new
towns and oil wells, over a territory
that has been overlooked for so many
years, although the best geologists
in the Dominion have reported the
indications favorable for the best oil
field on the Pacific slope.
LOCKOUT OF DOCKMEN
Shipowners   Have   Put    Into   Effect
Their Threat Against
Men
(Special to The Journal)
Liverpool, Aug. 15.—Tbe threatened lockout by shipowners came
Into effect yesterday, when thirty
thousand dockmen were refused employment until they decided to abide
by the terms of their recent agreement.
 o	
AUTO ACCIDENT
Dr. Louis Ti iieleeiii.  Returning From
Political  Meeting Met
His  Death
(Special to The Journal)
Montreal, Aug. 15.—Dr. Louis
Trudeau, a well known resident of
.Montreal, was instantly killed four
miles from St. Hyacinthe when an
auto in which he and two friends
were returning from a political meeting upset at a sharp cure.
INCREASED WAGES
C. P. R.
Mechanics in the West Demand
Higher Rates Than
Prevail.
Three  and   a   Half  Cents  per  Hour
Sought  by the Federation
From  Company
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, Aug. 15.—The committee of federated mechanics of the
Canadian Pacific Railway waited on
the management yesterday and demanded wage increases of three and
a hal cents per hour. The federation includes the machinists, blacksmiths, boilermakers and carmen employed from Fort William to Vancouver. They now receive wages
ranging from twenty seven and a
half to forty two and a half cents
per hour.
■ o	
IJ. O.  VOTERS'  LISTS
RAILWAY TROUBLES
Strike is Expected on the English Lines
as Result of Differences Between
Managers and Men.
Fear Expressed Thai There May Be
Grave Results in Consequence
of  Disagreement
(Special to The Journal)
London, Aug. 15.—There appears
little hope of averting a general
railroad strike. At a meeting yesterday the managers of the different lines operating in England concluded that the time had arrived to
resist the men's  encroachments.
One manager expressed the fear
that there would be grave troubles
with all the railway systems before
the end of the week.
■ o	
ON LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Matron   of   Hospital   Left   Vestd-day
on Vacation of a .Month's
Time
Ottawa's  Action   Merely   Means  Reprinting of  Provincial
Lists
Miss McTavish, the matron at the
hospital, has been forced to take a
vacation. She has been ordered by
tbe doctor to take a rest In the hope
of recovering from a threatened nervous affection. It was thought that
she would be able to continue on
duty for a few weeks longer but it
was finally decided that she should
leave at once.
Leave of absence was granted for
one month, at the expiration of which
time it is hoped she will be able to
resume her duties.
Miss More has been appointed acting matron during her absence.
Miss McTavish will visit the Okanagan, taking in Vernon and Kelow-
na among other places during the
vacation.
 o	
Returning Officer
Word has been received hy the
Liberal executive in tbe city that
r'. G. Dawson of this city is to be
returning officer for the coming election.
 o	
FINISH   BUILDING
ACTIVITY SHOWN IN
BUSINESS SECTION
Demand for Lots is Improving—English Capitalists Purchase Double Corner on Second Avenue and
First Street—Others are Seeking
Property Within the Central District.
Prince Itupert real estate is showing greater activity than has been
the case for some months past and a
more pronounced demand has been
created. This due doubtless to tbe
fact that the completion of the
G. T. P. is now well within sight
and also to the fact that the streets
in the business section are assuming
a finished state as far as grading Is
concerned. Visitors to the city are
all surprised with the appearance of
the streets and several have within
the last few weeks made purchases
or entered into negotiations looking
to the acquiring of lots.
A, D. Tennant of the Red Cliff
mine and Mr. Chadwick of London,
who spent a few days in the city
this week, made a thorough investigation into the business conditions
here and the outlook. As a result
they decided to invest. Accordingly,
they yesterday purchased from the
Bank of Commerce the valuable double corner, 60x100 feet, on Second
avenue and First street. It adjoins
the Pattullo Block and is beautifully
situated as a business sile.
This is not the only purchase that
there gentlemen Intend milking. They
have their eye on other properties,
but did not care to say anything
about it during the negotiation
stages.
The lots secured are In the area
which many believe will be the very
heart of the business life before
many months pass, ,
David II. Hays is milking rapid
progress with his substantial block
only one block away fro mthe lots
which have just changed hands. The
Hays Block will be one of the most
solidly constructed buildings in the
city and will undoubtedly be occupied at once.
On Third avenue between Fifth
and Sixth streets, M. M. Stephens &
Co. are having their new block
rushed to completion and there has
been a demand for space by those
wishing to occupy it as soon as completed,
On Second avenue, on the lots held
under lease by the Westholme Lumber Company, between Fifth aud
Sixth avenues,  two good  blocks are'
(Continued on   Page Eight)
The recent announcement from
Ottawa that voters' lists for British
Columbia for use in the forthcoming
federal election are being prepared
at the Federal capital is now interpreted as meaning nothing more than
that, for the necessary uses of the
campaign, the provincial lists, as revised during May last, are being reprinted in the government printing
bureau. This conclusion, too, is
strengthened, if not wholly confirmed, by a telegram received by Hie
provincial secretary from Ottawa.
The Federal government, under the
Dominion elections law, possesses authority to revise the voters' list, under the supervision of special commissioners, with somewhat arbitrary
powers, when no revision lias taken
place during a year preceding the
election at which such lists are desired to be used. As this condition
does not apply in this province in
the present case, il is understood
that the mere re-printing of tbe lately revised provincial lists is the sum
total of the Federal action In regard
thereto.
Canadian Fish & Cold Storage Quarters
are Now Completed.
LAUNCH  CAMPAIGN
Opposing Leaders Will Speak   Within
Few Miles of Each Other
This Afternoon.
II. I.. Borden Appears at London anil
Sir Wilfrid At Slmeoo in
Opening  .Meetings
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 15. — Canada's two
political chieftains left the capital
last night to launch their election
campaigns, within a few miles of
each other. Sir Wilfrid Laurier
speaks at Sfmecoe, Out., In the afternoon, and R. L, Borden speaks at
London, Out., in the evening.
Mr. Borden will continue to campaign Ontario for two weeks, and Sir
Wilfrid Laurier will speak at a big
meeting In Tliree Rivers, Que., on
Thursday and In Quebec City on Friday.
Capt, John Irving has gone to
Mice Arm to look after some mining
Interests he has there.
Machinery  Is te>  Be  Installed, After
Which Start Will Be Made
at   Work
Tlie- building of the Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company at
Seal Cove has been completed as far
the walls and roof are concerned.
This immense structure is now ready
for the installation of tho machinery
preparatory to starling up In the receiving of fish and produce.
The Installation of the machinery
will go on all winter so thai an early
start may be made on the general
work of the undertaking.
The purpose of the cold storage
plant, which will be' one of the largest on the const, Is to take care of
immense quantities of eggs, butter
and other produce as well as llsli.
The company hopes to be able to
build up a very large trade with
Northern B. C. pints anel Alaskan
points. Eggs and butter will be
brought in when the railway is completed from the' prairies and also
from local points and treated al the
works to be kept for distribution
the year round,
The company was organized several years ago, the whole situation
being fully gone Into and figured out
on  a  commercial   basis.
Work  Completed
The Westholme. I.umber Company
has completed the contract It had on
the railway line at Stewart. The
The equipment will be moved from
there soutli.
To Attend Convention
The delegates to tbe Liberal nominal ing convention in Nanaimo leave
on Friday. In addition to the name
of Duncan Ross, who is supported by
the local association, the names of
Judge Mclnnes, W. Sloan and II. C.
Brewster, M.P.P., have been put forward.
Superlntendenl Phelan of the Dominion Governmenl Telegraph uine
leii for the soutli yesterday morning. I HMMI MMM
**V».,*.
eWfeU
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
RAILWAY TO MINE
Red Cliff Company at Stewart Observe
the Completion of Railway
to the Works.
Informal    Luncheon   Served   at   the
Site of tlie Bunkers by Officials
of Organization
Inaugurating the completion of the
Canadian  North  Eastern  Railway to
the   Red   Cliff   mine,   the   president
and directors of that  company gave
an   informal   luncheon   to  a   number
of visiting shareholders and business
men   of  Stewart,   says   Hie   Portland
Canal Miner in describing the event
which look place last Friday.    A special train was placed at the disposal
of the management and shortly after
1 I   o'clock  arrived  at   railhead,  the
site of the company's  ore  bunkers.
The guests were in charge of Superintendent   H.   Neil   Smith   and   were
escorted through the mine workings
and'shown  the wonderful  ore  body
that has been opened up during the
past twelve months.    After the visit
of inspection luncheon was served in
the   boarding   bouse.     President   A.
Brskine Smith acted as chairman and
called    upon    a    number    lor    brief
speeches.     X.   Mel..   Curran,  on  behalf   of   the   railway,   congratulated
the management in  being in a position   to  produce  tonnage  that  warranted   the   construction   of   a   railway to the camp.    Sounding a keynote of optimism, fraught with a perfect faith in the possibilities of the
Red   Cliff  and   other  mines   in   the
Portland Canal division, J. G. Chad-
wick,   J.   P.,   of   Harrowgate,   England,  one of  the  company's  shareholders, stated that since he was invited  by A. D. Tennant to purchase
treasury   shares  he  and   his   friends
had not disposed of a single certificate,  and  he  could  safely  say  that
they had no intention of selling any,
but on the contrary would purchase
more of'the treasury stock when any
were offered for sale.    He eulogized
the   directors   in   pointing   out   that
few companies who sought the English  money  markets  could  boast  of
developing a proposition so economically,  and   it   was  exceptional   in   a
world wide experience that there was
no salary attached to any of the directors.     The  enormous  amount  of
development work so far accomplished  reflected  credit on the integrity
of the management and the subordinate officers, and on his return to
England he would inform his fellow
shareholders of the success that had
been   achieved   in   opening    up    the
property.
J. W. Bryant, representing the
Tyee smelter; John Conway, mining
recorder; A. D. Tennant, Mrs. A.
Erskine Smith, R. M. Stewart, W. J.
Bowen, Captain John Irving, Frank
Wilcox, James Cowie, Stipt. H. N.
Smith, William Irwin and M. R.
Jamieson also responded to toasts.
Alter two years of ceaseless development the Red Cliff will within
a few days join the ranks of the
shippers. The occasion of Friday's
social function gave opportunity to
a number of visiting shareholders to
witness the development of the mine,
to see the phenomenal ore bodies
and to join with the company's directors in celebrating the advent of
the railway that makes it possible
to place the Red Cliff on a producing and dividend paying basis.
Besides some forty local guests,
the following officers and their
guests were present at the luncheon:
President A. Erskine Smith and wife,
Vice President W. J. Bowen, Secretary F. Wilcox, Director A. D. Tennant, .1. G. Chadwick, .Mrs. W. L.
Chadwlck, Miss Chadwick, W. F. Irwin   and   wile,   13.   I''.   Newbold   and
Munson, F.  B.  Pblpps
W. Bryant and Albert
wife, W. II
and wife, J
Roberts.
Tlie catering was executed by the
Northern Hotel, who provided a
recherche menu, tbe arrangements
for tbe luncheon being all that could
be desired, and credit is due to P.
Plombo, the hotel chef, for the excellency of the repast.
 o •
Inspector (cross-questioning the
terrified class)—And now, boys, who
wrote Hamlet?
Timid Boy—I'-p-please, sir, it
wasn't me.
Inspector (the same evening to his
host, tiie squire of the village) —
.Most amusing thing happened today.
I was questioning Ihe class, and asked boy white wrote Hamlet, and he
answered tearfully, "I'-p-please, sir,
it wasn't me."    ,
Squire (after loud and prolonged
laughter)—Ha! ha! That's good; and
I suppose the little beggar had done
"It all the time.
 o	
BREAD   COMPANY
For the Information of the General Public.
Large Organization Affected   to   Carry
on Making of Essential
Article of Food.
It    Will   Manufacture   on   Gigantic
Scale in Different Cities
of   Dominion
Cawlbra Mulock of Toronto at the
close of a meeting of the principal
interests announced that all arrangements had been concluded for the
organization of the Canada Bread
Company, Limited, the new all-Canadian company which will at the outset have large bread manufacturing
plants in Montreal, Toronto and iWn-
nipeg, and will forthwith proceed
with the erection of plants in the
other large cities in Canada.
Mr. Mulock stated that included
in the new company were five of the
largest bread manufacturing concerns in Canada and that the services of all the most successful bread
manufacturers were being assured to
the new company. Among the companies taken over were the Breden
Bread Company, of Toronto; Stuart's
Limited, Montreal; George Weston,
Limited, Toronto, known as the
Model Bakery; W. J. Boyd, Winnipeg; H. G. Tomlin, Toronto, known
as the Toronto Bakery Company, it
was the intention of the company,
by extending the present plants and
erecting new large plants in Montreal and Winnipeg to increase the
output of the company's plants as
quickly as possible to 1,000,000
loaves of bread per week, giving an
annual output of approximately 50,-
000,000  loaves.
Mark Breden, head of the Breden Bread Company and regarded as
perhaps the most successful bread
manufacturer that Canada' has yet
had, will be general agent of the
new company. The company is being placed in a strong financial position by having at the outset
$4,000,000 of cash in their treasury
to provide for the erection of the
proposed new plants and extensions
and supply ample working capacity.
The board of directors of the new
company is as follows: Cawthra Mulock, Toronto, president, director of
Imperial Bank, director Confederation Life Association; Mark Breden,
general manager, president Breden
Bread., Ltd.; George Weston, Toronto, president Geo. Weston, Ltd.,
Model Bakery; H. C. Tomlin Toronto, Toronto Bakery Company; W. J.
Boyd, Winnipeg, Boyd's Bakery; Alt'.
Johnston, Toronto, of W. 11. Jhon-
ston & Co., wholesale clothing; A.
Laschlnger, Toronto, secretary, formerly assistant deputy postmaster of
Canada.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
If necessary. We call for your
Leaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
THE BOARD OF HEALTH WISHES TO DRAW THE ATTENTION OF
THE CITIZENS TO CERTAIN CLAUSES OF THE SCAVENGING
BY-LAW, WHICH MORE  IMMEDIATELY AFFECTS THEM.
Clause 1.
The contractor (J. G. Weston) shall have the sole right to remove
all the garbage and night soil from residences, hotels, restaurants, lodging-
houses, stores, tenements, office buildings, hospitals, churches, clubs,
public buildings, theatres, school buildings, rinks, factories, printing offices,
laundries, and all and every other class of building in the City of Prince
Rupert, where night soil or garbage is to be found.
Clause 8.     .
The City agrees with the contractor that during the continuance of
this contract, no licence shall he granted to any other scavenger, the
intention being that the contractor shall have the sole right, so far as
the City can give the same, to remove garbage and night soil from all
parts of the City of Prince Ruperl.
Clause 1).
The contractor shall charge the persons from whose premises garbage
or night soil is removed, the following fees and no more: —
Residence of two rooms and under, for night soil and garbabe,
per  month    50c
Residence of three rooms and over, for night soil and garbage, per
month  750
Hotels, for removal of garbage, per 15 gallon can 10c
Hotels, for removal of night soil, per 15 gallon can 50c
Restaurants, for removal of garbage, per 15 gallon can 10c
Restaurants, for removal night soil, per 15 gallon can 50c
Lodging Houses, Stores, Office Buildings, Clubs, Banks, Printing
Offices, and all other buildings other than private dwellings:
For removal of garbage, per 15 gallon can 25c
For removal of night soil, per 15 gallon can 50c
Clause 10.
In case of the occupants of two or more cabins using one commode
for the accommodation of such cabins, it shall be lawful for the contractor
to charge the occupant of each cabin the rate above mentioned for the
removal of garbage and night soil.
Clause 11.
In case the occupant of a store on the ground floor permanently
uses the same commode in use by the occupants of the upper floor, or
vice versa, then the said rates shall be collectd from both the occupiers
of the upper and lower floors. ,
Clause 25.
That nothing in this contract shall prevent the owner of any premises
from taking away his own garbage, by his own conveyance, providing same
is done to the satisfaction of the Health Officers; but the contractor shall
have the exclusive right under his licence to remove garbage for remuneration.
Clause 26.
And, whereas, it is possible that disputes may from time to time arise
between the contractor and persons dealing with him under this contract
as to the proper charges to be made: Now it is agreed that in case any
such dispute shall hereafter arise, the same shall at once be referred to
the City Medical Health Officer, who shall be empowered in a summary
manner to settle any such dispute, and in doing so shall have power to
settle any question as to the proper construction of this contract so far
as the rates to be charged are concerned.
(Signed) J. O. REDDIE, Medical Health Officer.
L. E. McFARLANE, Sanitary Inspector.
By-Law No. 55
A BY-LAW TO PROVIDE AGAINST THE SPREAD OF CONTAGIOUS
OR INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND FOR REGULATING WITH
THE VIEW OF PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS
DISEASES THE ENTRY OR DEPARTURE OF BOATS OR
VESSELS AT THE PORT OF PRINCE RUPERT.
The Municipal Council of the City of Prince Rupert enacts as
follows:— __
1. This By-law shall take effect on the twenty-eighth day of July,
A. D. 1911.
2. It shall be unlawful for any boat or vessel to be docked or moored
at a less distance from any wharf in the said City than six feet.
3. It shall he unlawful for any boat or vessel, entering the Port of
Prince Rupert, lo be secured or made fast to any wharf in said City by
any hawser or hawsers, on which there is not placed a metal rat-guard or
funnel, at least tliree (3) feet In diameter and at least three!3) feet from
such wharf.
4. It shall be unlawful for any boat or vessel entering the Port
of Prince Rupert to be connected with any wharf in the said City by a
gangway which is not guarded 1>y some person there for the purpose of
preventing rats from leaving such boat or vessel by such gangway.
5. Every owner, agent, and captain of any boat or vessel, entering
the Port of Prince Rupert, and every other person violating or Instructing,
authorising, ordering, or permitting, any person to violate any of the
provisions of this By-law shall for each such offence be liable to a penalty
not exceeding One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) and not less than Ten
Dollars ($10.00).
PASSED THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT THE 12TH DAY OF JULY, A. D. 1911.
(Signed)
(Signed)  Ernest A. Woods, Clerk.
WM. MANSON
Mayor.
RECONSIDERED AND FINALLY ADOPTED BY THE SAID COUNCIL
THE 24TH DAY OF JULY, A. D.  1911.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria.  B. C, July 7, 1911.    Jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION CF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25fh of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
(Signed)
WM. MANSON,
Mayor.
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land In the name of William Jordan Larkworthy„ which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Di-'rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23
Skeena Laud District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lauds:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thenc9 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 cliains; tlience south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 cliains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John  Klrkaldy,  Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the   issue   of  a   duplicate  of the
Certificate   of  Title  for  Lot   361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it is my intention  to  Issue at  the
expiration  of  one  month   after  the
first publication  hereof a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described  lands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which   Certificate  of  Title  is  dated
25th   November,   1909,   and   numbered 44 I.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District Registrar.
Land Registry Office,  Prince Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. al5-sl5
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
WATEB  NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I Intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District  of
oKeena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line In a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Lesll3, Agent.
Dated 6th June, 1911. 6-26
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division  of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. O.J  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (If unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The premises on v, iLh tlie
water Is to be used (describe s:. i
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which
water  is  to    be    used—Geiieri*' **•',
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe : •
land to be irrigated, giving acreage
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place wliere the water Is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
tlience southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from Its
mouth, and ou its south bank; tbence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. J-ll
j MMHmhmmm
:>fl«—*«»■«•■«-
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
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The Kelowna district has the merit
qf being the pioneer tobacco producing section in the province, and this
fact is largely due to the efforts of
Louis Holman, the gentleman who
is at present acting for the provincial government in the capacity of
inspector and expert to supervise the
first attempts In this line of a number of other parts of the province.
Mr. Holman is the manager of the
Kelowna Tobacco Company, which
manufactures a large quantity of cigars a year, growing much of the
tobacco required for this output. The
company has shipped oul some hundreds of pounds of first class leaf
during the present season, and never
have any difficulty in disposing of
what they produce. They, however,
prefer to hold most of what they
grow, in order to give it the benefit
of the aging process. Mr. Holman
estimates the company has now on
hand some 65,000 to 70,000 pounds
of tobacco, which is being stored to
develop the prime qualities which
come only with time. It is understood that negotiations are now on
foot with some eastern people which
have in view the speedy tranter of
th business. This arrangement,
when completed, will probably be
followed by several important forward steps in production and general
management.
In conversation with a press representative, Mr. Holman spoke of the
work he is doing for the government with the enthusiasm of the
specialist. During the past season
he has addressed interested gatherings of ranchers at Nanaimo. Na-
kusp, Penticton, Enderby, Armstrong, Vernon, Keremeos and Okanagan Falls on the subject of tobacco culture, pointing out its possibilities in sections which suit the
plant, and, in almost every case, his
addresses have been followed by the
planting of experimental crops of the
fragrant leaf. Mr. Holman himself
has supplied the plants for these experiments, having shipped out over
10,000 to different districts. He
states that there is some very good
tobacco grown on the Island, especially in the vicinity of Nanaimo, and
he also thinks well of the possibilities In Nelson and the Siocan. He
was particularly pleased with the
showing in Salmon Arm and also in
Okanagan Falls. It must be explained, in this connection, that Mr. Hol-
man's expert and advisory duties call
for four visits to parts of the province conducting tobacco experiments.
The first was to put the matter before the ranchers and to make preliminary arrangements. The second
is to give instructions and advice as
to pruning. He has just started on
his third trip, the object of which is
to show how to top and harvest the
tobacco. The last round of visits will
be paid in November, when the final
process of taking down the harvested
leaf and stripping it ready for market will be fully gone into.
MADE LEACH READY
Thrilling   Sensations   of   .Men   Who
Put Crank  in  Living
Tomb
"The worst experience of my lifetime " was how one of the members
of tne boat party which towed Bobby
Leach and his barrel to the point
wliere he was cut loose, describes
his sensations on  the trip.    ,
"I had taken part in the affair
without realizing fully its possible
effects," he said, "and not until a
saw the rope cut and the barrel spin
loose on its perilous career, did I
understand the part which I had
helped to play.
"We left LaSalle, six of us, In a
high power gasoline launch, shortly
after 2 o clock. On board were
Bobby, two newspaper men, a moving picture operation and three
boatmen. As we swung up the river on the way to the boathouse where
the barrel was located It seemed that
the trip would never be made—that
day at least.
"Sheltered as we were, by land on
each side, we shipped an enormous
amount of water, for the river was
lashed into high cresting waves by
a tempestuous wind. Once the barrel was secured, however, it acted
as a steadying factor, though, none
the less, when we swept across the
open towards Navy Island, two of
the party were kept busy bailing out
the seas we shipped. With the island reached, final preparations were
made for the trip.
The moving picture machine was
posted on the bank, wliere every detail was faithfully recorded. Leach
was easily the most composed man
of the party. He gave directions—
which, if neglected, meant a lingering death—in an ordinary matter of
facr tone, not once exhibiting the
slightest nervousness.
"Ince he clinued into the barrel
and after a look around the interior
got out again.
" 'He's not going,' said one man.
"Leach heard him, and said, quietly: 'Don't be .in a aurry, I am going
to make the trip, but I want to see
that you feelows know your business.'
"He then directed a friend minutely as to fixing the hammock, and
again entered the narrow aperture,
which barely, slight as he was, admitted him. Turning round, the
hammock straps were adjusted, this
operation occupying some time.
Twice the snap refused to bite the
ring, until finally the man with the
longest arm reached down and made
It fast.
"A cord was next handed down
to the intrepid navigator and then
came the most gruesome operation—
that of fastening the gasket into
position. No one who was not present could realize the thoughts of
those who watched the oval piece of
iron being screwed into position. It
was like assisting at a funeral of a
live human being; but one thing has
to be remembered, that those who
were present had not the slightest
fear that the little Englishman
could not negotiate his trip.
"His very confidence at the last
moment impressed all, and when the
last nut was in place he topped upwards a final cheery 'Good bye; I'll
be over in thirty minutes.'
"Out went the little craft, with
the barrel and its living occupant inside, out to the mid-stream, wliere
the waters once again dashed over
the gunwale, drenching all. On the
starboard side, at right angles, rode
the barrel.
"The launch swept on until It
seemed as though the current must
sweep it, too, over the Falls.
"Then when some began to think
that we were going to accompany
Leach also, the order came to 'houl
her in.'
" 'All readby, Bobby?'
" 'Cut her loose,' came the muffled reply.
"Two hands reached over and severed the rope, and the barrel, released from its mooring raidly took
on momentum.
"It was now time for the launch
to look after itself, for the current
was running strong. Only by skilful navigation did it finally stem the
sweeping flood. But few gave
thought of our peril. Nor, one, nor
two, but all, stared over their shoulders at the red object spinning and
tossing on its way to the final plunge
over the majestic falls.
"The next thirty minutes were like
a lifetime for us, but what they must
have meant for the little Englishman trussed helpless like a fowl in
his strange craft, no living man can
say. Not even Bobby Leach."—Toronto News.
Skeena Land Listrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKjS NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; tlience west 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:.—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; tbence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince nupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chr.ins; thence north SO chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Molly—Did you ever ride through
a railway tunnel?
Dolly—No; but I've been kissed
in the dark.
 o	
"Had a puncture, my friend?"
asked the passer, with an air of
interest. The chauffeur looked up
and swallowed his feelings with a
huge gulp.
"No, sir " he replied.    "I'm just
changing the air in the tires.    The
other lot's worn out, you know!"
 o :	
Some  for  a  high   crowned   bale  of
hay, and some
Sigh for a spread out pancake to be
come
Their beauteous style—other prefer a flap
Before   their   face,   to   hide   them
chewing gum.
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. AH desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marlon Mc
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant in
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tlience north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 cliains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION McDAIRMID.
Daniel  McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-1B
Skeena  Land  District—District  of   !
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days|
from  date,  1,  Austin  M.  Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B.  C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for  coal and petroleum
on and under C40 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the soutli corner of
C.L.4475;   thence  nortli   SO  chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south'
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to1
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile nortli of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 8 0 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to t! | Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO cliains; thence west
80 cliains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 cliains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 4470; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; tlience west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, I". S. a., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 99±; tlience south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north SO chains; uence east
so chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. .Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  10    i!Ul. A-16
Skeena  Land   District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tlience soutli
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described Iands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C. N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June  26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai llattie Sutherland of Illair, Nebraska, l*. S. A.,
occupation housewife intends to
apply lor permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a posl planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-J miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 60 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thenco east 60
chains; thence south So chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATTIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. .Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16    1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; tlience east 80 chains; tbence
north 80 cnains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, ti. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to  place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler. Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 cliains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4475; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.   BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, By occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; ihence east
SO chains; uience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN AI.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated July  21,  1911. 8-8
Skeena    Land    district—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
tlience east 80 cliains; Ihence north
80 cnains; tlience west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM   HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south .80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for.a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under oi0 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; tlience
soutli 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 cliains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C., by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south SO
cliains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of Britisii Columbia,
occupation, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
thence south three chains; Ihence
east ten chains; thence north tliree
chains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Dated   July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 cliains; theuce soutli 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
JAMES  MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.   1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast, corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains eaBt;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; tlience
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred  Boblen, Agent.
Dated June 14, 1911. 6-23
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.alns In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
'12598 at Lakelse Lake; tlience north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Prince Rupert   Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NuTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence north
80 cliains; tbence west 80 chains;
tbence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement;   containing 640 acres.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 4 0 chains to the shore; tlience
:ilong the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES I'RECY  HICKMAN.
Dated June 7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on tho northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; tlience following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H.  Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
I Office nt II. B, Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH  COAL
1 Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No  68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
-prince ftupcrt
Telt'iiliom*
journal
138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point In
Canada, 52.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
rates    furnished    on
Advertising
application.
0. H. NELSON",
Editor.
"^^
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
Press Opinions
PRESERVING  THE  HERITAGE
The presence of Mr. McCandless
of Vancouver In the city this week
revives a aentimenl In favor of steps
being taken to secure for Prince Rupert tiie trade of the north rather
than allowing il in any way to slip
through our lingers and be diverted
to the south. This Is suggested by
the presence of Mr. McCandless because he is one of tlie most ardent
advocates of the railway from tlie
northern interior to Vancouver, in
advocating it Mr. McCandless is actuated by a desire lo benefit his own
home city.
it may be urged that the throwing
of any obstacle in the way of the
construction of such a road as suggested is selfish—that it is not a
prupei' spirit to show inasmuch as
there should be a readiness to aid
in developing the whole province. In
one sense such a point is well taken
but the selfishness that actuates the
move to preserve the trade to Prince
Rupert is just on a par with the
selfishness which actuates the people
of Vancouver to try to invade this
territory and secure a trade that
should come here.
Mr. -McCandless says the road is
going to be built; there is no doubt
of It. We feel quite satisfied that
such a road will be built but we
would like to see it delayed for a
reasonable lime until the lines of
trade have been established this way.
With the G. T. P. completed and
with the character of the road such
as it is second to none on the continent, Prince Rupert will become
the best wheat shipping port on the
Pacific Coast within a few years.
When the trade becomes established
along this line and the merchants
of Prince Rupert have established
connections with the interior country this City will be In a position to
meet all legitimate competition.
It is the early days of the trade
regarding which we are jealous.
AN   EX-MINISTER'S  OPINION
The day we adapt ourselves to the
United States markets . . . that day
we strengthen the grasp of the
United States on Canada.
At the first beckoning hand from
Washington we turn to listen; the
first time any one beckons we turn
from the path that leads to Empire
to the path Hint leads to Washington.
These resolutions spell retrogression, commercial subordination, the
destruction of our national ideals
and displacement from our sound position as tip. rising hope of the Britisii Empire.—Hon. C. Sifton in tlie
House  of Commons.
"James," saiel bis mother, "you
eat and eat, and never seem satisfied. Here is one more helping of
pudding, but it must be the last."
James started on the pudding with
delight.
"Once upon a time, James." went
nn his mother, "there was a little
boy wlio ate, and ate, until one day
he ate loo much pudding and be
burst."
"There ain't such a thing as too
much pudding!' grunted Jimmy as
he finished his helping.
"There must be,' said his mother,
'"or why did the little boy burst'/"
"Nol enough boy!" replied James,
and handed up his plate for a nth
helping.
•f *
■***•*•**••••••** ••••••+***
THE    GOVERNMENT'S    POSITION
It has been made pretty clear In
the House of Commons where the
responsibility for a general election
this summer lies. Sir Wilfrid Laurier would have gone to the country
immediately after reciprocity was introduced and secured a snap verdict
before the proposal was understood,
if he had dared. But that way of
avoiding redistribution would have
been loo crude to have deceived anyone. He preferred to waste the time
of tlie IIoits and try to put the blame
ul' obstruction upon the Opposition.
But all the time lie was preparing
for a general election before the
country could be properly represented.
In this tactical delay be miscalculated two or three things. He
eliel not realize his waning popularity. He never dreamed that the
Canadian people had brains enough
to subject his policy to the searching analysis they have; he trusted
once too often to the false glitter
of his rhetoric. It never occurred
io him that American statesmen
would erankly and openly disclose
their underlying motives of aggrandisement througn annexation in
recommending reciprocity to their
people.
The effect of the favored nations
treaties upon the Canadian market
and upon Imperial relations never
crossed his mind, although that has
stirred even the radical free trade
ministers of Great Britain to gloomy
anticipations of serious trouble. Now
he sees the ground rapidly slipping
away beneath his feet. He finds
an Opposition in the House determined to bring out in discussion
everything cognate to the present
extraordinary political situation, and
a growing hostility in the country
which warns him to put his fate to
the touch at once, in the hope that,
through an unfair appeal to an. improperly represented electorate,
there may still be time to avert disaster.
He is appealing to the country in
a way and at a lime which is a virtual, if not a technical, breach of the
constitution in two respects. The
only alternative he offers to a general election is the forcing upon the
country of a revolutionary policy, to
pass which he has received no mandate and upon which tlie people have
not been consulted. If the Opposition were to permit him to do so,
they would have made it perfectly
plain that who ever is fit to govern
Canada, they, at least, are not, because they would be conniving at an
infraction of the fundamental principle of popular representati**" ,ov-
ernment, they woud be rc.eoing to
discharge the duty for which an opposition exists, to prevent arbitrary
and autocratic rule.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier professes himself anxious to secure a vote in the
House of Commons on reciprocity.
Mr. Borden Is anxious to secure a
vote in tlie country. According to
the usage of our constitution, Mr.
Borden is right, and Sir Wilfrid
Laurier Is wrong. We have a single
chamber government in Canada, for
our senate is not a legislative chamber at all, and without the restraining influence of a minority, single
chamber government means government by the cabinet, which soon degenerates into the worst of all governments—an Irresponsible bureaucracy.
The passage of reciprocity and an
Immediate appeal are not by any
means necessary alternatives. If
they were, Mr. Borden would still
be right In holding that an Imperfect appeal was better than no appeal
al all. Bul Sir Wilfrid Laurier Is
doubly wrong in forcing them lis
alternatives. The census material
upon which redistribution Is based Is
In his bands now, or will be within
a very short time. A lull tabulated
information of the census Is not necessary   for   that   purpose,   only   the
number of the people. Reciprocity
could not be injured nor affected bj
a few weeks' delay, but the proper
representation of the county in the
next parliament can will be seriously
njured by an Immediate election.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier thing that its injury will be his benefit, and that
is the reason for his action.—Winnipeg Telegram.
THE   AMERICAN   PURPOSE
The adoption of reciprocity by
congress furnishes parliament with
one more excellent reason for rejecting the agreement. The Amercian
purpose is tlie domination of the
Dominion by the United States. J. J.
Hill says that under the operation
of this compact Imperial trade would
soon  disappear.
Addressing the National Editorial
Association at Detroit last week,
Chase Osborn, governor of Michigan,
said that the new trade relations
about to be established with Canada were hut a prelude to a union
of nations from the North Pole to
the Isthmus of Panama. He spoke
of the time when all North America
would be "one country with one type
of government, one language, one
People."
In reporting the speech, the Detroit News frankly states that in
order not to arouse Canadian susceptibilities the governor adroitly
avoided the word "annexation," substituting "union" instead. The address elicited enthusiastic applause
from the newspaper editors present
from all over the United States. Nor
is it surprising that this should be
the case. Three years ago these
same American journalists toured
Western Canada, and they appreciate the prize that from their viewpoint seems almost within their
grasp.
All over the republic the newspapers approve Mr. Taft's reciprocity
arrangement with Mr. Fielding as a
shrewd method of annexing half a
continent, at first commercially, but
afterwards legislatively and politically. The Chicago American says that
In history the present congress will
be known as the congress that
"united the two countries in business
matters, while waiting for and developing through trade a closer union in political matters." Similarly
the New York Journal says:
"We look forward to the day when
this whole North American continent
will be one great nation, as it
should be."
The Journal goes so far as to say
that once in the Union this vast
Dominion, larger in extent that the
entire Republic, would still have as
much voice in its own affairs as the
state of Maine or Texas. What a
descent would that be from the Dominion's present proud position as
one of the five free nations in the
British Empire! There is no beating about the bush here. Nor was
there any lack of frankness about
President Taft's assertion that reciprocity would operate to withdraw
Canada from "the Imperial orbit,"
as he called. The Democratic leader,
Champ Clark, went farther and with
less consideration for our feelings
openly stated that the Dominion
would be absorbed by the Republic.
No doubt rei..ains of the American intention only half concleaed in
tlie agreement which Mr. Taft foisted upon Mr. Fielding. It is nothing
against our shrewd neighbors across
the border that they look upon the
Canadian provinces as a desirable
acquisition commercially and polit-
Ically, All the sborlsightnedness Is
to be found on our own side of the
line. Few Canadians are traitors at
heart. Few knowingly would aid In
setting on foot a movement that
would result ultimately in the loss
of our national status. The danger
Is with those Canadians who do not
recognize the signs of tlie times. The
News Is confident that the vast majority of the electors are sufficiently
awake to the rlskR Involved In reciprocity to repudiate the whole transaction  al   the  polls.—Toronto News.
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INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
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THE GENERAL  ELECTION
The dissolution of parliament wns
inevitable, and the responsibility for
It and for the early election rests
upon the government. Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and his colleagues Introduced the reciprocity agreement as
a herring across the trail of their
record. For years they have been
piling offence upon offence until they
have stultified the history of tin ir
party and made Liberalism a syn-
onniym for graft, electoral corruption and the prostitution of public
business to party ends. Six months
or more ago they saw defeat ahead
of them, and so they started their
reciprocity campaign in order to I.lde
the other issues that foretold their
undoing.
Bul the Opposition, representing
public opinion, would not he put oft
the trail, and during the short period
since parliament again met Mr. Borden and his followers have persis'-
ed in showing up the misdeeds of
the government. It was more than
Sir Wilfrid Laurier could stand, so
he has thrown the country into a
general election In the midst of a
bus year, and will try to make reciprocity the sole Issue upon which
he Is to be tried.
Reciprocity will be a lending issue,
but on It Mr. Borden is so far shown
to be right. He fought for Its reference to the people, which the government would hnve denied if it
could. Now that he has gained fo-
the public the right to speak upon
It he Is prepared to oppose It, ai u
within  n  few  days, even, according
Replenish
the
Pantry
■
.j
■ High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods e'or the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
1 MERRYFIELD'S S
CASH GROCERY
l
■
.J
to the government's own arguments,
he may be shown to be right again
by the passage by the congrc-.* of
the United States of a tariff measure which will give Canada without.
ie clprocity all the advantages that
ereii Its supporters rlalm  for it.
Canada has a thousand reasons
for refusing to enter a trade deal
with the United States today for
one tin.t can be urged on its behalf.
But reciprocity will not be the only
issue, especially in the west. The
jdulv    ,,   record   of   the   administra
tion, the taking away of our natural
resources, the indifference to the
coal situation, the character of the
ministers, these and other elements
will come into the discussion now
before the people, and the opposition
to tlie government of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier welcomes the opportunity to
refer them to the electors of Can-
ada.--('algary  Daily   Herald.
 o     ,
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
ku«
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
TEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT  LANDS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   \ND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
	 SSS&JB
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦'1
j   MARINE NEWS   I
<f> *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
INVESTIGATION INTO WRECK
Just a year after the stranding of
the Canadian Pacific steamer Princess May in Alaskan waters, the an-
nouncemnt is made of a sitting of
the marine court to investigate the
wreck. The sitting will be held In
Vancouver on August 18, and the
next day Judge Martin will preside
at an investigation of the loss of the
steamer Belcarra of the Sechelt
Steamship Company. Both cases
will come up in the morning at
10:30   at   the  court   house.
A year ago Ihe Princess May, under command of Capt. J. McLeod,
struck the north reef of Sentinel
Island, near Junea, Alaska, and remained for almost a month in a
perilous position with her bow high
in the air. She was proceeding south
from Skagway with eighty passengers and struck at about 4 o'clock
in the morning. All the passengers
were landed and cared for at the
Sentinel Island lighthouse till the
arrival of the Princess Beatrice to
bring them home. At first it was
thought that the vessel was a total
loss, but when the tide went down,
she rested firmly on the reef high I
above the water, and repeated attempts to get her to her natural
element failed. At the preliminary
investigation, the disaster was attributed to the fact that haze obstructed the window of the pilot
house, when in charge of Pilot Richardson, in the absence of Capt. McLeod, who was asleep In his bunk.
At the next high tides, the vessel
was floated, towed to Esquimalt and
repaired being converted into an oil
burner at   the time.
The Princess May has possessed a
superabundance of names. She was
built at NewcasiIe-on-Tyne in 1SSS,
and before she was bought by the
C. P. R. was called the Hating, being operated by the Chinese between
Hongkong and Saigon. She is down
in Lloyds' register as the Princess
May, ex-Ninkchow, ex-Cass, ex-Arthur,   ex-Cass,   ex-Hating. ,
The Belcarra, which was a vessel
not unlike the Tartar, sank in 35
fathoms of water September 17,
1910, in Agemennon Channel, Jervis
Inlet. The little vessel, with a crew
of fourteen and a passenger list of
four, crashed into a rock and hung
suspended by her bow for five hours,
till the receding tide lowered her
stern and she sank. No passengers
were injured and the vessel was
fully insured. She was valued at
about $20,000. She was first owned
by the B. C. Packers' Association,
who called her the Union, and used
her in the Fraser River.
DOCK  IMPROVEMENTS
An expenditure of between seven
and ten million dollars in local improvements, the construction of tliree
docks, with one of them promising
to be the largest on the Pacific
Coasl, and the changing of the steamer Minnesota's headquarters from
Seattle to Vancouver before the
opening of the Panama Canal, is the
news brought to Vancouver by M. J.
Costello, general traffic manager for
the Great Northern Railway Company.
"We are going ahead with plans
of improvements which entail an expenditure of between $7,000,000 and
$10,000,000 within the next two
years," said Mr. Costello in discussing bis company's plans for Vancouver In the immediate future.
"Business in Britisii Columbia
has been so very encouraging for us
that we are not going to lose any
time In pushing to a speedy completion our plans for Improvements. We
contemplate constructing tliree
docks, and while two of them will
be leased—one of these two to Balfour, Guthrie eS* Co.—the third and
largest one will be for our own use.
It will practically be tbe largest
dock on tlie Paclflo Coast, being between 800 and 1,000 feet long, 15"
feet wide, and will be able to accommodate steamers drawing 42 feet of
water. While I don't care to appear
in the light of making an iron-clad
statement, 1 don't mind expressing
my opinion that the Minnesota, the
largest sleamer on the Pacific, will
run from Vancouver to the Orient
before the opening of the Panama
Canal.
 o	
PANAMA CANAL
the demand now being made by
American shipping men that congress shall announce a definite policy—first, as regards the canal tolls;
secondly, the question of permanent
organization on tlie canal zone; and
thirdly, whether the Panama railroad
across the isthmus shall be allowed
to compete with the waterway, or
whether it shall be acquired by the
government and rates fixed giving
preference to the canal.
It is believed by the business commissions which lately visited the Isthmus that Americans, by adopting a
keen trade policy, involving the control of the sale of coal to ships and
also the sale of stores and the establishment of laundries for the convenience of ships' passengers and
crews, and also by levying what Is
called here full rates for ships using
the canal, can recoup themselves for
the enormous outlay of $375,000,-
000, and fears are expressed that If
congress delays in organizing a staff
thuns early for working tbe canal,
there may be a big waterway entirely destitute of shipping.
Colonel Goethals, who, more than
anybody else, has made the dirt fly
at Panama, does not favor the administration of the canal by a commission, but a one-man control, and
be declares also that if congress does
not run the business end of the canal
it will be administered by trust magnates for the benefit of private interests. Colonel Goethals himself believes that the work of administering the canal may prove a bigegr job
than the construction, and for the
latter purpose he favors the retention of 6,000 of the 12,000 Americans now employed In the construction for working the locks and attending to the various mechanical
details. He wants to extinguish the
separate corporation which owns and
operates the Panama Railroad. He
wishes everybody and more particularly American shippers, to use the
canal.
Public opinion so far has not been
greatly aroused by the possible commercial advantages of the new waterway, but Panama has been so revolutionized physically by the engineers that disease, which was once
prevalent, has disappeared, and one
day it may take a place as a health
resort.
Mr. Roosevelt, who appointed Col.
Goethals, apparently favors the idea
of one-man administration, instead
of a commission, and has also declared that the policy of the government in administering the canal
should be announced forthwith, so
that other great commercial nations
may know what to expect and shape
their policy accordingly. He also
believes that the American government should equip and run establishments for the sale of fuel, food and
ships' washing. He does not say
that the Panama Railroad should be
wiped out, but he declares that it
should be run by the same man who
runs the canal, and who should also
dominate every other form of activity within the limits of the canal
zone. Other persons suspend judgment as regards Panama until a committee of enquiry has investigated
and studied the development and administration of the Suez Canal tinn-
der the English.
 o	
According to reports from Panama sent to Washington the great
canal on which America is spending
$375,000,000 will be ready for the
transport of ships from ocean to
ocean within two years. But three
and a half years must elapse before
before the waterway is complete In
all its details. This statement, which
Is endorsed by Colonel Goethals, the
engineer-constructor,  gives  point  to
TO TOUt CANADA
Party
of   Britisii   Journalists
Size  Up  Dominion's
Possibilities
Will
Nothing has been so successful
Iu the emigration branch of the public service of Canada as the publicity which has been gained in the
British press, largely through the instrumentality of J. Obed-Sinith, chief
of tlie emigration staff in Europe,
and the Hon. Frank Oliver, on the
principle that too much cannot be
known of a good thing, spending
some of the public money in order
lo still further bring before the people of the Old Land the advantages
of the Dominion.
Mr. Smith, under whose persona]
supervision a large measure of the
success of emigration from the Old
Land must be credited, will accompany a party of twelve journalists
of the first class, representing the
following papers: Westminster Ga
zette, London; Daily Chronicle, London; Eastern Dally Press, Norwich;
Free Press, Aberdeen; Scotsman,
Edinburgh; Evening Telegraph, Belfast; Irish Post, Cavan; Western
Mall, Cardiff; Independent, Sheffield; Titbits, London; Foiiiancial
News, London; Banner and Times
of Wales. They propose to journy
from one end of Canada to the other.
It is needless to say that it may
be taken for granted that at any
point in Canada where, during the
short time these busy men can give
to the visit, the boards of trade and
other pub'ic bodies will be glad to
assist in giving them an opportunity
of gaining Information that must
sooner or later, be given to the British public through the powerful me-
ilium of the Britisii press.
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN A
Fairbanks - Morse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
0&M\
iff)
fflfi'^l
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agemt—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. O.
- PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital    !j*500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M.  1)., Pies. DAVID   H.   HATS,  First  Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
O.  II.  PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real  Estnte and Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent Vu™ Lam*s al,d Mi,,es
Agent for Cine of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Mortgages and Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will he pleased to answer any inquiries regarding Investments in
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE   RUPERT,  R.   O.
THE   SAFETY   MATCH
Great   Inventor   Might   Have   Made
Millions  but  Public
Benefitted
The grant of a civil list pension of
60 pounds annually to the daughter
of theh late Dr. George Gore, F.R.S.,
LL. D., recalls an interesting and romantic personality of the great scientific awakening of the mid-Victorian era.
Dr. Gore, who had devoted most
of his long life to scientific research,
died two years ago at the age of 82,
leaving a fortune of some 6,000
pounds. It is because he left the
bulk of his savings to the Royal
Society and the Royal Institute, to
be devoted to the furtherance of
original scientific research, that his
daughter needs the pension that has
now been granted.
His small fortune represented a
very small part of the wealth that
he created. His daughter's small
pension represents the return of but
a fraction of the benefit which the
nation derived from his labors
Upon the chemical discoveries which
resulted from his patient investigations and experiments with phosphorus are based the safety match.
Upon his researches in electro-metal
lurgy are based nickel plating. If
he had received one fraction of a
percentage of the profits derived
from the commercial uses to which
his scientific discoveries were ap
plied he would have been many times
a, millionaire.
But his concern was with pure science, and he was content to make
discoveries out of which inventors
and manufacturers gained huge fortunes.
George Gore was born in Bristol,
the son of a working man, In 1S26.
He had no education beyond reading and writing, for there was none
available. He left school at.the age
of thirteen and worked as an errand
boy until he appreticed himself to
a blacksmith, and as a blacksmith
he earned his living as a young man.
But the wonders of scierfce fascinated him. He educated himself. As
a young man he settled In Birmingham, where industrial development
demand scientific knowledge, and devoted himself to research.
Typefounding, dyeing, chemical
bleaching, electro plating, a hundred
trudes benefitted by his discoveries.
To the end of his life he went on
experimenting, and made a modest
fortune, but everybody who strikes
a   match  does  so  with   ills  help,
—o-
II. C. CHAMPION
By defeating Beverly Rhodes of
Vancouver in three straight sets in
Victoria Joe Tyler of Spokane won
the men's singles in tlte annual tournament at tho Victoria Tennis Club's
grounds and with it the championship of Britisii Columbia. The first
set was bard fought, but in the next
two the Vancouver man was completely outclassed. Not satisfied
with one championship, Tyler, with
Ills partner, Captain Foulkes, annexed the honors in the men's doubles
by winning from Conrad Schwengers
and Harrison iu straight sets. .Mrs.
Talbot and Miss Gillespie won the
title In the ladies' double nnd, as was
expected, Mrs. Talbot went through
the tournament undefeated in the ladies' singles.
 .—o	
"You are certainly a good looker,
Mrs. Jinx."
"You flatterer! You like blondes,
then?"
"Why—er—I—didn't you just
tell nie that you had to look about
more than an hour or two for a
good servant?"
"My dear," he feebly said, after
they had permitted her to go to him
after the operation, "I shall not recover. They think I will, but they
are mistaken. I feel it. 1 am going
to die."
"No, no, John!" she cried. "Don't
say that! You mustn't die! 1 haven't
a thing that is fit to wear to a
funeral."
"There are many delightful
dishes to be made from left-over
food."
"That's nice," responded the
young bride. "There's a great deal
of food left over since I began doing
the  cooking."
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver,  Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays nt 8 a.m.
Fur STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat $9.50
return,   including   meals   itnil   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays, 5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service'Of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
**************************
! STORAGE!
Household Goods and Baggage *
given careful attention. *
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents *
TRANSFERERS |
Prince    Rupert    Warehousing *
and   Forwarding   Co. .;.
First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St. 5
* DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,     *
% Manager. *
* P. O. Box 907 Phone 202 %
* x
**************************
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, AUGUST, 1911
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities In Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
TicketB to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 116 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
HIGH  WATER
LOW WATER
DATE AND DAY
Time!  Ht  Time1   Ht II  Time   lit   Time1  Ht
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
IS
19
20
21
2 4
25
20
27
28
29
30
31
Tuesday .
{Wednesday
|Tliursday .
jFriday   .   .
Saturday   .
Sunday   .    .
Monday   .
Tuesday    .
[Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday    .    .
iSaturday  .
Sunday   .    .
i.eionday  .   .
Tuesday
16.5 18
15.2:19
14.5 20
14.6.21
16.0 22
00116.0 23
...... 12
01|19.1!13
39119.7113
Wednesday  .   .   .   . |  5
jThursday   .
Friday   .    .
■aaturday   .
Sunday  .   .
Monday .   .
Tuesday .   .
Wednesday .
Thursday   .
Friday   .    .
Saturday   .
Sunday .   .
.Monday  .   .
Tuesday    .
.Wednesday
Thursday   .
0:
0:
l:15|20.2:i4
1:52 20.5|14
2:29|20.5 15
3:07.20.2:15
3:45'19.7 16
4:27,18.7 16
13U7.6T7
14J16.3 IS
45)15.5 19
18'16.6'21
36 16.6 22
40117.j;23
..I....12
10|22,0 13
06 22,5 13
54 22.5 14
89 21.9 lo
22121.0 15
0»|l»,7 16
49!i8.2 16
3716.6 17
36 16.2 IS
s.o
9:
.110:
.11:
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.1 3:
.1 4:
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.    5:
6
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:38jl7
:30 17
:33jl7
32 17
:21 18
39116
14 1
4511
13 18.
4 0; 1S
08119
38 19
11 19
4Sil9
34119
32 18,
46 IS
04 19
18120
2121
30 19
12 20
6121
29|21
06 21
43120
30 2"
58 19
38 18
26 17
0:11|
1:04
2:27j
3: 40;
4:44,
.3|| 5:34|
8!| 6:12;
5 i 6:46
181
5|| 7:49i
9,| 8:191
2|] 8:49'
4li 9:201
5',' 9:55
5N10:34
3,|il:17|
»j 0:14
8|| 1:28
2, 4:52
ii 4:06
H! 5:08'
2l| 6:021
3I| 6:50|
Oil 7:331
2 8:14'
2!; S:52j
7 9:28j
0 ;10:03l
2 10:40|
2 11:20
3 U:24
6.S12
7.3(13:
7.4114:
7.0 15;
6.3116:
5.417:
4.6 18:
3.8|18:
3.3119:
2.9 19:
131 7.5
03) 9.1
06110.3
20il0.7
2S 1(1.6
22 10.1
04    9.3
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAW CO.
R. C. Const S. S. Service
41|
16|
50!
8.5
7.6
6.8
2.8
20
25
6.1
2.9:21
01
5.6
3.3
21
40
5.3
4.1
22
25
5.2
5,1
23
16
5.6
6 4
5.8
12
11
7.7
6.9
13
20
8.9
5.4
14
40
9.3
4.2
16
00
8.8
2.9
17
12
7.6
1.7 18
09
6.3
0.9
18
.-,S
5.1
0.7
19
45
4.2
1.1
20
30
3.7
2.0
21
14
.'). e
3.3
21
57
4.1
4.9
OO
41
4.9
6.6
23
28
5.9
#
Famous
Princess
Line
^■^
6.9 12:06'  9.9
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for tbe 120th Meridian west. It Ib
counted 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is In feet and tenths of u toot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Churl. . The Harbor Datum, as established by the Q. T. P,
Railway, Is one foot lower.
Princess Royal
Friday, Aug 18, 11 a.m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
Free Employment
Office
***********************
*
l. *.;..;. * *.;..;..;. **** * * * * * * * * •;.•!• <5> •:•
T
*
GROUND
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HARTBUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds uf laborers or niochnnlcs, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waitei i
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE 1'LASTEB
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AM) LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All  orders  promptly  filled—see  us
for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 116
I Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd. f
* *
*****************************************************
For
Neat Job Print
ape the Journul Man
Tel. 138
ni
\ ^^^^^prMemMeaeueieem
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
AUGUST : FURNITURE : SALE
If you have not visited our store it will PAY YOU TO DO SO NOW. Since lowering to street grade, we have
our immense stock in shape for your inspection and convincing SALE PRICES in all grades of FURNISHINGS.
Have you stopped to consider the saving of $ $ $ on the House Furnishing you require ?
20 and 25 per cent. Discount for Cash
Pillows and Cushions
Our New Stock of PILLOWS is
what you require. At our Sale, Prices
120 and 26% From Regular Values.
AH grades to make selection. DOWN
PILLOWS, GOOSE PILLOWS, HEN
FEATHER PILLOWS, MIXED
FEATHER and WOOL PILLOWS.
Also KAPOCK CUSHIONS for Settee
and Cosy Corners.
Regular Value of IRON BEDS,
$5.00.   Sale Price,  any size. . .$3.50
This Same Reduction given to al*
IRON BEDS ill our large assortment.
Twenty Different Designs BRASS
EXTENSION RODS, at Cut in Two
Prices.
Here's a Record
in
Chiffonnier
Values
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONIER
with Five Drawers and Hat Compartment,* Britisii Bevel Mirror on
top. Regular Value, $20.00. Sale
Price      $14.00
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONNIER
with Five Drawers and Oval British
Mirror. Regular Value, $22.50.
Sa e Price   $15.00
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONNIER
with Five Drawers; Serpentine Front
Shaped Mirror. Regular Value,
$25.00.    Sale Price $17.00
CHIFFONNIER, Quarter-Cut Oak,
Five Drawers, Oval Mirror. Regular
Value, $30.00.    Sale Price. . .$20.00
CHIFFONNIER, Solid Quarter-
Cut Oak, Five Drawers and Hat Compartment, Oval Britisii Mirror. Regular Value, $38.50. Sale Price,$27.00
CHIFFONIER, Quarter-Cut Oak,
Five Large Drawers, Swivel Front.
Regular Value, $45.00. Sale
Price    $32.00
Dining Tables
DINING TABLES, BUFFETS,
CHINA CABINETS, CHIFFONNIERS, LARGE LEATHER COVERED EASY CHAIRS, PARLOR TABLES and  COUCHES.
A Pull Line of OFFICE DESKS—
Roll Tops, Flat Tops and Typewriting Desks.
Dressers and Stands
DRESSERS and STANDS, Surfaced
Oak. Regular Value, $18.50. Special .sale Price $14.50
Fifteen other Different Designs to
Receive This Reduction.
DRESSERS, Solid, Quarter-Cut
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GEO. D. TITE,
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SPORTS
NATIONAL   TENNIS
Although it is not definitely announced as yet where the next national tennis tourament will be held,
British Columbia is making a big
bid for the games. Whether the
Coast province will be the scene of
contests in 1912 or not will be decided at the annual meeting of the
Canadian Tennis Association next
spring, and it is learned that the
British Columbia club is making a
big effort to land the meet. If such
a thing is possible the tourney will
take place at Victoria, the home of
Schwengers and McRea, who distinguished themselves so creditably
last week. There is a possibility,
however, of several of the eastern
clubs putting forth strenuous kicks
in this regard, claiming that the
travelling expenses will be too heavy,
but when it is considered that the
Coast city sent representatives to
Ottawa last week regardless of expenses, it is likely that the eastern
clubs will give way to the Victoria
organization.
SCEPTRE   SOLD
Sceptre, one of tlie greatest racehorses the world has ever known,
has been sold for 7,000 guineas. Sir
William Bass, who has sold out bis
entire racing stables, parted with tbe
enqulne start recently io Messrs.
Tattersall and it is surmised that
she will be kept at the stud. Sceptre, considered by many to be the
mare of the century, created a furore a few years ago when she practically swept the boards in winning
classic races. She, however, failed
to win the Derby for her then owner,
Robert Standish  Siever.
Luck in the selection of racehorses
was never more pronounced than in
the acquisition of Sceptre by Mr.
Sievier. A colt bearing the name
of Duke of Westminster and the
filly, Sceptre, were put up for sale
as yearlings and D. Faber had the
first choice of buying either for 21,-
000 pounds. He selected the Duke
of Westminster and Mr. Sievir, who
had second choice, had no alternative
but to take the filly for a similar
amount. Sceptre covered herself
herself with glory from her initial
appearance and won race after race,
Mr, Sievier making a profit on his
investment in two years.    With Mr.
Faber it was the reverse, for Duke
of Westminster never lived up to
expectations and only won one or
two races of small dimensions.
In 1902, Sceptre won the Two
Thousand and the One Thousand
Guineas and also the Oaks and the
St. Leger, the only classic which she
did not win being the greatest race
of all, The Derby. Despit the fact
that these races go back for a few
generations, no filly has ever won
the five classics, and the only one
to equal Sceptre's performance was
Formosa, which won the Two Thousand and the One Thousand Guineas,
the Oaks and the fat. Leger, in 1868.
Sceptre disappointed her admirers
in the Derby of 1902, when she ran
unplaced to J. Gibbins' Ard Patrick.
As a two-year-old Sceptre won the
Woodcote Stakes at Epsom and the
July Stakes at Newmarket, while as
a four-year-old, she annexed for her
owner the Hardwicke Stakes, the
Jockey Club Stakes, the Duke of
York's Stakes, and. the Champion
Stakes, Newmarket. In these events
and a few smaller races Sceptre won
for her owner about 42,000 pounds,
so that Mr. Sievier made 100 per cent
profit, to say nothing of perhaps a
far bigger amount won by backing
the filly every time she appeared in
a race.
Opinion is divided as to which
was the best filly on the English
turf. That the present generation
lias seen tlie two best Is unquestionable and ninny, no doubt, will entertain the opinion that Pretty Polly
was superior. Charlie Trigg, Ihe
jockey who usually rode Pretty
Polly, declares that this filly was the
best ever known, but other jockeys,
owners and trainers will answer
without hesitation that there never
was a filly born to equal Sceptre.
•SENSATIONS  OP AEROPLANIST
Lieutenant Conneau (Andre Beaumont), officer of the French navy,
winner of the Paris-Rome and Circuit
of Europe air races, and the first
competitor to leave Brooklands in
the great race for the London Daily
Mail $50,000 prize, writing In that
paper, says:
"On my return from my two great
voyages by air—the Paris to Rome
race and the Circuit of Europe—I
endeavor to set down the bird-man's
sensations during a great crosscountry flying race. It is difficult
enough in all conscience to discern
and analyze one's own emotions, and
especially to define them with requisite correctness, even when these
are emotions which other men have
known and experienced. But here
in a domain which is totally new to
humanity, both for the spectators
who observe the flight of the man
from below and for the airman who
today is trying his wings, there Is
something almost audacious in seeking to lay bare a state of mind which
is still unprecise, a mentality not yet
conscious of itself. But since I must
be thus daring I will try to penetrate for the first time the mysterious grotto where the bird-men jealously hide their emotions, their anguish and their joy.
First of all, then, let me remark,
people must remember that we who
fly are men like the rest. Therefore,
the sensations we have in accomplishing this almost suprhuman feat are
profound and intense, and it Is even
by reason of the depth and intensity
of these sensations that we are often
incapable of understanding them. In
point of fact, I know more than one
airman who would be far less puzzled to cover a nundred miles In full
flight than to face an Interview on
this delicate subject.
1 gather up all my courage, then; 1
spilng Into my monoplane; I switch
on the contact, the propeller flies
around dizzily; I give the signal, metaphorically, to let go, and with the
map of Europe before my eyes, I
rise into tlie air 1n search of my impressions, scatered over the route between Rome, Paris, Utrecht, Brussels, and London. For our impressions have wings, too, and 1 shall
need all the speed and suppleness
of my machine to grasp them In their
flight.
Here are tliree of them already on
my road through the air, always the
same, familiar to all airmen, varying intensity according to the day,
the weather, or one's state of mind—
they are the anxiety at the start,
the enthusiasm and the ardor of the
contest, the manifold emotions of full
flight, and, finally, the immense joy,
the Involuntary cry of victory at the
finish.
Just look at the airmen when they
are. about to go up. They do not
speak, or hardly at all. their attention is absorbed by the minute examination of the machine to which they
are about to trust their fate; they
go over everything in silence—the
state of the wings, the levers controlling the rudder, the eievating
plane, and  the warping;   the condi
tion of the motor, above all things,
this metal heart which gives life to
the frail framework of wood, canvas,
and steel. This is not the moment,
my dear young ladies in search of
autographs, to ask the airman to sign
picture postcards! ,
Then there is the scrupulous
toilette while the airman dons the
ungraceful panop'y of the most
graceful of sports, the paper gloves
and socks to ward off the cold, the
overalls, the Balaclava helmet, the
goggles, the woolen comforter—in
short, the bizarre egtup which gives
one the appearance of a being from
another world, a Martian, or a man
in the mooner, as they are described
in books. Next the compass and thj
maps have to be attentively examined. Does the map run all right on
its rollers? And so on—a host ol
other little technical details into
which I need not enter here.
At last the pitiless hour has arrived. Everything is ready. It Is
time to start. Amid the deafening
roar of the motor the aeroplane
snatches itself out of the hands of
the men holding it back and hurtles
along the ground. Then it hops and
suddenly rises with a slide into the
air, describing a graceful ascending
curve as it leaves the ground. Arrowlike, It darts straight towards an
unknown point on the horizon.
The irregular jouing and shaking
caused hy the unevenness of the
ground ns the aeroplane dashes to
Its ascent from the earth are succeeded by a soft gliding sensation
which defies definition; the anxiety
and anguish of the start have vanished, to make room for a feeling
of repose, of absolute solitude. The
man has disappeared; he is now a
bird!
He rises but he has not the impression of rising. As in balloon
ascents, one has the Impression that
the earth is sinking beneath one.
People seen far below look like very
mobile little black points, then only
groups can be seen, then one is only
conscious of the black mass of the
spectators. Everything blends together and dwindles away. Houses
look like dice thrown on a billiard
table, the largest cities seem like
Llllputlan towns, the bas-relief melts
away, roads, rivers and railways appear to wind their way In a child's
model landscape toy. Only the sea
and lofty mountains are spared In
this wholesale diminution, and they
always impose on the airman respect-
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000 REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
tbe principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia Et*ypt
Austria-Hungary    Faroe Islands
Belgium **' '
Brazil
Bulgaria
Ceyba
Chfli
China
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands    Sweden
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Finland
Formosa Japan Portutja] Switzerland
France Java Roumania Turkey
Fr'ch Cochin China Malta Russia United State*
Germany Manchuria Serria Uruguay
Great Britain Mezico Seam West Indies, etc.
Xbe amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc, as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
ful admiration mixed with a very
lively sentiment of fear.
Intoxicated by the sight, the airman mounts and mounts, his machine pointing upwards. Far beneath
him 'the distant earth He flattened
out. Human sounds no longer reach
his ear, deafened by the motor's
roar. Suddenly, appalled by the utter sense of solitude, he rights his
machine, and planes horizontally over
hills and hollowed valleys. There
are no more roads, nor bridges, nor
barriers; forests, marshes, and lakes
exist for the airmen no more; the
road Is straight and clear In all
directions, and on every side! It is
then that man has the real sensation
of flying, of having at last left the
earth, of having conquered the air
as he has conquered the ocean, moving In it, playing In It, at his fancy,
with a machine of his own Invention,
obedient to his slightest gesture, rising, falling, wheeling, and diving
with the grace and lightness of the
bird.
The danger? But it is for the very
reason of the danger that man loves
nying. It Is because his fair young
conquest threatens at every instant
to destroy him that man loves it.
Man loves flying as he loves his mistress.
But in the great cross-country races
man has yet another delight. He has
not alone the sensation of fighting
against air's treacherous element, but
of striving In It against other men
winged like himself, with a destination to reach like great migratory
birds.    The  emotion  caused  by his
victory over the air is heightened
by the ardor of the strife to be the
first to reach that little plot, as yet
unknown to him, first with anxiety,
then with astonishment, and lastly
with enthusiasm at seeing two white,
two human wings, at the hour appointed barring the heavens for the
first time.
This is the airmen's most impressive moment. When, for the first
time, he sees the great bare space
where he Is about to rest his wings,
when he has recognized by signs
familiar to him—the flying flags,
the white cloths spread as a signal
upon the ground, the bonfires lit to
guide him, the crowd pressing about
the barriers—that he has reached the
goal of his race by air, it is then
that he is cought at the throat by
an intense emotion, so sweet, yet so
strong as to make him forget the
anguish of the start and the perils
of the journey. And when this final
goal is a city, when this city is a
capita], when this capital is the cradle of humanity, when it is Rome,
the feeling Is so overwhelming that
a man may be allowed to enjoy a moment of pride.
Anguish, joy, pride, fright, isolation, hope and despair alternating,
struggles, disasters, mournings, vls-
tories, and, dominating all, the tenacious instinct of self-preservation—
such are the sensations experienced
In the great cross-country flying
races. Therefore may it be said of
them that they are the Intense image
of human life.
Mk Tuesday, August lo, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
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Mexico's Great Rubber Fields
Rubber is one of the great resources of the southern part of the
Republic of Mexico that has been
practically undeveloped up to the
present time. Large rubber plantations are now, however, occupying
the attention of foreign capital, and
Canada is represented in the rubber
trade there by the La Ermita Rubber Plantation, Limited, which is incorporated under the laws of the
province of Manitoba.
E. R. Chapman, solicitor and general consel for the La Ermita Rubber Plantation, Limited, has just returned to Winnipeg from a trip to
the .Mexican plantation. Mr. Chapman talked entertaingly and interestingly of his trip as follows:
"1 returned from my trip to Mexico on Thursday last and in many
ways I had a very pleasant trip. As
you kno, I left Winnipeg April 22
for the purpose of procuring title to
a plantation which was purchased
hy La Ermita Rubber Plantation,
Limited, a company organized here
and Incorporated under the laws of
Manitoba. When I left here I was
altogether unacquainted with Mexican methods of doing business and
thought that 1 would be back In
about three weeks' time, but I soon
found that one could not do business
there as quickly as he could in Canada, or In other countries that are
more developed.
"The law of Mexico is all founded
on the civil code, and when I got
to the City of Mexico I soon found
that the matter of titles was very
different from what they are here.
Although they have nothing like our
Torrens system of registration, they
are very careful about the titles, and
if one goes about it in the right way,
the titles there can be made quite
as perfect as the titles in this country.
"As soon as I entered the country
at Laredo 1 was immediately arrested
with the antiquity of everything connected with the country. The abodes
and modes of life are just are they
were, in many instances, 300 or 400
years ago, and everything Is tinged
with the appearance of the east.
When one remembers that about 30
years after Columbus sighted the outlying portions of this continent, Cor-
tez landed in the country with his
Spanish legions, he can realize how
very interesting it is from the historic standpoint, but even before the
time of Cortez the Aztec Indians had
a very advanced civilization and a
wonderful system of religion.
Especially during the past few
years, as a result of research and
exploration of the country, a great
deal has been discovered to show that
they had a civization perhaps as old
and quite equal to that of the Egyptians. One is also struck with the
similarity of the two.
A  Beautiful  City
".Mexico City, which is in the heart
of the country, is a beautiful city.
Situated as it is in the torrid zone,
nearly 8,000 feet above the sea level,
it enjoys a climate that is really de-
liglitt'iil. While tne country Is divided Into states, each with a sep-
arte state government, Mexico City
is situated within the Federal district, governed directly by the national government, which is annually
expending large amounts of money
in beautifying the capital. There Is
now under construction a national
theatre which occupies a space
fronting on the Central Square, equal
to a large block of land in this city.
It has been under construction for
four or five years, and it is expected
that it will talte about four years
longer to complete il. It is made
entirely of Italian marble, and has
some very beautiful statuary, the
estimated cost being 32,000,000 pesos, equal to about $10,000,000.
"1 soon learned lhat the electric
lighting and street railway systems
of tlie city were controlled by Canadian capital, and as these, perhaps,
are the mosl conspicuous feature of
a city, It makes a Canadian rather
proud of his nationality. Tlie Bank
of Montreal has one of the best
buildings In the city, and has been
established there for some years.
About a year ago the Canadian Bank
of Commerce established a branch
there and these two banks are
looked upon as two of the soundest
financial Institutions in the country.
"While I was there business was
quite dull on account of the revolution, but the revolution was not
as serious a matter as one would be
led to believe by reading the newspaper reports. Outside of about
three states in the northwestern portion of the country near the American border, there was really not as
much excitement or trouble as there
would be here in a general election.
You know the only way they can get
a change of government In Mexico
is hy a revolution.
mountains from Mexico City to Vera
Cruz is a sight worth the trouble of
the whole trip. Large numbers of
Europeans come over for the express
purpose of taking that trip, and
viewing the beautiful scenery th at
lies in the valley of the Maltrata and
the mountains around it. On my
return, I had the privilege of seeing
ex-President Diaz embark on his voyage of exile from his country.
"I went by steamer from Vera
Cruz to Frontera across the Gulf of
Campeche, Frontera Is at the
mouth of the Grajolva River, and Is
the seaport of the state of Tabasco.
San Juan Bautista, the capital, Is
situated 76 miles from the mouth,
and is reached by. beautiful river
steamers. La Ermita rubber plantation is situated 60 miles above San
Juan, at the head of navigation on
the Teapa River, and the trip had
to be made in a motor launch.
"Rubber is grown in only about
tliree or four southern states of the
republic, but in none of them is it
so natural to the soil as in the state
of Tabasco. It grows wild In many
sections there, and when planted its
growth Is most luxuriant and rapid.
As I made my stay as short as possible on account of so much time
being consumed in the necessary business in connection with the title,
I did not have any orpportunity of
visiting other plantations.       ',
"Owing to the scarcity of rain in
the northern part of the country
there is very little agriculture carried on and it is really not well
adapted for grazing, but, of course,
there are quite a number of cattle
raised on the ranches. Mexico has
a fabulous mineral wealth, but even
that has not been largely developed.
The greatest opportunity for the investment of capital at the present is
in the culture of rubber in the
southern states, wliere the soil and
climate, heavy rainfall, and other
conditions are most favorable for its
growth.
"The railroad systems of the country are also entirely controlled by
the national government, but the
southern states- are so intersected
with navigable rivers that there has
been very little construction south
of the City of Mexico.
"The situation of La Ermita rubber plantation at the head of navigation In the Teapea River, makes
it a favorable one for trading purposes. The company Is having constructed a motor boat and launch to
do the freighting for its own purposes, and it is the intention to establish on tlie plantation a large
general store to supply the trade
which they expect to get."
 o	
SEA ELEPHANTS
Expedition    Discovers   Three   Herds
in Gulf of California
The American Museum of Natural
History expedition to Lower California aboard the U. S. S. Albatross
was the most fruitful and interesting
scientific trip ever made in the
southwest, and its discoveries are of
inestimable value. The results were
not disclosed until Pingree I. Osburn
of Pasadena, the young naturalist
who was selected as guide for the
party, and who nearly lost his life
in that little known region, recovered
sufficiently to give an account of the
expedition. The staff of naturalists,
under Dr. Charles il. Townsend of
the museum, Included Dr. J. M.
Rose, Washington, botany authority;
Dr. Paul Bartch, studying the Invertebrates; L. N. Tongue, resident
fishery expert of the Albatross; .1.
C. Bell, making casts of rare deep
sea fish; Howard Anthony, inamals;
W. Schmidt, his assistant, nnd Os-
liiii'u, specializing in orinlbology.
The cruise covered practically all the
Island In the Gulf of California.
By far the most Important find
was made In a large hidden cove on
Guadalupe Island, wliere the scientists came upon tliree herds of sea
elephants (Macrorphtnus angustlros-
trl), about the present existence of
which there has been serious doubt,
many believing them to be extinct.
Osburn describes the sight as the
most unique and fascinating any
man In the party had ever beheld.
The first sea elephant seen was
a gigantic bull lying prone on the
sand under a towering cliff. As soon
as he sighted the explorers he made
for the water, but before he reached
the edge he was shot by one of the
naturalists in the boat, It being impossible to take him alive. This animal was the largest seen and measured about twenty-one feet In length.
The weight was enormous. While
he was being killed Dr. Townsend
managed to round up five young live
sea elephants, and these were taken
aboard.    They did not show the well
The   railroad   trip   through   the developed  elaphantlnellke  snout  or
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trunk of the adults and resembled
the California sea lion. They all
showed fight and wallowed about the
deck unceasingly. Their call, hard
to describe, is a concert of sharp
cries and barkings.
The largest herd of these water
elephants comprised about fifty of
all ages and sizes, and they were
lying high on the beach and wallowing In the sand. They were so sluggish and Inactive that the naturalists
walked among them and made photographs and sketches. The fighting
bulls opened their mouths, threw
their long snouts up in the air and
rolled their heads until they touched
their backs, all the time letting out
hollow roars most like the terrifying
ones of caged lines. At times Ibey
emitted from their mouths small
clouds of white vapor and rolled
I heir   large,   black   eyes.     The   eyes
of the bulls were  more  than  three
inches in diameter.
At Pichilinque island Mr. Osburn
shot a black hare, found nowhere
else in the world except on another
Island nearby. These hares, coal
black on top, inhabit the sea caves
and the rocks of the cliffs and
mesas. Hundreds of immense lizards, rare birds, fishes never before
seen and an unclassified deer were
taken.
 o	
TO EXTEND TO CANADA
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Tun la lailneit.
Capital and Re»rra Over $7,300,000
Letters of Credit
For our customers' convenience
we issue Letters of Credit payable
in Pounds Sterling for use in
Great Britain and all parts of the
world, and payable in Dollars for
use in Canada, United States,
Mexico, Bermuda, Bahamas, Cuba
and the West Indies.
We buy and sell Drafts on
France, efjermany, South Africa,
Australia, New Zealand, India,
China and the West Indies.
Prince Rapert Branch —
F. 9. LONG. Manager.
Directors of Lloyds  Decide •» Alter
Constitution to Permit
Expansion
The proposals of the directors of
Lloyd's Bank to alter its constitution
so as to admit of foreign and colonial business were sanctioned by the
shareholders at the meeting In Birmingham,   The chairman, B. v. Vas-
sar-Hinlth, explained thai their object was lo extend the tneorandiini of
association giving power to carry on
business in connection with banking
which was not contemplated when
the memorandum was first drawn
up  In   1865.
The growth of the bank In relation to foreign and colonial business,
and to the possibilities of wider extension, required the provision of
further powers. During the past few
years proposals had been made that
they should open branches or auxiliary Institutions in various parts of
the world—Canada, New York, Paris
and Hamburg—or acquire interests
operating in these places. Hitherto,
however, they had been prevented
from doing that by the restrictions
of their memorandum.
The company, the Chairman further
explained, had a proposal lo acquire
an Interest In a business on Ihe continent which would not only bring
profit to the shareholders of t ho
bank, but would also he a convenience to Its customers. The growth
of their out-of-Englaiid business was
satisfactory, and it was In their Interest to encourage thai as an addition to their home business. The
shareholders would remember the
falling off in their profit in 1909
odwing to the Impossibility of employing the resources of the bank
in their home trade. The requirements of their manufacturing customers would have the first attention, and the claim of local industries would, as In the past, always
receive favorable consideration, for
they had no desire to eolle't deposits
in the country to use mainly in London or abroad. Therefore, if the
present confidence in the bank were
continued he had no doubt they
would have plenty of money to satisfy their home debands and tie make
some Increased profit out of the foreign and colonial department.
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence In the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (If unnamed, the
description is)—I-In-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—-At er
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake Into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the montn of tbe Ain
[River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water  Is  to     be     used--Generating
I power.
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painleBS extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
(h) If for irrigation, describe
ihe land intended to be irrigated,
giving  acreage	
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and tbe difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose Iands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)  Massel, B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot p>;r second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
inches.
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAuL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAVNUR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  VV.  B.  CLAVTON
DENTIST
—0—
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over  Onne's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
Corner Eighth nnd Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Elrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 0.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; Unit-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenn"   Prince  Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in     MERRYFIELD'S
•STOKE, Third Ave. nnd Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of nil
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 184 .       BtMMNM   ■■**'■:   o; .   ■
■e
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 15, 1911
ISLANDS ARE ACTIVE
Graham Island is Being Steadily Developed—Oil Drilling is Proceeding Steadily.
Expert   From  California   Has   Every
Hope  Thai   West   Const   Will
Give Good  Returns
(Special Correspondence)
Masset, Aug. 12.—A number of
workmen arrived at .Masset, on the
3rd inst., and immediately commenced constructing a schoolhouse
on Colllson avenue. A new teacher
will be engaged when the school reopens, Miss Nicholles having resigned.
The diamond drill, imported to
operate on the Yakoun River, will
be in operation shortly, the plant
having been taken up tlie stream and
installed in dose proximity to the
Wilson   coal  mine.
Drilling operations at Tallin Point,
on the west coast of Graham Island,
was suspended for several days
through lack of cylinder oil. The
boring has reached sixty feet belew
the surface, with good indications
of striking oil. An expert driller,
with six men, is at work and the
plant is the first installed on the
island.
Charles Andrews, who has been
inspecting the mining possibilities of
Graham Island, left on the 10th inst.,
after spending a month on the west
coast and at the black sand deposits
on the east coast. Mr. Andrews is
most favorably impressed with the
indications and formation of the
country and feels assured that oil,
in large quantities will be found in
the neighborhood of Otard Bay. The
shale and basalt rock formation
found on the west coast are always
present in the California and other
fields, where Mr, Andrews has interests. He considers the tar, asphalt
and other indications point to the
development of an industry which
will bring the Queen Charlotte Islands prominently before the world
as an oil producing locality.
 o	
ELABORATE PLANS
Hydro-Electric Company Has in View
Extensive Work in Developing
Power
According to the statement of R.
Brutinel of Paris, France, one of the
directors of the Prince Rupert Hy-
dro-Elei'tric Company, who is at
present stopping at the Hotel Vancouver, active survey work has been
started in connection with the company's plans for supplying power and
light in Prince Rupert. The programme recently adopted by the
board of directors contemplates the
expenditure of $600,000 during the
next twelve months and $2,500,000
within the next four years, says the
News-Advertiser.
It is proposed to develop the Kah-
tada River power by building a dam
capable of giving 15,000 horsepower,
and it is expected that within a year
there will be available not less than
3,000 kilowatts, which will be increased to 15,000 kilowatts within
four years. The power will be conveyed to Prince Rupert, a distance
of 42 miles. The falls on the Exaw
River, 28 miles from the city, are
reported to be capable of furnishing
nearly the same amount of energy,
but will not be harnessed until circumstances warrant such an action.
 o	
LOWER RATES
BRIGHTER PROSPECTS
A. G. McCandless Sees Good Future
for Prince Rupert—Street
Work   Pleases  Hiin
A. G. McCandless of Vancouver,
accompanied by Mrs. McCandless,
paid a visit to Prince Rupert yesterday on their way north to Skagway.
Mr. -McCandless is one of the business men of the soutli who realized
tlie opportunities that Prince Rupert
offered and purchased property here.
He made a tour about the business
section yesterday and expressed his
satisfaction with the way the city
was opening up its streets. The
money so expended was wisely used,
lie thought, and Prince Rupert
would have a very prosperous time.
Mr. McCandless is one of the members of Hie Vancouver Board of
Trade who is most enthusiastic over
a line of railway from Vancouver
into the northern part of the province by way nf the Peace River Valley. He says the road will assuredly
be built and, in referring to the
effect it might have on Prince Rupert, admitted it might hurt some,
but there would be business for all.
 o	
NEW HEADQUARTERS
Foley, Welch &  Stewart  Will  Build
General Offices at Once at
New Hazelton.
Government Policy Respecting Lands
Is Being Carried Out
by   Province
Prince  Ruperl  Club  Will   Be Given
Water  Service  Cheaper
Than Formerly
The city council has decided to reduce the water rate charged the
Prime.. Rupert Club from $74  to $<I8.
This Is eieiiic upon the recommendation of the water committee following tbe investigation and report of
.1. C. McLennan, under whose charge
collections are made.
Aid. Newton wanted to know If
this was   i proportionate charge.
Aid. Clayton said it was. The
club had no kitchen nor baths and
did not use anything like as much
water  as   a   hotel..
Aid. Newton said he would accept
Aid. Clayton's explanation that this
was proportionate. He thought. It
seemed a low rate, however.
It was finally decided to ask an
explanation from Mr. McLennan.
J. C. McLennan explained that the
rate for hotels was $20, which included the bar, looking, etc. The
club used  much less water.
Upon the subject of cabins being
Introduced, Mr. McLennan said he
disliked the name cabins as it led
to a difficulty. There would he one-
room, two-room cabins, etc. He
thought it would be better to classify
then as one-room dwellings, two-
room dwellings, etc,
The report was adopted.
Foley, Welch & Stewart are about
to begin work upon their new headquarters at New Hazelton. The new
premises will be completed early this
fall and occupied immediately after
this. The move is an indication that
there is no doubt that the company
intends to have the line completed to
Hazelton early this winter, and operations will iii hand down the Bulkley
Valley.
The quarters which the company
Will put up will be quite substantial
in character and will serve as (lie
headquarters for them for some time
to come. When they are through
with the building, it will be capable
uf being converted into some other
use, either for the company or for
some private company that may wish
to make use of it.
The buildings will be two stories
in height. There will be offices of
various kinds on the ground floor,,
while above will be living quarters
for the employees. There will also
be a restaurant built which will serve
tlie employees. All through, the
quarters will be made as comfortable as possible and such as will
afford all the accommodation that
u'l be required for some time to
come.
With the completion of the tunnels on the line near tbe canyon the
company's field of operations will for
the most part be beyond the site of
New Hazelton, affairs will be much
more eeasily handled from that point
than would be the case from here.
 o	
ARE TO NOMINATE
RESERVES OF LAND
Provincial Government Makes Selection
for University and for
Preemptors.
Work  Will B Completed as Soon ns
Possible Preparatory to Moving Into Them
The last issue of the British Columbia Gazette contains a long series of official notices of the lands
department gazetting under reserve
cancellations a quantity of crown
lands, in aggregate area approximating 200,000 acres, surveys of which
were carried out last season, and
which—In accordance with the
adopted policy of the government—
are now being set aside, one-third
for the university endowment purposes, one-third for preemptors, and
one-third for future sale by public
auction. The lands dealt with in
the succrent notices are principally
in the Stuart River, Fraser River
and Fraser Lake sections of Cariboo
and Lillooet.
A small area of land adjacent to
the town of Fort Steele is also being
set aside for sanitary purposes—as
a garbage dumping ground for Fort
Steele and vicinity.
 o .
Tenders Called For
The   Methodist   Church   is   calling
for  tenders   for   the  erection   of   a
comfortable church.    The intention is
to have the work go on this fall.
 o	
Named a Candidate
John Oliver is to be the Liberal
candidate for New Westminster riding at the coming election in opposition to the sitting member, J. D.
Taylor of the Columbian.
 o	
On Way Here
The Big Bonanza, with lumber for
the G. T. P. for here, which returned
to Victoria waterlogged after striking at Seymour Narrows, is now on
its way again for Prince Rupert.
 o	
Noted Visitors
Among the arrivals expected in the
city tomorrow-by the Prince George
are Rev. Dr. Chown, general superintendent of the Methodist Church;
Rev. Dr. White, superintendent of
missions for Britisii Columbia in the
same church, and Rev. Dr. Allen of
the general board. They will visit
Port Simpson and later return to
Prince Rupert for a short official
visit.    ,
 o	
ACTIVITY SHOWN IN
BUSINESS SECTION
(Continued From Page One.)
Conservatives Meet in Nanaimo Tomorrow to Name Candidate
for Election.
Local  Association   Endirscs the Candidature Of S. M. Newton us
Standard Bearer
The Conservatives of Comox-Atlin
are meeting in Nanaimo tomorrow to
select a candidate tor Comox-Atlin.
From Prince Ruperl there went
south on Monday, S. M. Newton and
Dr.   Clayton.
Mayor Manson, who is also a dele-
gale, Is in the south and may attend,
althoungh he intended to leave before the convention If he got the city
business completed in time to do so.
Ilr. Quinlan Is also in the south and
will attend.
J. F. .McDonald, representing Hazelton Conservatives, went soutli
also.
At a meeting held in Melntyre Hall
on Friday evening of the Conservative Association the three northern
names that had been mentioned as
candidates came up. Of these, O. II.
Nelson explained that he would not
go before the convention, although
he appreciated highly the honor of
having been named by the local association. Two other names. S. M.
Newton, and Harry Smith of Stewart, expressed their readiness to
stand for nomination. II was on a
vote decided to endorse Mr. Newton,
and Ihe name accordingly will be
put in nomination at the convention.
to be erected at once. Within about
sixty or seventy days the new theatre, accommodating about nine hundred people, will be completed.
The prospects point to a rather
active season in the building line
this fall and with that will come ah
active season in real estate. Enquiries are increasing and few come
into the city now who do not want
to purchase before leaving..
The complaint that property is too
high Is not being neard as freqeunt-
ly now with respect to the business
section. On the other hand, the visitors now seem to realize that if they
are to buy right they must make
purchases al once as real estate is
sure to advance.
A. I). Tennant and Mr. Chadwick
and party have gone to Skagway.
*    *    *
.1. II. Pillsbury has returned from
a trip to Goose Bay, where he had
some survey work to carry out,
.     .     .
Mrs.  (',   11.   Warn  and  family  left
Monday    morning    by   the   Prince
George on their way east on a visit.
 o	
As an old lady who was 111 seemed
much easier, the nurse in attendance said: "Now, Itblnk you will be
all right if put tills hell beside you,
and I will go and get a sleep." "A
sleep!" exi'laimed the old lady In
evident wonder. "Why, I thought
you were a trained nurse!" "I am
said the nurse dryly, "but unfortunately we are not trained to keep
awake for ever."
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue-
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4 %  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
00@@0@@|dE@@[q1@@^
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
EBEHEEEEHe
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES,  OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone  222
LOANS        INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
The Suy S&tlsfoctoiy'R&nge
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove  bolts  and  stove  putty.    It's
important to every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
**************************
t   FOR RENT   l
*
Store     building     on     Second  *
%   Avenue    at    Seventh     Street.  %
Low   Rent. %
I JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. f
* *
**************************
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Building Committee of the Methodist Church of Prince Rupert, B. C,
until 12 o'clock noon, August 22nd,
1911, for the erection and completion of a Church building, to be
erected on Sixth Avenue, in the City
of Prince Rupert, B. C, according
to plans and specifications prepared
by G. L. Proctor, architect, Prince
Rupert. A certified check, equal to
ten (10) per centum of the amount
of the tender drawn in favor of the
Treasurer or Trustee Board, which
will be forfeited if the party tendering declines to enter into a contract
when called upon to do so; or if he
or his heirs or executors fail to complete the contract. The lowest or
any other tender not necessarily
accepted.
Plans and specifications may be
seen at the office of P. McLaughlin,
Third Avenue, after noon, Tuesday,
August 16th, 1911.    '
BORN
FISHER—In this city on Friday,
August 11, to the wife of Mr. W.[ E.
Fisher, a son.
TENDERS   WANTED
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned up to Tuesday, August
15, for Plumbing (sewer and water)
In the old school building on Second
avenue. Plans and specifications
may be seen at the City Engineer's
office.
W. D. VANCE,
Aug. 11-15    Secretary School Board.
TENDERS   WANTED
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned up to Tuesday, August
15, for the painting of a room In
the old school building on Second
avenue. Specifications may be seen
at the City Engineer's office.
W. D. VANCE,
Aug. 11-15    Secretary School Board.
TO WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
*
*
*
*
x 75 x 100 Feet
For Lease on Third {
%   ASK
1 UNCLE     Avenue at Ninth
* JERRY
Street
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
—TBE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest ot
the commercial world 1b a matter ot
business history—yours for 17 cent*
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences ai
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machine!
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tl)6.
OLIVET?
Typewriter
The  Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that ll
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Hornet"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an Important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
**************************
MISS HENNY WENNERSXi.V
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, a acial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work.

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