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Prince Rupert Journal May 5, 1911

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Array /
KS+'
a
New Wellington
Coal
is the best,
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
Print* %uptti loitrtwl
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1911.
Price,  Five  Cents.
No.   93.
MOB DUMPS COAL INTO THE HARBOR AT CORDOVA
FINAL INSPECTION OF
HIDDEN CREEK NINE
Granby Officials Have Gone to Goose Bay With M. K.
Rodgers Preparatory it is Believed to Taking
Over the Controlling Interest in
the Propositions.
There arrived on the Prince Rupert on Wednesday an important
party of mining and smelting men
and capitalists on their way to Goose
Bay. By impressing a launch into
their service the party were enabled
to make arrangements to be taken
off the Prince Rupert on the way to
Stewart and proceed to Goose Bay.
The party had at its head M. K.
Rodgers, the original owner of the
Nickel Piute Mine at Hedley, and
who still retains his Interest in it.
Some years ago he became attracted
to the Portland Canal and Goose
Bay. The Hidden Creek group was
developed to a considerable extent,
which was followed last season by,
the taking of an option upon the
controlling interest by the Granby
Smelter interests.
All winter the company has had
its experts at work on the property
and within a few weeks' time a decision has to be reached as to
whether the purchase will be made.
With Mr. Rodgers are J. B.
Graves, the head of the Granby
Smelting Company, 0. B. Smith, superintendent at Phoenix for that
company, Mr. Sylvester, the general
manager, Mr. Williams, and several
other experts. They are going to
Goose Bay for the final inspection
before taking over the control in the
mine. The tests made as the mine
has progressed and the material exposed has been, it is generally believed, entirely satisfactory,. although the officials of the company
have been very reluctant to give out
information. It is therefore, expected that they will take up the option
and thus become the controllers of
the mine. The present trip will decide the matter.
Following the taking over of the
properties it is expected that the
Granby company will build a smelter in close proximity to the property, A supply of coke is important
in connection with this and coking
coal is being sought by the officials
within as easy reach as possible of
the location.
The establishment of such works
will be attended with wonderful results for the whole of the north. It
will give new life to mining on the
coast and avoid the necessity of
shipping south as at present.
The party will spend a few days at
Goose Bay before returning south.
WILL ADJOURN HOUSE
UNTIL MIDSUMMER
Opposition Wins out at Ottawa in Opposing the Rushing
of the Reciprocity Agreement Through Parliament—Mutually Settled to Rise Until
Middle of July.
Intense Opposition to the Policy of the Government With Re&pect to
Alaska Coal Cases Results in Protest in  Form  of Privately
Owned Fuel From Vancouver Island Being Thrown Into
Water—Authorities are Powerless to Prevent
the Move
(Special to The Journal)
SEATTLE May 5.—A mob of 300
men emulating the revolutionary heroes who formed the "Boston Tea
Party in 1773," went on to the dock
of the Alaska Steamship Company at
Cordova, Alaska, yesterday and began dumping into the sea several
hundred tons of coal stored there.
The coal stored at that place is valued at $6,000 and is part of the
stock kept on hand by the steamship
company and the Copper River and
Northwestern Railway Company..
J. Barry, general agent for the
steamship company at Cordova, says,
"The  feeling here  Is. intense    over
coal matters. A mob of over 300
men are now on the dock dumping
Nanaimo coal into the bay. The authorities here are powerless. The
mayor is celling on the governor for
help. There is no feeling against
the company. It is against the government on account of the report
that no action would be taken on the
coal land cases."
Senator Lafollette's resolution
adopted by the United States senate
calling on the secretary of the interior for information relative to President Taft's executive order of October 12, 1910, withdrawing from the
Chugach forest reserve 12,800 acres
of tide land on Controller Bay, Alaska, revived the whole Alaska coal
controversy. Controller Bay is the
nearest ocean port to the great Beh-
ring River coal fields, in which are
situated all but one of the groups of
claims which have been under investigation. The bay shore is shallow,
but ships could load coal at trestles
built across mud flats to deep water.
It is alleged that last summer the
steamer A. G. Lindsay landed <m the
shore of Controller Bay more than
five miles of barbed wire fence consigned to Mr. Richard S. Ryan. It is
alleged also that early on the morning after President Taft's order was
issued Mr. Richard Stanley Ryan,
former delegate to Congress from
Alaska, staked all the land opened,
posting notices of location under
soldier's scrip. Ryan's operations
are said to be financed by Probst,
Wetzler & Company, Lords Court
building, New York. Ryan, according to land officers, was engaged all
last summer in surveying the lands
subsequently opened, and his engineers are known as Guggenheim employees.
At the Seattle office of the Alaska
or Guggenheim-Morgan syndicate it
was said that nothing was known of
Ryan's movements.
ACCEPT FIRE FIGHTER
City Council Agree to Take Over Auto
From the Manufacturers
Triul   Run  Yesterday   Showed  That
Machine Was in First-Class
Condition
(Special to The Journall
OTTAWA, May. 5—Although the
arrangements will have to be submitted for ratification to the caucus
of the Liberal party to-day, it is
practically certain an agreement will
be carried in the house for a adjourn-
meqt of the seesion from May 23
to July 18. This decision was
reached  after   consultation   between
Sir  Wilfrid Laurier and   R. L.  Borden, the leader of the opposition.
While in a general way the truce
is a victory for the opposition, it is
admitted the terms bear heavily
upon members all round, inasmuch
as it means that they will have to
return to the capital in midsummer
and conclude the work of the session
without any extra remuneration.
PUSHING BRANCHES
G.T.P. is Pushing Work on the Feeders
of the Main Line on
Prairies.
Brnndon  Road  May  Soon   Be  Coin.
meiiced While Active Operations
Are on Elsewhere
(Special to The Journal)
WINNIPEG, May 5.—E. J. Chamberlin, general manager of the Grand
Trunk Pacific, says the announcement that the Brandon branch of
the Grand Trunk Pacific will be surveyed at once and work started is
soon possible. The contractors are
pushing work on the Reglna branch
and promise to have the grading finished by Jul 1.
 o—	
Preparatory to commencing work
on the grading of a piece of work between Lynch's and the Knox Hotel,
the city has received tenders for rails
and other equipment. These were
opened last evening. Three were received, the various items being specified. They were from the Prince
Rupert Hardware Company, Handa-
syde & Hurt and Thompson Hardware Company. These were referred
to the streets committee with power
to act.
SEALING CONFERENCE
British Representatives at Gathering to
be Held in Washington, D.C.
Capt.   Harris,   of  Victoria,   Will   Re
One of Those Who Will Give
Expert Advice
(Special to The .Journal) /
OTTAWA, May 5.—At the international sealing conference to be
held In Washington on May 15, the
Britisii representatives will be Ambassador Bryce, and Joseph Pope,
Canadian under-secretary of state
for external' affairs.
Associated with them will be J. M.
Macoun, assistant naturalist and
botanist of geological survey, W. A.
Found, acting superintendent of
fisheries, and Captain Charles I.
Harris, of Victoria, who will attend
the conference as a sealing expert.
 o	
J. Y. Rochester has returned to
the city from the south.
 o	
E. Stonham, inspector of the
Bank of British North America,
spent a few days in Prince Rupert
this week In connection with his du-
tle. He reached here from Dawson
just one year from the date when he
first came to the city to open the
branch of the bank here.
The city council at a meeting held
last evening in the city hall, formally accepted the new auto fire
equipment which combines a chemical engine, hose wagon and limited
ladder wagon. The machine is the
very latest of its type and has been
found fully up to the specifications'
as ordered last fall. It is made by
the Seagrave Company, of Walker-
ville, Ont., and before being landed
here had been put on exhibition in
Toronto and Vancouver where It was
very favorably regarded and in each
resulted in the selling of duplicates.
Yesterday afternoon Mayor Man-
son, the aldermen, newspaper representatives and othrs were taken for
a run out in the machine under the
charge of the experts, Mr. Browning,
the selling agent, and Mr. Lee, the
driver, representing the company.
The route taken was through the
business section ard out to Seal Cove
by way of McBride  Fifth and Sixth.
While there was no hose carried,
it was estimated that the sixteen
men who took up position in the
part allotted to the hose would represent about an equal weight to that
which would be required of the auto.
No difficulty was experienced in
takin gall the inclines without alter-
in gthe gear. The return was made
from the end of Sixth avenue, overlooking Seal Cove to the Fire Hall,
in seven minutes, the run being made
without any attempt lo make record
time and with' a number of slow
turns where houses were being
passed.
The machine wns always under
most complete control and showed
Itself very satisfactory—the only objection raised being tlie difficulty of
getting along (he streets with ease
until the grading is done. However, that was something the agents
could not be expected to solve.
At a special meeting of the council held last evening, His Worship,
the mayor, told of the trial run and
the report of Fire Chief Mclnnis was
presented in which he stated the machine was fully up to specifications.
Mr. Gibson has shown himself able
to handle it.
Aid. Smith moved that the auto be
accepted and the account paid thirty
days from date. He would like to
have on record in the ctiy hall the
original agreement. The copy of the
agreement which the city had,
seemed to have been lost. He would
like to have the original agreement
on record.
This Mr.  Browning agreed to do.
At the suggestion of Aid. Morrissey, the correspondence relative to
the purchase was produced In order
WILL BE CHARTED
Hydrographic Steamer Lillooet is
tinuing Work in These
Waters.
Con-
Entrances   to   Prince   Rupert   Will
Soon Be Covered in Charts
of Department
  I
hydrographic    steamer    Lil-
3apu J P. Musgrave,   s again
The
looet,
on duty In these waters, preparing
the charts covering the entrances to
this port so that all may be in readiness for the ocean-going shipping
that must follow the completion of
the Grand .Trunk Pacific.
Last summer the remaining portions of Dixon Entrance were surveyed by the Lillooet from Masset
Inlet to Naden Harbor and to within
the three-mile limit on the Alaskan
side. There yet remains to be done
several weeks' work to give a continued charted course into the open
ocean and this will be done by Captain Musgrave.
The Lillooet has this year, in addition to Captain Musgrave, who is in
charge, three assistants, Mr. Davis,
Mr. Burns and Mr. Fortier. Already
since coming north the Lillooet has
been engaged coupling up the surveyed parts south of Kennedy Island
so that all the coast line for a considerable distance south of the
mouth of the Skeena is well charted
and the greater part has been published by the department for use of
the shipping men. The work of last
year along the north end of Graham
Island Is being published by the department now.
There will be no land party engaged this year as there has been in
former years. The land party used
a launch and operated off Kennedy
Island, The moBt pressing work
there  has now  been  completed.
The Lillooet now is engaged In a
survey off the entrance or Skidegate
Inlet. The charts used at present
are very old ones, compiled ley the
admiralty and while exact at the
time are now nol exact. The banks
have altered and the channels are
not perfectly marked In consequence.
Captain Musgrave will attend t"
lhat work and thus place exact information' at the disposal of the
shipping men./
in the most reliable month of tlie
season he will complete tlie work
done by the Lillooet and Egeria in
Dixon Entrance.
With good weather conditions prevailing this year, the Lillooet Will
be able to leave In the fall with all
the entrances to Prince Rupert in
good shape for navigators.
PROSPECTORS' UNITE
Association Formed at Copper City to
Aid in Development.
Strong'  Body  Organized  with  Inter.
ests of Community at
Heart
to answer some questions he had lo
raise.
With respect to a driver for the
machine, Aid. Smith moved that Mr.
Olbson be employed as driver on
probation for 60 days, after which
the question of permanent appointment would be taken up.
This carried.
The prospectors of the Copper
River district are enthusiastic over
the recent organization of the Cop
per River Prospectors Association,
says the Inland Colonist. The membership Is increasing surprisingly
fast owing to the fact that the members of every outfit that has arrived
there recently, promptly filed applications for membership, as soon
as the objects of the new association
were explained to them. The objects
are: A live publicity of the mineral
resources of the hills tributary to
Copper River, and co-operation in
work for good trails and other facilities for transporting supplies and
ore.
The' membership is now over
thirty, and only a small number of
the prospectors who make Copper
City their headquarters are yet
aware of the existence of Ihe organization. With the many incoming
prospectors who are expected to arrive In Copper City within the next
thirty days, it is believed that by
lune 1 the membership will not fall
under  the 100  mark.
One of the first moves the association will consider at its next
meeting will be arrangements for
placing an exhibition in the "Made-
in-Canada" fair, which will be held
in Vancouver early in June. With
the number of prospectors at hand
who have remained at their camp;
during the winter and who are familiar with the whereabouts of
every promising prospect in the district, the association should oxperi-
ence no difficulty In collecting samples enough by the second week in
May lei make a very attractive exhibit.
POLICE STATION
TO AID  SETTLEMENT
Experts Representing the Government are
Going Into the Interior to Study
Conditions
They Will  Pass up tlie Skeena and
Then Follow Route of G, T. 1".
to Fort George
Temporary Building Will He I'm up
on Governmenl Reserve—Store
Room Authorized
The city council lasl evening
adopted a recommendation from the
streets committee based upon the
report of the superintendent of
works With respect to building a
temporary police station on the government reserve. The building is to
cost not more than $650 and will be
movable.
It was explained that to rent a!
building suitable for the purpose]
wolud cost $50 a month.
The report was adopted.
It was also decided to build a
lean-to to the corporation building
near Market place, lo be used as a
blacksmith shop and storeroom at a
cost of about ?200.
E. A. Weir, of Ontario and E. W.
White, of this province, are in the
city on their way into the Skeena
River district to make expert reports
upon the conditions prevailing from
the standpoint of the farming Industry. Both young men are undergraduates of the Ontario Agricultural College, which ranks among
the best of its kind in the world.
These young men who were referred to a few days ago in these
columns are being sent In by the
provincial government to gather as
much exact information as possible
for the department of agriculture in
Victoria, so that intending settlers
may have information that can be relied upon when they seek to learn
what his new country is like.
The two men will study the soil,
the plant growth, the climatic conditions and, in fact, will go as fully
as they e-an into all matters that
may affect the district from an agricultural standpoint. They will probably get away Monday, but are not
sure yet where they will first land.
It had been their intention to go
on to Hazelton and from there go
into the Kispiox and then into the
Bulkley, going through to Francois
Lake and on to Fort George, making
their way out by Ashcroft.
As the season is not very far advanced at eeazelion, they may alter
their plans a little and make, a landing at Kltsuiiikaluin or some of the
other valleys of ihe Skeena and investigate the soil and conditions
there. As often as llie-y can <i<> it
they will reporl  back to Victoria.
The visii of these experts should
be- of Inestimable advantage. They
are going Into the country without
prejudice o i'any kiml to find eeut
what the country is i.esi adapted for
in Ihe- way of farming.
They will distribute sugar licet
seed for experimental purposes. Ii
is also believed tint there are vast
areas well adapted for fax growing.
On the evening of May 24 the
Overseas Club will hold one of the
best concerts of the season, In the
Empress Theatre.
»     »     •
A dance was given last evening in
honor of Mr. Du Vernet and his
bride, who will leave shortly for
their home up the river.
Mr. and Mrs. tieorge Brownley, of
Vancouver, are spending a few days
in the city, guests of Mr. and Mrs.
D (1. Stewart. They will leave early
in the week for Hazelton, en route
to the Ootsa country, where Mr.
Mrownley will engage in ranching. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, May 5, 1911.
CENSUS ••• GATHERING
The cenus, or gathering of statistics with respect to the internal
affairs of the Dominion of Canada,
. will take place on the first of June,
1911, and all information gathered
shall have reference to the same
date, unless otherwise specified In
the schedules, or determined by the
Minister  of  Agriculture.
From the following information
gleaned from the schedules and instructions issued under the direction
of the agricultural minister, and ol
direct importance to the big cities,
may be learned some idea of the
immense amount of labor entailed,
and the success of which can only be
obtained by the co-operation of the
Canadian people everywhere in this
Dominion.
Schedule No. 1 comprises the population by name, personal description, etc., and the following questions will appear on the census paper: Name of each person in family,
place of habitation, sex, relationship
to head of family or household,
whether single, married, widowed
divorced or legally separated, month
of birth, year of birth and age al
last birthday. The following questions as to citizenship, nationality
and religion also appear: Country or
place of birth, year of immigration
to Canada if an immigrant, year oi
naturalization if formerly an alien;
racial or tribal origin, nationality
and religion. Five questions appear
under the heading of profession, occupation or means of living, to-wit:
Chief occupation or trade, employment other than at chief occupation
or trade, if any employer, employee,
or working on your own account.
Better Figure This Out
The census also delves into your
otherwise private affairs, as in tho
matter of wage-earners, thus:
State  where person   is  employed,
as 'on farm," "in woolen mill," "at
foundry shop," "in drug store," etc.
Weeks employed in 1910 at chief
occupation or  trade.
Weeks employed in 1910 at other
than chief occupation or trade, if
any.
Hours of working time per week
at chief occupation.
Hours of working time per week
at other occupation, if any.
Total earnings in 1910 from chiet
occupation or trade.
Tntal earnings in 1910 from other
than chief occupation or trade, if
any.
Rate of earnings per hour when
employed by the hour.
If you are insured the government
wants to know, and asks the amount
of life, against accident or sickness,
cost of insurance in census year.
Your education and language will
also be looked after, as you will be
called upon to answer the months at
school In 1910, whether you can
read or write and the language commonly spoken, the cost of education
in 1910 for persons over 16 years ol
age, at college, convent or university. With regard to your physical
condition, the following questions
confront you: Whether you are
blind, deaf and dumb, crazy or lunatic, idiotic or silly. 1 fyou are unfortunate enough to come under this
haed you must specify at what age
the infirmity, appeared. Schedule
No. 2 deals with mortality, disability
and compensation, and these are
subdivided into twenty-two questions, as follows:
Nam of person.
Sex.
Single,      married,    widowed,    divorced, or legally separated.
Month of birth.
Year of birth.
Age at last birthday.
Country or place of birth,     ilf i:i
Canada, specify province    or    territory.)
Racial or tribal origin.
Religion.
Profession .occupation or trade.
Month of death  in  census year.
Disease or cause of death.
Place of death, if it occurred away
away   from   home.      (Give   name   of
place,  hospital,   or  other   particular
address.)
Name of attending  physician.
Physician's  postoffice  address.
Nature of loss or injury caused by
accident in census year.
Cause of accident.
Weeks of debility in year, due to
sickness or due to accident, loss of
salary or other earnings caused by
sickness or caused by accident.    Voluntary allowance to    employee    by
employer for lost time through sickness or accident    In    census    year.
Compensation   by   employer     under
3tatute in census year for loss of life
by  accident or  for  injury  by  accident.     Compensation   by   Insurance
in census year for loss of life or for
sickness or injury.
Questions for Everybody
heads of families, and alms to get information concerning the fruit crop
of 1910, and the number of bearing
and non-bearing fruit trees in 1911,
also the amount of grapes produced.
Schedule No. 4 is intended for the
farming community and seeks to
find the products of the farm and
the price received by the farmer for
his grain. Every kind of grain is
included in this schedule, and are
divided as follows: Fall wheat,
spring wheat, barley, oats, rye, corn
for husking, buckwheat, beans, peas,
flax, mixed grains, hay and clover,
alfalfa, corn for forage and other
forage crops.
Schedule No. 5 takes in the hard
crops, tobacco, hops and grass seeds
in 1910, and field crop seeds In
1911.
Schedule No. 6 comprises the
number of animals and animal products, and the number of pure bred
animals registered or eligible for
registration in 1911.
Schedule No. 7 dealing with farms
and urban values, asks for statistics
with reference to farm and urban
values (real estate and live stock),
live stock and nursery stock sold iu
1910, dairy products consumed on
farm, sent to factories, or sold in
1910; animals slaughtered on farm
in 1910; other products of the farm,
such as wool, in 1911, eggs in 1910,
honey and wax in 1910, maple sugar
and syrup in 1911; hired labor on
farm in 1910; total number of
weeks employea; the amount paid
for hired labor, including board;
value of all lands and buildings, not
manufacturing establishments or
mines owned in Canada, outside of
enumeration district in 1911.
Schedule No. 8, forest products in
1910, dealing with timber.waney or
flat, excluding ash, birch, elm, maple, oak, pine and all other timber.
The information needed is the
amount in cubic feat and the value
in dollars. Logs for lumber, etc.,
asks for the amount in board measure, and the value in dollars of elm,
hickory, hemlock, oak,pins, spruce
and all other logs. Miscellaneous
products include bark for tanning,
fence posts, firev/ccd, hop and hoop
pcles, masts and cprrs, piling, rail-
ror.d ties, staves, stave bolts and
heading, telegraph poles (including
telephone and te'egrapa poles for
electric wires), wood for pulp, and
furs and skins of forrest animals un-
dressd.
Factory Figures
The schedule of the census deal-
inr with the manufacturers, ship
and boat building, and which is
numbered 9 among the schedules, is
of great interest. The statement
filled, must be certified also by the
owner, manager, or other responsible person connected with the works.
The information required is as follows, with a few abbreviations: The
name of owner, name of company or
corporation, post-office address, location of the works In 1910, principal product of the works in 1910.
Then commences a complete analysis of the works:
I. Capital employed in the works
in 1910.
First section of question relating
to No. 1.
11) Value of land, building and
plant.
(2) Amount of working capital
employed.
3. Managers, superintendents, etc.,
on salaries; the number in male or
female to all the following questions
where necessary:
4. Aggregate hours of working
time  per  week.
5. Average hours of working
time per week.
6. Aggregate salaries paid to in
year.
7. Officers, clerks, etc., on salaries.
S. Aggregate weeks of time em-
plodyed  In a yar.
9 Average hours of working time
per week.
10. Aggregate salaries paid to in
year.
II. Operatives or workers or
workers of sixteen years and over
on wages, the number.
12. Aggregate weeks of time employed In year.
13. Average hours of working
time per  week.
14. Aggregate wages paid to in
year.
15. Operatives or workers under
sixteen years of age.
16. Aggregate weeks of time employed In year.
17. Average hours of working
time per week.
18. Aggregate wages paid to in
year.
19. Pieceworkers employed outside of the works.
20. Aggregate payments made to
21. Aggregate value of products
in year.
Power Census
Under the heading No.  3,  power
employed in the works in 1910 arc
arranged the following:
22. Steam engines, and to these
questions, when possible, the number, horsepower and other remarks.
23. Gas engines.
24. Gasoline engines.
25. Water  wheels.
2 6.    Electric motors.
27. If power not used all year, in
what months shut down.
28. Power sold to other companies, public or private.
29. Power bought from other
companies, public or private.
30. Maximum electric horsepower
used.
No. 4. And under the heading
Coal and other fuel used at the
works in 1910, the following occur:
Kind or class of coal, in tons, and
whether foreign coal or Canadian
coal.
Bituminous coal, slack.
Bituminous coal, round.
Bituminous coal, run of the
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends , to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
' Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
For Sale
155% Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McLACHLAN.
Box 324.
31.
32.
33.
mine.
34.
35.
36.
of    articles,
houses,  etc.,
of   fin-
Anthracite coal, lump.
Anthracite coal, dust.
Value of wood or other fuel
than coal used at the works.
Then No. 5 heading. Custom work
and raw materials in 1910.
37. Received from custom work
and repairs in year.
38. Kind or class of raw or partly
finished materials used at the works
in year.
39. Cost value of raw or partly
finished material used at works in
year.
No. 6 heading kind or class of
products In 1910.
40. Kind or class
products, ships, boats,
made or built in year.
41. Quantity or number
ished articles in year.
42. Value of products in year.
This is certainly a e complete census with regard to manufactures,
and the figures will be awaited with
interest by all who are interested in
the growth and development of Canada. Great care should be used to
give the absolutely correct infqrma-
tion  for these  reasons particularly.
Churches and Schools
Schedule No. 10, with respect to
churches, schools, collegs and other
institutions in 1911, is also of great
interest to this city particularly, and
requires answers to the following
questions: Location of church,
school or other institution. Church
and place of worship must be answered in the following way: Religious denomination, seating capacity
of edifice and land. Sunday school
or catechism is divided into the following: Religious denomination;
number of officers and teachers,
male or female; number of scholars,
male and female; value of building
and land (if separate from church);
high, public, separate or privale
school; kind of class of school; num
her of rooms; number of teachers,
male and female; number of pupils
male and female; value of buildings
and land; college, academy, university, etc.; kind or class of school
(designate by name); number of
professors, lecturers or tutors, male
or female; number of students, male
or female; value of buildings and
land; charitable, penal, or other institutions; kind or class of Institution (designate by name); number
of officers in charge, male or female; number of other employees,
male or female; number of inmates,
male or female; value of buildings
and land.
Schedule No. 11 (fisheries), asks
for the name of person, firm, partnership, or company.
Post office address.
Value of plant employed. I Vessels, boats, seines, nets, etc.)
Number of persons employed In
year.
Total days of service in year. The
value of fish caught is required In
the following order:     Fish   (fresh),
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lln, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kitkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for sale
at $15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southwest quarter
section 6, township 63, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O. Box 324     Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
interest in company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office in Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer 1639 Prince Rupert
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on tha
European plan. FIrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8, p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and up
First Avenue   Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean O •£ *\
White Sheets   -    -    «*JC
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Prince Rupert  Private   Detective
 Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and individuals.    Business strictly confidential
P. O. Box 80S — Phone 210
WM. S. HALL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Ruperi
Schedule No. 3 is intended for the In year.
(Continued on Page Seven)
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Far Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
Skeena Land Districl—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Pills-
bury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent
Dated Feb. 19, 1911.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Allco Arm, on Its Easterly
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
chains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb., 1911.
NIOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
BrokerB, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
3. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inf orced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
WUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.
W. B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the   Westenhaver   Block
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena   Land   |District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commenc
ing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or lesB, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Re-
vier," Masiat, Q.C.I
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.} V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, Intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and In a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 cliains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE, MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated February  20th,  1911.
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop..
Rooms, 93 Per Week
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  r.ght down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
LINDSAY'S GARTAGE&STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Essington, B. C.
occupation prospector, Intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of MgCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu-
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence .20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thenco following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4.7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—Distrlot of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogilvie, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the 80uthwi98t corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 ohains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910. Friday, May 5, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
&iffltffltffltfflifflifflftiKi!
ifflwtflifliflwwifflk
1 GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC 1
TOWNSITE
M
Ka
ELLISON
The only Main Line Town-
site in British Columbia in
which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company
has announced its joint
ownership.
ELLISON
SEE THE OFFICIAL MAP.—The
first glance will show you that
ELLISON Is located at the junction
of the Skeena River and the Bulk-
iey Valley. The Grand Trunk
Pacific has announced that they are
joint owners in the townsite of Ellison. Now, my dear reader, you must
remember that up to date the Grand
Trunk Pacific has not announced
that it has any Interest in any other
main line towsite in British Columbia. Does that start you thinking?
 o	
STUDY THE MAP and you will
find Ellison is where the railway tracks leave navigation. That
fact is a very Important one for conservative investors to think over.
What is known as the Hazelton district covers a territory many miles
in extent in every direction radiating from the townsite of Ellison.
Mining machinery, ore shipments,
smelters, reduction plants and all
sorts of mining operations starting
up in thisl rich mineral region, must
necessarily have a metropolis, a
HUB, a headquarters. If any sane,
conservative man can figure out any
other spot except Ellison for the hub
of the great commerce of this district, his plan should be very Inter
esting to the Grand Trunk Pacific
officials. It does seem as though
these officials, after several years of
investigation and engineering,
would know just what they were doing when they put their official
stamp on Ellison.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—I desire to
say to all parties who are talking townsites in the vicinity of Skeena River and the Bulkley Valley
that there will no doubt be several
small towns, just the same as one
always finds in a mining district.
There will be towns in the vicinity
of Ellison along branch railways,
probably towns at the ends of branch
lines made to serve the mines and
the collieries, but it will be history
repeating itself in regard to the
building up of every metropolis.
Ellison has every natural advantage,
has every earmark of being the future mercantile and financial center of the Skeena River mining district and the entrance to the Bulkley Valley.
 o	
STUDY THAT, MAP and you will
find that all of the mining
towns and railroad towns around
there just beginning to    be    talked
about will only be feeders to the
city and port of ELLISON. The
Grand Trunk Pacific has put its
official stamp on Ellison. Do you
believe the company will do as much
for townsites owned by individuals
as it will for one in' which its stockholders are joint owners? If you
do, don't buy any lots in Ellison. If
you desire to make a permanent investment, or merely to make a little
quick money, you must decide for
yourself right now. Do you propose
to follow the individual townsite
promoters or the Grand Trunk Pacific  Railway Company.
 o —
STUDY THAT MAP.—If you desire to put your money Into a
real estate promoter's townsite you
will have many, many opportunities
this summer. The average promoter
is full of hurrah and red fire. He
must enthuse investors of the mail
order class with his wares. ELLISON is in the Missouri class. Therefore, I am not telling any fairy
tales about it. I am making statements that can he readily verified.
 o 1	
STUDY     THAT      MAP.—If     you
want to join that great army of
investors-at-long-range,     then     you
should put your money into promoters' townsites. If you want a perfectly safe and sound investment,
certain to bring you large profits,
then put your money where tlie
Grand Trunk Pacific, after years of
careful investigation, have put their
money.
 o ■
STUDY THAT MAP.—It is not
likely the Grand Trunk Pacific
will have any other townsite in British Columbia for sale this year. The
officials of the company state that
the company is not interested in any
townsite in the Hazelton district
with  the exception of ELLISON.
ELLISON is on the bank of the
Skeena at its confluence with
the Bulkley. You may change railway surveys; you may change the
location of towns along the line of
road, but you cannot change the
geography of the country through
which the railway passes. The head
of navigation necessarily means an
important townsite. Ellison will
not only be at the head of navigation but the center of a mining district wonderful in its resources that
is  now   being  opened   up,   and   for
which Ellison will be the shipping
point both by rail and water. The
fact that trains may change engines
up or down the line or in tlie suburbs of the town of Ellison does not
amount to shucks in building up a
town when such places are compared with a town located where
rails and navigation meet.
STUDY THAT MAP.—You will
find on the official plan of Ellison that a large part of the town-
site has been reserved for future
sales, the same as the company has
done with certain sections of Prince
Rupert townsite. There are, therefore, at this time, comparatively
few lots on the market. You must
hurry if you want one.
STUDY THAT MAP.—ROGERS'
ADDITION to Ellison, only a
small parcel of land, lies within
eight blocks of the site of the railway station. Lots in this are being
offered. I am advising my clients
to buy Rogers Addition lots at $150
for inside lots and v^50 for corners.
Terms—10 per cent discount for
cash, or 10 per cent down and the
balance on easy terms;  no interest.
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
PRINCE RUPERT
British Columbia
^WWWWWWWW!
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
0ffices-2nd Avenue
Facing Grand Trunk Terminal
w
tffl
,H
I
WWWWWWWWI^
SIR EDWARD GREY
Well
Known   Politician's  Style When
Addressing the House of
Commons.
Exchange Deals with His Manner of
Dealing with the Subject
of Debate
The question of international arbitration has been forced to the
front in Britain owing to the remarkable and entirely unexpected
speech of Sir Edward Grey, imperial
foreign secretary, delivered in the
Commons during the discussion on
the navy estimates. The evening's
debate had been of usual humdrum
type. The house was almost empty
when Sir Edward Grey rose from
the treasury benches and began very
quietly to defend the government.
Then, with that mysterious Intuition which seems to come to the
Commons when great events are being foreshadowed, the whisper went
round that something was happening. Instantly almost, the corridors,
the smoking rooms and the lounges
were emptied and members came
crowding lu silently, expectantly,
and were soon under the spell of
that quiet, earnest voice and aesthetic face, says an exchange.
Forgotten were the veto bill, the
Dreadnoughts, the super-tax, home
rule, the budget and all the other issues which divide, and at times subdivide, British political parties. Forgotten was the strife of the earlier
evening, and eagerly the awakening
crowd of members listened to the
Empire's foreign secretary announce
that negotiations were progressing,
on the initiative of President Taft,
for a treaty of arbitration between
Great Britain and the United States.
So quietly and so unexpectedly
had come Sir Edward Grey's momentous statement that even the gallery
reporters, ever on the alert for
"good copy," were somewhat late in
realizing the vast significance of the
speech, so that It was not until the
afternoon of the next day when the
evening  papers  appeared     that  the
British people realized the import of
the remarkable address delivered at
a late hour of an ordinary session.
It is so gratifying to note tnat before the popular voice could be
heard in support of the proposals
for an arbitration treaty between
Britain and the United States the
leader of the Opposition in the Imperial Parliament announced himself as heartily endorsing the idea
of such a treaty as outlined by Sir
Edward Grey.
The whole tone of the speech has
had a wonderful effect in Britain.
The sentences which seem to have
touched the heart of the nation are
these:
"Twice within the last twelve
months the president of the United
States of America has sketched out
a step in advance in arbitration more
momentous than any practical
statesman in his position has ventured to say before. President Taft
has recently made the statement that
he does not see personally any reason why matters of national honor
should not be referred to a court of
arbitration. He has also expressed
the opinion that if the United States
could put through a positive agreement with some other nation to
abide by the adjudication of an international arbitral court in every
issue which could not be settled by
negotiation, no matter what the issue involved, a long step forward
would be taken. Supposing (wo of
the greatest nations of the world
were to make it clear to the whole
world by such an agreement that in
no circumstances were they going lo
war again, I venture to say that the
effect on the world at large would be
bound to have beneficent consequences. Armies antl navies would
remain, no doubt, but they would remain then, not in rivalry, but as the
police of the world."
As soon as the news of the speech
spread through Great Britain, the
churches, all the moral and social
reform organizations, the trade unions and the leaders of the great
friendly societies in one accord
united in their declarations of support for the movement, and for the
past two Sundays, and again tomorrow, all Christian churches held, or
will hold special "peace services."
It  is  curious,    but    nevertheless
true, that this man, who seldom
speaks In the House of Commons,
who is even seldom in the chamber,
except on a division, is yet the man
to whom the Liberal party might
look for their next leader in case of
Mr. Asquith's retirement. He will
enter the house on special evenings,
walking quickly and with a little
jerk in his step to his seat. There
always seems to be a far-off look in
his eye. Perhaps it is his frequent
solitary rambles, his love of fishing,
for he can often be found by "a
troutin' burn," or climbing a lone
hillside of the Cheviots or the Highlands, thus communing with nature,
which gives the air of deep reflection always noticed on his face.
Left fatherless when quite young
he was brought up by his grandfather, Sir George Grey, and thus he
had ever set before him the example of a man who was careful in all
matters and ever ready to listen to
the views of those who might differ
from him.
Sir Edward, too, has had a long
and varied diplomatic and political
training, beginning under Lord
Cromer at a conference on Egyptian
affairs, next acting as secretary to
Mr. Childars, then chancellor of the
exchequer, and then entering Parliament six months before Mr. Asquith.
Sir Edward was in the days of the
Tory regime a Liberal Imperialist,
and when he entered the cabinet of
Sir Henry Canipbell-Hiiiiiierman It
•was to the grievous disappointnient
of Iho Unionists in general and of
Lord Cromer in particular. Alter
the Boer war he and Mr, Lloyd-
George were often together, and it is
said these conferences had much to
do with the union of the Liberal
party and the promptitude with
which their cabinet was formed, as
well as for its advanced programme.
in his speech on arbitration Sir
Edward was careful to point out that
arbitration did not mean an offensive and defensive alliance which
might be Interpreted as being
formed against some particular nation. The gain, he pointed out,
would be immense, and the example
of an arbitration treaty between
Britain and the United States would
have a far-reaching influence In inducing other natios to agree to the
same sae method of settling disputes.
CONSERVATIVES    ORGANIZE
Kitselas   .Association   Elects   Officers
for tlie Year at Enthusiastic
Gathering
The organization meeting of the
Kitselas Conservative Association
was attended by an enthusiastic
gathering of Conservatives, and although it was the time of year when
many of the people of the Interior
are in Prince Rupert or have gone
soutli to attend to business matters
before the opening up of river navigation, thus draining from each
town a majority of the voting
strength, the local Association started out with a membership of 24.
More than that number of local
voters were absent, either working
on the mai Iteams, or in Prince Rupert awaiting the departure of the
first river steamer for Kitselas, and
who will be placing their names on
the mmbership roll at the next regular meeting.
The veteran Conservative of the
district and former member, C. W.
D. Clifford, was selected temporary
chairman of the meeting, and later
unanimously elected first president
of the association.
The only work transacted waB
confined lo the organization of the
association, and after a short address by the chairman, in which he
set forth the objects of the proposed
association and reasons for qrganiz-
ing it ,he called for election of officers. The following officers were
unanimously elected:
Honorary presidents—Hon. Richard McBride and Wm. Manson,
M. P. P.; president, C. W. D. Clifford; vice presidents—Ceo. A. Kerr
and J. W. Paterson; secretary-treasurer, Dr. S. Traynor.
The following executive committee was appointed by the president:
F. M. Whitlow, Arthur Gill, Frank
Jones, R. Lowery, Ed KIbby, H.
Daniels and Wilson McNeil.
"Has your husband any hobbies.
Mrs. Jumptuppe?" said the hostess
to the afternoon caller.
"No, I carn't say as he 'as," Mrs
Jumptuppe, who was one of the old
school.
"Oh, how nice!" gushed the oth
er. "Now, mine, you know, is a
terrible nuisance in that way. He's
a downright bibliophile. When he's
at home there's no getting a word
out of him; he's simply wrapped up
in his bookshelves."
"I say, John," said Mrs. Jumptuppe to her spouse later in the evening, "that there old Tomkins is a
nice old cup o' tea. 'Is wife told
me today that he's a regular bibulous old file and that he comes
'ome fairly speechless and goes to
sleep on the bookshelf. Shockln',
ain't it? An' 'im a man of 'is eddi-
cation, too. Wotever's the world a-
comin' to?"
"We get some sad cases," said
the attendant at the Balmy Lunatic
Asylum to the interested visitor,
and opened the door of the first
cell.
Inside  was  a  man  sitting  on     a
three-legged   stool,   gazing   vacantly
at the wall.
"His is an unhappy story," said
the attendant. "He was in love with
a girl, but she married another man,
and he lost his reason from grief."
They stole out softly closing the
door behind them, and proceeded to
the next inmate.
This cell was thickly padded, and
the man within was stark, staring
mad.
"Who is this?" Inquired the visitor.
"This?"  repeated  the    attendant.
"This is the other  man!"
A boy was one day telling his companions about a great dinner at
which lie was present. He told them
about Ihe lovely things he had to
eat.
"An' 1 suppose ye had napkins,"
said a bystander.
"We had, of course," lie answered,
"the finest you ever tasted."
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, MAY, 1911
|       HIGH WATER      ||         LOW  WATER
DATE   AND   DAY
| Tlmo| Ht | Timej Ht II TIme| Ht | Time| Ht
1
Monday.   .   .   .
.j  2:31 22.6 16:82 19.6    9:07    1.4 L'l :09   6 9
2
Tuesday  .   .   .
.    3:14'22.0 10:25 IS.li     9:66    2.2121:58    8.1
3
Wednesday
.    4:02 20.le 17:2.". 17.7   10:62    3.822:69    9.8
•I
Thursday   .   .   .
.    4:68 19.6 18:40 17."   1 1:68   4.6 |	
6
Friday   ....
.'  i!:(i!i IX.1 20:on 16.9    0: 16 10.2 18: 13   6.5
6
Saturday   .   .   .
.    7:44 17.8 21:14 17.4    0:46 10.2 14:82   8.0
7
Sunday  ....
.    9:08|17.822:0'8[18.2    3:08   9.2 16:88   6.1
8
,10:16 17.7J22:62|19.1     4:16   7.6 16:82   (i.l
II
Tuesday.   .   .   .
. 11:10 18.8|i3:2919,8    6:06   0.1 17:18| 8.1
10
Wednesday  .   .
. 11:56 18.8     6:60   4.7 17:5!!   6.2
il
Thursday .   .   .
.    0:0220.6 12:36 19.0    6:28   3.7 18:26   6.4
12
Friday	
.    0:33 20.9 13: 18 19.1     7:03   3.1 18:68    0.8
18
Saturday  .   .   .
1:0'S 21.1 13:60 19.0    7:::7   2.8 19:80   7.2
14
Sunday   .
.    I:88l21.1|14:27|ls.7    8:10   2.8J20:02   7.8
15
Monday.   .   .   .
.    2:04 20.0 15:05 is.::    8:44   3.1 20:36    S.4
1(1
Tuesday   .    .    .
,2:37 20.8115:46 17.8    9:19   8.6 21:10   9.0
17
Wednesday .   .
J  3:13 19.9ll6:30|17.2     0:57    1.121:52    0.0
IS
Thursday  .   .   .
.   3:6419.0117:21)16.6 10:41   5.2 22:4:110.2
19
Friday.    .    .    .
.    4:43 18.0)l8:17)16.2  11:32   6.0J23:46 10.6
20
Saturday  .   .   .
J  5:4317.1 19:20|16.8 1 i. ...  12:31    0.7
21
.;  6:56 16.4120:23116.7    1:02 10.4 13:37   6.8
22
,    8:18 10.4 21:21117.(1     2:21    9.6 14:40    6.9
23
Tuesday   .    .    .
.;  9:30.17.0 22:08 IS.7.    3:29   8.0 16:86    6.6
24
Wednesday   .   .
.-10:32:17.8 22:5] 111.II     4:22   6.1 16:28    6.2
25
Thursday .   .   .
. 11:25 18.7|28:31|21,2     6:11   4.3i 17:13:   5.8
26
Friday   ....
 !.... 12:13 19.511  6:68    2.G;17:58|  5.6
27
Saturday   .   .
.    0:10 22.2|13:00 19.9     0:44    1.318:42;   5.7
28
Sunday.   .   .   .
.   0:60122.0)13:47 20.2    7:29   0.6119:27   6.0
20
Monday,   .   .   .
.    1:38|2'8.2 14:88 20.0    8:16   0.8 20:14   CO
80
Tuesday     .   .   .
.    2:18 22.9|16:28 19.7    9:02   0.7 21:04   7.3
81
1  3:06!22.1 16:24(19.1     9:51;   1.4 21:69   8.1
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west.    It
i counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is in feet and tenths ol a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific   Railway,   is   one   fool lower. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAI
Friday, May 5, 1911.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone
138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, May 5, 1911.
INDIANS' CLAIM
We confess to being unable to understand the position which Sir Wilfrid Laurier is reported to have
taken in his reply to the delegation
that waited upon him in respect to
the so-called Indian title to the "unsurrendered" lands of this province,
says the Victoria Colonist editorially.
It seems very clear that he thinks
the provincial government ought to
consent to an adjudication by the
court upon the alleged claim, and
he appears to have promised to do
what is possible to compel a submission of the case to the court, although he is very careful to avoid
any expression of opinion as to the
validity of the claim. If he appre
ciates the gravity of the contention
of the Indians he would surely see
that the province cannot consent to
its submission to any court. It is a
monstrous claim, and one that, if it
were conceded to be valid, would be
tantamount to a conquest of British
Columbia by the Indians. The so-
called "unsurrendered" lands include practically the whole province.
For more than half a century the
government of British Columbia has
held the vacant lands in right of the
crown; its acts were as much sovereign as if performed by the Britisii
government itself, and we are now
asked to accept that this right may
have been a usurpation. There are
some things about which the legislative autnority of a province cannot
consult the courts and in regard to
which it might properly refuse to
recognize any jurisdiction existing in
any court, and this Indian claim is
one of them.
Let us follow the case to its legitimate conclusion. If the Indians are
yet entitled to all the "unsurrendered" lands of the province, that is,
to all that they did not specifically
abandon to white people, it follows
that there are not and never have
been any crown lands in Britisii Columbia, and hence that every crown
grant, milling licence, right of way
for railways, hitherto supposed to
have been crown lands, must be absolutely void. If this is not what is
implied in the claim, we would like
to know what are its limits. We
have been told that the Indians
claim something les than this, but
however their "case" may be stated,
it is in derogation of the paramount
right of the crown, as represented
by the provincial government, in
British Columbia. It is an intolerable claim and Sir Wilfrid Laurier
would, wa submit, have been much
better advised If he had refused to
recognize that there is anything debatable about so preposterous a
proposition as is put forward on behalf of the Indians, lie will not
weaken the determination of the
provincial authorities and the only
effect of his course will be to create
disaffection among tlie Indians.
geographical studies to xe extended
uuring his high school course. There
is also the study of physical geag-
raphy, than which there is nothing
more interesting for the youth of an
inquiring mind and observant nature.
The place of the study of constitutional history in the public school
curriculum was also discussed at
this convention, and the remarkable
view was put forward, that the boys
and girls of twelve, thirteen or
fourteen years of age were not capable of understanding the constitutional history of Great Britain and
Canada, a knowledge of which was
required at present for entrance to
the high school. We are told that
the matter was dwelt upon by "principals who had prepared pupils for
entrance examinations, and it was
suggested that questions of constitutional history should be excluded
from the entrance papers."
There is nothing so difficult in
the study of general outlines of the
constitutional history of our country
tnat either the examination questions should be so abstruse or the
teaching of the subject so defective
that the pupils for entrance honors
should be placed under a handicap
The knowledge that is important is
the form of government in province
in dominion and in empire. Consti-
tutioal history, of course, includes
not only a study of the present parliamentary system of Canada and
Great Britain, but a survey of the
historical events and the long processes of development that have given
English speaking nations their democratic form of government. This
may require for a proper understanding a matured mind and may
properly belong to the high school
period. But should not the common
school pupil possess an intelligent
appreciation of the Canadian and
British forms of government, and
can this not be imparted without going too deeply into the questions
that concernd the Fathers of Confederation? Sometimes it is questioned if the high school entrance
graduates have really any intelligent
conception of the framework of our
parliamentary system.
GEOGRAPHY   \.M> HISTORY
There is indeed a considerable
humor in the use of the expression
"lickspittal press," by a neswepaper
cradled and nurtured for the sole
purpose of representing one particular political idea in the community.
**************************
* *
t     News of the Province     f
******** ************
NUGGET IX GARDEN
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Bnilding,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
*************************f.
*
*
*
*
*
(New Westminster Columbian.)
At the Provincial Teachers' Convention, held in Victoria during tlie
jeier-t week, the question of adding
history and geagrophy to the high
school curriculum was discussed. It
Is reported thai the point was em-
phasized thai since history and
geography have been dropped from
the high school course of study, ihe
younger generation of teachers are
handicapped as they possess no extended knowledge of these subjects,
such as they require to Intelligently
teach them.
Here is a subject on which tlie
laymen may be presumed lo be qualified to express an opinion. This
opinion will not unlikely be that It
Is a mistake to omit these subjects
from the high school course. The
business man and the professional
man have been compelled to note
that the high school graduate seems
to be deficient in what should be an
e'ementary knowledge of places and
events. For example, how many
boys from the high school will locate the country, province or state
of tlie principal commercial cities of
the world? Is Ottawa In Ontario?
Some will hesitate at answering.
This should no tbe. It. would seem
that the h.gh school graduate mlghl
find  It a valuable equipment for his
NELSON—An extraordinary discovery of a valuable silver nugget
in a hotel gardn, through apparently
supernatural agency, is reported
from Ainsworth. For some nights
past at the same hour C. F. Olson,
pioneer hotel man of Ainsworth,
had been awakened by a voice which
seemed to say, "Dig deeper, dig
deeper!" So persistent was the announcement that he moved his sleeping place to his office across the
street. Next night he was again
awakened by the mysterious voice.
He arose to investigate, opened the
door and looked out. In the moonbeams he saw the figure of an old
miner busily digging in his garden,
wit ha pile of silver bullion lying beside him. Mr. Olson shouted oul.
The figure and nuggets instantly
disappeared. Next day, while working in his garden at the place where
the figure had disappeared, he uncovered a lump of silver weighing
225 ounces and worth $120. Mr.
Olson is convinced that he will find
more silver in the same place and
will  thoroughly explore the locality.
CONDEMNING   BUILDINGS
VICTORIA—The cit yof Victoria
has been making application before
a judge of the supreme court for an
order for the destruction of certain
buildings which are alleged to be insanitary and a menace to the health
of the community. It is understood
that there are over a hundred such
buildings in the city which have
come under the ban. The question
of amenity was generally admitted
but the legal aspect has proved quite
another matter. In chambers, before Mr. Justice Murphy, In one of
these applications which was directed against L. J. Quagllotti, In re
spei't of a building owned by him,
J. A. Aikman raised the point that
the city had shown no grounds for
making application for such an order. He reminded the court that a
necessary preliminary was a declaration from the medical health officer to the effect that the buildings
were a menace to the health of the
community, that their existence was
likely to spread    disease,    or    that
61 Floor Varnish
Made
Especially
for Floors
Will not crack nor peel off.
Water will not turn it white.
Sold only In sealed cans.
Ask for sample panel.
If your dealer does not stock it write
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
«E
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty of
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25 th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
RESERVE
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
*
We  also  carry
stock of other
a  complete •:•
Replenish
the
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
s
I
■J
I
■
I
I
MERRYFIELD'S ■
CASH GROCERY
I
I
I
J
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
The best local  beer on the S
market. %
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
.      ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
I CLARKE BROS.
*      Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
Telephone 30       Third Avenue
t *
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there was a contagious epidemic in
the city which the said building
would tend to stimulate and extend.
As a matter of fact there was such
a declaration made in connection
with the building referred to and
would like to cross-examine the city
authorities. City Solicitor McDiar-
mid, of course, admitted that there
was no epidemic raging in the city
at the present time, nor was there,
so far as he knew, any likelihood of
one. Mr. Aikman then pointed out
to the court that it was not mandatory to gram such an order as was
desired on this occasion. It was
purely a matter within the discretion of the court. His Lordship decided to exercise his discretion by
refusing the application in question
and all the others applied for under
similar circumstances.
Mr. Merrill arrived from the south
by the Prince Rupert.
* *     +
W. M. Law returned to the city
by the Prince Rupert this week.
* *    *
Paul Bennett, of Nanaimo, and
Mr. Blood, of Toronto, paid a flying
visit to Prince Rupert this week, arriving on the Prince Rupert and returning by the same steamer. Mr.
Bennett Is a brother of Mrs. William
Manson.
Old Gentleman—Now, kiddles, do
you want me to have a game of
romps with you?    Eh?
Youngster—Oh, no! We're playing at Indians, and you're no use.
You're scalped already.
"So there's another rupture of
Mount Vociferous," said Mrs. Partington, as she put on her specs. "The
paper tells us about the burning
lather running down the mountains,
but it don't tell how it got afire."
"My! Miss Ma'r," said the old
darkey to the young lady of the
house, the morning after her coming-
out ball, "you sho' did look sweet
las' night. My! I hardly knowed
you. Dey wasn't a thing about you
dat looked natchei."
"You have such strange names for
your towns over here!" said a titled
Englishman. "Weehawken, Hobokon,
Poughkeepsie, and ever so many
others  don't you know?"
"I suppose they do seem strange
to English ears," said the American
thoughtfully. "Do you live in Lon -
don all the time?"
"Oh, no," replied the Briton. "I
spend part of my time in Chipping
Norton, and then I've a place
Pokes-togg-on-the-Hike."
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British,Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable Waters  Protection Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the Bite
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. C, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General in
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice. is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
amplications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to Thursday, June
1st, 1911, at five o'clock in the afternoon for the purchase of Lot 541,
Range 5, Coast District, situated in
the vicinity of the City of Prince Rupert and containing 19.7 acres.
An upset ptlce of one hundred
dollars per acre has been fixed upon
the lands embraced in said lot.
Each tender must be enclosed In
an envelope securely sealed and
marked "Tender for Lot'541, Range
5, Coast District," and must be accompanied by an accepted cheque
for twenty-five per cent of the
amount set out in such tender.
Payment for the lot will be accepted in instalments, one-quarter
cash and the balance in three equal
annual payments with interest on
deferred payments at the rate of six
per cent per annum.
The cheques of all unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them.
The highest or any tender will
not necessarily be accepted.
Field Notes of the survey of the
said Lot 541, Range 5, Coast District, may be seen at the office of
the undersigned.
No commissions of any kind will
be allowed.
j. h. Mcmullen,
Government Agent.
Government Agent's Office,
Prince Rupert, B.  C,
April 27th, 1911. 6-1
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN,
holden at Prince Rupert.
In the Matter of the "Official Administrators Act," and In the
Matter of the Estate of L. Buto-
vitch, deceased intestate:
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honour Judge Young, made the
28th day of April, 1911, I was appointed Administrator of the estate
and effects of L. Butovltch, deceased
intestate. All parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward same properly
verified to me on or before the 15th
day of May, 1911, and nil parties indebted to the said estate are required to pay the amount of their
indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated this 1st day of May, 1911.
J.   H.  McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
5-2-6
TRUST COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined In the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furniBh particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of Its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided in
section 4 of said Act.
W. U. RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm 1
Friday, May 5, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
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AMONG THE MINES
FIFTY YEARS A MINER
Notable Anniversary in Career of John
Cummings Commemorated by
Premier McBride.
John Cummins, of Cariboo, Has Had
a Free Miner's Licence for
Fifty Years
A graceful illustration of the invariable thoughtfulness and kindness of
heart of Premier McBride was furnished just before the departure of
the Prime Minister from his capital
when in his capacity of minister of
mines he had the pleasure of forwarding to Mr. John Cummins, of the
150-Mile House, the fiftieth renewal
of his licence as a free miner of
British Columbia.
Mr. Cummins was one of the old
brigade, through whose indomitable
courage and strenuous endeavors the
golden resources of old Cariboo were
made known to the world, now half a
century ago. He was one of the
original workers of the world-famous
Cariboo Cameron's claim, and ever
since has spent at least a portion of
each year prospecting the Cariboo
mountains for precious metals.
During a visit to the Upper Country last year, the premier had the
pleasure of meeting his old friend of
the hills ,when Mr. Cummings was
taking out his forty-ninth renewal of
the licence. This year Hon. Mr. McBride anticipated the usual application of the veteran of the hills and
sent the licence direct from departmental headquarters, accompanying
it with a graceful personal letter in
which good wishes were expressed In
felicitous terms.
The free miners' licence as it exists in Britisii Columbia, is a document carrying very extensive and
special privileges and wide authority.
Armed therewith, one may even invade the sanctity of private property
or of declared reserves in quest of
precious metal. Last year his late
Majesty King Edward VII not only
was the holder of a "ticket," accrediting him a free miner of British Columbia, but the fee therefor prescribed by law was charged in the
usual course.
This unusual condition arosa
through the transfer to the Dominion
government for park purposes of the
famous Deutschmann Caves, or Caves
of Cheops not far from Revelstoke,
which had been originally taken possession of by the discoverer under his
free miner's licence.
When the formalities of transfer to
the Dominion government obtained
consideration, it was found that serious obstacles presented themselves
in the imperative dictates of the mining law, and it was finally decided to
complete the transfer under that law,
the caves being regularly located and
subsequently Crown granted to His
Majesty the King as represented by
his government in Canada, and the
fees and costs attaching being subsequently rebated by the provincial authorities.
 o '	
A regiment of soldiers were at
camp and a young Scottish recruit
was put on sentry outside the general's tent. In the morning the
general rose, looked out of his tent
and said to the young man In a
stern and loud voice:
"Who are you?"
The young man turned round
smartly and said:
"Fine!     oo's  yourself?"
TUNNEL AT STEWART
Mining   Company   Proposes   to   Cut
Way Through to Take Out
the Ore
Announcement was made at the
annual meeting of the Stewart Mining and Development Company just
held, at which there was a large attendance of shareholders, that a tunnel was to be driven a distance of a
thousand feet from No. 4 ledge
through to Bear River to permit of
the ore from the mine being dumped
direct into the cars of the Canadian
Northeastern Railroad built from
Stewart. Arrangements will be com
menced to ship shortly. The directors
reported as follows: "The tunneling
done during the year on the four
ledges, amounts to about 1,000 feet.
On the No. 4 ledge, where the most
work has been done, an ore chute of
great promise was encountered. Considerable work has been done and a
winze sunk to the depth of 50 feet
on this ore. The ledge widened with
depth. Careful assays, taken all the
way down, give an average value of
$20 per ton in gold, silver and lead.
This is highly satisfactory, but, owing to the presence of water, we decided to postpone work on the winze
for the present and continue drifting
in the face of the tunnel on this
ledge, which is one of the best on
our property. At the time of writing we are advised by the foreman at
the mine that the work on this drift
continues to expose good ore.
"The time is drawing near when
this property will have to undergo
the change from a prospect under
development to a shipping mine, the
bodies of ore found in the No. 4 ledge
being now considered sufficient to
warrant this. The most feasible plan
for working the property as a mine,
will .be by a tunnel from the Bear
River side. This will obviate the
necessity of constructing an aerial
tramway, and will give us approxl
mately 700 feet depth vertically below our present workings, and drain
the mine for practically all time. The
mouth of the tunnel will only be a
short distance from the line of the
Canadian Northeastern Railway,
which will be in operation before the
end of June. At a rough estimate
the tunnel will be about 1,000 feet
in length, and with a spur from the
main line to the mouth of the tunnel
it will facilitate the handling of ore
at the very lowest possible cost."
Mr. R. M. Stewart, vice-president
explained the development and proposed work, including the steps to be
taken to install necessary facilities
for shipping, the most efficient method being to construct a tunnel at a
vertical depth of 700 feet, which,
owing to the dip will give 1,000 feet
of stoping ground below the present
workings. This tunnel can be constructed at low cost, as all work can
be carried on from a base on level
ground close to the railroad. In
working the mine this tunnel will
offer a cheap way of handling the ore
as the tunnel will be driven with a
slight raise for drainaoge and an up-
chute at a point beneath the present
workings will be driven for ventilation. Thus the ore can be stoped,
and the expense of hoisting machinery saved. It is expected this tunnel
will cost in the neighborhood of
$20,000. It Is the intention of the
directors to have a thorough report
on the mine by an eminent mining
engineer, aud a survey of the tunnel
made shortly, and as soon as this is
done work on the proposed tunnel
will commence.
RICH TERRITORY
Resident of Kitsuinknluiii Expects to
See  Rapid   Development
Tliis  Season
W. J. Goodwin, the Kltsumkalum
rancher, looks forward to big doings
in Kltsumkalum this summer, He
believes that within another two
months a flourishing townsite will
be placed on the market, which will
shortly become the gateway to the
rich Kltsumkalum valley and the future base for the railway that must
within the next few years be constructed from the Grand Trunk Pacific on the Skeena, up the Kltsumkalum River to the Naas River, says
the Inland Colonist.
He believes that by the extensive
road and trail construction work
that will be carried on this summer
throughout the Kltsumkalum valley
by the provincial government, the
Kltsumkalum Valley will be one of
the best advertised valleys along the
Skeena River before the summer is
over and that several hundred more
ranchers will be coming in. As
these roads and trails will connect
with Alice Arm, Stewart and even
with Hazelton, at the head of the
Skeena River navigation, and the
base for all of tnem being Kltsumkalum, he believes that the Kltsumkalum townsite will become one of
importance on the Skeena Inside of
another  twelve  months.
The ranchers In that vicinity will
plant a large acreage this spring in
vegetables for sale In the Prince
Rupert markets.
 o	
Bishop Du Vernet returned from
the south by the Prince Rupert.
 o	
********* ************ *****
I     NEW YORK FASHIONS      I
t *
**************************
During the past few months the
large shops have made a great display of tailored costumes in medium
weight materials and recently they
have added many charming models
of still 'lghter tailored and semi-
tailored costumes of silk, for spring
wear. It is always well, if possible,
to have two tailored suits for the
summer season; one a practical
plainly tailored suit for rough wear,
outing purposes, etc., the other of a
dressier character. An attempt to
combine the two is seldom successful,
but many women now do away with
the dressy tailored coat and skirt and
blouse or three-piece costume, substituting for it a smart one-piece short
frock to be worn with a separate
coat.
Pretty Models
Some extremely pretty models are
now appearing in the exclusive shops.
They are in changeable taffetas with
etamine or chiffon in combination
and while there has for some time
past been a prejudice against taffeta
the most autocratic makers are certainly taking It up. The texture and
finish of the newest taffetas are really lovely and the colorings, particularly the changeable effects, are
beautiful.
Skirt and short smart coat costumes of the changeable taffeta, the
skirt mounting high and jointed to
a dainty bodice of changeable etamine in the same color as the taffeta
mounted over white and touched
with embroidery in the two colors,
are built up on varying lines of different designers and in beautiful colorings. Very dark blue and a rather
vivid green are good In this changeable silk. A soft brown combines well
with an old rose, a rose with violet,
a gray with rose or deep golden yellow. Another idea developed successfully in changeable colorings is
the frock of changeable etamine
trimmed in soft ruches of fringed
changeable taffeta and with a little
coat of the taffeta to mach.
Ruches in Favor
It may be remarked here that
ruches are evidently finding considerable favor and one sees them trimming all kinds of frocks. One of the
most artistic and charming models
shown in one of the shops was an exquisite fine fancy net in the yellowed
tone of old lace, made very simple
with a beautiful fichu of old lace
and fringed ruches of silk in a soft
yellowish brown for the only trimming.
Grenadine and Silk
Coat and frock costumes of grenadine or etamine and silk, with loose
unlined coats in the semi-tansparent
material trimmed in silk, are shown
in some of the most attractive designs and there are serviceable little
costumes in the plain charmeuse, me-
teore and other satin surface silks,
the foulards, surah ,silk serges, etc.
Linen Coats
Good linen coat and skirt models
admirable in design, cut and finish
may be bought at prices surprisingly
reasonable even at very smart and
exclusive shops. Almost every ultra-
modish shop has some specialties in
this line and in the simple one-piece
linen and other tub frocks, which
they have made up to meet the demand for such things among their
valued patrons and to keep these
patrons from resorting to the big
shops; and there are specialty shops
where chic models of this kind are
sold in great variety and at remarkably low prices.
The Harem Skirt
For some reason or other the designers of    women's    fashions    are
making frantic efforts to popularize
the trouser or harem skirt. In Paris
the women seem to have taken a
fancy to the new style and they seem
determined to give it at least a trial.
The prominent mckers of women's
dresses are turning out large numbers of these skirts and, realizing
that some redeeming feature must be
introduced in these skirts to make
them attractive, the designers have
concentrated their efforts upon beauty of material, soft and supple, artistically designed, and showing the
most exquisite workmanship. In spite
o fthese efforts arid the prediction of
a prominent designer that trouser
skirts would be worn generally a
year hence, the sensible, refined women of good taste Is not showing
any inclination to adopt .he trouser
skirt.
Bonnets in Favor
Bonnets are worn a great deal at
the present time and prominent milliners say that hey will be in fashion
throughout the summer and probably
in the fall. The type of bonnet one
sees most often on the street is built
up in rough straw, has a round
crown quite covering the head down
to the neck in the back and a slightly
projecting poke brim and is trimmed
with a big bow set low in the back
and perhaps some little prim nosegay
or single flower posed near the edge
of the brim In front. The brim may
be lined with contrastin gcolor or
with self color.
But it must not be imagined that
all bonnets are built upon the same
simple and conservative lines. Some
of them are extremely audacious and
many of them, unfortunately unspeakably vulgar and ugly. Even the
conservative and really pretty models
are not suitable for all women. They
are becoming and even attractive on
a young and slender girl, but look
perfectly hideous and absurd upon
short and fat women who have
passed the period of their youth.
Ther are strings upon a good many
of the bonnets, though they are the
exception rather than the rule nad
they are usually tied well at tne lefi
side. Occasionally, however, one
sees strings knoted on the outside
and fall in loops and ends down over
the shoulder without passing undei
the chin at all.
Ribbon Fashions
The ribbons of the season are so
beautiful that the milliners have not
been able to resist using them much
upon both hats and bonnets, and the
wide taffeta backed velcet, often with
the silk facing in color contrasting
with the velvet, makes smart bows,
as do the exquisite brocades and
printed designs and one-tone color.
Ings.
Sometimes a ladder of trim little
velvet bows is set up the back of the
bonnet in place of a big bow and
there are fascinating little models
whose trimming is all bunched at one
side instead of being posed on front
or back.
Velvet is much used in the spring
millinery. Straw hats have velvet
faced brims or velvet crowns with
straw brims. White straw shapes
are faced with black or dark blue velvet. Black velvet-might be said to
be the characteristic touch of the
season.
FOR   SALE
BLOCK
SECTION ONE
LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
11
11
1-2-3-4-5-6
 9-10
1?
 22
13
 21-22
18
 1-2
ff
SECTION FIVE
 22-23
18
LOTS
 3-4
19 15-16
20 19-20
34 36-37-38
34    42
27    9-10
27 42-43
SECTION SIX
'3 7-8-9-10
JIT      Q       D jp \JC/~\ AT    The Atlantic Realto and Improvement
VV.    O.    £jHil\\D\Jiy     CompanoUd.        -        P.O. Box 51
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT &S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Soils for Stewart, Thursdays, 8 a. ni.
Sails for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a. in.
S. S. "PRINCE ALBERT" for Port Simpson,    Naas    tviver    Points,
Massett, Naden Hrrbor, every Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.
and for
Refuge Bay, Skidegate, Queen Charlotte City, Lockeport, Pa-
cofi, Jedway, Ikeda Bay, Rose Harbor and return    via Queen
Charlotte City, e.re:-y Saturday,  1:00 p. m.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY  SYSTEM,    connecting   with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec,   Halifax,     Portland,     Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Information  and  tickets obtainable from the office hereunder
mentioned. Trans-Atlantic steamship bookings by all lines arranged
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
BOARD WANTED
Gentleman desires board and room
in private family; $10 tc $15 per
week. State conveniences. Address
R. A. M., "Journal."
WANTED
WANTED—An assistant in the furniture business. Apply to J. F.
MacDonald, Second avenue,
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Des
Brlsay, of    Vancouver, canneryman,
intend to apply for    permission    to
lease the following described    foreshore:— Cpmmencing    at    a    post
planted at the mouth   of   Delkatlah
Inlet, on the south    shore;    thenpe
2,000 feet along shore in a southerly
direction  including all foreshore between high and low water mark.
Staked January 19th, 1911.
JAMES DES BRISAY,
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
2-11
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Through tickets to all points in the
United States and Canada by
The Northern Pacific Railway
The finest train across the continent.
Connecting at NEW YORK, BOSTON
PORTLAND and HALIFAX with ATLANTIC STEAMERS for all points In
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, GERMANY,
FRANCE, ITALY, NORWAY and
SWEDEN, by WHITE STAR. RED
STAR, AMERICAN - DOMINION,
WHITE STAR DOMINION, CUNARD
FRENCH LINE, NORTH GERMAN
LLOYD, HAMBURG AMERICAN and
CANADIAN NORTHERN Steamships.
For all information write me, or
call at office:
J. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
9
FAMOUS
Princess Line
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
| JUL Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
NOTICE
APPLICATION    FOR    LIQUOR
LICENCE.
I, Edward James Maynard, of the
City of Prince Rupert, in the Province of British Columbia, Liquor
Dealer, hereby apply to the Board of
Licence Commissioners for the said
City of Prince Rupert for a Bottle
licence to sell intoxicating liquors
under the provisions of the Statutes
in that behalf and the by-laws of the
City of Prince Rupert, and any
amendments thereto, for the premises known and described as Lot 29,
Block 11 Section 5, to commence on
the  15th  day  of June,  1911.
And I hereby agree that in case
a licence is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or be permitted to be
upon said premises, other than in
the capacity of a guest or customer,
nor shall Asiatics be employed off
said premises to do any work to be
used in or in any' way connected
with said premises, and 1 hereby
agree that 1 shall accept said licence
subject to this agreement, and that
any breach of this agreement shall
ender me liable to all the penalties
provided for in Section 19 of the
Prince Rupert Liquor Licence Bylaw,  1910.
My postoffice address is Prince
..upert,  B.  C.
The name and address of the owner of the premises proposed to be
licene-ed is C. D. Rand, Vancouver,
B. C.
Dated  at   Prince  Rupert   this  4th
day of May, 1911.
6-16 E. J. MAYNARD.
Princess
May
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
MONDAY, MAY 1, at 6 p.m.
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
NOTICE
APPLICATION    FOR    LIQUOR
LICENCE.
I, .1. Arthur Smith, of the City
of Prince Rupert, In the Province of
British Columbia, Contractor, hereby
apply to the Board of Licence Commissioners for tlie said City of
Prince Rupert for a Bottle licence to
sell Intoxicating liquors under the
provisions of the Statutes in that behalf and the by-laws of the City of
Prince Rupert, and any amendments
thereto, for the premises known and
described as Lot 2, Block 34, Section
1 to commence on the leeth day of
June, 1911.
And I hereby agree that in case a
licence is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or bo permitted to be
upon said premises, other than in
tlie capacity of a guest or customer,
nor shall Asiatics be employed off
said premises to do any work to be
used in or in any way connected
with said premises, and 1 hereby
agree that I shall accept said licence
subject to this agreement, and that
any breach of this agreement shall
render me liable to all tbe penalties
provided for in Section 19 of the
Prince itupert Liquor Licence Bylaw,  1910.
My postoffice address is Prince
Rupert, B. C.
The name and address of the owner of the premises proposed to be
licenced is J. Arthur Smith, Prince
Itupert, B. C.
Dated  at   Prince  Rupert,  this  4th
elay of May, 1911,
0-16 .1. ARTHUR SMITH.
If you want the honey
That comes  from  the hive
Take up the phone and
Call one, double five.
Skeena Land District-—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described Iands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at. this post; tlience 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
CARLES JAMES GILIINGHAX
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
NOTICE OF  DISSOLUTION
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore existing between
Joseph E. Merryfield, Prince Rupert, B. C, and Joseph E. McEwen,
of Kitselas, B. C, has this day been
dissolved by mutual consent, and
that Joseph E. Merryfield will carry on the grocery business heretofore
carried on by the firm at Prince Rupert, B. C, under the name of "J. E.
Merryfield," and will collect all
debts due to and pay all debts owing
by the said firm, and that Joseph E.
eMcEwen will carry on the business
of the partnership heretofore conducted at Kitselas, B. C, under the
firm name of "Merryfield & McEwen," and will collect all debts due to
and pay all debts owing by the Bald
firm at Kitselas, B. C.
Dated   at   Prince  Rupert,   B.   C,
this 21st day of April, A. D. 1911.
J. E.  MERRYFIELD,
J.  E.   McEWEN.
Witness:
M.   M.  STEPHENS. 5-12
• J
I
_i PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, May 5, 1911.
SPORTS
BRADFORD'S VICTORY
Before 70,000 people at Manchester, Bradford City won the replayed
final for the English Football Association cup from Newcastle United
by 1 goal to 0.
Bradford attacked strongly and
scored their goal in the first half as
the result of a lightning drive by
Ribins from the half-way line
Thompson secured the ball, centered to Devlne, and though Lawrence ought to have cleared, Spiers
dashed it into the net. In the second half Bradford played a stone
wall defence.
ATHLETES FOR  LONDON
As the result of the recent visit to
Ottawa of Frank Nelson, governor
o fthe Amateur Athletic Union of
Canada, it is practically certain that
the Dominion will be represented at
the Festival of Empire sports, which
are to be held at Crystal Palace,
London, England, from June 24 to
July 1, inclusive.
'y Mr, Nelson Secured an Interview
with Hon. Sydney Fisher, who has
charge of the Canadian representation at the coronation festivities and
received every assurance of encour-
agemnt. Mr. Nelson applied for a
grant to defray the expenses of a
team, composed of eight of the leading athletes of the country. Mr.
Fisher has promised to give the
A. A. U. a reply in the course of a
few days, but in view of the fact
that the Australian and South African governments have sanctioned
the sending of teams to the sports,
which are open only to athletes of
the British Empire, it is altogether
likely that Mr. Nelson's mission will
prove productive of the desired results.
Lord Desborough, who was perhaps the leading spirit in the Olympic games in London three years
ago, is now the chairman of the
committee which will have charge
of the Festival of Empire sports.
Crystal Palace has been selected as
the scene of the all British meet,
and it is suggested that Canada,
Africa and Australia each send a
team of eight. Eight will also be
chosen from Great Britain and Ireland.
The programme includes the one-
hundred, two twenty, eight eighty
and one mile runs, as well as the
two twenty hurdle event. In the
swimming there will be one hundred
yards and one mile races, and in
addition there will be wrestling,
middle weights, catch-as-catch-can
style, and boxing, heavy weight.
Tennis was first given a place on the
programme, but recently the A. A. U.
was notified to the effect that the
tennis has been eliminated.
Frank Lukeman, it is safe to
guess, will be one member of the
team. Lukeman could compete In
the one hundred, the two hundred
and again in the hurdles. Gordon
Johnstone, the Ottawa swimmer,
who holds the Canadian championship for one hundred yards, is also
a likelihood. For the mile swim
there are several probabilities.
Charlie Gage, the 'Varsity football
player, who holds the Canadian
championship, should be the choice
for the heavy weight boxing, and for
the wrestling there is one particularly good man at Vancouver. Jack
Tait for the mile, looks a certainty,
and for the half, Arnold Knox, of
Toronto, may be the choice. Hal-
baus for the Porter runs is also a
possibility, Winnipeg will also be
represented if it. can supply a man
good enough. Bobby Kerr may also
go, as It is the intention of the
A. A. U. not to compete in too many
events. Lukeman will remain over
and compete for the British one
hundred and two twenty yard chaw-
pionshtps, which were held two
years ago by Bobby Kerr.
BATTING STYLES
youngster and eager to train the
twig in the direction that the tree
should grow. "I hit 'em where they
ain't."
That is the secret of batting—
hitting them where they ain't. Sometimes things will break bad for a
good batter and it will seem as if
he can't get a hit. He will meet the
ball squarely time after time only to
find it laying a course for the outstretched hands of some fielder.
Cobb went to bat 17 times in succession in the season of 1908 without making a hit. He was as nearly
crazy as any ball player ever becomes and stays out of a retreat. He
would spend his mornings while he
was in the baiting doldrums walking about the streets looking for a
load of empty barrels to change his
luck. The day he made his first hit
after the arid spell he had a lead
penny in his pocket that a blind negro had given him. He has carried
the piece from that day to this in
the pocket of his uniform. Nothing
upsets a good batter so much as
missing his regular diet of base hits.
Probably the most momentous
pinch hit ever made and the one
which had the most far-reaching effects was the single pushed into
centre field by Bridwell, of the New
York Nationals, on September 23,
1908, in a game between the Giants
and Cubs. If Bridwell's supporting
cast had done their share and acted
thier parts correctly that hit would
have won a pennant, as things afterward turned out. But why mention
Merkle agan and that regrettable
incident about second base, with
which bag his name will be associated as long as there is baseball?
Bridwell came to the bat in the
ninth inning with one run needed
to -win a game of ball. Two were
out. He made the hit, and then, on
a "fluke,"  the game was lost.
WOMAN'S RECORD
There are two types of successful
batters—the scientific man and the
natural hitter, the man born a baseball genius. "Willie" Keeler, who
appeared last with the Giants was
practically the inventor of scientific
batting. He was the firsi man to
chocke his' bat up short so that he
could bunt or bit it out without
shifting the position of his hands.
He was in a class by himself when
it came to out-guessing a third baseman.
Diminutive physically, he stayed
up among that exclusive set, the
three hundred hitters, for seasons
on end, simply by his baseball Intel-
lce-t, expressed through his bat. A
young player asked him once how
he managed to make so many hits.
"That's easy," answered Willie,
always glad  to give advice to    the
Motoring has not yet been taken
up by Edmonton women, as in the
larger American cities, where large
numbers of little electrics and other
smart runabouts are owned and
driven exclusively by ladies. To
philosophize on the matter, one
might advance the opinion that the
reason of this is that in Edmonton
women are more domestic in their
tastes than their sisters across the
border. They are probably as fond
of healthy amusement as any women
in the world, and there is no doubt
that they "simply adore" automobiles. Neither can it be questioned
that the wives, sweethearts and
daughters of this town have had a
great deal to do with boosting the
motor car industry here. But Edmonton women apparently would
rather not motor alone, or merely
for show purposes. They like the big
car, which will accommodate the
family or a jolly party of pleasure
takers.
The lady here who could afford a
car of her own, in addition to her
husband's, either foregoes that luxury or employes a chauffeur to take
her and her friends about. It is a
rare thing to see, as you will see in
Buffalo or Cleveland or Detroit, ladies out shopping or calling alone In
their own small runabouts.
But in Edmonton the number of
women who can drive autos is increasing rapidly. A year or so ago
people would turn to watch a woman
driver. Now the sight is ordinary
enough. And—who knows?—the
fad for ladies' own cars may come—-
it may come soon. And of all fads it
is one of the most healthgiving and
invigorating.
The The most famous Canadian
woman driver, by the way, is Mrs.
K. R. Otis, of Montreal. She has
been an expert for years, and has to
her credit speed and endurance records, which many a man might envy.
She was born in Canada, and recently retured to this country, but most
of her records were made while she
was a resident of the United States.
Three years ago she lowered the road
record from Buffalo to Cleveland,
and Barney Oldfield has tried unsuccessfully to beat it. In the same
year she won the hill-climbing championship of Cuyahoga county, in
Ohio, in competition with a large
number of experts with high-power,
cars. Last summer she successfully
defended the cup won on that occasion. Other victories to her credit
are: A Cleveland to Toledo record,
which still stands; a mid-winter record from New York to Boston, and
the highest average of over thirty
cars in a relay race from Pittsburg
to Upper Sandusky, Ohio, Mrs. Otis
driving a double relay over this distance, which is 240 miles.
As to the general question of
women's skill and good sense in the
management of automobiles, it is in-
terestin gto note that, in the opinion
of close observers, ladies, as a rule,
are more careful drivers than men.
Municipal Notice
NOMINATION  NOTICE.
Public notice is hereby given to
the electors of the municipality of
Prince Rupert, that I require the
presence of the sad electors at the
City Hall on the. 8th day of May,
1911, at 12 o'clock noon, for the
purpose of electing an Alderman to
fill the vancancy caused by the resignation of Aid. T. D., Pattullo as
Alderman for Ward 2 in the Municipal Council.
The mode of nomination of the
candidate shall be as follows:
The candidate shall be nominated
in writing; the writing shall be subscribed by two voters of the municipality as proposer and seconder, and
shall be delivered to the Returning
Officer at any time between the date
of the notice and 2 p. m. of the day
of the nomination, and in tlie event
of a poll being necessary, such poll
will be opened on the 11th day of
May, 1911, at the City Hall, of
which every person is hereby required to take notice and govern
himself accordingly.
Qualification for Aldermen
Persons qualified to be nominated
for and elected as an Alderman
shall be male Britisii subjects of the
full age of 21 years, who have been
for the 6 months next preceding the
day of nomination, the holder of an
equity or equities in real property
in the City of Prince Rupert, whoso
name appears upon the last Municipal Assessment Roll as such owner,
and of the assessed value of $500.00
or more.
Given under my hand at Prince
Rupert, B. C, the 2nd day of May,
1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Returning Officer.
NOTICE
"CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF
    PRINCE RUPERT   	
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of the Court of Revision for the
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert, B. C, will be held in the
City Hall, Prince Rupert, B. C, on
Monday, June 5th, 1911, at 10
o'clock a. m. for the purpose of hearing complaints against the Assessments as made for the year 1911.
Any person desiring to make complaint against the said Assessments
must give notice in writing, stating
cause of complaint to the Assessor,
at least ten days previous to the sitting of the said Court.
Dated at Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 1st, 1911.
J. C.  McLENNAN,
5-9-30 Assessor."
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will sup
ply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline ovei
again. Then its tremendous slgnifl
cance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest ol
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 centp
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences ac
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Auto
matlc Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING  MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All  orders  promptly   filled—-see   us
for  prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN,
Holden  at Prince Rupert.
In the Matter of Lazar Milovich, Deceased,
and
In  the Matter  of the  "Official Administrators' Act."
Dated   13 th   day   of   April,   A.   D.
1911.
Upon reading the affidavits of
Mich-o Luke Kosich, Mike Wusovich,
Nike Gurvich, John Hugh McMullen,
C. V. Bennett and a further affidavit of J. H. McMullen, it is ordered,
that John Hugh McMullin, Official
Administrator for part of the County
Court District of Atlin, embraced
within the Skeena and Queen Charlotte Islands Mining Division,
shall be Administrator of all
and singular the estate and effects
of Lazar Milosevich, deceased, Intestate, and that this Order is published in the Prince Rupert "Journal" for two issues.
(Signed)      F. McB. YOUNG,
5-2 Judge.
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machine*
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people ol
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tl}6.
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that 1b
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of eyery
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C BEAN
Prince Rnpert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
Building, Chicago, III.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 118
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE tl at J. E. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED. A.  DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte IslandB.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ot Masset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence touth 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeent, Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C, occupation spInBter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence weBt 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte IslandB.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Millard,
of Masset, B. C, occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of the N. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
ALICE MILLARD.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tbence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON.A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4M> miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Massett, B. C, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of .Masset Inlet two
miles west of the S. W. corner of T.
L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence westerly
along the shore back to the place of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ALLAN   ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA  ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer. Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permls-
sionu to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains Bouth
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 cliains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Orland P
Merrill, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation coal operator,, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains east and 40 chains south of
the N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
ORLAND P. MERRILL.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
MISS HENNY WBNNERSXwN
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, a acial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work.
ROOM NO. 4, EXCHANGE BLOCK Friday, May 5, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
THE DUAL LANGUAGE
Former Resident of Sooth Africa Expresses His Views Respecting
Skeena Valley.
He   Thinks   English   Should   Have
Been Made tlie Official
Tongue
That the official recognition of
the dual language in British South
Africa will retard the harmonious
progress of that colony Is the opinion of Mr. H. E. H. Greene, now a
resident of Vancouver, who was secretary to the Rhodesia chamber of
mines for several years, during the
most exciting period of the country's
development.
"It would have been very easy,"
said Mr. Greene, "to have proclaimed
English the official language at the
time of the peace settlement. Then,
in fifteen or twenty years, the racial
feeling would have died down and
the best interests of the country and
the empire would have been served.
As things are at present the Transvaal is more thoroughly Dutch than
it was before the war."
Speaking of comparative conditions," here and in South Africa,
Mr. Greene said that it was not possible to compare the two owing to
the fundamental differences. He
looked for better times in South
Africa in later years and expressed
confidence in the future of Western
Canada.
During his term as secretary to
the Rhodesia chamber of mines, Mr.
Greene became personally acquainted with the late Cecil Rhodes and
had a rare opportunity to see behind
the scenes. Dr. Jameson, now Sir
Lander Starr Jameson, was Mr.
Greene's family physician and a personal friend of the latter before,
during and after the famous raid.
Mr. Greene has in his possession
some most Interesting documents
bearing on the preparations for the
Jameson action.
"After the raid," he recounted
"three men came to my office to
make a search for papers or arms,
on suspicion. 1 told them straight
that they needn't expect to find anything of that nature lying around
where they could find it. They
went away empty-handed for which
I was rather pleased, seeing that 1
had four rifles stowed away in the
chimney. Had they found them I
should witnout doubt been Imprisoned."
Referring to Cecil Rhodes, Mr.
Greene described him as a most
kindly, unselfish man. He cared
little about his personal appearance
and was most persistent aud dogged
in following out an idea. He was
also the author of scores of philanthropies of which the world never
knew.
POPULATION FIGURES
GRAND TRUNK DEPOT
The new home of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway at Winnipeg,
known as the union station, has
been completed and the head offices
of the company have been moved
into the building. The new terminals and station have been constructed to take care of the rapid
increase of the importance of Winnipeg as a traffic centre, and the
structure is a credit to the western
metropolis. The building has a
frontage on Main street of 352 feet
and a depth of 140 feet, and covers
a ground area of approximately 50,-
000 square feet. It comprises basement and four storeys surmounted
by a dome 90 feet in diameter and
100 feet above the street level.
The new depot forms a part of an
extensive subject involving a system
to trackage and buildings which will
provide one of the best equipped
terminals in the world. The main
floor of the building has a large circular lobby in the centre under the
dome, with waiting rooms, restaurant and lunch room on one side,
the ticket offices and baggage rooms
being placed on the opposite side.
It communicates through the rear
by a subway and stairways to wide
platforms between the eight through
tracks, which have a capacity for
200 cars at a level of ten feet above
the level of the main floor. The
main lobby is entirely unobstructed
by columns or seams of any kind,
and is exceptionally well lighted
on all four sides by large arch windows. In the basement there is a
waiting room with an area of 10,000
square feet, besides excellent accommodation for immigrants. The
second, third and fourth floors will
be devoted to office purposes. Ultimately it is planned to add four
more storeys to provide a total of
200,000 square feet of office room.
European   Countries   Show   an   In.
crease—Some of  tlie  Showings of Large Cities
A British blue book has been issued givin gvital statistics for the
principal foreign countries for the
ten years ending 1909. The figures
relating to population ar'e particularly interesting. They show the
following total populations of the
countries named, in 1909:
Germany 63,879,000
France 39,276,000
Italy 34,270,000
Spain 19,945,000
Belgium    I .   7,452,000
Netherlands       5,911,000
Portugal 5,340,000
Switzerland 3,584,000
Sweden 6,476,000
Denmark..    .' 2,692,000
Norway 2,370,000
Austria-Hungary   (1908) .49,163,000
Russia   (1908)     157,079,000
United   Kingdom   (June
30,   1909)     45,006,000
For some of the countries outside
Europe, the following figures are
given:
United   States    88,566,000
Japan 49,905,000
Argentina       5,884,000
World's Great Cities
The population of the world's
great cities show some interesting
comparisons with London, the figure for which at the last census
(1901)  was over 6,500,000:
New York  (1900)    3,437,000
Paris   (1906)     2,763,000
Toklo   (1908)     2,186,000
Berlin    (1905)     2,040,000
Chicago   (1900)     1,699,000
Vienna   (1900)    1,675,000
Philadelphia   (1900)    ....1,294,000
St. Petersburg  (1897)   ...1,265,000
Osaka   (1908)    1,227,000
Moscow   (1897)     1,039,000
Buenos Ayres  (1905)   ...1,026,000
Perhaps one of the most interesting features is a comparison ot
the respective growth of populations
In the ten years 1898 to 1908,
which works out as follows:
Increase in 10 years.
United   Kingdom       4,166,000
Germany    8,574,000
France            522,000
Russia 28,614,.000
Unitaed States 14,222,000
Japan      5,048,000
Austria-Hungary 4,054,000
CENSUS GATHERING
(Continued from Page Sevon)
ysters   (fresh),   shell  fish   (oysters,
clams, scallops, etc.).
Fur seals.
Hair seals.
Canned fish, preserved, salted,
smoked, kippered or boneless, fish
manure, fish oil, fish guano, salmon
roe and sturgeon caviar, together
with canned and preserved lobsters,
and canned oysters, will be entered
on the schedule of manufactures.
Other Industries
Schedule No. 12, relating to butter and cheese factories, etc., requests the name of the factory, name
of owner, firm, company or corporation doing business, post office address, present value of buildings,
present value of machinery and
plant, number of patrons In 1910,
days operated In 1910, pounds of
milk converted into cheese in 1910,
pounds of milk converted into butter jn 1910, pounds of butter produced from cream delivered at factory in 1910, pounds of condensed
milk delivered at condensed factory
in 1910, value of condensed milk
made at factory in 1910, value of
other products made at condensing
factory in 1910, aggregate selling
value of cheese at factory, aggregata
selling value of butter at factory
amount of money distributed to
patrons for cheese produced in
1910, amount of money distributed
to patrons for butter produced In
1910, number of persons employed
in factory in 1910, aggregate days of
service in 1910 and the amount paid
for salaries and wages in 1910.
Schedule No. 13, relating to mining and mineral products, Is divided
into four sections, namely, mines
and mining works, employees, salaries and wages in 1910; capital, and
plant employed at mines, quarries or
works in 1910, and products of
mines and works in 1910.
Full instructions accompany the
schedules for the information of
enumerators, the divisions of districts, the directions for taking a
census of the Indian reservations,
and the remuneration of the commissioners, agents, or other persons
appointed to take the census.
 o	
Editor—But where Is the joke in
this comic?
Comic Artist—Oh, that comes in if
you buy it.
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Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS     ■
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINefJE RUPERT
The Best
Publicity J $2.00
Channel
Subscription
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
*****************************************************
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends' to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains Bast to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAK^I NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of .commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:-.
Commencing at a post planted 7 54
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E, Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that CharleB J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over' 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
pq no ] rt |»
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; theuce 80
chains Nortn; tlience 80 ciialns
West; tlience 80 chains Soutli;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or. less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. uilling-
ham's S. E. Corner; tlience 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM,
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   ot
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent
Dated March Oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of tha mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres nioij
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal add'
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less. '
CHARLES J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March Oth,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   ot
TAKE NOTICE thi.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
Nortli; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains Soutli; tlience 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  ith,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. 0.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E, of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division ot Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. O,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >t
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity ot water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which tlie
water is to be used (describe same)
At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
Ihe land Intended to be Irrigated,
giving  acreage	
(i) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place wliere the water is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j). Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON   A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second Is equivalent to .15.71 miner's
Inches.
Job Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, May 5, 1911.
Secure Your Chairs For the Verandah
Suitable for living
rooms as
well as for
Verandahs
"■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦OT
Third Avenue
Geo. D. Tite, Complete House Furnishers has just put
in stock the most complete supply of Wicker Rockers
and other Easy Chairs, at all prices.
Complete stocks in every line of House Furnishings to suit the
least pretentious homes, or the most palatial residences.
GEO. D. TITE
Third Avenue
|i ♦jt i|i *j. «j* tiff »ji »*« »j» «j» »j« ►*« »jt »jt tj*»;«*j» *3t *j» »jt »+« »*« *j» tjt •;« »**
I   Shipping Report   f
| By Dominion Wlrelesi. |
**************************
May  5—8  a.  m.
Skidegate — Clear; calm; sea
smooth.
Ikeda—Overcast; calm; barometer 29.40; temperature 48; 'Ight
swell.
Trianlge—Overcast; wind northwest, 6 miles; barometer 28.89; temperature 37; light swell; Alameda
at 6:30 p. m. southbound off Triangle; U. S. revenue cutter Manning
off Tirangle at 8 p. m. northbound;
Chicago reported at 8:30 p. m.
Estevan—Overcast; light southeast wind; barometer 29.32; temperature 43; sea moderate.
Tatoosh—Light rain; wind south.
10 miles; barometer 29.72; tempeia-
ture 46; sea moderate; out, steamer
Luceric at 6;30 a. m.J out, steamer
Sarston Reta at 7 a. m.; inside
bound out, Thos. L. Wand and Watson.
Point Grey—Raining; wind southeast; barometer 29.62; temperature
48.
Cape Lazo—Overcast; wind southeast;  barometer 29.54;   temperature
4 4; sea smooth; two-masted schooner northbound at 8 a. m.
May 5—noon
Skidegate — Clear; calm; sea
smooth.
Triangle—Overcast; wind southeast, 8 miles;-barometer 29.02; temperature 42;  light swell.
Estevan—Cloudy; wind southeast,
fresh; barometer 29.32; temperature
47;  sea moderate.
Pachena—Cloudy; wind south, 32
miles; barometer 29.55; temperature
46; out, Thos. L. Wand, 8:10 a. m.;
out, Watson, 8:45 a. m.; in, schooner Luzon, 9:52 a. m.; in, schooner at
11:10 a. m.
Point Grey — Passing showers;
calm; barometer 29.66; temperature
56; in, two-masted schooner 11:20
a. m.
Lazo—Cloudy; wind southeast;
barometer 29.63; temperature 45;
sea moderate; tug Edith with scow
northbound at 11:45 a. m.
channel which have been marked by
the Company as follows:
(1) Amur rock, having on it 12
feet of water, lying about four cables
northeastward from the wharf,
marked by a black barrel buoy.
(2) A shoal having on it depths
down to one-half fathom, marked at
its outer end by a platform buoy
exhibiting a red lantern light from
the pyramidal wooden top, and the
inner end, two-thirds of a cable
north from the wharf, marked by a
spar buoy.
Shapes of Tops of Buoys
The folowing clause is to be added
to section three of the "Rules governing buoys and beacons adopted
uniformly throughout the Dominion
of Canada":
"All starboard hand spar buoys,
maintained by the government of
the Dominion of Canada, shall have
pointed tops; and all port hand spar
buoys shall have flat tops."
(Starboard hand buoys are red
buoys and port hand buoys are black
buoys.    See Rule No. 5.)
All parlies having to do with the
maintenance of buoys are hereby instructed to carry out these regulations concerning spar buoys.
RIVER   NAVIGATION
CAPT, NICHOLSON F.XPFCTFD
Captain J. B. Nicholson, of the
Grand Trunk Pacific steamship service, is expected to arrive here in a
few days.| He will look Into conditions here, going on to Goose Bay,
it is expected, to study the situation
which presents itself in tin- way of
I rude there.
NOTICES TO MARINERS
The department of marine and
fisheries has Issued the following information:
There is a settlement known as
Pacofi at the head of Selwyn Inlet,
Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte Islands, where the Pacific Coast Reorganization Syndicate nas established a factory and built a wharf.
This wharf is 368 feet long with an
ell 72 feet long. There is a depth
at the head of the wharf of 14 feet
at low low water and a depth In the
approach of nowhere less than four
fathoms. The wharf Is near the
southwest extreme of the head of the
inlet and the channel up to the
wharf is elose to the south shore.
The head of the wharf Is In latitude N. 52 degrees 51 minutes, 30
seconds, longitude W. 131 degrees,
67 minutes, 30 seconds.
There are two shoals north of the
The trade up the Skeena continues
as strong as ever. There is a constant demand for additional facilities
to meet the demands and this it is
said  will continue all  summer.
A little difficulty arose with respect to licencing the river steamers
leaving here in view of the fact that
they navigated waters that were outside the river which is not provided
for. This was felt to be merely a
technical difficulty and the Board of
Trade has taken it up with the department at Ottawa. In the meantime Mr. McDonald, the collector of
customs, is waiving the point and
granting the clearance papers.
INSPECTED CORPS
Col. Wadmore D.O.C. for District Has
Paid Official Visit to
City.
The Need of a Drill Hall Is Manifest
to Military Officer in
Charge
WILL RE GIVEN SEND-OFF
Smoker  Will  Be  Given  Tonight in
Honor of Captain Stork and
Color Sergeant. Leek
This evening there will be a complimentary smoker given by the
members of the local militia corps,
Earl Grey's Rifles, to the commanding officers, Captain Stork and Color
Sergeant Geo, Leek. The smoker
was planned as a send-off to Sergeant Leek, who will leave shortly
to join the rest of the Canadian contingent going to the coronation of
the King. Captain Stork has also
decided to go to London this summer,
accompanied by Mrs. Stork. He will
leave next Friday and the corps have
planned, therefore, to make the
function a. double one.
All members of the corps and
their freinds are asked to be present
at the Knights of Pythias hall at 9
oiplock this evening.
 o	
HOSPITAL PATIENTS
Smallest Number of Patients for Any
Time Are Now in the Insti-
•) tution
The hospital directors met
Wednesday in the hospital and transacted general business. The board
made a tour about the institution
and found everything in first-class
condition.
It was reported by J. G. Scott, of
the executive committee that the fire
escapes had been ordered to be put
in place.
The matron reported that the
number of patients on that day was
the smallest since the hospital
opened, there being only twelve.
An application was received from
Seattle from Miss McLeod, inquiring
about entering the hospital to train
as a nurse.
This letter was referred to the
executive  committee.
PRESBYTERIAN SYNOD
Session Is Being Held in Vancouver
This Week for Transaction
of Business
Colonel Wadmore, 1). O. C. for
tills military district, spent ii tew
days In the city this week, Inspecting the local militia corps, Earl
Grey's Rifles, lie- left again for dis-
Ir'ct headquarters in Victoria this
morning.
The D. O. C. officially inspected
the stores and alco the corps at a
parade held on Wednesday evening.
There waE a fair attendance, the
company being put through their
drill by the commanding captain,
Fred Stork.
Colonel Wadmore expressed - his
regret that there was not a drill hall
sufficient for the purposes of the
corps. He urged the necessity of efficient training and also the advisability of receiving training under
conditions mel with in active service.
For this reason he advised training
In the conditions met with in the
open areas about the city.
It Is probable lhat something may
be done to allow of this training to
be carried out.
The Presbyterian Synod of British Columbia, composed of the Presbyteries of Kamlopos, Victoria, Kootenay and New Westminster Is meeting In St. Andrew's Church, Vancouver, this week. The whole work
of the synod throughout the province will be reviewed and all the sessions will be open to the public. It
was the intention of the body to
have their retiring moderator, Dr.
Ferguson, conduit divine service but
he will not be able lo be present on
account of illness and the Rev. R. J.
Wilson was appointed in his place.
Rev. ,1. S. Henderson, of New Westminster, lias been appointed moderator.
The various subjects to be discussed will include Missions, the Col-
leges, Y. P. Societies, the Sundae-
Schools and Social and Moral Reform. ■
The synod Is the twentieth synod
of the province, the first having been
held in St. Andrew's Church on July
20, 1892, with Mr. now Dr., McCrae,
as Its first moderator. The first
clerk was Rev. W. R. Ross, of Chilli wank, whose obituary was read at
the meeting this week. At that time
the synod Included the Pprebyterles
of Calgary, Kamloops, Victoria and
New Westminster, which comprised
the whole territory of Alberta    and
A FEEDER TO CITY
C. W. D. Clifford  Has High Opinion
Respecting Skeena
Valley.
Well-Known  Resident  of  This   District Is Paying Visit to Prince
Rupert
C. W. D. Clifford, of Kitselas,
reached the city by the Hazelton on
Wednesday, and today went on south
to transact business. Mr. Clifford is
an old resident of the north. For
years he had been interested in various points in this part of the province and sat as the representative of
the district in the Legislature.
He reports that the    past    winter
rTEL. 187
2nd Avenue & McBride^
C. W. 1). CLIFFORD
has been a very good one at Kitselas.
There has been steady business and
the spring promises exceedingly
well. The residents are preparing
for a considerable influx of settlers.
Of the agricultural posibilities of
the Skeena, Mr. Clifford Is very optimistic. Last year he grew immense cucumbers in the open and
also ripened tomatoes. There will
be no difficulty, he says, In growing
all kinds of vegetables and fruits.
The long days bring these to the
highest stages of development and
produce a splendid type of vegetable.
British Columbia. In 1904, owing
to the growth and Influence of Alberta, the court was called the synod
of Britisii Columbia, and Alberta. It
continued so until 1907, when it was
divided and each province had ItB
own synod.
Tlie present clerk, Rev. J. A. Logan, has been continually in office
since 1895 and has been at every
meeting since the origin of the
synod.
The present Synod of British Columbia comprises a total membership of 120 ordained ministers and
294 preaching stations and is largely a home mission field. Its history
during the last twenty years has
been one of rapid growth and increasing progress. Plans will be discussed at the meeting for a large
extension of Its work.
 o	
Martin O'Reilly, who with Mrs.
O'Reilly returned by the Prince Rupert, is receiving the congratulations
of his friends here.
Fancy Groceries
Family Groceries
Fresh Groceries
Green Vegetables
Fresh Fruits
Special Attention Given to Family Trade.
You Will Find Our Prices RIGHT.
STALKER & WELLS
^
2nd Avenue & McBride
^
l©©!!!©^^
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS=
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, h*.
HHHHHHHSHHHHI3HHHH0BHHHE1H
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Uiotlies tu the
PIONEER  STEAM  LAUNBUY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT  IS  TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
Laundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY

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