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Prince Rupert Journal Jun 30, 1911

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Array ■"?
fi
Ntw Wellington
Coal
is ihe best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
Ptinct Unpttt
<-^~Ugislative 5j>
VOLUME II
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  O,   FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1911
Price,   Five  Cents.
No.   4
RETAINING WALLS,
SEWERS AND DRAINS
City Council Discuss the Broad Questions of Improvements for the City—Will Probably Postpone
Decisive Action on These Until
After Voting on Water
and the G.T.P.
Agreement.
The Wednesday evening meeting
of the city council was given over for
the most part to consideration of two
or three of the largest schemes with
which the council has to grapple.
These were the retaining walls, the
sewers and the stone culverts and
surface water courses. With these
are connected several other important matters relating to the financial
questions. Among them is the
method of paying for the work, out
of general revenue or by the local
improvement system. The discussion which took place was of a very
informal character, the city engineer
being present with plans. The object of the meeting was to get all
the information possible and exchange views, with the purpose of
arriving at the best method of carrying on the work.
Sewer Proposition
The city engineer was asked to explain the sewer proposition he had.
This had come up previously and
from time to time had been worked
upon by him. The chief engineer of
the Grand Trunk Pacifc had shown
him the plans of the company with
respect to works on Hays Creek.
The ship yards at the mouth of the
creek, It was explained, would result
in the main sewer down Hays Creek
being carried around to about opposite Claude street before being emptied into the harbor.
This sewer, which begins behind
Comox avenue and the Acropolis
Hill is twenty-four inches in diameter at the start and where it empties into the hrbcr would be thirty
inches.
There will be a large area of
the townsite, especially the residential section served by this main
which will take in the lateral sewers
from the various quarters.
Colonel Davis explained that the
sewer system he had planned was
an Independent one; that is, it would
carry sewerage only and not surface
water. A system of drains to take
care of the surface water would
have to be provided independent of
these sewers. In the general working out of the propositions this had
been found the better plan. If
surface water were introduced Into
sewers there was sure to be at
times more water introduced than
the sewers could take care of. In
dry weather the pipes were so large
as compared with the amount of discharge that they became offensive.
Engineers had the best of data to go
on in providing for sewers alone and
he had planned his work for the city
along these approved rules.
In Business Section
For the business section a plan of
sewerage was shown to cover Section 1 largely, but with other additions to it. This would be carried
out in conjunction with the sewers
now put in by the government and
the city. None of the lines would
be main trunk sewers in this section.
The cost o fthis work was put at
$199,200. The work would serve
for 40 years. It was proposed in the
original plan prepared for the old
council to make it a work of local
improvement, assessing the cost
upon the basis of frontage.
The discussion that followed
showe that there had been a proposition to make trunk sewers a charge
upon tbe general cred't ot the city
and the lateral sewers a work of
local Improvement.
Aid. Hilditch said that he had
looked into this proposition for Sec-
(Continued on Page Eight)
NAY END THE STRIKE
The Miners Trouble Will Very Likely
Come to an Early Settlement
OPEN OLD SCHOOL
Final  Calling Off of Trouble Is Expected About Beginning
of Week
(Special to The Journal)
. NELSON, June ,10.—It. is reported here on good authority that a
settlement of the Alberta and
Crows Nest coal strike Is arranged.
The operators have agreed to offer
day workers increases of seven per
cent in wages nnd other concessions, not including the closed shop.
It is understood the strikers have
agreed  to accept  the offer.
An official announcement of the
end of the strike Is expected the beginning of the  week.
SAWMILL .SITU FOR CITY
» The growth of the city and
" the opportunities for trade are
' bringing varied inquiries from
1 large enterprises that seek to
' enter business here. This week
> one of the local firms, M. M.
' Stephens & Co., have received a
' communication seeking infor-
' mation relative to establishing
' sawmill here on a large scale.
' The company back of the enter-
' prise is one of the best in the
' Dominion and well able to carry
' out any undertaking. It is sug-
' gested that if a suitable loca-
1 tlon can be found either in the
city or close to It, a mill to cost
' half a million will be located.
1 The company seeks informa-
' tlon as to electric power and
1 other details, intimating that an
1 early start can be made.
One Room for the Small Children Will
be Provided for in the Heart
of City.
It  May  Be Found  Possible to Carry
on the Work Without Addition to Stuff
The Board of School Trustees
held a meeting this week when the
question of opening a room in the
old sdi ol i nib. ing In the heart of
Hie clt;- ruuio i i- It W '3 f< I: ".'
Ihe trustees that there was a need
for opening up a room there to accommodate the pr'mary pupils in the
hear* of thfe cltv. It wus accordingly
decided that a room should be
opened to take care of the younger
pupils that, may be ready to attend
It was decided to later advertise
for a teacher 10 take the room vacated In the Central School It being
the intention tO assign Miss Johnstone to the room In the old'school.
In primary work, Miss Johnstone
has made a specialty and is well
qualified.
On the other hand, If It is found
possible to rearrange the work so as
to dispense with the services of a
new teacher it will be done. Jt Is
believed by the trustees that this
may be possible.
The purchase of the bird specimens from Rev. J. H. Keen will not
bo made. Mr. Keen asked lo have
the offer withdrawn and the board
felt that In view of the fact that the
birds were not mounted it might be
wise to withdraw.
Several small accounts were ordered paid.
ENGINEER'S DEFENSE
Col. Davis Gives Facts Relative to the
Conduct of His Department
He   Meets   the   Ci-iticisnis   of   Those
Who    Found    Fault    with
the Administration
In view of the fact that there has
been criticism of the engineering department relative to work on the
streets the following statement prepared by Colonel Davis for the guidance of the council when they considered the report signed by Aid.
Newton, will be of interest:
Prince Rupert, B. C,
June 20, 1911.
To His Worship, the Mayor,
City of Prince Rupert.
SIR: —
In compliance with your request 1
beg to submit the following reply to
statements contained in the report
of your special committee appointed
to enquire into the matter of a more
economical administration of the
Engineering Department.
With  Reference to Sections 1  and 2
The work cannot be carried on by
a staff the size of the one proposed.
The engineer's staff from the beginning has been too small to plan and
superintend works of the diversified
character and magnitude of those
undertaken; this has been more apparent since the first of the year
when the introduction of the day
labor system for the construction of
a portion of the works added to the
duties of the Engineering Department the work of a contractor's office. This is proved by the fact
that the cost of engineering for Section 1 will not exceed 2 per cent on
the cost of the work—less than one-
half the usual cost of engineering,
which is usually estimated at 5 per
cent.
Section 4
Mr. Thomson has not expressed
his willingness to undertake the supervision of the waterworks without
extra charge. Acting as consulting
engineer is a very different position,
and an experienced waterworks engineer in actual charge of the work
would be absolutely necessary.
Section 71)
There is no question that, under
ordinary conditions, complete surveys, plans and specifications for
every detail of the work in Section
1 should have been prepared before
commencing any part—this would
have required at least four months.
In view of the situation in Prince
Rupert at. the time; a stagnation in
business of all kinds; no payroll of
any extent in tbe city; hundreds of
unemployed men on the streets, it,
appeared to the City Council, and to
me, to be necessary to provide work
for the unemployed citizens at the
earliest possible date and to complete   the  detail   drawings  and   esti-
i Continued on  Page Four)
SMELTER TOWN AT GOOSE BAY
Official of the Granby Company is Now On His Way Here For the Purpose of
Going Into Proposition of Development at Centre Tribtuary
to This City
(Special to The Journal)
VICTORIA, June  3(1.—The Grand
Trunk     Pacific     Steamer        Prince
George left yesterday for Prince Rupert and Stewart.
F. W. Sylvester, of New York,
prominent with the Granby Mining
and Smelting Company, of Grand
Forks, and wife are among the passengers. Mr. Sylvester goes north
to complete arrangements for construction of the company's extensive
j docks and smelter at Goose Bay
which are to cost $2,.1000,000. Mr.
Sylvester stated that the plant will
handle 100,000 tons of copper ore
per month, when in full operation.
A townsite proposition is included
in the plans and a town of 2,500
people has been prejected for the
employees and business interests
that will be bzrought in as a result
of the investment.
Mr.  McDonald,  the local  manager
at Goose Bay, was here yesterday.
He has left for the mine, taking a
large force of men with him to push
development work on the property.
The announcement with respect to
the mine and smelter is good news
to Prince Rupert. It means the
building up of a centre with a large
payroll within easy reach of the city.
Prince Rupert will naturally be the
base of supply for the Goose Bay
district especially when the road Is
completed through.
MINORITY MEMBERS
It is Suggested That Liberal Government
Will Introdhce Principle to Get
Seat in Toronto
Sir    Richard    Cartwright    Suggests
That Conservatives Would Gain
in St. John, N. »., by This
(Special to The Journal)
TORONTO, June 30.—In a speech
before the Liberal Club Sir Richard
Cartwright intimated that under the
redistribution act to be introduced
by the government after the census,
minority representation may be introduced in order that the Liberals
can secure representation in Toronto. He claims the Conservatives
would benefit as a result in St.
John, N. B.', so that the matter
would be evened up.
FULL  DAY'S  SPORT
Tomorrow the Citizens  Will Celebrate
Birth of Dominion in Royal
Fashion
Preparations Made for a Aery Com-
plete Programme on Water
and on Land
The committee in charge of the
sports tomorrow have1 arranged for a
very complete day's enjoyment. The
forenoon will be devoted to aquatic
races, leaving the afternoon clear
for field sports.
In order "to properly provide for
the public a grand stand has been
erected at the corner of McBride
street  and  Sixth  avenue,  where  the
WARMLY WELCOMEDjINSPECTION TOUR
R. L. Borden Says No Arguments Can Be
Put Up to Warrant Reciprocity
Carrying
Party of Officials Left Today for Trip
Along the Route of
Railway.
He Can See No Relief for Fanners
from Interlocking Tuiiffs
of Countries
(   Special to The Journal)
LLOYDMINSTER, Sask., June 30.
—R. L. Borden and party were
warmly welcomed here yesterday.
"In my opinion," Mr. Borden said,
"there never has been an argument
forthy of the name, even on the
economic side, put up to support the
reciprocity  pact."
The blow proposed by the treaty
you do not thoroughly understand
perhaps. Although I do not fear for
the loyalty of the Canadian people,
I say if they once get to understand
the probable effect of the pact they
will not stampt it with the sign of
approval at the polls.
He held up to ridicule the claim
that relief for 'the farmers would be
had by Interlocking the tariff of
Canada with" that of the United
States, a country with such high
walls around it and which was the
home of trusts and combines.
-o-
S.AFI-: DEPOSIT BOXES
The     Continental     Trust     Company
Has  Now Equipped  Its Office
in This Line
(Continued on Page Five.)
G.T.P. FORWARDS
CASH FOR ITS TAXES
The Sum of $30,000 to Cover the Taxation on Railway
Property for This Year and Last Has Been
Forwarded to the Council From
Montreal on Compliance
With Agreement.
Will Close Tomorrow
J. E.  Merryfield  wishes to inform
his customers that his store will  be i
closed   tomorrow.     They  should   all
attend to their purchasing tonight.
 o	
Mrs. Downing, of Vancouver, is
visiting her brother, Aid, J. II. Hilditch.
The city has received from the
Grand Trunk Pacific the sum of
{80,000 in payment of the taxes
upon the railway lands in Prince
Rupert, in accordance with the
agreement reached between the officials of the company and ihe city a
few weeks ago. The sum covers the
amount due for last year and this
year.
The city will accept the    amount
conditional  upon  the  ratification  ofj
ihe agreement by the ratepayers and
the government.
The tendering of the sum is an
evidence that the company is ready
to live up to the agreement lo the
fullest extent. Before Charles M.
Hays left the city he said he would
at once on realu;ing Montreal have
the money forwarded. There has
been no delay em the pari of the
company.
In other respects la company is
showing Its readiness te> live- up to
the agreement entered Into with the
city. There Is a force of men already
at work under J. II. Plllsbury, the
engineer in charge locally of the
work In connection with the shipbuilding yards and floating docks,
The men are making a careful test
of the waterfront at Hays Cove and
vicinity, ascertaining the depth eel'
water and silt before bedrock Is
reached, so as to have information
relative to getting the piles put in
for the works that arc to be erected
there.
The intention of the council is to
have the vole upon the Grand Trunk
Pacific agreement, brought on very
quickly. There is a general sentiment ihroughoiii ihe- city that the
matter should be> decided quickly,
the result of such n course being tee
the advantage of the place,
The Continental Trust Company,
which has been open for business
for some time, has this week
equipped its office with an up-to-
date deposit vault which gives it
special advantages In this line of
business. ,
The vault Is built on a solid rock
foundation and is made absolutely
fireproof. Boxes of various sizes
can be rented by private parties and
absolute safely assured. The boxes
vary from five inches by ten Inches
to two Inches by five Inches, so that
all classes trade can be accommodated.
The company has now its office
ai Kitselas in full running order ami
is prepared to elee business with all
Interior customers,
— o—
MAS   LARGH  SI ITI.IKS
Westliolme   Lumber   Company   Prepared io Handle all Classes
e>r Trade
Mr. Allien, tlie- len-.-el malinger of
the Westholme Lumber Company,
has returned from a trip to southern
British Columbia cities, lie- is prepared to make further extensions In
connection with the- business here.,
as may be seen from his advertisement on another page.
A large consignment of German
Alse-n cement has been secured and
is being offered to builders on good
terms.
in addition to other classes of
ijuilillng material the company has
arranged for a heavy supply eif lum-[
her with which te> meet tlie. growing
demands and are offering the lumber at low rales.
Mr. Albert returns tee Prince Unpen with the highe-st hopes for the i
future of It. He- expects to sec a I
decided move- in the city within the
next few months. With prices bucIi
as are being quoted iiiieui propertj
in Vancouver and Victoria, the rates
irevalllng here are low and the In-
e-estlng public will assuredly take
advantage of the opportunities.
Mi*. Schreiber, tbe Dominion Government Engineer Reached City
Vesterdny and Left Today
Early this morning u party of of-
ticials of the Grand Trunk Pacific
and of the government left by special train for an Inspection of the
route of the railway as far as it is
laid and along the portion now under construction.     It  is  made  up  of
B. B. Kelliher, chief engineer of the
Grand Trunk Pacific, and C. C. Van
Arsdol. divisional engineer, Collingwood Schreiber, the Dominion Government engineer, and J. \V. Stewart,  of  the  contracting    firm.     W.
C. C. Mehan, general superintendent,
accompanied the party to the end of
the steel. The party will proceed to
Aldermere. all of which is under
contract.
Mr. Schreiber reacheil the city yesterday where the remandeir of the
party has been awaiting his arrival
for several days. The government
engineer explains that his delay was
consequent upon the taking off of
the Prince Rupert, which he had expected to come by. He will, on his
way back, ins-feet the eastern parts
of the road.
Notwithstanding thai Mr. Schreiber is of the advanced age eif eighty
years, he is as mentally and physically active, If not more so, than
was the case many years ago. Mr.
Schreiber stuteel that he- fell Just as
young as he did at the age of tuny,
line- entirely to keeping hard al work
ami keeping his mind occupied. He
Is nol troubled with Indigestion, and
is aide to eat anything al any hour
and   lee enjoy  It,
Mr, Schreiber came ffom England
in 1852 to assist in the building of
a railway between Toronto and
Hamilton. Later he was for many
years chief engli r of the- Intercolonial (tallway, extending from Point
Levis, opposite Quebec, to Halifax,
and directed its entire construction.
Subsequently he was depfity minister
ni railways anil government chief engineer Of the t'eeiiailiiiii Pacific Kail-
way, his chief lee-iieg Sir Charles Tupper.       He-   lleee-s   nOl    lie-lie",.-      In    BttJ
ii.vi-il em.- Umll  tier retirement.
 o	
INSPECTING FISHERIES
lic'iuii  Cotumlssloiicr for tlie  Province   Is   on   Official   Visit    lee
llu-  Northern Canneries
There is in the- <-it>- al iire-se-ni 11 ,\
Melntyre, deputy commissioner ol
fisheries for the province with headquarters in Victoria, He- Is accompanied bj .Mrs. Melntyre, The- visit
is the- tlrsl official one which the
new head of the department has
made to Hie- north since assuming
office.
He- hie- visited the Rivers inlet
canneries and those of the Skeena
and will await the first steamer
south.
The preparations are all tor a
large catch, Mr, Melntyre says. The
run fluctuates, however, and while
i few days ago there were large
ate lies there has later been a falling
off and the last Few days were
lighter.
There are ee number of details
which Mr. Melntyre Is taking up
■vith lines.' concerned on thli efficial
Istl PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 30, 1911
*
*
*
*
***********************************************
AMONG THE MINES     I
*
*
i....*********************************************
ANOTHER RECORD BROKEN
Nickel Plate Ore Production for May
Has Beaten That of Any Oilier
Month in History of Mine
The month of May has been the
biggest month in the history of the
Nickel Plate Mine, at Hedley, B. C,
in o'ure tonnage and in every other
way including e-loseness of extraction, showing that the new plant is
meeting all expectations held out for
it.
May, of course, is a favorable
monih for purposes of comparison
for in that month there is abundance
of water to run everything and the
plant is therefore in position to run
with the maximum of economy so
far as working expenses are concerned. The following figures show
the tonnage mined and treated in
the month of May of the last three
years:
1909 1910 1911
3,831 tons 4,305 tons 5,095 tons
Thus it is seen that the tonnage
has eceexded that of the past man
agement hy 1,204 tons for the
month, but the increase in the ton
nage is only a small part of what
has been accomplished, for the extraction has been much higher than
ever before.
Of course the new plant has been
responsible for a certain amount of
this improvement but not altogether
for it will be seen that even in 1910
when no change had been made in
the plant from that in use in 1909
the tonnage treated exceeded that of
1909 by 474 tons.
The increase in the tonnage of ore
treated has not been the result of
any addition to the crushing capacity
for the number of stamps now at
work is exactly the same as that
used when the mill first started up
seven years ago.
Another important feature which
should not be lost sight of which
makes the present showing even better in comparison than would appear from first sight, is that heretofore the operations were confined
wholly to extraction of ore and no
care was taken to keep development
work ahead. Now, however, this is
altogether different and development,
work is going steadily forward, the
cost being charged up to operating
expenses and still the monthly profit
is much higher than when they
were merely picking the eyes out of
the mine in their inordinate greed
for dividends.
in the ,past few years, but none was
on the books of the recorder's office.
The sample was examined by many
who pronounce it of the same formation and character as the other
quartz found in this district, and not
different In any way, except that it
carries a great deal more gold than
any  yet  shown.
The news of the rock in the dead
man's pocket leaked out, and many
culled at the marshal's office to see
and eaminex it. Many, as soon as
they had one good look at the sample from the unknown ledge, immediately made arrangements to be
absent from town for a few days,
and started for the hills in the vicinity of Mile 21.
There is not a shred of evidence
in any way in the dead man's effects
to give one clew as to where the
piece of rock came from; just the
mute evidence of the fact that somewhere in the hils back of Trail lake
there is a ledge that, if one could
only follow the dead man's footsteps ,his cares, like the cares of
the man in whose pocket the sample
was found would be over for all
time. As soon as the snow is off
the hills sufficiently to allow intelligent prospecting, there will be many
in the hills around Mile 21.
 o	
IX IDITAROD
ALBERTA'S CROPS
Large Increase in the Area Under Cultivation This Year is Shown by
Govetnment Records.
Guggenheims Are Reported to Have
Purchased Claims There to
Install Dredges
All of Flat creek, in the Iditarod
district of Alaska, one of that district's two best producing creeks,
has been purchased by the Guggenheims and will hereafter be worked
by that syndicate instead of by individuals as formerly. In fact, there
will be practically nothing done on
that creek this year or until dredges
are installed.
With   tlie   Present   Conditions,   the
Vield in Province Will Be
Exceptionally Great
PECOWAH   LEAD
Nuggets   Pound   on   Body  of   Miner
During  Inquest and Search
for Ledge l-'ollows
In tlie history of the mining
world iher have been all kinds of
strikes made and all kinds of stampedes started, says a correspondent
writing from Seward, Alaska. Mines
have been discovered by burros, and
mines have been found by jack rabbits, and, in fact, it is a pretty hard
proposition to find anything that is
connected with a miner's life that
has not at some time or another
either found a mine or created a
stampede.
The strangest stampede that was
ever started in Alaska, it is believed,
was started hy a dead man, and the
information that led to the stampede consists of a small piece of
quartz that was found in ihe dead
man's pocket, and right there the information stops, pinches out, plows
up and  is no more.
A miner named While recently
telegraphed in lo the marshal stating that a dead man had been picked
up on Hie railroad track at about
mib' 21 on the Alaska' Northern
Haelway line, and asking for instructions. The marshal hastily stim-
niiiiieil a coroner's jury anil took the
railroad auto feu- the scene of the
death. The man was there as per
Instructions, anil the coroner's inquest was held.
No marks of violence were found
on the body, which was that of an
<eld man, and subsequent investigation has proved that his name was
Frank Crimean. Gruneau was a
prospector, living in a cabin on Trail
lake and spending his time in the
hills. He was an old man and of
Russian descent, He had no Intimate friends, and none knew him
well.
Upon going through his pockets
a small sample of eiuartz was found
that i3 just literally shot full of gold.
The gold is there in lumps as big as
a grain of coffee, and runs all
through   the  sample.
On the jury wer several miners.
and as soon as they saw the sample they became Interested. They
started to look up any locations
that had been made by the dead man
Harry Bordman, electrician for
A. N. C. Treadgold, arrived on the
Dawson, having stopped off on his
way out from Dawson and visited
tbe new placer strike on Nansen
creek, sixty miles back from Car-
macks, says the White Horse Star.
Of the new discovery, Mr. Bordman
says:
"The strike is certainly the best
in Yukon for several years. About
a dozen claims, from 5 below to 7
[above discovery, show good pay, the
average yield being two cents to the
pan which makes slightly qver 25
cents to the bucket. Bedrock is an
average of 50 feet deep and the
ground  is mostly frozen.
"Tom Bee, who owns discovery
claim, is taking out $25 per day to
the man and will have a good cleanup. Work is being done on several
other claims but mostly in the way
of development. Bedrock has only
been struck in a few places but pay
has been found wherever it has been
struck. In my opinion the creek
will prove a big proposition."
NANSEN GREEK
Several  Claims  Prospected    at
New Camps, Give Goo<l
Results
the
DAILY SERVICE
After July 1 the most importaent
towns along the Grand Trunk Pacific west o fEdmonton will have a
daily mail service instead of the triweekly service which has been in
operation since the tri-weekly local
service was put on the line to Edson. The new service has been authorized by the post office department at Ottawa. It will give a daily
mall to Wabaniun, Kntwistle, Wolfe
Creek to Edson or Heatherwood as
the first divisional point of the
Grand Trunk Pacific is called by the
post office department.
 o	
A  Natural  Conclusion
Millionaire (to raggeel beggar) —
You ask alms and do not even take
your hat off. Is that the proper way
to beg?
Beggar—Pardon me, sir. A policeman is lookin gat us from across
the street. If 1 take my hat off
he'll arrest me for begging, as It Is,
he naturally takes us for old friends.
Easy
"Oh, yes," Mrs. Smith told us,
"myp husband is an enthusiastic
archaeologist. And I never knew it
until yesterday. I found in his desk
some queer-looking tickets with the
inscription, 'Mudhorse, 8 to 1.' And
when I asked him what they were,
he explained to me that they were
relics of a lost race. Isn't it interesting?"
Crop reports which have Just been
completed by the Inspectors of the
provincial department of agriculture
in Alberta indicate that the total
area of land under cultivation this
year, and seeded to wheat, oats and
other cereal crops, is no less than
1,900,000 acres, representing an in
crease of over 70 per cent as compared with last year's total of
1,193,264 acres. The Increase for
1911 is approximately 700,000 acres.
The figures are as yet but approxi
mate, and it is possible that the
crop area may be considerably larger
even than the reports indicate.
The department has had in the
field 1,000 men who have now com
pleted their returns from the various
portions of the province, and the
statistics which were received by
George Harcourt, deputy minister of
agriculture this morning, show the
above total. At noon today the
analysis of the figures had not been
completed, and it was not possible
to determine the relative areas sown
to various crops, but the reports are
almost uniformly excellent, and
make it clear that not in the history
of the Canadian Northwest has so
remarkable an increase taken place
In a period of twelve months. In
one or two Isolated cases, districts
which are very circumscribed in extent, have failed to benefit from the
almost universal rains, but these are
very few, and taking the province as
a whole, there has been no former
year during which the outlook has
been so bright.
The increase in crop area is but
a very meagre indication of the increase which is likely to be seen in
the yield in cereal and other crops.
Last year's failure in the south
through lack of rain, and the fact
that nowhere except in the Edmonton district were the season's crops
up to the normal level, coupled with
the unusually propitious character of
the present season, go to show that
yhile the actual area under cultivation is greater by 70 per cent in
1911 than it was in 1910 the actual
harvest will be very much greater
than 100 per cent.
How great this increase will be
has not yet been determined, but
within the next couple of weeks the
department of agriculture will have
received additional reports, from
which may be formed an estimate of
the probable harvest. From the informal reports which have been received, and from a general knowledge of the conditions prevailing
throughout Alberta, it is safe to
predict that the increase will be
enormous. The total yield of grain
in 1910 for the province of Alberta
was 22,027,184, of whifih 5,697,950
was In spring wheat, 2,206,564 in
winter wheat, 12,158,530 in oats and
1,889,509 In barley, while the remainder was in flax, rye and speltz.
Previous to 1911, 1909 was the record crop year of the province. The
total cro parea in 1909 was 1,242,-
644, end the total yield of various
grains,  36,761,493.
 o ■	
DEATH OF DR.  ELLS
her out of that port. The Starr has
been laid up for over a year. The
vessel was built in Seattle in 1879
by J. F. T. Mitchell. She was
launched on August 12, the same
year and began her trial trip on
August 14, in command of Gaptain
Charles Clancy. She Is copper bottomed and her hull and timbers are
in excellent condition and contain
more years of service despite the
thirty years already to her credit.
At the time of the great Klondike
rush the Starr made several trips to
Skagway, crowded with freight and
passengers. The trip Is one of the
most remarkable ever undertaken by
a vessel of her class.
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable Waters Protection Act,"
R. S. O, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. O, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General In
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the Issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for Part (N. 25
Acres) of the S. E. part of Section
16, Township 1, Range 5, Coast District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned lands In the name of
John Flewin, which Certificate was
issued on the 21st day of November,
1906, and is numbered 284.
WILLIAM E. BURRITT,
Dist. Regr.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May  6th,   1911. 5-9-6-2
PUBLIC SERVICE ACT.
Prominent  Geologist  and   Authority
on  Mineral  Resources Passes
Away  nt  Ottawa
By the death of Dr. Robert Whee-
loe-k Ells at Ottawa last week after
a short Illness, Canada has lost one
of her greatest geologists. The
late Dr. Ells was born at Cornwallis,
N. S., on July 20, 1845. His ancestors were United Empire Loyalists,
who came to Nova Scotia In 1761.
He joined the staff of the Canadian
geological survey In 1872 and was
active In that service ever since. He
was a fellow of the Royal Society of
Canada and a fellow of the American Geological Society. He was
elected president of the Ottawa
Literary and Science Society in 1895
and has published various reports on
geology and mineral resources In
the different provinces of Canada,
including the Queen Charlotte Islands.
SIDE-WHEELER  SOLD
The historic old steamboat George
E. Starr, the only side-wheel passenger vessel on Puget Sound and
one of the oldest vessels in these
waters, is to be placed under the
British flag, according to her owners, who announce that she Is to be
sold to Vancouver parties who will
place her in commission and operate
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks,
and Stenographers will be held at
the following places, commencing on
Monday the 3rd July next:—Armstrong, Chilllwack, Cumberland,
Golden, Grand Forks, Kamloops,
Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Vancouver, Peachland, Revelstoke,
Rossland, Salmon Arm, Summer-
land, Vancouver, Vernon and Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and
30, if for Third-class Clerks; and
between 16 and 21, if for Junior
Clerks or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further information, together
with application forms, may be obtained from the undersigned.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Public Service.
Victoria, B. C, 27th April, 1911.
4-27—-6-15. .
NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation was approved by the Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing
the minimum sale prices of first and
second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre respectively.
This regulation further provided
that the prices fixed therein should
apply to all lands with respect teo
which the applications to purchase
were given favourable consideration
after the date of said regulation
namely, April 3, 1911.
Further notice Is now given that
by virtue of a regulation approved by
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
on the 10 th of May, 1911, that the
regulation dated 3rd April, 1911, be
held not to apply to applications to
purchase vacant Crown Iands which
were received by the Assistant Commissioners of Lands on or before the
said April 3rd, 1911, and with respect to which tbe required deposit
of wfty cents per acre had been received by said Commossioners on or
before the said April 3rd, 1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, 16th of May, 1911.
5-23—lmo
WATER  NOTICE
TRUST  COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined In the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," Is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of Its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided In
section 4 of said Act.
W. U. RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
,   ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published In the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of LandB.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25£h of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse In the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water Is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and Is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Klrkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W.  SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May, 1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.; V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; tlience west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that. Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or -ess to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE  xtUPERT  SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.ains in a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
3 2598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post, planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land  District—Dislrict
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northea-.t corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencomont.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 ohains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GILI INGHAM
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Klrkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
or less.
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE' that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles In a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following shore in an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Rudge, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man. \
Friday, June 30, 1911
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
CANADIANS' CHANCES
While This Country Offers Good Opportunities to Britishers There is
Reciprocal Openings.
The Mother Land  Seems to Afford
an Open Door to Those Who
Go from This Country
.items on the programme, viz., i'aster
! and cheaper steamship and cable
communication between the principal ports of the empire. Anyhow,
the feeling is in the air that this
Imperial Conference will be less
barren of good political results than
its predecessor. However, it may
disappoint political enthusiasts on
either side.
 o	
NEW  OFFICERS
The past few weeks in London
have been notable for the number of
social functions at which Canadians
have been among those lionized.
Those who attach little importance
to such a fact may be reminded that
the undoubted fact of Canadians
now occupying a social position—
which so far as visitors from the
North American continent go—was
not so very long ago monopolized by
Americans, is a valuable educational
factor which extends its influence
Into important financial centres. It
is from a large section of which is
called "society" that the money emanates which prompts activity on the
stock exchange.
In social circles now Canada and
strictly Canadian enterprises are not
so often confused with the United
States and Americans. The bulk of
the small investors, of the clergy
and the spinster aunt type still
largely take their cue from the
names in a directorate of a Canadian
company which are known to them;
and it is all to the good that such
families as the Middlestons and the
Lyttletons and other names reputably known to the peerage and
"Who's Who" brokers of Al standing, like Mullens and law firms hitherto mostly concerned with gilt-edge
Britisii or foreign securities, are
now, as you have doubtless seen,
treating Canadian issues (where
vouched for by the Canadian banks
o ftheir affiliations) with less disdain; the amount of money which
follows the cue of such firms has astonished men like Max Aitken, J. N.
Greenshields and others who have
been interviewed recently either in
London or in Montreal, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Ottawa and Vancouver.
Again, such a man as Sir William
Mackenzie, for instance, would not
have put off his return to Canada
merely for the pleasure of attending
court and social functions. Financial enterprises are propagated not
only in the city, but also in the
West End. The increasing number
of visits paid to Canada with the
purpose of looking into the prospects for investment on the spot are
largely due to invitations given in
the course of those social intimacies
with select circles into which an increasing number of Canadians are
obtaining  the entree.
By the way, on the day of the
much-talked of Hamar Greenwood
wedding, a traveled and wealthy
Canadian had an interesting conversation with a similar type of Englishman who chaffingly said:
"You talk a lot about the opportunities for Englishmen in Canada,
but what about the opportunities for
Canadians in England?" going on to
instance the remarkable careers of
a few of the Canadian born who are
making the metropolis of the empire more or less their headquarters
and are prominent either in politics,
at the bar, or in the city, and also
in social circles. Neither did he stop
there, but with Sir Thomas Tait and
Sir Percy Girouard as his first examples he was able to speak of the
opportunities which the connection
with the old country afforded In
other portions of the empire for
civil servants and others, as well as
in the army and navy. More than
one London Journal has been asking
for a list with photographs of notable Canadians of this type, and if
you will look through your Canadian
"Who's Who" and the army, navy
and civil service official guides you
may be surprised at the string of
names that can be produced to justify the text of what was a very Interesting and instructive conversation regarding the extent of the
ramifications which unite the social
as well as the business or professional life of the different nationalities
which make up the empire. This
applies particularly as regards Canada and Britain, no doubt mainly
owing to their greater geographical
proximity. The very anxiety for
faster steamship services, trans-
Atlantic and trans-Pacific, cheaper
cable rates and more Intimate Journalistic relations are all evidences of
the growing desire to get "closer together," a feeling which is limited
to no political section, and involves
no political prejudices.
Probably the result will be that
even the party now In office which
contains so many who object to all
kinds of subsidies on economic
grounds may be found amenable to
the necessary extent to secure the
promotion of at least two prominent
Odd   Fellows   Held   Very   Successful
Gathering at Cranbrook—Next
Provincial Lodge at Victoria
The sessions of the Provincial
Grand Lodge I. 0. 0. F. were held
in Cranbrook this year, the members
were exceedingly well entertained
by that city. W. H. Cullin, who
has been honored with election as
grand master for the ensiling annual
term, brought back with him to Victoria as a significant souvenir of the
occasion to be treasured hereafter, a
massive golden key, suitably engraved and emblematic of the freedom of the city, presented in behalf
of the citizens by Mayor Hunt of
Cranbrook.
Victoria was chosen as the scene
of the netx annual foregathering of
provincial members of the great order of three links, the date being
fixed as the second Wednesday in
June,   1912.
The newly-elected grand lodge
officers are:
Grand Master—VV. H. Cullin, Victoria.
Deputy Grand Master—VV. S.
Johnson, Vancouver.
Grand Warden—R. Dudley, Fer-
nie.
Grand Secretary—Fred Davey, M.
P.  P., Victoria.
Grand Treasurer—11. White,
Cranbrook.
Supreme Representative—E. G.
Cavalsky, Nanaimo.
Upwards of two hundred and fifty
Odd Fellows and their guests attended the banquet, with which the
business proceedings were pleasantly
terminated.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or lass, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  Feb.  24th,  1911.
COAL MIXES ACT
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE tat J. K. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Comiubu>.lug at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land    District—District    ot
C1 fl *5 fl i 1 T*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6 Vz
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the Junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; th"nce 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
ORATORICAL BILLS
Laughable  Mixing of  Metaphors by
Speakers of Note
The ex-Irish attorney general's
delightfully mixed metaphor at Bottle, about the milk cow which distilled golden sovereigns is another
proof that one should not use a metaphor unless one really means it,
says the Manchester Guardian. The
House of Commons produces a rich
crop of these weeds of oratory.
When Mr. Bryce, our ambassador at
Washington, was Irish secretary, he
amused the house by describing the
Irish local government board as "a
malignant fairy which steps in off
its own bat."
It was an Irish member who after
pointing out that the Irish Land
League was losing public support
and had to practice economy, went
on to say: "But, sir, the well is
running dry, and they think that by
putting in the pruning knife they
can bring more grist to the mill."
Another Irish Unionist described a
concession to the Nationalists as
"the first stitch in the dismemberment of the empire."
Mr. Field, who has something of
a reputation for this sort of thing,
once said: "The right honorable
gentleman shakes his head—and I
am sorry to hear it," and on another
occasion, speaking of a bill relating
to the shipping of cattle across the
Irish Sea, he begged his fellow members "not to look at the subject from
a live stock point of view."
But even the most practiced
speakers sin in ths way at times.
The present prime minister, usually
counted among the most lucid and
logical of debaters, once affirmed
that "retribution is a thorny subject which requires delicate handling
or It wll ltread on somebody's toes,"
and the leader of the Unionist party
once spoke of "an empty theatre of
unsympathetic auditors."
Even Mr. Gladstone, replying to
an opponent in the house who shook
his head at some statement attributed to him, said: "No, no; it will
not do for the honorable member to
shake his head in the teeth of his
own words."
Lord Curzon, another extremely
lucid speaker, was 'once betrayed
into saying: "Though we are not
yet out of the woods, yet we have a
good ship," and Sir W. Hart Dyke,
in complimenting Mr. Lowther, said
that he "had caught a big fish In his
net—and went to the top of the tree
for it." Lord Middleton, then Mr.
Broderick, informed the house of
Commons, when it was settling down
to discuss the affairs of the army,
that "among the many jarring notes
heard in this house this subject at
least must be regarded as an oasis."
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary ot T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and'
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 cliains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320   acres  more  or  less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G.  S.  Mayer, Agent.
Dated  Feb.  24th,  1911.
j Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKu NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of, the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 64 0 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; tlience northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April  11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast  .
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
VV. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogilvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowing
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated  Dec.  9,  1910.
ihence SO chains North; thence 80
chains West; tlience SO chains
South; thence So chains East to
■o:m of commencement and con-
....ning 640 acres more  3r less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at u post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence '80 chains
North; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and die junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; theuce SO chains
West; thence 80 chains South:
thence 80 chains East to. point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
j Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of th i mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
Nortli; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 chains Soutli; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: )
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 «hains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   Of
f^fl ^5^1 fl. i*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6-,4
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence SO
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; tbence 80 chains
North; thence SO chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or Igss
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  Oth,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thr.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena , Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. ullllng-
ham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence SO chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
soutli from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dlst..,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 2 5 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
30 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Ageflt.
Dated June  14,  1911. 6-23
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  *th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 040 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N". E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas.  J.  Gillingham's S.  E.  Corner:
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1309," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. O,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-In-tsiia Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skuudale
Lake into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water ap-
plied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
fe) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
j water  Is  to    be     used -Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
ihe land Intended to be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I)    If the water Is to be used for
j power  or  mining  purposes,  describe
the place where the water Is to be
I returned   to  some   natural   channel,
land  the difference  In  altitude    between   point  of  diversion   and   point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crow-n land Intended to be occupied hy the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on tbe 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands arc
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.   Address)   Massee,   B,   C.
NOTE.—One cubic 1001 p<;r scc-
ond is equivalent to 36.71 miner's
inches.
Skeena Land District—District of
Oueen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley .Mayer, of Masset, B. C., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 011 the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; tlience east 80
ehains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 4 0 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C., occupation married,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
oast of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence touth 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east SO chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeent, LaLd District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOT ICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C, occupation spinster,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a pqst planted about 40 cliains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
SO chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; Ihence north SO ehains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrlck
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase Ihe following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P, Right-of-way; thence weBt
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; tlience east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence nortli
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FKEADRICK  MADDEN.
Thos. L.  Pay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
NOTICE.
A book is kept In the City Clerk's
Office In which to enter the namee
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
Agency
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies and  Individuals.     Business  strictly  confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
Job   Printing  of  all   kinds   neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
If you want the honey
That  comes  from  the  hive
Take up the phone und
Cull one, double five. '
PRINCE RI'PERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 30, 1911
prince lUipcrt journal   engineer's defense
Telephone 1.18
i
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising    rates    furnished    on;
application.
O. II. NELSON,
Editor.
I Continued from Page One)
Friday, June 30,  loll
PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES
Century old Document Dealing with
Early Dritlsh Columbia Added
lee Governmenl Collection
Through the courtesy of Dr. Samuel A. Green, librarian of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Ihe pro-
vim ial archives department has recently been placed in possession of
a copy of an Important diary—it
might almost be termed a state paper- -by John Hosklns, who came to
the Pacific Coast of America on the
good ship Columbia Rediviva in the
year.- 1790, 1701 and 1703. The
document is entitled "The Narrative
of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast
of America and China on Trade and
Discoveries, by John Hosklns: Performed In the ship Columbia Rediviva;   1790,  1791  and  1793."
This century old document is of
very deep interest to students of the
early history of British Columbia
hy reason of the fact that Hosklns
served under Captains Gray and
Kendrick, the first named of whom
was the discoverer of the Columbia
River, and for the latter of whom it
is claimed by a considerable number
of American historians that he was
the first to circumnavigate Vancouver Island, and thus to establish its
insularity. Many interesting details
are given of the fur trade at that
time, especially as it was conducted
by the Boston traders, who were
among the first to take advantage of
the lucrative traffic In the peltries
of the sea otter In Ihis, as it was
then, far-away region of the western
wilderness.
' To historians the Hosklns diary
is of especial interest because this
journal does not in any way support
the claim advanced by certain American historians that John Kendrick,
as stated by Lieutenant Meares, of
Nootka fame, sailed through the intricate channels which separate Vancouver Island from the continental
mainland, This paper in conjunction with the journal of Captain In-
graham, of ihe brig Hope, neither
Of which documents has ever been
published, affords very considerable
evidence of negative' character in
respect to the much disputed point
of priority in discovery of Vancouver
Island's   insularity.
The archives department has also
been fortunate recently in receiving
through the kindness of Rev. Canon
Good, for many years n prominent
resident of this province', an Interesting manuscrlpl history of tlie
Church of England missions and
missionaries In British Columbia
with many interesting details of
facts concerning men and conditions
in ih.- very early days of this province,
FIRST PROSECUTION
VANCOUVER Tlie' first prosecution under the new Companies' Act,
which was launched in the police
court, resulted in three directors being fined e'ae-li $ln and costs. The
charge was brought by Mr. \V, M.
McKay, (en behalf of the attorney-
general agalnsl the Steamboat Central Mines, Limited, li was that
this company had failed to file Its
prospectus with the Registrar of
Joint sieee-k Companies In Victoria
before issuing ii to the public, The
charge   was  laid   under  section   so,
sub-see lieell    .".    elf   I III.    British    ('llllllll-
leiee Companies' Act. Mr. J. A. Harvey, K. ('., appeared for Ihe company and entered a plea of guilty.
He said the directors had simply followed Ihe "lei rule', ami as they bad
not consulted a solicitor, they did
nol know of the requirements of the
new act, The magistrate said the
provision was a salutary one. The
aet allowed him to impose a fine of
$2." for every day thai had elapsed
since the prospectus was issued, in
this case, however, he would simply
impose a fine of $10 and e-osls on
the directors of the company. The
directors are F. L. Stevens. A. E.
Jacks ami Alexander Smith,
Test   Supreme
Host — Well, Jones, leave you
looked over my new dining-room'.'
Jones—Oh. yes; very carefully.
Ilosi     How do you like- i' ?
Jones Ah! I'll tell yen, thai better after  dinner!
mates as soon as possible. Any other
course would have been condemned
hy the public generally.
The proposition to make the excavation with a steam shovel, to
crush the rock and to roll it down to
form macadam roads could not possibly have been carried out. It is
necessary to gel the rough grading
completed first and then proceed
witli the road making. None of tho
practical men who were in the
council suggested ihis method, and
none of the experienced contractors
who have been engaged on the work
have Been fit to make use of a steam
shovel.
li has been clearly shown to the
council that the Engineering Department is not in any manner responsible for what is termed the
"mlxup"  in  the McMordie contracts.
The changes in the grades established hy the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway Company were made on a
petition eif the ratepayers, recom-
mended by the engineer and adopted
by the council after due consideration. Tlie city engineer could not be
in any way whatsoever responsible
for grades which had been determined and dstablished by statute of
the Provincial Legislature before his
appointment.
Section 7c
The question of retaining walls
was discussed hy the council and on
account of the enormous cost of the
grading it was decided not to increase it by the cost of walls, it being presumed that, in most cases,
the walls would be constructed by
the owners of the property on the
curb line, so as to provide an area
for coal chutes and for storage
purposes.
Sections  7d  and  7e
It was necessary to construct temporary culverts in places because
proper materials could not be obtained.
In the case of the Fifth street culvert, since it is proposed to drain
Fulton street, to the northwest across
Second avenue there will be only
one-half arre to be drained so that
a cast iron pipe can be placed inside the wooden box, but it is not
likely that even that will be necessary, for the broken stone which
forms the embankment could not
hold back the water.
Section 7f
In the construction of the Eighth
street sewer it was decided to place
the work in charge of any experienced sewer foreman who bad been
working on the Government sewer
contract under S. P. McMordie.
Many difficulties occurred which It
was not possible to foresee and It Is
by no means certain the work
would have been done more cheaply
by the City.
Section 7g
The lenders of the Engineering
Department have in most cases been
well below the highest tender and
have been carefully prepared, conservative tenders.
Section  Tli
In the case of the Electric Light
plant, tlie plant proposed was to be
of tliree units, aggregating 450 K.W.
The first unit installed, on account
of Hie urge-in need of street lights,
was composed of machinery which
coii'd be procured near at hand and
quickly installed. When this unit
was Hearing completion, the council
was advised by myself on the 30th
January last, to postpone the installation of the two remaining units
until a report from an eperxt could
be obtained, as to comparative cost
of different methods of generating
power. Accordingly, only one unit
has been Installed. At the lime the
works were taken from the control
of i In- engineering department some
$36,000.00 had been expended. The
electrical engineer who designed the
plant   is an   engineer     of  experience
and we'll recommended,    bul    as    I
have stilled, the unit we are now using was, on account of the urgency
of ihe ease ,made up of machinery
and appliiini-es which could be ob-
talned on shun notice.
Section   71
With regard to location of electric light Hues on the avenues, the
lanes are used in some instances; In
others where the lanes are not continuous for any distance the avenues
are followed.
In future, when permanent pavements are constructed, the wires
should be laid in shallow conduits,
This will not be possible on the lanes
because il will be many years before
the lanes are reduced to grade. So
far as danger from the wires is concerned, the streets and avenues have'
the advantage; for the high tension
wires, If on the lanes must be within two or three feet of the property
line and the buildings and will certainly he a source of danger to the
buildings  and   to  firemen   who  may
require to erect ladders when figl t-
ing fires from the lanes.
Section 7,j
With regard to the waterworks
report. As the published reports
show, the preliminary work in connection with the power proposition
was done on my recommendation,
the report itself intimates that a
subsequent report will follow, as tlie
water power was not owned by the
City the Information regarding its
extent and value could hot be made
public, The Waterworks Committee
were, however, acquainted with the
tacts.
Section 7k
The substructure of trestles on
certain streets could not have been
saved without closing the street for
traffic, which was oul of the question.
Section 71
In the grading of the streets the
muskeg has been disposed of in such
a way that it will eventually disappear in the interstices in the rocks
and occupy no space in the embankment. Rock will, in every case, be
placed next to the property line and
will cover the muskeg in the interior
of the embankment. The grade in
the places mentioned in the report
has not been finished and cannot be
until rock excavation is reached.
Yours respectfully,
WM. MAHLON DAVIS,
City Engineer.
Correspondence
To Editor of Journal:
Dear Sir—On behalf of the Baptist Brotherhood, who are entering
n number of contestants in the coming Dominion Day races, I wish to
make public announcement that all
the Brotherhood athletes are amateurs and wish to remain so, and
further that they enter these races
with the intention of competing with
amateurs only.
I believe it is the intention of the
Sports Committee to keep these
races amateur as far as possible and
should any professionals race it is
without the knowledge of the Brotherhood.
As there is no Athletic Association
yet formed in the city to give jurisdiction over amateur and professional sports, the Brotherhood takes
this means of making known their
stand towards athletics so that In
niiy future rulings they will not be
classed as profesionals through having competed with professionals.
The stand for clear amateur athletics is very strong among the
young men of the city as evidenced
by the number who will display the
white "B" on a green shield, the
Brotherhood colours.
Thanking you for your hearty cooperation and publicity given this
announcement,
On behalf of the Brotherhood,
HARRISON W. ROGERS,
President.
■»■»♦♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Jaegers
Pure Wool
Clothing and
Bedding
Wool is I lie most equable
clothing. Being a bud heal
conductor,   wool   does  not   feel
hot in a high temperature,
nor coin In a low. The general
belief Hun roollen clothing is
peculiarly wami and enervating is entirely wrong. Wool
protects against bent us iiiih-Ii
us agalnsl cold and by its bail
lie-iil-ciiiiiliiilivity lessens tile
effect of sudden changes of
temperature, thus hardening
Instead of enervating; I. C.,
rendering the body Indifferent
to such changes.
The Jaeger name mid Trade
.Mark guarantees Pure Wool in
place of mixtures containing
cotton  or other adulterants.
We have secured the exclusive agency for this celebrated
line and a small consignment
has arrived. More are on the
way and you can order any
special line desired from the
catalogue and price list, which
may lie bad for tho asking.
This catalogue contains much
valuable Information,  (Jet one.
Reduced Charges
W. G. Weston, who has been
awarded the contract for city scavenging, says there is no truth in the
statement that the prices will be
doubled as a result of his taking
over the work; on the contrary, he
is given it at a reduced price. The
ordinary dwelling will, under the
new arrangement, pay about 75
cents  a   month.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy ' Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles In an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. II., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
nortli 40 cliains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Daled June  7,  1911. 6-30
:•>>•:-.:..>•:••:..:«.:■
j. * * * * * * * -?
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also   carry  a  complete *
•:• stock of other                              *
•> *
* *
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
*
£       The best local beer on  the £
S   market. *,
* *
* «:•
! CLARKE BROS.j
.'-.       Christiansen & Brandt Did.      *
* *
* Telephone 30        Third Avenue  *
f I
'> *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * v
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::   PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A.  Bevan, and P.  C.   Williams, Secretary.       :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.     Issues  made on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
IS THE
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
r
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Replenish
the
Pantry
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High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious   Housewife
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■ MERRYFIELD'S i
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CASH GROCERY
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TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JUNE, 1911
SLOAN & CO.
(ii li Street
I'.   «).   BOX  (122
********* + **.
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND   DAY       | Tlme| Ht| Time| Ht |j Time| Ht | Tlme| Ht
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
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Saturday  .
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Friday.    .
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Sunday.   .
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18.0
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2.6
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8.8
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9.2
12:41
5.3
9.1
13:46
6.4
8.4
14:50
7.2
7.2
15:48
7.7
6.0
16:35
7.9
5.0
17:17
8.1
4.1
17:56
8.3
3.5
18:34
S.4
3.1
19:11
8.5
2.9
19:47
8.6
3.0
20:23
8.7
3.2
21:00
8.8
3.7
21:40
8.9
4.3
22:25
9.0
4.9
23:18
9.1
5.7
8.9
12:43
6.4
8.2
13:43
6.9
7.1
14:46
7.1
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7.1
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16:46
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17:39
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18:30
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19:20
6.4
—.2
20:10
6.5
0.1
21:01
6,7
0.9
21:54
7.0
2.1
22:49
7.3
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific  Railway,   Is  one  foot lower.
•' V V V V V V V V V V V V V "J V *** V V V V V v V ••*
STORAGE!
*
Household Goods and Baggage *
given careful attention. .j.
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents *
TRANSFERERS |
Prince     Rupert     Warehousing *
ami   Forwarding  Co. *
First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St. f
*
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,    $
*
Manager. .;.
Phone 202 %
ft*
P. O. Box 007
•{> «j« »£■ »*<«;«»j» »j* »*< •;• »*« »j» *j» •*« •£<■ .*. .j* •*« »*•»*•»** »j< *i- »j» *J»
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice Is hereby given that It Is
my Intention to Issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLUM   E.   BtiRRITT,
Di -rlct  Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C.
May  26,  1911. J23 Friday, June 30,  1911
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD.
****^*^^^****^^*II^^^^****^^^^iWis^iWisssssss^^
Specials
.;. ♦ * * # * # $ <. $ $ $ ,;4 4.»;. 4 .> .j. 4*.;. $ .5..;, .5,♦;« »> .;« <, .*„ $,;,
I All Prices Include |
I Delivery to any I
! Part of the City !
et. m *
FEET BY (l IKEI   AND 2 FEET
BY  (I  FEET <l  INCHES   (EACH)
No. 1 Dry Spruce Rustic, 10 in. per m. -
No. 1 Dry Fir Drop Siding, 6 in. per m. -
First Class Cedar Doors,
Crystal Rock Plaster, per ton
Tacoma Hardwall Plaster, per ton
No. 1 Hard Selected Bricks, per m.
No. 1 Fir Lath, per m.
No. I Shingles, per m. -
$20.00
22.00
1.00
13.00
18.25
24.00
3.00
3.00
******* *************
I      2,500
|   Barrels of    J
Cement
* *
% Just Received f
GERMAN ALSEN CEMENT
Is conceded to be the very best Cement manufactured. It has stood the severest
tests for all cement work. It is known and used all over the world. The most
prominent Architects, Engineers and Contractors use and recommend it. We guarantee this Cement to contain 25 pounds more .net Cement to the barrel than any
other Cement on the market.
Everything
for
Your
Building
PRICE DELIVERED IN ANY QUANTITY, $4.00 PER BARREL
First Avenue     Prince Rupert, B.C.     Phone 186
SPORTS
XAXAIMO  CHAMPIONS
Tbe football match between Na
nalmp United and Ladysmith for
tl)e British Columbia championship,
played on the cricket grounds, at
Vancouver, resulted Xanaimo 4,
Ladysmith 2, thus giving tbe championship of British Columbia to Nanaimo United. The game, which was
well contested, but somewhat rough,
was played before more than two
thousand spectators.
CORINTHIANS COMING
■ The famous Corinthian soccer
team will be at full strength for
their great tour of the Dominion
this fall. England's finest amateur
talent has been secured for this occasion. The following will comprise
the aggregation, including seven
well-known  internationals:
G. G. Newman, goal.
F. N. Tuff, J. E. Snell and W. U.
Tlmmlns (English International),
backs.
M. Morgan Owen (Welsh International), II. G. Howell Jones (Welsh
International), K. G. Thompson, P.
A. Sergeant and II. R. L. Bradell,
hall-backs.
S. II. Day (English International),
C. E. Brisley, B. O. Corbett I English
international), G. C. Vassell (English International), R. C. Maples, H,
C. Bache (Cambridge captain), and
H. L. Bickersteth (Oxford captain),
forwards.
Mr, C. Wreford Brown, president
of the Corinthian Club, will have
charge of the team.
The schedule of games follows:
Aug. o—At Toronto.
Aug.  7.—At Hamilton.
Aug.   9.—At Toronto.
Aug.  12.—At Montreal.
Aug.   14.—At  Cobalt.
Aug.   17.—At   Fort   William.
Aug. 19.—At Winnipeg.
Aug.   21.—At  Regina.
Aug.  24.—At Edmonton.
Aug.  2 6.—At Calgary.
Aug. 29.—At Vancouver, B. C.
Aug.;  31.—At Ladysmith.
Sept. 2.—At Victoria, B. C.
Sept. 4.—At Vancouver, B. C.
Sept.   9.—At  Chicago.
Sept. 12.—At St. Louis.
Sept.  16.—At Philadelphia.
Sept.  18.—At Pawtucket.
Sept. IS.—At Pawtucket, R. I,
Sept.  19.—At New York.
Corinthians will sail home from
New York, September 20.
Bill Hilton, secretary of the Ontario Football Association, states that
the Corinthian Club have got together the finest aggregation of talent that tver left the shores of old
England, and will be a team never
to be forgotten. He calls the famous
amateurs to win every game. The
coming visit is arousing tremendous
enthusiasm throughout the west.
Hamilton and Vancouver will put up
a hard proposition.
Beginning Clearing
W. J. Sanders of Copper City, is
in the city for a few days on business. He has his stumping plant on
the ground and is beginning clearing
operations. With a number of drawbacks to be encountered always at
the start, he has not had an opportunity to fully test the work yet,
but expects to have the equipment in
full working order shortly.
Methodist Church Services
.Morning service at 11 o'clock; sermon subject—"Every Man His Own
House." Sunday School al 2:30.
Evening service at 7:30 o'clock. The
pastor will deliver the first in n series of discourses on "The Way of
Life," the topic being "The Way
Thai Seemed Right." Strangers
Welcome to all services. Mid-week
service on Wednesday evening at S
o'clock, Bible study in Acts of the
Apostles, "Vital Elements in Ihe
Infant Church." Every one is invited.
FULL DAY'S SPORT
(Continued From Page One.)
races and other land events will be
put on.
There has been a very keen competition shown among some of the
dubs in the city and individual athletes so that the sports should exceed In interest any ever held before in Prince Rupert. The sports
commltttee have arrangements well
in hand.
 o	
PR1XCE RUPERT COMING
The Grand Trunk Pacific steamer
Prince Rupert will return to the run
between southern ports and here
next week. She will leave Seattle
on Sunday on her way here, calling
at Victoria and Vancouver and
reaching this port on Wednesday, according to schedule.
When the Prince Rupert again
goes into service she will run right
through to Stewart, making semi-
weekly calls with the Prince George.
This will give a twice a week connection between this port and Stewart by the Grand Trunk Pacific
steamers. The Prince Rupert will
leave here on Thursday mornings
for the northern port, returning Friday morning on  the way soulh.
"Mother,  I  know  of    what
phants 'tusks are made of?"
"What, dear?"
"Why, paper knives."
ele-
mm
S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sails for Vancouver, Victoria and  Seattle
Mondays 8 A.M.
Special over Sunday Excursion to Stewart
"PRINCE GEORGE"
Sails Sundays, 8 A.M.
Reduced Fare SO.."50,  includ    lug Meals and Berth
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson,   Xaus  River,  Masset and
Xiulen  Harbor,  Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island   points,   Saturdays,  1   P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    trains from
Prince   Rupert   Wednesdays  und  Saturdays,  1  P.M.;   returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged \iu all lines
Full Information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P.  Wharf.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Atc
Prince Rupert, B.C.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
II. C. Coast S. S. Service
f
Famous
Princess
Line
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue-
e >    Paints. General Hardware,
''     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
NTOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
.1.   W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON' BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders  promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
HAYXOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
llllel
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
Free Employment
Office
Dll.   IV.   II.   CLAYTON'
DENTIST
Office   In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's   Drug    Store.
Prime Rupert
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE  EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks nnd Walters
j    Corner Eighth and Eraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
J Hoard and lodging. Home cooking
a   specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,   Prop
Rooms, $;l Per Week
Hamblin's Bakery New   Knox   Hotel
Princess May
Monday, July 3, at 9 a.m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
Friday June 16,   at 9 a.m.
J. G. McXAB,
General  Agent.
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in     MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. nnd Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.   Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Ceikes anil Confectionery of nil
kinds
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
For Neat Job Printing
Bee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
V.,
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from G.30 a.m.
to  8   p.m.     Excellent  cuisine;   first-
class service.
Board, SI a Day — Reds, BOc and up
First  Avon.:-    Prince  Rupert PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 30, 1911
THE INVESTITURE OF THE PRINCE OF WALES
■ /BPriigfei^.-^-'
Till: YOUNG  PK1NCE EDWARD, AS A  NAVAL CADET, TAKEN WITH   HIS GRANDFATHER, THE LATE  RING   EDWARD
Never, in nil its history, has gallant little Wales witnessed anything
one-tenth part so imposing as the
maginificent pageanl which the King
has arranged in connection with his
oldest son's investiture ns Prince of
Wales, a ceremony which 1ms not
taken place since Henry VII sat on
the throne, says Penny  Pictorial.
In the King's honor the Home
Fleet will guard Carnarvon Bay,
while the whole of the Welsh Territorial, reinforced by Britisii cavalry,
will be mobilized for the occasion.
The actual ceremony of investiture
will be performed by the King himself (not, as has been erroneously
stated, by Queen Mary, although, of
course, she will be present). Inside
Carnarvon Castle room will be found
for 13,000 leading Welshmen to witness the proceedings, ihe poetry and
mystic symbolism of which are of a
nature to appeal strongly to a Celtic
people.
The precise ritual of the investiture bus not yet been published, but
it ancient precedents are followed
the picturesque ceremony will be approximately 'as   follows:
Wearing a crimson mantle, young
Prince Edward will be formally pre-!
sented before King George, who will
be robed in purple and gold and all
the stately trappings emblematic of
his royal station. With his own
hands the King will place upon
Prince Edward's head a chaplet of
gold, made in tne form of a garland,
as a token of principality. Next the
King will put into the Prince's hand
the sceptre of gold, the emblem of
government. Finally, his Majesty
will   place  a  ring  of  gold   upon  his
firstborn's middle finger, at the
same time adjuring him to be a husband to his country and a father to
its   children.
When the Welsh bishops have led
the Prince of Wales to a species of
throne and seated him upon it with
due solemnity, the investiture proper
will be completed. But there still
remains the picturesque act of the
Prince's  presentation  to  the  people.
Opposite the famous Eleanor Gate
of Carnarvon Castle there is a big
quarry. When cellared and fitted
up with seats this will form a grand
stand to accommodate 50,000 people, all of whom will have a perfect
view of the gate, over which a temporary platform will be constructed.
When a fanfare of trumpets announces that the ceremony Inside
the  castle is concluded,  every neck
will be craned for a good view of
the King and Queen and the young
Prince as they mount to their place
above the gate. From this same
spot, seven centuries ago, King Edward I presented his infant son to
the Welsh people to be their Prince.
There will be a breathless hush
while King George V stands forward
and in ringing tones presents his
own firstborn as Prince of Wales in
the same way.
So long as he lives no Welshman
who witnesses that soul-stirring
spectacle and hears the thundering
echoes of the people's cheering, peal
on peal, is likely to forget It. So
far as the King is concerned, a magnificent banquet will conclude the
proceedings, but for a week thereafter historic Carnarvon and all
Wales will hold high revelry.
INFLUENCE OF CORONATION UPON FASHIONS
So fascinating are the new mate-]
rials and  so charming    ihe    colors j
which will  be worn during the coro-j
nation   season   that   there   is   really
some excuse for this unusual course!
o fproceedlng.    The temptations, In |
fact, which are set before us at the
moment are of the most persuasive
description,   and  there  are  but  few
of us who  would resist  them, even
if we could.    Tailor-made gowns, in
spite of the severe simplicity of their
style, are  quite exceptionally  smart,
with   the   bright   touches   of     color
which are introduced in ihe shape of
narrow   slip-vests,  and   again     very
possibly on the cut's.    There is a curious fascination nlso in the new fabrics chosen for tailor-made cents and
skirts,  notably  in  the  case  of  those
fine whipcords  which  are  useful as
well as decorative, since they resist
the dust in a mosi remarkable fashion, and  at  the same  time success
fully withstand any amount eef rough,
usage', in fact, ihese whipcords will
prove ideal fabrics for smart but
useful tailor-made costumes.
Gowns which are carried out in
fine navy serge coating will remain
still In favor all through the summer months, and will be trimmed
again, as they were last year, with
black silk braids of various widths
On some of the newest of these navy
serge gowns draped sashes of soft
black satin are being introduced
with excellent effect, brought high
under the arms in Empire fashion,
and then tied on the left side in
front with long fringed ends.
Other coats and skirts that ar.e in
summer cloth, chosen in pale colorings, and trimmed with broad bands
of silk and silk-covered buttons in
u darker shade. A smart costume of
this kind in lavenjler cloth has the
broad straps of silk arranged In such
a way that they run horizontally and
form a panel in front of the straight,
narrow skirt. The collar and cuffs
are outlined with bands of silk and
adorned with buttons, while the collar and cuffs are trimmed to correspond, and finished with full dlrec-
toire ruffles composed of finely patterned ivory-white lawn. Quite a
simple hat in black Tagel straw will
be worn with this gown, turned up
sharply at the back, and trimmed
across the front of the brim with a
huge bow of chine brocaded ribbon,
showing a design of lavender-tinted
lilac blossom and pale green foliage
on an ivory-while background, with
a narrow satin stripe in a bright,
shade of cerise to border the ribbon
on either side.
In the same way both the afternoon and Ihe evening blouses have
their special ralson d'etre, and it is
pleasant to be able, to chronicle the
fact that they promise this season to
be prettier than ever, They are carried out in many instances, of
course, in the same color, though not
In the same material, as that which
is chosen for the skirt. There are,
however, certain exceptions to this
rule, as, for example, when a material of Paisley of cashmere design is
chosen for the blouse, patterned
with a variety of harmonizing
shades, among them perhaps subdued tones of lilac, vieux-rose and
leaf-green may be equally prominent. The use of fabrics of this
kind lias many advantages, since a
blouse which is made in a material
of this description can be worn quite
successfully with lilac, vieux-rose or
leaf-green skirts In crepe de chine,
silk voile or eollenne, chosen carefully to match the prominent shade
In the Paisley fabric.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA  ORR.
M. A.  Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVBS, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about ^^^. miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR  W.  NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permls-
slonu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25. 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. O, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; tbence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED. A.  DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B.. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
Bhore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1 % miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or lest.
WILLIAM H.  HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th March, 1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Re-
view," Masset, Q.C.I
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
-—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cent*
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scoreB of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications tor machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tfie.
OLIVER
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
he done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
MISS BENNY WENNERS'i i. V
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, racial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment (or
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work. Friday, June 30, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Management of the Continental Trust Company Limited wish to announce that their office is now fully equipped in all departments for the transaction of
business.   The public is invited to inspect its premises on Second Avenue, CONTINENTAL TRUST BUILDING.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Deposits received payable on demand. Interest allowed at the rate
of 4% per annum, compounded
quarterly. We allow the use of
cheques, thus combining the advantages of a Current and Savings
Account.
$1.00
will open an account
with us.
Safe Deposit Department
The company Has the largest and
best equipped vault in the City.
Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at moderate rates.
The vault Is absolutely fireproof
and the door, which weighs three
tons, is both fire and burglar-proof.
The only safe place In the city for
valuable papers, jewelry, etc.
To persons who contemplate a
more or less extended absence from
the city and are at a loss what to
do with their securities and property, we tender our services at a
very   moderate   charge.
Real Estate and Insurance
Department
This company will take entire
charge of real estate In the absence
of the owner, or for those who wish
to be relieved of the responsibility,
collecting rents, paying taxes, making repairs, looking after Insurance
and taking all the trouble off the
owners' hands.
Members of the Prince Rupert
Real Estate Exchange.
A general Insurance business
transacted.
TRUST DEPARTMENT
Executing all deeds, discharges,
etc., also for bond Issues of financial, industrial and all other corporations under mortgage deed of trust,
and in the management of sinking
funds  in   connection   therewith.
Providing for safe investments in
first mortgages and other good securities, for collection of interest, dividends, rents and other income, and
for managing and winding up estates.
Countersigning and certifying Ihe
issues of stocks and bonds of mining,
industrial and other corporations,
thus protecting shareholders against
the danger of over-issue through
error or otherwise and from Irregular scrip.
Of companies or firms in financial difficulties.
Fur the benefit of creditors, In
cases of bankruptcy or friendly settlement.
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres.
DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vlce-Pres.
M. 3. HOUIX, 2nd Vice-Prcs. & Mgr.
JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
('.  li.  PETERSON, Ass't  Manager
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LTD.
Prince Rupert
British Columbia
OPENING PROVINCE
Premier McBride in an Interview in London Tells of What is Being
Done.
The Country, He Says, Is Advancing
by Leaps and Rounds at
the Present Time
Among the Dominion Premiers
who have just arrived in London, Is
the Hon. Richard McBride, of British Columbia, who looks with the
utmost satisfaction upon the future
of that province, says .the St. James
Gazette.
The country is so celebrated for
its magnificent climate, fine scenery,
and hunting and fishing facilities
that Mr. McBride, in an interview
with one of our represntatives, considered it quite unnecessary to dilate
upon those features.
"British Columbia," he said, "is
increasing in population and wealth
at a pace far beyond anything ever
known in its previous history. This
may be accounted for partly by reason of the construction of the Grand
THrunk Pacific Railway development, as well as the extensions in
our territory of the Great Northern
Railway.
"The completion of the Panama
canal, which is expected within the
next four years, will assuredly mean
a great deal for the development of
the Pacific Northwest. " In addition
to the railway projects, the municipalities are carrying out very large
extensions of their various highway
systems. With the wonderful territory we have behind all these transportation routes there is no question
as to the future of the country.
Overcoming  Difficulties
"Britisii Columbia is the largest
province in Canada, and possesses a
greater variety of resources, perhaps, than any other. Owing to its
configuration and the fact that it Is
traversed by a couple of mountain
ranges, the problem of development
has been a little more complicated
than in other parts of the country.
However, modern road and railway
building has surmounted these difficulties, and the country is coming
into Its own.
"Our natural resources, chiefly
timber, fish, minera's and agriculture, Including fruit growing, must
be pretty well known to the people
of the home land who are at all
Interested In the Over Seas Dominions. What we want in British Co-
lnumbia Is population and more capital. There are many excellent Investments, but people should proceed
cautiously, as we are anxious that
the money should flow In the right
channels.
Satisfactory liniiiUviiuKs
"I have noticed letters from Canada now and then in some papers in
the old country which would appear
to discredit many of the statements
with regard to British Columbia,
but when these are traced to their
source they are found to have emanated from those who are not In
a position to speak with experience.
We are getting the right class of
emigrant, but we are so far away
that other provinces reap some of
the advantages we should otherwise
gain.
"The country Is going ahead by
leaps and bounds. The way our districts are growing tells the story
very quickly.    There will be a large
contingent from British Columbia in
London for. the coronation, not only
those who have emigrated from the
home land, but many Canadians who
are looking forward to a pleasant
holiday."
 o	
DOLLARS FOR TITLES
An investigation of "chronic title-
itis," described as a disease of "rich,
trust-made women," is urged In a
introduced In the House of Representatives by Mr. Babath, of Illinois,
who would have the state department enquire why only two dozen
American peeresses have been granted permission to take part in the
coronation ceremonies In England
and to ascertain the amount of money this country is sending across the
Atlantic annually to maintain the
titles.
After demanding that light be
thrown on the discrimination shown
against the other American peeresses
the resolution calls for information
as to the number of unhappy marriages and the amount of American
money being spent in the chase after
coronets. The resolution says the
information is desired so that this
government may judge "to what extent our country is being benefited
by this, trade."
 o	
THE WHEAT AREA
Nap Showing the  Possibilities of the
Prairie Provinces in This Line
Prepared.
Tremendous Extent of Cereal Grow
ing Country Shown to Exist in Canada
A map of the Canadian West (and
as far as is known of the Northwest) was compiled in the Department of the Interior last year and is
now available. The present limits
of the provinces are shown and special attention is given to the three
prairie provinces, as the map Is particularly designed to show the wheat
possibilities of the Dominion in these
new districts.
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta 143,285,412 acres of land
have been surveyed for settlement.
This does not include the lands set
aside as Indian and forest reserves,
and as parish and river lot settlements. Of this great extent already
surveyed 4,500,000 acres were recorded as early as 1873—being the
smallest portion of Manitoba in the
vicinity of Winnipeg. Nearly half
of this land lies south of latitude
54 degrees. After this surveys will
at once be instituted which will
probably cover the whole of the
present limits of the province and
extend along the routes proposed for
the Hudson's Bay Railway. In this
district wheat has been grown at the
fifty-sixth parallel of latitude. Westward the wheat limit is shown to
reach the sixtieth and sixty-second
parallels in the Yukon and in the
unnamed  country north of Alberta.
Twenty  Million  Acres  Granted
Besides the 143 000,000 acres al-
readly surveyed .ther are 250,000,-
000 acres not yet plotted In these
tliree prairie provinces—all of which
are climatically suitable for wheat
raising and a great percentage suitable as regards soil conditions. Of
this great area only 11,960,000 acres
were under cultivation  in  1909.
It Is this part of    the    Dominion
Subscription
The Best
Publicity ($2.00
Channel
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
A A »j« »**;{« A •♦« A *Ji A »J* A. A A A »jt A A A A »J. A A A A A A A. A A A A *J, A A. A A A A A A A A A A A «J» A »*. «J» A A A
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
******** ***»:. ****.>***> '..********** :••>.:•-:-•:.•:••> ************:••:••:..;-
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
WATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water .Act, 1900," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands   Division   of  Skeena  District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett. Graham Island,
B. C;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
le) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power plant.
If) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe the
land  to be Irrigated,  giving acreage
which Is receiving the greatest
amount of public attention. Out In
these prairie provinces the "free
homestead entries" from March,
1909, to March, 1910, toalled 6,650,-
880 acres; and during the last two
years 20,000,000 acres have been
granted by the government under
the homestead and pre-emption laws.
Under this latter law, the payment Is
made for the land—It costs from $5
to $15 per acre.
Great tracts of irrigated lands
have also been sold by the Canadian
Pacific Railway together with blocks
of "ready-made farms' which have
proved so successful that this season
the company purposes to greatly extend the system.
Sir William Whyte, of the Canadian Pacific Railway has estimated
that in fifteen years the province of
Saskatchewan alone will be producing as much wheat as the whole of
the United States.
Compared with Tobolsk
This seems, perhaps, an exaggeration, but in the map referred to an
interesting comparison Is made with
the Russian province of Tobolsk,
which  Indicates  the    possibility    of
such expansion of the wheat production.
The Canadian city of Edmonton is
almost on a line with the most
southerly point o fthis Russian grain
province, and It has been found possible to raise wheat 700 miles north
of Edmonton.
The most northerly wheat experiments shown on this latest may are
at Simpson, on the Mackenzie River
—latitude 62, a little further than
750 miles north of Edmonton. At
the 700-nille point not only has
wheat been grown, but a regular
dairy farm Is In operation, which
provides all dairy produce, vegetables and grain for the Hudson's Bay
posts and those of Revillion Brothers, which are within reasonable radius.
Other Expansion  Possible
From just such a locality as this,
In Russia, Great Britain Imports as
much as 19,712 000 pounds of butter annually; so there Is more than
the wheat and other grain wealth to
be looked for from these new Prairie Provinces.
With the growth or the past few
years  the  trade  in   tlie  Dominion  Is
already showing great annual increase. The latest report shows an
Increase of $70,144,296 in the trade
figures of the past ten months of
the. fiscal year, us compared with the
same period of last year. The total
trade reached $684,481,076,
The capital flowing Into the' new
districts Is in proportion to the number of citizens, equally large, as beside Investments of foreign capital,
the newcomers have themselves
brought an unusual amount of money Into the country.
TO GROW ORCHIDS
.NELSON—With 3,uiiii orchid
plants en route from Mexico anil
with plants In preparation for the
erection of a hothouse on the ranch
which he has just purchased from
Mr. Vernier un the Granite Road
through T. A.  Roleley, of ihe  British
Columbia Agencies, T. M. McPar-
lane, a recent arrival front Orlzava,
Mexico, proposes lei gee in etxensively
for raising the many hued tropical
Ileevvi'i's In this elisirie-:.
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
Ik) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and'application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
tl) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or II-
eensees who or whose lands are
likely to he affected by the proposed
works, either above or below tho
oul let—None.
I Signature)  ORLAND P.  MERRILL,
IP.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address I   Mnsset,   13.   C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast— -Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward II.
Port, of Prime Rupert, II. C, occupation farmer, Intends In apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the Soniii West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thenoe 20 chains East, to
Soutli West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains Norlh, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence Soulh, following along
the shore line of salel Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD  II.  PORT.
Hy r. N.  Pring, Ageuit.
Daled  Jane 26,  1911. 6-26
0-26
Skeena   Land   n^iriet     District   nf
. neena.
take notice lhat the Canadian
Canning C pany,  Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B, C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission t <• purchase the
following described lands:—Ciiih-
uie'iie ing ai a pest planted adjoining
a post marked w. N. about 300 feel
South eif Wallaces wharf, Naas Harbour, B. ('.; thence easl 20 chains;
thence sumh 20 ehains; thence west
l'ii chains; thence following the
coasi line in a northerly direction
back io the point of commencement
ami containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD,
Per I.. II.  Leslie, Agent.
Dated   Olli  June,   1911. e;.;.'.;
Awaiting Warm Weather
"I'm going in pull off something
ns the weather gets warm."
"A big garden party, perhaps?"
"oh, nn.   .Inst a porous plaster."
"My geeied man. how did you happen to be thrown oul of work?"
"I gol "in." replied Weary Wombat,   with   ilignety.     "I   elieln't   hatter
he. thrown out." PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 30,  1911
WOULD AID RAILWAY | Retaining walls
1        SEWERS AND DRAINS
Hon. W. Templeman Assured People of
Stewart He Would Support
Such a Move.
He Says the  Canadian  Government
Has  Never  Had  to  Put up tt
Dollar of Guarantee to it
Speaking at Stewart on the occasion of his recent visit there, Hon.
William Templeman gave an assurance that he would support a proposition lo have the Dominion Government aid the Canadian Northern to
ment and the Canadian Northern to
build from Edmonton to Stewart.
He advocated the aid by the Dominion Government rather than by the
Province In the way of guaranteeing
the bonds of the road. He is reported to have said:
"The Canadian Northern Railway
have been aided almost exclusively
by the Dominion Government guaranteeing their bonds, and have been
following this cystom for ten years
or more, and during that time the
Dominion Government has not had
to pay one cent for the bonds guaranteed for the Canadian Northern
Railway. If they come to me for a
guarantee of their bonds for the
railway from Stewart to Edmonton I
would have no hesitation whatever
in supporting it. I am speaking for
myself and not for the Dominion
Government. I think the Dominion
Government is more able to do this
than the Provincial. The Dominion
Government has very little to do
with the public directly. All we can
do is to aid railway construction,
build public wharves, give you telegraphic communication, etc.
"1 would suggest, Mr. Chairman,
that your association should forthwith obtain information concerning
the? country to the east, the country
which would be served by the proposed railroad, and furnish me with
all the facts so gathered in order
that I may place them before my
associates in Ottawa."
 o	
HILDITCH RETURNS
A Discussion Upon the Dunedin Block
Lead to the Locating of
Him.
Aid.   Morrissey   Wanted     to    Know
Why  tbe  Building  Was  Not
Torn Down—Explanation
Aid. Morrissey referred to the fact
question of the Dunedin block at
Wednesday evening's council meeting. He thought that action should
be taken and the block be pulled
down In view of the fact that the
council had authorized it. He wanted
to know just how it stood and why
action  was  delayed.
His Worship stated that there was
now a lawsuit on betwen the parties
interested in the building. It had
been felt that it would he unwise for
the city just at ihis time to thrust
itself into the case.
lie   Comes   Back
The question of the last minute on
the bonks of the council with reference to this came up and while a
search was being made a deep voiea
from the mayor's office announced:
"It was in March."
The' members of the council
laughed as they heard tlie voice was
that of Aid, Hilditch, the withdrawal nf whose resignation had been ac-
cepted a few minutes before.
The suggestion was acted upon
and   the minutes accordingly  found,
His Worship then suggested that
as Aid. Hilditch was in the building and Ills resignation had been
withdrawn ii mlghl be advisable for
liim  tie take, a  place at the board.
Aid. Hllditch explained the situation, He said that when Aid. Smith
was acting mayor Ihe matter had
been referred to Aid. Smith and
himself (Aid. Hllditch), as chairman Of the streets committee to act
If they found it advisable. The
building, be said, was not regarded
as a source of immediate danger. It
was an awkward thing to remove the
material just now with the street in
its presenl condition, There was,
moreover, a legal difficulty In connection with the securing of the cost
and the matter had been allowed to
stand for the- present.
Aid. Morrissey brought up the
that there had been the opinion of
the city solicitor obtained on this
question and considerable expense
involved n thai nay. lie thought, If
possible, the cjty  should  proceed.
The matter was allowed lo stand.
(Continued from Page One)
Hon 1. He felt hat while they might
..ot be able to do it all just now,
about $75,000 might be expended in
the business section. This would
take in the area from Fourth street
to Eighth street and from Borden
street to the waterfront. There
colud be added further sewerage on
Hays Creek.    He advocated putting
he sewers as low as possible. He
felt that the sewer rentals should be
so fixed that when the buildings
were put up to make the city prac-
ically solid, tlie rentals would  pay
nterest and sinking fund.
General Discussion
In the general discussion that fol-
owed, the members of Ihe council
showed open mi:|:Is, the object being
get the fulest information on the
question. The question of the depth
at which to put the sewers and the
surface drains gave some trouble. It
was pointed out that it would be im-
lossible for the city to provide
drainage for very low lots by its system of drainage. At the same time
provision should be made to secure
draining off all the surface water so
as to give dry basements in the
business section.
It was finally decided to have the
engineer bring in an estimate of the
cost of putting In a system of sewerage from Eighth street to Fourth
street and from Borden street to the
water front, providing for a depth
of 10 feet 6 inches below the grade
line for sewers and 11 feet 6 inches
for sub-drain.
Retaining Walls
The question of retaining walls in
parts of Section 1 is giving coiy.ern
and the council conferred with the
engineer on that point. In several
places very low lots have to be protected by walls which would be of
tremendous height.
After discussion it was decided to
leave the matter in the hands of the
mayor and the city engineer, with
the object in view of trying to arrange where it is deemed expedient
to have rock dumped on some private lots so as to raise the level of
these, improving the lot and at the
same time overcoming the necessity
of building very high walls. In some
instances it was suggested that ex
propriation proceedings might be
necessary, the lots after being re
claimed by the filling being more
valuable than before it, so that the
city would suffer no loss. The owners of the lots will be communicated
with  in the matter.    "
Surface Drains
On the question of surface drains
and culverts, the point arose as to
whether these should be considered
a charge upon the whole city or be
put on the local Improvement
scheme. It was pointed out by the
chairman of the streets committee
and the engineer that these drains
drew from more than the immediate
lots where the water courses were.
Drainage from other sections of the
city poured into these and it was
beardly fair to expect fbein to be
built by the property owners through
or past whose property the waterway
ran.
A  Broad Question
This led to the whole question of
the best method of paying for the
improvements in genera], whether as
a work of local improvement or
through general revenue.
His Worship pointed out that If
the system of carrying out all these
Improvements to streets was made
on the local improvement plan it was
questionable whether Section I
would nut be able to carry out its
work cheaper than if it had to help
to pay for the work in all the other
sections as time went on,
Aid. Hllditch believed that at the
present time ihe paying for plank
roadways in the outlying sections
would come as a greater burden
upon the owners Of lots affected
than won! til lie work of grading In
Section   I.
The opinion was expressed thai it
would not perhaps be wise to alter
the plan already being carried out
of doing the work on the local improvement plan.
The final decision on this point
It was felt could be left over for the
meantime, however. It was felt that
probably it would not be wise lo
bring too many issues before the
public at one time. The Grand
Trunk Pacific agreement and the
proposed water proposition would
probably be better dealt with alone
at  the time of voting next month.
 o	
Kindly Oblige
ALDERMEN RETURN
The Resignation of Aid. Hilditch  Has
Been Withdrawn and Aid. Newton
Will Likely do Likewise
Question   of   Testing   Public   Opinion
on Point in Dispute Will
lie Dropped
There is every prospect that Aid.
Newton and Aid. Hllditch will resume their places at the council
board. Aid. Hilditch has, in fact,
taken his seat again and Aid. Newton is likely to return on Monday
night. On Wednesday night communications were read from the two.
Take Action
A letter was read from Aid. Newton, stating that he would withdraw-
bis resignation on condition that
Aid. Hilditch withdraw his challenge.
Aid. Hllditch wrote stating that
after consideration he would ask
leave to withdraw his resignation.
It was decided that the letter of
Aid. Newton be filed.
In compliance with Aid. Hilditch's
request, Aid. Kirkpatrick moved that
he be permitted to withdraw his resignation.
The motion carried, Aid. Douglas
alone voting against it.
Special Services
There will be special services in
the Salvation .army Citadel on Sunday. The morning holiness meeting
at 11 o'clock will be followed at 3
o'clock by a special service. At 8
o'clock in the evening there will be
in addition to the usual services a
special musical programme. The
Prince Rupert Orchestra will take
part again.
ATTENTION, ODD FELLOWS
All members of the I. O. O. F.
(visiting Brothers included) are
earnestly requested to meet at tbe
Hall, on Tuesday, July 4, at 7:30
p, m., for the purpose of having a
photo taken. Immediately after
this, the installation of the newly-
e'ected officers will take place.
G. S. JOHNSTONE, N. G.
HARRY,  H. MORTON,
6-30—7-3 Recording  Secy
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAi,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Ruperl
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean O E\ n
White Sheets   -   -    &Ol
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for tlie Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
ygiaiaiiiiigppigisiaiais^
SHERWIN &WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
Is there anyone |||
you want to |||
interest in
Prince
Rupert
Have the
Journal
sent to him
for
six months
or a year
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENT.S
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground is Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. duw m#.
^®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®@®®®®£
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
i.aundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD AVE.
The; Stay S&tlsfactor/Jfoeege
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IP  YOU   RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
'lie-eir teacher," wrote little Johnny's mother, "kindly excuse John's
absence from school yesterday after-
iiiiein, eis in- fell iii the- mud. By
doing the satin- you will greatly
oblige his mother."
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
1
•Rural
fv  '  ■HeMtHi>* * I
rf&-t ,3iMf«  -f
nk
Ipgst
Sf. siFjj
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which  the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove  bolts and  stove  putty.    It's
important  to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
BLOCK LOTS BLOCK
19 . .
11    1-2-3-4-6-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 21-22
18    1-2
i.OTS
 3-4
19 16-16
20 19-20
34    36-37-38
34    42
27    9-10
27     42-43
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 22-23
SECTION SIX
'3 7-8-9-10
W. S., BENSON ^:u?a"°. andIPTi
ooement
. Box 51
LINDSAYS CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US

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