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Fort George Herald Sep 13, 1913

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 %»%* ^BV*»*^V
VOL. J. N0* 2'
%%i***t
CRE4T LOCAL INTEREST
IN PRINCE GEORGE
Several Have Left to Attend Sale
of Lots in Vancouver on
17th Inst.
ie ^ile of the G.T.P. townaite of
which    is    to  take
Tbe
Prince t'™vSe .  ,
Vancouver  next  Wednesday
ilace
in
s attract inn a large attendance from
8H points, The oat-going boats this
carried  several  intending
week have
jund  for  Vancouver to
Investors.
liUcml the sale. The general attitude
o( the investing public appears to he
one 0f regret that present financial
conditions will not permit heavy Investments In real estate at this time.
•IV Herald's    latest   information,
received by   wire from   Land Commissioner Ryley,  of    the G.T.P.,  is
definite on tlie matter of the date of
the Prince George sale.
Tbe Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
Company, as   related    long   ago in
those columns,  will sell their town-
site under the name of Prince George
awl it will be known by that name
Irom the   date  of  the  sale onward.
The station on their townsite will be
called Prince George, and their hotel
will also bear the name.    The town-
site promoters   who   are endeavoring
to spread the illusion that tbe G. T.
P. railway are putting on the market
an "addition  to    the    Fort  George
townsite" will soon be disabused on
the matter,  as    will  the    credulous
ones who get a twisted sens i of relative values by perusing and  digesting such absurd statements.
It is understood that certain parts
of the townBite will not be oflered
for Bale at this time. The eastern
end will be probably sold first and
the western end held under reserve
for future sale. Ii is very generally
conceded tbat the eastern portion of
the townsite will be the first area
to be generally developed, and we
believe that the first extensive business section will grow up within five
blocks of the Fraser river.
We advise intending investors to
purehase on the eastern end.
SUUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C, SATURDAYjsSPTEMBER,!* 1913
$3 PER ANNUM
INDIANS ARE BARRED
CANYON CACHE ITEMS.
(Special Correspondence to the Herald)
According to Supt. W. G. Dow, Foley Bros., Welch & Stewart's Canyon
Cache will be ahut down within a
month. The canyon has been one of
the most important of the caches along
the river. Through it all of the tens
of thousands of dollars worth of Foley's
supplies and outfit have passed. The
Cache and its maintenance has cost
over $150,000 during the two seasons
of its existence which is reasonable in
view of the conditions that had to be
met and overcome.
Joe Steers of the Carleton Co., and
incidentally the best dressed man on
the line, spent Wednesday night at the
Canyon on his way to Fort George.
During the entire navigation season
the S. S. Conyeyor in command of Capt.
Shannon was the only steamboat to
negotiate the Upper Canyon without a
line. She made the run in a scant 15
minutes with her own power the last
four trips up. The only other steamer
to attempt it was the S. S. Robert G.
Hammond but she did not get far before a line was necessary to save her
from the rocks. It took the Hammond
six hours to make it. Capt. Malloryof
of the Marshall Wells launch made the
Upper Canyon several times on his own
power in less than 15 minutes.
The present mail service nlong the
line is now in first class shape. The
launch Kathleen leaving Mile 129 for
the Canyon every Sunday and Wednesday morning and the Betty F. leaving
Fort George for the Canyon every Tuesday and Friday morning.
Geo. Booth, one of the original "Canyon Cats" is back with Foley Bros.,
Welch & Stewart's regular pilot crew.
The boys on this crew have made big
stakes this season averaging about
$1000 each for each month of the season.
The low stage of the water has enabled Supt. Dow to begin salvaging
scows wrecked at the canyon in the
early part of the season. During the
first day's work this week several
thousand dollars worth of outfit was
recorded.
Fishing at Canyon is splendid, Fire
Warden Hanson caught an eight pound
trout just in front of the Upper warehouse. Two and three pounders are
quite plentiful.
With a view to encouraging the
ted man to work and save his earn-
•nKS, the lieutenant-governor-in-
sitting in Edmonton, has
an order  that hereafter  "no
SITS HERE M0NDA1
WORK C0|
___    #*
The«*>6&tesiljta
Whose contotuft
ENCED ON BRIDGE.
ers Construction Co.
for building the lift
r'tBj-je here Jf going forward rapidly
Party Will Arrive Tonight—Local I n$x_$^Wing
Labor Problems Will be
Discussed.
The Royal Commission on Labour
will reach this place tonight, and
will sit in Burch's hall on Hamilton
Avenue on Monday morning next at
10 o'clock. Rooms have been reserved
for the members of the commission
at the Empress hotel.
The commission will hear the
views of any persons wishing to
give testimony upon labor problems
or conditions.
ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL.
A general meeting of the South Fort
George Football Club was held last
night and the following officers elected:
Trustee for Montgomery Shield, John
Crozier; Pres., H. C. Seaman; Viee-
Pres., J. O. Williamson ; Capt, John
Hillhouse; Vice-Capt, J. F. Richardson; Sec-Treas., Allan Mclntyre. Committee to consist of captain, vice-captain, secretary, J. O. Williamson and
S. Shannon.
Resolutions were passed thanking
Mr. Bronger for presentation of shirts
and hose, and also Jermyn & Bowles for
jerseys.
A practice game will take place Sunday on the baseball grounds at 3:30 in
the afternoon.
A series of five games will be played
between the two teams for the Montgomery Shield, the first to take place
on Wednesday next in Fort George
where a fair is being held on that day.
Both clubs are enthusiastic and good
games are expected.
The Montgomery shield is now on exhibition in Kelly's window. This is
one of the finest, if not the finest, association football shield in the province.
CLUB CAFE ENLARGEO
Fred Wilson, proprietor of the
Club Cafe, on Third Street, has completed a large addition to his premises. The Club only recently commenced  business,  but  the  rapid  growth
a steel cofferdam on
Railroad Island, which the bridge
crosses on, for the abutments. The
bridge contractors are getting out
rafts of piles, and have two pile
drivers at work on the crossing at
this writing.
PEACE RIVER'S GOOD CROPS
CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
IN SHUSWAP FIRES
Forestry  Department    Reports
About 2,000,000 Feet of
Timber Destroyed.
Just what amount oi damage, was
done to British Columbian timber by
the recent fires in the Yellowhead
Pass cannot be definitely ascertained,
but it is believed to be run into perhaps a couple of million feet, according to Mr. R. C. Benedict of the
provincial forestry department, who
has completed a tour of the affected
district.
"At first," said Mr. Benedict, "we
thought that the Alberta outbreak
had spread over the boundary Une
of this province and had started to
burn up our reserves in the vicinity
of Tete Jaune. Cache, but on loosing over the situation I discovered
that our first reports were inaccur-
a matter  of  fact
"Crops in the Peace River district
are well out of the danger zone," said
H. C. Wilson, a farmer from Dunvegan, at Edmonton, Alberta, recently.
"With the exception of a small amount
of grain on two quarter sections on the
Peace River townsite, the work of the
binders north of the Peace River Crossing is complete for this year.
"The year 1913 has been a fine one
for the entire Peace River district,"
continued Mr. Wilson. "Dunvegan has
seen the erection of about 12 mills, I ate and that as
while the number of improvised stores I our rangers succeeded in keeping the
that have been erected is astonishing, flames out. They did it with a mar-
All that is needed to make these little ! gin af about two hundred yards or
merchandise establishments as advan-! so, but that was sufficient, and I
tageous as some of the Edmontoni think it speaks well for their act-
stores is lumber which the mills areivity and methods to he able to say
trying to turn out. Most of the mills ] it, for seldom has such a Maze oc-
are finding that the demand for lum-1 curred without doing much greater
ber far exceeds the supply, but this ! damage."
condition will be entirely relieved before the middle of September.
"Negotiations are being made now
for the construction of a church in
Dunvegan during the next month, and
it  is  expected that the townsite will
have a house of worship before winter j two miUion feet o[ timbcr" j cannot
sets in. The district is becoming so | estimate the loss for the simple
thickly populated that a church is nee-  reagon that wfi -^ ag ye(. nQ means
l'3"    '' of  getting    into   the    territory,   and
had to content ourselves with looking at it from afar. From Tete
Jaune I could see the smoke, and
occasionally the flames, and I based
my calculation of the loss upon my
—- knowledge of the country. I can say
Local Company  Launches  New J that the timber that was destroyed
Boat for Work on Upper
River,
"The trouble to the provincial
timber did not come from Alberta,
nor in fact did it happen at Tete
Jaune at all. But we had a big b:aze
some thirty miles off at Shuswap
which I think   has destroyed about
BRAND-NEW STEAMER
IS "TBE DOCTOR"
into the Bulkley valley by the advent
of the steel, a despatch from Smithers says that a new order of things
is to be permitted to enter I is rapidly replacing the old in that
'1 or  billiard room or bowl-1 portion of   British     Columbia. The
Uf alley in the province of Alberta.' ; coming of the iron horse is making
tuunci!
passed
Indian
any |
BULKLEY'S DEVELOPMENT
Telling of the development  brought |of"it8"p7tronage haa renQered'neces
sary the large additions made
11 is also provided that any proprietor lading to observe the order shall
•* subject to the cancellation of his
liceilce. William Alexander Wilson of
Edmonton, who has been appointed
Pool room licence inspector, is chars'1- with the enforcement of the law,
wt|icli was enacted at the last session uf the provincial legislature.
Il1' Pool playing, intoxicating
"quor and gambling under the ban,
"tout the only things left for In-
dla*« is farming, trapping and horse
rafl"K. Bald a member of thc Crce
ln,K' "1 Edmonton recently. "Prob-
J7V it is for the best" he added,
but- it is spoiling a lot of fun for
«c younger men."
The local school re-optfied last
•"""■i-ay with about fifty pupils. The
™<*lpal's name,   for the   term,   is
•Mrs* Dunn.
The balance of the local electric
"gat piant
is expected n«xt week.
great changes, and the pioneers are
not yet accustomed to the new conditions.
The tedious freighting of supplies
into the interior towns is now a
thing of the past for trains are running, bringing everything the district needs nt a minimum cost and
time. The pack horse and the canoe,
as well as the winter dogteams, have
found their places taken by more
modern transportation means.
MARVIN-OLIVER NUPTIALS
A quiet wedding was solemnized
last Tuesday, at the residence of Mr.
and Mrs. John O. Williamson, the
contracting parties being Mr. Hugh
Gordon Marvin and Miss Evelyn
Gronow Oliver, both of London, Eng.
The ceremony was performed by Rev,
Father Cocola, O.M.I., before a party
of friends and relatives. Miss Oliver
is a sister of Mrs. J. O. Williamson.
Private rooms and tables may be had at
The Club when the addition is opened
to the public.
The Steamer Port Praser, owned by
the Fort George Timber and Trading Company Ltd., is( no longer
a unit of the fleet of steamboats on
the upper Fraser. The little* Fort
Fraser was not a good model for
the kind of work her owners required I fighting the fire, but then it occurred
her to do, and she was recently dis- i to us that the rain would beat us,
by this fire, which I am inclined to
think covered an area of from six
to ten miles, was not ot any merchantable value, and would not be
so for perhaps thirty years more to
come. Still it was unfortunate, although of course impossible to avoid
on account of the lack of trails. We
thought at first of starting in to
build  trails    into  the    country  and
mantled by shipbuilder Dan McFee,
of Victoria, and was re-assembled on
a new hull. Shipping registration
laws do not permit two keels to be
On the night of August 21st a car named alike' and as in ""> regard °J
containing liquor was broken open _t,ano^nS circles the defunct Fort
the Tete Jaune siding and a number of Fraser is stm among the 1uick' the
cases of whisky consigned to Fort!new model has been named "The
George were taken out. Twenty-seven [Doctor," in honor of Dr. J. K. Mc-
crses of whisky were found buried in a jLennan, one of the company's officers
sandhill near by and Wm. R. Ogilvie, j who is a well known man in railway
A. L. Ogilvie, A. Wortz, G.T.P. Rail- j circles.
way employees, were arrested on sue- The Doctor is a neat little craft,
picion and brought before Justice of; She has an importance hitherto un-
the Peace Sugars. Allen L. Ogilvie | known to the boat before her latest
was released, there being not sufficient: transmigration—that of possessing
evidence to detain him, and the cases ; two decks.
against W. R. Ogilvie and A Wortz The engines have befcn re-bored,
were adjourned. | Messrs. Fowler Bros., of New West-
Fearful of what the inventions of the j minister, doing the work, and ac-
the white man may lead to, supersti-1 cording to Engineer Rankin, who in-
tious Indians of Skidegate have watch-! stalled the engines in both  models,
Tete j
""ne Cache, the dead cSty o n the headwaters of thc Fraser.
ed the operations of the new wireless
■tation there with awe. A party of
old Indians called on Dr. Spencer, the
Methodist medical missionary, and told
him they thought it was time to die.
They had seen the new station working
and were convinced that men hundreds
of miles apart were talking together.
"We hear, but we cannot see them
talk," said one Indian. "Pretty soon
white man can tell what we are thinking about."
Leaving Kelownn In an auto loaded
with fruit, and produce of the Okanagan Valley, including a line assortment
of cigars, grown and manufactured in
Kelowna, George Graham Lyster left
recently from the Board of Trade building, to ride to Fort George to sprerd
enroute the glories of the Orchard City
district. He Is mnking the trip with
the object of setting forth in a cor-
vincing manner what Kelowna hns lo
offer the grower. The route will lay
through Vernon, Kamloops, Ashcroft,
passing 150-Mile House, and skirting
the Fraser River on the Fort George,
returning by a circular tour, and covering altogether over a thousand miles.
they are now as good as new.
Mrs. George E. McLaughlin entertained a large party of friends at
dinner last Thursday evening, the
occasion being the anniversary of
her birthday. The McLaughlin home
was prettily decorated with flowers.
and so it happened. Before we came
away we had lots of rain and the
fires were all out. Everything at the
present looks good but of course the
danger is by no means past. Taken
so far the province has enjoyed
splendid immunity from tire this year
as compared with other places, and
I think much of the credit for that
condition belongs to the forest department.
"Now that the fires are out we
are commencing the construction of
trails at certain points and the general improvement of our system of
communication. In fact the principal object of my visit this time
was to see, just where it would be
advisable to have trails cut; and I
intend now to draw up a report for
the consideration of the government.
"On my way down I made a call
at South Fort George and several
other points, and saw the rangelrs.
1 found everything in excellent shape
all over. I may say that during my
travels in the interior country I
discovered other vast forest areas,
which are so far entirely unchartered.
A construction camp on the Fraser rivel- near tlic Willow, 1'AliT*
il
FORT GEORGE HERALD
Published by the Northern Interior Printing Company, Limited
,1. B. Daniell, President.
Devoted  to  the  Interests of the  Fort George District
Interior of British Columbia.
nd  thc  Northern
SEALPD.T^D.Kffle'Vend«
'•    undersigned and enQoiseu
for Jetty and Dredging at the Noith
Arm of the Fraser River, B.C., will
be received at this office until 4 1. M ,
on Tuesday, September 30th, 1913. pi
the construction of Jetty and Dredging
at the North Ann ol'the I-rase. Rivel,
I'.. C.
of con-
Subscriplion $3.00 a Year in Advance
Advertising Rales on i
THE opening of the Grand Trunk Pacific for freight
traffic to Mile 145 B.C., will greatly facilitate the
placing of adequate supplies at Fort (leorge before navigation closes nn ihe Kraser, says the Edmonton Bulletin.
The steamers will be able to make two trips a week between South Kort George and the end of steel, while they
could only make one trip a week when the end of steel
was at Tele Jaime.    But, even so, shippers will not be
able to depend upon the steamers to get their supplies
forward, as there is already said to be more freight awaiting than can be carried during the balance of the season.
This means that freight will have to go forward by flat-
boat, and therefore, that each shipper will have to make
his own arrangements for storing his freight at the end
of steel and getting it forwarded to Fort George.   Under
these circumstances it would certainly be in place for the
Edmonton board of trade, or the jobbers' association, or
some individual association of dealers interested in the
Fort George trade to unite in placing an agent at Mile
145 who would see to the proper storage and shipment of
Edmonton goods destined for Fort George.   Unless this
is clone, a great deal of extra individual expense will be
incurred, and no doubt, in any case, loss from damage or
delay will follow. This is a case in which Edmonton merchants will do well to work in co-operation.   The possibility of trade is there; the railway has done its part; it
now depends on the dealers themselves to do theirs.
THOUGH it cannot be charged that we as a nation are
in any great danger of becoming excessively moral,
we are in some danger of becoming morbid over our morals, says the Detroit Free Press. Morbidity is a peculiar
privilege of youth at a certain age, and we appear to be
approaching that age.
Just as two or three years ago everybody talked,
thought, wrote and dreamed of mental therapeutics, and
discoursed learnedly of the influence of mind over the
body, so today everybody is discussing morals or cogitating on the subject. The whole country has become one
vast dissecting room, devoted to the study of sexology.
We go into fits over the horrors of the split skirt. We
rave inarticulately about the iniquity of the tongo and its
allied gyrations. We split hairs to find moral issues in
socialism, feminism and suffrage. We hold investigations to determine whether a $6 a week clerk can be a
respectable member of society. We discourse in mixed
companies on subjects which St. Paul would have classed
among matters not so much as to be mentioned. Supposedly reputable magazines publish treatises on subjects
that formerly were discussed only in well-guarded medical journals, and we hand the treatises over to our children for the health of their souls.
We revel in the contemplation of putrid iniquity and its
manifold incarnations, the more virtuous among us drawing therefrom a species of horrified belief.
If we thought so much about what we eat and what we
drink as we do about our morals we would all be hopelessly dyspeptic. If we examined as continuously into
the state of our national nerves as we do into the state
of our national morals we would be a land given over to
neurasthenia.
Our great mistake is in thinking that the question of
morals is primarily a public question, whereas it is in the
first instance a personal question. If we would forget
about our morals and content ourselves with being moral, we would all be much better off.
T^WO erudite gentlemen in the east have been debating
the merits and demerits of party government. Professor Adam Shortt, former teacher of political economy
at Queen's University and now a civil service commissioner, declares that the system is the invention of Satan,
made worse by human professionals, while Professor Mc-
Phail, of Montreal, says that, if party government were
abolished worse evils would follow. The most ardent
supporters of the system freely admit its defects, Imi nobody has immortalized himself so far as to suggest a feas-
able substitute. It would be interesting and entertaining to learn from Professor Adam Shortt what he proposes to take the place of that which he picturesquely describes as a Satanic invention. The only alternative that
presents itself is absolute despotism; but the profane history of the world lias exhibited no person qualified to enjoy supreme mundane power. We know this to be true,
because one-man rule has been tried. -Victoria Times.
Plans, specifications and tormoi contact can be seen and forms of tender
obtained at this Department and at the
office of C 0 Worsfold, Esq., District
Engineer, Now Westminster, ti. *..,
WZ. Earle, Esq., District Engineer,
Winnipeg, Man'; J. S. MacLachlan,
Esq , District Engineer, Victoria, It.
C ; J. I*. Michaud, Esq., District Engineer Posl Office Building, Montreal,
P Q.;J. G. Sing, Esq., District Engineer, Confederation Life Building,
Toronto, Out., ami on application to
the Postmaster at Vancouver, B.l .
Persons tendering are notified that
tenders will not lie considered unless
ma.leon the printed forms supplied,
stating their occupations and places ol
residence, ln the case of (inns, the
actual signature, tho nature oi the oc-
■ cupation, and place of residence of
each member of the linn must be
I given. .  , ,
Each tender must be accompanied by
an   accepted  cheque  on   a chartered
banl;, payable io the order of the Honourable the Minister of   Public Works, |
I equal  to live per cent. (."> p. c.) of  the;
! amount   ol'   tlu> tender, which will be
i forfeited if  the   person tendering decline to   enter   into   a   contract when ;
! called upon to do so. or fail to complete
! the work contracted for.   If the tender j
i be not accepted the cheque will be re-1
| turned. '
The Department does not hind  itself.
j to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary,
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August, IS, 1913.
Newspapers will not be paid for this
advertisement if they insert it without
authority from the Department—45074
(Sept. 6, 2t.)
WATER NOTICE.
The Northern Lumber & Mercantile Company \m\\._
W. F. COOKE, Pre.. RUSSELL PEDEN, Vice-Prcs. C. E.
eeALiici
FOR  A  LICENCE TO TAKK AND USE
WATER,
NOTICE is herehy given that James
Dibben, of Fort Fraser, B.C., will   apply for a licence to  take and use   ten
thousand gallons per day of water out |
of Nine  Mile Creek, whieh  Hows in a
southeasterly direction  through  town-
ship 16, range B, empties into Nechaco j
river near section 10, township 16. The I
water will be   diverted   at west boundary line of section 16, township 16, and
will be used  for domestic purposes  on j
the  land   described  as   west half   of j
section  16, township 16, range 5.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 26th day of August, 1913. The
application will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Fort George,
B. C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
JAMES DIBBEN,
Applicant,
by Geo. Ogston,
Sept. 13-5t Agent.
Manufacturers and Dealers in the Best FIR
and SPRUCE LUMBER in Brjtishj^
You can't build economically without getting
our estimates from cellar to roof.
Operators of the Famous Light
Draught Steamer   "Quesnel,"
HAYING Season is Here!
We are prepared to supply your machinery
.   wants,   including   .
McCormick Mowers and Rakes
Hand Rakes, Forks, etc., at our usually
low prices
Northern Lumber & Mercantile
Second  Street
South Fort George
Company, Limited
• ,     1  Central Avenue
Fort George
What Might
Have Happened
Whether due to carelessness or to
an accident that might have happened in the best regulated business
we will not discuss.
But a few nights ago our two
front doors were left unlocked.
And if anybody had been wise
they could have walked in and by
chloroforming Mr, Harkins and Mr.
Blair who were sleeping off the office
they could have loaded up and
got away with 'Mill rifles, shot guns
and automatics, that had just arrived for the shooting season and
had just been placed on exhibit by
our Mr. Harkins, 200 watches and
some magnificent fur sets that had
been neatly arranged by Mrs. Blair;
500 suits of McNean's; 1000 top
shirts and 700 suits of Stanlield's
underwear just being opened up for
our fall trade by our Mr. Roberts;
1000 Stetson and felt hats, brought
direct from the Stetson people and
being placed on exhibit, by our Mr.
Garvin; Chipp, Slater and Ames-
Holden shoes upon which our Mr.
Williams had made special prices.
A magnificent display of carpenters' tools and 1000 kegs of nails,
neatly arranged by our Mr. Hughes;
a brilliant display of fancy and
heavy groceries that are being handled by our three grocery experts,
Mr. Campbell, Abbott, and   Perkins.
Space will nol allow us to continue. Fortunately the open door
was not discovered and everything
found intact in tho morning. We
are. therefore so much ahead.
We are not going to ho hoggish
and are going to share our profits in
this transaction with our customers.
Come on and get your share.
Kennedy, Blair
<& Co., Ltd.
Real Estate and Insurance Agents
Fort George:   160 Acres Suitable for Sub-Division
Five acre Garden Tracts within two miles of Town on
Government road; Open Land; Good Soil; Good Water
Call and See Us.    Write and Enquire.
Hamilton Avenue,
South Fort George.
Central Avenue,
Fort George
 '
\,mm__+.A
RELIABLE POWEK
f___Uz__$b
FA1RBANKS-MORSEIGAS0LINE AND DISTILLATE EN-
ARE RELIABLE, SIMPLE AND ECONOMICAL.
Take You There and Back!
IMMEDIATE  DELIVERY   FROM  STOCK
Write for Catalog Fg. 5000,
The p
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse U
Limited.
Vancouver,
British <-
0LUMBIA
ubsenbe
for le Hffi
—-■—1 n
£ FALL SEASON HAS AJtiti v il
an(j with it comes the hunting season, the cool days, and the preparation for winter
Hardware and
Sporting Goods
We have a good stock of standard
makes of Hides and Shotguns, and
a large stock ot Ammunition to
choose from.
Heaters, Ranges
and Cook Stoves
the most complete range of Stoves
to be found in town.     We have
w|,at vou want.
AN IDEA OF OUR PRICES:
A four-hole Cook Stove, cast top,
steel body, a good size oven-a
splendid Cook stove for .   .   $20
A No, 9 six-hole Range with high
closet and reservoir, nickel-plated
trimmings, full size oven; a good
baker, moderately priced at . $53
Builders9
Supplies
including Nails, Roofing, Building
and Tar Paper. You cannot afford
to build without getting our prices.
Groceries
You will find our grocery shelves
teeming with good things'to eat—
THE FINEST LINE OF FANCY
GROCERIES to be found on the
market.
Heinz Pickles- nearly all the 57
varieties.
White Star Olives, Pickles and
Spices.
Christie's Fancy Biscuits.
The Staples have not been neglected either:
Royal Household Flour, 98-lb,
sack $8.50
Special prices on large quantities.
St. Charles Cream (hotel)  40c
(family) 20c
We handle Dehydro Fruits and
Vegetables, Bluenose Butter, and
other lines necessary for the prospector, surveyor and trapper.
See our prices before buying your
winter stock,
Ladies9 Wear
Why send out for your Winter
Clothing? We are closing out our
stock of Ladies' Wear and can save
you money on every purchase,
Men's Furnishings
We carry a complete line of Men's
Furnishings including the heavier
lines. Our stock of Mackinaws are
the best, being Carss 44-oz. goods
and Finnie & Murray's famous bird
Mackinaws.
A large line of Sweater Coals
ranging from $2,50 to $9,50.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
We are clearing a few broken
lines of Shoes at prices that will
suit.   See our windows.
%
General   Merchants
HOOD'S LIMITED
Hamilton Avenue
PROSPECTORS SEARCH
fH BURIED WEALTH
Experts From Many Camps Exploring Peace River
Country.
Roused by recent discoveries of rich
undeveloped mineral, asphalt, gas and
oil resouroes in various parts of the
western provinces, scores of prospectors and experts known in many camps
throughout the United States and Canada and Mexico, are making exhaustive
searches in the Peace River country
and other northern districts.
The Dominion and provincial governments have their experts in the field
and even some of the northern Indians
and halfbreeds, who usually confine
their operations to trapping furs, which
is no mean indnatry when it is recalled
that pure black fox whelps bring
as hiph as $10,000 a pair in this and
outside markets, are using the pick,
pan and drill to uncover wealth hidden
in the hills, canyons and river beds all
over the west.
Several hundred thousand tons of
provisions and supplies, including mining, drilling and sawmill outfits, have
been shipped from Edmonton to the
outposts of civilization during the last
ninety days and much more equipment
1 K>i forward by river scows and
Pack 'rains before the close of the season. Seventeen parties are prospect*
>ng in the Canadian Rockies, west of
Edmonton, but most of the work at
P'Ment is being carried on in the north
country.
William Gordon, a pioneer of the Fort
McMurray district, Baid in Edmonton
"ist prominent English and American
financial houses are backing several of
>ne prospecting parties.
now is being devoted to the reconstruction of the largest railroad hotel in
Western America, the Banff Hot
Springs Hotel. The reconstruction is
exciting much interest in the architectural world, as it is practically converting the back to the old hotel into the
front of a new one. Beautiful as the
old structure was, the back ground of
Rundle Mountain was always rather
disappointing. When Banff became
better known, it was realized that the
view of the site from down at Bow
River was much more effective, and
Mr. Painter worked out a new scheme
which is now being carried out into
effect at the cost of several million dollars.
MISSIONARIES TO
CONSTRUCTION CAMPS
Lives of Lonely Railway Workers Made Brighter and Happier by "Skypilots."
George east to Mile 160, B. C.
Our Proclamation: "There is none
other name given among men whereby
they can be saved."
Our Ambition: "The knowledge of
the Lord may cover the earth as the
waters cover the sea."
NOTES OF THE LINE.
F. Nugent & Co. have closed one of
their camps, having completed the west
end of their work.
The stopping place of Roy Spurrs at
Willow River has been closed owing to
the lack of supplies, but the store is
still running.
The loading of the coyote holes at
the rock cut at Willow River was started on Monday, Sept. 1st. Mr. L. Johnson, who has a contract at Mile 192,
has charge of the loading. The blast
will take place about the 18th of Sept.
"Skypilot" Foreman of the C. C.
Mission is making his final trip through
the camps before he returns to college
at London, Ontario.
VIEEAGE AT
TUNNEL MOUTH
Grange House  in   Which  the
Workmen at Glacier
Will Live.
Foley, Welch &  Stewart, who have
10 contract for the construction of the
PWntic tunnel for the C.P.R. through
•j Selkirks  at Glacier, propose  to
u1Mp in connection with the tunnel a
railroad camp, which haa not a parallel
"i history.   One of the problems  they
™v<- to face  is   that of  the drifting
vnow at Glacier in  winter, which is
r «y inconvenient for their operations.
'c'y nave therefore asked  an  accom-
|j1Bh«i architect, W. S. Painter, to de-
j(';n for them a village to be erected at
•1 ol $!>0,0l)0, on a plan  so unique
a'll reads like a chapter from Gulli-
'«   1'ravels.    The    floors  of    the
>■», which are of substantial eolith uctlon' are to  be eight feet above
ground level, and  connected with
Whe  M  "f the houses by little bridges.
.""Mr. Painter was first BBked to
j^'Sn thus village he thought it was a
furti JUt °n  consitlering  the matter
real]id ^ atudyinK Possible plans he
He t   i        the notion was a E°oti one<
dwell    'dettS  from  Prehi3t°ric lake
Hon ",KS °r Switze''land and Imperial
^   *' iuui Ule result is a novel village
Mut engineering interest.
•  lainter-B  chief  attention just
(Contributed)
There are two well known societies
working for the welfare of the men in
the construction camps, namely, the
Church Cimp Mission and the Reading
Camp Association. The object of the
former is to try and elevate the minds
of the men into a spiritual and moral
channel, while the aim of the latter is
to instruct the men along educational
lines.
The C. C. Mission is a nomadic mission to the moving camp life (in Canada), being the Canadian branch of the
Navy Mission Society of England.
There are about twenty missionaries
working in Canada thia year reaching
from Vancouver Island on the west to
New Brunswick on the east.
It is the unique mission of the C. C.
M. to checkmate the grave evil of lonely camp life. When men are segregated by fifties and hundreds, often at
great distances from civilization, such
as on the transcontinental from Edmonton to Fort George, there is naturally a deadening effect upon the minds
caused by the absence of diversified
interests; the results in the majority of
cases is a peculiar predisposition to the
allurements of drink, immorality,
gambling and other forms of vice.
The objects have leen attained with
good results, by the distribution of papers and magazines, the glad message
of help conveyed by the "skypiloti"
and an attempt to come into personal
contact with these noble pioneers on
the lonely frontiers. The success and
blessing given in the work has been
due to several causes. Firstly, the
kind welcome given to the missionaries
by the men themselves; secondly, the
willing help and kind hospitality received from the contractors and engineers, who have done their utmost to
show their appreciation and approval
of our work.
Superintendent McCormick, known
to all the contractors us "Railroad
Mac," was the pioneer missionary. He
started with the transcontinental in
the east, and haB followed its course
westward for five years; his sole ambition now is to follow the road through
to its completion. He has entrusted
the work from Fort George to Tete
Jauno Cache to Mr. Foreman and Mr.
Callan. Mr. Callan of Wycliffe Hall,
Toronto, works weat from Tete Jaune
Cache, while Mr. C. Foreman of Huron College, London, works from Fort
FOR SALE
Lime, Shingles and Cement
in any quantity.
I am Specializing  in this Line
Warehouse on Hudson's Bay Property near the Bridge
M. W. WHITLEY.
"Believe me, I am not a faddist on
the navy question, b-t when I saw
100,000 Canadians lining our shores recently looking with admiration upon
the fine vessel which little New Zealand has contributed for the common
defence of the Empire, I was half
ashamed to call myself a Canadian."
Thus spoke Sir Richard McBride, premier of British Columbia to a Montreal
Star representative at the Windsor
Hotel the other day, prior to his departure for Britain via New York, aboard
the Mauretania. "What we want,"
continued Sir Richard, "is a foreign
nation to send its ships up the St.
Lawrence and then we should see where
we stand, and know what the Union
Jack stands for. Everything we have
today, all the privileges we enjoy,
come to us because of the protection
which the old flag gives us.
Stop!   Look!   Listen
THE LARGEST AND MOST UP-TO-DATE CONFECTIONERS IN THE CARIBOO DISTRICT. MANUFACT-
TRERS OF Ice Cream, Soda Water and all Classes
of High Grade Confectionery. WE ALSO CAPRY A
VERY LARGE ASSORTMENT OF HIGH CLASS TOBACCOS, CIGARS AND CIGARETTES.
Our prices are very reasonable and our.'motto will always hi
"We ourselves are better served,
By serving others best."
l      McGaghran & Thorne
j HAMILTON AVENUE
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
tr
A.P. ANDERSEN
BUILDER and
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
^
ee
Modern five-room house on Fourth
St. for sale. Three-ply of boards.
Warm winter house and cool in
the summer.   Price $1200.
Address,
Box" A" Herald
^B
J
L. P. ECKSTEIN
Barrister, Solicitor, Etc.
Opp. Postoffice,
Fort George,      -     B.C.
P. A. Landry J. H. McGregor J.F.Temi-leton
T. A. Kelly, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
BrltUh    Cnlumbia    Land    Surveyors
Land Aftenta Timbo^Cruisers
Chancery Chambers, Lnnitley Street, V1CTOUIA,
U.C, P.O. Boit 152, Phone 684.
McGregor Building, Third Street. SOUTH PORT
GEORGE. II. C.
t.'A_i'^'^'A_'A*__:_X'J-_'A*'A_:'A_'A_Z 3
ft Do you contemplate f
A       BUILDING?        ►<
ft
f
f
First btreeta     k?
?A
9t Then Investigate" our workmanship and rt
t4 get our estimates tt
3       DANFORTH & M'INNIS ft
« Contractors | Hamilton and R
A and Builders "': "'   '-'"' *•
J. A. Manahan & Co.
Signs and
Decorating
Central Avenue      -      FortGeorge
Fort George Electrical Construction & Supply Co.
Contract Work Promptly Attended to and Estimates Cheerfully Given.
If You have Work of any Kind in Our Line Let Us Figure
With You.
P. 0. Boi 44
Pilose       1
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
FORT GEORGE
Dtawn 203
The
Little Nugget
Cafe
The most motlern and best-appointed
cafe in Fort Georgo,
FIRST-CLASS CUISINE
Meals       -        50 Cents
Short Orders a Specialty
Mus. F. C. Nahrwald, Proprietress
Cor. Hamilton and Third
South Fort Gecrge.
FIRST-CLASS
DRESSMAKING
Apply Wesley's cottage,
Rear Close & Brown Co.
Own your own home! You
can build your future home
now at thc minimum of expense.
No building is too large
or tao small to receive
our careful attention.
Blue prints and plans furnished.
Get our estimates.
Bronger & Flynn |
Contractors and Builders i
SOUTH FOKT GEORGE        j G.T.P. READY IN ArKIL
13
East End lo Reach Fort George
and West End Burns Lake
by First of Year.
Hazelton, B.C.- Speaking of
railway construction, J. W, Stewart, of the contracting firm of
Foley, Welch & Stewart, announced while here that the road
bed would be completed and the
rails connected up in April next
year.
Every contractor is making
great headway. All the camps
are working full forces and the
contractors are all on the job
urging men, horses and machinery to the utmost,
Mr, Stewart stated that by the
first of the year the steel would
be into Fort George from the east
and to the lower end of Burns
Lake on the west end by the
same time, leaving only about a
hundred miles of steel to lay before the spring. By April, 1914,
he looked to see the connecting
link completed.
From all reports received in
New Hazelton the construction
of the G.T.P. was never shoved
faster than at present.    All the
contractors had lots of men; they
have lots of supplies and the big
freighting outfit is able to keep I
the supplies up.    As the steel is j
advancing fast from both ends i
the freighting distance is shorter
and the time faster.   Conditions
are more favorable for fast time
now than ever before.
If there is nothing serious interrupts the work through trains
will be running on the G.T.P. by I
next midsummer or earlier,
lllUSUtlie   LU  UiUOG   nuu    .,^.~   	
I ber licenses from the crown that
the Government is prepared to
give careful consideration, to any
argument against an increase in
the royalty that may be advanced. But at the same time it
should not be forgotten that the
Government, in all questions of
its administration, owes a duty
to the people of British Columbia
and in the matter of the timber
resources of the Province it is
essential that the return in revenue should be arranged for on
a fair and equitable basis,
about Masset who nave tnj»».-	
I their plight be made known.   Numbers
1 to 50 in the matrimonial  lottery are
! said to be without exception young
and good looking. Some have a few
minor defects, a few smoke and chew
but assurance is given Hr.it none of
them are partial to the rough stuff,
whatever that is. All of them would
make good husbands and .".nnounce
themselves as anxious to hear from
some good women.
Pity the love-lorn swains of Masset,
which is on Graham Island off the British Columbia coast. Bachelors there
have sent out a Macedonian cry for
wives and they threaten to leave their
island home because of their lonely lot.
All persons are warned that
anyone caught dumping refuse
in the Fraser River will be prosecuted.
By Order,
HEALTH DEPARTMENT.
Herald Ads. Bring Results
l'HONE 16
P. O. BOX •
The B. C Stabl
Light and Heavy Horses for Sale and Hire.
Single and Double Driving Horses.
Saddle Horses.       Good Buggies and Lurry.
Draying, Freighting and Excavating Done.
WHITE &  WESTOBY     -      -     Proprietors
WILL RECONSIDER
ROYALTY ON TIMBER
GENERAL CONTRACTING
We are opening a branch of our Vancouver contracting business at
tbis point. We have built several of the largest buildings in the city
of Vancouver.
Estimates rendered on all kinds of Contracting,
Building, Store Fronts, Counters, Etc.
REINFORCED CONCRETE WORK A SPECIALTY.
Matheson & Gordon
FORT GEORGE and SOUTH FORT GEORGE
—it proves that other people
will read yours.
1 THE HERALD covers the Fort George
District from end to end.
1 Pre-emptors, Railwaymen and Business
Houses working or operating in the district
all read THE HERALD.
Victoria, B.C.—The possibility
of deriving a larger  and  more
proportionate revenue from the
timber resources of British Columbia is the main object of the
inquiry into the royalty question
which is  being  undertaken hy
Hon. W. R.  Ross, commencing
at Vancouver on September 8th.
The matter is one that affects
the  interests of  the  public at
large.   After deliberation which
involved   consideration  of  the
subject  from  many angles the
conclusion has been reached that
the stumpage is in some instances being sold for less than its
worth and the object of  an increased,    and  possibly   graded
royalty is to insure that the timber  resources,   which are   the
property of the people, as represented by the crown, yield a revenue that is considered commensurate with   their  great   value,
At present the royalty is 50 cents
per thousand feet, board measure, but this is insufficient.   It
is not considered a wise policy
that the timber men should be
enriched at the expense of the
public, and  while  the  government is anxious to do everything
in  its  power  to encourage the
lumber industry the duty of safeguarding the public  interests is
paramount to every other consideration.
lt is with this object in mind i
that Hon. W. R, Ross, the Minister of Lands, is setting forth
to an important step forward in
the timber policy of the government, It is his hope that evidence will be submitted by all
lumbermen to him, who have interests in the Province and that
those who are unable to appear
before him in person will make
out memoranda of their case and
forward them to he considered
before definite legislation is
drawn up.   This  course should
LIMITED
H PULiJ
FOR SIR RICHARD
,  heading   "United
a Man   Like  Sir
n,l(.,"theSanFran-
lublishes the fol-
[Jncier
States N
Richard
cisco Examine
imviiig editorial:
10 ,hl everything but name,
British Columbia is an indepen-
Exercising its sov-
British Columbia
down if a Sir Richard McBride insulted and our citizens outsat in the seat m which William raged, robbed and murdered by
Jennings Bryan preaches and the unrebuked and unpunished
proses of impossible  universal savages across the Rio Grande."
dent stati
■Mini power,
■jen the issue of  tim-
e and fishing  licenses
and has denied to
elis the right to buy or
1 within the boundaries
anu
have vigoro
court of i
has
ber, mini"
to Oriei
these a!
own Ian
of the province,
"There exists between Great
Britain and Japan a treaty of al
]j;imv  Which  is  both military
tical, and the Japanese
rorously protested to the
ames against the
,i British Columbia.   The
British Government, in turn, has
notified Sir Richard McBride, the
premier of the province, of the
protest of Japan.   And the reply
0f Sir Richard  McBride to the
imperial government  is   plain,
brief and straight to the point.
" 'The Province of British Columbia,' he says 'is sovereign in
control of its internal affairs.
This province has legislated in
regard to Orientals within its
boundaries, and this legislation
it is determined to enforce.' "
"Tiny 1 nveil men in the Canadian Northwest, evidently-
mi n whose veins are full of blood
andiron, This Sir Richard McBride, now, as you will observe,
mingles no grape juice with his
diplomacy, nor any milk and
water, He does not rant nor
flourish big sticks, nor wheedle
nor whine plaudits of universal
peace, lh* speaks for his people
firmly, emphatically, in the
strong, modest words of a modest, strong man who knows exactly what he means to do and
knows that he will do it.
"It was men of that breed who
signed the   great Declaration;
who knelt behind the rail fences
at Bunker Hill; who fought the
sea fights   that    immortalized
tlie names of Hull and Decatur
and Rogers and Lawrence; who
fell to the  man at the Alamo;
*ho triumphed at Buena Vista;
who met each other with equal
% on the fields of that great
Wt which began at Bull Run
tended at Appomattox.
"What   this  United    States
needs just now is a secretary of
state built on the specifications
01 Sir Richard McBride—a man
™o can distinguish the line at
Mich national efforts to preserve
peace cease to become admirable
and become pusillanimous; a man
who neither blusters nor cringes,
■ rt who affirms  his  country's
sovereign dignity as a matter of
lli,l is ready  to keep that
's honor sweet with the
is with courtesy and lion-
baling.
have  had  a Seward, a
"nl a Bayard, and we did
not need to look toward Canada
jj'th unions eyes in those days.
Now we have Mr. Secretary Bry-
an' and grape juice diplomacy,
a«d academic twaddle of univer-
S;i1 I'eaee and peripatetic lectur-
'n8 campaigns, with platitudious
[■Jngues to the gentler sex of
1,1111 Anders   and the sword of
J nation rusty in the scabbard
"'-' every peon  spits at our
aSand shoots  down unarmed
yencat1   men  and   outrages
M ,.esa American   women   in
' ^lc° at his own infernal, cow-
ZlZ']]] a"d Pleasure!
ch Wo,'hl   that we could ex-
ange prjme   ministers  with
"tl8n Columbia, if but for a
y-   A.  voice  of courage and
' 1,mar»d would speak the indig-
Yourself a Home
lm?rov^Vffllrt*lli,„n¥bu^lnBt^«l11 thla city are to eonfomHty with the wnemlly
5» £r tfi ll" now ■™8ibl° to secure every requisite here for the* build-
home £ ^*SVff^^tenla*i?Wn,lbteJ?ri««* > *-*••' aeaign und build your tuture
nome lu suit jour ideas.   LE.T US TALK IT OVER. OK WHITE
D.  A. BREWSTER
p-0- Box 17- . South Fort George, B.C.
country
' sword;
"We
Blaine
Here Are
A Few Things We Keep
in Stock which perhaps cannot be bought
anywhere else in Northern B. C.
LOUIS PIPES    G. B. D. PIPES    CRAVEN TOBACCO    VANGUARD WATCHES
A Full Line of GROCERIES Just Arrived,
The t. A. Blair Bargain House
THIRD STREET, -        -        SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Fort George Trading& Lumber Co., Ltd.
STEAMBOATS
Lumber and Builders' Supplies
The large capacity of our Mills ensures our customers PROMPT DELIVERIES from a full-assorted and high-grade stock of
Siding
Mouldings
Shiplap
manufactured for Fall trade, also DIMENSIONS, BOARDS, ETC.
in any quantities.
Our Fall Stock of Builders' Supplies
is now in our warehouses here. We carry full assortments of BEAVER
WALL BOARD, SASH, DOORS, COTTAGE-FRONT WINDOWS (late3t
designs), STORE FRONTS, READY ROOFING, BUILDING PAPER (the
famous P. & B. insulator?) SHINGLES (XXX Clear Cedar from the Coast
Mills. These are the highest grade Shingles in the world, and make the
most economical roof you can put on.)
Come in and Get Figures on Material for Your Building.
Yards and Offices-Second Street, SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
Telephone One-One.
r
~-^\
DENTISTRY
Why neglect your teeth and suffer all kinds of
digestive disorders ?
You have an opportunity now of having your
teeth fixed as good as you could in Vancouver,
by DR. KEELEY, the well known Vancouver
Dentist, at practically the same cost.
Gold Inlays.
Gold or Porcelain Crowns,
Plates that look natural, that
articulate properly and that fit,
Bridge work a specialty,
Gold or Porcelain fillings,
Come in and have your mouth
examined,
All work guaranteed.
Dr. KEELEY,
PAINLESS EXTRACTION.      JOHNSON BLDG.
MAIL UKUJEJta
We do a large mail order business
and guarantee satisfaction.
Our stock of general merchandise
is large and up-to-date, which enables us to fill all orders quickly.
\
ft
ft
f
f
f
ft
f.
f
i
Give us a trial
John A. Fraser
|j Front Street
Quesnel, B. C.  i
WILLOW RIVEH
British Columbia
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company are
now disposing of the remaining portion of their
lots in the new town of Willow River at the confluence of the Fraser, Salmon and Willow rivers.
By those who are in close touch of the true conditions, this new town is considered to be one of
future importance in Central British Columbia.
In investing in Willow River property be sure
that your property comes to you direct from the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company—make no
mistake in this. There is only one official and
original Grand Trunk Pacific Railway town of
Willow River at the confluence of the Fraser,
Salmon and Willow rivers. It is located on Lot
785. Station site was approved by Board of Railway Commissioners under date of March 26th,
1912, Order No. 16179. We have no interest in
outside subdivisions. For authentic Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway maps of Willow River and detailed
information call on
F. W. CRAWFORD
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, BRITISH COLUMBIA
or address
Transcontinental Townsite Co. Ld.
Authorized Agents Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
WINNIPEG
tr
'-%
REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS
A Choice Acreage Subdivision
For Sale En Bloc
THE  best available subdivision  in the Fort George District is
offered for sale by the owners.   The property is located opposite
South Fort George townsite on deep water.    The very best of land.
The survey is complete and the land ready for marketing.    Price
on application.
HAMILTON AVE.      ....       SOUTH FORT GEORGE
V
_J
HOTEL
Corner Fourth and Hamilton        -       South Fort George, B. C.
A NEW AND UP-TO-DATE HOTEL.
Bright and comfortable  rooms  and
suites at the Empress,       :      :
Rates on Application.
lo.
WARCUP
Proprietor
Fort George, B.C. Victoria, B.C.
V. V. Burden. Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Gvil Engineer*, Dominion & B. C. I.aml Surveyors
Survoya of Lnnds, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
J
WANTED- Inside business property in South FortGeorge. H.
J. Haslett & Co., corner Third
and Laselle.
Everybody's
Doing It!
Doing what? Getting their clothes
French Dry Cleaned at the Wardrobe
Cleaner's.
Goods Called For and Delivered
on Short Notice.
A. D. Southern, - Prop.
Fourth St.    -    South Fort George.
Phone 42.
' MAGNIFICENCE DE
NORTH COUNTRY
J,  K.  Cornwall Describes New
Empire of Northern British
Columbia.
J. K. Cornwall of Edmonton,
who with a party including Emerson Hough has just returned
from the north, declares that his
trip has convinced him more and
more that the Peace River country was to be an annex to British Columbia. All the rivers to
the Pacilic, and all the timber,
turned to the Pacific. "It might
be true that at Fort Smith," said
Mr. Cornwall, "there are port-
aees of 300 feet high, and rapids
i.f 25 feet in depth but what
matters that, when all the rivers
run to the west,"
"Since we leftAthabascaLand-
ing, until we reached Prince Rupert, we never saw a sleeping
cu' or a decent meal. But that
does not matter. When we go
out into the North, we look for
northern conditions. Throughout our whole trip we were
amazed by the magnificence of
the country and the difficulty of
navigation. We went from Edmonton to Athabasca Landing
by train and thence by scows to
Fort McMurray. There was a
portage to Smith Landing of
some 300 feet, but from there we
ran down the McKenzie river to
Fort McPherson, which occupied
two and a half weeks.
"Finally we arrived at Fort
McPherson and thence made our
way down to Dawson and Skagway."
Mr. Cornwall has been for
many years the pioneer of the
Peace River country, and he was
untilia year ago its representative in the Alberta Legislature.
He made up his mind that he
could do more for the country by
personal efforts outside of politics than by political efforts, and,
..•...■■■■■MMjT.nu.*!ic.niiiJi«iiui»iM«iiBi mmmma^l^^^
WANT ADVERTISMENTS
UllSieJ-ULC.   OCI-VIICU    vi**~     	
of a party which was headed by
Emerson Hough, the author of
the Mississippi Bubble and who
knows how many other novels.
With Mr. Hough, he took with
him a representative of one of |
the largest picture film concerns
in America, in the person of Mr.
C. A. Lupert. Mr. Hough said
he had travelled 5380 miles
through an absolntely new country in Canada since May 28.
Tenaers ▼* <"«^«
Tenders will be received by the undersigned
for 10 Cords of 20-inch
Firewood delivered at
the Public School.
Address-
Secretary School Eoard.
I Look at Some of Our Prices 1
Fresh
Beef
Mutton
Meats Z
Wholesale and retail
THE B. C. MEAT MARKET
FORT CEORGE AND
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
WOOD
Four-Foot Mill Wood
$3.75 Per Cord Delivered
This wooil will be  sold  at ?5  per
cord this winter.
Phone 11
Fort George Trading & Lumber Co. Ltd
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Special on Baking Powder.
WANTED—Girl capable of keeping
books and able to do typewriting
in restaurant. Also one cashier.
Apply  Club Cafe between 2 and 4.
LADIES WEAR-Closing out business
by September 18th. Anyone wishing the latest fall and winter coats,
suits, evening dresses, silk patterns
etc., should call before that time.
Some Bargains-THE LADYWEA.R
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
Notice Is Hereby Given that the
partnership heretofore existing between
us, the undersigned, as merchants and
manufacturing confectioners, has this
day been dissolved by mutual consent,
and all debts owing to said partnership
are to be paid to, and all claims against
the partners or their tusiness on or be-
fore this date, are to be presented to
William Thorne, by whom suid will be
paid. JOHN McGAGHRAN (retiring)
WILLIAM THORNE.
Dated at South Fort George, B.C.,
this 5th day of September, 1913.     13-5
Shoe Repairing!
LADIES AND GENTS , SHOES
NEATLY REPAIRED BY AN
EXPERIENCED WORKMAN IN
A WELL EQUIPPED SHOP.
FORT GEORGE DRUG CO.
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Hair mi
We have just received as
fine a line of HAIR
BRUSHES as is carried
in any store in any city.
Price's Baking Powder, 51b $2.50
"   2 1-21b 1.25
     12 oz. .50
Cow Brand Soda      -      - .15
Silver Gloss Starch   -      - .15
Celluloid Starch       -      - .15
St. James'Tea, 1 lb -      - .40
Tetley's Tea, 1 lb and 3 lb
tins, per lb   -            - 45c
Kippered Herring     -      - .25
Lobsters      -      -      -    - .50
Yeast Cakes (Roya|) .* fw
All kinds of spices
Grape Nuts
Post Tosties
Buckwheat Flour, lo lb
Canned beans and peas
Van Houton's Cocoa
Brown Beans
Lima Beans
Lipton's Tea, half lh
Christie's Sodas (large)   .
.10
.20
.20
1.15
.25
.30
.10
.15
.25
.45
This is Less than Cost.   Get your Winter Surd,
while they last.
<rown unr
L
KS*i
GENERAL MERCHANTS.
Laselle Avenue and Second Street     :      South Fort Ge
P. BURNS & CO. Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all Kinds of
Fresh  asud  Cured
GOODS DELIVERED TO ALL
PARTS OF CITY.
Butter, Cheese, Eggs;
Highest Prices Paid for Hides and Live Stock
s. j. Mcdonald,
Fort George and South Fort George
Phone 36
Local Manager
FARM LAND
IN THE
FORT GEORGE DISTRICT
NECHACO VALLEY
Carefully selected land at reasonable
prices and on long terms. We own
every acre we offer for sale, and can
give guaranteed title.
R. R. WALKER, Resident Agent of the North
Coast Land Co,, Ltd.   .   South Fort George, B.C.
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 619 to 624 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver,B.C
London Office:   6 Old Jewry.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, - - - $1,500,000.
OLAF, BRANDT
Shop First St. Near Landing of Steamer Chilcotin.
/*"
THE
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON  STS.
DAVIS & PITCHER, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
Nechaco Valley
We have a number of choice tracts of Farming Land
in the rich Nechaco Valley that are worth careful attention by the Farmer or Investor.
Lot 842, located some 12 miles west of the Mud River
and having over one mile of water frontage on the Nechaco River. It adjoins property owned by the Grand
Trunk Pacific on which they are to build a station and
yards. This property is Crown Granted and can be purchased at $25.00 an acre on good terms,
Within one and one-half miles of the town of South Fort
George we have three five-acre tracts of Garden Land
which we can offer for a few days at from $125.00 an
acre on easy payments.   The soil is river bottom deposit.
Blocks of Land from 10,000 Acres Up for Colonization Purposes.   Particulars
and Information From.
The Northern Development
Company, Limited
403-404 Carter-Cotton Building   -   -   -   - Vancouver, B.C.
HAMILTON AVENUE
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
The Lines
We Carry:
Dr. Jaeger's Woollen Goods.
W. G. & R., Regal, and Deacon Shirts.
Leckie,  Beresford,   Floresheim, Ames-Holden
and McCready Shoes.
Waterproof Tin Pants for Men,
Complete Lines of Sweater Coats, Sox, Mitts etc,
HURRY UP Those
Fall Shipments
If you don't, they will get stalled at Quesnel. Navigation closes in a few weeks. The quickest service is given
by the
B.X. STEAMERS
The fastest and best equipped boats running into Fort George.
DON'T DELAY-SHIP NOW!
British Columbia Express Company
Auto, Stage and Steamboat Owners.
1913
| 1836 |      AsseU Eiced Fifty Million Dollars
The Bank of British North America
Your money la safer in the Bank than in your houBe or In jour
pocket. It ia not tied up. You can get it out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold.  COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders Issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH.
J. MUNRO, MAHABEI
Capital Paid Up:
JI 1,660,000
Capita! Authorized:
126,000.000
Reserve and rniiivjW''roflli:
The Royal Bank of Canada
Incorporated 1869.
-WITH WHICH IS UNITED-
The Traders Bank of Canada
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
A GENERAL BANKING  BUSINESS TRANSACTS
Montreal
Head Office
Fort George Branch.
D. MURltAY, Manager
H. W. GROSS
A. C
BUCHEL
F
SOUTH'FORT GEORGE, B.C.
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp Stoves, Hot-air Furnaces, Etc.
Sole Agents Nagel-Chase Celebrated Gasoline Lighting h)Z^
The newest and most modern
hotel in the northern interior
^
Best of wines,
liquors and cigars
Albert Johnson
prop
__4__~" 1

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