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The Delta Times Aug 13, 1914

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Array JUL^-Oia,
aMMBMt'
THE DELTA TIMES
Volume 7
LADNER, B. 0. THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
DELTA'S CALL
TO ARMS
Residents and Campers Answer Call
to Mobilize Westminster
Fusiliers.
Two officers from the 104th Regiment at New Westminster visited
Ladner on Monday for the purpose
oi notifying men belonging to that
corps, who are working on tne Delta, that they must report at once
foi military service. Many of the
men camping at Boundary Bay have
answered to the call to arms and do
not mind losing their holidays while
they have the privilege of serving
their country.
NORTH WILL BENEFIT.
Prince Kupert Will Handle Bulk of
Commerce Following Alaskan
Hallway Development.
MONTREAL, Aug. 12.���Rapid
progress is being made on the preliminary railway surveys in Alaska
and the engineering commission expects to have the reports completed
and ready for presentation in Washington in December. To Lleut.-Col.
Arthur Mears has been assigned the
task of Superintendent of Construction of the Alaskan Railways. He
was one of Col. Goethal's assistants
on the Panama Canal, being appointed chief engineer on the Panama
Railway.
This railway development ln Alaska is being watched with keen interest by the people of British Co
Iumbia.
BUILDINGS HAVE
VERYGLOSEGALL
While Burning Weeds    I. O. O.
Building Its, Threatened By
Fire.
What might have been a very
serious fire but which was luckily
stopped in time, started on Tuesday afternoon In the rear of the
Odd Fellows' building underneath
Dr. Wilson's window.
While at work in his shop Mr. E.
DEATH DUE
TO IGNORANCE
Inquest Touching Death of    Indian
Boy  Urges Attention of Indian Department.
VALLEY MARKET.
Mr.
struction of the thousand miles of
Alaskan railway by the United
States government at the cost of
���$35,000,000 will be followed by the
extension  of the lines through  the
5J3EK? AfL **�� & I BS   5��B? econnnaeSn?nwirS
Howard heard the crackling, and on
It is expected that the con- i investigating found that    a      large
LOCAL NEWS.
bunch of dried weeds were burning
furiously alongside the building. The
flames had just started on the woodwork,   burning   several   boards   and
An inquest was held on Saturday
aifternoon, the 8th instant in the police court before Coroner King touching the death of the infant son of
Jasper Turner, an Indian residing at
the Deas cannery. The following
jury were sworn in; Foreman Mr.
D, B. Grant, Messrs. E. L. Berry,
P. Smith, R. L. Handford, H. L. Wilson and G. T. Baker.
Evidence was produced whicih
showed that the child came to his
death   through   the   criminal   ignor
had not the fire been stopped when 'ance on  the  part  of  the nurse,  an
at present White Leghorn hens laying, and these hens are only four
"id a half months old, which can
Jl'oe taken as some record.
/> Mr. Nelson Howard of Fort George
cycled from there last Wednesday,
arriving in New Westminster on Sunday and is now visiting with his relatives in Ladner.
Mr.  Carson   went  on  business  to
the city on Monday.
The meeting of the W. C. T. U.
was held last Tuesday night at Mrs.
Lannlng's camp at Grauer's beach, j
but owing to the absence of most of
the officers no business was transacted.
Mr. O. A. Murphy made a business
trip to Vancouver on Monday
the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway.
Prince Rupert In particular will
benefit by the opening up of Alaska.
That city justly claims to be the real
gateway to the North. With its
magnificent harbor, Its dry dock
just approaching completion and its
ideal situation���it is the nearest
Canadian city to Alaska���it will
handle the bulk of the commerce
over the newly created routes.
COUNCIL  .MEETING.
lt did there would have been a very
dangerous Are.
CONDITIONS IN  BELGIUM.
At the meeting held in the council chambers on Saturday night the
The Ladles' Aid of the Methodist I lo\3ovfta%  communications   were  re-
church   met  last  Thursday  at  Mrs.   ce'ved.
Leaning's camp at Boundary Bay.       .  Fr��m_, the   Vancouver   Exhibition
Misss W. McCallum returned to ' Association, which the clerk was in-
V. ilner on Monday evening. istructed to reply to.
Mrs. Nelson returned home on I ,FrorD w- Holden, regarding re-
Saturday after an extended visit on,1'airs t0 the 0Iiver road* wh'<-"h ar��
Vancouver Island  with her  friends. ' ����^K l�� be attended to.
Mr. J. Johnson motored to Van- Tne Ro>'al Columbian hospital
mover on Tuesday afternoon. jnotltied the council of patients who
The voting son of Mr. and Mrs. nad been admitted.
Barnes 'while playing on the porch ' The Tratle license By-law Was
in front of the house on Monday Passed as being finally reconsidered,
afiernoon, fell off sustaining a frac- [and the Delta Revenue By-law, 1914,
tered arm. The little chap ls pro- Passed the first and second readings.
;ressing favorably Repair  By-law  191*1  and  the  Delta
Mr.  Barnes made a business trip I Dyking and Drainage By-law, 1892,
Correspondent's    Interesting    Summary of What Is Going on���Results of German Invasion.
LONDON, Aug. 11.���"The Daily
Telegraph's" correspondent, who
witnessed much of the Liege fighting, says that the German artillery
was excellent, but expresses surprise
at the infantry in fighting in close
order. Battalion after battalion
was thrown into the field in solid
formation, but, he adds, the estimate
of 25,000 lossess was an exaggeration.
Most of the captured Germans
were from 18 to 24 years old. Their
gray uniforms were stripped of all
insignia and their helmets were covered with gray cloth.
The civilians of the town, says the
correspondent, showed the greatest
courage under bombardment and ih
the face of alarms brought in by
frightened refugees. The German
shells did little damage to the city
in the angle between the rivers Our
the and Meuse.
Indian woman, who attended the
mother, death finally resulting from
hemorrhage.
It was recommended that the department of Indian affairs issue instructions to the medical officers,
agents and clergy connected with
the Indians in British Columbia to
Id struct the mothers as to the proper care of infants at birtlh.
From evidence produced at the inquest it would appear that the same
ignorance as shown in this case has
with fatal results attended several
other cases, the Indian women acting as nurses among themselves.
DUKE WILL GO TO CAMP.
io Vancouver on Monday.
Dr. Ottewell and wife motored on
Sunday to Ocean Park.
Mrs. Devereaux and a large party
of friends motored to Boundary Bay
on Sunday, spending the day there.
.Mrs. W. R. Ellis and daughters returned on Monday after spending
.-une time visiting at Barnston Island.
Mr.   R.  Evans,  a   gentleman  well
known In Ladner, has responded to
his country's call  to  a
for New Westminster on  Monday to
pass the necessary medical examina-
t        IS.
Mr. Haley Wilson and Miss Wilson
ri   visitors in  Vancouver on Tues-
passed the third reading.    The Delta ,
Dyke   and   Drainage   By-law,   1895,
Repair   By-law,   1914,      passed   the
third reading.
The usual monthly accounts were
ordered paid.
THREATENING   DUTCH   BORDER.
THE HAGUE, Aug. 12.���The German   troops are  assembling heavily
rTsTnT'iAft   al0"��  the  Dutch  fontier provinces
.��  -w���-,i_-, tn [of Gelderland, Zeeland and Brabant.
I.lmburg Is placed    under    martial
law.
RESERVISTS CALLED.
Fieltl    Artillery    From    Anonymous
Canadian    Accepted ��� Private
Funds Equip Infantry.
OTTAWA, Aug. 11.���R. B. Bennett. M. P., of Calgary, is bearing
jointly with Hamilton Gault, of Montreal, the cost of raising the regiment to be known as Gault's Infantry,  for service in  Europe.
A camp  is  being  prepared  at  Val-
cartier for H. R. H. and the Duchess
of   Connaught.     His   Highness   will
The  factories and I supervise the equipment and mobil-
coal mines were operating through- j Ization of the troops,
out the fighting. >!     The government has been offered
Force Change ol Plans, ;anf*   has  accel,te(-  a   fully  equipped
_,. T    , ... battery of field artillery for service
The    correspondent     writing    on  in   E Th,      ,    Awards   the
Sunuay, predicted that the Germans
Hsa   \.   Whitworth   visited   Van-.     OTTAWA, Aug. 11.��� The Imperial |
couver   on   Tuesday   attc-idinr     the   authorities have advUM the govern-!
���tin!*  of the  Red     Cross    -nirses : ��*-*"t   that   all   Brit.sit   reservists   In
li ii very strong intention o! join-   Canada are required at home to join !
Ing, I the   British   army.     There   are   be-
Mrs.   D.  A.  McKee ami  Mrs   I. J. I tween four and five (h.vusand reserv-:
'   sen and familv have re'nrne-1 from   Jsta in  Canada, nios.lv  in the West, i
month's camping at Engl let Bluff. | more particularly in  British Coluin
The   .-amp   "A dam less   Eden"     at [
could not take the forts without
enormous sacrifices, iwhich would
cripple their right wing. He expressed the opinion that the German
plan of sweeping down the Meuse to
Sedan must be abandoned because it
has already been so long delayed.
He says the Franch have massed five
amy corps in the Germans' path.
The   Germans   will   bring   their
heavy    artillery against    tbe forts,
which will   stand   much   bombardment.    In the opinion of the corre- i
spondent, the Germans have decided ;_    ,
to advance along the south side of|fjr~".,s "l,w
the Meuf-e, leaving Liege.
Hundred Spies Shot.
Belgium is filied with German
spies. Six hundrea already have
been arrested and one hundred were
shot yesterday. Some of those captured were wearing uniforms of gendarmes,   civic
Empire's defence is said to have been
made by a wealthy easterner, who
was for many years prominent in
western and federal politics.
HOME TRUST AT GERMAN TRADE
May Release German Patents to the
British Manufacturers���Banking Barred to Germans.
LONDON, Aug. 11.���In the House
of Commons today Mr. W. L. Runcl-
man announced that the Board of
considering releasing
for the use of British manufacturers
all patents owned by Germans that
are registered in the United Kingdom. This action would result in
enormous losses to German manufacturers, all of whom have various
processes patented In this country.
Germans  have  been  forbidden  to
���uards,   soldiers and  engage in banking    business, except
via.    The militia  department    thi
morning mailed a let'.e.- to every re  . ,
cerviBt  in  Canada,  informing them | !*ea.rl��? f.a.lBf.num____s:
that  they  must  at   once  respond  t*
Britain's call,  and  ii. ron:panied    by
transportation to Irc.lar.d.    It Is ex-
Mlss Thirkle visited Vancouver on. pected  that  Wlthil   a   week all Brit-
Tueeday, i .sh army r.^.-ylst-t will be on   their
Mr.   Pearson   motored   to   Vancou-   way to the Mother Country.
i - indary Bay has gone Into liquid
atlon, the young ladies'1 returning to
their respective homes last Monday.
Mr. T. Foster motored to Vancou-
vei on Tuesday morning
officers of the Belgian army. Many with the permission of the Home
were armed with bombs and revolv- Secretary. The order includes bank
ers and   were riding  iu automobiles  directors.      In  the    directorates    of
They also ; English   banks  are  many  prominent
had   In   their   possession  telegrams .Germans.
and letters with the counterfeit c.S-l The White Star line steamer
natures ot the Belgium Minister of Olympic's sailings for August and
War. | September have been cancelled.
Just   before  nnd   after  the  fight-]       Classic Red  Cross  Hospitals.
ing began private signs were discov-      The Duke of Portland has placed
ver on Tuesday.
Mrs. M'-Crea was a visitor in Van-
couver on  Monday.
Mr. Handford made a business trip
t" the city on Monday.
Amongst the  week-end  visitors at
the  Delta hotel  were Mr. and Mrs.
A    Miicdougiili, Messrs. T. Keogh, F.
" oung, A. Evans, E. L
H.  Paterson.
"wing to sudden changes In the
weather last Friday the ball game
m 1). 'luled to tnke place between Lad-
: ��� i- and   the  Malklns  of Vancouver
i   postponed.
Ir. (lenient spent the early days
,      Ust   week   on   business   In     the
JSity,
Miss Mobbs of Vancouver Is the
l-'uest of Mrs. John McKee at Ros-
. tta.
Mr. N. A. McDiarmid went to Van-
���' iver on Tuesday.
Mlsa   Marshall  of Chilliwack. who
1.AKER..I-1-.
Next Friday evening at 6:15 p.m.
sharp, the last ball game of the sea-
son will be played In Ladner when
Leckie's team from the city meet
Kirkland and the local players. The game
promises to be one of the best and
I., ckie'l have the reputation in Vancouver of being a very smart lot.
ered on bridges, military works and J the famous Welbeck Abbey In. Work-
aqueducts Indicating that those-sop at Ihe disposition of the Retl
structures should be blown up. Se-;Oross; the Duke of Westminster hns
vere precautions have now been'offered the society both of his town
taken by the military authorities and I an! country seats, and Mr. L. Har-
no one Is admitted at the railway court, secretary for the colonies, has
station without military permits.        given his country    residence, Nune-
'ham Park, Oxford, for convalescents.
bookkeeper in the White Store.
Mrs.   VV.   A.   Kirkland   was  a  visitor
in New Westminster on  Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmhurst returned
to Ladner on Wednesday alte.
spending a few days visiting friends
In Vancouver.
Mr. Hamilton of the Royal Hank
of Canada has been removed to
Ladysmith where ho Is on relief duty
The War Minister has issued a
proclamation that every German and
Austrian who does not declare himself within twenty-four hours will be
considered  a  spy.    Since   the  Flan
U-15 the First.
Financial conditions ln England
nre returning to normal. Although
there is a great dislocation In many
tiers provinces   were   placed   under (trades, the prices of foodstuffs have
martial law two days ago, more than  risen on'y slightly.
have been ar-
two    thousand spies
rested.
Forty thousand volunteers have
been formed into twenty regiment!
of two thousand each.
It is reported from Bel fort that
In  view of the execution of French
subjects   by   Germans   seven   promi-        ., ,    ,
nenl   residents ol   the German  town ""��� the TntP of ��PVPTal ***-** ""'"
The Admiralty has Informed the
Mayor of Birmingham that the cruiser Birmingham, which was put in
commission last February, sank the
first German submarine of the war���
the D-1B,
Ilritnln's   Fifth   Line.
Recruits for the army are enlisting
Has been  visiting Miss  May  Kittson , at present.
irned home on Monday, Miss Kitt- |     Miss  Myrtle  Alexander  is  visit.m;
���ii returning with her to spend the   her
���i > I*.
Mr. and Mrs. O. Zeigler of Vancouver siient Sunday at Mrs. Howard's in Ladner.
'-Ir. ami  Mrs.  Charles Arthur and
aunt, Mrs. P. McCrea.
Messrs.   McClellan     and     Munroe
spent the week end in Vancouver.
Mr.   Walters  motored   to  Vancouver on  business on  Wednesday.
Mr.   and   Mrs.  McAllister  or  New
Mrs. W. A. Kirkiaiid was a visitor   Westminster  motored  to  I.adner on
tored   to   Vancouver   on   Monday   Sunday.
New   Westminster  to  meet  Mrs. I     Mrs.   Whittaker   antl   family     are
'*rpe of Nanaimo who is anticipat-'spending  a   lew   weeks  visiting    in
spending several  weeks visiting   Vancouver
of Montreaux-Vieiix,
frontier, have been
French us hostages.
just   over
taken  by
the
the
'   Mrs, Arthur's.
..   N|r   James    Rudd     returned    on
1   '-'lay  after  spending  the    wcek-
'; [| In Vancouver.
A'r.   a.   Roberts   has   taken   over
'feed's carriage and repair shop
Westham   street  and   appears  to
" doing a brisk business.
Miss  Weare  apejjt  the  week  end
' 'ii   friends   in   Vancouver   return-
11 i.adner on Tuesday afternoon.
. Mr. and Mrs. R. Wilson spent Sun-
���  at Boundary Bay.
| a day. The business men are organizing their employees into a fifth
line of tiP'fence. A majority of the
able-bodied  men  of the country  are
  drilling In their home organizations.
GERM ANT.   WELL   PROVISIONED, i Relief Funds  Merged.
  I     Queen Alexandra, who started the
BERLIN, Aug. 12���That Germany Soldiers' and Sailors' Relief Fund,
has sufficient food supplies to last a has consented to fuse her fund with
year even if all outside supplies that of the Prince of Wales. Queen
should be cut off was declared by [Alexandra and ex-Queen Marie
government officials. The Kaiser lAmelle of Portutral, visited today the
contributed two hundred thousand .headquarters of the Prince of
. . from his personal fortune, one half , Wales' fund, where they were In-
Mr. Arthur Fawcett of \ ictoria is   tQ t,._ ReA (-rog-( ,*1P ot*,er -,a*f for   formed  that It had reached $2,500,-
Ileld at New Westminster Featured
By Delta Supplies���Apples and
Plums Sell Rapidly.
Fruits and vegetables grown in
the Delta were two of the many features at the Fraser Valley Market,
neld at New Westminster on
Friday morning, August 7. There
was a good demand for all of the
supplies which sold rapidly at the
regular prices. Early apples and
plums were the two best sellers in
fruits and they averaged at 80 cents
to $1.25 per box for tbe apples and
60 cents to 80 cents for plums.
Sweet corn in the vegetable department along with celery were the
two new supplies and they sold good
at 35 cents the dozen and five cents
per bunch, respectively. Butter and
eggs remained at the usual quotations. There was large supply of
everything and a good number ln
attendance.
The following prices were quoted:
Wholesale Pouitry.
Poultry, live weight  ...   16c to 19c
'mall chicks, per crate $3.0*
Chickens, broilers, per lb. 18c to 20c
Chicks, 2 days old, each 10c to 20c
Ducks, live weight 13c to 14c
Retail Poultry.
Spring chickens,' dressed 22c
Hens, dressed, per lb. ... 18c to 21c
Squabs, each       25c
Vegetables.
Potatoes, per sack     $1.25
Potatoes, per ton    $20
Carrots, per sack    76c
Cabbages, per sack     75c
Turnips, per sack  75c
Lettuce, per bunch  6c
Onions, green per bunch.. 3 for ,5c
Asparagus, two bunches for  ...15c
String Beans, per lb 2 l-2c
Parsnips, per sack   75c
Cress, per bunch      6c
Parsley,   per  bunch       5c
Peas, per lb 2 l-2c
Cucumbers ,eaeh 6c to 10c
Cauliflower, per head      10c
'adishes,  two  bunches for   ....   5c
Tomatoes, per lb    12 l-2c
Cabbages, per head 5c to 15c
Turnips, per bunch, 3 for 10c
Endive, three heads for  10c
Eggs ana Butler.
Eggs, retail      35c to 40c
Eggs,  wholesale       35c
Butter, retail, per lb.  ...  35c to 40c
Butter, wholesale, per lb 25c
Pure Cream Cheese, lb oOc
Cottage Cheese, per lb   10c
Devonshire cream, per pint  . . .   45c
Honey, per lb    2 5c
Wholesale Meat.
Pork, per lb loc to 10 l-2c
Pork (salt) per lb   13c
Pigs, small, each $2 to $5
Mutton,   per  lb    22c
Leg of Mutton, per lb 22c
Veal, medium, per Ib 16 1-tic
Veal, large, per lb 12c to 16c
Retail Meats.
Beef, best rib roasts ... ,22c to 25c
Pork Chops  18c
Mutton    18c to 20c
Leg of Mutton       26o
Pork       20c  to   25c
Beef, pot rest   18c
I Beef, loin    28c to  30c
Beef, short loin    30c
Beer,  sirloin    27c
I Boiling Beefs 12 l-2c to 15c
j Sugar cured corned pork 15c to 20c
| Home-made pork sausage 15c to 20c
j Salted pig's head, lb 8c
I Pickled pits' shanks, per lb. . . 10e
j Sugar cured hogs' heads, lb. ... Sc
I Sugar cured corned beef. lb. , .. 15c
I Picnic Hams, lb '. lit-
Pure Lard 15c to 3'ic
Sugar  cured   bacon       22c
: .-sugar cured boneless ham .... L'ric
.Spring lamb, forequarter, each $1.50
Spring lamb, hind qr., each.. $2.50
I Fish.
'Red spring salmon, per lb. . .12 l-2c
.White Spring salmon, each ....  SOc
I Sockeye salmon, each   SOc
;Fresh Herring, 3 lbs for 25c
! Smelt, per lb    10
i Sturgeon, per lb    lf.c
'Shad,   per  lb    15c
I Soles,  per lb    10c
i Cod.   per  lb    12"/_c-
Halibut, 3 lbs   25c
;Flounders, per lb    8c
jSknte,  per  lb    8c
Tommy Cod, per lb 8c
Flowers.
'Carnations, 2 dozen    25c
J Cut Iris, per dozen  25c
Flowering plants, each . . 10. to 2 5 c
leranlums, per doz ... fi to $2.50
Dahlias, each       10c
Sweet Peas, per bunch  . .  mc to 25c
Cut Roses, per doz 10c to 25c
: Baby Itambler Rose in bloom . .
! "Ut   Stocks,   per  doz	
' Hose  bushes,  each   ....   35c to
i iladlolus,   per   doz   	
Fruit.
(Rhubarb,   per   lb	
Currants, per lb   8c to
Raspberries, per box  ....  5c to 15c
Blackberries,  per crate       $1.26
P. aches, per box 75c to $1
Early Apples, per box. . SOc to $1.26
iPlums, per basket 20c
I Loganberries, per crate   $1.50
:Black Caps, 2 boxes for    25c
DEATH OF
G. J. DOWN
Former East    Delta    Resident Melt
Shocking Death in England
Recently.
. 2 D C
25C
50c
50c
3 c
10c
OBSOLETE  FORMATION.
visiting  relatives in  Ladner.
Mr. and Mrs P. McClellan of Vancouver motored to Ladner on Sun-
day.
Mrs. Addison and daughters Irene
and Hazel and Miss Myrtle Slater
left for Vancouver on Wednesday after   .-Islting rrientls in  Ladner.
Mr. J. Hastings was a visitor in
Vancouver on Tuesday.
Mr. J. K. Brown of the B. C. Tele
relief   of   families   whose   breadwln-  f>��0.     The  manager of  this  fund  Is
ners are killed Iu battle. Mr. C. Arthur Pearson, who Is lend-
 , ling his great ability as an organizer
RETIRE BEFORE THE FRENCH.
to the  great
success.
work   with   remarkable
phone Co.,  was  in  I.adner on Tues-
'Ir. J. Newall"spent the week end I day on business,
''"'indary Bay. Mr.   and   Mrs.   Mills  of
'     W.   Forest  of  Kelly,  Douglas ' visited  Vancouver on  Monday.
('o., spent Tuesday ln I.adner on I     Mr.  Desohaney  and  a    party    or
lest, | friends motored from Vancouver on
'"""s  A.   Allen   of   New  Westmin- .Sunday.
1   'ister of Mrs. Captain Herrllng,       Mr.   Kilbert   spent   the   week  end
s   taken   Miss   Fenton's   place   as | with his family in Vancouver
BELGIUM, Aug. 10.���It was reported today that the greater pari
f.f Luxemburg which hail been occupied by the Germans, had been cleared of the invaders by the advance
of the French army.
AUSTRIAN FLEET MOVING.
Burravllla I    FORTIFYING IN M'XEMIU'KG.
LONDON, Aug. 11.���Heavy fighting between French antl German
troops In Luxemburg is reported.
The Germans fortifying strongly at
Esche ln Dutchy of Luxemburg.
ROME. Aug. 11.���via Paris, 5.30
a.m.���-An Austrian fleet of thirteen
battleships nnd sixteen torpedo boats
Is saitl to he going at full steam toward the Strait of Otranto. which
connects the Adriatic with the Ionian Sea. The probable purpose of
the fleet Is to give succor to the German cruisers Qoeben and Breslau,
which have been reported In that vicinity.
LONDON, Aug. 11.���Apart from
I.lege, the lighting of the first week,
when resolved to the proper perspective eventually, doubtless, will
be considered Insignificant. One of
the most important developments in
the eye of experts, is the general
testimony that the German infantry
formation is Obsolete and ineffective
against weapons of today, and means
an enormous slaughter if retained.
WOMEN AS TRAIN CREWS.
PARIS. Aug. 11.���Women i i
nted the Nnrtl-Sud train with the assistance of the older regulars y. s.
terday, without the slightest hitch.
The wives nnd daughters of the employees have been mobilized for this
work.
Mr. Charles James Down, aged 56
years, tather of Mr. Edward Down,
of East Delta, who had been living
at one of the cottages near Merley
bridge on the outskirts of Wimborne,
England, met with a shocking death
on Saturday, July 18, while cycling
home. In the afternoon he went to
Poole to do some shopping and on
the return journey called at. the
New Inn, Longfleet. On leaving the
inn a few minutes afterwards, lie
mounted his bicycle about the .am*
time as a motor lorry approached
him from the direction of Wimborne. It appears that deceased was
seen to move from one side of the
road to the other as if uncertain as
to which side he should go and
eventually ran into the front of the
lorry, one of the wheels of which
passed over him.
Mr. Down received shocking injuries from which he succumbed
about two hours later at the Cornelia hospital, to which he was removed. Deceased was to have been
married this month and the banns
had already been published.
His fiancoe was present at the Inquiry to give evidence, if necessary,
but she was not called. It appeared that the deceased was not an expert cyclist, although he rode a good
deal and rode steadily and quietly.
The man on the lorry gave evidence
that when hn first saw deceased he
was about tbirty yards away and
the -tter.ruai. gave three signals
with his hand to deceased to pass
the lorry on the left. The signals
were, however, apparently not seen
and in spite of the driver of the
lorry turning well to the right he
ran "right, into the front near wheel
of the lorry which passed over him.
The jury were unanimous in agree-
ng that the death was due to purely
accidental circumstances and considered that the driver and the steersman should be commended for th6
endeavors they made to avoid an
accident.
Deceased was a steady man and
well known and respected round
Ladner where he lived for upwards
of 20 years, leaving here about two
years ago for England.
Deceased leaves two sons to
mourn his loss, one of whom has
served in the British navy. On hearing of his father's illness Mr. Ted
Down of East Delta left for the old
country, cabling his friends here of
his father's death.
INDIA  RESPONDS.
Two   Divisions  ol   Native  Troops  Al-
ready Left for England���Indian
Loyalty Assured,
LONDON, Aug. 11.���Two divisions of Ghurkas and Sikhs have already sailed for Great Britain to
share in the defence. They will not
be used on the continent. A numb..
of prominent Indians bave addressed
the Marquis of Crewe, secretary ot
State for India, assuring him tha ,
whatever differences there may he
on internal troubles in India, her
people are devoted to the throne
when it faces an external foe. and
will join in whole-heartedly to secure victory for the Empire.
BOMBAY, Aug. 11.���A meeting of
the most Influential citizens of this
city has been called for the purpose
of offering to the BrVCs*- Government every assistance in the way of
men and money. The sons of many
native chiefs are begging for "the
proud privilege of making a sacrifice for the Empire."
COMPANIES ORGANIZED.
Esquimau to Be Numbered aa Well
ns Nanaimo with Independents,
OTTAWA. Aug. 12.���The Royal
Canadian Regiment is being Increased  in  Size  ai  well  as  being recruited
to full strength'. a militia order
Issued today authorizes the organisation of a company of the Royal
Canadian Regiment at Esquimau,
and an independent company of infantry with headquarters at Nanaimo, B.C., is also authorized. A number of other now regiments are being authorised, including an eight
company city corps battalion of infantry at Hull, and a squadron of
cavalry at Victoria,
An eight company regiment  of infantry with headquarters at Fernie,
B.C., is also authorized.      The     ar
fever is resulting in the organiza.
of  new  regiments  all  over  Canada.
WAS A  RAD OUESSER,
LONDON, Aug. 11.���German* Is
being given s rude awakening in several directions today, according to
messages t i the llritish embassy officials. Journalists who escaped to
Rotterdam from Berlin show how
confidently Germany counted on i "*-
things: First, an easy, swift march
through Belgium, thus enabling Germany .o -.-������-!,- through the line of
Frencb fortresses along the France
Qei man fri I ir, and, secondly, a
financial snd food panic in K*i^-
laml and Civil war in Ireland, which
Germany honed would together ensure Britain's neutrality. Both calculations failed miserably.
I THE DELTA TIMES
CORPORATION OF THE MUNIOIPAIiTr.: OF DELTA.
.'.loSIKfi K!t^ ?t  the hour of  10
^er^T"^^
Name    of   Person   Assessed.
_,.__. ,.
W.
J.   G..
Ho'.il.n, Wm...
Mardeslch, J ..
Holllnghead, J.
Pearson,  T.   R.
1...  0   	
t ampoell,   .Mrs.
Kt-llingKm.   I   A.     _^^^^^^^^^^
Carlton,  W. and J. R.  Brown	
1..isr.il. r   Est.,   Geo ������
MoCloskey,   Geo   	
Kennedy.   Robt    	
Kennedy,    Robt    	
Kennedy.    Robt	
Kennedy,   Root   	
Kennedy,   Robt    	
Kennedy.   Kol.t    	
Kennedy,   Rol.t    	
Kennedy.    Rot.t    	
Kennedy,    Rol.t    	
Kennedy,    Robt    	
Kennedy,    Rol.t    	
Kennedy.    Robt    	
Kennedy,    Robt    	
Kennedy,    Rol.t    	
Kennedy,   Robt    	
Kennedy.    Ruin    	
Kennedy,   Robt   	
Kennedy,    Robt    	
Hall.  T.   a.   and   Damaske,  C	
R.'issmurssen,   J   	
Trod.-a,   J.is    	
fhorapson,   ll.   G	
MoKenny.   J	
���Oriental   Contract   Co	
En.lersby,   W   and   Uriah   	
Ilalt-Cn..k.    II	
Hall, T. S., and Damaske, C	
Hall,  fi.  S..   Rothwell.  Dr.  Kennedy..
Kennedy.   Robt    	
Kennedy,   Robt   	
Kennedy,   Robt   	
Hall,  T.  S.,  and  Damaske,  C	
Smith,    F.    P	
StOUt,   TI	
Reid.   Susan    	
McT.ellnn.  J.   C	
Leeson,   F.   W	
Paskai,  s	
Shlbato, n	
Kennedy,    Roht    	
Kennedy,   Robt    	
Kennedy.   Root	
Robt    	
Robt    	
Robt    	
Robt    	
Robt    	
Robt    	
Kennedy
Kennedy
Kennedy
Kennedy
Kennedy
Kennedy
(Muni.  'Nells
Fraser, P. Tt.,
M'-K-nzie.   J.
Kelllnitton,   K.   A
K.-lIinu'tun.   IO.  A..
TT. wlnn.   F.   W.   ,
Smith.   H.   E���   Smith,   H
JTenner,   T	
Stf-:u-m:in.   Mrs,   M	
Parks,   Wm	
St.   Qulnten.   Mrs.   R....
Day,   R.   w\.	
Bay,  r.  w	
Motts,   R.   W	
W	
and McKenzie, Mrs.
nd Duncan
W..
W.,
Molts, R.
Motts, R.
Metis, R.
Cochran, J. E. .
Adams. Mrs. I. ,
MePlinton,   S.   K.
Curtis.  *W.   C	
Curtis,  *W.   C	
Curtis,  W.   C	
Kellett,   Geo   	
Kellett,   Oeo   	
Kellett,   Oeo   	
Kellett,   Oeo    	
Kellett, f'.ro
Kellett, Oeo   	
K.-l'.rit. Geo   	
Kellett, Oeo   	
Kellett,
Geo
Ranney,   A.   M	
Lindsay   &   Cameron'
Lindsay   &   Cameron
Cake,   K.  p
Porter,    A.    O	
,T.
Elizabeth
Keanan,  P
^ ��� ��� ��� .\\______\
Fllmoure, M	
Kent, f. it. and C, w
Kent, '���' H. snd C, W>
Cftmtibell
RI, ., ���      t*..:i.,v    ...
West.  Abraham
Dennlns   William
Cunn'ng-ham,  o..
n-iiiM.   ,\	
DaBnn,   A	
n imlnlc
Kelllnn-i  n
Kelllnjtton
FCelllngton
'' -Hi"..- in     ir
'-���"   ".    ""...
Jensen,   Arth
""-ili.im
Fleet,
Fisher.  W.  A..  P|sh
Dennett,  Arthur   ...
Ranney,  a
Ranney,   a
Trual  r-o.
A.
I*.   A..
E. A.,
F. A..
tf. ndry, B,
M. -ndry, 11.
Hendry, B.
Hendry, B
Description of Property.
Pt. lots 54 and o9, G. 2	
Lot 9, sub-div. pt lot 54, G. 2.
Part lot  L.  Ladner  	
Lot 4,  Block A of Lot SO, 0. I
Lot 37, Block I", lot 30, G. 3....
Lot 1.  Block C, lot 30, G. 2....
Lot 7.  BITi.-k ('. lot 30, G. 2....
Pt.   ST'1!.  Sec.  10,  Tp. .i	
Pt.   NW'4.  Sec.   35,   Tp.  5	
NiE*4,  Sec.  12,  Tp.  0	
Pt.   Lot  132,   G.   2	
Pt.   Lot  132,   G.   2	
Pt.   Lot   132.   G.   2	
Lots 15 to 17 of Lot 133, G. 2..
Lots 23 to 2(1 of Lot  131, G. 2..
Lot 1 of Lot 119, G. 2	
Lot 2 of Lot 111),  G. 2	
Lot 3 of Lot 110,   G. 2	
Lot 4 of Lot 119.  G.  2	
Lot 5 of Lot 119.  G.  2	
Lot 6 of Lot 119,   G. 2	
t-ot 7 of Lot  119.  G.  2	
Lot   8   of  Lot   119.   G.   2	
of E1-. Lot 119,  G. 2	
Lots 4 and 5, of Lot 18, G. 2..
S>_  Lot 2 of Lot IS.  G   2	
Lots 9 to 12 of Lot 18, G. 2	
Pt.    Lot   17,   G.   2	
Pt  Lot  16,  O.  2	
Pt.  Lnt 3 of Lot 15.  G.  2	
Lot   I.   SW',.   S.-e.   3,  Tp.  4	
Lot   2,   SW>',.   Se,-,   8,   Tp.  4	
Lot 3. SW",, Sec. 3, Tp. 4	
PI.   SE14.  Sec.  12,  Tp.  4	
Nl''j  Sec. 12, Tp. 4	
Part   WU.   See.   11.   Tp.   4	
Part  SWii, Sec. 14,  Tp. 4	
XW*i.  Sec. 22, Tp.  4	
SV. NW14. N'- SW'i, Sec.
SRV4,   Sec.   23.   Tp.   4	
NEW   Sec.   23.   Tp.   4	
Pt.   SW'4.   Sec.   24,   Tp.   4	
Pt. NWV.',. Sec. 21. Tp, 4	
Lnt   8.  SE1,,  Sec.   24.   Tp.  4	
Lots 11  and  12.  SEH4,  Sec. 24, Tp. 4.
L01   2.  NE',. See.   24.  Tp.  1	
Lots 5 and fi. N_E%,  Sec. 24. Tp. 4...
Lot 2.  W>_ NE',,  Sec. 24. Tp, 4	
Lot   9.   WW   XE''.  See.   21.  Tp.   I	
Pt.   "WWSeo.   2.".!" Tp.   4	
Pt.   St*   SE'.  Sec.  25.  Tp. 4	
'���*'    rlM'tt Sec. 25. Tp. 4	
Tp. 4.
I-i
G. 1.
Pt. W'i  S.-,-. 2.*.. Tp.  4..
Pt.   T.ot   440.   G.   2	
Pt.   Lot   440.   G.   2	
Pt. SYV'i  Sec.  25.   Tp.  4....
Pt.   SEV,   Ser.2*.  Tp.   4	
--K1,   Sec.  26, Tp.  4	
Lot 5 1,f T.ot O of 312 and Si
t 1. sr-:1., sec. is, Tp. 4	
N-V- Lot   8,  SE'j  Sec.  13. Tp. 4
Lot 13,  SE'i  Sec.  13,  Tp.   I....
Lo! 15.   SE'.,   Se,-.   13.   Tp. 4....
i.ot 3. SEU See. 14.  Tp. 4	
Lot il. SE'i See. 14, Tp. 4	
Lots 10 to 12. SK'4 Sec. 14, Tp.
Lot 1fi.   SE'i  See.  14.   Tp.   .....
Lot 17, si-:', See. it, Tp. 4	
Pt. Lot 21. SIC, See.  14,  Tp. 4 	
Lot 1 of Lots 1 to 5, XE'4 Sec. 86, Tp. i..
Lot 2 of Lots 1 to 5, N'E'j Sec. 36, Tp. 4..
Lot 9. Stib-Dlv. Lots 1 to 5, NE''   Sec. 36.
Tp.   4   	
Lot 10, Sub-Div, Lets 1 to 5, NE'. Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot' 11. Sub-Div.' Lots i "to IS.Niiii'SeO 36.
Tp.   4   	
Lot 12. Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5. NEI4 Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot  15. Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE',�� Sec, 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot 23. Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NEVi Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot 18, Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE'i Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Dot 1.7, -Sub-Div. Lots 1 .to 5, NE'4 Sec. 36.
Tp.   4   	
Lot 19, Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE'i Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot 20, Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5. NE'-, Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot 21, Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE'4 Sec. 36
Tp.   4   	
Lot 22. Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE'4 Sec. 36.
Tp.   4   	
Lot 24, Sub-Div. Lots 1 to 5, NE'i Sec. 36
Tp.   4   	
Lot 25, Sub-Div. Lots 1  to 5. NE'4 Sec. 36.
Tp.   I   	
Lot 26, Sub-Div. Lots 1  to 5, NE'i Sec. 36.
Tp.    I   	
Lot 27, Siib-Dly, I,on 1  to 5, NE':, Sec. 36.
Tp.   1   	
l.-.t 28, Sul.-Div.  Lots 1  to 5. NE'., Sec. 36,
To.   4   	
I,.,I 1-:.. Sol,-Dlv.  Lots 1  to 5, NE'i Sec. 36,
To.   1   	
Lot 30. Sub-tMv. Lots 1 to 5. NEW Sec. 36,
Tp.   4   	
Lot ,S.  NE',. See. :-,.;,  Tp.   I	
NE',  Sec. 86, Tp.   I	
xi-:', See. 88, Tp. t	
NIC. Bee, ���;.;. To. 4	
Lot ?.. Suh-D!v. Sees. 25 and 36, Pt. Lot
441),   G.    2	
I.ot 1. Sui,-lily. Sees. 25 and 36. Pt. Lot
.40.    il.    2	
I".   Lot   "���.   Sub-Plv.   Sees.  25 and  86,   Pt.
Lot   440.   O.   2	
Sees.  2*.  and
...I  24,
.0!   85,
Se
Lot   12,   Sub-Div
II 1.    .;     -j
'."��� i".  s..b-i*iiv
440. o.   2..
' ��� ���   16    CV-..TV,-    a..
II.,     .;      _���
1 ol _.;. Sub-Div,'
441. n.  2.
'"I   II    So',-Dlv'
II:      C      2
T of  42.   Sub-Div
440,   c     2
' nt    11.   s--',.llh'-'
' I 1,   ��� :    2
'   "   18   Sub-Div.
n-    i ���    ���>
' ol   "-I   Sub-Olv.
44".    O     2
P
Lot
Sees. 2*. nnd 86, Pt.' fjot
""   ���'.' "V.'pV.'lo
25 and 36,  Pt.' Lot
Bees',   2*.   ami 86,   pt
Sec��   :*, an*_"8_,"pt
 :
in 1 86, Pt,
Been
T.ot
Lot
Lot
pV.'l'o
"   Si.-.-l.'v. Sees, 2*. .-iml 3.
 _____-__--���
���***  58.   "ub-DIv
Iio.   O     -.'	
Join,
Oeo.
G. II.
M
tt.
' - '   :"   8i-bJ.lv
14".   - ���     ������
I 1   Sub-i.lv
' ! 1.    f,     2
I   '  ''.:   8u*i-D.*A
in.   o    1,	
^^^^ unl ���
Sees. 25 and' 36, Pt. T.ot
Pt'.' Lot
*��� ca, 23 :.n.i'-'.;."pt'."l.'ot
sec-. 25 ,,-,1 mVpV. 'itet
*' ��� -" and 36,"p't."t,'oi
Sees.  25 and 36,"_"."��,'_(
""   rt    2.
Lot si. suii-Di'v.' Sees
440,   .,.   2 .
'. il   B3   Sub-Dl'v	
II'.. O 2
'.-'*   v,   Se'.-DK-
140, f. 2
' -.1  91,   Suh-D'v
2". .111.1 :).;,  1 {.Lot
...
25 and 36,  Pt
S, es.   2.'
and
140,   n
.....       25     -p   I    -,,;
���   ...   -.-   ,.. , ..
'"**   2*.'a-ul':-���
l..,t
Pt'."l.ot
Pi. Lot
Pt. T.ot
;'!."f.ot
Ranney,
/* ��� '01, y.
R mney,
R-nney,
M...
M.
M.
...   , ,
21.   Pt,
,"Se_g'
-,�������.
,.....,, v.    \.   ^f	
P   ���,-, ��� .   A.    M	
H   -*i. *.*.   A.    M	
Ranney,   A.   M	
Rannev,   A,   M	
    - - '-..-k.   Dr.   c.    I!..
' ion-Jack,   Dr.  r.   p..
 'are-.  . Fred     	
��(*.. ��� .   W    ,T	
Lot    140,   O.   t.%.	
,,, tn. co .ie...   pi   1 .
23  ... . ������ ���   p.   j .<  <ji%, ,T    	
Lot  17   Bi" -Dlv,  1".  Lots 119 to 121
25   and   3fi   	
���    -   is   <3pi.-t-.1v.   Pt,   Lots  119 to 121. Sees
-nil   3,, ^^___------i"i"i"i"���������',','^^^���
I,..'   19,  Snh-.DI
ami  _____m___t
Lot 2.1. Sub-Div. Pt.  Lots V" to I*    Sees
25   a"-'   ���"'     	
PI.   Lois   Ipi  t0  121,  8#0��
-.-
���'-    c ,..,    .1-   ,,.. .   ...
"e >,  .:   ,:.,i   :: ;,
1   \q   B'lh.i I.e  122	
���   <9    <3..b.      -.   Lol   '22	
Lol  2-   S-1.-' 1    I  122    	
t     I""       <-....,.���     A-.     I,,l|     fW	
T.ot   12.-   ������-"���>.Dlv.   Lol   122	
Pt. 1 o-  ���    - t .,1- 134 ,ina-11,". .,   .
pi 1 .������   ""���   rt.  0
DateU at Ladner, lie, this 10-tli
dn\
Kust.  1914.
x 01
Eh
$70.77
7.70
34.60
8.85
16.20
6.74
2.68
416.50
412.62
772.75
644.3.-1
130.34
131.28
197.37
176.30
70.80
70.78
69.16
70.78
72.78
73.S0
80.63
76.33
274.87
78.50
20. S2
109.65
69.30
123.9s
5.66
68.78
57.75
14.17
410.48
341.12
10'.i.T3
122.53
118.96
210.74
34S.2S
135.25
33.X0
17.53
11.35
27.55
105.30
21.72
21.72
87.31
57.06
57.70
57.76
92.85
18.42
134.21
17.54
117.32
28.45
43.97
26.00
22.'.*;
14.45
23.08
48.08
8.32
27.34
5.20
2.S6
'    2.86
2.86
2.S6
2.86
2.-6
2.S6
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.36
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
2.86
5.;. 1:1
2-1.92
39.84
39.84
20.66  -
11.5:1
5.92
43.83
51.88
24.08
42.60
I9.S1
40.27
43.83
23.26
45.08
45.08
20.!..|
2.1.96
20.65
20.65
43.02
34.63
27.08
.33.20
41.11
���12.26
2.36
2.86
2.80
2.S(i
2.86
2.80
2.86
2.86
2.S6
2.86
2.86
41.0",
41.05
312.45
H2.54
x
S
*8
B   .
rt tr.
01 ��
e -
Q
2.14
2.11
2.11
2.14
4.S2
3.44
8.98
3.99
3.03
2 *)9
1.19
3.09
3.23
4.13
2.99
4.01
4.19
3.10
4.25
4.25
4.25
3.04
3.01
3.03
3.0.3
4.15
3.73
3.35
3.66
4.05
1.11
2.14
2.11
2.11
2.11
2.14
========_=^_  THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, l9li
*j Horse .Show Arena a Sleeping Porch
and Meals Served in .Machinery Hail.
$5.53
$76.30
2.38
10.08
3.73
3S.33
2.19
6.14
2.81
19.01
2.33
9.07
2.12
4.68
22.82
439.32
22.63
433.25
40.63
813.38
34.22
67S.57
8.52
138.86
8.56
139.84
11.87
209.24
10.84
187.14
5.54
76.34
5.53
76.31
5.45
74.61
5.53
76.31
5.63
78.41
5.69
79.49
6.08
86.66
5.82
82.15
15.71
290.58
6.93
84.43
3.04
23.86
7.4S
117.03
5.47
74/77
8.19
132.17
2.28
7.91
1.93
63. .is
4.93
63.68
2.70
16.87
22 5''
433.*l
laios
360.17
7.47
117.20
8.12
130.65
7.94
12.;.:.'.
12.53
223 ''7
19.41
367..;:.
S.76
144.01
3.69
37.19
2.S7
'u.40
4.06
43.41
8.86
30.91
7.26
112.36
3.0S
24.Si.
3.08
24.SO
6.36
93.67*
4.85
61.91
4.8S
02.61
4.S.8
02.64
fi.64
99.19
2.67
16.09
8.71
142.92
2.87
20.41
7.-1
125. is
3.42
81.87
4.19
4V10
3.30
29.3*1
3.14
2.;.]..
3.14
26.1.)
2.72
17.17
I] 15
52.1-
4.40
52.18
2.41
10.78
3.36
3...70
2.26
7.16
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.11
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
3.00
2.14
3.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.14
3.00
2.11
5.00
2.14
5.00
2.11
5.00
(From tlie British Columbian)
Queen's Park, long famous as a
public recreation grounds, for the
first time in its history is converted
into a huge military camp and soldiers doing picket duty and on guard
at the various outlets to the grounds,
add not a little to the general pic-
turesqueness of the animated scelie
which presented itself to the observant eye of the visitors, who are
flocking to the park in hundreds to
inspect their soldier boys, many of
whom are native sons aud have their
homes and families in this city.
Last night the boys slept ln the
Horse Show building with blankets
spread on the hard lioor. Meals are
being cocked by a corps of youths
under the expert supervision of Sergeant Anderson, of Chilliwack, and
the boys are keenly enjoying this,
their first taste of what actual field
service would mean.
Plenty of room for drilling and
manoeuvres is afforded on the
grounds of fhe park and every day
the men will be put through strenuous courses of marches and drills
and the recruits are rapidly rounding into shape as efficient- militia
men. The cooking is being accomplished in large mess tents, which
have been erected for this purpose,
but meals are served in the Machinery Hall.
About four hundred men are encamped at the park just now and although local officers are expecting
orders to move shortly, there, is a
possibility that the men will be at j
the park for some days. The delay,
while it may be irksome to many of
ihe hotter spirits of the regiment,
is beneficial to the troops in that
they will be brought to a higher
state of military efficiency with the
passing of each day as the drills are
already producing a marked change
for the better ln the despatch and
accuracy with which the various intricate movements are being carried
out.
Incorpora ted 1869.
CapiUI  Authorized  	
Capital Paid Up     ���SS.Ooo.k,
Reserve Funds    '."..'.'.'       ', V   *11'5M,O0o
��0��
Aggregate Asset., One Hundred and k^ty^^^
I	
hIs fining
Dollar*. -"'Mm
It Is the aim of the management of this Bank tn m.i-
posltor welcome, and to give the best possible ftt,Jtion A*]$*
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT.
Accounts may be opened with deposits of One Dollar .** ���
Interest paid or credited at the highest current rates ���n l* V*""-"��.
November 80th each year. ���-**�� on M��y 3ln JJ
JAMES GRISDALE, Manager.
����
-LADNER, Re,
Pho
E. L. BERRY
Grocer and Baker
Buy IMPERIAL FLOUR, made at Eburne
SPECIAL  WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR
LADNER, B. C.
BREAD DELIVERED  TO  CRESCENT  ISLAND,  TUESniv
FRIDAY. *USHU>AX
ne 56
AXD
LUMBER!
EBURNE SAW MILLS, LIMITED
Manufacturers and Dealers In all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
j3hlngle_, Lath, Sash, Doors, T urnlngs and House Finishings.
Prompt Delivery by Rail or Scow.
Phone R14 Eburne.
.-.no
5.00
5,00
61,81
*2���W
48.83
43.S3
23.111)
45.80
S.21
48.02
21,D2
27.01
48. TS
82,80
4I.2S
4S.02
2i'. 12
49.33
4S.88
19.83
24.09
24.00
28,68
17.17
38.38
80,13
36.86
13.18
-.00
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
0 o
O VICTORIA  XEWS. O
0 o
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Ready for Casting.
Advices to Sir Richard McBride
from the Agent-General in London
are to the effect that everything Is
ready for the process of easting ln
bronze of the statue of Queen Victoria by Mr. A. Bruce-Joy, the sculptor, which is to be placed ln position
ln front of the legislative buildlng3
in Victoria.
Will Probably Form Corps.
The formation of a corps of engineers, whose services might prove
of great value ln the present situation, Is being discussed by the members of the Civil Engineers' Association. There are about forty members of the profession residing ln
Victoria, and it ls felt that the services of such an ex-pert and technical
body could be used to advantage.
The mntter Is now being taken up
with the local military authorities.
Flrsi Train Yesterday,
The first train over the east coast
extension of the F-hciiiimalt & Na-
iiiiimo Railway left the depot at I)
o'clock yesterday morning, and consisted of b-agigft-ge and express cars
and four coaches.
Was Lieutenant Here.
Rear-.UImira! .Sir Robert Keith
Arliiitlinot, who is commanding a
squadron of crnlser-i In the homo
fleet, Is well known by old residents
In Victoria through his being formerly stationed here as lieutenant.
The admiral \��*.a a great sportsman
when here, nnd played regularly on
the football field, where he was well
known for hig prowess.
Inspector Returns.
E. H.  Fletcher, post office inspector, returned  yesterday from  an official   tour  of  northern  British  Columbia posts.     The last point visited
was   Atlin   where   official   attention
.was renulred after the fire of a few
weeks   ago.      Mr.   Fletcher   reports
[that mining activity In the north Is
most hopeful,
Hospital   Ship 'Offered.
Rev. .Tohn  Austin yesterday offered the hospital ship Columbia of fhe
Columbia Coast  Mlsslon to the government   ns   a   hospital   ship   should
there be need of It In these waters.
Free Fares for Soldiers.
For the next few dnys, during the I
time of preparation for mobilization,
the R. C. Electric Railway Company,   ;
Limited, will carry all men, when In j,"
uniform, free on its cars.
Makes  a   Selection.
Under the provisions of
*********************************** (**m*************H
DELTA   HOTEL
J. JOHNSTON, Proprietor
Ladner, O. O. Phone _ .
Dining Room Open All Day Sunday.   Private Dining t
Room for Touiists.     Good Garage j
*'*************************************************t��t
Fresh and Cured Meats
DELTA MEAT MARKET
A. N. YORK, Proprietor. Phone 21
No. 1 .Shamrock Bacon and Hams.
So. 1 Circle Bacon and Hum*.
So. 1 Southern Cross Butter.
���Since November Lnst Wc Hnve  Handled Nothing But No.   1   Stall
Fed Steer Beef. I '
YOUR PATRON AflB IS SOLICITED.
SACKS
BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO.
Victoria, Vancouver, New Wettminster
and H. N. RICH, Agent, Ladner, B. C.
V/ie flatta Vi
imes
#1.00 A YEAR
.     U. S. A.   .    .   $1.50
Payable in
Advance
tient   between   the   govern
_ _ ���
lo  this  proposal,  and  instruct  those
;ten..tontTmeem."e^e8���fryvo^r?" *�� \V*li to the Prince, and 1.1. <.bjeo.
the agree-|,���  ���*-*!. ���;JS.e���,b e���?..,of,_y?l,r ."-^n'"" | Is  to  make a  complete  tour el .*���*
     ���..,. mini, ni   ana j willing  to  Join   thnt  corps  to
the Ennui malt and Nanaimo Railway imunlcatn with  ���*>��.    ���<*���'���*���    ���
about the disposition  of land  under
the Vancouver Island Settlers' Rights
2.14
ii.no
'.' 'i
2.11
��� ��� .
2.1-1
B.'flO
2.11
- i.,i
2.11
- ��� 1,
4.05
4-, 1,1
4.06
IS .n
17.U2
- 7
0.12
r.i.w
munlcate with me    without   delay.
The chairman nnd other members of
   ,..p.,.- I the council of the branch have been
net. which was signed in 190!) and I informed of the receipt of the com-
ratified by the legislature at the jmunfeation, 8o that, If considered ad-
1910 session, by which the Ksqul- jvlsable to do so, action may be taken
malt  ���*> Nanaimo Railway was to re-  along  the  lines suggested.
celvc  up to  20,000  acres on  the ti-
lend from v*w��rtnt crn��-n inndi aft��r
survey,   the   provincial   gazette' an-I     The future of the outside irurH-i
noi-nces this week the company's ap. PtllttM   as   customers '"' '
Municipal   Water  Customers.
X. A. McDIARMID. Collector.
Advertise in the Delta
..ii     .,       _       ... v"iii-|mnys np- .i'"iii��-n    an   customers     of   tlm   /l,--
tary of the Western Branch of the ibe charged Saanlch for water whin
Canadian Mining Institute, received ,the great undertaking wtuS. ha! ��.
a night lettergram from Mr. H. Icupled the attention of thiit$&
Mortimer-Lamb.   MontrnaJ.   Quebec,  Council In the past    thr**   ,������2
|secretary   of   the   Institute,   as   fol- completed
lows:      "Suggested     that     Institute
should take some stops to assist the
LONDON, Aug. 7.���Chancellor ol
the Exchequer Lloyd George informed the House of .Commons that the
commt-u-.ir.n_,-   -v. V **���"-������  ���'""���" I government    was    oonilderlng    the
tive service.     Will  you please "take  Empress hotel      ti,,   a ,gl,est r,t the h1"*1-��� ot taking over the harveil
mprees notel.     This    ls    b.l    first   throughout the British  Isles.
rp�� 'V"",. , "��*&������<>"���'>     mat     institute I Co-operation on Fru*
I should take some stops to assist the1     Amnnc ���*-��� _      "u...
I   iniAe,mrn ,n P-^ ��rt5�� by ralslj a city Ta8gJ   /ohTsnn   n1"'?'3 ,n thfi
1   1111 CO ���Ps nr miners and sappers for ac-  coLZllLi��^.^miai^  fr'"'t
whole fruit-growing area, '.villi I'1"
purpose of encouragtni* closer to*
operation between the Ottawa ��"
Victoria governments In measnrei
towards the development of -no fruit
ltidustry.
Old-Tlmer's   M'slmp.
George  Prescott, an old-timer of
tht   city,   broke   his   thigh ri ��'*
1." when his horse -raddenly baclt-
ed near the Point EMcc bridge ana
threw Its driver over the shaft of
the rig. The Injured man was <!"|v'
lug his horse and rig near the bridge
when a sand and gravel trm;i backed
up to the horse, wbfch stopped suddenly.
MAT   BUT  BRITISH   HAB VESTS. ���mx.iniinn'.*"
THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 1B14.
K-
THE DE__,TA TIMES
...LOCAL ITEMS...
Mr. W. Pybus went to Vancouver
on Saturday.
Mr. Guites spent the week end in
Vancouver.
Mr.  J.  Addison,    of    Vancouver,
was a visitor in Ladner on Sunday
Mr. A. deR. Taylor and son motored to Vancouver on Monday.
Mrs. H. L. Wilson was a visitor to
Vancouver on Monday.
Mr. H. W. Slater went to Vancouver on business on Saturday.
Mr.  D.  Gilchrist paid a  business
trip to Vancouver on Monday.
Mr. S. Walter motored to Vancouver on Friday.
Mr.  and Mrs.  Brandrith  drove to
Vancouver on Friday.
Mr. P. Berry spent the week-end
with his parents in Ladner.
Mr. R. Dawson, of New Westminster spent the week-end in Ladner.
Children's dressmaking   and plain
setoing. Apply Miss Evans, Ladner.*
Mrs. J. Addison, of Vancouver, Is
the guest of Mrs. H. W. Slater.
Mr. Felix Guichon and party motored to Point Roberts on Saturday
evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Lamb and family
have left Ladner to take up their
new residence in Fernie.
Miss MacDonald who has been
visiting friends in I.adner returned
to  town  last Friday.
Mr; and Mrs. Hume were visitors
in the city on Saturday.
Mr. L. Ladner spent the week-end
in Ladner,
Mr. T. Foster went to Vancouver
on Friday on business.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Foster motored to
Vancouver on Monday.
Mr. William Hornby was a visitor
in the city on Friday.
Mrs.  George  Baker  and  children
went to Vancouver on Friday.
Mr.   Wood,  of  Vancouver,  was a
visitor in Ladner on Monday.
Miss Lyla Grant spent Sunday in
Laduer with her parents.
Mr.  Luxemburg,    of    Vancouver,
spent Sunday in Ladner.
Mr.  Voake  of  Vancouver  was  in
Ladner ou business on Wednesday.
Mr. Hutcherson, of Vancouver, is
visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
C. Clark.
Miss LaChance and Mrs. Anseil
made a trip to Vancouver on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. K. MacDougall, of
Vancouver, were week-end visitors
at the Delta hotel.
The S. S. Birdswell loaded a full
cargo of hay and potatoes on Monday for Victoria and the Island.
Rev. and Mrs. ,T. J. Hastie are
spending their holidays in Vancouver.
The B. C. Telephone intend installing a pay station at the Delta
hotel.
Messrs. A. Evans and E. L. Kirk-
land registered at the Delta Hotel
for the week-end.
Mr3. McChackeran, of Vancouver,
1 as been visiting her mother, Mrs.
H. Benson, returning to the city
early this week.
The S. S. Grainer, loaded a cargo
of grain and hay for Brackman &
Ker, Victoria, this week.
For strawberry, raspberry and all
other fruit boxes try the British Columbia Manufacturing Co., New
Westminster, B.C. ������
Mr. Cuksey, wire chief of the
Cloverdale, B.C., Telephone Co., exchange, was in Ladner on Tuesday
repairing the local exchange.
i     Mr.  L.  Douglas,  Mr.  J.  Reid and
IMr. A. Sinclair, of Vancouver, spent |
! Saturday last on the  Delta visiting
- I at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T. Rob-
Mr. and Mrs. Alto, of Sunbury, are  ertson.
receiving the congratulations of their ', 	
friends on  the birth of a daughter .     jyj-   j*._  j*;.  Denny,  of  Vancouver,
last Wednesday. was a visitor in Ladner on Sunday.
��������� j    Mr.   and   Mrs.   Davison,   of  Van-
Miss MacKenzie and Miss Fisher, eouver, motored to Boundary Bay on
who have been visiting Mrs. N.  A.   Sunday.
McDiarmid, went to Vancouver    on	
Monday for a short visit with Mrs.      Mlsg ue88|e Fenton and Miss Grace
McChackeran. Grey left Ladner on Sunday evening
" to enter the Jubilee Hospital for a
For all Building Supplies and Fuel three years' course of nursing. They
Oil, apply to the B.C. Transport Co.,'carry with them the best wishes for
Ltd., 505 Westminster Trust Build- their success from their many friends
Ing. Office phone 826; wharf phone'on the Delta,
880.
Holstein-Friesian Breeder
Writer of His Impressions
W. A. Clements Contributes
Notes of Interest to the
Breeders of the Black and
Whites.
Mr. W. A. Clements, secretary of
the Canadian Holstein-Freisian Association of Canada, has just arrived
at his home in Ontario after a visit
to British Columbia, where some
weeks ago in this city he conferred
with the members of the British Columbia Branch in the matter of arranging a sale of Holsteins in this
province some time this autumn.
Mr. Clements haB kept very close
notes of his trip, and writes The
British Columbian regarding it as
follows:
St. George, July 20, 1914.
To the Editor:���Mr. R. F. Hicks,
president, of the Holstein-Friesian
Association of Canada, and royse.l.
have just reached home after spending a month in the West, and I am ment of Agriculture.
sending you a few notes regarding Rive, Provincial Dairy Instructor,
our trip with the hope that they may | Mr. Hopkins, Assistant Live Stock
prove of interest to your readers i Commissioner, and Mr. Wiancko,
who are breeders of the black and Dairy Inspector, were our compan-
wbites. We left Toronto on June ' ions and a most enjoyable day was
19 and went straight through to spent. We saw the herds of Mr. W.
Vancouver Via the C. P. R��� enjoying N. Paterson, Koksilah; G. T. Cor-
beautifu! weather all the way. I field, Corfield; H. Bonsall, Che-
will not attempt to describe the ' mainus, and that belonging to Mr.
glorious scenery of the Rockies and j Bishop himself. Mr. Paterson is a
the Selkirks���it must be seen to be ! young breeder who is doing excel-
appreciated. j lent work in the Record of Perform-
On our arrival in Vancouver we ance. He has one of the finest show
were met by Mr. Thos. Laing, secre-1 cows seen anywhere on our trip, a
tary of the B.C. Branch of our asso-1 champion at Victoria Exhibition,
elation, and Mr. Wm. Atkinson, and j Mr. Corfield has large herds of both
problems of the B.C. breeders and
the policy of the parent association,
lt was the concensus of opinion that
no females could be bought in the
province, and a resolution was passed requesting us to arrange for a
consignment sale of about forty first
class heifers in calf to the best bulls
in the East, to be held in New Westminster in September. Mr. Steves
agreed to Join with the Eastern consignors and contribute some twenty
head from his herd. If breeders ln
the East are ready to make a tri|al
of this method of sale, this will offer
an excellent opportunity to do so.
But there is no use sending anything
but prime stuff, well grown and ln
high condition.
Crossing to Victoria we visited Dr.
Tolmie's Braefoot Farm and found
splendid crops and good Holsteins.
His stock is of Colony Farm breeding and he has some excellent females. Ladysmith Daisy has given
over 24,000 lbs. of milk in eleven
months. With the genial F. J.
Bishop as guide we set off for a trip
among the breeders on Vancouver
Island, as the guests ot the Depart-
Mr. Henry
taken on a motor trip among the
leading breeders of that locality.
Our first call was at the famous Colony Farm at Coquitlam, run in connection with the Provincial Hospital
for the Insane. Here we were hospitably entertained by Mr. C. W.
Holmes, who has charge of the herd,
and to whom great credit is due for
the fame which lt has attained. The
cattle and horse barns are magnificent and the stock can scarcely be
surpassed in America. Ten cows in
the herd have made records of over
100 lbs. of milk in one day. Madam
Posch Pauline is the Canadian champion mature cow for seven days and
Holsteins and Jerseys, and many excellent cows, headed by a capital bull
bred in California, Westport Lad.
Mr. Bonsall is one of the veterans,
and has a large herd of big strong
cows. Oi'ficiaJ testing would doubtless reveal many great producers
here. Mr. Bishop's herd is headed
by B.C. Choice Goods, a grandson of
Pontiac Korndyke. One of his
three-year-old heifers was winner of
the silver cup given at Victora for
the championship of^the province,
and another three-year-old just
fresh was gl"ing at the time of our
visit nearly 85 lbs. per day.
Returning    to the    mainland we
I.adner people are pleased to see
Owing to the supply of logs run-'that Aliss May York Is ahead in the
ring short the mill stopped running world competition and it is to be
lor the early part of this week. The hoped that those who have not subvert weather that we have been scribed to this paper will do so ant-
experiencing for the past few days give our popular candidate every sup-
v ay cause an extra delay as it will port. The first three prizes are
be difficult to tow the logs. The high grade automobiles and Miss
planing mill and kiln, however, had York promises her friends many a
in t to stop working, neither had the pleasant joy ride in it if she tops
b adlng. tbe list.
thirty days in butter production and' spent a few hours very pleasantly
she bids fair to capture the records j with Mr. P. H. Moore at the Agassiz
for both milk and butter for the ; Experimental Farm. He has a nice
whole year. She has given 18,000 | start in pure breds from Mr. Steves'
lbs. of milk in five and a half months
and is ctill going strong.      Zarilda
Clothilde 3rd DeKol, Netherland
Segis 2nd, Wadmantje Canary and
many others are well known to Holstein breeders all over the country
as record breakers. The bulls in
service are Korndyke Butter Boy
Pride, grandson of Pontiac Korndyke and Aaggie Cornucopia New'-'
man, a son of the great Washington
jow,   Margie Newman.    Sir  Canarj
'herd, and a profitable herd of Holstein grades.      Although picked up
in the East and not yet thoroughly
culled, the whole herd averaged a
profit last year of nearly $110 per
head over cost of feed. Conditions
ln the British Columbia valleys, especially the Fraser delta, are ideal
for Holsteins, probably better than
that ln Holland, and Eastern breeders will need to bestir themselves if
they wish to prevent all the cham-
WHITE ROOK NEWS,
WHITE ROCK, Aug. 10.���Tbat
volunteers from White Rock will be
numbered in the Canadian contingent for the "tiont" is practically
c.rtain, several young fellows from
here having nlready passed the tests
required by the military authorities,
Amongst the number who have already signed on or are about to do
so might be mentioned Jack and Ted
Thrift, both of whom have had previous training, A. Dunthorne, cousin
oi W. Finch, Corporal Sevln, late of
the Prince or Waies Dragoon Guards
and J. W. RobertBon, formerly of tlie
_8th London volunteers.
Tbe week-end dance at the White
Rock hotel was as well patronized
as on previous Saturdays, but the
men were In a minority, for the first
time this season, owing to many of
the usual crowd being held in town
lor regimental duty.
A second whist drive took place
at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. I.
II. Vidnl, on Friday evening, about
Iio guests were present. This affair
was in honor of the Misses Bessie
Dickinson, Grace Dashwood-Jones
and Mr. Vern McNeil.
Mrs. D. I). Wilson and child, from
New Westminster, are expected
down today for a week's camping.
They will occupy the tents just vacated by Mrs. II. P. Vldal aud daughters.
The construction crew who are
engaged in building the Dominion
government wharf at this point are
making good progress under the supervision of Engineer Gross and the
work is interestingly inspected by
large numbers of the summer visitors as well as the residents.
The Rev. W. W. Abbott, of
Queen's avenue church, will preach
at the evening service, White Rock,
next Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. McDonough and
daughter were the week end guests
ot Mrs. J. D. Taylor.
Mechthilde, owned by Mr. J. M. | pionship records falling into the
Steves, has also been used quite ex-' hands of the men on the Pacific
tensively and has left a fine bunch I Coast. As entertainers the latter are
of heifers. 'certainly great.    The luncheon given
At Mr. Steves' farm at Steveston in our honor at New Westminster
we found tj)e old bull and a long after the meeting of the Branch was
row of his daughters. If this bull most enjoyable, and everywhere we
had been fortunate enough to enjoy went we were met with a hospitality
the opportunities and the boosting that we hope some day to be able to
given to some Eastern sires, not even  return.
Pontiac Korndyke or King of the I We met Hon. Price Ellison, Min-
Pontiacs would have outranked him .ister of Finance and Agriculture,
today. By his use Mr. Steves has and Prof. W, T. McDonald, Live
built up a wonderfully good herd, I Stock Commissioner, and were prom-
and he will doubtless remain in ser- j ised the hearty co-operation of the
vice right where he is as long as he ! Department in the efforts of the tfs-
lives.    Two gems In the Steves herd | soclation to check the traffic in culls
Portable
Baths
Made of Brazilian Para
Rubber, pressed into
heavy duck, then Vulcan*
ized under high pressure
insuring against cracking, peeling or mildew.
When not in use can be
folded into small space.
Each bath is guaranteed
by the manufacturers for
five years.
PRICE ONLY
$8.50
SEE OUR WINDOW
Clement & Lambert
BICYCLES
AND REPAIRS
Automobile Accessories
Oils and Gasoline
Agents for Pennsylvania
Oil Proof Vacuum Cup
Tyres and Special Ford
Type.
Taylor Electric Co.
Phone L60. Ladner
CRESCENT XEWS.
CRESCENT, Aus. 12.���Mrs. Thos.
Gifford, Jr., and family are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Welsh.
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis and Miss Edna
Eastman are staying in Mr. Agar's
home.
Mr. and Mrs. Steward, of Sapperton are the guests of Mr and Mrs.
MacDogel.
Mr. and Mrs. .Maxwell, with their
daughters, are the guests of Mrs
Maxwell's sister, Mrs.,.lames Gilley.
Miss Gladys Whitely, of Cloverdale, Is the guest of Miss Eileen Gilley.
Miss Mary Keary, who has been
spending a few days with .Miss Isa-
belle Phillips, returned to ber home
on  Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. George Adams have
for their guests Mr. and Mrs. Summers, of New Westminster;   Mr. am}-     .,.., ,���..,,���,,	
Mrs. Rod****��� ami Miss Ethel Revely.  -Madam    I'osch    Panine)   and   some   fo_ Cnnai,a !ln(1 thp Brltlsh Emp*-e,
of  Vancouver. \*__\ >��"''S stock, which  was in tbe | statl��tlOK   Of   the    Dominion's  trade
Mr. and Mrs. Malay, of Camp "Quit stCMM.    The night was spent at the , w|th 0(ller       t_ of ,he E     ,re beI
Vour  Klrkin""   h.d   for  their  guest  hospitable    home   of    Mr.  Laing   at     , wherever  the  figures  are ob-
__���      . i < x�� :      1. .    .. I.   I ,. II..       Iii..        t ���        .-��,l..��i,1,1        f >, ��....       I  "
The Ladner - Steveston
Ferry Service
Spring and Summer Schedule
Beginning Monday, April 20, the
steamer Sonoma will run on hei
spring and summer schedule, as follows: Leaves at 8.30 a.m., 12.30
and 6.30 p.m. Vancouver passengers can make connection by taking
the 8.30 a.m., 12.30 and 6.30 p.m.
cars at Granville street station. New
Westminster passengers should take
the Eburne cars at 8.00 a.m., 12.00
j and 6.00 p.m. and the Steveston cars
' at Eburne.
are Lady Pietje Canary's Jewel and
Lillth Pauline Calamity Jane 3rd,
whose yearly records at two years In
the R. of P. are 830 and 825 lbs.
respectively. The former had just
completed a seven-day record at the
time of our visit of 32.83 lbs. butter
In seven days as a junior three-year-
old, with 100.6 lbs. of milk in one
day testing 4.07 per cent. fat. Mr.
Hicks cast longing eyes at her bull
calf sired by Sir Canary Mechthilde,
who is also grand sire of the heifer,
but Mr. Steves declined to price the
youngster.
Our next call was upon Capt. Erskine, who has a nice little herd headed by a capital two-year-old bull,
full brother to Lady Pietje Canary's
Jewel above mentioned. We also
called at Mr. Wm. Earrell's and saw
Ills herd bull (a son of the great cow
and to enable buyers to procure good
stock without unreasonable expense.
Prof. McDonald we found to be
thoroughly capable, enthusiastic in
the cause of better stock and a
princely entertainer. British Columbia is fortunate in having such a
man at the head of its live stock interests. Iff the Dairy Branch, which
supervises our official testing, we
found another highly capable official
in Mr. Rive, to whom our thanks
are due for much information and
hospitality.
IMPERIAL  YEAH BOOK.
"The Imperial Year Book for
Canada." is the name of a new publication, which will be issued mid-
yearly in Montreal. It is a 600-page
volume and Is described ns a statesman's and business man's year book
Miss Margaret Nelson, Mrs. Nicker
son, Mr. and Mrs. Green, of Vancou
ver, and Mrs. Pride, of New West
minster
Eburne     He   has   a   splendid   farm,. talnsble,    Among the many subjects
which is under option at present to   wit|i   wh,ch   ,t   ,,_.���.   are.   Nat|ollal
a   real  es ate   dealer at      1500  per!and imporInI eVPnta, ���Bt of -Rents.
Owing to this fact Mr. Laing , genera, of u     Dwnlnlona in London
ai re.
Mr. and Mrs. Coldicutt and family-has not been breeding extensively re-iand ���f r-anada.s commissioners and
returned to their home in town on Icently but hasI a nice bunch of_ young , oolnmarclal agPnts throughout the
Friday of last week. stuff, and will stock up more heavily | _,���_-.,   Confe(lerationi  Imperial   au-
Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey, of hdmonds, f the option is not taken up in Oo- thoHties, Canadian government,
are visiting  Mrs.  Manriisb_ lober ��� !electoral statistics, ministries, Cana-
Mrs. Edward Bell and fan,! 1, re- V\ o bad a fine meeting of the BC. : dia_ tnu, railwavs ,���,, CiinaIfi| f,_
turned to their home In town on Sat- Branch at Now Westminster   presld- , n t   ofn        f,gheries,    R,llp_
urday. !**d over  by Dr. Tolmle in  his usual1
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Daniel    Scnoter, Of (felicitous  manner.    A  full  and  free
Ferry Auto Stage
ladner-Vantouver Service
Auto leavee corner Eraser
Arm and River Road ait 7:00
and 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 and
6:00 p.m., connecting with all
ferries at Woodward's Landtag.
FARE 35 CENTS
Ferry Free.
�� ���% v \ \ i   f :
*��� <-.     1-.    <_. fcVll   ��� JF,rfV ,
Focus YourWants
ChtMified Want Ads.
will fill all your requirement*. Ther act
m a lens which will
concentrate all your
needs, and bring them
to a perfect focus of
.satisfactory results.
THE   DELTA   TIMES
CONDBNMDD      AJOVKRTlSKMBNTSj
For Stale. For Excbanrt Wanted te
Purchase, To Let. Lost. Found, Work
Wanted Situation! Vacant, 1 cent per
word. Minimum, X cents for any mm
advt. Thene rates for sash with order.
All Want Ads. mutt be In by t p.a.
on Thursday.
FOR SALE���For sale cheap ons :
Ma-sey-Harrlg "Great West"
arator.    Will sell cheap for	
or will trade for stock or prodnes.
Terms if required. Machine eaa
be seen at Windebank'a Lumber
Yard, Mission City.
Mineral and
Soda Waters
J. HENLEY
New Westminster, B. C.
Manufacturer  of  Soda  Water,
Ginger Ale, and all Kinds of
Summer Drinks.
Your Patronage Solicited.
Delta Motor Transfer
Freight Sen-ice Daily to and
from Vancouver, Eburne,
Ladner.
Van. Phone Sey. 754 Ladner 63
HERB. BL.GH   Mgr.
DRS. WILSON �� WILSON
PHYSICIANS
AND  SURGEONS
Oddfellows'.Building
Ladner
General Office Hours
Advertise in Delta Times
"What's Your Phore Number?"
Can You Answer This Question
If not, don't you know you are
losing business and running risk.
What is more necessary than a telephone In case of sickness or fire!
Delta  Telephone   Co.,   Ltd.
YOUR HOME  COMPANY.
DU. E. h. THOMPSON
Dentist.
Sensitive cavities    prepared    and
filled  absolutely  painlessly    by tbe
new nitrous-oxide-oxygen method.
Eburne Station, B. C.
Phone Eburne lit
CO-OPERATIVE EGG CIRCLES.
MISSION HIGH SCHOOL.
"The Organization Of Co-operative Egg Circles" is the title of
pamphlet No. 4 by "V. A. Brown, B.
S. A., of the Poultry Division of the
Live Stock Branch, Dominion Department of Agriculture. In introducing this subject the writer defines a co-operative egg circle, states
Wilbur Smith's home. j
Miss Clara Smith is the guest of*-
the   need   for   organization   and   the
ping, criminal and divorce statistics, Iwork that can be accomplished.
NVu    Westminster.   I    .,-....-..   Mr.  discussion  took  place  regarding  t*�� iJgJK^-g^^ The benefits,  methods and details
migration,   innor,   customs,    iniann 0f    organization    aro    exhaustively
 . revenue, agriculture, -minerals, com-  deaU with -,1(* directions for setting
missions, titled Canadians, churches ! up   an(j usjnir    an    eKIr    testing  ap-
and relig'ons. education, press, sport, IpHatlce arc given.
The pamphlet, copies of which
I may be obtained upon application
i from   the  Publications   Branch,  De-
Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Green
Mr.   and   Mrs.   J.   W.   MacDonald
had for their guests last week. Mr.
and Mrs. B. T. Casselmen, Mr. and
Davidson. '
Mrs.  William  Gifford  and  family
guest   last   week   Miss  Carrie  Mere-
Master  Herble  Allen  Is the guest \ Provinces ""d the Empire.
of Mrs.  Lusby.
Mr.   and   Mrs.  Anderson,  who  for!     NORTH SEA  AGAIN UNSAFE.
MEXICO CITY, Aug. 11.���Tbat
the transfer of Federal power In
Mexico from Carbajal to the Constitutionalists will be made peacefully
within the next seventy-two hours j llngham
was the declaration of a high Mexican government official. He refused to be quoted.
some time taught in  tbe Royal City!     LONDON,   Aug.   10,    3.45   p.m.��� j partment    of    Agriculture,   Ottawa,
are the guests of Mrs. Fred Lynch, j High School, spent last week as lhe The North Sea  was again closed to concludes with a proposed constitu-
Miss B. W.  Burpee came back to guest of Mr. and  Mrs. T. H.  Smith,  the  fishing  fleets  today.    The  bar-!tion and bylaws siutable for an Egg
her camp  on  Saturday after an  ab-1     Mr. and Mrs. Bennet bad a house i bormaster at Scarborough received a'Circle.
sence of a week. | full of guests on Sunday.    Included [message    from    the    Admiralty    lm-1	
Miss Ella Burpee had for her guest | were  the  Misses  Turnbull,     Albert, | struct inn him  to  tell the masters ofi BOY- SCOUTS KILLED.
last week, Mrs. C. Richards, of Ne**- Beatty  and   Mr.   Alderice, Ifishing vessels    not to go    out until       BELGIUM, Aug. 11.���It is report-
Westminster,   and     Miss     Margaret |    Mr. Longherst moved into his new ; further notice. jed that several boy scouts have been
Burpee and Master  Burpee, of Bel-  home  last  week
Mr.  Sellers had the misfortune of
Miss Grace Cole spent a day at ber , having  his  large    eight     passenger
home  in  Vancouver  last   week. 'auto   burned   on   Sunday   by   an   cx-
Mlss Tennis Reid    had    for her plosion.
���uickty (top* cotifhs.  curei  cold*. ��nd  heal*
ths thrcr.t nnd lur.~,. :: ::        aa cn-..
.killed and wounded In the fighting
| about Liege. The boy scouts were
I most useful throughout the engagements in carrying despatches, and
ishowed great courage.
Will  Huve Manual Training Class���
.Mission to    Supply   Teacher at
New Steelhead School,
MISSION CITY, Aug. S.���A manual training class will' be a feature
of the Mission High School when the
fall term commences next month,
and a little later the school board
will inaugurate a girl's cooking
class. Carpenters have been busy on
the establishment of benches, work
tables. e;c, in the oid school building during the holidays and the work
1 will be complete in readiness for the
i school  opening.
Steelhead Valley settlers at a recent meeting decided to proceed with
the erection of the proposed new
school building and work will commence on the structure right away.
Tbe new building will be 20x30,
and will be constructed entirely cf
logs. The work is to be done by the
settlers and will be voluntary. The
school board of Mission municipality will supply the teacher. An attendance of twenty scholars is promised by the parents ln the Immediate vicinity of the new edifice.
I
-'I 4
THE DELTA TIMES
IRRIGATION'S MISSION
Increases Productiveness by Promating
Intensified Farming���The Irrigation
Convention.
The Western Canada Irrigation
Association will hold Its eighth annual convention in the City of Penticton, Okanagan valley, province of
British Columbia, August 17, 18 and
19. The meeting will convene on
the morning of the 17th at 9:30
o'clock.
Experts in fruit culture, exponents
Of alfalfa production and practical
students of modern farming in all its
ramifications will attend. Questions
of greatest interest to irrigationists
will be discussed and dealt with by
prominent authorities from California. Oregon, Idaho, Washington and
Utah, as well as the prairie provinces
and British Columbia. The splendid
encouragement that the association
has received in the attendance of
delegates at its last two conventions,
the fact that for the first time in
history the International Irrigation
Congress will be held in Canada a
month later, and that some of its
permanent officers will address the
convention, and the general interest
that is steadily manifesting itself
throughout the entire west in the
science of irrigation practically assures a successful meeting.
Irrigation's Mission.
Irrigation is a science that is somewhat misunderstood, is the opinion
of one eminent authority. To a large
number of people. It stands for "reclamation" as the only means of salvation for lands which otherwise
would be useless. Irrigation, it
seems to be thought, is merely a substitute for rainfall, and Is required
only in those countries which unfortunately have none. The success of
irrigation in converting desert or
arid areas into prosperous agricultural communities, lends color to
this rather common impression.
Without attempting to undervalue
this branch of Irrigation progress, it
should be emphasized that irrigation
has another and higher mission���
not so much to create conditions of
productiveness as to increase them.
Firstly, it can supplement rainfall,
and, secondly, it can be used as tc
make argricnlture more    profitable.
The fact that irrigation can be and
indeed, often is, called into service
in districts which have an ordinary
rainfall, establishes that irrigation
does not take th-a place of natural
precipitation, but rather helps it.
Irrigation farming is a movement in
advance on farming by rainfall. The
farmer in a rainy country may suffer as much because it rains too copiously at the wrong time, as he does
because it does not rain when his
crops need moisture. Seldom does
he want all his ground watered at the
same time; some crops thrive only
when moist, and some are destroyed
by moisture. It might be said that
there are no two plants which require exactly the same quantity of
moisture at exactly the same stage
of growth.
Promotes Ripening.
Under irrigation the exact degree
of moisture can be applied to suit
any crop. The very color and texture of fruits and vegetables can be
regulated. The plants can be kept
always evenly moist until they have
attained their maxim development,
and then, with the water shut off,
can be ripened quickly. For instance onions cultivated in this way
have the most'perfect qualities while
potatoes which are kept always evenly moist are smooth and free from
second growths. Irrigation farming
is the only system that ordinarily
j'ermits of the intelligent treatment
of every individual crop.
Irrigation is also beneficial to any
country because is promotes intensified methods af farming. If a given
area can be made to produce even
en ner cent more than it could bj
ordinary methods, then everyone
shares in greatly increased prosperity. Firstly, the cultivator himself
obtains bigger returns per acre, with
a correspondingly bigger income.
More labor is required on the land.
Closer settlement is caused���in fact,
irrigation and the "syndicate farm"
are not compatible. The basis of agricultural prosperity is the small
farm worked by and supporting a
large family; and 'hat is what irrigation tends to strengthen. With a
larger number of people working on
the land, all with a larger spending
capacity there would be a greater
circulation of money and an increased traffic in merchandise of every
description, affecting not only the
small country traffic which came
into direct contact with the agricultural producer, but also the larger
centres from which supplies were
obtained, and thus the good results
would be like a snowball, getting
bigger and bigger as it went. Irrigation can do these things, and not
on a ten per cent basis, but on a
twenty-five, fifty and one hundred
per cent increase.
It is often asked why irrigation is
necessary in Western Canada. In
the southern part of the province of
Alberta, the Canadian Pacific Railway has brought a large area of approximately three million acres under irrigation, this being the largest
individual project on the American
continent. Broadly speaking, intensive methods of agriculture have not
been practised in Western Canada
and this undertaking was, therefore
entered into as part of a great development scheme,
THE SPIRIT OF THE FLEET.
RICHMOND BOND SALE.
BRIDGEPORT,       Aug.      4.���The
Richmond    Municipality    has    just
made    what is    considered to be a
most favorable deal in the disposal
Englishmen    are 'of bonds'to the amount of $104,500,
formal,   so   hedged [especially in view of the present con-
(From the Toronto World).
In the British navy there is a
spirit of reckless daring which has
always been difficult for foreigners
to understand,
apparently so
about by etiquette, so cooled by culture that the .flare of enthusiasm
discerned in Trowbridge, in Sir .lohn
Jervls, In Lord Hood and Lord Bar-
ham lias bet n an unexpected phenomenon. Lord Nelson's career
showed this spiritual characteristic
i:i lull measure. Confidently, when
on detached service off Corsica in
the Agamemnon he could give chase
to four frigates of the enemy. Confidently���not boasl fully���lie could
prophesy within one how many snil-
of-iue-iim; would ne captured at Trafalgar.
Before leaving on his last cruise
the First Sea Lord of the Admiralty,'
Lord Bar ham, asked Nelson to
choose his officers, "Choose yourself, my Lord." was his ,-esponse.
"The same spirit animates the whole
service." That was literally true.
In tin' .-hips' companies there was
co-operation and enthusiasm. The
men idolized their officers. The officers loved their men. There wns
plenty of class-separation In peace
times, but In war, classes were forgotten. More than one officer was
found pointing guns with his own
hand. Nelson, after tacking over
half the world on a two years' cruise,
sai I    :' :'.      .  . .:...!   ...   	
ship, the battered Agamemnon, "We
were a band of brothers."
Mow do we know that n similar
spirit prevails today? First, because of tlie little episode of the
Condor -it th<- bombardment of Alexandria in 1SN2, when Lord Charles
Beresford ami his ship's company
displayed that sublime recklessness
which is the tradition of the Royal
Navy. "Well done, Condor," signalled the Admiral, and all Britons
echoed the sentiment. Secondly,
during the war in South Africa a
naval 1 rigade was landed and showed such gifts of initiative and invention in getting their heavy guns in
position tind in serving them when
once placed that the ardor of the
men was apparent.
Further, the training that the officers and men receive is so thorough that its character-forming effect shows on tlle face of every British sailor. Every post-captain is a
finished diplomat���with a swift-fire
of rage in him which can blaze up
on occasion. And now we are about
to hear from Admiral Sir George
Calahan! The test is here. (iod
grant that the the seas
clean of tyranny!
dition of the money market, owing
to the war. These bonds are to provide funds for the two dyking
schemes that have recently been approved by the ratepayers, one on
Lulu Island and the other on Sea
Island, and for the extension of the
water service throughout the municipality. Great satisfaction is expressed in the municipality at. the
result of the sale.
Two schemes of dyking have been
passed by the ratepayers, and the
nope is expressed that both will be
completed before the fall, so as tc
provide adequate protection for the
lands in the municipality before the
unfavorable weather sets in.
The one is for the encompassing
of the whole of Sea Island with a
permanent dyke, the amount of the
bylaw for which is $40,D00; while
the other is for the construction of a
dyke along the North Arm of the
Fraser River on Lulu Island, between Number Two rond and Number Five road, so as to fill in the
gap at present existing there, and
which will afford protection to the
whole of that island. The bylaw for
this work is  for $24,500.
ANOTHER TRUST DISSOLVED.
ST.  PAUL,  Aug.   12.���A  majority J
of  the judges  of  the  United  States I
Circuit   Court   of   Appeals   has   declared   the   International   Harvester |
Company to be  a  trust  in  restraint
ot   trade and  ordered  it  to  dissolve
into   at   least   three   different   parte
within DO days.     Judge Sanborn rendered dissenting opinion.
THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD
WE CARRY THE BEST LINES OF
Panning Implements
on the market, and can ship to you without delay Frost
& Wood and Deering Binders, Cast and Steel Skein
Wagons, Gasoline Engines, Columbia Hay Presses and
Iron Age Potato Diggers, are a few of the lines necessary
to do your work on the farm.
We also carry a full line of
Shelf and Heavy Hardware, Paints
and Oils, Rope, Binder Twine,
Stoves, Furniture and
Tinware
Order through our Agent, Mr. GEO. T. BAKER, of
Ladner, or Phone us Direct:
T.J. TRAPP & CO., Limited
p. , Implement Dept.    691
���-ones:. j General Hardware   59
New Westminster    -    -    -
B. C.
Closing Out Sale
OF THE FIRM OF
Denny & Ross
After the End of August the New Company Will
Take Over This Business
We have less than a month to sell over Twenty Thousand
Dollars worth of FURNITURE, CARPETS, LINO-
LEUM, DRAPERIES, ETC. These goods will be
delivered to your home at less than you can buy direct
from the factory.
Here Is a Sample of Our Price Cutting
Mahogany Chiffonier, Colonial style, sells from $31.00 to
$35.01).   Closing Out Price  $25.00
6-ft. Extension Tables, from    $5.75
Mahogany Parlor Suites, five pieces, upholstered in green
velour, regular $35.00, for $26.00
Dining and Bedroom Furniture at one-third off regular
prices.   Carpets at saving prices.
Scotch Inlaid Linoleum, in wide selection of patterns;
regular $1.25 per yard.   Closing Out Price, yard 85c
Denny & Ross
THE BIG FURNITURE STORE
Corner Sixth and Cat narvon Streets
New Westminster
OPENED FLOODGATES
WITHOUT AUTHORITY
Thut Is Chaise Against Mr. Charles
Drinkwater, Heard at Cloverdale Today.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, _oi4>
DELTA DIRECTORY
CLOVERDALE,  B.C., Aug.   ll.-���
Joseph Drinkwater apreared before
Delta municipality ig situated ..
the mouth of the Fraser River in nT
finest agricultural district in t>7?
The chief interests in the Delta
farming, dairying, fruit cult*.,?
market gardening, sheep and ho
breeding. There are also salmn!
canneries in the Delta municipal?!.
There are shipping facilities by r.n
and boat to the markets of Can.?.
and   the   United   States.    The ".J
Mr. S. Shannon, J.P., this corning, |^d Is the largest per acre in cM_
charged with opening the floodgates j��J��- �� * ����� ���*�������*���horse, br*
of the Serpentine dam without au- ����� J������J I�� British  Column*
the   case   being   adjourned |-* ���? ��e��, bank of the Fra*,
for
thority,   .
until Thursday morning to allow
Drinkwater to secure an attorney
and to permit the prosecution to secure evidence. Mr. W. G. McQuarrie appeared for the municipality.
Drinkwater, it appeared, had a
bunch of shingle bolts in the river
and secured permission for opening
the gate for two tides. The bolts
were not boomed and floated far up
the river, and returned to the same
place on the second tide. Drinkwater is charged with then opening
the dam without authority and
flooding considerable land, and It is
the intention of the officials to make
an example of this case as a warning
to others who might be tempted to
tamper with the floodgates.
are  splendid  sites
DEBPAHTMKXT  OF   WORKS.
NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS.
"Otter School."
Sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Otter School," will be received by tbe Honourable the Minister
of Public Works up to noon of Wednesday, the 19th day of August,
1914, for the erection and completion of a large one-room schoolhouse
at Otter, in Langley Municipality,
Delta Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on an<"
after the 30th day of July, 1914, at
the office of Mr. F. C. Campbell.
Government Agent, New Westminster; also of Mr. R. A. Payne, Secretary of the School Board, Murrayville, B. C; and the Public Works
Department, Victoria.
By application to the undersigned
contractors may obtain a copy of the
plans and specifications for the sum
of ten dollars ($10), which will be
refunded on the return in good order.
Each proposal must be accom-
panied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to tlie Honourable the Minister <f
Public Works, for a sum equal to 10
per cent, of tender, which shall be
forfeited If the party tendering decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit nf unsuccessful tenderers will be
returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered un-
River   there
industries.
Board of Trade.���President  w j.
Kirkland; secretary, S. W.' V__Z
meets 2nd Monday In each month'
Justices of Peace���H. D. Benson  u
J. Kirkland, J. McKee, E. I.. Berr,'
Police  Magistrate.���J.  McKee
Medical Health Officer.���Dr j  k\_���-
Wilson. ' **"'
Coroners.���Dr. A. A.  King and n,
J.  Kerr Wilson.
School Board.���S. Wright, chairman
A. deR. Taylor, secretary; j   u.
Callan. '
Farmers' Institute.���C. Davis, pre*,
dent; N. A. McDiarmid, secretarv
Delta Farmer.' Game Protective A*
sociation��� Wm.   Kirkland,  pr*)***.
dent; A. delt. Taylor, secretary
Delta   Agricultural   Society. D.  A.
McKee, president; A. deR. Taylor
secretary. '
License Commissioner.���Reeve A. D
Paterson,   Councillor   8.   Iforin*
J. Harris, J. McKee, J.P., and E
L. Berry, J.P.
Member of Parliament.���J. D. Taylor
���New Westminster.
Member of Local Legislature.���F, j
MacKenzie, New Westminster.
Boat Sailings���SS. Sonoma leaves
Ladner for Steveston at 8.30 am
12.30 p.m., and 6.30 p.m. connect-
ting with the B.C.E.R. cars, Fern
boat leaves Ladner for Woodwards at 7, 9 and 10 a.m., l.||,
3.30 and 6 p.m., returning learn
Woodwards at 7.30, 9.80 aid
10.30 a.m. and 2, 4 and 6.30 p.m.
On Sunday leave Ladner at 9 aad
10 a.m. and 1.80, 8, 6 and 7 p.m.
and half an hour later from
Woodwards. The S.S. Transfer
leaves for New Westminster dally
except Sundays, at 7 a.m.; retort
Ing leaves New Westminster at S
p.m., reaching Ladner at 5.80 p.m.
Railways.���Great Northern leaf-
Port Guichon daily for New We*.-
minster and Vancouver at 7 a.m
returning, leaves Vancouver it
2.30 p.m., reaching Port Guicbca
about 6.30 p.m. B.C.E.R., Lulu
Island Branch, E. Stirling, superintendent; Vancouver to Eburn��
and Steveston���Cars leave Granville street depot (at north end
of bridge over False Creek) to
meet New Delta at 8.30 a.m. and
3.30 p.m. and leaves for New
Westminster via Eburne at 8.0��
a.m. and 3 p.m. Special car for
Eburne at 6.00 a.m. Cars leave
Steveston at 6.30 a.m. and hourly
until 11.30 p.m. Sunday service
���First car leaves either terminus
at 8.30 a.m.; hourly service thereafter until 11.30 p.m.
Post Office.���Hours, 8 a.m. to
p.m. Mail for Vancouver clo.i-
at 12 noon; for New Westminst'
and up river points at 6.30 a.m
closed  all   day  Sundav.
less made out on tbe forms supplied f....-1-i _i    ��',��._.
signed  with  the actual  signature  ofP*'"lcifa!   ,0oJJaSU-T*i8eU ,
Municipal   Hall,   Ladner,   on   tt.-
second and fourth Saturdays ���
each month at 2 p.m. Reeve A.
D. Paterson; councillors, Jas. Savage, Joseph Harris, Seymour Huff,
Sam Morley, Chris Brown; clerk,
N.  A.  .McDiarmid.
the tenderer, and enlcosed In tbe envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Deputy   Minister  and   Public   Works
Engineer.
Public  Works Department,  Victoria,
B.C.,   28th  July,   1914.
IRRIGATION CONVENTION.
Two Thousand Delegates From Western   Provinces  Expected  to
Meet nt Penticton.
tFrom  tho   British   Columbian'.
The  eighth   annual   convention   of
t! p Western fpnrula Irrigation Asso-
ctation will be beld in Penticton, B.
'".. commencing August 17 and  lasting  three  whole  days.      Prominent
men  from  all  sections of the prov-
i ince  and  the  Northwest  will  attend
and address the gathering, and over
(2000   delegates     from  the  Western
i provinces are expected to attend.
Some of the papers to be rend will
be:   "Interdependence  of  Farm  and
:City." by Dr. J. G. Rutherford, sup-
I erintendent   of  agriculture  and   nni-
be swept   ma] industry branch, ('. P. R.     "The
Actual  Problem  that  Confronts the
Irrigator," Don H. Bark, in charge
of investigations, Boise, Idaho.
"Moisture Conditions in Relation to
I Plant Diseases," J. W. Eastman, provincial pathologist, B, C. government. "Irrigation Water Administration in B. C," W. R. Young,
Icomptroller of water rights, B. C.
Ivcvernment. "Features of B. C.
-Water Act," H. W. Grunsky, water
;rights branch, B. C. government.
Other probable speakers will be:
iSir Richard McBride, premier of
British Columbia; the Hon. Arthur
Sifton, premier of Alberta; Hon.
j Walter Scott, premier 0. Saskatchewan, and various cab.net ministers
ifrom the governments of British Co-
umbia,   Alberta   and   Saskatchewan.
CRANBROOK,
G. Sassomoto. Japanese rancher,
was shot and killed last night as he
stepped out of his back door by an
unknown assassin.
ShilohM
The   family  remedy   for   Coughs   and   Colds-
Small  dote.    Small  bottle.    Beat aince  1870
BURQUITLAM NEWS.
BURQUITLAM. Aug. 11.���This
evening at a general meeting of the
|Burnuitlnm Women's Institute, held
;in the Agricultural hall, the move-
jment to assist in the financing of a
hospital ship from Canada inaugu-
I rated by the women of Canada, will
be discussed. Yesterday Reeve
L, B, Marmont received a telegram
from Victoria explaining the object
and he at once arranged for the
meeting, and this evening the residents of tbe Coquitlam municipality
will be given a chance to help In the
r.-iismg of the $10,000 for the hospital ship.
This afternoon the regular meeting of the Institute is being held In
the Agricultura] hall at which Mrs.
J. B. Kirk, president of the Strawberry Hill Institute, is addressing
the members on the subject, "How a
Mother Can Help Her Girl and How
a Girl Can Help Her Mother."
NORTH HEM).
While a gang of men were en
gaged in fighting a small bush fire
along the C. P. R. tracks near North
Bend recently, they came upon tbe
dead body of a man lying In the
bush. The body was carefully cohered over with brush and other evidences were found which point to
foul play. The provincial police
were notified and an inquest will be
held at North Bend.
CHURCH   NOTICES
Anglican.
Holy Communion, first and third
Sundays at 11 a.m., second fourth
Sundays at 8 a.m.; matins, 11 a.m.;
Sunday school at 10 a.m.; Evening
Service at 7.30 p.m.; Wednesday
evening, Litany at 8.30. Rev. C. C.
Hoyle,  M.A.,  vicar.
Baptist Church.
Pastor���Rev.     D,  G.    Macdonald.
Ladner���Sunday school, 11 a.m.;
evening service, 7.30 p.m.; prayer
meeting, Wednesday, 7.30 p.m.; mis-
SrXOPSIS  OF   COAL   MINING
REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion, in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, tbe
Northwest Territories and in a portion of the Province of British Columbia, may be leased for a tern>
of twenty-one years at an annua;
rental of $1 an acre. Not more than
2580 acres will be leased to one applicant.
App-icatlon for a lease must be
sionary meeting every first Wednes-jmnde by the-applicant in person to
day under the auspices of the Ladles'ithe  Agent  or Sub-Agent of the dii-
Circle.
Crescent Island���Sunday school, 2
p.m.; service, 3 p.m.; singing practice and Bible reading, Tuesday, 7.3f
p.m.
Gulfside Schoolhouse���Union Sua-
day school, 2 p.m.; singing practice
and Gospel service. Friday, 7.30.
Catholic.
Church services will be held every
other Sunday, beginning with Sunday, November 14, 1909. Parochial
mass at 10.30 a.m.; Sunday school,
2 p.m.; evening devotion, 3 p.m.;
a.m. Rev. Father W. Chaput, parish
priest.
Methodist.
Services next Lord's Day at 11
a.m. and 7.30 p.m.; class meeting,
before the morning service every
Sunday; Sabbath school at 10 a.m.
every Sunday; Epworth League
every Wednesday at 8 p.m. Rev C
Wellesley Whittaker, pastor.
St. Andrew's Presbyterian.
Services next Lord's Day at 11
a.m. and 7.30 p.m.; week night services on Thursday evening at 7.30
o'clock; Sunday school at 2.30 p.in.
J. Hastie, minister.
Rev. J.
trict in which the rights applied for
are situated.
In surveyed territory the land
must be described by sections, or
legal subdivisions of sections, and
in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant  himself.
Each application must be aci-om-
panied by a fee of $5, which will be
refunded if the rights applied for
are not available, but not otherwise-
A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per  ton.
The person operating the min(l
shall furnish the Agent with sworn
returns accounting for the full fi""*11-"
tity of merchantable coal mined and
pay the royalty thereon. If the coal
mining rights'are not being operated, such returns should be furnished
at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal
mining rights only, but the le*"-*8
may be permitted to purchase wha
ever available surface rights may
Any corrections in above names
or times should be sent to the office
of the Delta Times, Ladner, B C
The Delta Times is published everv
Thursday from the Times Building, Ladner, B.C. J. D. Taylor
managing-director.
i
bt
considered necessary for the working of the mine at the rate of $1"���00
an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary oi
the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agen-
of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized publication oi
this advertisement will not be P��'��
i for.���30690.
i\\

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