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The British Columbian Jun 11, 1884

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Array rrov-noUlSwrota----
1   i, .we
OrTIOt, OHUMtU smn. Mum n tn-
ittUk Ml iOMIUI OaWmilMTIIIIO0tllT.il.
Putin k Wi. low k ttmmtti t~u,
tlHII Br Hall, Kiwi fllOforemoa.i
fl for S mo.. I pvanlo In Adra.n. DallierM
by Oerrieror Agent, ,1 per quarter, pnj»bl.
quarterly to Curler or Agent.
AOBNTS
T.-LlUnuACi. Vimm
T.I. PIAMW k tS »««.
1.1. flMU AJwrtHw Jii«nt, n H«rcl»nt's
tiSSn'i- rrmd«.. UamborlMaloiwaH.
AdrKtanauttferUulpapar.
S  mayUlonnd on lil. at
I Ow. P. Howell *Co.'.
SMrtfifttt BnreanflO Sprnco flt.i,
ng contnoU may 6o made for it fn
Wm British Columbian.
Imtai, Me ll, IM.
I   till   I, ,     I IL
Anclent Wine.
During the past few months we
havo published a number of articles
discussing tbo character of Jewish
wines from various points of view.
Tho question is one of great interest, and should be met honestly and
without prejmHt* 80 -fir at we
know it ia not one of sect or party
at all. In ihe New YorlclFftnen
of 29th Ma; we find an article on
this subject which brings out some
new points, and is worthy of perusal. It says: "In considering this
important subjeot, six things are to
be kept in mind:
1. That throughout the Old Testament there runs a series ot passages wherein wine is spoken of. as
a blessing, and another series, wherein it is spoken of as a curse; and
that different names in Hebrew are
usually given to the two kinds,
one being believed to be fermented
and the other boiled.
2. That tbe ancients know nothing about alcohol, which was only
discovered by distillation centuries
after the Old and New Testaments
were completed. The various preparations of the fruit of the vine
therefor, could only be distinguished
by their different appearance or the
different effect, they produced.
3. The different names given to
distinguish these different preparations in the Hebrew of the Old
Testament are merged into one general name in the New. So thut the
distinction, so far us name is concerned, between the kind preserved
by boiling and tbe kind by fermentation is lost. One exception to
this rule is found in the case'of the
preparation used at the Lord's Supper, which gets a different and distinctive name; as if to make sure
tbat the mistake would not be made
ot supposing that Jesus used the
fermented wine, whioh is elsewhere
called a mocker, and likened to a
serpent.
4- The two ways of preparing the
juice of the grape to keep for com
mon use are praetised now in Syria,
as they were in the Old Testament
times, and they are called by different names now aa then. It iB not
supposable that there was an interregnum in this twofold use ot grape-
juice, at the time the New Testament was written in Greek, during
whieh only fermented wine was
made.
Various adjectives were used to
designate the different kinds of wine
by Greek and Roman writers, all of
whioh, including syrups and even
cakes (like cakes made of maple sap)
were called wine. Such preparations cannot have been intoxicating,
though c.tiled wine in classical writings.
5. To assume that wherever win.
is' mentioned in the Greek New
Testament, and in our translation
of both Testaments, it must have
been fermented, and consequently
intoxicating, is gratuitous. On the
contrary, every line of evidence
leads to the conclusion that the two
different kinds are often included
nnder the same nam. in the New
Testament, though for the most part
distinguished by different names in
the Hebrew of the Old Testament,
6, The fruit of the vine was, and
is in Palestine and Syria generally,
a most important element of th.
food *f the people. It was and is
used most freely in the natural state
at the time of gathering the crop,
and as long after as it will keep. It
was, and is, in the inspissated or
boiled preparation, in common use
all th. year round. This was doubtless the main use of it in Old Testament times, as it is at present, and
it is not to be supposed that there
was any material difference in the
habits of the people during the time
embraced in tha New Testament nap
rative. The boiled or inspissated
pr.prr.tion was and is used tor
sweetening, as we use sugar and
molasses; and it was and ia also
tued freely as a beverage by mingling
water with it, as we do with various
syrups. It was thus an important
element in the food ot the people,
and so continues to be; only a small
portion of the grape erop is tormented now in Syria compared with what
It boiled
In the Church of Home tbe practice of watering wino for the celebration of the Supper has descended
from the first institntion of the ordinance; although in process of time,
fermented wine, whieh needs no
watering, and gets none usually,
hu been substituted for the boiled
grape-juice, which doe. need it.
These things being so, it is easy
to understand the account of the
marriage at Oana in a sense no way
derogatory to our Lord's wisdom and
love. The wine at that marriage
(syrup of grape-juice) had been prepared as a beverage in the way common alike among Hebrews, Greeks,
and Romans, by mingling it with
water, when used for drinking, a
prooeM whioh take, many ancient
wine, ont of th. lilt, for what modern
-[■•■-"--"--■"-
Columbian.
VOLUME 26
NEW WESTMINSTER, R 0„ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1884.
NUMBER 46
wine is mingled with equal parts ot
water,or sometimes withtwieaor three
times as much water as wine, before
being used) At .the marriage slipper doubtless good wine or the syrup
of grape-juice not too muoh diluted
with water, was provided, and when
more was needed the Lord caused
water to be poured Into the water-
pots again, and though ther. was no
wine (syrup) put into the pots to
mix with the water, th.ro cm. out
richer, better (less diluted, win. than
before. Instead of th. company being partially intoxicated, aa tlw irrl-
tabl. defenders of intoxicating wines
would have us believe, they had
merely had a good supply, and now
they got a second supply of .batter
quality than Ui. first To Ml
that th. Lord provided tf
firkina-of more iotoxfoating -J
a company which wa. already pritty
well intoxicated, is so absurd that it
is astonishing anyone could for a
moment deem that understanding
the right one. The term "well
drunk, in this narrative, as the
same word rendered "drunken" ih
the case of the Corinthian Christians
who made the Lord's Supper a meal,
has evidently no reference to intoxication, but to being full, or satisfied
already.
These statements, which much investigation into tliis question convinces -is are substantially, correct,
will be found to explain those texts
which have been supposed to describe and warrant the use of intoxicating wine, nnd by analogy of other
intoxicating drinks. And by this
understanding, what a mass of interpretations favorable to the use of
alcoholic liquors is swept away I"
A Discover)' In Surgery.
After the oxooution of Lloyd L. Majors, on Friday last, a post mortem examination of the body wat held by Dr.
E. H. Wooltoy, of Oakland, in the
pretence of several other physicians.
This examination gave an unusual opportunity to observe tho initial stage of
repair after the fracture ot the bone.
Just ono wook before Majors wat hung,
in his attempt to oscapc, he received a
fraoture at the middle of the right ulna, ono of the bones of the right forearm. Thit wat a simple, commiuuted
fraoture j that it, the tkin was unbrok
en, but the bone wat broken in several
pieces. A compound fraoture com
munlcates with tbe air by means of a
wound. The fracture of Majors' arm
was carefully dratted with a splint.
At the pott mortem examination th.
fraoture wat examined and tho .entire
ulna wat removed. There waa no bony
union, nor any union whatever at the
bony surfaces, bat the callout material,
whioh unites the broken fragments permanently after fraoture, had juat Itegun
to be aeoreted. There wss just a little
tenacious material perceptible on the
surfaces. That the beginning of the
secretion of callout material at the end
of the first week is noticeable, hat been
accepted aa the rule by turgeons, but
in practice it hss been found that thit
callous material hat not been sufficiently abundant and condensed to
yield tigns of repair until about the
tenth or twelfth day after injury—lhat
is to say, ths so-called knitting of the
bo:., '.~m not occur until about that
time. An opportunity waa offered in
this case of studying the earliest pro-
oestet of repair in fraoture, tuch at hat
very seldom before boen afforded ft)
turgeons. It is understood that the
books contain no parallel case, Whenever an opportunity has been given
to observe repair of fraoture, it hat
been in subjects who have died from
injury or disease, and not in one who
waa in other respects perfectly healthy,
and having, at thit one did, all the
forest in active operation. To the surprise of Dr. Wooltoy, it waa found that
temporary union of the broken bone
had already taken place, not by callous
material, but by means of the organization of the blood which had been
poured out about the fracture at the
time of the injury. Thia organised
blood embraced the bone at the point
of fraoturo, and for about two inches
above and below. Tho fraoture showed
that originally it had been oblique and
that, by a continuation of tho force vf
the blow that caused the fraoture, the
lower projection or point of the upper
part of the bono waa broken off. This
little fragment projected a little from1
ita place, -but it and the two main por-'
tiona of tho bone were held together
by the grasp of this organised blood so
firmly as uot to give away in the least
upon the disarticulation and entire
removal of tho bone from the arm. This
provisional clasp, as it may bo called,
waa elastic, and the bone wat grasped
at one end and shaken it would yield
and give away at the point of fracture;
but it waa sufficiently strong to prevent
any drooping of the distal fragment at
tho othor end when the bone wu held,
still.
From this examination thia muoh was
learned that wu not known before; or,
at all oventa, it wu nol sufficiently
known to be recognised and laid down
aa a principle, vis: that the early and
perfect adjustment and perfect maintenance in position of fractured bone,
it necessary to perfect repair. The
prevention of irritation of tissue, and
of consequent pain and constitutional
diaturbance and the liko have bean the
tpeoial reasons for th. early proper adjustment of fractures, but all that hu
been deemed absolutely necessary to
tenure perfect repair of the bone iti.lt
hu been a perfect adjustment of fractured bones fiior to the eighth or tenth
day after injury, and maintenance af-
tetwards in place. But thia case furnishes signincent proof of the great
value of the perfect adjustment of a
fracture before the coagulation of
the Mood at the seat of the injury hu
had time to occur.
Dr. Wooltoy remarked to the reporter who questioned him about this
examination that never before, in all
hia practice, bad a similar opportunity
been offered to examine a fracture in
the first ataauof repair, and alto, that
h. deemed the disclosures ct great
scientific value.—S. F. Bnllttin.
1
a. HATUm., M.JD.
wo«-C(ilua>bl.at.,oppo.lurorta«-ce.
a-pas-MJakt) ttr*",.oppo.lt.tne
iblle-Behcel^jiWeitmtn^,
Basra-
•unil.
TV I..HIHn, «.».*.<*.*.# LiO.
PHYSICIAN * 8DROSOH.    .
a&sWtS^si^-iWk
c,
■U.TKM-W,SLB,1S-i>-r-*kt,,tS.
PHYSICIAN* SOR-" EON.
Burgeon B. c. FenltantiarV. Satnon Sew
MlMtmluMr H~, otMear.lwth. ttt-
irlet. Of nro-Conar «< Olukata aad
HcK.osl.8UMU. jualdttm.MaryS'.
' 1 —, »»*IMen- n«-p      '
J. A. CALBICK,
BUILDEB& CONTRACTOR
isms 09 JoBBma aud be-
wrmoau>Ti,Y SXBCCTKO.
mB"
*1.*.«.. law.St.arp>
aa«* S.I.
ant Square, Columbia St.,
- -^rearof T4o»Oven's
V.OOOPKR, B. A.,at.D„ '
PHYSICIAN A SUBQEpN.
H
OFFICE and RESIDENOE-Church St.
Sieit door to FaittiMi' Home), near
oUimbla Bt, New VM-tatUtiitet) B.O.
OFFICE aOBRS-StoWfcm.' lioSMd
6.80 to 8 p, m. Calls ta town and coHh-
trjr promptly attended to. W3M
TOHJf fl. XeGUUUB,M.D.,
PHYSICIAN A SURGEON.
Graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, m
also Assistant Surgeon1 late Honorable
East India (Company Service, wishes to
announce to the people ot Lillooet District tbat he ban taken up hia residence
at CLINT** and opened ft drug store. All
oorarautcatlons by mall promptly attended to. -      ioyi7^-m
pORBOULD * McCOLL,
BARRISTERS, BOI.ICITOR8, AC.
OmoB-McKenilo street, New Westminster, a O.
T>   W. ARHITROKO.
'   BARRISTER, SOLICITOR,
xroTJLxtrr  p-crsxizo,   hito.
Opposite Colonial Hotel,
NEW WESTMINSTER •'-' • '. • % 0.
t t. wilkinson,
'custom boot a shoe maker,
Chilliwhack, B. C. First-Class workmanship. Repairing neatly and quickly executed. Terms strictly cash.       myai*3m
M'
OURAY * FB.Y,
HOUSE ADD SIGN PAINTERS,
Graining, Kalsomlnlng and Paper-Hanging;. Snor—Clarkson street, opposite tbe
N.w Westminster Jail, New Westminster,
British Columbia. apz-to
mHE VICTORIA MAIL,
(Lato "Times.")
A paper that ll alive to the Interests or
TltEfeOVB. SubKrlpUon.Kr ye.r In advance, 25 cents.
E.K. BARGISON,
Jo7-!m Publisher, Victoria, B. C.
iiriu.-Bi.iiAtow -
GROCER A OEHERAUj......*,...
Good  Accommodation, for Travelers.
Opposite Steamboat Landing,
LANGLEY.....  .'. ...B.C.
 m-U-lm '
TtOYAL HOTBL,
CENTREVILLE, CHttUWHACK.
First-class accommodation for Travelers.
MRS. M. A. HARPER,.
m;31-<8«-lr Proprietnss.
-j-TBI, M. A. HARFKK,
CENTREVILLE, CHILLIWHACK.
»ry CMda aa. ^merle*. XSlHla.rya.Nl
t*tne*tjH>sih
First-Class Dressmaker In attendance.
ntyxVM-17
BOOTS and SHOES
non
HEATHORN-S
lout & ffini IiniiMory,
VICTORIA,
AT   VICTOBIA   PRICES.
R, THOMAS,
S'top tinder Uu new Oddfellow Hall, Columbia at., New Westminster.
Every Has to his own Business
JL..   FEELE,
PRACTICAL
CHEMIST A DRUGGIST,
COLUMBIA   STREET
(OFF. COLONIAL ifbfKI,),
NEW  WESTMINSTER,   6. 0.
Faytlclani' Prescriptions and Family Beclpei * Specially.
N. B. — Only Genuine Drugs used.
Over twenty vears1 experience.    mr23
BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXPRESS. COMPANY
(UMITED)
The attention of Mi o public Is called to tho
REDUCTION
la mmr nld ot Express Freight and
Honey *.■ mlttanrcit is anil from
Victoria ud V«le.
OOME AND SEE
Got. Till M Cone Aguii, Bojs!
rpBE.PROPRIETOR,   JAMES TURN-
ABDXIj, having again taken pokkcshIoi.
of the TjearaUNCK HOUSE fronting on
Columbia and Church Street*, opposite
Episcopal Church, City of Now Weatmln-
Hter, ft C, and now known ua the
FARMER'S    HOME,"
Will accommodate all his old friends and
tho nubile eonernlly who favor him with
a call, at old prices. Hoard per day, 91.00;
Board per week, IS.00; Single Meals, 25
cenuj BedR. 25 ccnt«, oam Good accommodation for Ladlfifl and Families.    au29tc
-   ©SOS'S*
MUSICAL AGENCY,
^GOVERNMENT   STREET,
Viotoria,   -   -   British   Columbia.
BTEIJIWAl- rU>JOa
■Ufa-Mall PUMOa
ihu kekivi. rujfoa
-UINEB rUNOB
, BELI,  St COMPANY'S OEtUXB
 (JaMto)	
FURNITURE!
THE UNDERSIGNED HAS PLEA*
auro tn announcing that he is now
prepared to supply all kinds of Furniture, ke., at the lowest possible prices.
Cabinet work and Upholstering done
promptly and in first-class style.
UNDERTAKING
In all Its branches. The undersigned
has the only HEARSE in the City. A
continnanco of public patronage solicited.
Old stand, next Occident Hotel.
J. d. BUNTE,
Late Manager Sehl's Branch Furniture
Store. auSto
J. BAGNALL,
IMPORTER A MANUFACTURER OF
.Fad tsi.?ea and. Farcel«
Not containing any extra valuable or dan-
geroiu compounds, under
16 lbs to Yale 25 cents
W lbs from Victoria, .25 cents
In currency or bank notes. Insured against
any lon whatever, por 9100
To or from Victoria 38 cents
To of from Yale A all points In tho
Interior. 50 cents
Pn. * IK 8. BARNARD, Manager.
FRED HOMER, Front Street, Agont at
New Westminster. ap2-tc
MESSRS.
rp J. TRAPP,
AUCTIONEER AND APPRAISER,
Columbia Btreet New Westminster
Arrangements are being made for an
oxtenslve Auction Bale of Beal Islatt, to
take place In May Next. Parties desirous
of disposing of their farms, etc., will do
well to placo the same in the hands of the
above.
All commissions will, receive prompt
and careful attention. Beat' references
given when required. mhl2-tc
*m    H.  FALDIMO,
LAND, HOUSE AND GENERAL AGENT
Accountant, Collector, Conveyancer.
LIFE, FIRE A ACCIDENT INS, AGENT,
Custom House Broker.
Agont for P. T. Johnston A Co.,Seedsmen,
—■-■Victoria.-—.
And John Leahy, Brewer, Victoria,
orricK
McKensle St, one door from Columbia Bl,
NEW WESTMINSTER, R C.
■g
H. B. CROASDAUK. A. W. JONKS.
OROASPAIU&JONU,
Beat Estate A|*at s and Brake-r*.
Particular attention paid to the sale of
farming lands;
Money to loan at low rates of Interest on
Improved terme.
Large lists of town and country property
for sale.
Port Moody Agent, Mr. Charles Foster.
Orrtoi-Governnient Bt, near Broughton,
Victoria, n, €.     POboxWl.   '   apMo,
VV. D. FERRIS,
LAND,    HOUSE,
GENERA^AGENT
Bent and Debt Oolleotor.
SEVERAL GOOD FARMS FORSALE
Agnt ftr Ue TIATItlUB- l»I
•Bi ACOIMU IINUXOI cd„
■•riftrt^CfH. ;
OFFICE: - McKeniia Street,  Ntw
Westminster. deft
Bespertfullybeg to Inform tho publio of
Ne? Wi jtmtnster and District that
tbey have commenced business as
land Surveyors ^Draughtsmen
«eal Estate Brokers 6 Agents,
Conveyunccrs, AocounlantMc.
And are now prepar-Kt to receive Instruo*
tlons In their several branches.
All bnslnras placed In their hands will
receive prompt attention.
They have for sate Town and Suburban
Lots In New Westminster,
Town Lots at Port Moody, Port Hammond and Lots on town sites at
Heatings, Granville and
English Bay
Also farming lands on tho Lower Fraser.
Office—Front Street,
•ppaslte C. P. N. Company's Wharf,
NufFrtireStore
W.PROTHEROiCO.
Manufacturers and dealers in
Furniture
Of all kinds, including
WALNDT AND ASH EXTENSION
TABLES,
CENTRE TABLES,
BED-ROOM SUITES,
LOUNGES, MATTRESSES, 4C, *C.
All kladt of Furniture, Mattresses, ko,
tattle to order in Hrst-eUss style.
Having puraliaaed for cash, we intend
toa.ll at Viotoria prlees.
Oall and oh our stock before pnrohas-
iag els.wh.re.
Show R«cma-Holbrook's Stone Build-
log, Columbia St., New Westminster,
 nryli-to	
NOTICE.
BrUMi colanbl* PenltentlM-jr.
TtWDIllBO—A Trail,  na.trn.tor
Dl ror B. 0. Penitentiary, at Tailor; must
bearaod eutter and Otter. Apply loth.
Varln,     By Order,
JaW. A. H.McBRIDK, Warden,
VV
AND ALL KISDS Ot
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
ILL VISIT THB   MAINLAND,
on a Professional Tour, and will
bo happy to receive and execute orders
for all Kinds of Musical Instruments.
Pianos and Organs tuned or regulated.
Favors from tbe Mainland, fcrw iided
through W. H. Keary, N. W., will te-
eoive prompt attention. jy23t»v ■
W. R. CLARKE,
AUCTIONEEB.
APPRAISbR ANO COMMISSION
MERCHANT.
Sales Room, Fire-proof Builoiho,
Yates Street,
VICTORIA, • BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SAT Liberal advances made on Consign*
ments,
To facilitate the sale of Real Estate, I
have complete maps of Viotoria, Esquimalt, New Westminster and the Districts.
N. B. Parties desirous of selling their
Stock, Stock in trade, or Fuuft-ire, and
not wishing the trouble of an Auction
Sale, can find a Cash Buyer hy calling
on the above. Office of the British Columbia Wire Works, All sorts of wire
work done. Orders filled with neatness
and dispatch.
Office or Harbor Master aad Port Warden, mo
 DEALERS IN	
BOOKS,
STATIONERY,
Fancy Goods, &c,
YALE,  b. o."
A   LARGE   STOOK ALWAYS ON
A.  hand. Goods not In stook will t,o
ordered promptly.
Newspaper*  and  Uagaalnes supplied from al) parts ot the world.
Prompt attention given to orders by
nail.
JaSStc]    A. Q. JOHNSTON, Manager.
Jor gait or % $tnt.
FOR SALE.
A SINGLE PLAIN BEDSTEAD, WITH
wool ami strnw mattresses.  Apply at
"■Wc T-uacrflcfe,
Cows for Sale.
SIX GOOD COWS FOB SALS.  Apply to
A.IKVING.
my3-tc  Maple Hidje.
Oxen for Sale.
B.O.A.A.
FIRST PRIZE!
KURTZ&CO
CIGARS
[Signed] A. PEELE, See,
       (ool7tc)
Mm k 1 Co.,
(UMITED.)
RICH-AD STREET, HEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
Manufacturers unit Dealers in all
kinds of
ROUQH &
DRESSED
WOODS I TURNER,
Conveyancers,
Beat E»late Agents.   Land  Surveyor*.
DrangbiHmru.nnd Insurance Agnls*
Ouv property    ** aw now very com-
{ilete, and wo wo.. 11 attention to the
ollowinj; selection htch we are enabled to olfer at ven . onablc figures.
Titles guaranteed:
New Westminster Oity.
Lot 20, block XXXII—good roaidenco
site.
Subdivision of lot 10, block XXXV-
66x132 feet.
Southwest •} of lot 17, block XXXVI.
New Westminster Suburbs.
LoU 7 nnd 8, block V—graded, cleared
and fenced; adjoining residence of \\, B.
Towiiftend, Esq,
Isots (18 nnd 70, block v.
Subdivisions of lota ■ nnd 2, block 0.
KulHlivit-iotiK of lutrt 10 ami '2,1, block 7.
New Westminster District.
Good farniB in nll parts.
106 acres on False Creek road.
4.T0 acres at Matstjui—good dairy farm;
highly improved; to Ite sold with stock
and implements if desired.
200 acres at Sunins—a splendid chance
fur dairy farmers.
245 acres near Ladner'B Landing.
320 acres on Lulu Island.
Port Moody.
A lavge snd complete list, embracing
nil parts of the Townaite.
Land Surveying
In all its branches; maps compiled, tracings prepared, and all descriptions of surveying carefully and promptly attended
to.   90 years' experience.
Having been over almost the whole of
New Westminster District during our
surveying tours, wo aro in a position to
give intending purchasers a correct description of the property offered.
Money to lend on approved security at
low rates of Interest.
Agents For
The l'hcnix, of Brooklyn, and the
Liverpool ft London k Ololw Insurance
Companies.
Th. Equitable Life Assurance Society
of the United States.
Gladding, McBean k Co's terra cotta
chimneys and vitrified stone sewer
piping. 	
OFFICE- EUard's Blook, Columbia
Street, New Westminster.
aplS-tc       WOODS * TURNER.
Shingles,
Lath,
Pickets,
&C..&C.
Orders   from   the   country
promptly   filled.
ESTIlv£AT*ES
of quantity and cost of material for
f   carefully   [
reeof clurge.
building   carefully   prepared
ire    "   '
Flnt*class grafft*e*n<-<l flMrinr* a
specially.
J. B. HENDERSON,
mCitol Manaoib.
BARGAINS
The following very eligible nntl valuable property will bo sold at PRIVATE
BALE, Full pavtloulurs furnlsherl on application to the undersigned;
Soutliwexl. )i nccIIoii, block 30. township
'2,Surrey; lin> aeres: 80 ncren prairie; 80alder bottom; within i% mfleH of New Wc«t-
mliiNtcr. The mnking of an excellent
farm, nlo-io to a good market.
KluhtyUIT--N-.ln-rlli '.,cif northeast^ of
mvtliiti ii, inwnshlii'J. with road run til tig
llmiti-:.! lo Mud llav; tl nillcN fnnii New
Wi-Ni in I nstcr; alder btrttom, with |.-r to
si ni i ii.  To ho sold at n bnrgtiln.
J. itnHN-'an's Itnneh, Lnnglev; lot .125,
groups. IW acres) :w nero« undereultlva-
lloii; <ii'-liiiril, large Imrn, xtoblo and cub*
hi. This is -inr uf the ehcapoHt pieces of
laud In tin'iiiurki't.
Ilttrlou Pruirle.back of Rt. Mury'sMIs*
Hlnn, 1448 iwireH of nngood land an there In
In the Province: nil In one hlockj very
near the line of tucC.P.R.; lias itm* fiiniill
bouse thereon. Thin Is a rarechnnco for
mu* ur more parties deslmuH of getting a
large farm, for dairy pwrponcB CBpcclally.
Northnest >-{ of section 6, township 4; 100
nereti; on Improved form, with cerilflcute
of Improvements.
North went}{ ot section 22, township 1),
The Booth Form, Ladner's Landing; 240
acres, all prnirie; OOunder cultivation, nnd
200 under fence; good dwelling house and
farm buildings,  A great bargain.
  •
One nearly new Plana, by Challenger
of London,   Price, J'iW.
One second hand Bag*) •
T.J. TRAPP.
 ap2»to _____
"lul Btfiitrr OriJmw M"
Lols B, 7, « ami S7, Block XXXII, Lot C,
Block XXVII, and lots IS and IS,
Block XXVIII, art fn the City
q/-V<m nv*fmirMf*T.
ACKHTIFICATB OT INDBFIOAB-
iblo title to the above mentioned lots
1 be issued to Henry Valentine Edmonds on tho 22nd day of August, IBM,
unless In the meantime a valid objection
thereto be made to the undersigned In
writing by some person claiming an estate or interest In *said lots, or some part
thereof.
0HA8.JA8.LEGOATT,
Aetlng Reglstrar-Oeneral.
Land Registry Offloe, 31st May, IBM.
myM-Sm
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
The Only PiM-Praof Hotel
in ie Gil?.
THE (JURY OmiTltNT
IS DNDER THE CHASOE OP AN
EXPERIENCED ARTIST.
THE UNDERSIGNED BEGS LEAVE
to anaounca to •„» Public that lie
has parohaMd th. ahove Hotel, where
.verytliing will br found lirst-class, and
at reasonable rates.
The Parlors ui Sleeping Apart-
Melts are under the superintendence
of Mas. Adsti.v.
Private Dining Rooms tor Ladies,
Families and Private Parties.
A PrlTSte Reading Room, commodious, comfortably furnished, and
well supplied with boohs and papers, is
provided for the use of guests.
TWO YOKE OP 0-YEAR OLD WORK-
OXEN for sale. Girth from «feet 11
in. to 7 feet 1 In. Also—1 BULL and 1
STAG, unbroken, good size.
IIlh2flt«
WM. H. LADNER,
Ladner's Landing,
FOR   SALE.
I/JAACBBROF FIRST.CLAM
1UU high and dry farming land on the
Mud bay road. Ahout nix acres cleared
and feneed; small house and good dour*
lulling orchard of young apple trees. Ap*
Ply to WILLIAM MURRAY.    r
myl.-8t Langley.
Is supplied with the choicest brands of
Wines, Liquors, Ciqabs, ftc.
JNO. AUSTIN,
Proprietor.
the
I
HASTINGS, B.
THIS FINE AND COMMODIOUS
new Hotol has been recently completed and ia furnished with every convenience for the comfort of guests. The
situation and accommodations are unsurpassed on Burrard Inlet, which !-as become the most fashionable
WATERING PLACE
In British Columbia, Tbe prospect is
charming, tbe sea breezes are invigorating, and the facilities for bathing and
boating are excellent. Private Sitting
and Dining Rooms. Suites of apartments for families or parties. Tbe Bar
U entirely detatched from the main
building. j    -.
Af The Hotel is under the immediate
superintendence of Mrs. Black.
First-class stabling and feed for Horses. Busses to and from New Westminster twice a day.
GEO. BLACK,
jy28te Proprietor.
ESTABLISHED 1859.
ROBT. DICKINSON,
BUTCHER,
Net*ly Oppoilte tbe Colonial Hotel,
NEW WESTMINSTER.
THE LARGEST AND   CHOICEST
assortment of all descriptions of
MEATS AND VEGETABLES
Constantly on hand, and eupplicd to Families, Restaurants, and Steamboats at the
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES.
Free Igl School.
TN ACCORDANCE WITH THE pro*
1 vIbIoii-. made at lust tienlonof thctcg-
iHlittivt-'iiNM'iiihly, iiiiili-i* In licn-by given
tlmt tt Free High Hehool will be opened nt
New Westminster,
During the lirst woek In August next
Thin will be n (tovernm<>nt Hirlinol, nnd
the CC-untO of study will bo Hint preHrrlbnd
by tne Provincial Educational Department. The curriculum will embrace all
subjects necessity for College inntrlculn-
tloti, nnd for qualifying porftmiH lo obtain
provincial teachers' certlUrates. The
school will be nnder a fl rat-class tencher.
Persons desirous of entering the clauses
should communicate with the Secretary
ns early as possiblo.
T.J. TRAPP,
my8-to Bee. Bd. of Trustees.
F. F. NELSON,
H
PORT
AS    JUST   OPENEP  A   NEW
Store at
MOODY,
Where will be found a full .took of
Dry floods, Groceries, and Ben-
eral Merchandise,
Which will he sold at New Westminster
Price..
Aa.atr.r North Am.rim AccMeal ■■•
nraaee c-.mtH.ay.
ST Kelt Door to Caledonia Hotel,
fo*Mo
r.r Catinters, ArUInu. BalMrrs,
Macttlalala, Ur.
08B0RNE A ALEXANDER,
828 Market St., San Franoitco.
Mechanic' Tools, Hardware, and Machinery. Catalogues of all our good, nnt
fr.« on application. apSMm
FOR   SALE.
QPLENDIP FAUM OK ISO ACRES)  j
p On Heres hfgbiy Improved, with good
houso nnd outbuildings, and a flourishing
young orchard of nbout 140 trees; 8 miles
from the boat landing at Langley, on the
Trunk Road. Easy terms. Apply to .
myl4*8t      HENRY DAVIB, Langley.
Milch Cows For Sale.
THE irNDEHSIGNED HAS FROM ONE
to ten good milch cows for sale. They
are quite gentle and first-class mliken.
For particulars apply to
P. GANNON,
Botcher A stock Dealer.
mhllMc. Ladner's Landing;
City Property for Sale I
THE UNDERSIGNED, WHO II
about to remove from the city to m
suburban residence, offers his city house
and lot for sale. For price nnd terms apply to
JAMES KENNEDY,
myl7to «On the premises.
.   FOR SALE.
IN CHILLIWHACK, A MORTOAG-
ed farm of 108 ncres, of which DO acres
are cleared'fenced and under crop; good
orchard; neat frame dwell Ing bouse, barn,
stable, and donV...-wulIed dairy. Will be
sold riienpior cash.   Applyto
MRS. M. A. HARPER,
l-H-gt]   Prop'r Royal Hotel, Ohllllwhack.
FOR SALJORLEASET
ONE ACRE OP LAND, HORE OR
less, at the Maple Ridge public landing, containing two houses. One boose
nearly new, contains 9 rooms; the other
has eight rooms. Will be sold together or
sen: rufely, cheap for cosh, or rented to
sulmMc tenants.  Applyto
JNO. McKENNEY,
!-:,''v:iw Maple Ridge.
Improved Fan to Leans.
QDAUTEH BECTTOX 18, TOWNSHIP fl,
f-i I'eJta Municipality, 160 acres. The
farm h pm: ..-, all djrked and cleared, 100
noreb i-<-ndy mr the plough. A good frame
house 24x30 hai, Just been erected, and ft
barn SOxl'U, witu thrashing machinery
driven by water power. About 20 acres
uuder timothy. Also a young orchard.
Funiculars on application to.
T. W. KERR.
miiWo New Westminster. -'
FOR SALE.
m
W. H. KEARY
Wishes to dispose of his stationery MM
Book Store and tho good will of the bus! -
ies.;.   Ti_ltM8 EASY, which cu   * e «»b-
tuined on application to T. J,. n     >  ig. .
March 31st, 1881. ifttci   .
STAGE BUSINESS
 AND	
LITEM STABLE for SALE
THE UNDERSIGNED OFFERS FOH
snle Ills entire Stage and Livery bnsl-
ih-ks, including complete outfit of Stages,
Rigs, Horses, Stages, Ac. Full purticuiani
on application. The business is paying,
and affords nn excellent chance to nn en*
ergetle man. The undersigned desires to
sell because he has other business cn-
gngements requiring his whole time.
mySMm
W. R TOWNSEND.
FOR SALE.
THE BEST DAIRY FARM IN THB
Province of British Coiumbin, situated
in LowerSumns,consisting of L.00 aeres,
of which 1100 is prairie and the remainder
timbered. There is ng-jod dwelling house
o; ll rooms; a flrst-olass dairy with water
power vomplote for churning; a largo
imrnl30xM. T^ims, •u'-ha!t down and
bnlnnci on 0 years* Utno nt 8 per cent
W.'ll be soirt with or without stock. Apply
to A..-**. VEODEU,
' *:n (1il)Uviu(ok,B.C.
FORSALE.
1440 ACRES CHOICE
DELTA LANDS
3 MILES FROM LADNER'S
Landing, on the Trunk Wagon
Road; two other roads runninRthrough
the premises.   Apply to
E. A. WADHAMS,
de22tc Ladner's Landing, B.C.
SECOND-HAND
EmklrW
CYLINDER 8xi2, SUITABLE
for direct action Saw-mill; with
Saw Arbor and two 62 inch Spalding-
tooth Saws: also, feed gear, donkey
pump, and shell boiler. The whole Is
In good order, and may be seen at the ,
Brunette Saw-mill, will be sold at a
bargain.   Apply to
DeBECK BROS. & CO.
New West., 20th Dec, 18S3.   [de22tc *
THE FINE 8TALUON
BLACK HAWK MORGAN
(At Mr. D. MeUilllvrny's), on Saturdays,
Mondays nnd Wednesdays,
—OH I III WHACK—
[At Ur. A. C. Wells'), on Tuesdays and
Fridays.
—KNOWLES—
On .Tuesdny evenings and Wednesday
mornings.
Blat* Hnwk Morgan's pedigree and record have boon published in the Comjm-
liiAN.nml ho Is In overy respect a first-
class horso.
Terms nnd particulars on application to
the groom.
W. TUlia008E, ProprleU*.
W. Miller,Groom, myl7-to NEW ADVERTISEMENTS TNIS DAY.
B. E. Broker.... .Hughes & Atkinson
Am. Agriculturist... .Orange Judd Co
Tend.™ Wanted Thos. L Briggs
1150 Reward John McKee, Jun
Auction Sale J. 5^«»™»
Important Announcement. .Mrs. Gold
B. 0. Penitentiary... .A. H. MoBride
Lost-. "Popsie"
liu gritish Colttmbian.
Wedmodar Horalaf. Jan. 11. Ma".
Great Men's Views.
The tor-centenary of the Univer-
aity of Edinburgh was recently held.
Speaking of it an exchange aays:
"The occasion was made remarkable
by the presence of 'men of renown'
—men of more than European reputation. Among these were Lavel-
eye, Helmholtz, and Virchow, the
great German scientist The audience that thronged to hear Virchow was immense, a thousand students being present Helmholtz had
uttered a word of warning against
what he called 'False Rationalism'
insolence; Laveleye reminded hia
atudenta that their first duty was to
seek the kingdom of God, but Vir
ehow surprised, astonished and produced a perfect furor of excitement
when he proclaimed with emphasis
that 'Evolution had no scientific
basis.' The Darwinian theory, he
aaid, might be true, but what he
demanded was proof, not hypothesis.
Such testimony from the greatest
anatomist, the greatest master of
natural science now living, it was
felt wu a real triumph for religion.
Dr. Edmund de Fresense, writing-
from Paris, declares that Virchow's
speech will have a great effect on
the continent of Europe."
The Ferry.
The reeve of Surrey does not admit that his municipality is wholly
to blame for the slow progress in
the ferry business. He declares,
however, that Surrey will not content to any ferry agreement unless
certain conditions which do not now
exist are imposed upon the ferryman. One of these is that the ferry people are to handle freight
coming across; another is that
trips must be made oftener tban
one* in two hours. Now, it seems
to us very late in the day for
Surrey to appear with these objections, and it is quite possible they
may prove fatal to the scheme, if
insisted upon. We should be exceedingly glad to find some person
willing to run the ferry e^ery hour,
to handle all the freight, and to
carry nt leas rates than those mentioned in the schedule. But in
matters of that kind one must just
make the best bargain possible
under the circumstances. It seemed
very doubtful last year whether
any person would take the ferry
charter at nil, and it is quite possible no person would have taken
it if encumbered with conditions
sueh as are now proposed. We
hope the people of Surrey will at
once formulate their demands, and
let us complete or kill the ferry
without delay.
A Protest.
In its edition of Sunday the Colonist gives special prominence to tbe
following protest: "The failure of
the Dominion government to commence work on the dry-dock and
open the publio lands to settlement,
in accordance with the provisions
of the settlement bill, excites surprise and indignation everywhere.
It is scarcely necessary to point out
that the Dominion Government are
violating a solemn treaty which was
ratified by the British Columbia and
Dominion parliaments. Sbould they
continue thus to disregard their obligations, the popular sense of their
treachery will soon make itself heard
and felt at Ottawa. The province
is suffering severely from the laches
of the Dominion in respect of the
two interests we have named, and
Is not in a mood for further trifling.
Immigrants are leaving the province daily because they can get no
satisfaction about the mainland railway lands and because the drydock
ia not being pushed as was promised." It is timo a unanimous protest went to Ottawa against the
polioy of inaction. Not only should
the press of British Columbia let its
voice be heard, but our representatives in the commons and senate
should also urge the im|>ortance of
having the railway landa opened to
settlement without delay.
The School "Scandal."
This ia the dignity to which the
person who writes to the GuardiatX
tuts elevated the Port Moody school
question. We say the "person who
writes," for although these articles
have appeared as editorial they are
written by a person who does not
reside in tbe city. That circumstance, however, does not affect the
(one ot whatever argument they
nay contain. It leaves the question,
nevertbeltM, in thia unfortunate con
dition, that the assertions contained
in these articles require proof before they can curry any weight.
And they are full of assertions,
without a shadow of proof. In referring to the Port Moody school
business a short time ago, we did
not consider the facts aud circumstances called for a serious reply to
the article which appeared in the
organ. It was altogether a new
revelation to us, because it put forward statements some of which
were very strange and others we
knew to be utterly without foundation. The very question upon
which the contributor to the organ
founded his observations was misquoted nnd distorted in a manner
worthy tbe genius of a cant ab. This
person first manufactures a man of
straw, and then proceeds to demolish his own creation. We have already pointed out that Tub Columbian nevor claimed for the government any special credit for tho
establishment of a school at Fort
Moody. But the organ had been
claiming all along that the government was deadly hostile to Port
Moody; and wnen the school wns
granted we merely pointed out that
this action of the government did
not support that view. Now, the
facts are these, and we submit them
for Cantab's serious consideration:
There never was any application for
a publio school at Port Moody until a few months ago, and no intimation, so far as we know, had been
given that a school was wanted.
Mrs, Heslop, a resident of Port
Moody, had for about a year been
teaching a private school, and it was
generally supposed the people did
not wish that arrangement disturbed.
But last spring the people of Port
Moody came to the conclusion that
they ought to hnve a public school.
On the occasion of the provincial
secretary's visit to that place a few
months ago a public meeting was
called and the matter discussed. A
report of that meeting shows the
steps taken to secure the school,
and tbey are just such steps as were
indicated in these columns. The
provincial secretary promised that
if an application was sent to the
government he would use his influence to obtain for it n favorable
consideration. In the words of the
report, "He expressed his regret
that the proper petition had not been
sent in before the estimates for the
year had been framed. Had that
been done, the amount required for
the erection of a school house and
the salary of a competent teacher
would have been plnced in tbe vote
for educational purposes." Our
readers will probably agree that the
provincial secretary, who is also
minister of education, knows better
what steps are proper and usual in
asking the establishment of a public school than tho annonymous
'writer in the organ. At the Port
Moody meeting a petition was read
by Mr. Meek, asking for the creation of a school district and the
establishment of a school. This
petition received the signatures of
the ratepayers, was forwarded to
the government, and the prayer of
it was granted. We repeat that
this is the usual practice. It is not
customary for the government to
create school districts or establish
schools where there has been no
request for a school. In the case
of Port Moody the petition was not
sent forward until after the estimates had been passed. If the government had been hostile to Port
Moody, as the Guardian and its
annonymous contributor seem so
anxious to make out, it could very
consistently have refused the request for a school on the ground
that there was no appropriation for
that purpose. But the government
went out of its way to meet the
wishes of Port Moody, and a school
has been established iu advance of
the appropriation. The Columbian claims that this is not an aot
of hostility to the people of Port
Moody; and we think the public,
and especially the people of Fort
Moody will admit this beyond dispute.
NORMAN'S
Elsta-telisiied. 1S-7-4.
'e * nrallvf Electric Belts, Kan*!*,
laealen and TrtMMM,
Aro guaranteed to be tlio bent remedy
known for the immodlntfl relief und per*
manent core of nervous debility, lame
bnck, rhcumatUin, neuralgia, nil liver,
Rtomachnnd client complnlnts, i-onstlim-
tlon, all dlneoK0N of tliu nerves, genital or-
?a»» and rupture, Circular and coimtiltalon free. a. nokman,
4 queen Ht. Kant, Toronto, Ontario.
TffttlmoBlalN lhat Speak for Thenmelven.
Ottawa, Sept 3rd, 1883.
A. Norman, Ebq.—Dear Hlr. I have experienced considerable benefit from your
Appliances. I feel stronger nnd better
overy day.       Youm truly,
B. E. HAUBUBTON.
Peterborough, Oct. 16th, 1888.
A. NoitMan, Esq,—Dear Sir: Hoon aftor
I commenced to uno your Electric Appliances, they opened my bowels, cured my
cough and cold, relieved my heud, and
con*ldorably relieved my catarrh In con-
ftet-uence. The tllachargeii from my bend
ond chest are now ensy, nnd I feel Altogether bettor. My digestion hns Improved,
myMoinnch Is less sour nnd windy, nnd I
nm IcHstroubled with dlntreRnliij* A vivid
dreams, I had previously tried almost nll
the advertised patent medicines without
deriving any good.     Yours truly.
mhlHin J. OHEEH.
LOST.
IN THIS CITV, ON COLUMBIA ST.,
on Sunday last, a brown BITCH PUP,
nnswers to the name of "Popsie." A suitable reward will ho given anyone leaving
tho pup at Lewis- stables. Jell-It.
AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST.
100 columns and 100 engravings In
ench Issue. 43rd 1'ear. $1.50 a Year.
Send threo '2e U, 9. stnmps for sample
copy f English or German] of tho OldeBt
ami Best Agricultural Journal In tho
World. ORANGE JUDD CO.,
David W. Judd, Pres.
751 Broadway, Now York. jell-to
H
UGHES A ATKINSON,
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
And Conveyancers. Accounts collected
and Loans Negotiated. Offlce, Columbia
street, opposite the Post Office, Now Westminster, B. O.
J. C. HUGHES,
Notary Public.
T. C. Atkinson,
Solicitor LOntarlo.]
Jell-to	
$150 Reward.
THE ABOVE REWARD WILL BB
pnid to any person giving Information
thnt will lend to tho orrcsl nnd conviction of tho person or persons who maliciously set fire to somo tlmbor ou my promises, on Friday afternoon, the Oth inst,,
with intent to dostroy the buildings there-
ii. JOHN McKEE, Jun.
Boundary Bay, Juno 7,1884.        joll-lin
Tenders Wanted.
TENDERS WILL BE RECEIVED
by the undersigned up to the 20th Juno
Instant, for placing the ways, at the lower
part of town, In'good order and condition.
Ways must have between two and threo
foet of water on lower end at low water
Sprlnc tides. Work to he completed by
30th November, 1884. Bonds will bore-
quired for due fulfilment of contract.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
Jell-td THOS. L. BRIGGS.
B.C. Penitentiary.
TENDERS WILL BE RECEIVED
by tho undersigned until 12 o'olock
noon on Tuesday, June 24th, for supplying tho Penitentiary from July 1st. 1884,
to June aoth, 1885, with the following ar*
tides:
1  COAL, Wellington screoned.
i)   gcjEp
8  BREAD, white and brown.
4 SALMON, fresh und salt.
5 GROCERIES.
0  BLANKETS, white 3>ipt, per pair.
7   LEATHER and findings for shuoshop
Neither the lowest or nny tender necessarily accepted-.
Samples may be seen and blank forms
of application obtained on application to
tho accountant at tho Penitentiary.
Imperial weights and measures required. All articles supplied to be of the uest
quality.
[Signed]        ARTHUR H. McBRIDE,
.ino 10,1884.
[jell-td]
Warden,
1011
Having -ieceived instructions from Mr. B.
Barnes, who Is leaving for the East,
I shall sell by public auction on
Tuesday Next, June 17tli,
At 10 o'clock a. ui.
At his residence, Douglns street, next to
H. ElckhofPs, the following
Household Furniture
-A.TSIXA   BrFBOTB.
Consisting of bedroom sets, spring and
straw mattresses, chamber sols, blankets,
carpets, pictures, folding and other tables,
rocking chairs, blinds, lounge, ship hi
case, Singer sewing machine, stoves; piping, kitchen sideboard, chairs, lumps,
glassware, erockorywarc, pots,Jpans, kettles, knives, forks, tools, Ac.
i-_e._r_Lv_cs C-A-sxa:.
J. GOLDSTONE, Auctioneer.
A first-class Dorse ond Express Wagon,
The horso Is thoroughly broken to single
or double harness or saddle, and will bo
guaranteed sound and without fault. Set
of single harness with horso. Tho owner
wishes to sell as ho Is retiring from tho
express business. Belongs to J. F. Black,
  Jell-td	
\- OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO +
0
+ OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO +
THIMOFITNOw!
Although much Is said about tbe Importance of a blood-purifying medicine, it mny bo
posslble that the subject law never seriously
claimed your attention.   Think cflt now!
Almost every person lias some form of scrofulous poison latent In his veins. When this
develops (n Scrofulous Bores, Ulwtrs, or
Eruptions, or In the form of Rheumatism,
or Organic Diseases, the sulferlng thnt ensues Is terrible. Hence tho gratltudo of thoso
who discover, as thousands yearly do, that
Ayer's Sarsaparilla
will thoroughly eradicate this evil from tho
system.
As well expect life without air as health
without pure blood.   Cleanse tbo blood with
AVER'S SABSArARILLA.
PREPARED UV
Dr.J.O.Ayer&Co..Lowell,Ma88.
Sold hy all Druggists i 91, six bottles for in.
CONTRACT.
THE UNDERSIGNED WILL LET A
contract to white men or Indians for
cutting 1000 cords of shingle blocks, put
up at the rate of 100 cords per month, will
pay S3 per cord, and will furnish tools and
- house to livo In. R. STEVENSON,
je7-8m Chilliwhack.
TENDERS.
SEALED TENDERS will bo received by
tho Rev. Father McQuekln, 0. M. I.,
up to noon on WEDNESDAY the 18th
Inst., for the erection of two largo Bonrd-
ing Schools at St, Mary's Mission, Matsqui. Pluns aud specifications can bo seen
ut St. Louis College, New Westminster.
June Oth, 1884. je7td
R. T. WILLIAMS,
B
OOK BINDER, PAPER RULER,
and Blank Book Manufacturer,     ,
Maps and LY wing Paper .Mounted,
Files of Magazines Illustrated Papers,
etc., neatly and cheaply Bound.
Government Street, Victoria, B. 4J.
WANTED.
A THOROUGHLY FIB«T-OLAM
miatom boot, nnd alloc mnkor; muat bo
of perfectly aobcr lmblt«, anil a .toady
workor. To auoh good wngoa and .toady
Wo,kwlHbeglvo„.TA^]toN90N
jet-3m OhllllwlmcK.
NOTIpE.
PARTIES LOCATING AND PRE-
einpting land are hereby notified
that land within the limits of the Hastings Saw Mill Company's lease is not
open for settlement, and that any one
entering thereon will he prosecuted for
trespass.
RICH'D H. ALEXANDER,
deS-tc _ Manager,
Confederation Life
ASSOCIATION.
Gunraatee fnpiliil' ■
Head Office, Toronto, Canada
This Association merits the
confidence the Public is reposing in it from the following
FACTS:—
The Security oflered to policy holders is
unsurpassed by any Company doing business In Canada,
It has no schemes of insurance, but the
well-established lines, hence the policy
holders cannot be misled as to their contracts.
Its statements to tlio public can be readily understood, its cash statement showing every item of Income nnd how expended.
Its position Is ascertained annually from
a detailed valuation in whicli every Hera
of liability is Included.
Its progress litis been unexampled In
tho history of Insurance In Canada,
Its policies are indisputable after three
years, and non-forfoitahlo aftor two years-
existence.
Its profits are distributed upon an equitable basis. The profits to one class of
policy holders aro not lessened to givo
lurgcr profits to any other class, which
method nffords superior ndvnntagosover
the uniform bonus plan of distribution.
T. R. PEARSON & GO.
Agents, New Westminster.
je7-2mo---.il ornate,
GREAT
COMMENCING
Monday
JUNE 9th.
I
SALE
OFTHE
looiniirn
.stoob:'
nuuiun lu
-OK-
Columbia »(,, Now Wo.tmln.tor,
Consisting of complete lines in
DRY GOODS,
 Millinery	
LafataGoods,
Fancy Goods, Clothing,
XX xx X d
Underwear, Crockery,
Groceries
Glassware, etc., etc.
At  prices  considerably
Below Cost.
Don't Miss tbis Chance I
let-it
LOOKOUT!
For this Space. It
belongs to
Real Estate Agent and Conveyancer, Port Moody, B. C.
JalO-to
Stage Line!
-TO	
PORT  MOODY.
THE UNDERSIGNED WILL RUN
a first-class
Four-Horse Stage
Between New Westminster and Fort
Moody* leaving Now WeBtmlpater every
morning; returning, will leave Port
Moody between 3 and 4 p. m, These
Btages go over the NEW ROAD to fort
Moody direct, carrying both Passengers
and Freight. ,
myl7te   ' JOS. M. WISE.
cd
c__
in
:ss
'• „ ri
2
In
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ink •
tt
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BOB
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O
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2
pq
in
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X
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in loiooi houu
Columbia Street,
NEW WESTMINSTER,
B.C.
Full assortment of
NewSpring Roods
Consisting of
Feathers and Flowers, Kid and Summer
Gloves,  Sunshades   and Parasols,
Black and Colored Satins, Cashmere aud  French Serges,
Scarboro Serge, French
Merino, Plain and
Broca'd Grenadines,
Prints and
Sateens, Ladies
Belts, Ribbons and
Laces; Silk, Lisle and ■
Balbriggan Hosiery;  Silk
Velvets and Velveteens, Otto-'
man Cloth ft Nun's Veiling, Plain k
Brocaded Dolmans, Frilllngs k Fringes,
Ladies' Neckwear
In every style.
CREWEL PATTERNS,
Wools and Silk.,
A SPLENDID STOCK OF
Men's and Boy's
Spring and Summer Suits
A complete line of
Gent's   Furnishings,   comprising Silk,
Merino, Canton Flannel and Cotton
Underclothing f White and Col*
ored Dress Shirts; Linen ft
Celluloid Collars and Cuffs,
Gent's Ties and Scarfs in endless variety; Handkerchiefs, Braoes, ftc, fto.
VALISES ft HAND-BAGS.
targe assortment of Ladies' Gentlemen's
and Children's
ROYAL
Goliti Hospital
New Westminster.
Board of Dlrfrtors, l(U3*4t
W. N. Bole .'President
J. W. Horvey Vice-President
\V. H. Keary. Sec-Treasurer
o. K. Corbould,       James Cunningham,
H. Elliott, C. M. McNaughton.
Annual BeiwH I
Tlio Directors of the Royal Columbian
Hospital have to report that during the
years 1883-4 they havo done their utmost
to keep down tbe expenses of tho Institution. When they took offlco there was a
debt of 91072 against the Institution, which
hns beon cleared off, besides which the
Hospital expenses exceeded tho Government grant by over 1100 a month for eight
out of the twelve montlnt, although tbe
strictest economy was exerolscd.
Tho Directors have to thank the public
and the Government for their great assistance.
During the last session of.Parliament
tlie Government have granted SSOO towards
most necessary repairs to the Institution.
Tliese repairs nave all boon completed by
contract. Tho grant docs not appear in
our Treasurer's report, as tlie Government
will hand tho money lo our successors.
We desire to thank Mesdames Uo*
Naughten and Bunte for the useful bed
which thoy collected for nnd presented to
tho Hospital for tho benefit of patients.
We annex our Treasurer's report, Surgeon's report, and subscription lists from
Clinton, Kamloops, Lytton, Moodyvillo,
Hastings Mill, Granville and New Westminstor,
* Burgeon's Kcport.
NKWWKSTMINSTEn, Apr. 9,1881. i
To the members of the Board of the Royal
Columbian IIospttal-OEitThttUKs:—1 have
the honor to present to you tho following
report for the year ending81st March, 1884:
The numbor of patlents.treated was: Indoor, 70: outdoor, 40. Tho number of
deaths(19)waB a largo percentage, butl
may state that 15 of these came in in a dying condition, and died within a weok
after being admitted. Causes of death:
Heart disease, 3; brain dlseaB0.2; Aneurism, 8; chronic alcoholism, 2; blood poisoning, 3; bronohltls, 1; pneumonia, 1;
phthisis, 1; abscess, 1; cancor, 1; gangrene,
1; fracture of spine, 1. -Total, 19. I am
'lad tostate that great Improvements have
cen made lu the building.  I have the
kc, yours faithfully,
It X BENTLEY, ti.. B.,
honor to be, Ac, yours faithfully,
Burgeon ifc. H.
Treasurer's Report i
The Royal Columbian Hospital in account
with W. H. Keary, Treasurer.
Government grant „ ,.91437 48
Do, to pny lastyear'H bills   BOO OD
Donations and subscriptions. 1006 41
Paying patients   475 00
Proceeds of Concert...  90S 50
Church collections :....   129 65
Total $8751 07
EXPENDITURES.
Salaries. .'. 91817 42
Funerals  809 00
Washing.  158 60
Wood and coal..  277 50
Meat  722 12
Vegetables -  140 40
Clothing  11 75
Light  78 69
Furniture  182 81
Repairs  54 02
Groceries  BT9 78
Broad
Fish...
Milk..
Medical comforts....;...     78 (
Dmyage      61
Nursing.     80 t
Ntutlonerv, postage * telegrams     26 1
Printing A advertising    541
Stock-taking     10 t
Insurance,. .'.    45 <
Lumber-      fi t
Shipping incurables    8. (
Sundries.... .._,     80 (
Liabilities from last year paid off.. 1072 f
Balance ,.  I
Total „$_7611
Examined and found correct,
W. H. FALDING, Auditor.
Subscription lists t
MWWMIKISBm.
.t g K do KuevotLIM 00
W Norman Dal*... 20 00
IBFlBhrr 80 00
Corl-rmlil A McColl 30 00
Stewart A (Hub 10 00
11 V K-Iinondi 10 00
II Elliott 10 00
Bhrlghouio	
JKIimley    fi 00
3 Vnn Vollu-nbcrg  5 00
0 Plttfinlrigli    OOO
J A LAidlnw 10 OO
DOhfihnlm 10 00
JWItsmy $6 00
L Willie  fi 00
WJ Armitrong... 6 00
Wowli 4 Turner... 10 00
Fred Bfokhoir .' 0 00
Ilennr IkUiolt... 0 00.
0 M McNnughten.. fi
E 8 Scoullar  ft
WDFerriD  6 00
WUom  0 00.
J Cunningham  5 00
AHulam ., ft
IO Bunte  0 00
Outa  8 00
W McColl  5 00
Wm Buffera  1 00
HcPhufen  2 fiO
C O Ji-liiuton  2 50
K Thomu  2 A0
W Hamilton  2 60
8 W Daggett  2 60
J M Kennedy 2 60
■I 0-Ilr.llornn  2 60
TboflOrena  2 60
M KiiKliili    6 00
W B Tov-nieuJ.....  6
JAB Homer 10
A Melody 10
PS OurtlaA Co...   ft
O MoDonnugh    6
D McPhadon   6
CPNCo 30
CO Major    6
J B Ilciidoraon ....   6
J A laidlaw   6
Jar. Orr    5 00 Caih       60
Trapp Bnn    fi
8II Webb    6
oiusnui.
J Mannion |16 00 |» McNaughton. ...910 00
UML00PS.
J A Mam 9 6 00
BVTunaUll  2 60
Fre-I'k Dennett..... 2 60
Hush Murray  2 00
Alex Hurdle  1 00
Alex II Bain  100
John O'Brien........ 1 00
J It Augustus  1 00
PFalrwoather  2 00
JDHoDoneU  100
DMcEdwar-i*  1 00
Q E Pendleton  1 00
PKIlroy  9 60
AVIUutln-  2 00
L Ilautler  2 00
KMcItaud  2 00
Janice Bell  2 60
A lterjna  2 00
O Harvey  2 60
CFCoiterton  2 00
WB Bailey  2 Of
John McDonald  1 00
Samuel Pearce  1 00
George Bafllio  2 60
HHPomk  4 00
J F Smith  100
BBatanger  1 Oil
L Curreau  1 00
Ju B U-1ghton ...-$ 1 50
JAMcIntoeh  2 60
Oeo lt Martin  2 60
VT P Troutto*.'.  2 IVK
AD Walker.  100"
JnoKHedland  2 00
Norman McLeod... 100
Edward SImpiou... 100
.lohn 1'hibbe  1 00
KJTronnon  2 60
AW Murray  100
A Steve-lion  fi 00
SBuo  100
S B Laint-lto       60
FHu-w-f  2 00
KOWIifteway  2 60
John Mcltityr  6 00
Joe ;.      60
Johnny  3 00
Johannes  2 00
WHoIntm.  6 00
Wm Braith  1 00
John Murray.  6 00
JWH Z  2 00
A Clomee  1 00
Morton House  3 ""
W Fearn  2
JameiValr,  2 00
MSMCo 960 00
Full line of
Brussels Tapestry, Kidder and Hemp
Carpets, Rugs and Door Mats,
Cretonnes, Loco Curtains, Tow
els, Napkins, Hickorys, Flannels in all Colon, white and
Grey Calico in all prices, quilts
and toilet covers, inosnuito bar,all shades.
White, Brown, Grey and Scarlet
Blankets at Cost,
Dressmaking and Millinery done on the
Premises.
Tin Lonaon In,
JAMES ElUID* CO.
myliAtn
II llnrnttrcht   5 00
A HO King   (00
K OuhrelUder.   210
II aodden    2 (0
K Beard   2 GO
T D Forbo.   2 U
HBWallir   100
J UNI    2 00
ABrlifht      CO
divine   100
JHarrltt...   100
II Chick..   2 50
WJOoi  100
O BcbntMrt  1M
T K.tum.  1 00
II CadwallmUr.....   100
II Mnndou   1 OD
PA Allan    2 00
HBchsffler «  100
MW Thain    100
J Tan Bratner. 10 00
W Power    5 00
J L Harmon , 2 00
DMcPhalden   I
SJR.od.ll   I_
It Stalker   5 00
JMcWhinnej  150
O Ualllnn    1 50
Bllore    100
W HoBonald.'  100
II Mdnljr    1 00
0 D iAmooronx ,„ 1 00
Simon Reid   1 50
BMeOallnm  100
P Conner.   1 50
J A Plihnr   1 00
J.m« Smith.......   IOC
T llannon.    1 00
ROraj.    101
tl Whito    100
WHoBrld. .'....  .00
A UcCrlmmon.  1 51
WDlckinion    fi __
C Kelly  2 (0
AWMcCollnm...   2 50
1 Bvl.ll  2 00
TENDERS
For Timber Wanted.
rraCNDBRSWIl-Ii BE RECEIVED
-eetof 18-foot loug CORDUROY, to be of
good sound cedar, split bastard fashion,
and not loss than tlirec inches thick and
elebtlncheswlde-tobo delivered on the
sldes.of the Trunk Road near Chtlukthan
Slough Bridge, so as to be of easy access
with a wagon. Corduroy to bo delivered
on or beforo tho 1st day of October, 1884.
Surety will be required to the amount of
1250 for tbe faithful performance of the
contract. By order of the Delta Municipal Council. WM. McKEE, C. M. C.
Ladner's Landing, June 2,1884.   JeMm
Just Opened Out
 AT	
T.LRIUIIOL.
f(W Copies Seaside library.
Including the New Stylo.
Robertson's a-Blt Series.
Very Complete Line of
Ike Poets, Various Styles.
Mark Twain's Experience, 1 bit.
Job Lot of 25 cent Novtjs.
Richardson's Piano Instructor.
Qetse's Organ Instructor.
Superb Sons Book, 91.
Song Folio, fl.
T. R. PEARSON & CO.,
Books, Stationery, and Music, Colnmbia
streot, New Westminster.
LUMBER
SHAKES
SHINGLES
BUTCHER,
CENTREVH-C.E, CHILLIWHACK.
The Best of Meats
Constantly on hand.
my2.*8m       -     	
TO BE SOLD BY TBHOBB PUIl-
Buant to anorder of Mr. Justice Crease,
a Judge of tbe Supreme Court of British
Columbia, made in tbe matter of the
gOOdS Of ClIAH,  PATRICK DONNELLY, de-
cottscd intestate, all that piece or parcel
of land and excellent business site at
Harrison River, known as Lot Ten A.,
Group One, In the Yale-Lytton Distriot,
British Columbia, containing TWO AND
ONE-HALF ACRES, more or less, situated near the Junction of Harrison and
Fraser Rivers.
Tenders will be received by and are to
be addressed to tho undersigned at Vletorla, B. a, not later than tke 1Mb dny or
Jnne, IBM, at 5 o'clock p, m.
The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
Particulars and conditions of salo may
be had on application to tbo undersigned.
Dated 19th May, 1884.
JAMEBO.PREVOST,
my2i-td Registrar Supreme-Court.
Annual School Meeting.
3IHE FIRST ANNUAL Public School
. Meeting will be held in the Court
oUBo.New Westminster, on MONDAY,
June 9th, at Ha. m., to recelvo tho report
of the retiring Board Of Trustees.
On MONDAY, June loth, Inst, a public
meeting of the resident voters of the
school distriot of New Westminster will
be held nt the Court House, at 11 a. m., for
the purpose of electing six persons (two
for each ward) to serve as school trustees
for the ensuing year.
"10. Any householder or freeholder rest*
dont In nny school district for a period of
six months previous to tho election, and
tho wife of nny such householder or freeholder, shall be entitled to vote at any
sohool meeting held In suoh district anil
for the election of trustees: Provided Chinese or Indians shall not vote,"
"12. No person shall be eligible to be
elected or Io serve as a school trustee In a
sohool district who Is not a male householder or freeholder In the school district
of the full age of 21 years, nnd otherwise
qualified by this Act to vote at an election
of school trustees In the said school district"    *    By Ordor,
Je7t3 T. J. TBAPP, Sec.
Frank Siddall's Soap
FURNISHED BY
HENRY W. HUGHES.
THE ABOVE ARTICLE HAVING
been tried by nearly evory lady in
town with success, needs littlo or no de
Bcription, but for strangers the following
is printed:—It does the washing for a
family in two hours; no boiling allowed;
little or no rubbing on the board; blue
not needed; does no harm to clothes.
Plenty of reference if desired. One bar
does two weeks* washing. Tho finest
soap known for faco and hands, shaving,
etc. Onoe used, it becomes a necessity.
Money refunded if the above is not true.
The undorsigned boing the first to in.
troduce it, respectfully asks the ladies to
patronize him. Orders kindly received
by Ellard 4 Co., at the Occident Hotel,
and orders received and Soap supplied
at Mr. O. G. Major's, cor. Columbia and
Mary streets.
Being well known as agent for all
newspapers, magazines, ana books sold
by agent, only, I need no introduction.
To those out of town, a letter will receive
prompt attention.   Address
H. W. HUGHES,
mhil New West.; B.C.
.AT..
Milo. 12 00
D Sutherland  2 GO
Krorboa  210
J yrnwloy  6 00
A IU.ua  1 E0
Al'nntr.  110
I. Cbibot  -i 00
MTKora  SOO
P William ..2 00
r. Oattl  2 00
JRijauU  210
AP.V.UII  2 00
LIuhap.ll  2 00
A Wliun  2 00
Ah Tango  1 00
JlMttr.  6 00
OWII.j.  100
Rrorrat  100
JMcDon.nih  100
L Solomon...:,.. , 100
> Pans  1 00
J Valcourt  1 00
MOraliy  2 60
Ml Watt  2 00
WMonilon  2 00
J Moffat  100
J A McDonald  2 00
PK.11;  10 00
E Outran  2 60
J R Chapman  2 60
WDIn.au  10 00
PCardlnrfl  2 60
RTtim  2 00
rP.lack.lono  2 00
DMItch.ll  100
JOaakln  2 60
W J Smith  2 60
J II 8teTun.ott  2 00
AEII(h  2 00
V ardo!l  2 60
J Iliintl...  1 00
A MoKeoEte  1 00
HGahar  2 60
J Gardner  1 00
W Tweed.  1 00
tl Billing.  1 00
tlRam.dell  6 00
Pater Hand  11 00
IISII Co IiO OOjO Ore|orj> .12 00
RIIAInuder....   6 00Oeoarogorjr  2 00
A J "font    6 00 J McGregor  100
AMerrlueld  2 60 Tho. Union  160
OAOoldwell    SCD'Kramo   100
Robt Smith   2 00 H Ham......  100
IIT Print    2 OORe, O Dltchem  2 00
M Hanaen   2 00 Tom Malay.  1 60
R UII Aleunder. 2 60,»red Ibuiton  2 00
CURtOlf.
II Ill«glnbott»m...* 1 00
B M E J   1 Ot
260
100
100
260
100
IIBIIa.	
1 k LeBourdal,
Jo. Oelke........
■ Bell	
1IWII	
WMP.no.  2 00
John Xct,r...  100
Danl.1 Smith  100
P W Poatar 10 00
r. DollaliM'ty   2 00
ONMcUllan.Oo 2 60
ROOnertl.ua...,
Robt Cation	
S A Artnau	
Tom Conroy	
NOuituieton.....
Alei Burnett,	
North American.
D Xrcob	
W P Allan	
0 Hay	
Win Boyd	
1'atOlnjle...	
R.rT#n.n...
mylMm
..$2 00
.,2 60
.. 100
.. 100
..2 00
..2 00
.6 00
.. 2 00
.. IOO
..2 00
.. 100
,. 100
.. 100
THE Subscribers have on
hand a large stock of
Rough and Dressed Lumber,
Shingles, Shakes, Doors, Windows, Mouldings, Turned Work,
&&,..&£,, which they are now
selling cheap for cash.
ALSO, a quantity of Second
Class RUSTIC, FLOORING, &c, which will be sold at
bargains, as they wish to clear
up their yard.
CONTRACTORS and
others who intend building will find it to their advantage to call before purchasing
elsewhere,
ALL goods furnished during
the month are to be paid
for on or before the 15th of the
following month (unless where
there is a special contract), as
we intend to sell cheap and keep
short accounts.
ROYAL CITY PLACING H1LLSC0.
 UMITED,	
NEW WESTMINSTER,
jet-to
Port My,
lew Westminster,
Fort Hammond,
Fraser Valley,
.FOKSAU! BY.
C. D. SABS,
M Estate Broker
.AND..
NOTARY  PUBLIC,
Columbia Street,
 ORDERS  FOR^	
SURVEYING
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
MONEY TO LOAN
-ALSO-
Agnt for Lift, Fire and Aondni
INSURANOI  OOMPANIM.
(aptto) W^-V'-f^
APVERTISINQ   RATE8.
Transient Advertlscincnts.-Ff nit Insertion, 8 oto. per line; subsequent insertions,
Sets, per line. -
Regular Commercial and Business Ad*
vertlsements.-l column, $12 per month;
Wool.,$7 per mouth; Ucol., ti por montli;
flinches, B per montli; 1 Inch, #1.50 per
month. These rates ta be charged on
standing advertisement* which remain
over 8 months. If for n less period the
rates will be: 1 col., tis per month; J. col.
19; Hcol.,»; 2Inches,K; 1 lnch,|2.
Specials, among reading mattor.-Flrst
Insertion, 10 cts, perllne; subsequent insertions, 5cts. perllne.
Births, Marriages and Deaths, SI each.
Funeral notices accompanying death notice, 60 cts. extra. ■
■or All transient advertisement* will be
measured by a scale of solid Nonparlel,
which makes 12 lines to tho inch and 7
words to tho line. Display lines must be
allowed for In making estimates. No advertisement Inserted for less than #1.00.
Wxt §ritish (folnmbiait
Wednesday Horning, Jut 11, IBM.
Sir Bartle Frere is dead.
The str. Enterprise is again undergoing repairs at Victoria.
Regular monthly meeting of the
Hyack Fire Oo. to-night.
Dr, Mathers has removed from Oolumbia st. to Wise's building, Front st,
The license court will meet noxt
Monday, at 11 a. m,, in the court
house.
We are glad to 6nd that the str.
Slope did not give any exoursion last
Sunday.
There was a slight fall of rain yesterday, but not suflicient for the requirements of the distriot.
Ratepayers should not forget the
sohool election next Monday, The
school meeting begins at 11 a. m.
We are informed that Job. Gillies,
the logger, met with an accident on
the sound lately by which both his
legs were out off.
The str. Idaho came over from Tacoma on Saturday night with 02 tons
of freight. She left again for the
sound on Monday,
Hen. Mr. Mowat and Hon. David
MUls left Toronto on the 20th ult. for
England. They go to represent Ontario in the boundary dispute.
From an advertisement published
elsewhere it will be seen that tejiders
are invited for placing the steamboat
ways at the lower end of the oity,
We hare to thank Mrs. W. J. Howison, of Agnes st, for some very fine
new potatoes raised in her garden.
Some of them measure 6| ins. iu diameter.
It jb reported that 3 men were
drowned at Seymour Narrows on the
lst inst, by the upsetting of a canoe.
One of the men was King, late of Burrard Inlet.
The Colonist is of opinion that in
the school election each qualified elector may vote for two trustees in each
ward, and it says this is backed up by
legal opinion.
Mr. 0. 0. McKenzie, M. A., late
superintendent of education in this
province, has been presented with a
cheque and a complimentary address
signed by 200 of his friends.
Mr. Qustav Leiscr Ib preparing to
erect a new shop on Columbia st.,
west of his present premises, and Mr,
W. J. Armstrong is going to build
both on Columbia and Front sts.
There seems to be a great deal of
dissatisfaction over the decision ar*
rived at by the agricultural society to
purchase Dr. Tolraie's property. Many
people think the exhibition grounds
should be at Beacen Hill,
Mr. Jno. MoKee, Jun., offers a reward of 9160 for the apprehension of
the person Who aet fire to his property
on Boundary Bay. It is to be hoped
the miscreant will get his deserts. We
believe this is the second attempt on
the same premises.
On Saturday night Mr. John Hall
died in this eity. After death a postmortem was held and a large bullet
found in a cavity of the head. This
bullet, it is said, the deceased received
about tour years ago from the accidental discharge of a gun.
Attention is called to the business
card of the new firm of Messrs. Hughes
& Atkinson whioh appears this morning. Mr. J. 0. Hughes is one of the
early pioneers of British Columbia,
and probably knows as muoh About
our lands as any man in it.
, Then is only one police court cose
to report to-day. On Monday Ah
Loon made application for admission
to the chaingang. In support of his
application a pair of boots stolen from
Mr, Thomas were produced, and Ah
Loon wu received 3 mos. on trial.
A telegram was received yesterday
afternoon stating that-in the caso of
Mr. Jno. Johnston against Oapt.
- Clarke judgment hod been given for
the plf. Tho dispute was about a
piece of hnd lying between lots 202
and 386, PorEj Moody, comprising
about 22 acres.
The late Judah F. Benjamin waB
level-headed to the last. He destroyed
private documents, leaving behind no
materials for biography, saying,the
treasuring up of old papers caused
half the miseries of life. He had
probably studied the awful example
of the Carlyles.
City Council.—Council met Monday night. Present, the Mayor and
Oouna. Elliott, Deane, Cunningham,
Johnston and Hendry. The following
accounts were presented: J, A. Calbick, 91.50; Royal Oity Planing Mills,
•179.93; E. S.*Scoullar& Co., 993.13;
J. H. Pleace& Co., 9106.25; James
Cunningham & Co., 912. The ferry
committee reported estimated cost of
dip 9000, which with certain modifications could be made 9800. The matter wm Uid over pending the action of
Surrey. The Mayer reported that it
wu the general opinion that the
amount required for steam fire engine
ihould be raised by special rate. The
Olerk was instructed to write to the
Clerk of Surrey to ascertain what was
Sing to be done in the ferry matter,
r. W. J. Armstrong was heard in re
water lease. He contended that he
ahould not pay rent since expiration of
lease. The matter was referred to a
special committee. The rate on real
estate was raised to If per cent. The
reserve sale by-law was further considered, and Messrs. Woods & Turner
wen instructed to prepare maps. On
motion of Coun, Cunningham, seconded by Coun. Johnston, it was resolved
"That in convictioni for the unlawful
■ale of opium or intoxicating liquors
one-half the fines imposed be paid to
the informer, unless specially provided
for under the Indian Aot. On mo*
tion of Coun. Deane, seconded by
Coun. Hendry, it was resolved that application be made to the Dominion
government for possession of the lot
on whioh tho Mechanics' Institute new
stands with a view to haviug the premises put in respectable repair, Couns.
Cunningham, Deane and Hendry were
appointed a committee to negotiate for
right of way for the New Westminster
A Port Moody Railway. The sum of
98000 was appropriated for Douglas
street and Royal Avenue.
6tbamb*s in PoBT.—Last Saturday
the following Bteamors were in this
port: Yosemite, Idaho, Dunsmuir, Irving, Maude, Relianco.Gertrude, Gem,
Slope, Myre, Ruby, Samson, Alice,
and K. de K., in all 14 steamers, besides some smaller craft.
 *•» ■	
Shipping iTEMa.—Saturday—Left,
Irving for Hope, Yosemite for Viotoria, Dunsmuir for Nanaimo, Ruby for
Victoria; arrived. Slope from Viotoria,
Ruby from Chilliwhack, Idaho from
Tacoma, Monday—Left, Slope for
Victoria, Idaho for Tacoma; arrived,
Irving from Hope, Yosemite from
Victoria. Tuesday — Left, Yosemite
for Victoria, Slope for Port Hammond;
arrived, Slope from Viotoria.
■*>■-	
Lanchjsy Pio-nio.—The people of
Langley are making arrangements for
a publio pic-nic to be held on lhe
Hudson Bay farm, about half way
from Langley to Langley prairie, on
Friday the 4th of July. It was originally intended that this social event
should be hold on July lst, but other
arrangements made that inconvenient.
It is intended to invite the district
and city members and others to be
present. There will be outdoor sports
and amusements, of whioh due notice
will be given.
Rifle Ranges.—On Saturday afternoon last the New Westminster Rifle
Association made the following remarkable scores. The highest possible
scon is 26 at eaoh range : 200 yards—
Corbett 23, Dr. Tnw 23. 300 yds—
Homer 22, Scoullar, 22. - 400 yds—
Scouiler 24, Diebl 22. 500 yards-
Homer 21, Trapp 19. 600 yards—Mc*
Naughten 22, Diebl 19. The highest
aggregates for the 5 ranges were, out
of a possiblo 125. E. S. Scoullar, 101,
Homer 95; Dr. Trew 95; W. Mo-
Colt 89 ; L. F. Bonson 84. This is
among the best scores ever made in
the province,        _
Coontv Oouht.—The business ofthe
county court was brought to a close on
Monday afternoon, tho Oth inst. The
case of Nelson vs. Trembath was concluded on Saturday. This was an action to recover the value of 9 tons of
hay. The particulars were published
on a former occasion, when the matter
was before the court. Mr. McColl
(Corbould «fe McColl) fur plff.; Mr.
Bole for def. Judgment reserved.
On Monday the caso of Adair vs. Por*
ter was disposed of. It was an action
to recover 934.12, balance due for
work on a scow. The defence was that
the work was so badly done that it was
worthless. The judge held that, aa
plf. was hired by the day, under direction of deft. ,he wm not responsible for
the character of the work. Judgment
for plf, with costs. Mr. McColl (Corbould aud MoOoll) for plf.; Mr. Bole
for def. The case of Metcalf vs. Holt,
action for account, was referred to ar*
bitration by consent.
—        *        	
Immigrants.—From Mr. Wm. Ross,
immigrant agent at this city, we learn
the following facts : Since January
lst there have been registered at the
office 832 immigrants who have located
on land. During the month of May
alone, 284 new corners took up land,
30 of whom located on the trunk road,
between Langley and Matsqui, when
there is a line settlement. Thtee
families leave" this morning for
the same destination. On Monday
28 immigrants registered at the
office beforo On. m. There are four
families in the immigrant shed awaiting the return of tbe husbands and fathers who are looking for suitable locations. During the past 5 months 125
foreigners have taken the oath of allegiance here. Several of those lately
arrived have purchased property in tho
city and are preparing to erect houses
thereon. On Monday another family
arrived from Manitoba, driven out by
the severity of the winters.
School Report.—According to announcement an influential meeting of
ratepayers took place last Monday
to receive the annual report of the
publio school trustees. Mr. Wm.
Johnston occupied the chair, and at
his invitation Mr. T. J, Trapp, secretary of the board, nad the following
report for the year ending June SOth,
1884: "The board beg most respectfully to nport that the different
branches of the public schools are in
a flourishing condition. The number
of ohildnn on the registor is 304, and
tho average attendance 129. The
government grant for incidental expenses has been expended in the usual
way, for sweeping, cleaning, coal,
wood, etc. The government have
completed the new school building,
and the whole of the classes aro being
taught therein, The board have
muoh pleasure in reporting that tho
government have at length made an
appropriation for a high sohool iu this
city, and that arrangements have been
made for repairing part of tho old
school building for the high sohool,
whioh will be ready for occupation on
the 1st of August. In reviewing the
past year the ooard have much causo
to congratulate the publio gei. • ally on
the position of educational -Lairs in
this city; and in retiring from office
they have to thank not only tho publio, but the government also, for the
very liberal support they have received
in their efforts to make the public
schools what they are to-day; and
they trust that the same consideration
may be extended to their successors to
enable them to carry' out their cherished hope of making* the publio
schools of New Westminstor second to
none in the province." After a brief
discussion, on motion of Mr, O. O,
Major, seconded by Mr, D. Robson,
tho nport was adopted, and the meet*
ing adjourned.
Anglican Indian Mission.
[Reported for the Columbian.]
On the 28th ult. His Lordship the
Bishop of New Westminster, accompanied by Mrs. Sillitoe, Miss Woods,
Archdeacon Woods, Revs. Ditchem,
Small and Wright, Messrs, Lowenberg,
Mony and Cantell, left for Lytton to
attend a large gathering of Indians
in Yale District, to hold divine services
and arrange for missionary labors and
review that whioh had already, been
done during the put year. On arriving at Lytton, horses wen in readiness
to take tho party from there to tha
site of the Indian eamp, situated about
15 miles above Lytton on the old "Hat
Creek Trail," leaving the wagon nad
at the confluence of the Thompson and
Eraser rivers. The camp was at a
point called,iu the Thompson language,
Pretannie, and signifies "TheGreat or
Grand Place," and is the resort of
nearly all the Indians in the neighborhood, it being a central point for the
Indians belonging to Lytton and below, also those of Lillooet, Cook's Fer
ry, Bonaparte and Ashcroft, and elsewhere: an abundant supply of food for
horses and cattle Is obtainable. A ma*
terial addition to the cuisine is found
hen in the shape of Camasa (Camas-
sia Eaoulanta) and other bulbs and tubers. Tne lakes and streams afford a
generous supply of trout. Dusky or
blue grouse, ruffled grouse and deer
an fairly plentiful, and a picnic or outing on a large scale Is annually held.
His Lordship had been specially invited to attend on this occssion, which
would thus afford an opportunity of
his meeting with the greater part of the
Indians at one point, thus avoiding the
expense and trouble of visiting each
camp separately, and enable the Indians to confer with him and go into
council respecting church, school and
other matters nlating to the body politic. The meeting waa of a very hap*
8y character. A large amount of
huroh work was undertaken and settled, and the Rev. Mr. Small, the incumbent lo be stationed at Lytton, was
inducted. Divine service was held
daily in the open air. The sacrament
of the Lord's Supper was administered,
and a number of childnn received the
rite of baptism. Over 900 Indians
were in attendance ; the utmost harmony prevailed ; good order and a due
attention to their religious duties were
observed on all points; and, to an ob*
server, religious services conducted un*
der suoh circumstances and with such
surroundings wen coupled with a singular charm and significance. The
camp ground chosen was singularly
handsome and picturesque; a gentle
sloping mountain on the one hand, tor*
raced and sloped at intervals, and the
slopes and plains covend with verdure
and the most beautiful and luxuriant
flowers. The place seemed covered
with a carpet of richness, requiring to
be seon to be fully appreciated. The
flowers noticed wen : Violet, Dogwood, For - get • me - nut, Columbine,
Larkspur, with here and then a clump
of cottonwoods or pines; Honeysuckle, Friteltaria, Meateagirs, Ranunculus, Wild Sunflower, Golden Daisy,
Lady's-slipper, Strawberry, Service-
berry, Seringa, Cruoiferrae, Lychmis
(Red and Yellow), Heather, Pansy,
and many others not identified. At
the foot of the valley ran a purling
stream of ice-cold water, the banks
fringed with cottonwood and alder on
tho opposite side of the valley, the
mountain slopes covend with balsam-
fir nnd other coniferous trees presented
a scene very handsome indeed. Overlooking the Indian camp on an eminence was arranged the Bishop's bell
tent, used as a reception room, flanked on either side by the tents of eaoh
party; floating over the whole waa the
British Ensign, the Australian aud the
Hessian flagsj while over the Indian
encampment were various Church
flags, and at the chiefs' own tents, ait*
uated at a short distance from the
main encampment, the Dominion flag
proudly fluttered in the breeze. Thousands of horses of all sorts, ages, sizes
and colors dotted the hill-side, and the
camp itself was bustle and activity—
with bands of horses coming and going,
Indians arriving and departing, breaking wild horses, etc., etc., formed a
scene never to be forgotten and very
pleasing to behold. After remaining
in camp for 5 days the party broke up,
returning to their respective homes,
with tho exception of the Bishop and
Mrs. Sillitoe, who have gone on an extended trip to Kamloops and Okanagan. His Lordship was provided with
a camera, and took some interesting
groups, as well u the camps of whites
and Indians. The camp ground at
Pretannie lake is 2,050 feet above Lytton, being about 3,550 feet above' the
sea level, and no mosquitoes, und flies
or troublesome insects ara thero. t The
secular portion, suoh as arranging for
transportation, commissary, etc,, was
under the direction of Mr. J. C,
Hughes, of this city.
Bridge Rirer Mines.
Correspondence of the Standard.
What little news then is from the
Bridge River mines is that there was
not muoh work done on account of
frost in the ground and the river rising
on the south branch. The Indians ap*
pear to have the best ground bench
digging; they took out quite a dab of
gold. Most of the miners left the
south branch and have gotten a new
creek—Tyaughton Oreek. It is about
50 miles from Lillooet, There ara
about 20 men on the new creek. They
all camo down and recorded thoir
claims, took back more provisions; and
they think they have diggings that will
pay from 94 to 97 a day, fine gold.
Tho oreek has been prospected for six
miles and the stream ean be easily
turned. Miners an busy whip-sawing
lumber for sluices during the high water. There an about 26 or 30 whito
miners and about the same number of
Indians in the mines—and the miners
oan advise their friends, Then has
been a large quantity of gold taken out
this spring around Lillooet, mnn than
thero has oeen fer yean, A Government party hu gone out to fix the trail
to the mines. Weather, very warm
aud dry; some of the ranches suffering
for water, Beans, none; bacon, scarce;
flour,we may have enough to last until
new wheal comes in. At last the Lillooet saw milt will start up this week.
We may expect some news in a few
weeks as to what the mines will come
to. As yet thero ore no Chinese gone
into the mines.   The Indiana will not
Eaokfor them or there would hare
een lots go, I will send you tho news
after high water. There Is every show
of good diggings, as each party have
good prospects, The miners are all
satisfied.
From Chilliwhack.
Prom Our Special Correspondent.
Chilli whack, May SO.—Your corns*
pondent has now spent the greater part
of two weeks "cruising" through this
district which he finds to be by far the
largest, richest, and every way the moat
Important agricultural section of country
so far visited since ho set out on his circuit. Tho district of Chilliwhack takes
In the north or upper half of the great
Chilliwhack-Sumas valley, is about 15
miles long by 8 miles broad, and comprises an area ot at least 120 square miles.
The Fraser enters the valley In the
softth-eest corner and In a great curve,
sweeps around the head, ami along the
north side of the valley, close to ths
mountains, receiving, as it rounds the
north-east corner, the beautiful, clear,
blue water of the Harrison. The surface
of tho valley Is nearly level and flat, with
a slight fall towards the Fraser. It has
few er no marshes or sags, but is interspersed hers aud there with an occasional
low fiat ridge, generally well timbered
or covered with thick brush, except
where under tillage, Travelling through
the valley, the eye is never sensible of
any inequalities of surface, save when It
catches sight of the "Little" mountain,
whioh ia situated in about the centra of
the distriot, and Chilliwhack mountain,
which rises on tbe south bank of the
Fraser, In ths west angle formed by the
confluence of the Luckakuckand that
river. The former is little else than a
high elongated ridge, but the latter rises
to the dignity of a hill. Both—especially
"Little" mountain—are heavily timbered. Contemplation of these elevations
suggests the Idea that Nature providentially placed them where they are for a
certain and very obvious purpose.
TBS PREVAILING SOIL
of the district is a rich clay loam, with a
deep compact clay bottom. It is admirably adapted for the growth of wheat,
barley, and hay, and all kinds of vegetables. Barring the "Big" prairie, the
district Is everywhere thoroughly drained by the numerous small rivers and
sloughs which intersect thia end of the
valley. Along the foot-hills, on the
south side of the valley, extending near*
ly north and south, lies the "Big" prairie
of Chilliwhack. It is about 10 miles
long by from 1 to 3 milea broad, covered
with a most luxuriant growth of wild
grass, called "blue joint," and "narrow
blade." It Is almost perfectly level and
flat, with here and there a patch of willows or rushes, and its entire surface may
be said to be covered with water, varying in depth from 2 or 3 inches to a foot.
It has however a slight fall, and could
be easily drained, and thus rendered
very valuable, for stock-raising and
dairying purposes. The surface soil of
the whole prairie, as well as that of the
bush land immediately abutting on it, Ib
a stratum of peat moss, varying from 1
to 3 feet in depth. The subsoil is a solid
compact layer of clay of great depth.
It will thus be seen that tliis large and
valuable stretch of land, whioh in its
present condition seems little better than
a peat moss bog, could, by proper drainage, be reclaimed, and rendered very
fertile. For so soon as the water is drained off, the moss will dry, harden, and
sag, and finally become disintegrated and
converted into a sort of blaok muck loam.
The north west corner of the district—
the arc formed by the bend of the river
and the Hope slough—iB intersected by
several sloughs from the Frasor, and cut
up into a number of small islands. The
soil of this section of the district is
lighter and more of a sandy loam, with
frequently a gravelly bottom. Yet the
land on these islands ia extremely fertile,
except along the banks of the sloughs
where the soil in a great many cases consists of nothing but pure sand. The settlements
OS THE ISLANDS
during times of high water, are to a certain extent cut off, and isolated from tho
rest of the community; otherwise the
district is composed of one thickly inhabited and compact settlement, having
all tiie appearance of a comparatively old
and settled country. Nearly all the public land in the district is now pre-empted,
by far the greater part of which has been
taken up since this time last year, There
ia soarcelv an unpn-empted lot left on
the prairie; but were still remain unclaimed considerable stretches of bush
land In several localities—probably an
ggregate of about eight sections in all.
_ lut tne rush and craze after land continues unabated, so that, in a very few
months, there won't be a lot left unclaimed in the district. A large percentage of
the pre-emption claims taken np here aro
not by bona fide settlers, but by "speculators and land grabbers"—perhaps better desoribed land gluttons—some of
whom, "with reverence be it spoken,"
are old residents of the valley. A large
proportion of the public land in this settlement is thus-to put it mildly irregularly and illegally appropriated and "corralled" and afterwards sold at big prices
as squatters'claims to the immigrant and
bona fide settler. This practice, which
by some unscrupulous Individuals ia
made a regular business, your correspondent found more or less prevalent in
every settlement he has visited. In some
instances, however, the land is not "corralled" for speculative purposes, but ia
appropriated and added to the family
estate under the name of pre-emption
claims for the minor and prospective
male members of the family, and, in this
provision, even the baby, if It happen to
be of the required gender, is not forgotten; and some fathers have suoh a deglutition for land, that if tho operation Were
quietly practicable, .they would unsox
their little girls In order to still farther
enable them to take advantage of the
pre-emption act, and extend their domain.   The
IHMIURATION DEPARTMENT
however, is after these fellows like a hot
brick, and they will all be made to dis*
gorge, A capable and energetic local
immigration agent—Mr, H. Kipp—has
bean appointed for the municipality, and
he seems very ambitious to do his work
faithfully and well. About 40 new
comers have located here within the past
year, all of whom have taken up preemption claims, and gone to work as
bona fide settlers. They were all Immigrants, and, with ono or two exceptions,
all from Canada. Thia end of the valley
being considerably higher than the Sumas
end, tho freshets of the Fraser can hardly
be said to affect it at all. Hence mixed
farming Is engaged in hero, and prosecuted very successfully, and in some instances conducted on a very Large scale,
Every kind of crop usually raised on a,
mixed farm Is produced with more tban
ordinary success, and, both In quality
and average yield, the product of the
soil of this valley la second to that of no
other agricultural section of the province.
Last year's crop, on account of the
drouth, fell below the usual average
yield, as waa generally the cose throughout tho country. This year, should the
season continue bo favorablo as it has
done so far, and taking Into account the
operations of new comers, there will be a
VERY LAROE INCREASE
over the average yield of any former
year. The armors say they have nevor
crops look bettor, and more promising in this settlement. Previous to the
welcome rain of last weok, it was fetred
the excessively hot, dry weather, it prolonged, would have a disastrous ellcet
on the crop similar to that of last year,
but the copious rainfall of last Saturday
dispelled that apprehension, aud farmers
say tho year's crop Is now assured.
Nothing else here has attracted the attention of your correspondent bo much
aa the large, healthy and magnificently
yielding, orchards he sees on every hand.
And still there is scarcely any care or
attention given to the cultivation of these
orchards. From the time the trees are
planted, until they mature, tiie only attention they may be said to receive, is to
be stripped of their load. Immense quantities of fruit of almost every kind, and
of the best quality are grown every year,
qf which New Westminster, Victoria and
Yale get each a share, but by far the
J;reatur part of which ia preserved for
1011111 use. Your correspondent has boon
luxuriating for tho past week on the
most luscious cherries and strawberries.
Both stock raising and dairying receive
considerable attention in tbis end of tho
valley also, but of course not nearly on
the same extensive scale as in tlie other
end.   Here the chief and
ATAW.K INDtrSTRV IH AGRICULTURE,
yet muoh care and attention ia bestowed
on the breeding and raising of blood
stook, and thero is scarcely an old settlor
or prominent farmer In the settlement,
who cannot boast of being tho possessor
of one or more thorough-brads of some
kind or other. Homer- ..o fowls of evory
kind are fairly plentiful, and tho irrepressible hog ia ever present, though not
nearly so muoh in one's way as In the
other end of the valley. Cows, horses.
and team oxen aro scarce, and command
a very high figure—-higher than over
known heretofore in the valley. Thoro
is one settler here engaged almost exclusively but on a limited scale, in sheen-
farming. His ranch is en Fairfield Island,
and he ays he makes it a success. Mr.
A. C. Walts, one of the oldest and most
prominent residents of the valley and
certainly one of the largest and most successful fanners in the province, is running a cheeso-faotory on his premises.
Tho factory, which has been in operation
now for over, a year, and which turns
out about 250 lbs. a day, is equipped with
all the most modern and improved machinery and appointments of a first-class
factory; and it. Ib unnecessary to add,
conducted by its proprietor with hia
usual and well-known energy and success, Mr, Robt, Stevenson, another
prominent, large, and successful, farmer,
a little farther down tho valley, ia running a grist and shingle mill combined
ou his premises. At the head of tho valley (Popcum) the Knight Bros, are running their saw and shingle mills-sto
which thoy have recently added a lathe
and wood-turning machinery and a tannery—to their full capacity.   The
VILLAGE  OF CENTERVILLE
the town yet to be, and that too befe/e
long, is situated in about tlie centre of
the settlement, about one milo from the
steamboat Landing. It has 2 hotels, 2
stores, blacksmith and wagon shops, millinery and dressmaking establishment, a
custom boot and shoe shop, council hall,
grist mill, (at present idle) an English
and Methodist church, school house, doctor's office, and quite a numbor of private
dwellings. ^ At the steamboat landing is
another villago, and at present perhaps
aa important a ono as the ono described,
and the two largo general stores and the
very excellent hotel there compete successfully with Centerville for tlio trade
of the settlement, Besides the one already mentioned, there are other two
schools in the settlement and a very nice
new R. C. Mission Chmch on the Indian
reservation near the steamboat landing.
There are also besides the one in the village two more blacksmiths, one at each
end of tho settlement. There are about
125 inhabitants in the sottloment, all of
whom own separate homes and ore happy,
except, of courso, those of thom who are
not so fortunate as to enjoy tliat greatest
of all earthly blessings—the divine ministrations of angelic woman—without
whioh uo man can be truly happy here
below. Tlie majority, however, are married, and happy in the possession of
wives aud families; hut—(your correspondent confesses toapaitgo. delicacy
in being compelled, in the interests of
truth, to mako this revelation)—a large
number of the old settlers, though all
well matured and developed, are still on
tbe odiouB "list," and nearly all the
new comers being single men, the poor
unfortunate "bachelor tribe hi this Battlement musters, even in this land of
celebacy, an unusually heavy roster.
Yet it must not be supposed that those
desolate, lonely, but gallant fellows embrace the forlorn, fruitless, celebate state
from choice. Far from it. Not a man
ot them— so they all aver—but would
jump at the chance of freeing himself of
the baccalaureate odium if the means to
do so wero obtainable. Your correspondent can vouch for the truth of this; for
he is in the confidence of these noble sufferers, and indeed authorized by them to
cause the fact to be mado publicly known
in the Columbian. No; this cheerless
and miserable condition of life, is saddled upon them by the general
DEARTH OF WOMEN,
which, throughout all ita history, has
been known to atllict this country. The
suffering and despised "bachelors" of
thia country, therefore, are so by necessity, and as auch, instead of being maligned and abused, as they very often
arc, ought to be commiserated and sympathized with. Some bachelors in this
settlement aro so far gone, anxiously
waiting and expecting in vain some
women to come along, that not a few of
them now avow, that, unless thia summer's immigration wilt bring some mar*
riageable females into the settlement,
they will certainly "miscegenate" by
next fall, as they are determined uot to
"put in" another winter alone. True
there are some exceedingly handsome
young girls right here in this settlement,
But what of that ? at least so far as the
poor honest "ranching bachelor" is concerned. These precious young creatures,
long ere they have left their short
dresses, nre bespoke by the young native
male bloods of the settlement. Besides
the young ladies of Chilliwhack, as a
general thing, are, if any thing, a little
too romantic and hifalutlu in their notions of young mon and matrimony—so
much ao, indeed, that for the average
"bachelor" ever to entertain auy "matrimonial designs" In that direction,
wonld be the height of imbecility. They
look for dash, glitter and knightly qualities iu a young man, and unless he nave
a chivalric turn and elcping tendencies,
they put him down for what tho Indians
call "coitus." Marriage in this settlement, without being signalized by elopement, would be considered a very tome,
flat, and inBipid affair indeed. The laat
event of that Kind here took place a little
over a month ago, and waa of a highly
romantic and thrilling character. Your
correspondent haa certain information of
another, and similar event, which has
been undergoing an elaborate process of
incubation for the past two or three
"weeks with the view of completely outdoing aud eclipsing tho last in sensational
interest. Look out for the denouement!
Lost-fall a
farmer's orange
was organized here, being the first grauge
ever formed in British Columbia. It is
a branch of the Dominion Grange, and
has already 40 members, Tho object is
mutual improvement, protection against
extortion in trade and the advancement
of agricultural interests. Tho initiation
foe is 82 for men and 50 cts. for women.
Meetings are held monthly. The officers
are: Win. Ford, D. O. M.i J. Patterson,
Seo.; and there are several female members who lend tlio charm of tlieir presence and moral influence nt tho meetings. If properly conducted this grange,
it is believed, will accomplish a great
deal for tbo settlement. This settlement unites with Lower Sumas in oue
municipality, aud the union is harmonious enough except iu the matter nf
roads. Tho Snmasites accuse the Chilli-
whackers of being too mindful of their
own interests in tlm respett uud too
oblivious of (hose of thoir neighbors; aud
tbe latter having both thu majority und
preponderating influence in the wttteun*
gomot of the municipality, the former
are naturally haunted by the-suspicion
thnt their big ally duos not just do tho
fair thing by them—especially in the
matter of expending this year's government road grant. Vour correspondent
baa no right to
EXPRESS AN  OPINION
on this question ono way or another; but
lie may bo permitted to say thut all tho
roads in Chilliwhack are good, und ull
the roads iu Sumas bud; and that when
tlie improvements and repairs now being
made to tliat section of tlie Yale trunk
road whieh runs through the oldest and
most developed part of Chilliwhack are
finished, it will look more like a "boulevard" than a country rond. Tho people
of this settlement think thoy have here
the prettiest and healthiest spot in thia
province, and they are determined to
make it tho health, sporting and summer
resort of the country. Hence the lavish
outlay on the improvement ot the roads
in order to afford pleasant drives, and
attract visitors. It must be confessed
that this end of this magnificent valley
affords ell the attractions aud possesses
almost every requisite of a salubrious,
enjoyable and delightful summer retreat.
The surrounding woods swarm with
game, and the neighboring small mountain lakes, of which there are many, and
tlie numerous rivers and creeks which
intersect the valley literally teem with
trout; so that for the sportsman, whether
he be of rod or rifle, this is au El Dorado,
The mountain acenery- well, your correspondent must confess tbat he approaches
this subject with a feeling of bashful
timidity and delicacy, So muoh has
been made of the scenery of B. C. that it
has come to be a by-word that tlie whole
country Ib nothing else but one sea of
mountains. Nevertheless, attention must
be called to the magnificent
MOUNTAIN SCENERY
in thia neighborhood—but only attention
—for a description of it cannot now be
attempted. Save whore the Fraser enters
its head, in the S, 10. and the Harrison
in the N. K, corner, the valley ia encompassed on all sides but one—the south
end—by an unbroken rampart of "rook-
ribbed' mountains varying iu height
from 2,000 to 4,000 feet. At the head
of the valley, riBtng on a sheer perpendicular, its summit covered with perpetual snow, liko a shrouded colossus, stands
the "patriarch" of the valley—Mount
Cheam— .,200 feet. About half way
down the valley, on the nortii Bide, on
the aouth bank of the Fraser,
between the river and Sumas Lake, rising
sheer from the .water's odge on both
aides, stands Sumas Mountain, 2,100 ft.
This mountain tbe Indians regard with
superstitious awe. According to tlieir
tradition a terrific battle wob at one time
fought on the top of tho mountain between two hostile tribes for the possession of a beautiful lake, "with one small
lonely isle," which, singular to say, is
situated on the very summit of the mountain, The lake covers an area of 30
acres, and has an island iu the middle of
it of ahout 3 acres, with a huge cotton*
wood tree in the centre. The chief of
one of the opposing tribes, bo continues
the tradition, with all his braves were
slaughtered by their adversaries; but
their spirits took to their canoes, and
made for the Island, and there they "hold
the fort" to this day. The Great Spirit
in the meantime caused the big cotton-
wood tree to grow, to provide them witli
council and smoking accommodation.
Society is organ-Ted and maintained in
Chilliwhack on strictly moral and religious principles. Nearly all the old residents are persons of large circumstances,
with sumptuous, and in a few instances
elegant, homes, and refined and cultured
familiea.
NOT A DROP OF LIQUOR
of any kind is permitted to be sold in
the valley from one end to the other; nor
baa thoro been for yeara, nor will there
be ao long aa the present generation
"hold the iort." In B, C. and in thia,
one of its largest and most populous rural
districts, this happy state of affairs is
certainly very remarkable; to your correspondent altogether surprising and unexpected. The people here are all, heart
and soul, dead level against ever permitting any whisky or intoxicants of any
kind to be introduced among them, ana
the anxiety and eagerness with whioh
they apparently wish this to bo publicly
and widely known, has been frequently
cause of amusement to your correspondent. Aa an instance of this, he waa ence
honored by being waited upon by a sort
of committee with the request that he
would cause the sentiment of the people
of the Chiillwhack-Sumaa va'ley, on
what they termed the "infernal liquor
«courgo,"to be published in the most
coispicuous corner of the Columbian.
He received the committee with hia usual
urbani.y and grace, but certainly and
very properly refused the request, unless
the same were paid for as a "special"
among the "locals," and this waa no
sooner said than done. Your correspondent will now make his conge to the
kind and hospitable people of this delightful valley—where neat the heart
and lunga of thia provinco—and for their
many kindnesses and hospitalities to
himself personally, as well as their generous and hearty support and patronage
of the paper he has the honor to represent, he begs to return them one aud all
his sincere and grateful thanks, and hoping the Spirit of Peace may ever hover
over and around their happy arcadian
homes, ho will now introduce their request, and then travel mountain-wards.
TAKE   NOTICE,
Victoria and New Westminster, attention. If any blear-eyed dribbler will
ever dare set bis odious feculent rotundity within the confines of this happy
valley of Chilliwhack for thb purpose of
'plying therein that nefarious traffic
known aa "Sat 'em up," he Bhall be met
by stern men with grim looks aud blood
right in their eye—he Bhall be handled
w:th "deliberate intent, malice prepense
and aforethought"—he shall come to an
untimely end, and a coroner's inquest
won't help his bereaved relatives, Timely
warning. Signed on behalf of all concerned, J. C. Mel).
cheering, singing and bands playing,
and every one on his foet waving hats,
umbrellas and handkerohiefs. Third
ballot resulted: Arthur, 274; Bluine,
375; Edmunds, 69; Logan, 63; Haw-
ley, 13; Gen. Sherman, % Lincoln, 8;
John Sherman, 25. Fourth ballot:
Arthur, 207; Blaine, 544; Edmuuds,
41; Logan, 7; Hawley, 15; Lincoln,
2. The vote waa received with great
enthusiasm, the bands playing and
cannon booming. Outside the streets
around the hall were filled with people.
Burleigh of New York, on behalf of
Arthur's frienda, moved to make tho
nomination unanimous. On the call
of states /or the nomination of vice
president, when the itate of Illinois
waa reached, amid considerable cheering Senator Plumb of Kansas took
the stand to nominate John A. Logan
of Illinois. Loo of South Carolina,
Pettibone of TenueBBeo, Morey of
Louisiana, Houck of Tennessee, Thurston of Nebraska, Horn of Michigan
and Bradley of Kentucky seconded
Logan's nomination. At 9:30 p. tn.
Logan was nominated by acclamation.
Tho suro effects of Ayer'a Sarsaparilla
aro thorough and permanent. If thore is
a lurking taint of scrofula about you,
Ayer's Sarsaparilla will dislodge it, aud
expel it from your system.
A whisker dye must be convenient to
use, easy to apply, impossible to rub off,
elegant in appearance, and cheap in
price. Buckingham's Dye for the Whiskers unites iu itself all these merits.
Try it.
NEWS FROM AU PARTS OF THE WORLD.
Winnipeg, May 30.— In the legislature to-day Mr. Norquuy made a
statement of the government policy
in regard to the Dominion government's proposals. Ho lead a long
document giving a reply to each clause
in tho Ottawa government's dispatch,
and entirely rejecting thu terms offered
in thu latter un the conditions pro-
pi ised. This wns adopted by
the legislature nnd a committeo
appointed to put a reply in shapo
for trnnsTnission to Ottnwa. Mr. Nor-
quay's b--M stand has again placed
him in harmony with public opinion
here, though ho was rather lute lu
taking it. The legislature to-day
voted down a motion of Mr. Martin,
of Portage la Prairie, to recall Attorney-General Miller from Iub mission to
EiiL'luiid on the* ground that the Dominion government had refused the province tlie public lands, and nothing
could bu gained by his attendance
there.
Ciuuaqo, Juno C— The morning of
tho fourth dny of the Republican
National Convention opened cloudy
and threatening. The convention was
called to order at 11:20 a. m. The
Arthur men, it is said, decided to
try and force nn adjournment after a
few ballots. An earnest consultation
was going en among the New York
delegates. One hour and a half before tho time of the convention to
assemble vnst crowds of people were
at the entrances waiting fur tho doors
to open. It seemed that there had
been iio change frum laat night whon
thousands demanded admission to the
hall already overcrowded. Doorkeepers, policemen nnd sergeants-at-arms
exorcised great patience, and there
was little irritation. The rumor this
morning in the uir is that the independents, alarmed at the strong Blaine
demonstration last night, have determined to cast tbe vote of Massachusetts and Vermont on the second
ballot fur Gen. Sherman, After
prayer camo the oall of the roll of the
states for the fint ballot, which resulted as follows: Arthur, 2S3; Blaine,
334|; Edmunds, 87; Logan, 55; Sherman, 43; Hawley, 13; Lincoln, 4, No
choice. The convention then proceeded to the second ballot, which
resulted in a little chpnge. Judge
Foraker then moved that Blaine be
nominated by acclamation. Boose-
volt of New York demanded a call of
the roll.   There was great excitement,
Port or Antwerp.
It is stated, on tho authority of Mr.
Edouard de Lavaleve, iu the Pall Mall
Budget, that the city of Antwerp in
Belgium is now the -chief seaport on
the continent uf Europe, the tonnage
of vessols entering it in 1683 having
reached tho great extent of 3,724,428
tons, represented by 7,370 vessels,
In 1883 the tonnage of Havre wob
only 2,200,000, thut of Genoa 2,250,-
000, and of Bilbao 315,000, owing to
its iron ore exports. London is still
the first port in the world, with a tonnage of 10,421,000 tons and Liverpool the second, with 7,351,000 tons;
Newcastle follows with 0,000,000 tons,
also ia excess of Antwerp, but 'both
Hull and Glasgow arc below, witli
respectively 1,875,000 and 2,110,000
tons. The remarkable growth "of
Antwerp is partly due to its position
as the embarking point from the continent of Europe, and partly also to
the recent additions and changes which
have been carried out there, and
which are now almost completed. This
ia bo well known that vessels bound
for Switzerland with a cargo of corn
from Russia pass Marseilles and go
2000 miles out of thoir way for the
purposo of unloading at Antwerp. No
other port in fact offers the samo facilities. There is not another place in
the world where fifty vessels of 3,000
tons can come alongside as easily as
the penny boats on the Thames run
into tho landing stages. Many important lines running from Bremen and
Hamburg, the Peninsular and Oriental Company, and a great many English vessels, select this port to complete their cargo and take on their
passengers. They embark for instance
wire from Germany, glass window
panes from Belgium, and other goods.
Business Directory.
Tho following Business Directory contains only tbe names of persons whose advertisements appear in lhe Columbia*-.
It will be found convenient and useful to
new-comers and persons wishing to do
business In this eity. Tlio names nre given In alphabetical order:
Physicians.
Dr. Bontloy McKenzie Btreet
Dr. Cooper Church Street
Drs. MacLeod A MacSwuIti,.Columbia St
Rr- .1i,*;t,IurB Columbia street
Dr McOuIre Clinton
->• Trew McKensle Street
Lawyers.
It W Armstrong. Colnmbia street
Corbould* McColl McKenzie street
Insurance Agents.
W J Armstrong. Front street
WD terils.......  McKonzie streot
T R Pearson A Co Columbia street
O D Hunt) Columbia street
Tnrner, Heeton A Co Viotoria
Woods A Turner Columbia street
Auctioneers.
WR Clarke Viotoria
T J Trapp Columbia street
Howse* Hickman	
Woods i Turner.	
 .....Front street
...Columbia street
Convcyanveri, Land Agents, Ae,
Cronsdnllo A .Tones....*. Victoria
HV Edmonds Columbia atreet
W II Hiding McKenzie street
W I) Ferris McKensle street
Howso A Hickman Front street
Win McLena ..Port Moodv
CD Hand Columbia street
Wood* & Turner Columbia street
General Merchants.
Jns Ellard A Co Columbia street
Mrs Emma Oold Columbia street
Mi* MA Harper.. Chilliwhack
Kelly Bros Columbia street
O G Major. Columbia street
Wm McColl Columbia street
F F Nelson Port Moody
Turner. Beeton A Co (wholesale)..yfotorfa
Mrs Elian Towle. „ Langley
Hardware,) Ac,
E G Prior...
...Viotoria
CONSIGNEES.
l'er str. Idaho, from Tncoma, Juno 7—
A Corran, Blair & Co, CG Major, I) K Curtis A Co, Jnmes Cunningham, .IR Johnson, J HPleacc, JO Henderson, Kyle A
Tllton, Knight Bros, L Trammer, Mrs E
Gold, D MoPbadcn ' D Whnlen, M E Angler, Trnpp Bros, F Eickhoff, H Eickhoff.
KB* Co, jno E Uml, J Homer, McO A B,
PASSENGEHB.
Per str. Western Slope, from Victorin,
June 7—Mrs Judge Gray, Dnrcey A wf,
McKee A wf, Misses withrow, Messrs
MofTutt, Amos Bowman, Arthur Bowman,
Kingler, Law, Lock, Johnson, Gardner,
Soule, Plence, McLellan, Strong, Batt,
Guichon, Ross.
Per str. \osemltc, from Victoria, Juno
9—Mr nnd Mrs Jemmett, Mr und Mrs
Coverdnlc, Mr and Mrs Spring, Mr and
Mrs Oppenheimer, Messrs Fletcher, Kyle,
™        ""    McBrido, Lord, Long-
Mrs Cunningham, Mrs Peers, Mrs Medina, Senator Nelson, Capt Chlsholm,
Messrs McKay, Green, Crosby, Robinson,
Sparrow, Stott, Taylor, Cartwright, Greer,
Snider. Weils, Ploklos, West, Sinclair,
Bum linker, Hammond, Mohun, Mixer,
Splnks, Rithet, Herring, and 11 others,
Por str. Western Slope, from Victoria,
June 10—Mrs Lindsay, Moore nnd family,
Messrs Hughes, Dale, Holdcn.Dossittcr,
Orosdale, Beackett, Lapfer, Sirr, Shore,
Wilson, Wralglit, Gannon, Benson, Ling
Kee, and 10 others.
T>KFORMED EPISCOPAL Church
JT\i Hev. G. B. Allen, Pastor. Sen-ices in
the Court House every Sunday at 11 n. nt.
and 7 p. m. Sunday School at ion. m.
iltr"-' ' " ■
All nremvited.
JoT-to.
METHODIST CHURCH, Mary St.
Hev. E. Robson, Pastor. Sen-ices at
11a. m. and 7 p. m, Sunday Sohool nml
Bible Class 2:a0 p, m.    Prayer Meeting nn
Thursdays nt 8 p. m. Seats freo: strangei
■■"-•'-■--•■*-- je7.fc,
cordially Invited.
UNION LODGE No. 9, A. F.
A. BL—Tito regular Communications of this Lodge aro
held on the first Monday 1 n each
montli.   Sojourning brethren arc cordially Invited to attend      WM. HOWAY,
felEMo Secretary.
A;
rnEMPKIMKCE.--In tho W. C. T. U.
I rooms, basement of the Methodist
Cliuivh.Maryst.: Bluo Ribbon Club and
W. C. T. U, mustcul and literary ontor-
talnmont every Wednesday evening from
Stoll. w, C. T, U. meet* every Wednesday afternoon at it:JW; Band of Hope ovory
Saturday afternoon at 2:ao. Every one is
cordially Invited. myH-lc, •
UiLLLD Sicilian
Hair Benewer.
The Beit la the Cheapest.
Safety! Economy11 Certainty of Good
Results!!!
These qualities are of prime Importance in the
selection of a preparation for tho hair. Do not
oapprhnont with now remedies whioh may do
harm rather than good; but profit by the ex-
tfcrieuce of others. Buy and use with perfect
confidence an st tlelo whioh everybody knows
to be good. Hall's Haib Ren-ewer will not
disappoint you.
PKBPASED nV
B. P. Hnll & Co.,Nashua. V.H.
Sold by all Druggists.
STATW1RT.
HA
Immediate connection with
paper manufacturers, we are
prepared to furnish the various
grades of paper, put up iu quarter-ream packages and upwards,
at much cheaper rates than formerly, A teat let will prove
this fact. Our stook also of
miscellaneous hooks, with the
usual lines of goods associated
with book stores and stationers,
Is always kept complete,
T. N. HlBBEN k CO.,
my31-to Gov't St, Victoria.
E 8 Scoullar A Co Columbia street
Carriage Works.
Johnston A Smith Columbia street
Commission Merchants.
W R Clarke Victoria
Homer & Son „ Front atreet
Druggists.
D S Curtis A Co Columbia street
J S McGulre .Clinton
A Peele ; Columbia Btreet
Roots ond Shoes.
R Thonins Columbia Btreet
J T Wilkinson OhlHIwhaos:
Flour and Feed.
Gustnv Hauck... Froht street
Furniture.
J Q Bunte Columbia street
W Protheroi Co Columbia street
John Walsh Columbia Btree
Rooks, Stationery, *c.
T R Pearson A Co - Colnmbia street
T B Pearson & Co Vale
Musical Instruments.
JBngnail ......Vletorla
Cross' Musical Agency. ...Victoria
T It Pearson A Vo, ..Columbia Btreet
Cigars.
Kurtz & Co Victoria
Liquors*
E Brown A Co...
Kchoe-t Co	
...Columbia atreet
 Sapperton
Hotels.
Brighton (Geo Black) Hastings
Farmers- Home (J Turnbull).._...Ohumh Bt
Occident (J Austin) Columbia street
Royal (Mrs M A Harper) Ohllllwhaek
Mrs Ellf a Towle „ Langley
Union (T Bartlett) Chllllwhacfc
Mrs M Harrison Chilliwhack
Fish Dealers*
Jas Tnfltuitlnlc ....Front street
Bui chert.
Robt Dickinson ......Columbia street
S J Turner .._»_.._.Chllllwbfwk
Painters, Ktc,
Murray A Fry Clarkson street
Contractors ond Hnlldeis.
J A Culbick..... Merchant Square
Stage Line*
J M Wise Now Wast. A Port Moody
Saw ami Pinning Mills.
Brunette Saw Mill Sapperton
Branch lumber yard nt Port Moody.
Dominion sawmill Richard atreet
Branch lumber yards nt Port Moody
nnd Victoria.
Royal City Planing Mill Richard street
Branches at Port Moody A Nanaimo.
Hook Rinding,
R T Williams. Viotoria
Seedsman.
G A McTavish North Saanich
Printing Offlce.
D Hobson & Co (Columbian) Columbia at
Ruling nnd plain binding.
Harnett' Talent Foot and Meant rawer
Scroll Saws,
Circular Saws, Mortisers, Lathes, Ten*
oners, Formers, Etc.
OSBORNE ft ALEXANDER,
Sole Agents, G28 Market St. San Franoisco. Mechanics' Tools, Hardware and
Machinery. Catalogue of all our goods
sent freo on application. ap26-.hu
N'
IfcTOTIOS.
OTIC I. IS HRRBRV GIVEN that
intend making application to
lease from the Chief Commissioner of
Innds and works, for timbering purposes,
tho following described lands In New
west-minster District:
Commencing nt a stake nbout S chains
east of the east shoro lino of Howo Sound,
nnd ahout 1 mile «outh of Wall's Point;
thouno north 2U clinins; thenoo enst fiO
chains tlicnco south 20 chnins; thence
west 50 chains to point of commencement
nnd containing one hundred acres.
DrBECK BROS. A CO.
New Westminstor, B. (.'., May 12.1SU.
myH-lm.	
NOTICE.
T IlEHF.nV GIVR NOTICK THAT I
I intend to apply to tho Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for pormliaiou
to purchase tho foi lowing described lands,
situated in tlie District of New Westminster: * •
Commencing at tbcNW corner of the
Government Reserve, situated on the
southern side of F.ngllsh Bay; thence due
south, along the western boundary of said
Reserve, to its southwest corner; thence
due west 110 chnins, moro or less, to the
eastern itoundary of Point Grey Reserve;
thonco due north, along snlu eastern
boundary, to the shore of English Bay)
tlicnco easterly, nlong shore of Knglish
Bay, to the place of commencement, eon*
mining nbout 600 ncres, more or less.
R.T. WILLIAMS.
Victoria, B. C. 8rd April, 188*. npiMc
NOTIOE.
VTOTICB IS HEREBY GIVEN tkftt
.1 we intend mnking application to the
hief Commissioner of Lands and Works
_jr permission to lense for timbering purposes the following desoribed lands, situated In New Westminstor District:
Commencing at n post about TO chains
south of SE corner of Lot 450, Malaspina
Strait; thenco true enst 180 chains; thence
south SO chains: thonco west 180 chains;
thenoe north, following shore line, to
point of beginning, containing 1400 aeres,
more or less.
Commencing nt n post about 1 mile
west of Thunder Bay, .larvis Inlet; thence
truo nortii 128 chains; thenco true west 8k
miles; thenco south 10 chains; thenoe eeal
70 chains; thenoo south 55 chains; thenco
cast tno chains; thenco following line of
lease Y to point of beginning, containing
7000 acres, moro or less.
Moodyville Sawmill Co, (Ld.)
.Manager.
B. SPRINGER,
Burrard Intel, BC, 12th Moy, 1884.
[1.4m A real or Telegraphy.
We have often heard of the wonderful line between thi. country and Teheran, the capital of Persia, a distanco
of 3,800 milea, but we ecarcely recognized the fact that good signals were
obtainable through ao great a length of
wire until recently, when we availed
ourselves of au invitation from Mr. W.
Andrew., the managing director of the
Indo-European Telegraph Company, to
make a vint of inspection. It was between 7 and 8 Sunday evening, April
13th, when we reached the office. In
the baeemant of an unpretentious
building in old Broad atreet we had
the Morse printer in connection with
the main line from London to Teheran.
The courteous clerk in charge of the
wire, Mr. Blagrove, informed us that
we were through to Erad.n, with the
aame ease with which one "wires"
from the city to the West End we asked a few questions of the telegraphist
in the Gorman town. When we had
finished with EmcJon, we spoko with
tho same facility to the gentleman on
duty at Odessa. Thi. did uot satisfy
ui, and in a few minutes we were dear
through to the Persian capital, Teheran. There were no messages about,
the time was favorable, and the employee ofthe various countries seemed
anxious to give us an opportunity of
testing the capacity of thu wonderful
line.
' T. H. N. (Teheran) said, "Oall Kur-
rachee," and in less time than it takes
to writo these words we gained the attention of tha Indian town. Tho signals were good, and our speed muat
have equalled fifteen words a minute.
The operator at Kurrachee, when he
learnt that London was speaking to
him, thought it would be a good opportunity to put us through to Agra,
and to our astonishment the signals
did-not fail, and we chatted pleasantly
for a few minutes with Mr. Malcom
Khan, the clerk on duty. To make
this triumph of telegraphy complete,
Agra switched us on to another line,
and we soon were talking to a native
telegraphist at the Indian Government
Cable Station, Calcutta. At first the
gentleman "at the other end of the
wire" could not believe that he waa
really in direct communication with
the English capital, and he exclaimed
in in Morse language, "Are you really
London!" Truly this was a great
achievement Metallic communication
without a break from 18 Old Broad
Street, London, to the telegraph office
in Calcutta! Seven thousand miles of
wire! The signals were excellent, and
the speed attained was not less than
twelve, perhaps fourteen, words per
minute.—Telegraphist.
 _> .	
Talk to the Boys.
The boys of America are being demoralized by the abominable printed
stuff that is sold under the name of
cheap literature. Dime novels and
villainous story papers make heroes
of such cut-throat scoundrels as Jesse
James and Billy the Kid, and make
highway robbery appear to be a very
fascinating occupation. The love of
adventure existing in the breast of the
average boy is perverted and played
upon by vicioua writers and rascally
publishers, and the very qualities
which, properly cultivated, would be
the foundation of character, are all
misdirected and made the incentives
to evil.
The purveyors of vile books cannot
be denounced too severely for thus de*
, praving the minds of children; but
parents are guilty of contributory negligence in falling to counteract the influence of auch literature by common-
sense talks to their children.
Last week two boys ran away from
Gloucester with their pockets stuffed
fall of dime novels and their heads
full of wild schemes of "making tnir
own way," as they explained their
notions. What these adventurous
Youngsters need is some person to say
to them: "Boys, the men who live
long and have good times in this
world are not tbe murderers, robbers,
tramps and miscellaneous outcasts you
read about in dime novels. Jesse
James did not enjoy life a bit. He
robbed trains to get money to buy
liquor and get drunk with a lot of
state-prison birds. When he was with
his companions he was in mortal terror lest one of them might be an
officer in disguise ready to shoot him
•t the first opportunity. He did not
dare to go among decent people and
live like a white man. He was hunted
from town to town, and had no peace
on earth. Such men as he will always
be miserable, and they ought to be so.
If you try to live as he did, you will
get yourself hanged, or somebody will
shoot you in the back of the head,
and serve you right.
"Don't you get the idea into your
head that it is smart to steal from
other folks, or noble to go around
■hooting at them, because if you do
somebody will take a club and beat
out the Idea and your brains at tbe
aame time, and nobody will be sorry
for you either. The books you have
been reading tell nothing but lies, and
If you believe them you will get into
trouble as sure as fate. The folks who
run things in thin country are the ones
who work for their bread, and they
won't let you be robbers or bandits in
slouch hats with pistols in your belts.
They'll lock you up in jail the tirst
time you try it, and make you work
harder for bread and water than you'd
have to outside for roast turkey. You
try to get up any Jesse James business
around here, and the police wilt catch
jfou, and if you go around breaking
into houses, you will get to be such
mean, miserable men that your mothers
won't own you.
"You can't be bad men out West,
either. There are too many good men
there to let you ride around flourishing
pistols and trying, to get your names
into dime novels. They'll take you
out and hang you up on a tree for the
crows to eat. If you want to make
your own way, go to work for a carpenter or a machinist, or somebody,
ud learn how to handle tools. You
can make your way honestly with a
Mw or a drill, but you oan't make anything but a road to State prison with
a pooket full of dime novels. If a farmer sees you trying to 'make your own
way* in the dime-novel style, he will
Mt the dogs on you. The bandit busineu don't pay worth a cent, and if you
want to start in on that line, you fust
make up your mind to live the life of
ft dog and die young."
After talking to the boys iu this
way, it would be a good idea to inform
them that a young Jesse James in
Philadelphia has just been sent to
prison for ft year for carrying a pistol.
-Bottm Weekly Qtobs.
A Magnificent Palace Oar.
The private coach recently built for
Mr, E. Talbot, of the Chicago Railway
Age, is one of the moat luxurious affairs, says Mr. Pullman, ever put upon
a railway traok. It runs on twelve
wheels, six of whioh were made in Germany by Krupp. The observation
room at the end of tho car is finished
in oak with plate glass windows, extending to the floor, velvet carpets and
embossed leather furniture, including
aofaa. The bedroom is finished in maple and amaranth, and, opening from
it, is the parlor, the most j elegant apartment of tho car. It ik finished in
Bolid mahogany, with inlaid panels and
carvings ot rare and costly woods from
all corners of the earth, including the
Holy Land. Tho butler's pantry,
kitchen, and the sleeping apartments
for the servants are models of elegance
and comfort. To duplicate the car it
would cost $75,000, It was a present
to Mr. Talbot.
VanflerMU's Strong Box.
I stood the other day in the vault of
tho formidable fortress of iron and
masonry on Forty-second streot,
where last year the richest nabob in
the world looked up hia $200,000,000
in stocks, bonds and other securities.
It is one of the most redoubtable works
of defence on the American oontinent,
though you may not be entirely certain of that by surveying the building
from the outside. Its foundations
were blasted out of the rock; the front
wall is five feet in thickness, and the
side and rear walls are three feet, the
materials used being pressed brick
with brown-stone trimmings. The
beams, girders and main pillars are
iron, incased in fireproof material.
The doors, window frames and minor
partitions are iron, marble and glass.
No wood is to be found in the structure. The great vault is 36x42 feet,
of wrought iron, steel and Franklin-
ite iron, is imposing in strength and
proportions, and iB situated on the
ground floor. Ita four outer doors
weigh 8,200 pounds each, and have
every effective and known improvement in defensive devices. A massive
wall of masonry surrounds the ironwork. The vault, which is burglar,
fire and water proof, constitutes a distinct building in itself. Tho armed
watchmen who guard the building day
and night are under the strictest discipline, their hourly movements being
recorded by an electric dook connecting with various points on each floor
of the structure, and there are also
wires running to police headquarters
and the offices of the district telegraph.
In one corner of this great vault, behind heavy iron bars, are the heavier
iron doora of the works containing the
Vanderbilt securities, which can be
opened only by skeleton keys held by
the owner alone. I suppose that a
hundred men in this building, with
Gatling guns, oould easily defend it
against a mob of 100,000 assailants; it
could be reduced by nothing less than
the continued play of heavy artillery,
—John Swinton.
A whisker dye must be convenient to
use, easy to apply, Impossible to rub off,
elegant bi appearance, and cheap in
price, Buckingham's Dye for the Whiskers unites In itself all these merits.
ftytt.        •
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeee
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeo
ICAL HALL.
COLUMBIA STREET,
NEW   WESTMINSTER,   B.   O.
 (ja9tc)	
&
-IMPORTERS-
&
MERCHANTS,
FBOM ST., • NKW WETTMINSTKR
OFFER FOR SALE
Extra, Superfine and Graham
.FLOTJE
BARLEY,
GROUND BARLEY,
WHEAT,
MIDDLINGS
. _A.m_T9
Everybody's Boy.
My son, drop that dime novel or
flash paper and let's have a little chat.
Yes, Indian and detective stories
are thrilling, but don't go too fast.
The chances are that you will never
see a live Indian outside of a circus or
a Btreet parade, and as for killing 'em,
don't.
No doubt you could strap a bowie-
knife and revolver around your waist
and take a loaf of bread under one
arm and the pamphlet life of Buffalo
Bill under the other, and go west and
slay Indians by the cord, but don't
think of it.
An Indian has feelings, the same as
a white njan, and as few of them have
laid by any bonds or mortgages, or invested to any great extent in life insurance, you must realize that the
widows and orphans of your victims
would be left in a sad plight. As for
detective stories, go and talk with a
real detective or a county sheriff.
Ask 'em about "Old Sleuth's" disguises and exploits and magic luck and
then listen carefully while they tell
you what a fool you are making of
yourself by grinding the end of your
nose against pages of such trashy fiction. We want you to read, but for
the land's sake look about for something different! Thore are good boy-
books, your father takes the daily
papers, and if you should read a page
of history now and then you wouldn't
waste your time.
That crowd of New York publishers
who are flooding the country with flash
papers and dime novels are your worst
enemies. No matter to them whether
you grow up a respectable man or a
murderer so long aa they get your
money. Their stories are the basest
lies, too silly even for a boy 10 years
old to believe.
Now, then, look about you and soe
how many men in our stores and factories and offices and upon the streets
are getting gray and wrinkled and old.
Twenty years from now not one in ten
of ub whom you see in business to-day
will be able to put our shoulders to
the wheel. Even a decade will retire
tens of thousands. What then? Why,
my son, thia is a world which knows
no atop. Thia iv a life which knows
no rest until old age compels it.
When the men of to-day are laid up
in dry-dock the boys of to-day will be
the fresh set of hands called on deck
to work the ship. They will be the
merchants, farmers, manufacturers and
professional men of the future. You
will have to bear the burdens and
anxieties of keeping this country on
the track of peace and prosperity, and
your voices will sound from the halls
of Congress and your pens write words
to burn in the memory of future generations.
Oome, now, begin right. Don't get
it into your head that an Indian-killer
is about four pegs above a State Senator. Don't imagine that a detective
wouldn't trade places with a lawyer
very quickly if he had his say nbout
it. Don't you believe that an embezzler, burglar or murderer is a hero,
and that men admire him.
Drop your novels and flash papers
as a starter. The boy who feeds on
such trash gets false impressions of
the world, and is more certain to bring
up in State Prison than in respectable
employment. If you have a pistol fling
it aside. The man who carries one
about the streets is a coward, and men
mark him as suoh. If you have a
bowie-knife on hand turn it over to
Jour mother for a meat or bread knife,
f you have a sand olub lying around
loose shy it into the ditch before any
body finds out hew empty your head
has been. That pair of brass-knuckles
can be tossed into the river. "Old
Sleuth" and "Buffalo Bill" will make
a good bonfire, and then you are ready
to begin life and to ask yourself what
trade or profession shall be yours when
done in the school.—Af. <Hio<*, in Detroit Free Press.
OIL OAKE,
OATS,
OAT MEAL,
CORN MEAL,
GRAIN   SACKS,
HAMS, BACON, LARD, BUTTER,
DRIED  FRUIT, COFFEE
AND SPICES.
Agents for Pacific Coast Steamship Co.
(jaOto)	
Bneijiif 1.
DeBeck Bros. & Go,
Manufacturers ami dealers In all
kinds of
WALSH'S
Tailoring
Emporinm
Opposite the Bank, Columbia street,
New Westminster, B. O.      [mySW-tc.
New Goods
New Goods
WM. M'COLL
Is constantly receiving new fcoods
consisting in part of
E>_R-Z-   GOOIDS,
Clothing.
HOSIEKY, ETC.
Iff
A fine selection of  *J
Groceries and Provisions
Always on'hand.
Holbrook's stono building, Columbia
street. myiO-tc.
STOVES
EAtallarMo.
Have juat received per
NORTHERN PACIFC RY.,
A large consignment of
STOVRS
 AND	
RANGES
From the celebrated mamifg firm of
E.C.GURNEY&CO.,
Hamilton, Ont.
Theso stoves embrace the
NEWEST & BEST DESIONS
And cannot be excelled by any others in
the Province. Having been imported
direct, they will be sold at very low
prices.
E. S. SCOULLAR & CO.,
Columbia St., New Westminster, B. C.
apl2-tc
Port Moody!
FOR SALE I
Shingles, Shakes, Pickets,
AND TRAYS.
We Intend to keep ti full stock of
Sash,
Doors,,
Blinds,
Mouldings
Ac,, Ac.,&e.,lntael
Evsrytliing is Woodwork
That will be required to
FINISH A  HOUSE
From bottom to top.
Orders for Scroll flawing, Trlmnlas
aud Shaping, will be promptly und care*
fully attended to. We pay particular at*
tent Ion to the manufacture of good, dry
Salmon Boxes,
And we believe our customers will bear
uBout In saying that we make
The Best Salmon Soxes on the HiTer.
We sincerely thank those who have favored us with their patronage In the past,
and beg to solicit a continuance of thoir
favors. During the post winter we have
made extensive additions to our Mill, and
ean now nil orders more promptly and
cheaply than ever. We have chartered
tho steamer "Iris" for the season, and wilt
therefore be able to deliver Lumber
promptly. Wc^ave also to announce to
the cltlxens of Port Moody that we have
opened a branch of oflr business at that
place, and will be able to fill orders from
thero In a few days.
DeBECK BROS. A CO.
New Westminster, Mar 28th, 1864. Ite
Fronting on the best portion of the harbor,  suitable for Wharves or
Warehouses, close to the
Railway.
"Valia.a"ble Xiaad
On tho harbor, admirably adapted for
Shipbuilding, Foundry or other man
ufacturing purposes.     Bpecial
advantages given. -,
dry mm
my mm
O.   Gk
MAJOR
Has now on hand a full and
well assorted stock of Dry
Goods, consisting of:
LADIES'
In Great Variety,
BLACK   QUILTED
ALPACA   SKIRTS,
Direct Importation
r DDnum
«WINE & SPIRIT MEROHANT.ft
By tho acre, in favorable positions, close
to the terminus,
Town lots and land In the City and Dis*
trict of New Westminster.
Iaa.tem.dlaa.gr Ixxveators
Will do well to apply to
HENRY V. EDMONDS,
LAND AGENT,
Columbia St., New Wcatminster, B. G.
no7] P. O. Box 39. -        to.
-_--------------->-____---_
CCKTBCnUE, < ■HLMWHilk.
Board and Lodging.    Hon.. for Hire.
THOS. BABTLETT,
aplo-to Pproprle'or.
PACIFIC
CARRIAGE
WORKS
COLUMBIA    STREET,
New Westminster, B. (!.
WAGGONS,
BUGGIES,
CARRIAGES,
-AND-
Painting   and   Repairing
neatly done.
A STOOK OF COFFINS ALWAYS ON HAND
JOHNSTON It SMITH,
noMte] FioniRoii
In all the Leading Colors,
LADIES' UNDERWEAR,
A full line, in English Merinos
and Canadian Lambswool,
HOSIERY
Ladies' and Children's, in plain
and   stripe,   Merino   and
Lambswool,
Infants' Wool Goods
Hoods, Caps, Boots, Gaiters, In-
fantees, Polka Jackets, and
Wool  Skirts,
A nice line of Children's Hoods
and Hats trimmed with fur,
Black  and  Colored VELVETEENS, in plain and brocade,
KID    GLOVES
Black and dark shades, White
and tinted,
Xj .a. a —. s.
Real Torchon, Real Maltese, and
a .nice variety of imitation
Laces,
DRESS  OOODS
A large and well-assorted stock
of plain and figured Dress
Goods,
Plainand figured black SATINS
and SILKS,
Ladies' and Gents' silk and alpaca  UMBRELLAS,
Fur Trimming,   Buttons, Ribbons, SILKS & TWISTS,
A fine line of Ladies' Hemstitched   Handkerchiefs,
Table Napkins,White and Brown
Table Linen, Sheetings in all
widths, Towels, Cottons,
And a full assortment of other
Goods   too   numerous to
mention.
CALL  AND   SEE   THEM,
SILVER JEWELRY
Gold mounted; a fine assortment.   Bracelets,  Lockets,
Chains, Earrings, Brooches, and Sets.
Other Silverware in great variety
Men's Clothing!
In large variety, good material,
and prices to suit.
Also, a large stock CUTLERY,
CROCKERY & GLASSWARE constantly on
hand.
A full and complete stock of
Groceries § Provisions!
fj^Goods delivered  free of
charge in any part of the City.
C.G. MAJOR
Cor. Columbia A Mary 8te.,
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
(Mltta)
Lnnnnui
BEOS TO INFORM THK RESID*
siits of New Westminster and vicinity that he is constantly receiving from
Europe shipments of choice
Wines,
Spirits,
Liqueurs,
English Ales,
London and
Dublin Stout,
Whioh he will .upply
IN BUD or DUTY FAQ,
In Quantities to Suit Cnitoneri,
Also, In r- iatant receipt, direct from
"W, A, Gllby'a, London
Fine Champagnes,
S?> mur's Claret,
Burgundy;
Genuine Sherry,
Fine old Ports
and Sherries.
E.  BROWN,
oox.-o-2C-B£A. e-rxurjux.
New Weitminiter, B, 0.
GOVERNMENT  NOTICES
PUBLIO NOTICE.
LANDS IN HEW WESTM1NHTER DIST.
•VTOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN tbat
i> all vacant, unreserved and unoccupied Crown Lands situated to tbe south of
the North Arm of Fraser River and to the
west of the-Mud Bay road, will be open
for sale or pre-emption on and after Mon*
day, tbe 2nd June next.
All persons claiming a right to any of
these lands must file a statement of their
claim with the Commissioner for the District prior to that date,
* WM. SMITHE,
Chief Com. of L. A W.
Lands and Works Depsrtment, Victoria,
B. C, May 10,1884. myH-lm
"; 1 '   iTOTICB-
ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
against the Colonial Hotel are requested to present them to the undersigned at once; and all persons indebted
to the laid hotel are requested to make
immediate settlement.
J. E. INSLEY, Proprietor.
New West,, Deo. 17th, 1883.      [del9-to
Land Kesbrvation, New Westmin-
btsr District.
T>VBLIC NOTICE II HEREBY
JT given that all tho vaeant Crown Land
situated within the boundaries of those
Sections in Township No. 4, Now West-
Slnster District, which are enumerated
low, ts hereby reserved from sale, preemption or Bettlemont, until further notice, for the purpose of Dyking and Reclamation, vis:—
NE X Section 4, Sections 7,8,0,10, IS, 16,
17,18,19,20,21.22 and 27.
WM. SMITHE,
Chief Com. of L. AW.
Land A Works Department, Victoria, B.
C, 2tid June, 1864.                       Je4-lm
i .-ai    .i  :	
PUBLIO NOTIOE.
ITT HERE AB, BT A PUBLIC NO-
VV tlce, Dated 8rd August, 1878, publiBh-
nd In the British Columbia Gazette, certain lands on the Mainland of British
Columbia were reserved for railway purposes.
And whereas, the Dominion Government have relinquished all claim to that
portion of those lands lying to the west of
Fort Moody. .
Public notice Is therefore hereby glvenr
that the above Reservation Is horoby rescinded In so far as lt relates to those
lands lying to the west of the Mud Bay
road, the.North road and tho North Arm
of Burrard Inlet,
WM. SMITHE,
Chief Com. of L, A W.
Xriinds and Works Department, Victoria,
B. O., May 10.1884. myH-lm
Canadian FaciBc Railway
NEW    SCHEDULE
—OF—
WHITE  LABOR
■* —OS -IBS—
Canadian Pacific Railway
—1»
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Overseers $125 00 par month,
Rook Foreman... .$3 IiO to *4 00 V day
Earth Foreman... 2 60 to  3 80
Bridge Foremen.. 3 60 to  4 60
Bridge Carpenter.,
Ut elan  * SO
Bridge Carpenters,
2nd elan  3 00
Masons 2 60 to   3 60
Stone Cutter..... 3 00 to 3 60
Blackamithi,   lit
TiLBLE
Showing tha dates and placet af
Courts of Assise, Nisi Prius, and
Of er and Terminer for the year
1884.
SPUING ASSIZES.
(On Vancouver Island.)
Victoria, Monday... 7th April.
Nanaimo Wednesday, 4th June.
(On Mainland.)
New Westminster,-Wednesday,... 7th May.
Yale ".Monday, 19th May.
Kamloops Friday, SOth May.
Clinton Saturday, 7thJune.
FALL  ASSIZES.
IPn Vancouver Island.]
Victoria, Monday,. 24th November.
Nanaimo Wednesday, 3rd December.
[On Mainland.]
Richfield Monday,... Sth September.
Clinton TueBday,..80th September.
Kamloops W'dn'sday Sth October.
Lytton 8aturday,..18th October.
Yale, Saturday,.55th October.
New West, .Wdn'sday,12th Novomber.
SOth January, 1884. teite
Mrs. M. Harrison
HAVING ENLARGED HER HOTEL
opposite the Steamboat Landing at
Chilliwhack, Is now prepared to give the
BEST ACCOMMODATION    1
To the travelling publio, Chilliwhack
Ib tbe moat delightful Summer He-
sort In Britisli Columbia. Splendid
drives and delightful mountain scenery.
 my21-3m.	
TURNER, BEETON & GO.
MERCHANTS,
WHAKF STBEET • VIOTORIA.
AOBITTS   1-OS
North British and Mercantile
Insurance Co. lor Mainland.
H. C. BEETON & CO.,
86 Finsbury Circus,
London, Bl C.
IMPERIAL
FIRE INSURANCE COMP'Y.
1 Old Broad St. and 16 Fall Mall.
LONDON.
INSTITUTED 1808.
FOE INSURING HOUSES A OTHER
Buildings, Goods, Wares, Merchandise, Manufacturing and Farming Stock,
Ships in Fort, Harbor or Dook, and the
Cargoes of such Vessels j also, Ships build*
big and repairing, Barges and other Vcb
sols on navigable rivete and canals, and
Goods on board such Vessels, throughout
Great Britain and Ireland and in Foreign
Countries,'
FB0H LOSS OR DAMAGE BT FIRE.
Subscribed and Invested Capital,
£1,600.000 BTG.
Rates of Premium and every information can be obtained on application to
W. J. ARMSTRONG
Agent for New Westminster.
E!
■hall have prompt attention,
jafito
Wood Turner
WANTED.     CONSTANT   EMPLOY-
mont will he ilven to a thoroughly
competent man. Apply at the
ihlMc DOMINION SAWMILL.
Building Ground
•a C'olHMbla aad Front Streets, N. W.
4BOUT 25 FEET ON EACH STREET,
or through from street to street, can be
ied for building purposes; next the
Holbrook House and Webb's gunsmith
ihop. Applyto
%ENRY V.EDMONDS,
mhlMc LandAgent.
NOTICE.
In tub Estate of Murdoch Morrison,
Deceased Intehtatb.
ALL PERRONS HAVING CLAIM*
against the above estate must present
E roved accounts on or before aoth June,18H,
>the undersigned; and all persons indebted to the Bald estate must settle such
Indebtedness forthwith.
E. A. JENNS, Administrator.
2nd June, 1884. Je4*lra
NOTICE.
VTOTICE   II   HEREBY    OIVBIf,
F% that I Intend to apply to Pie Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 100 acres of land
situated In New Westminster District,
described as follows: . , .
Commencing at the S, W. corner qf Lot
471, North Ann of Burrard Inlet, thence
West 40 chains, thenco north 40 chains,
thenco East 40 chains, thenco South 4o
chains, to point of beginning.
myl7m2        JAMES VAN BBAMEB.
DR. SPINNEY & G0.'S
DISPENSARY,
NO. 11 KEARNEY STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
DR. MPINNEY, well known »s thi Town,
der of thi Montreal, (C. E.) Medical Inrtl-
tute, nnd Inte Proprietor of the BHNNEYVILLK
INFIRMARY, wonld most respect folly, inform
hii patients and tbe afflicted generally, that he
■till continue! to treat chronic and nervous di*.
eater, with unparalleled incceet.
LADIES AND OBNTIBMBN.
Remember that procrutinatlon lt the thief of
time so
OOMB AND BB HEALED.
It tn.lt.ra not what yonr trouble, may b«, com.
.nd let th. Doctor ...mine yonr caao. It will
colt yon nothing for consultation, ao plena, call
.nd Mtlify your.el.ei whether th. Doctor nnder.
atanda your cue. It h. can cure yon he will tell
yon ao. if not, h. will tell you that, for h. will
not undertake . cue unless he la confident of ef.
fMtiueacure.
Parties at . distance wishing treatment, by
sending tH and * minute description of their
troubles will receive In.return a full course ol
treatment securely pocked so as not to excite en*
rloslty.
DE. SPINNEY will guarantee to lorfelt tin
linndnd Dollars for every case of any kind or
character which h. undertakes and tulle to cure.
P. B For dleeues of abort atandlng, . full
course of medicines, sufficient for « onr., with
til Instructions, will be sent to any address on
wce.pt of 110.
Call ar Address
Dr. SPINNEY * CO..
• ffl-lj     No.llKearney.st.,8enr,BBnci»eo,Cal.
Blacksmiths,  2ai
class 300 "
Blacksmith Helpers into 200   ••
Driller.  2 00 to 135    "
Laborers......... 1 78 to 1 00    "
Hewers, lit class  3 60 "
Choppers, lst class 2 00 to 2 N    "
Scorer., lst class   210 "
All outside labor 10 hours psr day.
All Csrpentere to furnish their own
Chut Tools.
All Employees to find themselves Bed,
Board asd Lodging.
Boarding Houses will be 00ST.nl.at
along th. Use.   Board—♦» per week.
It will not be compulsory lor Employ.
*ea to board In th. Company's Houses.
Wags, will be paid monthly, on th.
10th of eaoh month,
A.  ONDERDONK,
GlKWUI, MiWAOll.
Omm or thi Cokiiuotom,
Caimdmk Paoitto Railway,
Yale, Harsh 1,1883.
NILKS- PACIFIC COAST
New Fish Market!
JAMES TAFFANDALE
HAS JUST OPENED A NEW FISH
Mark.* on
FRONT 8TREET,
Eaat of th. Holbrook House, when, will
be found a full supply of Fish of all
kinds and of the best quality.
PurohasM delivered in any part of th.
city.   A call U solicited,        mh28to
BB. ALLEN'S
PRIVATE  DISPENSARY,
%A\_ Kearny %%,, S*m Franc! aco, Cal.
EmBLUBro roi tbb Bctumnc uttt Snisr Crai
or O»o!ft0, Nitron add Skcml Putins.
THE EXPERT SPECIALIST,
T\B. ALLEN, AS 18 WELL KNOWN. lS A
IJ rtgnhr grtduMrxl Phfildan, educated tt
SowiMn Collw ind Unlvenltj; of Mtchltu. He
hu do-roled * tt'etlmo to tbe itudy of tbe treat-
ment and cure of diieuei within hit ipectaltjr.
-sroxrarat amar
And MIDDLE AOKD MEN, who ue mfferini from
the effect! of Youthful Indberrtlooi or Kiomki
In maturer jreui.Nmvovl and Pstneu Dwmit.
Impomkci, Low Manhood, confusion of Ideu,
dull eye*. Morslon to society, despondency, pimples on tho f*co, lnu of energy and memory, Ire-
quency of urinating, etc.
BIT HOSPITAL  EXPERIENCE
I Having been mrgeon in darn of two leading
lospitals) enablea me to treat all private troubles
with eicellcnt result!. I wish It distinctly under*
■tood that I do not claim ft perform Impoeslbill-
tlei, or to have miraculous or supernatural power.
I clulm only to be a skillful and succoesful Phys).
clan and Burgeon, thoroughly Informed In my
specialty—
DMHAIBS UP MAV.
All applying to me will receive my boneit
opinion of their complaints—No eipsrimenting. I
will guarantee n positive enre tn every case 1 undertake, or forfeit $1,000. Consultation In office
or by letter iris and strictly private. Chances
reasonable. Thorough eiainlmttion, Including
chemical and microscopical analysis of urine, and
advice, 16.09. Offlce hours, 9 to 3 dally, S to fl
evening.  Sunday, 8 to 13 only.   Call or address
DR.   ALL EH,
26^ Kearney street, San Francisco, Gal.
49-Remember, the Doctor has a Viasum
CoaroHtD, the resnlt of many years of special
practice and hard study, which, nnder bis special
advice, lias never failed dt success In the con of
Lon Iumoob, ptumniMu, etc.
E. G. PRIOR,
Direct Importer And Dealer In
STEEL
M
POULTRY
—k*&—
LIVE  STOCK
,—sooac—
*A FINELY ILLUSTRATED BOOK,
JAjot great vain, to Poultrym.n and
Stockmen,,  Sent anywhere on receipt ot
mylMm      T, R, PEARSON k CO.
Agricultural
Machinery.
Sole Af.nl for .
BMrlnf-rwIM nlaa-cn, ■■<■»•• »«**■
en, Watui S.Uir lalt., amltr
•nil - arsMseart HeMer,
■a*lM4er>,   Osalaan.   Warns,
■laamt. Osier Tlrmkers, lie., He,
3-n.M-.at Tr. C-u.ltl--ra.torn.
Government Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
hSMm
THE GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY
Isamnr-falllng
Oar. for M«>-
onsDebillty.Si-
hansted Vitality
of any kind,
Weakness, Paralysis, Prosta-
torrhoea,and all
the terrible ef*
mmm——™     I feCtB Of yOUlbfttl
follies, and excesses In maturer years,
DS. MINUS will aire, to forf.lt
Vile Hondred Dollars for a cat. of
thi. kind the Vital Koiiuratlve (under
his special adrlce and treatnent) will not
cure, •>» for anytbluK impure or Injurious
found io It. DR. MINTIK treats all Diseases jucccssfully without mercury.
COnnllatlon free. Thorough eiaml-
I nation and advice, $5-01), Pilce or Vital
Restorative, $3'00 a bottle, or four
tines the quantity, SIO'OO; sent to any
address upon receipt of price, or 0.0. D„
s.cur. from obnrratlon, and In prlv.t.
nans II desired, by A. 1. SINIIK,
M.D.
Those who cannot visit DR. HINT IS
In Sau Franoisco should send a full and
minute atateuent ot their troubles wllh
$26'00, and in return a fnll conn, of
Medicine will b. forwarded, seenrely
packed, so as not to excite curiosity.
All orders for nediclas O, O, D. mutt
be accompanied with SI .00 (as a guar*
ant., of good faith), which will h. de*
ducted when the package Is shipped.
SAMPLE BOTTLE PREE.-Sent on
application by letter stating symptoms,
sn aud age. Oonmunicatlons strictly
conldsntlal, JuyM-Iy
II Kroner Una, Mn rranclm, Cal.

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