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The Cumberland Islander Dec 20, 1924

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which la consolidated the Cumberland Hewa.
I
ll
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 61.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20,   1924..
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Packed House At
Courtenay School
Christmas Concert
COURTENAY, Dec. 18—The Courtenay School Christmas Concert attracted a packed house at the Gaiety
Theatre Wednesday night The entertainment this year featured the old
fashioned English Nursery Storey
"The Babes In the Woods." and it was
put On ln good old pantomime stylo.
The opening fairy chorus was very
dainty and effectively done. The
dancing of the Highland and Gypsy
dances by Margaret Inglis was a tea- i
ture of the evening and was much appreciated by the large audience. The
principal parts were well alloted. The
"Babes" Fred Stephens and Buma-
dette MacAuley were typically modern
In their ways and manners and played
their roles well,
A CHRISTMAS APPEAL
A  local  communication,  unsigned,
addressed to E. W. Bickle, Esq., reads
as follows:
"Dear Sir:
Hoping you will have space in your
paper for this little item just to remind the City Folks that have their
plenties not to forget the poor and
lone ones this Xmas season."
We feel sure that this pitiful note
coming from our own city at this season will make a generous appeal to
tbose ln a position to render assistance.
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BEVAN BRIEFS
Mr. Jay and Miss Jay, of the teaching staff of Bevan school will spend
the Chirstmas vacation in Vancouver.
Mr. "Jim' Weir of the Rangers Foot
ball met with an accident at the last
The pirate captain [ game and has since been confined to
was ably represented by Sidney Williams. Honor Fechner, as Sir Ronald, the prnlclpal boy; and Kitty Williams as Rosalind, the babes big sister, both had important parts to which
they did ample Justice. Their songs
and duets were well received. Robert Hornal made a good Gypsy Chief,
and Agnes Sutherland amused the
audience throughout the evening as
an eccentric school teacher. The
Pirate Captain's assistances, J. Inglis and Osbourn Bell, were two bad
men who had large parts In the show.
A pretty and pleasing juvenile chorus
"Who Killed Cock Robin?" was sung
by a number of small birds as they
covered the sleeping babes with leavsjs
of the trees. The Gypsies, tlie Pirates
and the Courtiers all sustained their
roles admirably which reflects great
credit to those who worked so hard In
the production of this entertainment.
The staging was good, and the costumes excellent. The grouping aud
the placing of colors in the choruses
was decidedly good. The dumb acting of Honor Fechnor, Warwick Revle
Agnes Sutherland and Austin McLeod
following up a reading from a present
day novel by Dorothy Fletcher was
his bed.    He will not be able to resume work until the New Year.
The dance glven by the Burns' Club
last Saturday evening was well attended.
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Derail Christmas Tree
The Children's Banquet and Christmas Tree took place on Thursday evening, ln place of a concert as ln
former years the children participated
in fancy races the winners being
awarded with a prize. The banquet
then ensued, Mr. Jay acting as toast-
muster tor the evening. Later Santa
Claus arrived and produced bis mysterious sack, a gift for every Bevan
child. A dance for tbe elders followed, being held ln the Burns' Club
House.
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BASKETBALL MEETING
A meeting of the Cumberland Basketball League will be held in the
Athletic Club tonight (Saturday) at
7:30 o'clock. Ladysmith will be
playing here next Friday and it is to
deal with this business tbat the meet-
both funny and clever.     The act was ,
designed  to  show  what  a  peculiar j ^"J8^^    A" members are askcd
language is ours.    The reading being
literally Interperated by the dumb actors.
During the evening Mr. 0. W.
Stubbs. the principal of the Courtenay
Public School, thanked the audience
for their patronage and support. On
behalf of the Courtenay_ school, he
presented Mr. C. W. Shannon, who
has given a great deal of his time
to tbe beautifying of the Courtenay
School Grounds during the past year,
with a handsome silver mounted amber and briar pipe and fine tobacco
pouch, as a slight stoken of thanks
from the school. Mr. Stubbs also
presented Sidney Williams with a sum
of money, given by an anonymous
donor, for the best sportsman ln the
school. This is to be an annual event, and the boys themselves decide
by vote to whom the prize shall be
awarded. The Courtenay School
Chirtsmas entertainment was undoubtedly a decided success.
to be present.
Vancouver Bank
Robbed Today
A radio message received this (Friday) morning by John H. Cameron
' Cumberland radio dealer, reported
that the Bank of Nova Scotia, in Vancouver, was robbed shortly after elev
en o'clock by a young man about 2!
years of age. The amount taken was
not reported but lt was stated that the
robber simply walked into the bank,
took the money, and walked out again.
13ft S» 3ft 5i 3ft
Miss Annie Loggie ot Vancouver
will arrive this evening and will
spend the Christmas vacation here as
the guest of Dr. and Mrs. McNaughton
HOLIDAY ATTRACTIONS AT THE ILO-ILO
"This Freedom" Dec. 22 - 23
Xmas Eve Dance ., Dec. 24
"Tongues of Flame" Dec. 24 - 25
Cumberland United Football Dance Dec. 25
"Butterfly" Dec. 26 - 27
"Little Robinson Crusoe" Dec. 29 - 30
"Robin Hood" Dec. 31 - Jan 1
New Year's Eve Dance Dec. 31
Cumberland Rangers Dance Jan 1
"The Fast Set" Jan 2 - 3
ALL CLASSES ASSIST IN
SCHOOL CONCERT; WAS
LARGELY ATTENDED
Each year as the Christmas season
approaches, one of the most eagerly
anticipated events is the concert of
the Cumberland Public Schools.
Since only one evening was devoted
to Its performance this year, the seating problem was quite a serious one.
However, to take care of this, the
seating capacity of the theatre was
discerned by Principal Apps, and tho
pupils selling tickets were only allowed to sell a corresponding amount,
and in this way every person attending was assured of a seat. However
many who had neglected to purchase
tickets were turned away. Considering the severity of the weather the attendance of such a large number Is an
Indication of the popularity these concerts have achieved. The proceeds
are to be used In eliminating the debt
on the school piano and other essentials.
Juniors Pnrliclpn'e
The evening's entertainment was*
commenced by the singing of "0 Canada," followed by the contribution of
the Junior Grades consisting of three
drills, the Red, White and Blue, under the leadership of Gordon Robertson, the Fairies, and the drill of
Dumbells. The little folks were
prettily costumed, and the colored
dresses flitting to and fro to the measure of the Fairy drill made a most
effective picture. Tbe Junior program was under the supervision of
the Misses Robertson, . Richardson,
'Hunden and Mrs. Drader, the children showing the result of splendid
training.
Tableaux and Dialogues
Tbat part of the program undertaken
by the Intermediate Grades under
the direction of Misses Hood, Aspeci,
I. McFadyen and G. McFadyen was
Athletic Association To Hold
Annual Meeting And Xmas Drawing
the tickets held by the members will
be placed in a drawing box and a number drawn out, called three times and
if not claimed, another number will
be drawn out, this number will be
called out three times and so on until
the fifty prizes have been claimed.
Those of the members who find lt
Inconvenient to attend the drawing
are requested to write their name ou
also most ably carried out. A selection was rendered by the School Orchestra under the leadership of H.
E. Murray. The formation of the orchestra has been a source of pride to
the parents and general public, and
the selections were much appreciated
A tableau entitled "The Shepherds
and the Angel's Visit" was most effective, conveying to all the beautiful
spirit of Christmas and its significance. Barbara Grant appeared as
the Angel while Joseph Ducca portrayed the shepherd.
Also creditable to the Intermediates
was "Cinderella" Including a Roger
de Coverley dance and parade of the
Wooden Soldiers. The chief characters In the play were Audrey Gear,
Lillian Pickettl, Catherine Brown, Agnes McKinnon, with Bryson Parnham
as the "Prince Charming." The
"Rag Dolls" were also much enjoyed, Josephine Welch playing the Mother's part.
Numbers Contributed by Seniors
Those Seniors taking part ln tbe
Gypsy Song and Dance especially excelled themselves, as this number of
the program was most admirably given, the enthusiasm ot the audience
being manifest by the tumultuous applause for an encore. Special mention should be made of the 'The Quack'
a dialogue in which the principal part
of the doctor was protrayed by Norman Hill. Utterly lacking In self
consciousness or "stage fright," Norman delighted tbe audience by the excellent caliber of his acting which was
indeed remarkable for one so young.
Norman Frelone took tbe part of the
college chum ln the dialogue and also did splendid work. We must also
make mention of the 'Death of Nelson'
(Continued on  Page  Seven)
MISS MORDY RESIGNS
To consider tlie resignation of .Miss
M. Mordy who has accepted a position
on the teaching staff at New Westminster, her duties to commence at
the termination of tbe Christmas holidays, a special meeting of the Board
of School Trustess was called last
Monday evening. With the exception
of Trustee Maxwell all members of
the Board were present. Miss Mor-
dy's resignation was accepted, and
Miss Beatrice Bickle was appointed
ber successor, she being the most eligible applicant for the position.
3h $i 3ft 3ft 3ft
UNION BAY NOTES
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Glover returned from Victoria and Vancouver
on Thursday where they have been
spending two weeks' vacation.
Miss Bailey and Miss Davis of the
teaching stall' will spend the holiday
at their homes in Ladysmith.
Miss Redding will spend the Christmas holiday In Victoria.
Mr. A. Ellis spent last week end
in town.
Mr. E. Searle, Jr., of Vancouver arrived here on Saturday and will
spend a vacation with his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. E. T. Searle.
Mr. A Auchlnvole and Mr. William
Marshall left town Thursday morning.
«   «  «   «   «
School Concert.
On Wednesday evening last the
Union Bay School children held an enjoyable concert in tho old school
hall, It being prettily decorated for
the occasion with bright colored festoons and evergreens. The lengthy
and enjoyable program consisted of
songs, recitations, drills, dialogues,
etc. all of which items were very well
delivered and Indicative of much preparation on the part of both pupils
and teachers. The evening was climaxed by the appearance of the proverbial Santa Claus who distributed
numerous gifts from a gayly decorated Xmas tree.
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Benefit Tea Was
Great Success
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF
WREATHS AND SPRAYS
the back of the ticket and give lt to.
a friend who will be present at the j Mr8' J' Humpreys;  Mr. aud Mrs   J
II. Matecr; Mr. and Mrs. A. Aui'liin-
drawing,  in  this way each member
will get his prize if his is the number
called.
It gives me great pleasure to have
The year 1924 In the life of the Association has been one of the best,
even though at times it has been difficult to maintain a balance between
tlie Income and the expenditures, the
management of the Association have
always looked towards the Interests
of the Association and its members
at all times.
However the finances have maintained In that state which has permitted the Board to do things this year
which have bee,, on the table for
more than two years, and they feel,
that at the conclusion of their term of
office that the condition of affairs are
ln flrst class shape.
I wish to take this opportunity to
thank each member of the Board and
the members of the various committees for their hearty cooperation and
support and their help, to me during
my term of ollice, and to offer, on
behalf of the Board slncerest compliments ot the season.
The annual meeting for the election
of officers for the year 192B will bo
held In the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Sunday evening December 21st at 8:15
o'clock. I    The firewardens and firemen would
In conjunction with the meeting appreciate the co-operation of the
the Board will hold tho Grand Xmas householders of Cumberland, in case
Drawing at which there will be fifty. of fire during the cold spell, by turn-
good prizes drawn for. off  all  water  taps  ln  their  homes,
The drawing will be conducted ln otherwise, the pressure available for
the same manner as In previous years,' lire lighting purposes would be grcat-
namely ths stubbs corresponding to ly diminished.
Mrs. Thos. Hudson and family of
Union Bay, acknowledge the following wreaths aud sprays:
Cumberland Lodge No. 26 A.F.&A.M.
Cyprus Chapter No. 10; Native Sons
of Canada Post No. 3; Government
Telegraph Service; Masonic Emblem,
Mr. Thomas Irvin, Vancouver; Official
Members B.P.O.E. No. 60; Gizeh Emblem, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, Bayne
Sound; Cribbage Club, Union Bay;
Official Brethren Hiram Lodge No. 14,
A.F.&A.M.; Fraser & Home, Union
Bay; Mr. and Mrs. Con Relfle; Mr,
and Mrs. E. F. Searle; Mr, and Mrs.
Wm. Merrifield; Mr. and sMrs. C. DeCouer; Mr. and Mrs. Len Piket; Mr.
and  Mrs.  Wm.   Henderson;   Mr.  and
MARY DAVIS
BECOMES BRIDE OF
JOSEPH MONKS
vole; Mr. and Mrs. Arnold .Mathewson; Mr. and Mrs. Neal McFarlane;
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Weeks; Mr, and
Mrs. Hooper; Mr. and Mrs. W. Mar-
served in the capacity of pres dent of    .  „   .,        ...     _  „      , ,    ,,
.■.„     ...j... j ..... .,  'sholl; Mr. and Mrs. D. Renwlck; Mr.
the Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association   and   I   again   wish   to
thank all those who have helped and
given me their support during the
past year.
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association.    A. J. Taylor, President.
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IN CASE OF FIRE
and Mrs. L. Magnone; Mr. and Mr. A.
Hurst; Mr. C. Dalton; Mr. Fred Pickard; Mr. Joe. Hudson; Mr. A. A,
Davis,
Sprays—Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Wilkinson; Mr. and Mrs. D. Haggart; Mr.
B. Renwlck; Mr. and Mrs. S. Abrams;
Mr. and Mrs. S. Brown; Mr. and Mrs.
G. Davis.
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PROGRESSING  FAVORABLY
The many friends of Mr. J. J. Po*.-
ter, Chairman of the Board of Works,
will be pleased to learn that he Is progressing favorably after having underwent an operation at tho Cumberland Hospital this week.
A very pretty wedding was solemnized last Monday evening at 8 o'clock
when Rev. James Hood performed the
ceremony which made Mary, only
daughter of Mr, and Mrs. J. D. Davis
of this city the bride of Joseph Monks,
son of Mr. and Mrs. James Monks of
Minto.
In the nelghborhod of fifty friends
and relatives of tho bride and groom
were present at the wedding which
took place at the home of the bride's
parents. The bride looked vory
charming in a gown of white brocaded
silk, fur trimmed and carried a bouquet of pink  roses  and  carnations.
The afternoon tea and home cooking sale held last Saturday afternoon
at the Fraternity Hall by the Pythian
Sisters Lodge was a splendid success,
and in consequence a goodly sum was
realized for the benefit of the Old
Man's Home and the Orphanage, During the afternoon the drawing for the
prizes took place, the successful winner of the delicious Christmas Cake
being J. Watson; Mrs. H. Harrison
succeeded In winning the second prize
and Mrs. George Shearer the third.
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Mrs. T. A. Barnard of Nanaimo vis
ited town the beginning of the week
and was the guest of Dr. and Mrs. G.
K. McNaughton.
P. T. Association
Was Addressed
By Mrs. Barnard
The members and visiting friends
of the Parent Teachers Association
enjoyed a most Interesting and instructive address last Monday evening when Mrs. T. A. Barnard president of the P.T.A., at Nanaimo visited the Cumberland association at Its
regular monthly meeting. Mrs. Barn
ard was also at one time president
of the P.T.A. at New Westminster and
Is well qualified.
Slio chose as her subject "Domestic
Science in our Schools" and being
herself a real enthusiast. It was almost Impossible to avoid being converted to her views on^the subject.
The speaker said that she considered
the first step towards making Domestic Science an institution In tha
schools should be a Supervisor of Domestic Science who would visit all the
Provincial Schools along that line just
as Mr. Kyle, Supervisor of Technical
Education does the manual training.
It was very sad but true state of affairs that in many cases while men
were being modcrlzed to twentieth
century requirements, women
were being left hopelessly behind In
the 18th century "Home economics"
for that name was really more applicable than "Domestic Science."
Mrs. Barnard said, should be included along with manual training on the
regular curlculura of studies prescribed for the students throughout
the province. If a girl were taught
home economics in the school, sho
was much better equipped to some day
take charge of a home of her own,
and that it was a decided asset to
health, for it gave her a clearer understanding ot food values and combination than nay other training could
give. The mentality and mortality
of our race depends upon Its physical
fitness" emphasized tho speaker, "and
it is up to we parents to see that our
children are kept physically fit."
Mrs. Barnard said that in Nanaimo
schools they bad splendidly equipped
classes of domestic science and manual training, aud that they were effecting wonderful results. Statistics
given by the speaker made a humorous appeal to the audience when sho
said that 98 per cent of the world's
earnings was stated to be attributed
to men; the other two per cent, to
women; yet It was proved that 87 per
cent of the earnings were expended by
women. Since women were responsible for the expenditure of such a high
percentage it was only logical tbe
speaker said that they should be
trained to expend it to the best advantage. Home economics provided
just such a training—a training in pro
curing the best possible food values
In the most economic manner. Mrs.
Barnard closed her interesting address with nn appeal to the P.T.A.
that they do everything possible to
attain classes In Home Economics and
(Continued on Page Seven)
Combined Choral Societies Rendered
'Excellent Concert Tuesday Last
At the Ilo-Ilo Theatre last Tuesday evening the combined Choral Societies of Cumberland and Courtenay
rendered their first concert of the
season. While the audience was not
a large one, due no doubt to weather
conditions, It was nevertheless an ap-
She was attended as bridesmaid by | prcclatlvc one. Approximately seventy members took part In  the per-
.MIss Jessie Maxwell who was prettily
gowned ln blue silk with radium lace
trimming. The groom was supported by Mr. Frank Stevens of Courtenay
After the ceremony a most enjoyable
supper and reception was held, the
table being centered by the wedding
cake and beautiful bridal roses. Mr,
ond Mra. Stopford, of Vancouver,
uncle and aunt of the bride proved to
be splendid entertainers, being tho
scource of much amusement and gaiety, by their expressions of wit and
general circulation, of fun. Among
the guests present were Mr. Monks
and tamlly, Mr. and Mrs. T. Monks,
Bevan; Mr. and Mrs. A. Monks, Mrs.
Whltehouse and son; Mra. Farmer,
Mr. and Mrs. Gear, Mrs. Gear and son;
Mr. and Mrs. Eccleston, Sr., Mr. and
iMrs. Eccleston Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Ronald, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor, Mr. and Mrs.
Maxwell and tamlly, Mrs. A. Sommerville, Mr. and Mrs. McNeil, Mrs.
Hudson and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Parkinson, Mr. and Mrs. White and
son, Mr. W. G. Pelrco, Mr. and Mrs.
Loblcy, Mr. and Mrs. Gomn and Mr.
F. Covert.
formancc, and the splendid manner ln
which the various numbers of the program were delivered reflects great
credit upon thc conductor, Mr. C. W.
Sillence. He has evidently Inst no
opportunity of training thc members
to understand his baton, the perfect
rytlnnn and harmony of the numerous voices being very commendable.
Mrs. Tribe Nol Able to Attend
At the commencement of thc evening's performance Mr. Sillence announced that due to Illness Mrs. Tribe
of Courtenay would not be in attendance, and that .Mrs. Ben Hughes ot
Courtenay had very kindly consented
to fill her place. This was much appreciated by the audience as were the
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DOUBLE BOAT SERVICE
The SS. Princess Patricia will operate a double boat service on December 24 and 26, this for tho convenience of holiday passengers.
spcndld selections rendered by Mrs.
Hughes during the evening. She has
a rich soprano voice and chose as her
first selection "Sink Red Sun" graciously replying to tho profound applause by the "Cuckoo" Song. Tho
singer was at her best In "May Morning" and as an encore sang "In an Old
Kushioncd Town."
Mr. Georgo Gallagher was the other
artist of the evening. He has a splen
did baritone voice and delighted tho
audience by singing "The Watchman"
(Squires) and "Thc Bandolero" (Leslie Stewart) replying with "Absent"
and "Philosophy" as encores. His
selection of songs greatly pleased tlio
audience Judging from tlio manner in
which they were received.
Splendid work was demonstrated
by the choir itself In the various numbers. Spofforth' "Hall Smiling Morn"
was very well delivered and much enjoyed. In the selection "Oh Italia"
the choir was perhaps at Its best, the
attack and voice control being very
praiseworthy. Scott's "Ole Undo
Moon" was more along the lighter ordor of singing and was well received
by the audience.
The singing of that old English
folk song "To Cella" by the male
voices of the choir was splendidly
rendered as was "A Nocturne" by the
ladles. Mrs. L. H. Finch of this
city was accompanist, and filled the
role In her usual pleasing manner. PAGE TWO
TBE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20.   1924.
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Only 4 More Shopping Days
Give Something
That Is   Useful
Before Christmas
Give Something
That   Is   Useful
:**HEE.*ar3iSIM3KJHEraie
giBHISISIElBIEI
Don't leave your Christmas shopping 'till the last minute but come early while our lines
are full and the assortment good. You will find this store the mecca for this Christmas
shopping, and to make this a real Christmas for all, we have made special prices on all
Merchandise for this occasion. Space will not permit us to mention all the lines and gifts
but below we mention only a few.
DRY GOODS DEPT.
Ladies' Fur trimmed Gloves, in
Brown .ind Light Grey, all sizes
a real gift flJO  PA
Per pair   *\)sii*0\J
Ladies' Long Suede Cloth Gloves
in different shades d»A AA
Per pair   fP&t\)\J
Ladies Brushed Wool Sweaters,
different styles and (J»yJ AE
colors.     Special .... ty^&O
Ladies Brushed Wool Tuxedos
all sizes and in several colors.
Special <}»9 AC
Price   tPrnWltVO
Silk Knit Sweaters, d» A AC
Up from    «jV±«t/V
Ladies' Silk Hose, different colors and shades.     Special Price'
$1.15 to $1.95
Handkerchiefs, a nice gift for
Ataas (P-J   QC
Special per box .... «pi-»00
Ladies Envelopes d»A Aff
Special Price   tyUttjO
Ladies' Step Ins d»-| AC
Special Price   tP-L.t/V
Artvl Cable Yarn for Swaatera
special am AP
Per box   UpOtVO
Dress Goods—Home Spun Silk
Special C|K/»
Per yard   UOls
Pongee Silk. Special per yard.
$1.25   and   $1.95
Crepe De Chine in several shade3
Special price at d»Q (T A
Per yard  -   «p£.t#U
Silk and Wool Crepe, a fine gift
for dress. Special d»i f7(?
Per yard   tpl.l V
Girls' and Children's Gifts
Sweaters, Stockings Neck Scarfs
and   many   other   articles   at
Special Prices
MEN'S FURNISHINGS DEPT.
Xmas Suggestions
Ties in many beautiful shades.
50c to $1.50
Men's Neck Scarfs in Silk and
Wool at all prices.
Belts, plain and initial buckles,
a good assortment
75c to $1.50
Handkerchiefs, pure Linen, each
40C and 50C
Paragon Handkerchiefs, in lovely colorings, 35c. each C*-1
3 lor «Pl
Men's Gloves. Yes, folks we have
a big stock. Kid, Mocha and
Wool.     Prices range per pair
$1.00 to $3.00
W Men's Socks in Silk and Wool,
«r with fancy stripes   and   plain.
Sr Priced to sell at per pair
I 75c ,o $1.25
Slippers—Men's all Wool, Leath
er Soles House   Slippers,   nice
and cosy
Special per pair
$2.65
50c
Men's socks 100 per cent Pure
Wool, in all shades, the best sock
in Cumberland at
Per pair 	
Sweaters, almost any style and
all at Special Prices, lowest in
town at d»Q        (]»-| A
Each     «pO. to «PlU
Men's and Boys' Suits and
Overcoats
What about a suit or overcoat
for Xmas? Our prices will be
right and will guarantee every
garment. Come in you men,
get acquainted with our goods.
Shoes and Slippers
Men's Brown and Black Leather
House Slippers, flexible soles. A
useful gift
Special per pair
Sets of Suspenders„Garters and
Arm Bands at attractive prices.
Many other lines to choose from
in Men's Slippers
Boys', Girls' and Children's
Slippers. We have them all and
at prices which will seem like a
Xmas gift. Trot home a pair
of these for your children. They
will like the'w these cold nights.
Men's and Boys' Shoes
What about a pair of nice Leckie
Boots or Astoria, Murray's,
and Tread Rite Boots for Xmas'.'
Special Prices on all lines,
$2.65
E
Ladies'   Dresses—In Crepe   De
Chine, Satin and Silk, clearing
out at real Xmas prices i
Specially at 	
$25.
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS
WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY OF WISHING OUR MANY
PATRONS A  BRIGHT AND HAPPY  CHRISTMAS  AND A
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR.
A big assortment of Ladies
Coats at attractive prices. Do
not fail to look over our Ladies'
Ready-to-Wear Goods. You
will be amply repaid.
Travelling Goods
What about a good Trunk, Suit
Case    or    Club    Bag?       Our
prices will please you.
Caps Galore, in Men's and Boys'
Prices range from
$1.50 to $3.00
Grocery Department
You will find our Grocery Department the best in town. We carry only the best and you
get it at the lowest prices. We have anything and give the best service. Stock up your
wants for Christmas -- Candies, Nuts, Oranges, Xmas Stockings for tree, Cigarettes, Cigars
and Smoking Tobacco put up especially for Christmas gifts. Order early and get delivery.
The Mercantile Store Company
The General Store With a General Purpose
m
**M SAT-TODAY,   DECEMBER   20,   1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B.C.
iP
PAGE THREE
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
EXPLOSION OF COAL OIL
LAMP SETS HOUSE AFIRE
COURTENAY, Dec. 17.—But for the
very smart response of the City Fire
Department on Tuesday evening, it
is probable that the home ot Mr. anil
Mrs. R. R. McQuillan on Union Bay
■BILL** BARBER
.SAYS
vondIri
HAT THEI
IGERMAN
(COUNTER-   ,
IFEITERS ARU
I DOING FOR
1A LIVING    ,
[THESE DAYS.]
"Vi   >
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
Road would have been destroyed. Fire
was started by the explosion of a
coal oil lamp in one of the rooms used
by Mr. Harry McQuillan which forms
the upper part of a building a few
feet from the house, the ground floor
of which is used for storage purposes.
Harry lost nearly all his clothes and
personal effects, and he also lost no
lime in turning In the alarm as soon
as he realized what had happened.
Owing to tho fact that the city
water had been off for some hours
during the day, anxiety was felt thai
Ihero might be a lack of this very useful commodity at the critical time.
The pressure, however, was good anil
the firemen very soon overpowered
the blaze and had the situation completely in hand.
Do You Know?
THAT thousands of peoplo aro right
HOW free from stomach suffering been uso they lake a little Jo-To now
and then. Jo-To will give relief from
all forms of stomach misery in two
minutes. Jo-To sold at all Drug
Stores.
SEA GULLS SWORM
ABOUT COURTENAY
COURTENAY, Dec. IC—Prior to
the sudden drop ln the temperature,
the sea gulls in Courtenay have been
more numerous during the week than
for a long time. Thousands of them
were to be seen wheeling round in
the air and dotting the green fields
that skirt the river. The gulls are
attracted here hy the presencp of
dead salmon that have fulfilled their
mlsison of spawning, and unlike the
Scotch Salmon, that returns to the
sea to "cleanse" as do the trout also,
these salmon deposit their eggs in the
led of tbe streams and then undergo
a lingering death process In the
water.
The sea gulls have been having a
great feast of fish during the last few
weeks, and they have evideutly advertised the good tidings amongst their
friends far and wide. Sometimes the
birds do not wait for the fl3h to die.
The other day a good sized salmon,
ventured lino suullu,v water alu.it;
siue Mill Street, when oue ot the largo
grey gulls suuuemy descend, auu
lauding on the llsh started a battle
royal which lasted some minutes. The
large fish struggled furiously*to escape the cruel and powerful beak,
and eventually escaped Into deep
water; but the great grey gull got the
"decision" because before the fish
made his get away, a choice slice was
cut off its back by the sharp curved
beak of the attacking flyer.
MS MS MS MS MS
MONDAY NIGHT
SET RECORD FOR
COLD SPELL
responsible for this condition
snow was blocking the intake and
has been giving the city authorities
considerable trouble during the week.
Oh, yes! It may be nice and bright
and snappy; but—rain for ours, every
time, please.
MS MS f MS MS
POTATO GROWERS'
MEETING IS
POSTPONED
mm
The mains of the late Mr. Andrew Kirk-
wood were borne to their last resting
place on Saturday last. The funeral
service was conducted by the reverand
.Mr. W. T. Ueattle at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. James Ledgerwood in this
city. Interment took place at tbe
Presbyterian cemetery at Sandwick.
The late Mr. Klrkwood, who was In
his eighty-ninth year leaves a widow,
three sons and three daughters. Theae
are Messrs Wesley, Thornton and W.
II. Klrkwood;  and Mrs.    James    W.
COURTENAY, Dec. 17.—Oh, Boyn!
Wasn't she nippy Monday night? How
did you like "thawing out" the water
pipes only to find that there was no
water In thc main pipe. Inquiries ut
the City Hall brought forth the information that large quantities of
snow coming down Brown's River was
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls; 1S4X Courtenay
Office: 159 Cumberland
Greet Your Friends
By Long-Distance
When a friend lives miles away and a personal visit is
out of the question, there is no more cordial way of
extending the compliments of the season than by longdistance telephone.
Special rates exist after 8:30 o'clock at night.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
Eat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives
the poison from the system.    He that ls hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the
devil anil to ent the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
Mutries
Xmas Specials
When we say "Bargains" we mean Real Bargains.
We are out for your "Xmas Trade" with the greatest
quality and price attractions we have ever seen.
For Want of space we cannot begin to list all lines and
prices but offer a few suggestions.
WRIST  WATCHES
Ladles'   Wrist   Watches
$8.25 to $70.00
LADIES' RINGS
Ladies'  Rings—10 and  14K.
plain signets, stone set, and
diamonds
75c. to $125.00
BROACHES
Silver, Gold Filled and Solid
Gold.
50c. to $30.00
HANI)  BAGS
Ladles'   Hand   Bags—Extra
Special Values
$2.95 to $15.00
WATCHES
Boys' Watches — Ingcrsoles
$1.65 to $12.00
WATCHES
Extra Special 7 Jewel Lever
movement in Nickle Case. A
real watch fully guaranteed
$5.00
Waterman's Fountain Pens,
Wahl Pens at 75c to	
BRUSHES
Men's Military Brushes Sol-
Id Ebony. Special Value
$4.00
CUFF LINKS
Gold  Filled and  Solid Gold
40c. to $12.00
TIE PINS
Solid Gold
$2.00 to $25.00
SMOKERS
Pipes, Tobacco Pouches and
Cigarette Cases. Very Special
Values
$1.00 to $10.00
CUTLERY
Stainless Steel Knives
Jidoz. Dessert Size $4.25
H doz. Dinner Size $4.75
FRENCH IVORY
Very    Special    Values     In
French Ivory.     Some prices
reduced to
Half Price
Eversharp Pencils and
  $10.00
REMEMBER 20 TO 50 PER CENT REDUCTION
UNTIL DECEMBER 31
G. R. MUTRIE
The Gift Shop
JEWELER
Gifts That Last
COURTENAY, Dec. 17.—The annual
meeting of the Comox Valley Pota'u I Ledgerwood of Courtenay, Mrs. Col-
Urowers' Association which was call- j °"Ke of LoB Angeles, Calif., and Mrs.
ed for Tuesday evening last, h,13 Conner of Deloralne. Sask. The pall
been postponed until eight p.m. lo-! bearerB wcro J|l-'asrs- w- Duncan, W.
night (Saturday). Thc Potato Grow-1 ni"lson' w* J* Carroll, James Jolly,
ers will meet In the Agricultural Hall j Hu«n Stewart and J. Crump. Mrs,
The severity of the weather was re-1 Ledgerwood and Mr. West Klrkwood
sponsible for this postponement, and '' were chlef am0"Ssl "'« mourners,
if it gets much  colder some of the' ^S   ME   MS   MS   MS
growers may contemplate thc lnstal- j COURTENAY STORES
latlon of heating systems    In    their
root houses.
MS MS MS MS MS
AUCTION SALE
WELL ATTENDED
COURTENAY,—In spite of the cold,
the auction sale of household furniture and large quantities of miscellaneous articles conducted by .Mr. Felix
Thomas, auctioneer, In the Agricultural Hall on Monday was well attended by residents from all parts of
the dlBtrlct. The auctioneer was successful ln disposing of some 250 lots
in less than five hours.
MS MS MS MS MS
BIG CROWD ATTEND
HEADQUARTERS
SOCIAL CLUB DANCE
COURTENAY, Dec. 16.—The dance
staged by the Headquarters Sochi 1
Club last Saturday night was attended by some hundred and fifty people
from nearly every corner of the Comox District. It was held under the
auspices of the Headquarters Club
for the benefit of the Hlks Christmas
Cheer Fund. As a result of this
dance tlie Elks fund is augmented by
the sum of thirty-seven dollars and
fifty cents.
Owing to recent alterations and Improvements, the Community Hall at
Headquarters is now the longest in
the district, being one hundred and
fifty feet In length; and affording
plenty of room to fox trot or two step
to the heart's content.
There were dancers present from
Union Bay, Courtenay, Comox, Mervllle and the management was delighted to welcome a host of Cumberland dancers too. An abundance of
refreshments were served In the old
fashioned Headquarters meal style.
The music was supplied by Moody's
Orchestra, which maintained a high
state of satisfaction throughout the
evening.
MS MS MS MS ME
ANDREW KIRKWOOD
IS LAID TO REST
GLITTERING WITH
CHRISTMAS CHEER
COURTENAY.   Dec.    17.—The   re-
-^sSlr-A
, mUtibtwtftimp
MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS DINNER A FEAST OF FEASTS
BY INCLUDING
COMOX CREAMERY JAM
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER
COMOX CREAMERY POTATOES
ik
Comox Creamery
Association
COURTENAY, Dec. 18.—As Christmas approaches all the stores and
business houses are assuming a very
festive appearance. The toy shops
and the candy stores, the grocers and
the butcher stores are all getting
dressed in their best. Small noses
are being pressed against cold panes
of plate glass as longing eyes gaze
with rapture on an electric train as
it dashes around curves through tunnels, or comes to standstill at the station all within the spacious window
of a hardware store. Otber small red
noses are very close to the windows
of the stores displaying delicious looking Christmas fruit—figs, dates, oranges, almonds and raisins, Christmas crackers and all the rest of those
wonderful things that have always
helped to make Christmas what it Is
from a child's point of view. By
no means last are the garage men and
the radio dealers in the matter of
Christmas decorations, for the Courtenay garages are looking very attractive to tlie passer by. And after
all, what would Christmas be without
the Christmas spirit of good will and
plenty, which can only be made general by each and everyone doing his
or her bit at this season.
Marshall
NEW PIANO. USUAL PRICE
$475.00
REDUCED TO
$350.00
TERMS—$25 CASH
Balance Two Years
ONE ONLY CABINET MODEL
PHONOGRAPH
SIMILAR TO ABOVE
AND SIX RECORDS
$75.00
TERMS $2.50 PER WEEK
Marshall
Music & Piano Co.
Courtenay—Cumberland PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, RC.
SATUMXAt,   WWBMBBR   20.   1M4
= Reason's ^reefmgs *
CORFIELD MOTORS, LIMITED *
A UTOMATIC WINDSHIELD CLEANERS
COOT ACCELERATORS
QVERDRIVE GEARS
D ADIATOR AND HOOD COVERS
I)ASH LAMPS
COOT WARMERS
QIL GUAGES
DEAR VIEW MIRRORS
pIGAR LIGHTERS
LI AND SWIPES
D ADIATOR SHELLS (NICKLE)
INDICATORS, SPEED
OPOT AND STOP LIGHTS
TOY CARS, TRUCKS, TRACTORS
MOTOR METERS
A NTI SKID CHAIN1
CEAT COVERS
WE HAVE ARRANGED A DISPLAY OF USEFUL AND PLEASING
GIFTS FOR CHRISTMAS AND INVITE YOUR INSPECTION.
<**--, .*. ■-> <
1     i ^.msr.'di tf J.'.     -    1
A
MERRY
CHRISTMAS
AND A PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
TO ALL OUR PATRONS
McLaughlin Buick
Cars-
G. H. PIDCOCK
AUTOS &i
EVERYTHING
ALWAYS KEEP
BATTERY IN UPRIGHT
POSITION
Always keep the battery In a vertical position ir taking it out or replacing it In the car. Sediment may
he ln the bottom of the Jars, and
tipping them may cause It to get between the plates and short-circuit
them.
MS MS MS
AUTOMOBILE
COMMANDMENTS
1—Drive on the right side of the
rond; It's just as good as the left.
2—Slow down when approaching a
crossing; it is nearly as dangerous
ns a railroad crossing.
,1—Look out for children. You can
never tell what they will do, and you
are always ln the wrong if you hit
one.
4—Try to help instead of hindering
the traffic officer; he Is there for your
good, anil he's got a tough job.
6—Be sure that your lights are not
defective or glaring; it's no joke driving into a blinding glare, as you yourself know.
6—Read and obey warning signs;
they are not put up as ornaments.
7—If you've got to speed do it
where it won't kill anybody but yourself.
8—When making minor repairs get
all wheels off the pavement and stop
where your car may be seen from both
directions; otherwise you may stop
longer than you anticipated.
9—Speeding around corners Is a
straight route to the hospital. Don't
race past a stopped car. Some day
the jury will call lt manslaughter.
10—Use discretion. The fact that
you had the right-of-way won't bring
anybody hnck to life, least of all your
self.
MS MS MS MS MS
HERE'S AN EASY WAY
TO WASH THE CAR
By attaching a sponge to the end
of a pipe, the burden of washing the
car will be greatly lessened. In this
manner the force of the water ia
broken, which prevents marring tha
finish of the car, and avoids splashing
In addition to this, only one hand ls
required, and Inaccessable places
are easily reached.—Automobile Digest.
■MS MS MS MS ME
ACCIDENT TOLL IS
BIGGEST IN WINTER
With weeping skies and slippery
pavements again In season, motorlstB
should not forget that this is the time
of the year when the accident toll
reaches Its peak, is a warning issued
by the Automobile Club of British
Columbia. Wet pavements, fogged
windshields and murky atmosphere
are heavy contributors to the accident
list, and all motorists should make
this the season for slow going.
The only remedy, according to Fred
J. Elklns, manager of the club, Is &
resolve individually by motorists to
"play safe." It means a consequent
reduction in speed and added precaution at the wheel.
"The speed limit ot safety on a
slippery pavement ls the rate of speed
at which the car will not skid when
the brakes are applied," Elklns said.
"Have your brakes equalized bo that
they will function on all wheels; have
them reliued if they are worn beyond the point of efficiency; apply
them at first with the clutch engaged
when you desire to stop, and go slow
Remember that it is better to get thero
late than not to get there et all."
MS MS MI ME *€
WAR ON STICKERS
FOR WINDSHIELDS
ON IN NEW YORK
Have a Radiophone for
Christmas
There'll be a lot of entertainment in the air on Christmas, with its Church Exercises and Beautiful Carols.
But here's a gift that will be remembered 365 days in
the year at a price that makes gift-giving easy.
SEE  AND  HEAR  THE   DE   FOREST  CROSLEY
"TRIRDYN BEFORE BUYING
We can supply you with any make of Radiophone.
Our prices are better than Vancouver.     Why go out
of town to purchase?
TERMS CAN BE ARRANGED
We install only the best Batteries in our sets
Cumberland Motor
Works
Because posters Including those of
bathing beauties, on the windshields
of automobiles, prevent 100 per cent
vision of the operator, all owners of
cars In New York state are being
warned to keep their windshields
clear. Continuation of the practice
of ornamenting the windshields will
cause a suspension ot licenses.
«* ME MS ME ME
ESTIMATE COST OF
AUTOS PER MILE
Experts at the Iowa State College
of Engineering are reported to have
compiled reliable estimates showing
that the average cost throughout the
country of operating an automobile
is 10.27 cents per mile. Busses, they
calculate, 24.10 for tbe one-man type.
Trucks are figured to average a cost
of 11.05 cents per ton mile.
ME ME ME ME *€
LAW WILL COMPELL
AUTOS TO STOP AT
GRADE CROSSINGS
The constant increasing numbers of
cities and towns passing ordinances
requiring motorists to stop^at through
streets or arterial highways, is the
forerunner of a law which will soon
become national in its scope, is the
opinion of F. E. Uradlleld. vice-presi-
r^^WCMSMSMSMEMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMEMSME^W       (continued on page Five)
^SMSMSMSMEMSMSMEMSMSMsMMEMS^-MPMEMSMSMEM
WHAT WOULD BE NICER THAN A RADIO SET FOR THE FOLKS
AT CHRISTMAS?
We have sets to fit your pocketbook, including
RADIOLAS - DeFOREST - NORTHERN ELECTRIC • ETC.
PHONE US OR COME IN FOR A DEMONSTRATION
Get Your Radio Equipment Where You Can Get Electrical Service
Sparks Co. (Courtenay), Ltd.
Phone 99
AUTO ELECTRICIANS AMD RADIO SPECIALISTS
COURTENAY
Phone 99
XWff Saturday. December 20, im.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE FIVE
■%<*
i
t
*i>
i
RADIOS
ELECTRICAL
(Continued From Page Four)        TUNE IN YOUR RADIO SET
dent of Velle    Motors    corporation,
Mollne, 111.
"There will, In the near future be
laws which will require all motorists
to come to a complete stop before
crossing the right-of-way of electric
or steam railroads. Such a measure
when universally adopted, will greatly decrease the number of fatalities
which occur each day at railroad
crossings," he says.
ME «« ME MS ME
MOTOR BUS TRAVEL
IN NORTH CAROLINA
Motor vehicles in North Carolina
are proving to be the residents' chief
means of travel. Passengers can
Journey from one end of the state to
the other by bus, spacious motor busses making regular schedules on
routes between seventy-five and 100
miles of length.
ME ME ME MS ME
AUTOMOBILE DRIVERS
SHOULD UNDERSTAND
RULES OF THE ROAD
The most Important thing about any
rule of the road ls that everybody
must know it heart. In this country the rule of the road Is to pass
other vehicles on the right and to
overtake them to the left; in Europe,
the general rule ls to pass to the left
and overtake to the right. Either
rule works very satisfactorily If everybody driving and walking understands lt; but imagine an Englishman
trying to drive on the left hand side
of Fifth Avenue, New York, or an
American trying to drive on the right
hand side of the Strand ln London.
The American habit of driving to
the right Is so firmly established in
everyone's mind that nobody thinks
of doing anything else; if every rule
of the road were as well known mid
obeyed with the same care there
would be very few traffic accidents.
Thing of the Past
We can all remember when all the
cars in this country had right hand
drive. It took some manufacturers
a long time to see that when the rule
is to pass on the right the best place
for the driver is on the left side of the
seat. There is a perfectly good reason for this. When two vehicles with
left hand drives pass each other on
the right both drivers see clearly what
Is going on. If one is overtaken
trom the left a slight turn ot the
head shows the driver in front what
Ib coming.
The essential thing about safety in
traffic, speaking ln the broadest
terms Is that every driver shall let
the other fellow know what he Is going to do—and let him know before
he does lt. A signal given just before you are about to make a turn,
or to stop, or a signal made after you
have turned, or stopped, is only an
aggravation to other drivers and is
as useless as if It had never been
made. A careful driver ls over careful to make a clearly understandable
signal, well in advance ot any change
of direction or stop that he is going
to make.
It goes without saying that It Is
not enough that an understandable
signal shall be made by a driver. It
must be seen and understood by other
drivers, If It is to be of value. This
makes it necessary for everyone to
drive In rtafiflc so that he can see the
signals made by the driver tn front.
If a driver overtakes another driver
on the right he cannot see the front
man's signal made from the left hand
side of the. front car. If a man makes
a definite signal that he Ib going to
turn to the right, the driver too close
behind him and on the right fails to
see him; and trouble results. In
these matters as in all others dealing
with safety ln traffic there is a mutual obligation.
Common senBe demands .that all
signals shall be given ln ample time
and that they shall make an unmistakable indication of Intention it demands Just as much that all driven
shall be on the alert for the signals
of others and that they shall never
get into such a position that they cannot see signals whcn given.
Intelligible signals made ln season
and properly observed, and heeded,
are among the very first common
sense rules of the road.
In speaking of vacuum tube receiving sets we might compare them to
phonographs. They are similar in
the respect that both offer to the listener a reproduction of music and the
human voice. Both may also be
started and turned off at will. Beyond these points thore Is a vast difference. The phonograph Is a machine that requires but little care,
starts with a tourh of the finger and
continues to work without the need of
attention until stopped either automatically or by the user. A vacuum tube
receiving set, on the other hand, usually causes some annoyance to the
average layman. Unlike the phonograph It requires attention and tho
operator ls never sure whether it will
keep Its party manners throughout a
program. What Is more, a certain
length of time is necessarily spent in
tuning or twirling the knobs, so to
speak, before anything desirable is
received. For a visitor the fun usually begins with the tuning, the
amusement coming eventually with a
reception of a concert. Also, the
change of phonographic amusement
requires but the change of a record
while, with a radio receiving set, to
attain this same object it ls necessary
to re-tune and pick up another station.
It has been the attempt of radio engineers and manufacturers to duplicate, the simplicity of the phonograph
in vacuum tube receiving sets. Some
admirable work toward development
ln this line has been done, but so far
no receiver has been placed on thu
market that can accomplish this feat,
and it will evidently be some time before one does appear.     The question
then arises, what means can be applied to prevent vacuum tube receiving sets to attain satisfaction of operation?
One of our local distributors of radios claims that a very common fault
with many people who operate receiving sets, and this is done unnecessarily, is that they allow their sets to
whistle and are not aware that this
interferes with and can be heard In
other receiving sets in the immediate
locality.. This can quite easily be
overcome by simply turning the volume control or tubes down. If you
set ls allowed to whistle It will stop
many low powered broad casting stations from coming ln clean on your
neighbor's Bet.
ME MS ME ME ME
RADIO IS TAUGHT
IN SLEEP BY
PHONES ON EARS
Teaching the novice how to Bend
and receive radio code messages more
speedily be giving him Instructions
while he sleeps, is a method recently
adopted and said to be proving successful at a naval air-training station. Before retiring at night, the
student puts an ordinary headset of
telephone receivers over his ears.
All night long skilled operators semi
messages, usually ten words a minute in excess of the student's capacity. The next day in his con-
Bcious hours, it Is reported, the beginner is able to transcribe communications at the speed they came to him
during his sleep, and to send code
words faster than the day before.
Some committed to memory passages
ot literature flashed to them while
they slept.
MEMEMPS*«MEMS
MEMEMEMEMSMEM!
RADIOS!
 FROM $30.00 UP	
Over Twenty Sets to Choose From, Including
FREESHMAN
WESTINGHOUSE
GENERAL ELECTRIC
NORTHERN ELECTRIC
TERMS AS LOW AS $2.50 PER WEEK
MARSHALL
MUSIC AND RADIO CO.
Cumberland and Courtenay
LOOK!
We have just unpacked the swellest line of Table
Lamps, Shades, Candle Lamps, Etc., which have just
arrived from the east. The very latest in electrical
fixtures. Come and select yours early before the
Xmas rush begins.
Our Sporting Goods Dept. is still busy with all the
best Guns—Ammunition—Hunter's Clothing, Etc.
-RADIO-
-RADIO	
We sell reliable Radio Sets and Parts and service the
sets we sell.    Get your radio from a reliable firm who
know their business.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Court tn^y
1925 will be a
Chevrolet Year
WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY OF
THANKING OUR PATRONS FOR THEIR
GENEROUS SUPPORT IN THE PAST
YEAR, AND EXTEND OUR SINCERE
WISHES FOR A MERRY XMAS AND A
BRIGHT AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
Blunt and Ewart
Limited PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SATCIffiiAY.   MKBMBER  3ft.   lMsl
New Issue By C.P.R. Is Made
Available In Canadian Market
Company    Decides    to    Invite
Dominion    Investors   to
Take its Securities
SECURED BY  LAND SALES
Dealt)    Explains    Desire   to    Extend
Canadian   Holdings   of
Hallway's Securities
MONTREAL,—An olllcial announce
ment was issued following a meeting
of the Hoard of Directors of the Canadian Pacific Hallway of the issuance
by tlie company of $30,000,000 4% per
cent, note certificates, secured by deferred payments on lands.
Sot in Need of the Cash
Following is the statement as sent
out from the office of President E. W.
Beatty; "The company is not short ot*
funds by any means, Its bank account
being of very comfortable proportions
B.   P.   0.   E.
New Year's Eve
DANCE
GAIETY THEATRE COURTENAY, B.C.
Reserve This Date — Particulars Later.
but It has for many years been tho
company's policy to maintain a strong
position in its cash resources, and,
considering Hie magnitude of the enterprise, this is manifestly prudent.
Works of improvement in contemplation to provide lor its traffic and fur
the betterment of existing facilities
will require a considerable sum in the
near future, and to meet these expenditures ami to provide ample work
ing capital for other purposes the directors of the company have decided
to make an issue of note certificates
in much the same way as was adopted
in 11114, save that the issue will be of
a public character instead of being restricted to participation by its own
shareholders.
"In the belief that more extensive
holding of the company's securities
In Canada is desirable from all standpoints, the company has sold the
issue to a strong Canadian financial
group consisting of the Bank of Montreal, the National City Company, thu
Royal Bank of Canada, the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, the Dominion Securities Corporation, Wood, Gundy &
Company, and A. B. Ames & Compan./.
Decided to Puss up U.S. Market;
"Already a very wide distribution
is assured at a price to the public
which will make it an attractive Investment. It was quite open to the
company to secure the requisite funils
In the United States on terms equally
favorable, but in view of the interest
in the company's securities by Canadian  investors,  as  evidenced   by  thc
increase in the holdings of its common stock and bonds, the directors
were glad to be able to make the issue
a Canadian one."
These 4%% Secured Notes are one
of tlie highest grade and most thoroughly protected securities ever offered in the Canadian market. They
are a direct credit obligation of the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
and in addition are specifically seem Ml by Trust Agreement, under
wihch the Railway covenants to pay
to the Trustee land payments coming due to the Railway Company
totalling approximately $66,000,000.
This offering Is the largest single
piece of corporate financing ever undertaken in Canada. Prior to the
present year, all Canadian Pacific
Railway financing has been done
.abroad, principally in Great Britain
j or in United States, ln which nun -
; kets the company's securities rank as
\ market leaders. For example, in 1902
! the company's 4% debenture stock
isold In London at 118%, to yield only
:•, it't'/i nl ii lime when direct Dbmiu-
■ ion of Canada long term bonds were
selling at approximately the same
basis.
Following upon the success of thc
Dominion Government in refuundlng
its maturing War Loan"Issues in the
domestic market, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company Issued $12,000,-
000 Collateral Trust Bonds in tue
spring of the present year. Although
new to the average Canadian Investor,
these Bnnils quickly reached a price
comparable to the price of Dominion
New Issue
$30,000,000
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
Twenty Year 4V2% Sinking Fund Secured Note Certificates
Date of Issue December 15. 1924. Date of Maturity December 15, 1944.
Principal and semi-annual interest (June 15 and December 15) payable direct to holden by cheque negotiable at pur at sny
Branch in Canada of the Bank o[ Montreal.       Fully registered Note Certificates will be issued in denomination of
$100.   $500.   $1,000,  $10,000 and  $100,000.       Redeemable in whole or in  part  on any interest  data
on  six  weeks  prior .-intice at   102 and interest  up to and including December  15,   1929, and
at a declining premium ol % of \% during each five year period thereafter.
Legal investment for Canadian Insurance Companies.
TRUSTEE AND REGISTRAR: THE ROYAL TRUST COMPANY.
Transfer*  may be effected at the Registrar's offices or agencies in Montreal, Ottasva, Toronto,
Winnipeg,   Regina,  Calgary and Vancouver.
Mr. E. W.  Beatty, K.C, Prraident of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,  hns summarized his
letter of December 8, 1924. as follows:—
These Not: Certificates will be direct obligations of the Railway Company and have priority
over $33,335,254 Preference Stock and $260,000,000 Common Stock, representing an equity
at present market prices of approximately $460,000,000. The Preference Stock has received
4% dividends without interruption since its issuance in 1895. The Common Stock has paid
dividends continuously since 1882, with the exception of the year 1895, the rate since 1912
having been 10% per annum.
In addition Ihey will be secured by the assignment to the Trustee, by way <rf security, of all
unpaid purchase money or deferred payments owing or accruing due to the Railway Company
in respect of lands in the Provinces of Ufanitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and Bii'ish Columbia, sold or contracted to be sold by it prior to December 1, 1924. The anir.ur-i due or
accruing due to the Railway Company on December 1, 1924, in respect of said spies was
$66,000,000. The Railway Company will covenant to pay to the Trustee all monies, both
principal ar.d interest, less expenses and taxes paid to protect the security, received by the
Railway Company in respect of the said contracts. The Railway Company covenants that
it will not charge the lands in respect of which such deferred payments are or shall be due, so
as to prejudice in any manner the security hereby created.
Al! monies received by the Tnist.se will be utilized for the payment of interest on these Note
Certificates and thereafter as a Sinking Fund for the purchase and cancellation of flicse Note
Certificates at the best prices obtainable up to the tall price prevailing at the time of such
purchase. If Note Certificates cannot be so purchased the Trustee shall redeem the Note
Certificates by lot at the prevailing call price. The Railway Company will covenant that
in the fourth and each succeeding year the annual amount available for the purchase of Note
Certificates will be at least $300,000.
Thc Note Certificates will be issued under, secured by and subject to a Trust Agreement
between the Railway Company and The Royal Trust Company as Trustee.
The net earnings for the last five years, after paying all fixed charges, including interest on
Consolidated Debenture Stock and all other obligations, have been as follows:—
Year ending December 31, 1919  $31,320,863
"        "          "          "    1920  32,844,083
"        "         "         "    1921  33,169,867
 1922  33.5-15 140
"        "         "         -    1923  34,8S9:403
Yearly interest on these Note Certificates amounts to $1,350,000. The average yearly net
earnings for the last five years as above set forth amount to $33,155,873, or over 24 times
annual interest requirements on these Note Certificates.
These Sinking Fund Secured Note Certificates are offered if, as and when issued and received by sis, and sunject to tne
approval of all legal details by Messrs. Meredith, Holden, Heward At Holden. Trustee Certificates in interim form or Note
Certificates in definitive form will be available for delivery on   or about December 30,   1924.
Price 92.25 and interest, to yield W/%%
The Royal Bank of Canada
Wood, Gundy & Company
Harris, Forbes & Company
Limited
Matthews & Company
Limited
Osier & Hammond
The Bank of Nova Scotia
Banque d'Hochelaga
The Standard Bank of Canada
Bank of Montreal
The Canadian Bank of Commerce
Dominion Securities Corporation
Limited
Hanson Bros.
Nesbitt, Thomson & Company
Limited
Greenshields & Company
Imperial Bank of Canada
The Molsons Bank
The Sterling Bank of Canada
The National City Company
Limited
A. E. Ames & Company
R. A. Daly & Company
Rene T. Leclerc, Inc.
The Dominion Bank
Bank of Toronto
Union Bank of Canada
La Banque Provinciale du Canada
Use inftsmsatsocs coatajned in this advertisement Is based upon official statements and statistics en which we have relied In the purchase ol these
Note Certificates,   we do not guarantee but believe it to be correct.
of Canada Victory Loan Bonds. lt
Is not surprising, therefore, thut the
company hns arranged to offer this
larger issue in Canada. The offering is timely, inasmuch aa the Dominion Government issued only $50,-
000.000 of long terra bonds to replace
$107,000,000 of maturing Victory
Bonds, and it is evident that there is
available large sums of money whose
owners desire tlie highest graJe of security. The present offering of Canadian Pacific Hallway Securities will
meet these rcqiurements.
It is expected that the issue will he
quiokly absorbed by all classes of hi'
vestors.
f*3MaiaiSSMSiEsr''r..
J I SHALL NOT PASS ff
THIS WAY AGAIN    T
i!iiisj^a@jgjaE|gja^ia'3JBEE'SEiBEM^!liMt
I shall not pass this way again,
The thought is full of sorrow;
The good 1 ought to do lo-day,
I may not do to-morrow.
If I this moment shall withold
The help I might be giving,
Some soul may die, nnd I shall lose
The sweetest Joy of living.
Only the present hour is mine—
I may not have another
In which (o speak a kindly word.
Or help a fallen brother.
The path of Life leads straight ahead;
I can retrace it never;
The dally record which 1 make
Will stand unchanged for ever.
To cheer and comfort other souls,
And make their pathway brighter;
To lift the load from other hearts,
And make their burdens lighter;
This is the work we have to do;
It must not be neglected;
That we improve each passing hour,
Is of us all expected.
I shall not pass this way again
Oh, then, with high endeavor
May I my life and service give
To Him who reigns forever!
Then will the failures of the past
No longer bring me sadness,
And His approval smile will fill
My heart with joy and gladness.
T.WHERRY
SYNOPSIS (IF
LANDACIAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years ot age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, eondi-
tional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvemeat (or agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Lend Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing tbe Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Qor-
ernment Agent.
Records will be grauted covering
only land suitable tor agricultural
purposes, and whlcb ls not timber-
land, i.e. carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west ot the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre eaat ot that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, ln which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and Improvements made
to value ot $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed infoi niatlon see
tbe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for pur-
cnase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberlaud,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price ot first-class (arable) land Is $5
per acre, and second-class (graalng)
land $2.60 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands ls given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, Uie conditions Including payment ot
stumpage.
IIOMKSTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding SO
acres, may  be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a   dwelling    being
erected in the first year, title being
obtainable   after   residence  and   improvement   conditions   are   fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   industrial   purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Prov-
ince is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially Ires
permits are available for settlers!
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
BARGAIN IN NEWSPAPERS!
An Opportunity to Win $5,000
A Beautiful Art Calendar Free
The Islander has concluded an ar-
ragement with The Family Herald
and Weekly Star of Montreal by
which we can offer the greatest bargain to newspaper readers.
The offer includes a full year's
subscription to both papers, an art
calendar with a most beautiful picture subject ready for framing, and
ti) opportunity to win a prize of
$5,000 cash.
In the Federal Election of 1921
there were 3,119,306 votes cast out of
i total of 4,436,310 names ou the voters list.
How many votes will be polled In
tbe next Federal Election?
Tlie Family Herald and Weekly
liar are offering Ten Thousand Dol-
'ars in 94 prizes for tlle best estimates
md our arrangement with the pub-
ishcr of that great weekly gives ev-
iry Islander subscriber an opportun-
ty to make an estimate and perhaps
In the capital prize of $5,000. Somo
lerson will win. Why should it not
lie you?
Read This Bargain
The Islander costs $2.00 per year.
The Family Herald and Weekly
3tar costs $2.00 per year.
We now offer a full year's subscription to both papers, including a copy
of The Family Herald Art Calendar
ind the right to make one estimate in
The Family Herald's Election Contest.
All for $2.50
Estimates must be made at time of
ubscriblng, and no changes will be
permitted afterwards.
Evalin: "What's that nasty scratch
in your face, George?'
George: "That Isn't a scratch, dear
iltl thing,, that's a birth mark!"
Evalin: "A birth mark?"
George: "Yes. I was on the Aqultan-
ia last week, and Igot iuto the wrong
iierth by accident."
C/RINE
ftvt\ktttt EVES
'.fresha Tired Eyes
WritsMsinissCo..Chsato,<nErssCarslosk I
LAND ACT
10TICE OF INTENTION TO APPLT
TO LEASE LAND
IN NELSON LAND DISTRICT, Relate near Village of Royston Waters
if Comox Harbor, Nelson District.
subdivision of Lot 86 and Section 4
uid Section 6-A: Map No, — Take
■ollce that the Royston Lumber Com-
iany Limited, of Royston, B.C., oc-
■upatlon Sawmill and Timber dealers
ntends to apply for permission to,
ease the following described lands: —
Foreshore) on the North boundary of
larine Drive distant 50 ft. from the
Vest side of Royston Wharf: Thence
n a westerly direction following the
slorth boundary of Marine Drive and
ligh tide mark a distance of 1000 feet
o a post set on said North boundary
if Marine Drive: Thence at rlght-
inglcs North to approximately low
Ide mark .thence ln an Easterly direction, following low tide mark a
llstance of 1000 feet more or less.
Thence In a straight line to place of
■ommencement, and containing 10
teres more or less.
THE ROYSTON LUMBER CO. Ltd.,
per George K. Uchlyama.
Name of Applicant.
Eye-Strain Is
Painful And
Distressing
IT Is amazing why so many
persons submit to alt the distress and discomfort of eyestrain, when certain and Immediate relief can be so easily obtained.
IMPERFECT vision, headache,
nervousness and all the other
results of defective retractive conditions not only cause
you actual suffering but impair
your efficiency as well. You
are not as good or as useful a
member of society if a nervous-
leak caused by eye-strain Is sapping your energies away.
IF you have defective eyes
you know this to be true.
Can you think of any good
reason why you allow this to
continue? Is there anything
to prevent you from putting an
end to this difficulty of yours,
instantly and permanently?
DROP in and see me, I have
something    to    tell    you
about    your    eyes,    you
ought to know.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-6:00   OFFICE   7:30-9:30
P.M.       HOURS        P.M.
lit SATURDAY,   DECEMBER  20.   1924.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
<itt
PAGE SEVEN
What are you going to drink at
CHRISTMAS
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
ASK   YOUR   LOCAL  VENDOR  AND   DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
EI**MJ"Mlffl3ilffll!I**M
Silver Spring Brewery,? Limited
Victoria
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
F *      Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
TheSe BeerS the Products of Vancouver Breweries, Limited, are extremely
popular on the Island—because of their absolute purity, their wholesomeness, and their
fine "hops-and-malt" flavor.
and
U. B. C. Beer
On Sale at all Govt. Vendors
ANNUAL SCHOOL
CONCERT IS
WELL ATTENDED
(Continued From Page One)
COURTENAY RIVER
TRANSPORTATION
AGAIN CHIEF TOPIC
which was principally the work of
Division 1. These students devised
the scenes and plot as well as preparing the hats, wigs and' other parts
of the costumes. Very meritorious
work was displayed. Those taking
part were David Hutton, A. McKinnon, A. Mann, L. Leversedge and N.
Parnham.
The concluding number of the program was a. Minstrel Play in which
the Plantation owner (Fred Leversedge), his son, (N. Gomn), his college chums, (J. Hill, J. Sweeney, J.
Horbury), Izzy the Yankee (V. Marinelli), Fake, the Jew (S. Davis) and
tho Money Lender (J. Strachan) kept
the audience Intensely Interested and
entertained . Those teachers In
charge of the Senior training were
Misses Galllvan, Mordy, McKinnon
and Mr. H. E. Murray. Great credit
Is due the principal and teaching
staff for thc splendid training accorded the pupils, they being directly responsible for the splendid success of
the concert.
The program was as follows:
0 Canada.
Junior Grades—Dumbell's Drill;
Red White and Blue Drill; Fairies
Drill.
Intermediate Grades—Cinderella, In
eluding Roger De Coverley Dance, and
Parade of the Wooden Soldiers.
Rag Dolls; Orchestra Selection (by
School Orchestra); Tableau, "The
Shepherds and the Angel's Visit."
Senior Grades—Gypsy Song and
Dance; Dialogue "The Quack"; Deatli
of Nelson; Minstrel Play; National
Anthem.
COURTENAY, Dec. 16.—All members of the City Councl were on hand
at the regular meeting held in the city
hall on Monday night. With Mayor
McPherson in the chair, the prelim
Inary business was soon transacted
and once agaln the question of river
transportation occupied the attention
of the meeting. For two and a half
hours the very important matter was
discussed from all angles. It was
expected that some of the aldermeu
would perhaps have had some concrete scheme to lay before Mr. A. McGlUIs, the manager of the Vancouver-
Courtenay Transportation Co. Ltd., as
an alternative to the proposal made
by that gentleman recently. On this
occasion Mr. McGlIlis desired the city
of Courtenay to ascertain from tha
rate-payers If they were willing to
guarantee bonds on a boat for the
Courtenay River service to the extent of $35,000.
On Monday night, tbe Council decided by a three to two vote to give
the rate-payers an opportunity of expressing their opinion in the mattor.
This will take place in the form of
a plebiscite to be put at the same time
as the municipal elections on the 15th
of January next. While there are a
considerable number of people ln favor of going to any length, consistent
with sound business principles, for
the assurance of a continuation of the
liver service, much will depend ou
just in what form the plebiscite is
put before the people. Those aldermen ln favor of submitting a plebiscite to the rate-payers were Messrs
Cooke, mbleton and Pearse. Against
Messrs Fielder and Hagarty. Alderman Simms   being a share-holder ln
the    Transportation    Co.,    refrained
from voting.
The Lazo Electric Light extentlou
is now practically complete; and If
nothing unforseen occurs, some sixteen new consumers will be turning
on the electric limits lit their homes
Ul'pre thi sis Minted.
MRS. BARNARD
OF NANAIMO
ADDRESSES P.T.A.'
(Continued From Page One)
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
Jt.
EVERYBODY
..IS JOYFUL..
WITH
Nakagami
Gift Jewelry
Royal Standard Flour
Wild Rose Pastry Flour
Whole Wheat Flour
Graham Flour
Premium Certificates in 49's
and 24's ~
SOLD BY ALL GROCERS
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.,
Limited
COURTENAY
Manual Training for the Cumberland
Schools.
Expressions of Opinion
The president, Mrs. G. K. McNaugh-
ton, the,, asked that any expressions
of opinion or quesltons concerning th.)
subject bc made. The majority of
those present seemed heartily ln favor
of the movement. Dr. McNaughton
voiced his sentiments as being in accord with those expressed by the Nanaimo speaker and expressed the
hope that before long the School
Board would see their way clear to
Inaugurate these branches of study.
Since the Government would bear
fifty per cent of the expenditure in
this direction, even If the cost were
$1,000, only $500 would be the necessary expenditure for the city of Cumberland. It was pointed out to the
association by Mr. Sutherland that If
a domestic science and manual training teacher were procured by the city,
that he was of the opinion that il
could be arranged with Courtenay to
bear half the expenses. In this way
both schools would derive the benc-
lit at half the expense.
Miss T. Galllvan in giving an expression of views on the subject said
that she believed lt would be an incentive to many of the children to remain longer at school, for it was often
the case that If the pupil found him-
cslf backward in the classes he did
not wish to continue at school. Whereas It he or she became Interested in
these other branches of study( he
would In all probability make special
efforts along other lines on this account.
Principals Endorse Movement
The principal of the High School,
Mr. F. Shenstone, and of the public
school, Mr. G. E. Apps, expressed
themselves as being heartily In favor
of the movement in the Cumberland
schools, for they fully appreciated
the value of such a training to the
students.
Thought Curriculum Should be
Reduced
On being called upon for an expression, .Mrs. Banks, President of
the School Board asid that she scarcely knew which attitude to take. Listening to the very Interesting address
of Mrs. Barnard she could very much
see the force of Introducing Home Economics and Manual Training Into the
school work, but that the present cur-
riculin was quite extensive enough
and that If these subjects were to be
added she thought that some reduction should be made in the other
branches of study. However It was
pointed out by Mrs. Barnard that no
reduction had been made in the Nanaimo schools and that it had worked
out satisfactorily. It was decided by
the P.T.A. that every effort be made
In the near future to procure Manual
Training and Domestic Science
courses In the Cumberland Schools,
and a hearty vote of thanks waa tendered to Mrs. Barnard for her kindness
in delivering such a splendid address.
Miss Mordy Resigns
For some time past Miss Marjorie
Mordy has been acting as Secretary
of the Parent Teachers Association,
but due to the fact that she has accepted a position on the teaching
staff at New Westminster. It was
necessary to tender her resignation
at Monday's meeting. The president
and members of the association expressed much regret at the departure
of Miss Mordy and extended to her
their, best wishes ln her new undertaking. It was moved and seconded
that .Miss C. McKinnon, who ls now
acting as press representative of the
P.T.A. should be appointed successor
to Miss Mordy. However In the absence of Miss McKinnon no definite
decision was reached. The president
also announced that a new electric
stove had been Installed for the convenience of the association when serv.
Ing refresments.
A few Suggestions from
SWEATERS—Chappie Coat, Cardigan or Blouse style.
SCARFS—In Silk, Silk and Wool and All Wool.
APRONS—These   are   particularly  attractive,  from
50c to   $1.75
HOSE—Ladies' and Children's, in all grades.
HANDKERCHIEFS—Boxed,   from   25c.   to   $1.50.
Singly 10c. to   50c.
UNDERWEAR—A good practical gift.
MUSLIN GOWNS—Very dainty, in fact quite out of
the ordinary.
Combs, Barettes, Hair Ribbons, Purses, Beads, Fancy
Garters, Gloves, Collars and dozens of other things.
Small quantity of Toys to be sold at cost.
You are welcome to come in and look around.     You
will not be urged to buy.
Miss E. M. E. Johnson
Phone 177
P. O. Box 149
Masonic Block
Courtenay
JACK CANUCK
A   WEEKLY   MAGAZINE   of   what   the
people think, say and do
Grand Subscription
Campaign
$50,000
MORE OR LESS
IN CASH PRIZES
Free to Subscribers
A COMPETITION OF SKILL
How many words in the English language can you
make from the words:—
"Jack Canuck, Toronto"
No proper names are to be used. Webster's English dictionary
will decide.     In the event of ties, prizes will be divided pro rata.
YOUR SKILL MAY WIN YOU A FORTUNE
With your help we are going to make Jack Canuck the greatest
of all Canadian magazines, a magazine fearless In criticism, untrammelled by the big Interests, devoted to the common people.
OUR OBJECTIVE IS 100,000 NEW SUBSCRIBERS
Cut out the form below, fill In your name anil address, attach
it to your list of words, enclose the regular subscription price
of ?3.50 per annum nnd mall It to Circulation Department. Jack
Canuck Publishing Co. Limited, 319 Bay Street, Toronto, and
your little Investment may make you a fortune.
Mark your envelope "Cash Prizes."
The amount of money to be divided will be based on the number
of subscribers received, ln the proportion of CO cents for each
new subscription received. Thus, If the objective of 100,000
new subscribers Is reached, the amount will be $50,000.00, divided as follows:—
To tlle 1st subscriber sending in the largest correct list $i!ll,(MI0.(Ml
«    2nd " " " 10,(100.00
«    8rd « " " 5,000.00
«    4th is « it 8,000.00
"6th " " " 2,000.00
«    flth » tt ts 1,000.(10
«    ;ih « « « uosVhI
«    8th " " ■ 800.00
«    9th tt * u 200,03
Eighty prizes of $100.00 each 8,000.00
Total $50,000,011
EIGHTY-NINE PRIZES — 89 — EIGHTY NINE
Competition clos'eB on the first day of March, 1925 at 12 o'clock
p.m. Rush your entry and get a plnce among the big winners.
Circulation PcpnrtmenO, Jack (iiniick, DID liny Street, Toronto,
Bute	
Members of  the
Staff not allowed   Nome  •■• •
to compete      Address 	
Number ot words as per attached list 	 SATURftAV,   DECEMBER  20,  1924.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
iff
PAGE SEVEN
What are you going to drink at
CHRISTMAS
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
ASK   YOUR   LOCAL  VENDOR  AND   DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
ANNUAL SCHOOL
CONCERT IS
WELL ATTENDED
(Continued From Page One)
Silver Spring Brewery,?Limited
Victoria
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
; l      Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
TheSe BeerS the Products of Vancouver Breweries, Limited, are extremely
popular on the Island—because of their absolute purity, their wholesomeness, and their
fine "hops-and-malt" flavor.
and
U.B.C. Beer
On Sale at all Govt. Vendors
which was principally the work of
Division 1. These students devised
the scenes and plot as well as preparing the hats, wigs and other parts
of the costumes. Very meritorious
work was displayed. Those taking
part were David Hutton, A. McKinnon, A. Mann, L. Leversedge and N.
Parnham.
The concluding number of the program was a Minstrel Play In which
the Plantation owner (Fred Leversedge), his son, (N. Gomn), his college chums, (J. Hill, J. Sweeney, J.
Horbury), Izzy the Yankee (V. Marinelli), Fake, the Jew (S. Davis) and
tbe Money Lender (J. Strachan) kept
tbe audience intensely Interested and
entertained . Thuse teachers In
charge of the Senior training were
Misses Galllvan, Mordy, McKinnon
and Mr. H. E. Murray. Great credit
is due the principal and teaching
staff for thc splendid training accorded the pupils, they being directly responsible for the splendid success of
the concert.
The program was as follows:
0 Canada.
Junior Grades—Dumbell's Drill;
Red White and Blue Drill; Fairies
Drill,
Intermediate Grades—Cinderella, in
eluding Roger De Coverley Dance, and
Parade of the Wooden Soldiers.
Rag Dolls; Orchestra Selection (by
School Orchestra); Tableau, "The
Shepherds and the Angel's Visit."
Senior Grades—Gypsy Song and
Dance; Dialogue "The Quack"; Deatli
of Nelson; Minstrel Play; National
Anthem.
COURTENAY RIVER
TRANSPORTATION
AGAIN CHIEF TOPIC
COURTENAY, Dec. 16.—All members of the City Councl were on hand
at the regular meeting held in the city
hall on Monday night. With Mayor
McPherson in the chair, the preliminary business was soon transacted
and onoe again the question of river
transportation occupied the attention
of the meeting. For two and a half
hours the very important matter was
discussed from all angles. It was
expected that Borne of the aldermen
would perhaps have had some concrete scheme to lay before Mr. A. McGlUIs, the manager of the Vancouver-
Courtenay Transportation Co. Ltd., as
an alternative to the proposal made
by thnt gentleman recently. On this
occasion Mr. McGlIlis desired the city
of Courtenay to ascertain from tha
rate-payers if they were willing to
guarantee bonds on a boat for the
Courtenay River service to the extent of 136,000.
On Monday night, the Council decided by a three to two vote to give
the rate-payers an opportunity of expressing their opinion in the matte.
This will take place In the form of
a plebiscite to be put at the same time
as the municipal elections on the 15th
of January next. While there are a
considerable number of people in favor of going to any length, consistent
with sound business principles, for
thc assurance of a continuation of the
liver service, much will depend on
just in what form the plebiscite ls
put before the people. Those aldermen in favor of submitting a plebiscite to the rate-papers were Messrs
Cooke, mbleton and Pearse. Against
Messrs Fielder and Hagarty. Alderman Simms, being a share-holder in
Royal Standard Flour
Wild Rose Pastry Flour
Whole Wheat Flour
Graham Flour
Premium Certificates in 49's
and 24's ~
SOLD BY ALL GROCERS
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
-Jk£-
EVERYBODY
..IS JOYFUL..
WITH
Nakagami
Gift Jewelry
For all members of the family
and all your friends there in
some piece of gift Jewelry at
Nakagami's that will be the
most welcome sentiment.
All kinds of Jewelry and Fancy
Goods.
Specially Priced for Christmas
Trade.
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.,
Limited
COURTENAY
?*HP*«e*^P«^P«*^^
A few Suggestions from
SWEATERS—Chappie Coat, Cardigan or Blouse style.
SCARFS—In Silk, Silk and Wool and All Wool.
APRONS—These  are  particularly  attractive,   from
50c to   $1.75
HOSE—Ladies' and Children's, in all grades.
HANDKERCHIEFS—Boxed,   from   25c.   to   $1.50.
Singly 10c. to  50c.
UNDERWEAR—A good practical gift.
MUSLIN GOWNS—Very dainty, in fact quite out of
the ordinary.
Combs, Barettes, Hair Ribbons, Purses, Beads, Fancy
Garters, Gloves, Collars ar.d dozens of other things.
Small quantity of Toys to be sold at cost.
You are welcome to come in and look around.    You
will not be urged to buy.
Miss E. M. E. Johnson
the    Transportation    Co.,    refrained
from voting.
The Lazo Electric Light extention
is now practically complete; and if
nothing uuforseen occurs, some sixteen new consumers will be turning
on the electric limits tu their homes
lsi'ore thi sis Printed
« « « <c «
MRS. BARNARD
OF NANAIMO
ADDRESSES P.T.A.
(Continued From Page One)
Manual Training for the Cumberland
Schools.
Expressions of Opinion
The president, Mrs. G. K. McNaughton, then asked that any expressions
of opinion or questions concerning ths
subject bc made. The majority of
those present seemed heartily In favor
of the movement. Dr. McNaughton
voiced his sentiments as being In accord with those expressed by the Nanaimo speaker and expressed the
hope that before long the School
Board would see their way clear to
Inaugurate these branches of study.
Since the Government would bear
fifty per cent of the expenditure ln
this direction, even If the cost were
$1,000, only $500 would be the necessary expenditure for the city of Cumberland. It was pointed out to the
association by Mr. Sutherland that if
a domestic science and manual training teacher were procured by the city,
that he was of the opinion that it
could be arranged with Courtenay to
bear half the expenses. In this way
bpth schools would derive the benefit at half the expense.
Miss T. Galllvan in giving an expression of views on the subject said
that she believed it would be an incentive to many of the children to remain longer at school, for it was often
the case that if the pupil found him-
eslf backward in the classes he did
not wish to continue at school. Whereas If he or she became Interested in
these other branches of study, he
would In all probability make special
efforts along other lines on this account.
f Principals Endorse Movement
I The principal of the High School,
| Mr. F. Shenstone, and of the public
1 school, Mr. G. E. Apps, expressed
[themselves as being heartily in favor
of the movement in the Cumberland
schools, for they fully appreciated
the value of such a training to the
students.
Thought Curriculum Should be
Reduced
On being called upon for an expression, Mrs. Banks, President ot
the School Board asid that she scarcely knew which attitude to take. Listening to the very interesting address
of Mrs. Barnard she could very much
see the force of Introducing Home Economics and Manual Training into the
school work, but that the present cur-
rlculin wns quite extensive enough
and that If these subjects were to be
added she thought that some reduction should be made in the other
branches of study. However it was
pointed out by Mrs. Barnard that no
reduction had been made in the Nanaimo schools and that It had worked
out satisfactorily. It was decided by
the P.T.A. that every effort be made
In the near future to procure Manual
Training and Domestic Science
courses In the Cumberland Schools,
and a hearty vote of thanks was tendered to Mrs. Barnard for her kindness
in delivering such a splendid address.
Miss Mordy Resigns
For Bome time past Miss Marjorie
Mordy has been acting as Secretary
of the Parent Teachers Association,
but due to the fact that she has accepted a position on the teaching
staff at New Westminster. It was
necessary to tender her resignation
at Monday's meeting. The president
and members of the association expressed much regret at the departure
of Miss Mordy and extended to her
their^ best wishes in her new undertaking. It was moved and seconded
that Miss C. McKinnon, who Is now
acting as press representative of the
P.T.A. should be appointed successor
to Miss Mordy. However in the absence of Miss McKinnon no definite
decision was reached. The president
also announced that a new electric
stove bad been installed for the convenience of the association when serv.
lag  refresments.
Phone 177
P. O. Box 149
Masonic Block
Courtenay
ftft%%»fe»3»l»l»ddd&^
JACK CANUCK
A   WEEKLY   MAGAZINE   of   what   the
people think, say and do
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Number ot words as per attached list...	 PAGE EIGHT
TBI  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, & C
SATBBDAT.   DECEMBER   30,   1944.
SALE
CHRISTMAS
We are absolutely cleaning out our Christmas stock, giving our customers bargains when they want them most.
A Sale you can't afford to miss!
THE MOST
ACCEPTABLE GIFT
BHBISffliHBl^^
BOOKS  FOR  CHILDREN    l
AND ADULTS
Special Sale Discount of 10% (lit all
Children's books and reprints. Also
one lot ot Novels, valued up to $2.00
Sale  Price, each    98c.
HSIBIBE
XMAS STATIONERY        I
Brownies Folding from $2.05 to (IS
Folding Cameras from    $6.70
You can't buy these machines at a
lower price than we oiler them.
We carry only
GENUINE EASTMANS
SMOKERS' SUPPLIES
Our range of Fancy Christmas Boxes j
of Note Paper, Correspondence Cards, !
etc. is the most complete in the city j
anil prices have all been reduced for I
this Special Sale. I
This assortment must be seen to be
appreciated.
Regular prices from    60c.    to   $7.5')
Sale Price from -isle to  S5.96
DECORATIONS
Christmas  Tree  Ornaments,  Etc.
See our  complete range  in  prices
from 3 for 25c. up
Christmas Cards
Large Assortment from 2 for 6c.
Silver Plated Cigarette Cases,   Reg.
price $3.00 to $4.50.     Sale Prices
$05 to $3.10
CIGARETTE HOLDERS .......
We have a large assortment,     Reg.
prices from $2.50 to $3.00. Sale Price
$1.95 lo $2.65
Genuine French Ivory
French Ivory Hair Brush. Reg. $3.50.     Sale 	
French Ivory Hair Brush. Reg. $5.00.    Sale  	
French Ivory Hair Brush. Reg. $7.60.    Sale	
19 Piece French Ivory Manicure Roll. Reg. $22.50.     Sale
6 Piece French Ivory Manicure Roll. Reg. $3.50.     Sale ...
8 Piece Tortoise Shell Manicure Roll. Reg. $8.75.     Sale ...
Other Specials ln Combs, Jewel Boxes, Clocks, Etc.
Stock
.. $2.95
... $».2.">
... $U5
$17.95
.. $2.95
... $7.95
See large and complete
Genuine Waterman Fountain Pens
- ,|ft2£jBBJsi-» i^^m^^i
Buy the Pen that has Stood the Test of Time
Prices from $2.00 to $10.00
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
LEATHER GOODS
The gift to be. long remembered
LEATHER HAND BAGS
The latest exclusive designs, Fancy
Silk  Lining,  each   one   fitted  with
* mirror and change purse
$12.60 Sale Price   $9.9,)
$3.00 Sale Price  _  $2J">
$7.60 Sale Price   $5.95
UNDERARM BAGS
The   very   highest    Quality   Patent
Leather,   fitted   with   small   change
purse and mirror, lined with the best
Bilk lining in popular colors.
Reg. $4.00 Salo Price   $2.95
Reg. $0.50 Sale Price  $1.75
Reg. $10.50 Sale Price   $8.Ui
EVERSHARP PENCILS
Prices from $1.00 to $5.50
These make very good gifts for
young and old.
LANG'S DRUG STORE
FOR FATHER OR BROTHER
Leather BUI Folds
Leather Cigarette Cases
Tobacco Pouches, Cigar Cases
All ut Special Hale Prices
Soft Collar and  Handkerchief  Cases
(Leather)
Reg. $0.75  Salo Price   $5.25
Handkerchief Cases
Reg. $3.50 Sale Price  $2.95
GIVE HER CHOCOLATES
Our display of Fancy Boxes ot
Moirs, Ganongs and Neilsons
Chocolates consists of all fresh chocolates which we buy only direct from
the factory.
Prices range from 00c. to $12.60 box
Buy your Christmas Candies Here and
you will get Only the Best.
See our Window for Sale Prices on
Candies and Chocolates
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Extra Special
Full Pound Box of
Neilson Home Maid
Chocolates for 60c.
PERFUMES
Fancy Bottles in Christmas Boxes
Reg. from 60c. to $10.00
Sale Price 40c Ut  -  $7.95
Social and Personal
Mr. Wm. Day, of Hornby Island, accompanied by his daughter, Ella, ar-
reil In Cumberland Thursday evening.
Mr. Day returned home on Friday,
while Miss Ella will remain in town
for a few days, the guest of Mrs. Wm.
Merrifield.
Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Apps will spend
the holidays at .Mission.
Mr. H. E. Murray will spend the holidays at Armstrong, B.C.
Mrs. G. H. Wycherley left for Vancouver Thursday morning.
Pierce Graham who has been attending the University School at Victoria ia spending tho holiday at homo.
Dr. C It. Drader arrived Irom San
Francisco this evening and will spend
llie holiday in town.
Messrs Win. Merrifield nnd Dtui.
Stewart returned on Thursday evening, after a very successful hunting
trip on Hornby Island.
Thos, Rickson, ol Courtenay, was a
visitor In town on Thursday.
Local Option Measure Favored By
Legislature Members
After a lengthy debate In the Legislature last Wednesday evening, the
two amendments to the Liquor Act,
made to deprive those districts who
voted in favor of beer by the glass of
the privilege of doing so, were defeated by a huge majority. Tbls Indicates, that all districts which voted
for the sale of beer by the glass last
1 June, will be permitted to do bo in
TENDERS FOR HAULING COAL
Tenders will be received by the
Secretary of the Board of Directors
of the Cumberland General Hospital
up to and Including December 27th,
1024 for hauling coal from No. G track
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., to the Cumberland General Hospital. For further Information ap-
ply lo Thomas Mordy, Secretary. 52
STRAYED—White. Cockrel Spaniel,
with collar, brown ear, one eye Injured. Apply Campbell's, Union
Bay Road. 61.
LOST—Fox Terrier, black spot on
side and rump. Heeds to name
"Snookle". Please return to Cumberland Hotel.
the near future. The first amendment
against the Act was defeated 28 to 12,
and the second 28 to 16. One of these
amendments would have postponed
the enactment of the sale of beer by
the glass law for one year, while the
other would have struck out from the
Liquor Act, the clause which empowered the Government to make effective the June Plebiscite decision.
DOUGLAS FAIRBA17K5 IT? ROBin -HOOD*
AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, DEC. 31 AND JAN. 1
CARD OF THANK8
Mrs. John Gibson wishes to express
her thanks and appreciation of the
kindness and consideration extended
by Dr. McNaughton and the nursing
staff ot the Cumberland General Hospital to her daughter Margaret during her recent illness which necessitated her confinement to the hospital
for the past four months.
AUCTION SALE
AT HAPPY VALLEY
About 8 Miles from Courtenay and
Cumberland.
G. J. Hardy has received instructions
from Mr. Ben Pearse, who is leaving
for Vancouver, to sell by Auction at
his  residence, Happy Valley, on
MONDAY, DECEMBER 22
AT 1:30 O'CLOCK, P.M.
The whole of his household furniture
and effects, including:
Edison Diamond Disc Gramophone,
new; Record Cabinet; 22 new double
records; Singer Treadle Sewing Machine; Rockers; Occasional Tables;
Rustic Tables; Chairs; Child's Rocker; Child's High Chair; Quality oi
Linoleum; Congoleum Square; Sev).-
al Mats; all the Curtains; Hanging
Mirror; Chest ot three drawers with
drop brass handles; Handsome bow
fronted Dresser with large oval Mirror; Heavy Brass Bedstead with Coll
Springs and Restmore Mattress;
Steel Single Bedstead, Springs and
Mattress; Dresser with Mirror;
Child's Cot; Quantity of Blankets;
Large pipe rack with shelves; English
Baby Buggy; English Bicycle, Rudgo-
Whltworth make; Pyrene Fire Extinguisher; new 12 bore Shot Gun;
Quantity of Child's Toys, including
Bicycle, Wagon. Swing, etc; 4-hole
McLary Cook Range ln good condition; Kitchen Cabinet Table; all Ihe
Kitchen and Cooking Utensils, including quantity of Wear-Ever Aluminum Ware; Quantity of Crockery,
Glass and China; Sealers; Groceries,
etc; New Wash Tub, Boiler and
Wringer; New Oak Rain Barrel;
Cross Cut Saws; Axes; Sets of Filing
Tools; Shovels and numerous other
tools and effects.
TERMS—CASH
Further particulars may be bad from
G. J. HARDY
Phone 10    AUCTIONEER  CourUmay
CARD OF THANKS
On behnlf of the staff, Principal ti.
E. Apps of the Cumberland Public
Schools wishes to thank all those who
NOTICE
For Sale—4% acres of land On the
Royston Road joining Mr. Lelghton'a
assisted in the school concert by the Dairy Farm, 12x20 cabin on it, small
preparation of costumes, the loaning garden cleared.     Price $225.00.     Ap-
of properties, etc.     It was much ap- ply W. C. White, Cumberland. Phone
predated, 92R. 52.
Xmas Gift Suggestions
EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY OR
YOUR FRIENDS.
Come into our store and see our complete display of
scores of Christmas Gifts.   The best obtainable at
reasonable prices.
Fancy Box Chocolates, all sizes, also special lines in
Family Sizes, Nut Bars, etc., Special Boiled Candy,
mixed, all flavors; Chirstmas Stockings and Bon-Bons,
etc., all sizes; Chirstmas Cigars; Cigarettes; Tobacco's
all popular brands and sizes; Pipes  and  Cigarette
Holders and Pouches, etc.
Fancy Crockery; Tea Sets; Dinner Sets, etc.; Fancy
Glassware; Berry Sets; Table Sets; Sugar and Cream
Sets; Water Sets; Fruit Bowls; Bon-Bon Dishes; Va3es
Tumblers and Wine Glasses
Rogers Famous Silverplate Cutlery; A full stock to
choose from: Table Knives, Forks, Spoons, etc.; Stainless Knives; Carving Sets and Cabinet Sets.
Full Stock of Wear-Ever Aluminum Ware Kitchen
Utensils.
FRUITS
Jap Oranges; New Season's Naval Oranges; Lemons
Florida Grape Fruit; Bananas; Pomegranates; Red
Emporer Grapes; Spanish Malaga Grapes; Fancy Table
Apples, Cranberries, etc.
VEGETABLES
Hot House Tomatoes; Cucumbers; Cauliflower; Cabbage ; California Head Lettuce; Spanish Onions; Celery
Sweet Potatoes; Carrot3; Beets; Turnips, etc.
BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS FRUIT NOW
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38 *T^
/
THE ^CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
l>
Wltb which b consolidated the Cumberland Mews.
UU.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 61.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIASATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20,   1921. <uB^EliJ,
a
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•u^dmsMlABED SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
IQ24
Magazine Section
JEN
©«r (Elynatmaa touting
npO us no season of the year awakens so much of tenderness and fellow feeling towards all humanity as Christmas.
We are glad it is ours once more to greet our readers with a Bright and Merry Christmas. It seems but
yesterday that we sent a like message to you, and yet a
year has flown by. May your homes be bright, the dear
children of your household happy and the great wish and
hope of your hearts in abundant measure be realized this
Christmas tide.
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4 ?X* PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   .ffiJLANDBR,  CUMBERLAND, R.C.
SATURDAY,   DBX)fiM&l!IR   2D,   162.4.
4?c(9«(pffepprpp^«rp«ewf?s«p9«nK <«***st*pewsmHp**«'«M^
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■    - .' '"1MTW-".■'■S-./'}   "V... .■'"•'■i:.'.'**SPWJv|fsiyk'A"*'** ■
New Canadian National Transfer Engine Heaviest and Most Powerful Locomotive in the British Empire—92 Feet Long; 325 Tons in Weight
By F. E. D. McDowell
THERE wns a touch of haze In
the air that conies' with waning
slimmer days. ln the foreground, the blue waters of the mighty
St. Lawrence lapped lazily at Kingston's waterfront; a Great Lakes
freighter—a long, narrow, whaleback
tramp, peculiar to this chain of Inland waters—was discharging cargo
at a neighboring dock. To the right
stood the high wooden gate and
fence that marked the yard limit of
the Canadian Locomotive Works; to
the left was the red-brick station ot
the Canadian National Railways, its
neat-kept lawn and bright llower beds
giving a touch of color to the sombre
dignity of the waterfronts hefore it;
and beyond yet again, almost hidden
by the rows of stone warehouses reared the lofty pile of the City Hall, an
archltectual masterpiece fashioned
out of limestone, whose beauty has
evoked admiration from two generations of tourists.
Came three quick blasts of a whistle
deep and full-toned, which cut sharply upon the sedate quiet of the afternoon. The doors of the locomotive
works swung open and down the
yards there loomed a masB of steel
that vomited forth smoke in clouds.
Slowly, majestically, it moved forward, a ponderous, rumbling hulk on
wheels. Over the rails toward the
open gate it ground its way, 325
tons of steel which had just beon
wrought into an engine within the
low, stone buildings flanking the
other side of the yards. Out Inlo a
station siding it steamed, Its height
so great that the gate crossbar all
but missed being torn away by the
low-set stack, so few were the ineh-
es between the two. "A battleship
on wheels!" one spectator gaspetl, as
lie saw the steel monster hearing
down the tracks.
But it was merely Engine No. 4100,
the new Santa Fe type transfer locomotive, specially designed and built
for the Canadian National Railways,
leaving tiie locomotive works for tiie
lirst time.
During ita years of activity the
Canadian Locomotive Works has built
locomotives of many types for various
roads and some were mighty ones of
great power and speed.
The famous COOO-type of engines,
the biggest passenger locomotives in
Canada, were built at Kingston for
the Canadian National Railways and
they were bailed as the last word In
engine design and size in Canada. In
tart, competent critics have declared
the lines of "6000" so skillfully designed that the engine is the handsomest in America.
Hut all this was before "1100."
As "4100" steamed out of the :>■
comotlve yards that September afternoon it hearnlded thc accomplishment of the greatest achievement in
locomotive design and construction.
11 stood ns the ultimate effort in the
world of transportation, the heaviest
ami must powerful steam engine in
Canada nnd the biggest locomotive
ever built in tlie British Empire. A
vast difference from tlie method
transportation known to the generations of llie past.
It bas been written that tbe greatest  benefit  conferred  upon   mankind
was that which reduced distance and
brought community   closer   to   community and country closer to country.
From the time when man became the
dominant force  In   the  world  transportation has been his great problem.
First he sought the waterways as his
main highways;  then came the pack
train and the roughly-fashioned cart.
And crude  though  this method of
transportation  was  when  considered
In the light ot the  service given by
the steam roads of today, yet the lowly
pack train and its creaking cart was
not without perils  to beset Its way.
There   was   the   constant  danger   of
outlaws, who lived  hy preying upon
tho   mediaeval   carriers;   ln  fact,  sol
great became the hazard tbat It was J
necessary to engage mercenaries to
guard these trains as they travelled
from place to place.
Let us envision the freighters of
four centuries ago. There were the
patient pack horses, plodding out
13 or 20 miles a day, creaky cart hump
ing along in their wake; beside the
animals walked the freighters and,
possibly, two or three sleek merchants
bestrode their own mild-eyed mounts,
hearts beating tearfully lest a sudden attack be made upon them by a
marauding band; while surrounding
the entire train was a score of men-
at-arms, led by a knight, paid in silver pieces to protect his charge. A
costly and slow method, indeed, of
transportating goods and men from
place to place.
But outlaws were not the only danger whicli threatened the traveller of
the Middle Ages; there was also the
risk of tiie road. Even on the main
highways there was a chance of the
road itself being missing. The members of one party of freighters chronicled this of a trip made In 1499—
"It happened that an Aylesbury miller, Richard Boose, finding that his
mill needed repairs sent a couple of
servants to dig clay for him on the
highway and was In no way dismayed
because the digging of this clay made
a great pit In the road, ten feet wide,
eight feet long and eight feet deep,
which was quickly lllld in with water
by the winter rains. Imagine what
would happen :oday were some intrepid soul to remove a portion of a road
or the right-of-way of a railway to
repair his mill or barn!
Despite the dilliculties of transportation little was done to improve it.
In some four centuries no further progress was made than that of supplant
ing the pack train and cart of the past
by the coach and wagon. Even road
conditions were permitted to stagnate
Lord Macaulay wrote that when an
English prince visited the home ot a
great nobleman in wet weather he
was six hours In going nine miles
and it was necessary that body of men
should he on ench side of his carriage to prop it; several carriages,
whicli conveyed his retinue, were upset and the occupants injured. When
such was the fate of a prince what
would be that of ordinary travellers?
In the new world, as In the old,
transportation dilliculties proved to be
man's urgent problem. There are a
few men still living who rode, as
j lads, on parts of the old stage line
j which operated between Montreal
1 and Toronto and what stories they
i told of misadventures on the rough,
pioneer road! of stages being stuck
In the mud, when passengers had to
dismount and put their shoulders to
the wheel to the utter disregard of
their line clothes, in an effort to dislodge the unwieldy conveyance; of
turn-overs in sough holes; and of
hours of weary plodding through
storm drifts, arriving at destination
hours late but glad of arriving at all.
Yes, such were the stage coach days,
when a journey from Montreal to
Toronto was a matter of days; but
withal tlle advent of the stage ln the
New World was a great step in advance of the of the pioneer and tho
saddle.
Then came tlie railway. "The
Railway Era," as the boom-time of
building In the East has sometimes
been dubbed, ls too well known to require elaboration. Steel bands
speedily bound community to community and soon galant, little wood-
burners were puffing through settlement and forest. A new system of
transportation had been evolved.
Though the "Railway Era" was
foredomed to failure from a box-office
view-point owing to over-construction
of lines, a profusion of companies
and sparsely settled communities, yet
it was an age of high-lights both lu
construction and operation. Some
idea of the problems and the way
they were met can be gleaned from an
article, which recently appeared in
"The Gait Reporter," recalling the
67th anniversary of the opening ot the
Great Western Railway line from
Gait to Guelph:
Hidden away for more than a half
century ln a safe owned by a one
time prominent resident, Waterloo
Township, the following note came to
light quite recently which will he of
Interest to many. "Sept. 28th, 1857, to
day the railway from Gait to Guelph
was opened for traffic." The above
words contained a world of meaning
to the residents of the immediate vicinity at that Ume and completed thc
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
tfSWgWStSJSt-si-SHS^^
*•■ *       r'^-S- --rr...-._„.-_i $   \A*.*' ■.'.'■■ A
WHOLESOME BREAD
MAROCCHI BROS. CHRISTMAS CAKES
Your Christmas table will not be complete without an
assortment of tasty Marocchi Bros.' bakery goods.
Breads. Cakes and pastries just for the Holiday
occasion.
Marocchi Bros.
visionary dreams of the previous few
years.
There are yet a number of persons
living who have a vivid recollection
of the laying of the rails of what was
later known as the Wellington, Grey
and Bruce division of the Great Western Railway, from Hamilton to Gait
and then to Guelph. An event whicli
created, unusual Interest wub tho
transferring of two railway engines
overland from the Gait end of the line
to Shantz Station, there to bo placed
on the line being built from Toronto
to Stratford. These engines Were
run on portable sections of track
which were automatically placed on
the roadway. The first difficulty encountered was when the hill was
reached at the fork of the road leading to the then village of New Hope,
now Hespeler, and commonly known
as Groh's Hill. This point was reached on Saturday and the engines were
left standing on the road over Sunday, during which time the news was
broadcasted far and near and hundreds of visitors came to see the wonders of the age. Three oak trees.
which grew at the roadside served as
anchors around which cables were
strung to lower* the engines to the
valley beneath. Anchors were planted on the hillside beyond the valley
and other cables employed to haul
them up the grade. An amusing incident was many times told by a merchant of Gait, also by the parents of
For Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
m
if*.
i
The City Meat Market
has purchased
200
LOCAL
MILK FED
Turkeys
of the best quality
If you want to enjoy your Christmas Dinner, get your
Turkey from the
City Meat Market
ii
Telephone 111
Cumberland
(Continued   on   Page   Five)
awSfoSa*
-i~>
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*' * ■ i '■■'■•■* v.!.'
Gift
Suggestions
Gift Handkerchiefs in Fancy Boxes, Novelty Necklaces, Hosiery, Silk, Silk and Wool in Plain and Fancy
Colors, Ladies' Handbags, a very good assortment to
select from.
Slippers, for every member of the family, are always acceptable as gifts.
Men's Fancy Silk Mufflers, just the thing in this
cold weather.
Men's Hosiery, in fancy designs, in Silk and Wool.
Men's Belts, Suspenders, Armbands and Garters, in
Gift Boxes.
Our Christmas Ties are just right. Call and see
them.
A new line of Men's Oxfords in Black and Brown.
Men's Hats and Caps.
Gifts of furniture are always in good form and very
appropriate. Brass Beds, White Ivory and Wood
Finishes, in Steel Beds.
We are showing many useful gifts in Fancy China.
Dinner Sets as low as $14.95 Fancy antl Plain Teapots.
Santa Claus has hung out his sign
Let no one be forgotten on Christmas Morning."
A. MacKINNON ■
nA
\TURDAY,   DECEMBER
1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
PAT O'HOOLEY
TELLS OF *
Mickey's Gift From  Heaven
last, th 'tree waa stripped bare—not
avon an apple was left! Alt th'
childerB .sitting about had their lap:?
"Well, accordin" t' th' calendar,
ut'a soon goin" t' be Christmas," said
Pat O'Hooley, selecting a chair back
of the section-house stove. "Ut's bin
Bald that Christmas is a koind, forgiv-
in", charitable toime; an' who doubts
ut? Iveryhody is on th' strates, coni-
in' an' goin'. 5Th' towns are wan
splash of color. There's th' glitter of
beautiful ornamints, th' sheen of silks
an' foine fabrics, th' music seems
swaler, th' loights twinkle more cheer
fully, an' th' faces of th' people reflect th' holiday spirit. We'ro all
supposed t' be happy at this toime;
an' most of us are—but not fer th'
same reason. Th' merchants are glad
Christmas is cnmin', th' kids are glad
ut's here an' th' Old Man is moighty
darn glad whin ut's over! Th' only
wan who don't catch tli' Christmas
spirit is th" man whose pay-cheque is
twelve months overdue, an' he's stand-
in' outside th' show-windie lookin* in
at th' gifts he can't touch wldout
breakin' th' glass.
"Ut niver comes Christmas toimo
but I think of th' poor kiddies, an'
especially of Mickey Malone. Mickey's
father was dead—killed on bridge
nolneteen, eight years ago—an' his
mither wint out in th' avenin's an'
scrubbed offices. 'Twas a slim livin'
she made; although there wasn't a
lazy hair in her head. Havin' t' take
th* chapest rooms she could foind,
they lived on a wretched alley; an'
th' little fellie grew up loike a homo-
sick mouse, ready, at a moment's
notice, V run fer cover whin th'
thoughtless byes an' gals would jeer
at his worn an' patched clolhin'
"Ut was a sad loife! But wan d»>'
there came int' th' quarter a strange
lad wid a merry face; an' he loiked
Mickey, who was entoirely lovable
wance th' shyness was gone. An' th'
new bye whispered a wonderful story
t' th' lonesome kiddie of a big Christmas tree at th' Mission Sunday
School—soon t' be—where little byes
would be givon prisfnts aveu though
they wore shabby, patched coats. An'
Mickey was sorely timpted. He
thought of th' candy bags—full up;
th' apples, th' nuts, th' oranges, an'
all th' purty^ things he'd bin wan tin'
but niver aad; an' he promised t' go.
"Th' next Sunday, dressed in his
bist suit of patches, wid his heart
thumpln' so hard ye could hear ut;
Mickey stole int' th' Mission Church
an' was duly guided t' Miss Marjorij
Fuller's class of beginners. An' so,
fer three wakes, th' poor lad toll
under th' comfortin' smoile of th'
ijeauiiful Marjorie, who made ivery
effort t' win his confidence. An' thin
came Christmas Ave—an' tii' tree!
"There was foine doin's as th' Mission Church that noight; aa' -Mickey
was wan of tli' ilrst t' he there, Imvin'
kissed liis mither a tinder good-bye
at sivin o'clock as she was goin' t'
wurrek. He took liis seat in a quiet
corner, all of a trimhle, an' waited as
patiently as he could.
"Tli' room was gorgeous wid colored loights an' decorations, Mickey
had niver seen th' loikes of ut before.
An', oh! fwhat a beautiful tree! Ut
was lolke* Hivin t' th' poor lad; an'
as th' house filled up wid lflUghin',
happy children, he had t' pinch himself twice t' make sure he wasn't
dramein',
"First, there was a program, which
interested th' parents immensely; but
Ut had no charms fer Mickey an' th'
chitriers. They were too closely
watchin' th' his chimney. An' whin
there came a jinglin' of bells nu' dowa
tumbles old Santa Clans, wid liis
whiskers an' hags of toys, there was
loud shoutin' an' clappin' of handn.
Thin, th' main evint of th' aveuin'. tli'
distribution of piisints, was on in no
toime.
"Mickey hoped fer a sled an' a pair
of skates—he'd always wished for
'em; an' ihero was dozens of both
hung up in plain soight hy th' tree.
Hut uot a single wan Of thim had
.Mickey's name on ut! Strange t' relate, neither was there auythin' else
marked fer th' poor bye! Everythin'
found an' owner aisy enough; an', at
full  of  prislnts.
candy,   an'   nuts,
They  were  atcin'
an'    oranges—an'
Mickey was so hungry fer some! But
notbin' doin'! An' not wance durin
th' avenin' had Mickey seen Miss
Marjorie Fuller,
"T" .Mickey th' ind of th' world had
come.      ile   hated     iveryhody.      He
j wanted t' grab tli' stone pillar at his
! alhow an' pull down th' roof in wan
grand smash! Bui he couldn't.
Balked in his-desire, he foinally stole
quietly out on' begins runnin' down
th' strate blindly, th' big sobs chokin'
him.
"How far he wint, or whero, Mickey
niver knew, fer th' air waa filled wid
iiig feathery sn.owllakes, 'Tis sure he
was a long way from home, whim all
at wance he sees a \ision of an angel!
She was slanriin' ut th' edge of a little
park', just ahead an' her face reminded him of Miss Marjorie Fuller's, Th'
little fellie stopped an' held his
breath, hardly belavein' his eyess.
Uut 'twas uo nils take. Thee she
stood as plain as plain,, an' her Angers
was point in' (' somethin' on th'
ground which was all covered wld
• now!
j "Almost Beared stiff, but hopein' he
wouldn't get  hurled.    Micke      wint
I slowly forward, kapein' his eyes fixed
I on th' angel, until his fut touched th'
parcel—for parcel ut was, an' heavy.
: Thin he stooped, picked ut up, an' in
ia twinklin' he was gone, fearin' pursuit,  but  firmly    belavein'    that    an
j angel had brought him a prisint.
"Two hours later, Mickey hurst
open th' dure of his home, an' fallin'
I int' his mither's arms, sobbed out th'
story of th' noight.,
"'Lookut, mamma!' sez he, I didn't
git a single thing at th' Mission! But
there was an angel knew ut; an" see
fwhat she brought mc!     1 tored open
\ th' paper, an' there's a noice suit of
clothes, an' shirts, an' stockin's, an'
handkerchiefs, .an' candy, an' jist lots
of purty things! An', mamma, they're
Making Both Ends Meet
«&,. fl   V
"i}\ <-a,...'£•£<%  {
\w/f 4&m
all fer me. 'cos th' angel came down
from th' snow-cloud an' pointed
straight at th' bundle. Fwhat s
more,' sez he, 'she looked jist loikc
th' purty lady in th' Sunday School!''
'Wid a serious face, Mrs. Malone
read th' card on th' parcel: 'A Merry
Christmas to Mickey Malone. From
tiis S.S. teacher, Miss Marjorie Fuller,' ut said.
" 'Where did ye foind this, Mickey?
sez tli' widdie, in a husky voice. 'Was
ut uot at the corner of a little park,
near some trees? Was there a staiuo
staiidni' tbere? An' did ye notkle a
broken car by th' curb?'
" 'Yes,' aez Mickey, 'ut was at th'
corner by some trees—I remember
that; un' I saw a broken car, but 1
didn't notice anythiu' else hut th'
angel! Don't ye think me prisint
come from Hivin, mamma?'
'"I certainly belave ut must have.!
me riarlin','  sez th'  widdie,    wid    a
choke in her voice, pressin' th' little
feliie close f her breast. "Tis sad
news 1 have, me laddie! On th' way
F th' Mission this avenin', Miss Mar-
knew fwhat hurt her; an' th' first
tiling tb' good lady did whin she
reached Hivin was t' see that Mickey
got   th'   Christmas   prisint  she'd   bin
jorie   Fuller   was   killed   in   an   aul ; ! piannin' fer him.' ^^^^^
crash on that very corner! She niver' (Copyrighted, 1024, by i. H. Holden)
1 STAR LIVERY STABLE
gj ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
M
sl Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
£L prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
**< Storage if desired.
|J' Phones i and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
f
:meS*/s7MP\'S>i
WVfQWWtl^^
51 A$fc
I ,->/Ai®p
PICK YOUR CHRISTMAS TURKEY AT
Wilcock Bros.
WE WILL HAVE A FULL LINE OF CHOICE
"""""' "      SELECTED BIRDS
THEY BASK IN MID-WINTER SUNSHINE
m*m
 .     Y//ttr.t--f.        i\Hfe
t-
ill
•    V.**f    i
m.
, hv pick on me?" snys the little fellow, "there
are many other things which can interest you
and hold your attention," And so there are, bul
after all the native life of the "Isles of the Blest" is
worth a little study, is it not? Take this little Ja-
maician for Instance. If you took away his shirt
and hia broom handle you would not have him much
other than a full tummy, yet he is a British subject,
and as sues has ri opportunity of becoming—well—
of doing pretty wi4l for himself and of gathering
enough of this world's substance to give him comfort
at least in his later years. He will grow up in a
ramshackle old inn nn the edg '-f the town maybe,
and learn In hi ia1 im of his r'gu s ns a citizen; and
when he rnmes tu the ag of understanding he will
be more EJtiglMi thin the R'^Hsh, As a matter of
fart he will in a'l probability speak nl least two
"English" languages' In one of these he might im-
plore you to buy his fruits or lace bark souvenirs or
.'nn ul mi..ii.. Iniuit.'io Htlow, i.iutn lunrli itfiet a
i) in tht oiifii itr itrlmntins pool on thr deck of ifca
luiilruvul ''    Inm'l. "Yuu no «nj   Pom he»h."
direct you over the fine road that form a network over the island, and in the other he will
converse with his kind. This language sound*
ign us any you will meet with in your tour of
the West Indies, but if you listen intently enough you
will catch un "I" and an "an" or a "Yes"; then gradually your ear wilt be able to distinguish all the words
and you will wonder that you could not understand
the dialect.
They are interesting, these people. Watch th< m
as they swarm around your cruising vessel docked
in Kingston harbor, in their tub-like canoes, and dive
deep into the water for your coppers, They are a
lifferent people in every sense of the word.
Participants in the cruises to the West Indies by
the Canadian Pacific S.S. Montroynl in January and
February next will he afforded every opportunity to
it ii iy tl . vari ns p oples with whom they come in
ontact and will retu n with ut least a few imprcs-
[slons and n bi tei understanding of them No mat-
f ter how il fiuent they may be, they are never for-
elgn, This is especially true of the British protectorates. If one would really gel to the In art of these
people he dare uot patronize them. If lit does this
he only finds the type that he expects to find.
The Gift Store for
Christmas Goods
Novelties in many lines of Gifts for Ladies are here. Art
silk Vests, with straps, shades Peach, Lavendar, Pink and
While, a  real gift, each $1.60
Ladies' Boudoir ( aps, made of Crepe de chene, trimmed
hand made lace, real smart, assorted Bhades, Prices range
from, each   $1.75
Ladles' An Silk Scarfs, in variegated colors, mosl useful
Prices from, each . iOUi,
Ladles' New (Wove, iu various shades, embroidered. Prli   ■
per pair  . .■?!.'»»
Ladies' Box Handkerchiefs, a greal variety of colors and qual
(ties to Bull all,     Prlcos per box, trom 60c lo ... $1*7*i
Ladles' All Linen Handkerchiefs, most acceptable gfts, irom
per half dozen   |MHJ
Irish Linen   .Tablecloths, wltb Napkins to match,       Up to *■'.'.*
Real Eiderdown Quilts, make useful presents, McLlntocks.
every one guaranteed to give satisfaction, a good assortment al
various prh es,
Ladies' Wafsts in a good choice of materials, and st-hs,
each  from ^Jt.it.i io  $l9w'l
Men's Sweater Coals are always acceptable for the good
man and make useful gifts,     See our selection,
.Men's Gloves for weather such as we are having make useful presents.
.Men's Ties galore, in a great choice. Walk in and look
over our stock.
Men's Linen Handkerchiefs, real Irish Linen will he mo.it
acceptable,
Men's Forsyth Shirts, every one guaranteed, many of the
new Broadcloths bo much asked for. in tho wanted colors.
Men's Brace sets, \sith garters and armlA;.
Men's Scarfs in tlie new coloring.''. See those at $8t9.i
which we consider greal  value.
J. Sutherland
kNfc-vas?**. p*
Ik
mi
l\ y-e
For Your Xmas Gifts Try the (iift Store
•^r^u-* PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Saturday, December 20, 1934.
m Editorial and Comment
mm
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MORNING AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1924
CHRISTMAS
ALL hail to Christmas Day; it draws all the
good forth from our natures until we really
lovo our neighbor as ourselves. We rise out of
our selfishness and seek to bless others, and we
rejoice over another's joy. We are happy because others are happy and our happiness makes
other hearts glad. Have we a sorrow, we put it
away; have we an animosity, we bury it; have
we grudges, we pierce them with an arrow; have
we an unforgiving spirit, we crush it; and come
forth in newness of life this day into a new world
ruled by love, ordered by love and permeated by
love. A wonderful peace hallows all things,
and kindness wells up in every heart throb, and
our "Merry Christmas" carries with it so much
of good will the whole atmosphere is filled with
the music, and the re-echoes of Merry Christmas
keeps returning as if it could never quite die
out again.
THE BETHLEHEM MESSAGE
AND there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch
over their flocks by night.
And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon
them, and the glory of the Lord shone about
them; and they were sore afraid.
And the angel said unto them, Fear not;
for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great
joy, which shall be to all people.
For unto you is born th*'-, day, in the city
of David, a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.
And this shall be a signunto you; Ye shall
find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.
And suddenly there was with the angel a
multitude of the heavenly host, praising God and
saying.
Glory to God in the highest, and on earth
peace, good will toward men.
A CHRISTMAS MESSAGE
THE Christmas season with its featsing and
merriment is with us once again. We see
its influence reflected from the many happy
faces as they pass us by. There seems to be a
subtle magic in the air that is expressed by a
heartier handclasp and a warmer welcome.
What a joyous gladsome ring there is to
that good old-fashioned wish of "Merry Chri ,t-
mas," that we get from our friends. "Tlie
Same to You and Many of Them," we cheerfully
answer back, with a sparkle in the eye.
For Christmas is the one season that takes
us away from the bickerings and cares of business, and fills our hearts with human love and
understanding and sympathy; and poor indeed
is he whose heart or purse does not respond to
its magic call. Truly, at this season, "The
Bethlehem Message," is a living inspiration.
We feel we cannot better express our feelings and wishes to our many friends in more fitting words than those of poor crippled Tiny Tirn
in Dickens' delightful fantasy, "A Christmas
Carol"
"God Bless Us Every One"
HAPPY HEARTS
The happiest hearts at Christmastide are
those that have done something for others, those
that have made sad souls cheerful. There is
no chance to debate this statement. It is self-
evident truth and those who have tried it know
that it is so. The greatest joy in life is found
in denying ourselves that we may do unto others
who are in need of our help.
Paying a bill that you owe brings satisfaction, because it is the honorable thing to do, but
being generous in carrying a well-filled basket
to the door of a home in which hunger stalks
raises you above the level of earth and sets tha
glow to tingling in your heart.
Casting bread upon the waters is one of the
greatest promises made in the book of books.
Being generous, helping others, endowing a
worthy cause, spreading Chirstmas gladness,
are the greatest investments we can possibly
make. The electric lights on the gilded Christmas tree in the home of a rich man are less brilliant than the spark of the glow worm, when
compared with the candle you have put in the
window of a home where want and suffering
dwell.
"Vanity of vanities," saith the preacher, "all
is vanity." Social station, man-made wealth,
the power of place, cannot give the lasting satisfaction and deep solace that comes from conferring help upon the needy. Slowly but steadily, humanity is working its way toward greater
service and coming to realize that the more we
give of our plenty, the greater peace we find in
our good will and good work toward men.
The man who gives promptly when his fellow men are stricken by calamity; the man who
gives regularly when his neighbor is cold, hungry, sick or afflicted; the man who responds
cheerfully to every appeal for the betterment of
conditions in his community, is the man who
sleeps with a clear conscience and is laying stepping stones to success. "Though I speak with
the tongues of men and of angels, and have not
charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a
tinkling cymbal."
Let us strive this Christmastide to put
aside every chain of selfishness, to free ourselves
from the fetters of greed and seek our holiday-
happiness in doing something for someone less
fortunate than ourselves.
The Poet's Corner
WE CAM ONLY HAVE ONE MOTHER
We can only have one mother,
Patient, kind and true,
No other friend in all the world
Will be so true to you;
For all her loving kindness
She asks nothing in return;
If all the world desert you,
To mother you can turn.
Many tears you've caused her
When you were sad or ill,
Maybe many sleepless nights,
Tho' grown, you cause her still.
So every time you leave her,
Or when e'er you come or go,
Give her a kind word and a kiss.
'Tis what she craves, I know.
We can only have one mother,
None else can take her place;
You can't tell how you'll need her,
Till you miss her loving face.
Be careful how you answer her,
Choose every word you say,
Remember, she's your mother,
Tho' now she's old and gray.
We can only have one mother.
Oh, take her to your heart;
You cannot tell how soon the time
■When you and she must part.
Let her know you love her dearly.
Cheer and comfort her each day,
You can never get another
When she has passed away.
—Fred A. Campbell,
MOTHER SHIPTON'8  PROPHECY
The lines were first published in
England in 1485, before the discovery
of America, and before any of the
discoveries and inventions mentioned
therein. All the events predicted
have come to pass except that in the
last two lines.
Carriages without horses shall go,
And accidents fill the world with woe
Around the world thoughts shall fly
In the twinkling of. an eye.
Waters shall yet more wonders do,
Now strange, yet shall be true.
The world upside down shall be.
And gold be found at root of tree.
Through hills man shall ride.
And no horse nor ass be as his side.
Under water man shall walk,
Shall ride, shall sleep, shall talk.
In the air men shall be seen
In white, in black, In green.
Iron in the water shall float.
As easy as a wooden boat.
Gold shall be found 'mid stone.
In a land that's now unknown
Fire and waters shall wonders do,
England shall at last admit a Jew.
And this world to an end shall nome
In eighteen hundred and eighty-one
DROSS
FROM THE MELTING POT
BY SCOOP
SHEPHERD OF GALILEE
BROTHERLY love was one original concept
of the man whose birthday we celebrate at
the winter solstice. He discovered no new law
of nature;, he formulated no new principle of
philosophy. He added nothing to science, nor
did he reveal thn least mystery of the unseen
world. When in the bitterness of his cruel
death he reproached the Almighty with deserting him, science, philosophy and theology stood
excatly where they were on that starry midnight
thirty-three years before, when heaven opened
before the eyes of the wondering shepherds and
shining angles proclaimed his birth. But one
thing was not the same, and that thing was enough to make all the difference between the ancient world and the modern. No Confucius
with all his golden rule had ever dreamed of it.
No Socrates had dragged it from the depths in
the net of his dialectic. No stoic ponderings on
the secret of the highest good had conceived it.
Of all the crucified saviours of the world not one
had revealed it. The shepherd of Galilee alone
of all the human race perceived that men aro
brothers. In the solitudes of the Syrian desert
with struggles which the imagination can only
typify as fought soul against soul with the living principle of incarnate evil, he wrestled the
truth from the secret archives of the Almighty.
Despised and rejected by men and unfed and un-
visited, he taught the truth by word and deed.
Nailed to the cross, he proved it by his death.
The   almighty dollars are getting almighty scarce.
tf » t>
All men are born free and equal but some of them
get married.
»       *       *
"Home"—The place where we grumble the most and
are treated the best.
t       »       *
We wonder how anything so scarce ever Jame to be
called common sense.
* t       *
If a mistletoe dealer could guarantee results, he
could sell each spray for $50.00.
* •       •
The height of impropriety—Laughing at a funeral
when someone slips ln the grave.
* *       ♦
The man who married a girl named Helen Summer
says It's just the same in winter.
* *       .
Monkey glands did It, eald the country minister, as
he fled with the chorus girl In a taxi cab.
»       *       «
A perfect lady never chews tobacco ln public or
shoots any man unless he Is her husband.
* *       *
Two optimists are a couple of drunks in a speeding
automobile singing "Nearer, My God to Thee."
»       •       *
Now that the long skirts have come into fashion
again, a girl once more will be taken at her face value.
* •       *
A man who Ib the father ot a dozen children Is not
likely to make much of a fuss about celebrating Chirstmas.
ss • *
Prize fighters will soon be wearing wrist watches as
a precaution against giving fans too much fighting for
their money.
* «       «
They claim it was smoke which overcame a fireman
last Christmas when seventy-five college girls marched
out in night clothes.
* »       *
So far as bobbed hair making some women look girlish It Is about as successful as a belted coat Is in making
some men look younger.
»       t       *
Just because your wife tells you to buy ber something useful, don't think she will he satisfied if you send
her home a barrel of flour.
* *       *
A teacher of Mah-Jongg advertises that she Is now
ready to open classes having just returned from a course
of study In (he orient. Which moves a certain ex-
prlvate to offer himself as tutor to prospective crnp-
shooters and cinch players, having recently completed a
course of study in the C.E.F.
!.    Big Christmas Dance
GAIETY THEATRE, COURTENAY
December 23rd, 1924
Win a Turkey, Chicken or Other Prize off the big
Christmas Tree that night
DANCING 9:30 TO 1:00
GENT'S $1.00 LADIES 25«
■ r.V!:'J>^ *"^ s-*i    \A
t
'tt
"HOME'
Away From Home
SPECIAL DINNER
AT THE CUMBERLAND HOTEL
William Merrified
PROPRIETOR
Dunsmuir Avenue     —     Cumberland, B.C
fc*B^¥,*&afi?
 Si''.'.:&,i- li/ii^i'":  '
»«MMhMfa3d&M3^^
Power™
BEHIND YOUR
PRINTING JOB
To gain a favorable impression these days there
must be "wallop" and
"punch behind your printing job.
In view of the fact that
there is so much competition in your business it is
necessary* to have printing
that comands instant attention.
We are specialists in the
printing business—know it
from every angle and shall
be pleased to have you offer
us your problems.
Whenever you're in tho
market we will be glad to
Have you submit your work
to us for estimates. Quality,
of course, at all times, with
prices at their lowest.
Double Magazine Model Nineteen Linotype
<¥.
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*Z*&£m Wilt Tilf b       ' *""  ' ^
%=
*-*   "    S3   -*s? •"■'
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W^fffim ^4'&:%*:'TZU',%i
The Cumberland Islander
Equipped to Handle any Printing job
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
S^igigi •SATURDAY,   DECEMBER  20,   192),
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, R C.
PAGE FIVE
J
WHICH ARE PRACTICAL, USEFUL AND APPRECIATIVE
Boys' Clothing 20% off
jaiSfisygjSISIE^^
FROM NOW 'TILL THE END OF THE YEAR A DISCOUNT OF 20 PER
CENT WILL BE GIVEN ON BOYS' SUITS AND OVERCOATS. THESE
ARE TAILORED FROM ALL WOOL FABRICS OF HEATHER MIXTURES, GREYS AND BROWS, SIZES 24 TO 37.
Novelty Dress Goods in Dress    Diy GoOQS  Department    READY-TO-WEAR-GOODS
Lengths in Shot Crepes, Silks, Silk Crepes and Cut Velvets. -Silk, Canton  Crepe,   Tricotine and
Brodella Flannel Dresses.    Silk Georgette Crepe, Crepe De Chene Overskirt Blouses and Waists.    Silk and
Crepe Nightgowns, Step-ins, Bloomers, Under Slips and Bloomers, Camisoles and Boudoir Caps and Kimonas.
Silk and Chamisotte Gloves.   Silk Hosiery.
NEWEST CHRISTMAS NOVELTIES      I
IN SILK AND SILK AND WOOL SCARFS AND SHAWLS; UNDER ARM |
PURSES AND HAND BAGS, IN LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN'S; 1
COLLARS; JABOTS AND COLLAR SETS; ALL LINES IN FRENCH I
IVORY, PEARL AND BEAD NECKWEAR; FANCY TOWELS; TABLE §
CLOTHS; CENTER PIECES AND BUREAU SCARFS; FANCY COMBS, 1
BARETTES, ETC. i
See Special Handkerchief Display Table       j
Crystalized Pineapple Rings, per lb. 80<>
Crystalized Cherries, per lb 85**f>
Glace Cherries, per lb 65p
Downey's Almond Paste, per lb  75c
C. & B. Ground Almonds, tins 75-p
Wethey's Mince Meat, pkts 20(.'
Boiled Cider, bottles  35c
Extra Fancy Dates, per lb 35c
Symrna Figs, 1%. 2'/> and 3 inch
Per lb. 30£, 35«* and 40<*>
Symrna Fig Glove Boxes, each 25C
Symrna Table Raisins, I's 40£ and 50<>
California Table Raisins, I's pkts .... 30C
Boxes, 5's  $1.25
Preserved Ginger, per lb  45<>
Mixed Nuts, per lb 25(?
Chestnuts, per lb _  35C
Wild Rose Honey, jars 50c
Ontario Candied Honey, bricks 35f>
MEN'S   DEPARTMENT
MEN'S, YOUTHS AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND OVERCOATS; SWEATERS AND SWEATER COATS; FANCY WOOL VESTS; WOOL AND
SILK SCARFS; SMOKING JACKETS AND DRESSING GOWNS;
PYJAMAS AND NIGHTGOWNS; PURE WOOL UNDERWEAR; SILK
AND KNITTED NECKWEAR, GARTERS, ARMBANDS, SUSPENDERS
AND BELTS; ALSO IN FANCY BOX SETS
TIE RACKS; SHAVING SETS; SAFETY RAZORS; MILITARY BRUSHES; CUFF LINKS; TIE PINS; PLAIN AND INITIAL LINEN HAND-,
KERCHIEFS; FLASH LIGHTS; WALKING STICKS, ETC.
CLUB BAGS AND   SUIT CASES
iKsnKK*^^
:Fancy Groceries for Christmas:
Del Monte Peaches, 2's tins   30<*
Fruit Salad, tins, 40<? and 65£
Tea Garden Preserved Raspberries, Figs
and Strawberries, in heavy Syrup 65c
Tea Garden Pickled Peaches,    Figs   and
Pears in heavy syrup, bots SI.35
Fruit Salad, in heavy syrup, bots. $1.50
Fancy Currant. Seeded aud
Seedless Raisins, Lemon, Orange and Citron Peel, Shelled
Walnuts, Shelled Almonds,
Mince Meat, Jars and Tins,
Dromedary and Bulk Dates,
Jap Oranges, Cranberries,
Christmas Crackers and Stock-
Tea Garden Garnishing  Cherries,   bots.,
each 35<>, 50£ and   75c
Silver Shred Marmalade, jars 35£
C. & B. Lemon Cheese, jars 60<?
Queen Olives, bots. 25<> and ._ 40<) ,
Stuffed Olives, bots. 30£ and ....ft... 50c
Ripe Olives, tins, 20t? and 40-r)
ings and Candles, Christmas
Cakes and Puddings, Extracts,
in Peppermint, Rose, Etc.
Aluminum Ware
Aluminum Roasters ln oval and
round,  Double  Boilers,   Saucepans,   Fry   Pans,   Percolators,
Tea Pots and Tea Kettles.
Indian Chutney,   Sweet Mango, Etc.,
bots., 75<*> and 85<*
French Mushrooms, tins 50£
French Auchovies. bots., 50P
C. & B. Mushroom Ketchup, bots .... 30<*>
C. & B. Meat and Fish Pastes, jars 30<*
Motor Cars, filled with Biscuits .... $1.00
Cordials—Ginger and Port, bots .... 85c
Bovril, bots., 45£ and   750
Johnston's Fluid Beef, pots $1.35
Reindeer Condensed Coffee, tins   ... 35e
Barrington Hall Coffee, jars  65ri
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 1 quality 60c
Rowntrees English Cocoa, tins 25^
Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup, tins,
2 for   35^
Kraft Cheese, I's cartons ..._ 50c
McLarens Cream Cheese, jars   45^
ii
4 10 0
ff
(Continued From Page Two)
a certain person who Is now well over
the seventies as follows:
Many persons referred to tlie railway engine as the iron horse, while
others called it the Iron bull. The
person referred to was with his parents In a store ln Gait and, while his
mother was making some purchases,
he wandered to the door and seeing
a black mooley cow with a bell tied
to her neck, coming up the main
street he became frightened and running to bis mother he exclaimed, "The
)ron bull Is conilug." In those days
parents were equally as intent on giving their children a treat as parents
of the present time and one method
was to give them the honor and pleasure of a ride on a train. There
were those living at or near Preston
who would have mother take tho
children to the station and there
board the train, while father would
drive to Gait and bring his family
home again. This exchange also
was adopted by proud parents of Gait
and Hespoler in a like manner.
Indeed, thc old woodburners were
giants of power In their (lay; but
when compared to the monster '6000's'
and the giant '4100's' thoy would appear as pigmies both in size and in
tractive power. But it Is only a
short time in railroad history when a
17-per-cent engine was the maximum
of power on any Canadian road. Today, the '6000' series of passenger engines, built for speed, as well as
tractive power, are 50 per cent, engine; while the '4100's' with the
booster equipment attached, boast of
being 91 per cent engine.
Of the same streaming lines in design the 4100 closely resembles the
"6000" type. On Its right Bide It has
the same straight, running board that
ls somewhat unusual in appearance
but at the samo time adds considerably to a pleasing appearance and
gives it a noticeable stream line effect.
Whereas, however. Engine No. 60(10
wbb specially designed for passenger
operation, Engine No. 41000 was designed for the purpose of moving
heavy freight trains and consequently
not only la bigger ln bulk and length
but has a tremendous pulling power.
Of the Santa Fe type, No. 4100 Is 02
feet in length over all and weighs 3"ij
tons. Thia makes the new freight
giant more than three feet longer thaii
the big passenger monster "6000" and
35 tons greater iu weight.
Five of these new freight engines
are to he built for the Canadian National Railways and will be used as
transfer locomotives. At the time
of writing four have been completed,
and are in operation between Mimloo
and Danforth yards, in tlie Toronto
terminals.
Some idea of the tremendous power
of Engine No. 4100 can lie gleaned
when it ls known that its size is only
limited by the limits of clearance 0*
the National Railways. Its height Is
15 feet, 3 inches and its width 10 feet
8 Inches. The smoke box alone has
a diameter of 97 Inches, which is 11
Inches greater than that "6000" and
which means that t0 reach thc top ot*
It a six-foot man could sit another
man In his shoulders inside the box
and yet the two would be unable to
touch the top.
It Is when the holier ot Engine No,
41000 is seen that one fully appreciates Its tremendous power. The boiler is 104 Inches In diameter or just
four inches short of nine feet. It
can develop 3.200 horsepower nnd
some idea ot the great power can be
realized when it is known that this
horsepower is in extra of that distributed by the electrical plant of
Kingston which takes care of all the
electric lights and power requirements of a city with a population of
25,000 people.
Engine No. 4100 also has another
claim to fame as a freight monster,
for not only Is it the heaviest engine
In the British Empire but It Is alio
the largest Santa Fe type locomotive
ln the world. It has.10 drive wheels
—live on each side—and ls equipped
with the "Booster.' which gives a,i
additional power. It is what h;
known In Canadian National ratings
as an 80 per cent, engine, and witli
the "Booster" equipment in operation
it is a 91 per cent engine. When it
Is known that some engines run as
low as 24 per cent, the pulling power
of a 91 per cent, engine ls to be appreciated.      The  per  centage  of  an
Go To Th«
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCE.SSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KINO GEORGE V.
4t
Whisky may be old yet not
matured. To be matured it
must have been aged in cask-
gHADlAN <m§;
WHISKY
are thoroughly matured in
Oak Casks stored in rack
warehouses.
Observe the guarantee of
age  on   the   Government
Stamp over the capsule of
every bottle.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker& Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   .   ONTARIO
»
Montretl, Que.
Distillers 0} Fine
Whiskies since 1858
London, Eng.
New Yo* U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thc Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia,   y,..
ii
4 10 0
»
engine bears a distinct and definite
relation to the tonnage which it can
move, while the "Booster" consists
of a small two-cylinder engine,
mounted on the trailing truck, the operation of which is under tbe control of the engineer. By taking advantage of the truck weight and applying power to the wheels he can increase the tractive power If desired.
As a 91 per cent engine it Is estimated that No. 4100 on a level track ami
under good conditions, can move a
load of 14,500 tons or approximately
150 loaded cars of freight.
A brief description of Engine No.
4100 follows: The drivers are 57 Indies iu diameter, the boiler equipped
with Elco feed-water heater and 60-
unit latest type super beater; lire box
Is fed by the newest Duplex stoker
and fire-box door a Franklin automatic operated one; all steam pipes
arc outside tho cab for tlie greater
protection of the crew and tlie engine
Is designed to negotiate 18 degree
curves; tin- cylinder dimensions are
29 Inches and the stroke 32 inches.
which is the largest in the Empire;
the steam pressure is 2on pounds to
the Inch; the dimensions of the fire
box are S feet wide by 10 long inside,
giving the blgc area of 80 square
feet. Every modern nppllanco to Increase its efficiency and economy of
operation hus been added.
As In the case of tbe onglne Itself,
the tender ls also of a design new
to Canadians, it is of a rounded
type, known commonly as the Vanderbilt tender, us it. was designed by
that famous rullroader Cornelius
Vanderbilt and although used in the
United States lu plnce of the usual
rectagular tender is an innovation in
the Dominion. It Is of fl more simplified construction and carries 11,000
imperial gallons of water and 15 tons
of coal. Owing to tlie great supply
of water reqiured to take care of tlie
requirements of Engine No. 4100, this
type of tank is considered to he mors
economical for big motive power. Tho
Vanderbilt tank also has the al vantage of giving greater vlslo nto the
crew for yard work.
Although Engine .N'o. 4100 Is designed primarily for transfer work, it Is
thoroughly fitted for road service and
under adverse weathor condition*),
such as mow norms or snow block
ades, will handle trains expediously
and considerably beyond anything
which the present freight power will
handle.
Thus is shown In no uncertain way
the striking advance that has been
made In solving the age-old problem
of transportation. It ls Indeed a far
stride from the freight trains of tho
.Middle Ages to Engine No. 4100, the
aristocrat of the road, and to thc merchants of that day the present methed
of trasportation, swift, sure and safe
as it Is, would seem nothing less than
a modern miracle. But this might
bc written likewise of our forefathers
who knew only the stage and its slow
rumble. Think of what they would
say of making a trip from Toronto
to .Montreal In eight hours, when six
weeks was considered hy them to be
a speedy journey! And tho rapidity
of the trip alone is not all—there Is
the comfort In which It Is made.
It Is In the field of motive power,
however, that the great stride made
can bo definitely Ilxed. What engineer of the old, woodburner days could
hnve foreseen the advent of the 4100
type of locomotive, with its tremendous tractive power. Not that the
woodburners were Incapable of bursts
of speed, for with the light trains of
their duy 11 speed of 60 miles an hour
was often attained; but that freight
engine wns considered to be hiiullng
a heavy train when It hnd a string of
00 small bax cars behind It. Imagine the thoughts of an old-time engineer could he hut sec No. 4100
hauling a string of 100 or more heavy
box cars up the grndo from .Mlniico
to Danforth yards, box cars that
would almost make two ot the old-
time type.
Indeed, no greater object lesson of
! the advance made ln thc science of
1 transportation could be givon than
that afforded wben Engine No. 4100
; left the Canadian Locomotive Works,
I nt Kingston, on her trial run. It
, was the last word In locomotive de,
i sign nnd it was Canadian National.
Do You Know?
THAT piii-pons who bloat after eating and Imvu gns on thoir stomach
nro on tin- highroad to ohronfo indigestion? Jo-To Kill stop gas pains
and all form* of dtomaoh misery In
iwo minutes. Jo-To fold at al) Drug
Stor*«, PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SATURDAY,    DECEMBER   20,   1921.
spiled the whole civl ized world to be
kind and generous on Christmas Eve.
He was not a mighty warrior, but
lias done more for the happiness, kind
ness, and good humor of the world
than Caesar or Napoleon. Is that
net a fur greater mystery than Santa
Claus and his donkey?
learn from this story that a beautiful character is more powerful than
any fairy, ami understand that your
presents at Christmas are given to
you in secret only that you, when you
grow up, may follow the example of
Saint Nicholas, und give without telling.
Santa Claus, even if he comes in
your father s or your mother's body,
is still the loving spirit of the good
Saint Nicholas.
Santa Claus
A True Story of Father Christmas
CHRISTMAS EVE is the greatest
night in the year. It is a night
of mystery. When everybody is in
bed, except the policeman, down the
chimney conies an old gentleman in
a red cloak, bordered witli white
wool, carrying over his back an immense sack stuffed witli toys ami
bonbons,  which  be empties into the
wickerwork basket filled with tiny
birch rods, and he leaves one of these
whips for every child who has been
naughty, or cross, or greedy during
the year. Father Christmas, ot
course, only comes to children who
arc trying to be good.
There    is    another    difference    in
France.      Children  do not  hung up
stockings of good little hoys anil girls I their stockings on Christmas Eve; ln-
in tlieir cots.
The policeman does not see tlie obi
housebreaker; the black soot does
not smirch his beautiful red-and-
white cloak; more wonderful still,
the smallest chimney on the humblest roof in all the world is wide
enough for his descent, sack uml all.
The fact Is, Santa Claus, Saint Nicholas, Father Christmas. Bonhomme
Noel, Knecht Clones, or whatever
else children may call the old gentleman with the sack—the lad is. he
is a ghost.
He is the ghost of that good St.
Nicholas who went about doing generous acts in secret; who slipped
money, silver and gold, through the
keyholes or under the doors of poor
people, and made homes happy without letting anyone know how il happened. Nicholas was a kind man,
and now he is a kind ghost. All over
the world—in Europe. America, Asia.
Africa, and Australia, the ghost of
tbls good man on Christmas Eve
passes down millions of chimneys,
and fills billions of stockings with
trillions of toys and quadrillions ol*
candles. Ves. really and truly, it is
the spirit of St. Nicholas who comes
across the snow on Christmas Eve.
In France, Bonhomme Noel, as they
call Santa Clans, is accompanied by
another ghost—a thin, weasel-faced
old gentleman, with long, grey beard,
threatening dark eyes, and a frowning forehead. This is Le Pore Fouet-
tard. In French our word whip Is
fouet; so you see that Lc Pere Fouct-
tard means In English. "Father Whip-
per." This Father Whipper wlm accompanies Father Christmas in
France  carries  on   liis    shoulder    a
stead, they put their little sabots,
which are wooden shoes, in front of
the hearth, close to the chimney, by
which Father Christmas descends.
li' you have read Victor Hugo's wonderful book "Les Miserables" you will
remember tbe story 91 tlie poor .Utile
ill-treated girl who put her shoes on
tbe hearth year after year, and never
received anything till Saint Nicholas,
in the slmiie of a poor but good man
who had been iu prison, visited the
scene of her misery and gave her
happiness.
And Here is the Ileal .Mystery
Uanta Claus very often takes a human form. There arc so many chimneys in the world, and children will
wake up so dreadfully early on
Christmas morning, that nowadays
even a ghost has not time to go ail
round the world in a single night. So
tlie ghost of Saint Nicholas splits Itself np iuto iiltle atoms of kindness,
and ihcse atoms of kindness, like
seeds thrown from a sower's hand,
lake root In thc hearts of fathers and
mothers, and uncles nnd aunts, and
guardians and friends, nnd turns
them all, but for Christmas only, into
Santa Clauses.
"tine Christmas morning." sa.-s a
French author, "whon I was in my
eighth year, as I was searching In my
s.nhols. I pulled out two big pennies.
which made me very unhappy. Where
had Father Christmas, the fairy giver
of toys, unearthed this horrid, greasy
money? Certainly not from heaven.
I immediately suspected that my father had placed this prosaic money lu
my shoe simply to destroy my faith in
the legend of Father Christmas. .My
faith in dear old Father Christmas am!
bis donkey was completely shattered,
ami   it   wns   from   lhat  moment  thai
| doubt entered my infant, soul for tlie
lirst fWe."
But this little boy should have said
to himself: "No doubt my father put
Ihese pennies in my shoes; nevertheless, he does not put pennies' there
every night In tlie year, and so it must
have been Santa Claus wbo made him
do it.'*
And this, you will see, is the true
explanation of Santa Claus. Perhaps it is only In very old-fashioned
places that Father Christmas really
liiles about ou a donkey, and climbs
on to roofs, and descends down the
chimney with his sack of toys. But
it there bad never been n Saint Nicholas (who was a real man) uo stockings and no sabots—as the French
cull tlieir siloes—would over have
been set out on Christmas Eves for
surprise gilts. So it is still a mystery and it is still from heaven that
this mystery comes.
Ii" you could keep an eye open this
Christmas Eve and see while, you
pretend to he fast asleep, your father
and mother enter the room with enn-
dlcs nnd parcels of toys candies, and
oranges, just say to yourself that
Santa Claus in employing tbem to^do
his will, and that if Saint Nicholas
had uot lived and done kindly things
you would never have bsd that box
of soldiers, Mint automobile, that farm
yard, that grocer's shop, that doll,
thnt box of chocolates, that pair of
reins, that book of fairy tales, those
crackers, ami Hint box of candied
fruit.
Is it not more mysterious than
Santa Claus himself? llo uot think
that you arc very sharp and clever
to have found out how the toys and
candies conic to you on Christmas
Eve. It is one of tiie greatest mysteries of life.
For once upon a time thore lived
a rich young n.an who tried, because
he lmd so much admired ihe kind and
gentle character of Christ, to make
his money give other people happiness, lis- went about placing coins
and gifts in ibe homes of poor people.
Ile did good in secret. The name of
of this young mnn was Nicholas. When
he died people callod hlm Saint Nicholas. He died and wus buried like
nn ordinary man. llui one man,
whom men called Nicholas, hns from
liis grave, for hundreds of years, In-
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies*  and   Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
IV WE NOTICED
"If we noticed Uttle pleasures
As we notice little pains,
If we quito forgot our losses
And remembered all our gains;
If we looked for people's virtues
And their faults refused to see,
What a comfortable, happy,
Cheerful place this worhTwould be.'1
m
XMAS
FRUIT
CAKES
Plain  and  ornamented
CHOICE
\  SCOTCH
SHORTBREAD
XMAS
MINCE MEAT
PIES
tgtg
New Car Service
CAK FOlt HIKE KAY Oil NIGHT
24-—TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning j
and meets boat at Union Bay, |
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Place Your Order Now
Mann's
Bakery
Phone 18
Cumberland, B.C.
. JMk   . .,
'"'•T~AYY
;     A
-AA<^   -J-.       Jl,,/
,?Ss  *   /h  ;■*' ...,   %
%-:; xA' i
Mumford's
Grocery
EXCLUSIVELY A GROCERY STORE
HERE YOU WILL FIND A FULL LINE OF
BON BONS
CHOCOLATES
CANDY
XMAS STOCKINGS.
PLUM PUDDINGS, ETC.
If you get it at Mumford's
it's good
GOOD PRICES
#1%
tf
GOOD SERVICE
BOX 128
^AMS^-m •Tf
SATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20,   mi.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGfiSfiVEN^
tt
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Stoie
CUMBERLAND, D.C.
BIG VALUE FOR YOUR
MONEY
I if.,^jsj^sis)G@s@js@isis@iaijDfli@isiaa
CHRISTMAS CAROL
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING   AND  PRESSING
Open for business November 20
Under New Management
E Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
It is said that the Family Herald
and Weekly Star of Montreal works
on the prlcipal lh;it nothing but the
best will do for its readers. The
soundness of this policy is amply
demonstrated in llie rapidly growing
subscription list of this great weekly,
Tho public have been tempted ,by
traBhy weeklies at giveaway prices,
but wlien it come down to value for
your money and a genuine Canadian
flavor lo your reading, the Family
Herald and Weekly Star has no competitor. This year we see that the
publishers are giving each subscriber
whose sbuscription is received in
timo a large picture entitled "The
Sale of Old Dobbin," and a treo entry
to a contest, in which ten thousand
dollars will be awarded, Tlie sub-
BCdptiOH price Oi the Family Herald
is only Two Dollars a yoar.
Ci^fi
use   ^-^^~-^
/You FEE,. IT HEAL       .
fflenthGlatum
JarsdohCO* - Tubes JO''
PETER McNIVEN      1
i
..TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description Jg
At Reasonable Prices. M
M.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND         PH0NK 160 £
1,<i2i&itte&t^^ M
A. GAMBA I
COURTENAY J
Milk, Cream, Eggs, Farm Prod acts a
A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED
..Leave Orders at Marocchi's or Scavarda's Grocery....
Store.
m
rtiS&&&&^^
MlXTi
The\
J.i9binin9^
Remedy rorit
COUGHS-COLDS:
BRONCHITIS^
AT ALL
BRUCCISTS
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND BY LANG'S DRUG STORE
For Mud and Slush
You Need These Rubber Boots
Every farmer—every member of
his family—every man who
works out doon in all kinds of
weather—needs the dry, foot-
comfort given by .RHINO boots.
For use on the farm, RHINO
Rubber Boots -are easy to wear
because they're ounces lighter
in weight.
This footwear is made from
RHINO Rubbei^-the toughest
and most wear-resisting that
Science has yet discovered—
which will wear up to twice as
long as ordinary rubber,
RHINO Rubber Footwear is
built for long wear, otherwise
the iron-clad guarantee couldn't
be given witli each pair. We
stand behind it because it means
full value for your money.
The next time you need rubbers
ask us for a pair of KHINO.
'Compare The Wear"
CAVIN'S   SHOE   STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
ljJ..AlK,
<
JfA,*,*rA
. JK
EIHiyilllililBlisygJ^^
lt came upon the midnight clear,
That glorious song o£ old,
From angels bending near the earth
To touch their harps of gold:
"fence to the earth, goodwill to men
From Heaven's all-gracious King;"
The world in Bolemn stillness lay
To hear the angels sing.
Still thru the cloven skies they come
With peaceful wings unfurl'd;
And still their heavenly music floats
O'er all the weary world;
Above its sad and lowly plains
They bend on heavenly wing,
And ever o'er its Babel sounds
The blessed angels sing.
Vet with the woes of sin and strife
The world han suffered long;
Beneath the nugel-strain huve rolled
Two thousand years or wrong;
And men, at war with men, hear not
Tlie love-song which they bring;
Oh! hush the noise, ye men of strife,
Aud hear tho angels sing!
And ye, beneath life's- crushing load
Whose forms are bending low,
Who toll along the climbing way
With painful steps and slow;
Look now! for glad and golden hours
Come swiftly on the wing;
Oil, rest beside the weary road,
And hear the angels sing!
For lo! the days aro hastening on,
Ily prophet-bards foretold,
When with the ever-circling years
Comes round the age of gold;
Wheu Peace siiull over all the earth
Ils ancient splendors fling,
And the whole world send back the
song
Which now the angels sing.
This king of modern Christmas carols was the work of the Reverend
Edward Hamilton Sears, D.D., a Unitarian minister who was born at Sand
Isfield, Massachusetts in 1810 and
died at Weston ln the same state ln
1870.
Dr. Sears was a graduate of the
Theological School at Cambridge,
Miss., and official ns pastor at Way-
land, Lancaster, and Weston.
When you aro in need of a
numbing & Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 167
Cumberland
Your   needs   will   receive   immediate
attention.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
I'ORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
]    HOTELS AND CAMPS
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
sV . , ■
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
Romance of an
Ancient Ship
|   ROMANTIC story of an
|3  18th    century    treasure-
f" ^A* M s'llI> 's reca"ed by tne
■f\: §] signing of a contract between Lloyd's of London, and two Dutch
gentlemen of Delft, per-
uitiing me latter to carry on for a
specified period salvage operations for
the recovery of the cargo or other objects from the wreck of H.M.S. Lutine
All concerned in shipping are familiar witii the name of the famous
"Lutine" bell at Lloyd's which is
rung as a preliminary to the announce
ment by the "caller" of news of an
overdue ship.
Before the days of the French Revolution, In 1785, the Lutine, a 32-guu
frigate, was launched for the French
Navy ns La Lutine. She was captured by Duncan at Camperdown on
October 11, 1797, nnd since she was
lost in 171)9, her history has been inseparably connected with that of
Lloyd's.
How much treasure was aboard the
ship when she was shnk has for long
been a matter of speculation, but she
made her last voyage at a time wheu
the North Sea was enveloped In tho
"fog of war." Time and fire have
played havoc with the documents
which might be expected to throw-
light on the case, and it appears to
be impossible to say, with any approach to certainty, whether the bullion and specie still remaining in tbe
wreck and the sands which engulf it
is worth a few thousands or over a
million.
It has frequently been stated thot
at the time of her loss the Lutine was
bound for the Texel with money consigned by tlie Treasury for the payment of the British troops in Holland.
There appears to be no foundation
for these statements.
Was Lost In a Gale
Early in October Admiral Lord Duncan, then on board H.M.S. Kent, lying
at Yarmouth Roads, Informed the Admiralty that "the merchants interested in making remittances to the Continent for the support of their credit
having made application to me for a
King's ship to carry over a considerable sum of money, on account of
there being no Paquet for that Purpose, I complied with their request,
and ordered the Lutine to Cuxhaven
with the same, together with the
mails, lying there for want of conveyance."
The frigate was lost in a gale, and
of the two survivors one died immediately after liis  rescue, and the
other, a notary, did not live to reach
England
Iu the brief account he was able to
give of tho distaster he related,
strangely enough, that the ship was
"bound for the Texel." The underwriters at Lloyd's, with whom the
bullion was insured, promptly settled
a total loss.
Of gold and silver bullion to the
amount of over £275,000 recovered
by fishermen and boatmen, two-thirds
of the proceeds were clnimed by the
Dutch government. ln 1S21 Mr.
Pierre Eschauzler obtained from the
Dutch Government a Royal decree
granting to him exclusive rights to
undertake the salvage of the Lutine.
It being stipulated that one-half of
the recovered treasure should be
handed over to the Government. The
results of his work was practically
negligible.
The Dutch Government subsequently agreed to cede to Lloyd's that Government's moiety of the proceeds of
any salvage. Agreements havo since
that date been entered into by Lloyd's
with numerous salvors, but the results have been extremely disappointing.
DR.  R.. B.   DIER  AND   DH.
VV   .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor. of Dunsmuir  At*.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND. B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  etnrlw.
26  rooms,   electrically  hotel.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone lt.
R. TATES, Manager.
Car   For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Drirer
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or Residence
25 22
CUMBERLAND
ASK FOR
Fletcher's   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNG PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros.   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C.  W. Sillence        G. M. Swan        Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
~^triiatiiMt\?i,
NOTICE
All watches, jewellery and jobs of
all description left in my charge for
repairs if not claimed by January 1st,
1925, will be sold to defray expenses.
T. D. McLean, Dunsmuir Avenue,
Cumberland.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. c.
Christmas
Suggestions for the Family
FOR MOTHER
Dainty   Handkerchiefs,   Hand   Embroidered   Pillow
Cases, Scarfs, Buffet Sets, Guest Towels, Aprons, Etc.
FOR DAD
Hose, Ties, Eversharp Pencils, Sleeve Holders.
FOR GRANDMA
Warm Hose, Underwear and Bags.
FOR CHILDREN
Toys, Dishes, Blackboards, Writing Paper, Etc.
Mrs. L.  Francescini
SPECIALIZING in HEMSTITCHING
*J*JfSWB
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBEBLAND,  B.C.
AlsBIIlT EVANS
Praotleel  Barber,  uid  Hairdresser,  Bhampoolnf,   Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
T. Malpass
GENERAL  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leavo your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS Ol'It MOTTO
OB PHONE 15 UNION HOTEL
J. SUTHERLAND
--Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Glean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Oents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop In and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
j will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our  Work  and   Service
Will l'lease Tou i ■     t i
Christmas Joys
Electrical Appliances
Here are gifts thai are certain to make her
CHRISTMAS
one of joy. Picture her delight on Christmas morning when she steps into the parlor and finds there, on
the table, an Electric Iron, an Electric Percolator, an
Electric Heater, an Electric Toaster, an Electric Wanning Pad, a Vacuum Cleaner, and many articles from our
store that will aid her in the home.
GMSJisiliiiiSB
Cumberland Electric Lighting
8 Co., Ltd.
ft CUMBERLAND, B.C.
I
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER |  PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
T. Malpass VICTORIA, RC.     -     *■•■•»«
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
__TO KEEP "CLOSED^ PLUMBING "OPEFJ
This"is a '/i-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
\%    CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
I*); Limited.
& G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
|^»j*>*&^^£^j^2rS'jS&S*<^£*iS'^^Sj^5^^ PAGE EIGHT
TBE  CtTMBtttttAND  MIANDER,  CUMBERLAND, tt C.
SATURDAY,   DECEMBER   20.   l&2i.
£
Friday and Saturday **
December 19th and 20th
Rudolph Valentino
ADULTS 50c
ADULTS 35c.
AS YOU LIKE HIM BEST
SPECIAL MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2.30 P.M.
CHILDREN 25c.
CHILDREN 15c.
|| li I    ^ DECEMBER
Mon. and Tues., ***-**
William Fo^
presents
the Motion M
AtSM.HU
v Version cf
INSON'S Movcl
THIS, FREEDOM
EW
Can a. toife win freedom and. happiness
and disregard her home duties y
MOST WIDELY DISCUSSED NOVEL OF IHE YEAR.
 Directed bi/ Denison Qifb
~r*
Wed. and Thurs.
DECEMBER 24 AND 25
Thomas Meighan
IN
f4
Tongues of Flame"
THE STAR'S GREATEST PICTURE A TRIBUTE TO
HIS FRIEND
STORY  OF  A   STRONG  MAN'S  IDEALS  THAT
CONQUERED GREAT ODDS
 MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.	
 CHRISTMAS DAY	
DON'T FORGET CUMBERLAND UNITED FOOTBALL DANCE CHRISTMAS NIGHT 9:30—1:00
FRIDAY   AND   SATURDAY
Dec. 26 and 27, Carl Laemmle presents
"BUTTERFLY"
WITH LAURA LA PLANTE, NORMAN  KERRY,
RUTH CLIFFORD, AND K. HARLAN
THE LOVE STORY OF A HEARTLESS FLIRT!
WILL BE THRILLED BY HER GAY ADVENTURE!
.SHE WILL SET YOUR HEART A-FLUTTER.   YOU
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2:30
ILO-ILO   THEATRE
==riTMRFRI  Aisin—
P Ai

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