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The Islander Jun 5, 1915

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11
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 11 THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JUNE 5. 1915.       Subscription price, $1.50 per year
f    SS. WELLIN6T0N ON RUN
—
After several years of inactiv-
-( ity the old collier Wellington,
h owned by tf.e Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., has teen placed
I under charter to make a trip to
the Atlantic with' a full cargo of
British Columbia fir. The Wellington will transfer a cargo of
something like 1,200,000 feet of
lumber from Genoa Bay to New
York, and will make the voyage
from Victoria via the Panama
waterway. She is expected to
go on berth today at Genoa Bay,
and will put to sea toward the
latter part of the month. The
Wellington will go out in command .of Capt. Melville F. Cutler,
who ranks as one of the best
known shipping masters in British Columbia, and who has been
a resident of Victoria for many
years. Up to a few months ago,
Capt. Cutler was in command of
the big seagoing tug Lome, but
since that vessel was wrecked on
San Juan Island he has spent
much of his time ashore.'
The Wellington is by no means
a strange ship to Capt. Cutler.
He was master of the collier
when she used to ply regularly in
the coal trade between Union Bay
and San Francisco. Owing to
reasons best known to the operators, the Wellington was withdrawn from this trade some years
ago, and then came a long period
of idleness for the ship, during
which time she swung at anchor
in Esquimalt harbor.
As was only to be expected,
the continued scarcity of tonnage
a situation due to the war, resulted in practically, everything that
resembled a deep-sea bottom being sought to handle cargoes from
the North Pacific, and the time
for the Wellington to emerge
from her snug little cove soon
arrived.
A few weeks ago her rusty
anchors were pulled out, of the
mud, and the vessel was taken
in tow to Union Bay, where she
has undergone a complete overhauling. He engines are now in
good shape, and the ship is said
to be as staunch as ever,
The Wellington is a very handy
carrier, and it is probable that
she will be retained in the coast
to coast trade,
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
In the Cumberland Hall on
Sunday evening at 8 o'clock, a
bible lecture will be delivered by
Mr. Wm. F. Crawford, of Vancouver. The topic for tomorrow
evening will be, " Where are the
Dead?" On Monday evening,
June 7th, a lecture will be given
by the same gentleman, the topic
being, "The Living and the Dead;
what is their only Hope." Mr.
Crawford is a bible scholar of
renown, and takes his stand fairly
and squarely upon the scriptures,
giving bible quotations for all his
assertions. He -will be pleased
to answer any questions bearing
on his subject after his address.
These lectures are of the pro-
foundest interest to all. Come
and bring your friends,     Seats
free.   No collection.
—*
SERVICE IN METHODIST CHURCH 11 A.M.
The services in Grace Methodist
Church to-morrow will be aS follows: At 11 a.m., an illustrated
sermon on "Candles," to the boys
and girls; in the evening, the
closing sermon—the Pastor's last
sermon here, for the present-
will be from the text. "Watch
ye! Stand fast in the Faith. Quit
you like men. Be strong. Let
all that vou do be done in love,,'
SWANSON'S BODY WASHED UP ON BEACH
The body of Hans Swanson, the
remainder of the three who were
drowned at Oyster River on May
23rd, was found washed up on
the beach by Richard Coe, Sr.,on
Tuesday morning. An inquest
was held at Courtenaj on Wednesday when the jury returned a
verdict of accidental drowning.
Of garden hose and sprinklers
we have a good stock. C, H.
Tarbell and Son.
William McFadyen,of the Royal
Bank staff, is visiting Victoria
and Sound points on a two weeks'
vacation.
A writ has been issued by A.
G. Reid a.gainst W. Hodgson and
G. B. Leighton, claiming damages for slander committed at
Courtenay.
The residents of Union Bay are
making arrangements to celebrate
Dominion Day as usual. An energetic committee has the matter
in hand.
Rev. Henry Wilson, of Langley
will succeed the Rev. Wm. Elliott
to the pastorate of Grace Methodist Church.
NANAIMO'S UNLUCKY MONTH
May is surely an unlucky month
for Nanaimo. It was in May that
the big explosion occurred in
1887. This disaster was followed
by minor accidents of one kind
and another in the sanr. month,
until old-timers grew to dread
the coming of May. It was in
May again that the pithead was
burned down, and nobody has yet
forgotten that the recent strike
began in May. Now comes this
last explosion at the. Reserve
Mine. To say the least it is a
curious record.—Nanaimo Herald
NANAIMO DISTRICTJiUSTOMS RETURNS
The customs returns of Nanaimo District for the month of May
totalled $4783.26. The collections
by ports were as follows: Nanaimo, $3,456.84; Alberni, $16.29;
Chemainus, $75.84; Comox,$15.46;
Courtenay, $40.28; Cumberland,
$565.45; Duncan, $204.21; Ladysmith. $81.69; Port Alberni,
$95.56; Union Bay, $231,51.
RED CROSS AT-HOME WELL ATTENDED
An At-Home, in aid of the Red
Cross Fund, was heid at the Presbyterian Manse on Tuesday. It is
estimated, that about 75 people
were present. Mrs. G.W.Clinton
and Mrs. John Frame served the
tea. The amount raised was $29.50
J. E. Stillman, chief forest
ranger, will make Courtenay his
headquarters for the present.
SS. Wellington left Union Bay
on Thursday to load lumber for
New York,
J. R, Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., left on
Thursday for Ladysmith and
Victoria.
David Stephenson, provincial
chief constable for this district,
with headquarters at Nanaimo
was here on offical business on
Wednesday.
Searle Sherwin, son of Peter
Sherwin, underwent an operation
in the Vancouver Hospital on
Tuesday.
The serials in baseball for the
Stewart Cup will commence on
Sunday. Bevan will play the City
on the Recreation Grounds, and
Courtenay will play Union Bay
at Courtenay.
SPORTS AT BEVAN
The appearance of the Bevan
Recreation Park at the present,
time reflects great credit upon
the parties responsible for the*
vast improvements which have-
been made to the ground by the*
grading of the playing field. The*
erection of flag poles, seats, etc.,
lends to the ground the appearance of preparation for a festive
occasion.    The  Bevan  Athletic*
Association has drawn up a program  of  events  for  the  day,,
among which will be:—
CHILDREN'S RACES.
75 yards, boys' three-legged race,
12 years and under
50 yards, girls' race, 10 years and
under
100 yards, boys' sack race, 16 aad
under
50 yards, boys' race, 9 and under
100 yds, boys' race, 14 and under
75 yds. egg and spoon race, boys
and girls under 12
100 yds, girls' threading needle
race, 10 years and under
75 yds. girls' race, 14 and under
100 yds, girls' skipping race. 16
and under
LADIES' RACES
100 yds, married ladies
100 yds, single ladies '
CHINESE  RACE
220 yards, Chinese only
JAPANESE   RACE
440 yards, Japanese only
MEN'S RACES AND CONTEST
Tug of war, five a side, open
Football dribbling contest
Football place kick
100 yards dash
Sack race
One mile race
Running high jump, etc.
COMPETITIONS
Greasy pole. Cutting the goose
Ambulance demonstration, open
to all teams in the district, to
be governed by the rules issued
by the Washington, D. C,,
Bureau of Mines.
In the evening a dance will be
held, and prizes given to the
ladies and gentlemen for the
waltz and two-step. An efficient   committee  has  been ap-
1 pointed to take charge of this
portion of the program.
These events, together with
the football, baseball obstacle
race, and quoit competition should
materially assist in making the
day a huge success.
The committee reserve the
power to add events'to the program. TWO
ill*. ISLANDJJJK,   CUMBJSRLANA H. C.
.,
®hr 'JalattHvr
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One ye"ar in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, JUNE 5th, 1315.
The Record Reviewed.
Today the war enters upon the
•eleventh month of its existence.
On August 1st Germany declared
war against Russia. It is timely
to review the record. In so doing
we shall confine our observations
to indisputable facts. The original plan of Germany was to hack
a way through to Paris by way
-of Belgium, and, having by a
supreme blow shattered the pow-
or of France, to throw all her
available strength, combined with
that of Austria-Hungary, against
Russia and Serbia.   This failed.
Her second plan, adopted after
the great victory of the Allies on
the Marne, was to cripple Russia
by an advance on Warsaw and
subjugation of Poland. This
failed.
The next effort was to capture
Antwerp and the Belgian coast
and establish a base for operations against the United Kingdom
and England in particular. Antwerp and a part of the coast was
taken, but nothing in the nature
of a formidable naval base has
been established, and the United
Kingdom has not been invaded
or even seriously menaced.
Then came the rush to reach
Calais, which was defeated last
-autumn by the great battle of
Ypers, and thopgh it has been
renewed since, its success is more
remote than it was last October.
The second attempt to capture
Warsaw met with defeat
The Austrian attempt to take
possession of Serbia failed.
The attempt byGerman cruisers
to destroy British Commerce
utterly failed, and every ship of
war which Germany had upon
the high sea at the beginning of
the war has either been destroyed
or interned.
The attempt to. paralyze Bi itish
trade by establishing a so-called
war zone has failed.
The attempt tp stir up sedition
in India failed.
The attempt to stir up sedition
in Egypt failed.
The attempt to carry the war
into Egypt failed.
The campaign of 'f rightfulness'
has utterly failed of its expected
results and has alienated the
sympathy of all neutral powers.
The attempt to purchase the
neutrality of Italy failed.
The attempt to stir tip rebellion
in South'Africa Tailed.
There are cheap corsets, but when the most graceful
and comfortable corsets cost but little more 'than the
cheap ones, why wear any but the best ?
Comfort and an air of refinement become
second nature to wearers of
tgf
CORSETS
(Made In Canada) v
Come here and see the latest models. Also let us
show you our many new styles in ladies' outer
apparel.
Ask for our Catalogue showing New Models.
.... H — lil-L —14--U-H... JJIL.. iill 1 It ^
The German aerial raids have
failed of accomplishing any useful result.
The third attempt to capture
Warsaw, this time from the
north, failed.
The invasion of the Russian
province of Courland failed.
The attempted naval raids
against the coast of England
failed.
The use of poisonous gases has
failed to produced any results of
value.
The great German fleet, built at
enormous cost, and from which
so much was expected, has not
yet ventured from its base and
up to the present has proved
little else than a failure.
have accomplished.
By violating a treaty and by
pouring into Belgium the greatest army ever sent into the field,
before the British and French
were able to act, the Germans
were able to occupy the greater
part of that country, an area of
approximate y 10,000 sq. miles,
which is about one-third the area
of Vancouver Islend.
By continuing their advance
they were able to occupy approximately 15,000 square miles of
France. (The whole area of
France is 207,107 square miles.)
After the battle of the Marne
they were forced out of upwards
of 6,000 square miles of this, and
they now are in occupation of
The last great attempt tc-pierce; approximately 8.500 square miles,
the Russian front has failed.       ior a little more than 4 per cent
Let us now consider the th'ngs of the whole country,
which  Germany  and   her allies     Their battle line in Poland is
so located that approximately
10,000 square miles, or roughly
speaking one-fifth of the Russian
political area known as Poland,
are in German hands.
Deducting from these figures
the part of Southern Alsace in
the possession of the French, and
we have in German hands approximately a net area of 18,000 square
miles of the territory of the Allies
in the»West, and in the East approximately 10,000 square miles
of Russian territory. But Russia
has in Galica and Bukowina
27,000 square miles of Austrian
territory in her possession, leaving a balance against the Teutonic
allies in the East of 17.003 square
miles, which is nearly as much
as the territory of the Allies in
the West which Germany occupies.—Colonist, June 1st.
1 THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Rfel
THREE
*.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
11      CAPITAL, $15,0W,00« REST, $13,SM,MI
MONEY ORDERS
Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce, are a safe, convenient
and inexpensive method of remitting small sums of money. These
Orders, payable without charge at any bank in Canada (except in
the Yukon Territory) and in the principal cities of the United States,
are issued at the following rates :
$5 and under    r*       .       *      3 centa
Over Sand not exceeding $10     .      6   "
•<    i|     4i .. 3f      ,     19   ••
••   3f      « « 5»      .      H   ••
REMITTANCES -ABROAD
should be msde by means of our SPECIAL FOREIGN DRAFTS aad MONEY
ORDERS., Issued without delay atffaaonable rates. S2I
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.      W. T.  WHITE, Manager.
eS&eetwn/an/ awt/ eS&fflffle**
Phones E9TATES MANAGED Gmrtenay
42 & 48 RENTS COLLECTED &C
LAND   REGISTRY  WORK  A  SPECIALTY
Cumberland  '.
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C.
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE  AGENT
PHONE*: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER  BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST-ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO  THEATRE  BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
HOTEL UNION
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION
First Class in every respect Perfect Cuisine
Headquarters for Tourists and Sportsmen
Wines Liquors and Cigars
John N. McLeod, Proprietor
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilbrneb Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
General  Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing  a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Kebuilt, or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.
Kierstead & Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland, B.C,
New England Hotel
EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION
RATES     REASONABLE ,
EVERYTHING    MODERN
JOSEPH   WALKER,   Proprietor.
Lunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
B. C.
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «. C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
MEAT!   MEAT!
MEAT!
A
If you want QUALITY don't
forget to call at the
City Meat Market
WE BUY FOR  PAQW
WE SELL FOR  ^Aon
THEREFORE:
We are the best and cheapest
* in town.
CANCELLATION of RESERVE
VOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the reserve covering certain
lands in the vicinity of Carring-
ton Bay, Cortes Island, by reason
of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on the 27th
of December, 1907, is cancelled
in so far as it relates to Lots 866,
866, 867, 868, 869, 870, 871, 897, *
898, 899, 900, and 901, Sayward
District. The said Lots will be
open to entry by pre-emption on
Tuesday the 18th day of May;
1915, at nine o'clock in the forenoon. No Pre-emption Record
will be issued to include more
than on-, surveyed Lot, and all
applications must be made at the
office of the Government Agent,
at Vancouver.
R. A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria,
B.C., March 12th. 1915.
L
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and    Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
L
i FOUR
THS ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CHURCH NOTICES
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Service, 7 p.m.
Bible  Study   (Sunday  School),
2.30 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday
7-30 p.m.
Cottage Meeting, Wednesday at
8.00 p.m.
Choir Practice. Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Wm. Elliott, B. A., Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)'
Services for First Sunday afte.
Trinity:
8.30 a. m.,  Holy Communion
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of intercession on Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
NoAdvance
In the Price of
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
At    ,
FLETCHERS
Owing to the fact that we were in the
possession of an extra large stock of
musical instruments when the war
broke out. we have not been obliged
to raise our prices, and we are still in
a position to offer:-
Violins from $3.00 up
Mandolins .J'rom $5.00 up
Guitars    .from $5.00 up
Ban.ios  from $5.00 up
Accordeons. from $2.00 up
Mouth-organs. . from .25 up
Cases for all instruments'...from $2.00 up
When in Nanaimo call in and examine
our stock.   You are welcome whether
you buy or not.
G.A.Fletcher,
Music Company,Nanaimo,"\C. ■
OUT UNDER THE STARS
After He Had Told Helen Whole
Truth.
By S.  E. KISER.
. For three hours Helen Sibley had
been waiting at Northport Junction.
Luckily the evening was pleasant, so
that she was not compelled to sit in
the stuffy, dingy little station. There
;was just one pretty thing about North-
'port Junction, and that vas Helen. If
jthe train for which she was waiting
'ever came and eyer departed again,
JNorthport Junction would resume Its
habit of being about as unlovely a
spot as one might find within the tern-
Jperate zone.
' While Helen remained the place
.would possess one attraction that
would have lent distinction to a far
-more Important and a far more splendid center of activity than the Junction was ever likely to become.
1 The operator In the bay window that
Jutted out into the point of land between the branching tracks evidently
had an eye for beauty as well as an
ear for Morse. As Helen walked up
and down the platform he watched her
and became thoughtful. He wondered why it was that nature bestowed
her gifts so lavishly upon some girls
and treated others so shabbily. The
beauty that Helen possessed might
have made a dozen plain girls fair if
it had been distributed among them.
Such was the operator's reasoning.
The operator at Northport' Junction
was a philosopher.
But Helen was not thinking of philosophy, and if she had noticed that the
operator was eagerly watchir.g her the
fact neither added to her pleasure
nor caused her annoyance. For some
reason she was thinking of Tom Harlow. Perhaps it was because of the
.loneliness of her surroundings. It
was nearly a year since she had re-
{fused to listen when Tom had said that
ihe could "explain everything in good
jtime," and for months she had thought
that she waB never going to have any
'interest in him again.
] Thinking of Tom naturally caused
her to think of Mrs. Danforth, the pretty, young grass-widow who had come
between them. There Was something
mysterious about Mrs. Danforth.   Peo-
WANTED TO RENT-A house
containing at least five rooms.
Apply The Islander, P. O.
drawer 430.
BICYCLE BARGAINS: Scores
of shop-soiled and second-hand
bicycles and motorcycles are
offered at snap prices during our
great clearance sale. Write for
particulars. Plimley's Cycle
Works, Victoria, B.C.
NEW MODELS
i She Was Thinking of Tom Harlow.
pie talked about her, but nobody seemed, to kjiOW^ist why.    She had come
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that
the reserve existing on the Fractional East Half of the Fractional
North West Quarter of Fractional
Section 8, Malcolm Island,Rupert
District, by reason of a notice
published in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 29th day of May,
1902, is cancelled for the purpose
of issuing a Pre-emption Record
covering same to one, Anti Kusta
Aho.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,  Victoria,
B.C., May 11th, 1915.
Wanted to rent—A nice comfortable five or ^ix-roomed house
in a respectable locality; furnished preferred. Apply stating
terms to P.O. Drawer 430, The
Islander.
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Speoialty
West Cumberland
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C,
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE &. GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hondo*noil, I'roprietor
Kstinuites and Dusiiriis furnished
on Application
1411STDDID
Is now .open for
business in the
Willard Block
Dunsmuir Ave.
TAKEN
DAY OR
NIGHT
First Class Work Guaranteed
at Low Prices.
Enlarging a
Specially
Films Developed for Amateurs
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED $
BARN IS NOW FULLY STOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones YS1 and R99.
IMPORTANT  TO   CUSTOMERS:--No   Orientals,   Agents,   or  Solicitors
employed. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
1
!
r
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
OOAL mining nijhts of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tnries nnd in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years ar an annual nuiral of
91 an acre. Nor more than 2,500 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district ill which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or lesjal subdivisions
of sections, and in uusuiveyed erritory
the tract applied for shall he staked out by
theapplioaiit himself.
K-»ch application must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
•otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five centa per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pty the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall he
furnished at least once a year.
Tbe lease will include the coal minim;
rights only, but the lessee may, ba permitted to purchase whatever available sur
face rights may be considered necessary
f or the working of the mine at the rate of
$l0.00*nacre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawi,   or to   any
Agent or Sub*A-r*-*nt "fD'-minion Lands
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unaurhoriz id publication of this
advertisement will not be naid fnr.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE*
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
FIRE  INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London ft Lancashire Fire Insurance Oo., of Liverpool.
Total Assets • 928,788,930.
W.   WILLARD..
LOCAL
A Q«E N 1
NEW SPRING HATS
Mrs. Jotia Gillespie
West Cumberland
es YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sanding a sketch and description mar
quickly ueertain our opinion -free whether au
:ly i	
•tlon Is probably paten.**"?]*),. Communion-
Btrt
Patent! taken through Munn AVo."receive
>vecial notice, without charge, ln the
Invention l» probably patentable.  Co        	
; ioiiB strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
tent free. Oldest agency for eecurlnirpatci-ts.
' '""" through Munn & Co. r     '
Scientific American.
A handsomely illustrated weekly.   Lanrest clr*
ralatlon of any scientific journal.    Terms  for
.Canada, $8.75 a year, postage prepaid.   Sold by
all newsdealers.
MUNN &Co.3e,B^. New York
Sranch Office, 626 F St. Washington, D. C.
.«#* OiiTB-aWKVl  A  BlTtUtgei   aSa   0-.-=  —-
[been careful to leave her past behind
her. It had not taken her long to find
! rlends.and she was quickly admitted to
I [the best social circles. With plenty
of money, she lived at the most fashionable hotel, she entertained lavishly, and her clothes were the talk of
the town. Then, one day, she disappeared, and on the following morning
Tom Harlow told Helen that it had
become necessary for him to go to Chicago.
I A week later he returned, but a substantial citizen of Springfield had returned before him. The substantial
citizen had seen Tom and Mrs. Danforth together in Chicago. Of course
Tom had assured Helen that it was
all right, but he had not explained.
He had merely promised to do so "in
good time." And Helen had naturally
decided that the "good time" could
never come. So Tom went away.
1 She thought over all this as she impatiently waited at Northport Junction. A dozen times she tried to fix
her thoughts on other things, but always they turned back to the old subject. She became angry with herself,
at last, and more for the purpose of
trying to forget Tom Harlow than
with the hope of obtaining information
■she went into the station and asked
the operator if it was likely that the
train for Medford would arrive on
time.
| "She's Just reported fifty minutes
iate," the operator informed her.
"There's a washout up the road."
1 Helen turned away with a feeling of
hopelessness and went outside again.
If Northport had looked dismal to her
before, it now seemed desolate. While
she was trying to count the appalling
number of minutes that she would
have to wait, she heard tbe whistle of
en engine away up the curve around
the. hill on the main line.
When the long train stopped at the
Junction Helen saw a man step down
from one of the Pullman cars away at
the rear. She paid no attention to
bim, supposing he was a passenger
who had merely stepped oft to gt-v
breath of fresh air, but after tne tn
had gone on she noticed that the m.
was walking slowly down the cin.l.
path beside the track toward the .:,
tion. For a moment she ga-.ed i
him, and then hurried Inside." lt '■•;-
Tom Harlow, carrying a suit-case.
Selecting the darkest corner ln ■';.'■
station, Helen sat down, turned  i
back toward the door, and wait <l, li..<
ing that no one would come in :
fearing something tbat she could n.
have explained.    Her corner was  ,.
dark, and she remained so silent th
Tom entered without noticing her.
"When does the train leave tt
Medford?" he asked at the ticket w.
dow.
"It's pretty hard to tell," the opev
tor replied. "She's reported fifty ml.
utes late, but there's a washout u
tbe road, and she may be held up e
night."
That's encouraging," Tom remar!
ed.   "What I've seen of this   pla.
doesn't make me yearn to spend the
night here.    Where's the town?"
"This ls it."
"Isn't there a hotel of any kind?"
"No, nothing in that line except the
farm house half a mile down the track,
where the night operator and I
board."
"I suppose there's no hack?"
"None that I've ever heard of."
"What time do you light up here?
They ought to let you use plenty of
oil in such a lonesome place as this.
It's getting pretty dark."
"Just a minute.    Here's my call."
The operator turned to his instruments and Tom Harlow waited at the
ticket window, hoping there might be
encouraging news concerning the train
for Medford; but he was doomed to be
disappointed.
"I guess you may as well make up
your mind to hang around here all
night," said the operator after the instrument had ceased clicking (he
spoke rather loudly for Helen's benefit) ; "they say the track is washed out
in half a dozen places.. Therels been
a cloud-burst."
While Tom drummed with his fingertips upon the ledge of the ticket window the operator lighted the lamp in
his office and then proceeded to illuminate the waiting room, which
served for both men and women.
For a moment after the light had
been turned on Tom Harlow looked si-
Ien ur at Helen, who sat with her back
toward him, her head bent and he1
face hidden in her hands. The opera
tor turned to his instruments, which
were clicking frantically.
"Helen," Tom said very tenderly after he had paused beside her.
She' looked up at him, and he saw
that there Were tears in her eyes. He
reached for one of her hands, but she
drew away from him and shrank a
little farther into her corner.
"Helen," he said again, "I've come
to explain to you. I supposed you
were already at Medford. I waB going there to tell you."
She stood up, and when he again attempted to take her hand in his she
did not object. jtfc
"Let's go outside," he suggested,
"outside, under the stars, where I can
tell you everything—where nothing
will be between us and heaven."
The operator was busy, and did no'
notice that the waiting room was
empty.
"You see, Helen, it was necessarj
for Mrs. Danforth to take somebody
into her confidence," Tom said.   "For
some reason she selected me.   Her for
mer husband, who was a scalawag, Ha;
informed the secret service agents tha;
she had been smuggling jewelry.    1
was merely a case of blackmail. Sm
had refused to support him and ht
tried to get her to buy him   off.   Sh.
needed somebody to help her establis
an alibi, and at the same time   sh
didn't want the story of her trouble
to get out.    So she drafted me int*
her service, and I couldn't very we;
beg off. ; She was a woman in distress, that waB all."
"But why didn't you tellme before?'
Helen asked. $T%
"She had asked me iwt to tell any
body until she gave me permission it
do -»•"
"Then she has given you permlssl6iV
—and you have seen her again?"
"No, I have neither seen her nor
heard from her. The man has made a
confession, and the whole story is ii:
the papers."
She walked away from him, crosse*
the platform and stood for a long time
looking at the silent hills that lajtjtttjp
in the gathering shadows Of the ifijr;
At length she turned, came half w?.
back to him, and then stopped. Hi
approached her, held out his arm;
and asked:
"Don't yon believe I have told ycu
the truth, Helen—that I have told yon
all there is to tell?"
She did not speak, but put her arm *
about his neck and laid her necl.
against his breast, while his arm..
closed about her. Thus for a long
time they stood beneath the stars.
When they returned to the waiting
room the operator informed them that
the train for Medford would arrive ln
ten minutes.
At Medford Helen had friends, and
at Medford there were preachers.
(Copyright, 1912, by W. G. Chapman.)
"A'Loat^ArV
"Tou say you used to have- a profession, my good man?"
"Oh, yes, lady, I used to manufacture petticoats."
Nothing Else Forthcoming
"I beg- your pardon, sir—"
"Granted;  but it's no use begging
*Xor anything else!"
In THE MATTER of the "Navigable Waters Protection Act,"
"Chapter 115, R.S.C., 1906 and
In the matter of an application
by the Weeks Dunell Cedar
Company, Limited, of Union
Bay, Vance river Isiimd; in the
Province of British Columbia,
for approval under the said Act
of certain works at Fan; y Bay,
Vancouver Island.
Notice is hereby given that
Weeks Dunell Cedar Company,
Limited, of Union Bay, in the
Province of British Colnmbia, intend to apply after the expiration
of one month from the date of
the first publication of this notice
to the Cover nor General in Council for approval under the
"Navigable Waters Protection
Acf'^and amending Acts, of the
plans and site of a shingle mill
wharf and booming grounds for
the said mill to be constructed on
that certain water lot in Fanny
Bay, Vancouver Island aforesaid,
lying in front of a certain 6.36
acre portion of District Lot 43,
known as Lot "A" in Fanny Bay
in the public harbour of Baynes
Sound, Newcastle District Vancouver Island, in the Province of
':iitish Columbia, described as
commencing at a post planted at
the intersection of high water
mark of Fanny Bay with the
north boundary of said Lot "A"
District Lot 43, thence east 1286
feet, thence south 300 feet,
thence due west 1060 feet more
or less to high water mark,
thence northwestwardly following sain high water mark to the
point} Of beginning, containing
ah affea of 8.08 acres more or less
Tli^ said works when so con-*
s.. ucitci are intended to be used
for a shingle mill, wharf and
booming grounds for the >aid
mill.
.nND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
t at a plan of the proposed works
together with a description of the
site have beer deposited in the
office of the Minister of Public
Works at Otiowa. and is also in
the office of the District Registrar
of Titles at the city of Victoria, in
ehe Province of British Columbia.
Dated at Vancouver, this 10th
day of April, A.D. 1915.
BUCHANAN & BULL,
bp.ic.Qrs for applicant.
A
NOTICE.
1 FCT1VE PROM CCT. 1ST, 1914.
* ' ran.es of anv kind will be
permitted  on    the    Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 P.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. Ry Lockard,
General Supetintendent. SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FARM LAUDS PRE-EMPTED
Of a total of 694 lots opened
for pre-emption on May 18th, 119
were taken up, and it is interesting to note that the great demand
was for tracts  which   held   a
certain speculative value, rather
than farming landB.  At Vancouver 242 applicants appeared for
102  lpts  in  tracts  situated at
various  parts of the Mainland
Coast and islands between Sechelt
and Thurlow Island, two of the
tracts being situated near Sechelt
and  near  Lund,    The ketnest
demand was for the former area,
in which 20 lots of 40 acres each
had been subdivided.    The first
twenty applicants in line secured
these, and when others  found
they  had  been  taken  up, left
. without taking other lots offered;
In fact, although the total number of lots offered at this office
was 102 ar.d 242 tickets were
issued to show the priority of
applicants the last man in the
line found a choice of 22 lots a-
waiting him. The tracts at Sechelt and near Lund, which held
a total of 42 lots, were all taken,
and of the remaining 16 lots in
New Westminster district,sitdat-
ed on Redonda Island and Horn-
fray Channel, 4 were pre-empted
On Thurlow Island and Sunderland Channel. Range 1,   Coast
District, 29 were taken up of the
33 lots o'ffered, and 5 of the 11
on Cortes Island. A total of 80
lots of the total of 102 for which
242 applicants appeared at the
Vancouver land-recording office.
The contrast with Malcolm
Island on which 247 lots were
subdivided into 40-acre tracts,
and the South Fork of the Fraser
where 183 lots, mostly of 160
acres, close to the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, many adjoining
it and none'over 3 miles distant,
and Canoe River Valley, where
39 lots of 160 acres, mostly river
bottom land on Canoe River,
were offered, is indicative of the
nature of the demand. Of the
total of these lots, 469 in all, but
12 were taken. Six on Malcolm
Island out of 247 lots offered were
recorded at the Albernie land
office and six of the 222 on the
South Fork of the Fraser and
Canoe Rivers at the Fort George
office.
Of the logged-off lands subdivided for pre-emption on Nootka Island no applicant appeared
for the 39 lots offere. At Cranbrook about a quarter of the lots
offered, 21 out of 80, mostly 160
acre blocks, were taken up, and
six lots offered at Fernie were
taken up. Of the grand total of
694 lots offered in the various
districts 119 were taken, and of
this number 80 Were lots on the
lower Mainland Coast, within
easy reach of the city of Vancouver.
"QUEEN" Beer
«     *\
Makes you
Eat Better
Sleep Better
Feel Better
It's made of the very best B.C.
Hop and Alberta Barley—thoroughly filtered, aged and pasteurized.
Ask at the hotel for QUEEN BEER
—a beer you'll like.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington .Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No 2.
1
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
...   r
READ  UF*
isownoNS
•**' *
\
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
fues.
Wed,
Thurs
Fri.
Sat
7:00
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.    P.M.
11.05   4.50
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.10
10.40   4.25
Bevan
7.25
2.55
10:55
2.25
10:55
7-55
10:55
7:25
4.05
i
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
10.35   4.20
Puntledge
7.30
3.00
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
!  4.00 | 7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
10.30   4.15
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
3.05
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3,55 ] 6.5?
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
10.25   4.10'
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
3.10
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
1
,   3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50     3.50
10.20   4.05
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
3.15
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45  ' 3.45
i
f
10.15   4.00
Royston
7.50
3.20
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
i 3.30
1
6.30
'3.30
6.30
3.30     3.30
10.00   3.45
Union Bay
8.00
3.30
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leavp Cumberlahd for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY w
**a***wmmm**m
IMC iBLANDISK, CUMItJiSKLAMU, U. <U.
SEVEN
I
BRAVE DRUMMER tOY
Brother of Winnipeg Man Decorated
For Conspicuously Gallant Dead
How a young brother ot a Wlnnipag
man, Mr. R. L. Poster, of the McLaren Hotel news-stand, saved a
position for his regiment by gallantry,
carrying an important message in the
face of the enemy's fire, to be rewarded with the Distinguished Conduct
Medal, was told in the columns of an
English exchange,   The item read:
"An instance of an East Qrinstead
lad securing high honor is that of
Drummer Arthur W. Foster, son of
Statt-SergL A. W. H. Foster, an old
army man, wno has now gone back
to the service and is doing duty in
the .Army School of Cookery at Alder-
shot The boy has been awarded tha
Distinguished Conduct Medal by His
Majesty the King for conspicuous
heroism In the field. He, with two
companions (a color-sergeant and a
private), displayed great coolness and
gallantry In bringing up supports and
ammunition, and in carrying messages under a deadly bail of fire during a very stiff battle. It ls stated
ln a private letter that has been sent
home that the lad practically saved
the position by getting through witb
a certain message in regard to supports. Young Foster enlisted as a
drummer ln the 1st Battalion of tbe
South Wales Borderers at Chatham
ln January, 1912. He is only 18 years
of age, and has taken to his profession with great enthusiasm, making
himself extremely popular with his
companions and much respected by
tbe officers, who think t great deal
of him."   ".
/
Furnishing a Dreadnought
The; 12-lnch gun of a Dreadnought
Is 50 feet long, and if set upon end
would be higher than many a country
church tower. The cost of each gun
is about $50,000, while each time li
is fired $600 vanishes into tbe air.
As a protection against the guns
of th« enemy, a Dreadnought la cover
•d with armor costing $600 per ton.
aad as something Ilka 4,800 tons are
used In covering thi vessel this mean*
aa expenditure c< close upon $3,000,000
Boilers and machinery at $1,616,000
motor aad steam boats at $40,000.
torpedo-tubes at $16,000 each and tor
pedoes at $1,600 eadi; and $360,000
for searchlights and electrical fitting'
are other Items In the bill which go
to make a Dreadnought the costliest
vessel afloat     r
Prtpersd Fer Raid
Acting on the advice of the military
authorities tbe Wlthernsea (York
shire) Council called on all shop
keepers In the town to close their
shops and cease business for the day
at 6 pjn. A dugout was made to
shelter children in the event of a
bombardment.
The Kaiser   possesses   323 decor*
fttions.
Not Much!
"JJy good man," said the clergyman to a bareheaded man breaking
stone on a very hot day, "don't you
know that the sun will injure your
brain if you expose it ln that manner?"
"Don't worry!" came the unruffled
answer. "D'you think I'd stick at this
rotten job if I'd any brain?"
Ham or Never
Mew Maid—Would you mind giving
me a recommendation, ma'am?
Mistress—why, you've only Just
come!
New Maid—Yes, ma'am; but "you
may not want to give me one when
I'm leaving!
A Great Race >
Two globe-trotters met ln the
smoking room of a hotel in a part o;
the world called, by some poeple, "the
outskirts of the Empire." They fount'
that they had each spent a week in
China, on the strength of which th. -
proceeded to "weigh up" '.hat country
to their mutual admiration and satis
faction.
From that the talk drifted to sporting events witnessed in different parts
of the world.
"While  I  was  in  Australia,"  sai<
No 1, "I saw what I imagine to be th
closest race in the world.   The win
nlng horse only beat the second by
a tongue's length!"
No. < 2 seemed lost in thought. Hu
gazed abstractedly out of the window
At last he spoke:
"I have seen a closer race than
that," be murmured. "1 was once in
Scotland!"
Sold  Again I
"Johnny, I want you to go on a
little errand for me."
"Oh, mother, must I really? My
legs ache."
"In that case, of course, you need'nt
go; bnt I thought perhaps you'd like
ta You tee, I wanted you to go io
Mrs. 8tickney*a candy store and—"
Little Johnny   brightened wonder
tally.
"Oh, I think I ean walk as far as
tbat!" be said.
"Then you will gof
"Certainly, mother."
"Aad yen know wbere Mrs. Stick-
aey's store is?"
"Yes, mother."
"Well, I have a'*parpri upstates
which I want you to hat* in at the
post office nezt door. I'm afraid it
to rather a big parcel, but you don't
mind carrying H, do you, Johnny?"
B'GOLLY
THERE   ARE   TWO
REASONS WHY -50ME
FELLERS NEVER MIND
THEIR OWN BUSINESS.
ONB IS DAT THEY fl*NT|
GOT NO MIND F\N}
TH'OTHER IS 0RT THEY
HINT GOT„N0  BUSINESS.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery. Enainehvare
Paints, Oils, Edison*A: Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
NTAIN PEN
LASHLIGHTS
We have just received a consignment
of Ideal Fountain Lights, the latest
wrinkle in vest pocket electric
torches. Slighlty larger than the average fountain pen and clips on to the
vest pocket in the same way. Just
the thing'for motorists. A remarkably BRIGHT LIGHT IN A REMARKABLY
SMALL CASE.
SEE OUffWNDOW DISPLAY
PRICES:-
Gun Metal finish (complete) - $1.35
Nickel finish (complete) - - $1.50
Refills     .35
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED *:4 YEARS.] EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS   j [~~
• ^'^^■^^%/N^
Henry Devlin, mines; nspectov,
is here on his usual official visit.
Mrs, Charles White left for
New Westminister on Thursday.
Born: On Tuesday, dune 1st,
to the wife of Mr. Fred Leffley,
a daughter.
John Bennie and family arrived
recently and will again make
Cumberland their home.
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton accompanied his mother to Moose
Jaw on her road East.
Harold Woods and Milton Davis
have returntd from a two weeks'
vacation.
The infant daughterof Mr.and
Mrs. Robert Rushford died on
Sunday.
Born: On Saturday. May 29th,
to the wife of Mr. George Davis,
of Union Bay, a daughter.
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
The regular meeting of the Conservative Association will be held
in the committee rooms on Tuesday evening. Business of importance. All membeis are requested
to attend.
For Sale — Airedale Terries,
pure bren youngsters, from prize
winning imported stock, none
better; for show and work; $10!
a-•'I up. Apply Jack'on, Chiltoe
Farm, Sankwick.
A special meeting of the executive of the Cumberland Board of
Trade will be held in the council
chambers on Monday evening at
8 o'clock. All members of the.
executive are urgently requested
to be present..
Lost—A gold brooch set with
pearls, on Thursday evening between Courtenay Road Crossing
and along Mary port Ave. Suitable reward on return to Islander
office.
To-morrow the Pastor of the
Methodist Church wid begin
fortnightly services at Bevan.
commencing at 2 o'clock p.m. He
will be glad to meet as many of
the Bevan people as possible.
On Thurs.lay morning 2 Germans and 5 Austrians from Cumberland, 22 Austrians from Bevan, and four Austrians from
Courtenay, were sent to Union
Bay to be interned until the end
of the war.
The city ou icil held their regular session in the council chambers on Mondav evening. Accounts
amounting to $94.25 were referred
to the finance committee.
Rev. William Elliott, B.A., for
the past twelve montlis pastor of
Grace Methodist Church, will
leave in the course of a few days
and take the pastorate of Jubilee
Methodist Church, a station between Vancouver and New Westminster. He will be succeeded
here by the Rev. tienry V\ ilson.
I
THE   BIG   STORE
HIGH GRADE HOSIERY
All Penman's goods are guaranteed and any found
unsatisfactory will be cheerfully replaced.
Very Special Ladies' Hose, 300 pairs OC.   0 ..«
full-fashioned Penman's Hose    £*&%** tX pall
Penman's Cashmere Hose, the best  9Cr  a naL
value on the market today, 3 pairs for $1, or   ********** *X |J<UI
J§£fP^      Penman's Very Fine Cashmere Hose   t*[(*r*  9nai«-
/jSsitfyA.       A really first-class line at    Wvti tX fJOII
e**t*t*****m********m**********m**mm*m**mm******m*****mmm**tm**t**tt****^^
LADIES' MUSLIN WAISTS
Low Collar, trimmed pique and lace, five
different styles to choose from.
Price 75c.
in* "tn.
Ladies'   Middy   and   Balkan
Waists
A leader for a few days at
Price 95c.
Ladies9   House
Dresses
Made of good gingham
$1.25 to $2.50
Ladies'   Street
Dresses
Marked at special re-
ductipns.   - See these
before,tb£ygp.:   Prices
ateicight.
The House for the
D. & A.
Corset
At prices to meet all  ,
(**^*******f *.
SIMON LEISER
&
CO.,
LIMITED.
THE
BIG   STORE
.
Phone 3-8

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