BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Oct 25, 1924

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0068205.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068205.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0068205-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0068205-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0068205-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0068205-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0068205-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0068205-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0068205-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0068205.ris

Full Text

Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
i»
f*0.
''At
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 43.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA    SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Temperance Act
Sustained In Ont.
(Special to The Islander)
TORONTO, Oct.. 23.—The Ontario
Temperance Act was sustained as the
form of liquor legislation governing
the sale of liquor in this province in
the plebiscite taken today under provincial government auspices. The
majority in favor of the present act
is expected to exceed 25,000 when tho
final ballots are counted. The total
was close to a million votes representing a drop of 200,000 from the total
vote cast In 1919 when the Ontario
Temperance Act was confirmed by the
popular majority of 407,000.
The vote ln its broad lines was a
contest between ruralite and urbanite.
Three hours after the polls closed tho
Ontario Temperance Act had apparently been defeated and the counter
proposal for the sale of liquor under
government control without medical
certificates had been supported by a
majority of more than 65,000 voteB
with half the total votes counted.
This however represented the city and
town votes and when the country districts had been tallied the apparent
wet majority dwindled to the vanishing point. By midnight the majority
hail passed into the dry column and
with many votes still unrecorded prohibition had been sustained by a majority of nearly 25,000.
Provincial summary 5921 polls out
of 7332 show Ontario Temperance Act
475,120 government control, 450,198
majority, 24,922 in favor of the On-
'.ario Temperance Act.
ANOTHER MASS
MEETING SUNDAY
All employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., are asked to
Be present at a mass meeting to be
held in the Lecture Hall on Sunday
evening at 7:30 o'clock, for the purpose of accepting or rejecting the
Company's new agreement.
At the mass meeting held last Sunday the proposition put forth was referred back to the Company for further  consideration.
TRACTOR AND DRIVER
GO OVER EMBANKMENT
Walter Brown, an employee of one
of the camps of Horne Lake had a
miraculous escape from death on
Sunday last when he went over a 60-
foot embankment, accompanied by a
tractor. He was rushed to the Cumberland General Hospital and on being examined, was found to have no
bones broken, but very badly bruised
and shaken.
Parksville Has
Panther Scare
Word was received this .week from
Parksville of the exploits of Mr. Jas.
Craig, of Craig's Crossing, aud his
son, the former having killed two
panthers and the latter having been
rewarded with one. The animals
were first seen hy Mr. Despard in his
yard where they must hove been attracted by the flock of goats that Mr.
Despard keeps. Word was sent to
Mr. Craig who soon arrived on tlle
scene with his dogs and was able to
kill two of the beasts within half
an hour, the third and largest being
killed the following day by his son.
RANGERS AGAIN FAIL TO STOP
UNITED; LOSE GAME 4 TO 0
Cumberland United advanced another two points in the race for Upper-Island league honors when they
defeated the other local team, the
Rangers, In a return game here last
Sunday, thereby maintaining their
record of no lost games so far this
season. At the same time Nanaimo
City was upholding a similar record
on their home ground by disposing of
Ladysmlth by the score of one to nil,
and it looks very much as if the lcu-
gue Is going to result In an interesting race between the former and Cumberland with the game In Nannlmo on
November 30th, ns the deciding factor.
Sunday's game here was a decided
contrast from that on October 5th inasmuch that the spectators were not
in the same hostile mood, or, if so,
they were kind enough to keep their
criticisms and their booing to themselves. There Is no doubt at all that
a player who is booed for no apparent reason, as in the first game between these two teams, Is going to retaliate by playing dirty, and our statement is further borne out by the fact
that in Sunday's game, because there
was no booing, dirty play was also
conspicuous by its absence. This
week's crowd of fans, although fairly
large, was still not as large as those
which uttended former games hero
this season.
Pluy Hns Very Even
Promptly at the time set for the
commencement of play Referee Jones'
whistle wns heard and the gome was
on. Hardly hnd It's echo died away
when the crowd was brought to It's
feet by a spectacular bit of play on
Graham's part, who, after passing the
Ranger hacks, shot wide of the goal
when young Walker came charging
townrd him. The younger team,
whicli had apparently gotten over the
nervousness evident in the first game,
took a hand in the play and although
they didn't get very close to Blair they
kept his full-backs and halves In hot
water for a fully fifteen minutes.
Farmer was keeping close check on
Graham so effectively that that worthy
player was not in the picture as often
as he would liked to have been. Without their pivot the other forwards
could not do much for they were helpless against the defense put up by
Gough and Mitchell. Hut till- state
of affairs didn't last long and with
about eight minutes t-> l?0 the first
goal of the dny was registered for the
United though not by a United plnyer. Walker, while trying to save
from a scrimmage, had the misfortune to lose his bnlnnce and accidentally push the ball into his own
The Aims Of The
Public School
INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE PAPER READ BY MISS
T. A. GALLIVAN AT THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE
P.-.T ASSOCIATION— DR. LAMB, OF VANCOUVER
ALSO DELIVERS NOTABLE ADDRESS
net. This was the only score of the
period although the United missed
several golden opportunities to add to
lt. J
Score Three More
The second half was not quite as
Interesting to the fans for the reason
that the Rangers, whom they naturally favored on account of their
youth, gradually faded away except
for a few rare Intervals when Jock
Stewart seemed to take pity on their
forwards and left them a few easy
openings, which they did nothing
with. If the forwards were lacking
such was not the case with the Ranger defense. Of the four backs on
the field Gough was easily the pick
and Marshall at left-half was the best
man of the twenty-two. His playing
against such experienced players as
Hitchens, Fowler and Monohan was a
treat to watch. Farmer at center-
half is a wonder with his head and
as one fan was heard to remark "If
he could use his feet as well as he
uses the opposite end of his body he'd
be the best half-back In B.C."
In spite of this, the experience of
the United began to tell and before
the half was over they had added
three more goals to the one secured
in the first half. These were scored
by Ferguson, Graham and Fowler, the
last one being headed ln as pretty as
you could wish from Bannerman's
perfectly placed corner. Of the few
breaks the Rangers secured only one
was very dangerous aud that was
when Weir had the misfortune to lilt
the upright with Blnir beat a mile.
The game ended with no further scoring, the final result being 4 to 0 in
favor of the United.
Ackroyd Shines (or Vancouver
Jack Ackroyd, left back of the Van-
(Contlnued on   Page Five)
A most enjoyable evening was
spent by the members of the P.-T. Association in the Anglican Church
Hall on the evening of October 21st,
1924, together with a large number of
visitors. The meeting was in the
form of a social, the business part
being given a few minutes at the opening. Mrs. MacNaughton, the President, called the meeting to order and
the evening began with the singing nf
"0 Canada." The Secretary, Miss
Mordy, read the minutes of the last
meeting which were adopted as read.
The few business Items were attended
to; Mrs. Sweeney and Mrs. C. Graham being appointed as visitors to the
school. The President then welcomed the visitors in a few well-chosen
words, inviting all to become members of the Association. The evening's program, as arranged by the
social committee, with Mrs. Apps as
convenor, was then commenced.
A paper read by Rev. Leversedge at
the completion of his year's work as
President was re-read by special request.
Rev. Hood, gave a reading entitled
"School Examinations," this causing
a good deal of amusement.
The musical items of the evening
began with a piano solo by Mr. Thomas followed by a vocal solo by Mr.
Goodall entitled "Hail Caledonia!"
which was followed by an encore entitled "ltaliano," Mr, Jackson, accompanied by Mr. Goodall, pleased
the audience with a banjo solo.
An interesting flower contest followed which was- won by Mrs. Shortt
and Rev. Butler. The next game was
"The Jolly Miller." This was followed by selections rendered by the
Boys' Band conducted by Mr. E. H.
Murray, Assistant Principal of the
Cumberland Public School.
Miss Galllvan then read an excellent paper pertaining to Public School
work, the full text of which follows:
"The most general aim of the public
school is to promote normal development—it alms to lay that foundation
in the plastic mind and body that will
enable the pupil to appreciate the
treasure of the past and to add something out of his own life to the sum
of human happiness, knowledge and
achievement.
"Through the proper use of the
course of instruction the public school
endeavors apart from the mere em-
parting of knowledge, (1) to develop
the sense (2) to train the judgment
and imagination (3) to give greater
power of expression (4) to aid In
physical development (5) encourage
growth of aesthetic instinct (6) assist in character building—In all to
make of the child a healthy moral
being capable of appreciating the best
In all that lies in his path through
later years.
"First comes the development of
sense which Is accomplished through
the teaching of colors, paper folding
nnd cutting, drawing painting, spelling and writing. All the special
senses, hearing, seeing, smell, taste,
touch, including the muscular sense
are developed through agencies of
which they take cognizance.     It Is a
significant fact tliat practically all the
advance In human knowledge to which
tbe past century hus so largely contributed lias been gained through a
more diligent use of the senses. As
a muscle Is strengthened by suitable
exercise so also is a sense organ
made acute by proper use. The ac-
uteness of the sense however, resulting from proper use Is not being
sought primarily for its own sake but
rather for the effect it exerts on the
mental and moral life as a whole.
"Only the other day I heard a parent complain that time spent on drawing and painting in our schools could
bettor be devoted to more essential
subjects. If this subject was taught
In our schools with the hope of ever
producing Michael Angelus or even
turning out household decorators-
judging from the results obtained 1
would certainly agree that It was time
wasted. But such Is not our hope or
aim. ln this one subject alone we
have a training for the sense of sight
as also for the muscular sense—training the eye to note difference in tone
and shade, thereby making that sense
more acute—we also iu this teach
harmony of color, awakening the taste
for the beautiful—hence painting bus
an aesthetic function and even a little
along the line of character building
is introduced In the teaching of this—
for the child is taught to be exact^-that
one color or another must go just to
a guide line and no futher. Perhaps in nu other subject taught in our
public school does the child see for
himself more readily the result of
careless work mid it is a proven fact
that exactltudy in the small things of
life ha3 a marked effect on character.
"In arithmetic, grammar and nature study comes opportunity for
training of the imagination and judgment. From visible and finite things
as perceived by the senses imagination carries us to the invisible and infinite. The imagination is not only
responsible often for that peculiarity
in children which we designate by the
terms dull and bright, but is often the
secret of the superior mental achievements . of one person over those of
another. , The teacher has to deal
with xet-Atn phases of imagination
with a view of overcoming this. Much
of what is taken to be imagination
in the child is mere fantasy or fancy,
as example, putting head of man on
the body of a cat; as is so often seen
iu our receiving classes. This requires no true Imagination but is
merely a wrong usage of objects of
sense. These crude representations,
however, should not be wholly repressed as they may be but steps in
the growth of the true Imagination.
The teacher's duty at tliis point is to
help the child to distinguish between
the purely Imaginary and the real.
Inability to make this distinction Is
ofen responsible for children's dis-
honesy in word and deeds. The teacher should here resort to the surest
and safest test at his command—the
testimony of his senses—'What do I
really see?' In making this decision a judgment is involved. The
practical judgment is therefore trained in connection with things. In nature study comes ample opportunity
for the training of judgment—for at
every turn comes necessity for forming
an independent judgment which can
be tested as to its correctness. Again
in grammar a child never makes n
statement without giving reason for
same—judgment again Involved. it
it probable that back of all crime,
(Continued on  Page  Six)
SUCCESS MARKS
SCHOOL SOCIAL
Great success marked the sricial
evening given by the pupils of the
Cumberland High School In the Anglican Church Hull on Thursday to
their immediate friends and members
of the teaching stuff. The early part
of the evening was spent in playing
whist, the successful winners being
Miss Margaret Robinson and Howard
Carey and the successful (?) losers
being Miss Dorothy Maxwell and Heck
Stewart. The latter tied witli Robert Yates but won on the cut of the
cards. Dancing was indulged in until 10 p.m. when delightful refreshments were served by the girls, after
which the light fantastic continued
until 12:00. Everyone had a most
enjoyable time and were extremely
pleased with the excellent music supplied by Miss Jessie Maxwell, piano,
Mr. James Potter, saxophone, und
Mr. Tom. McLennan, traps.
To Sell Poppies
For Armistice Day
Poppies will be for sale as soon as
received tin a few days) by the children of the local schools. Place your
orders early with them or with any
Vet. As before, these poppies will be
in two sizes, large and button-hole
size, and they are made solely by disabled Veterans in the Red Cross
Workshops,   Vancouver.
CUMBERLAND HUNTER
SPENT NIGHT IN WOODS
BADMINTON  TOURNAMENT
Entries for the Ladies' and Gent's
singles in the tournament promoted
by the Cumberland Badminton Club
are rolling in fast and a start is expected to be made with the Ladies'
singles early next week.'
Coombs Sawmill
Destroyed 6 Fire
COOMBS,—The sawmill o .'lied and
operated by the Bowness Li nber Co.,
was totally destroyed by Hie Thursday at 9:00 p.m. The lumberyard
being some distance from the mill,
was saved. This will greatly effect
the district as many there were dependant upon the mill for work.
Quite a little excitement occured
In Cumberland on Monday morning
last when the news got around that
"Ollie'' Harrison, who had left early
on Sunday morning for a hunting
trip, was lost in the mountains ln the
vicinity of No. 4 dam, behind Cumberland's Chinatown. Ollie was accompanied by Sackl Conti and Pete
Franciola and On arriving at a given
spot decided to separate and meet
again at a certain time. Franciola
was the first to arrive and waited for
two hours, then decided the others
must have gone home. Later In the
evening Conti arrived home, but Harrison was missing.
Early Monday morning a search
party headed by Conti and Franciola
made another trip to the mountains,
and after considerable travelling found
Ollie camped beyond what is known
as Stevens Lake and in the vicinity
of tiie fourth dam, Harrison had
done the only wise thing. "Made a
fire and camped until someone came."
Vet's Masquerade Ball on Tuesday,
November 11th in the Ilo-llo Dance
Hall.     Will you be there? 43
CLIFFE LANDS HARD ONE IN
THIRD; THAT WAS ENOUGH
TWO OF MONTREAL BANK
BANDITS ESCAPE GALLOWS
United Journey
To Ladysmith
On Sunday
The United Soccer team Journey to
Ladysmlth on Sunday to engage the
latter in a return Upper Island League game. Up to date, Ladysmith
have been defeated twice, while the
locals still boast au unbeaten record.
A good game is anticipated and given
fine weather, a good number of fans
will accompany the team on Sunday.
The following have been chosen to
represent Cumberland:—Blair, Mortl-
bV, Stewart, Monahan, Co,ntl and
Bake; Deluce, Plump, Oraham, Hit-
chens and Bannerman,     Res, Fowler.
(Special to The Islander)
MONTREAL, Oct. 23.—With commutation of the death sentence upon
Mike Valentino and Leo Davis decided
at an emergency meellng of the cabinet this afternoon the number of
bandits who are to be executed tomorrow morning at Bordeaux for the
murder of Henri Cleroux last April
was reduced to four—Morel, ex-du-
tective of Montreal, Gnmbino, Vine-
ence (alias Tony Frank) aud Sera-
fini.
All preparations for carrying out
the death sentence on the doomed
men were completed today. There
is a powerful cordon of police around
the jail and the approach to the grim
structure was made only through line
after line of armed men. These comprised eight members of the Mounted Police, two officers and fifteen
men of the City Force, and twelve
Provincial Policemen. These were
In addition to the customary strong
guard.
The actual hour of execution Is
known only to the highest authorities
but the orders demanded all those officiating at the execution to report at
the Jail by 11:30 p.m.
POPULAR COUPLE
EMBARK ON SEA
OF MATRIMONY
A quiet but very pretty wedding
was solemnized at the Presbyterian
Manse, Cumberland, on Wednesday
morning, when Miss Edna Bennie only
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bennie of this city, became the bride of
Mr. Harold Peters of Vancouver, form
erly of Union Bay.
The bride wore a travelling suit of
navy blue tricotine with grey velvet
hat and was accompanied by her
cousin Miss Jessie Stevenson ,who
wore a dress of brown velvet and
felt hat Mr. Wesley Peters of Vancouver, brother of the groom, acted
us  groomsman.
After the cermony lunch was served at the home of the bride's parents the happy couple leaving afterwards for Comox enroute to Vancouver where they will reside. The
groom's gift to the bride was a beautiful fur, to the bridesmaid an onyx
and pearl broach and to tbe groomsman a stick pin.
COURTENAY,—Roy Cliffe remains
king of swatters in this neck of the
woods. Four hundred fans saw him
administer a sleep potion to Dave
Stewart, of Vancouver, who awakened from his enforced slumber minus
his fighting reputation but possessor
of an awfully sore jaw. The fighter.;
sparred in the first round, feeling each
other out without doing any damage.
The second round was almost a repe-
tlton of the first, Stewart giving a
wonderful exhibition of how to duck
out of danger's way. He made Roy
miss many of his famous right hand
swings, in fact Roy swung hard once,
and, missing, went to the floor. The
third round looked as though lt were
going to be the same as Its predecessors—and it was up to a certain point
—when Roy who had been playing
for an opening got it and planted his
right slap bang against his opponent's
jaw. Nothing could withstand such
an impact and Stewart crumpled up
on the floor of tbe ring, from where
he was carried to the dressing room
where he partially revived a half hour
after the battle. The defeated gladiator is probably as good a defensivi
WERE GUESTS AT
SILVER WEDDING
Mr. and Mrs. T, Lewis and Mr. and
Mrs. J. Lewis, of Cumberland, were
among the guests of Mr and Mrs. William Southern, Nanaimo, when they
celebrated their silver wedding anniversary on Saturday last.
Mr. and Mrs, Southern were the
recipients of many beautiful presents
from tlielr guests and in return they
served an elaborate supper, a feature of which was thc calf the top
tier of which bad been pi erved by
Mrs. Southern since her tiding 25
years ago.
United Football
Skipper Is Injured
Sack! Conti, captain of the local
United Soccer team met with a painful accident on Saturday last when a
car of mine timber broke loose, pinning the popular Sacki to the ground.
Assistance was quickly rendered and
on being released It was found tliat
Conti had escaped serious Injury, be
was however badly shaken and bruised, his Injuries keeping him out of
the soccer game on Sundny last.
Hopes are extended that the popular
captain will be fit for this week's
game against Ladysmlth.
1 fighter as any man Cliffe has tackled
but that is about all that can be said
of his ability as a scrapper. He had
no punch. True he landed one on
Roy's mouth but there was no steam
behind it. Cliffe left the ring without a mark.     This is his sixth succes-
I slve victory.     Max Blunt and Brother
I Joe were in the local boy's corner and
1 Roland  Aston and McNaughton sec-
| onded Stewart.
i There were a number of good preliminaries tbe first being between L.
Taylor and Johnny Perez. These two
boys went after each other in a real
business way but neither could gain
an advantage and the referee was
forced to call Lhe scrap a draw.
Then came one of the best boxing
exhibitions of the evening when the
Smart Brothers, Maurice and Charlie,
climbed Into the ring, donned the
mits and went nfter each other. Theso
two lads are popular with the fans,
for they forget brotherly love, and
think only of the task before them,
putting plenty of action into their
boxing. Charlie has the weight but
his wee kid brother makes up for
tliis with a more than ample supply
of the stuff called pep. His aggressiveness won him the referee's decision.
Barkhouse, he of the left swing and
an ability to duck, earned a draw
with Boffy of Cumberland. Boffy
perhaps hus had a little more experience In the ring than I-<efty, but
he could not connect very often with
his elusive Opponent. This was a
good scrap and a draw was the proper decision. Boffy'fl weight was announced as 135 and Leftys an 12S
pounds.
S. Venables and L. Myles put up a
great scrap, both being willing mixers. 11 Is well for scrappers to remember (hat uncontrollable long hair
may get them in a. whole lot of
trouble. Myles occupied a good portion of his time fighting his hair, using lime that might have been put to
better advantage. It was a peppy
battle nevertheless but Venables won
the decision.
Harold Jones and Wally Thomson,
the former Cumberland and the latter of Courtenay put on a boxing exhibition that was easily won by Jones.
Jones1 superiority was marked but hi_
! clean   sporting   nature     forbid     him
i punishing his  opponent.
I    Polarine   Imperial  Joe   and   Aristo
' Union Charlie were then called to thu
battleground.      it is a long time since
j these gladiators did any boxing and
though  they were not In the "pink"
j ns far ns training goes, their actions
i (Continued on  Page Nine) PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
t'ubllshed every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
HOME, SWEET HOME
When John Howard Payne wrote
"Home, Sweet Home," he touched upon the teuderest sentiments which
swell in the human breast. But he
nrobably did not realize that he was
also writing a song based upon an
economic principle. Ever since man
emerged from the nomad, he has held
last to the place called home. Whether it was a cave in the adjacent rocks
or a log cabin on the hill, he has
fought for his home. "Be it ever
so humble, there's no place like
home," not only expresses deep emotion, hut It expresses real estate
values as well.
If a man owes two debts of equal
amount, one secured hy collateral,
such as diamonds, stocks or bonds,
and the other by a mortgage on hla
home, and if he wero able to pay but
one of the obligations, it is not difficult to guess which one be will pay.
Men make all sorts of sacrifices to
save the home, even though it be ever
so humble. There are other diamonds, stocks and bonds, but "there's
no place like home."
It is this principle of love of home
which makes mortgages o_ dwellings
the best security in the world. Building associations realize this. Seldom is there a loss on a building association mortgage, for the reason
that nearly all their assets are invested in first mortgages on homes
occupied mostly by the owners. There
are very few forced sales under building association mortgages, and hardly
ever is there a loss. Most of these
sales are caused by a death in the
family. Unitl the home is broken up
by death, there is no security like that
of a mortgage.
of the Canadian Autumn, which is
never found on the city's streets nor
iu pulsing marts of commerce, hut
only in the clean open spaces and the
fragrant silent woods.
Now that the leaves are turning
crimson and gold you will begin to
dream of thc little hunting camp in
the far north woods, of sparkling
dewy dawns, tramps through the fai
len leaves blasting camp fires, won
drous autumn nights and the bed of
balsam boughs, for there is no tonic
in alt the world for a tired brain and
a weary soul like a hunting trip in
the northern wilds.
Canadian National Railways tap
tlle choicest of the solitary hunting
districts of Northern Ontario, Quebec and the Martime Provinces, and
if you are going off for a hunt this
year go to the nearest ticket office and
procure u copy of "Hunting In Canada," which contains full information
as to the various districts, accommodation and guides. Then pack up
your rifle, sweater and togs and be
off.
FINED FOR BREACHES
OF EGG REGULATIONS
BARGAIN IN NEWSPAPERS!
An Opportunity to Win $5,000!
A Beautiful Art Calendar Free Watchfor Saturday
Evening Specials
IT TAKES TIME
Hook 'em and get away does work
sometimes. Sting 'em and keep the
dough is a system that once in a
while gets hy, but real business success can only be built upon a foundation of time, patience and the hardest
kind of hard work. When you look
at some of the great concerns that
have made a success, you wonder:
How did they do It?
Big men are not such marvelous
men when you come to know them
well. They simply work hard, stick
to it, and the law of average offers
these big mon its opportunities and
they improve them,
We sometimes forget that many of
the big houses have taken from three
to four generations to build.     A lius-
VICTORIA. —Non-compliance with
the regulations relative to the inspection and marketing of eggs and the
purchase and sale of the same led to
a prosecution in the police court yesterday of Scott & Peden and the Infliction of a $50 line. The firm did
not deny the offence, hut Mr. W. P.
Marchant, acting for the defence,
pointed out that the defendants had
tried in every way possible to meet I
the spirit of the act but that it was
next to impossible to watch every
point.
A plea of guilty was put in, although it was pointed out that while
there were six charges levelled
against the accused they all originated in one delivery to the Canadian
naval forces at. Esquimau, of two
cases of non-inspected eggs under a
contract held by the company.
Mr. William Hagger, the egg inspector here, was the chief witness.
He said that following the bringing
into effect ot the act governing the
inspection of eggs and the proper
marketing of them, he had come to
Victoria and met those engaged in
the trade. He had rendered every
assistance in Instructing dealers with
respect to the work. He had found
the eggs in question at Esquimau and
saw that they had not been inspected.
They were not marked as required,
they were not properly packed, and
some of them were not fit for use.
The crown was represented by Mr.
Gordon Campbell, while Mr. H. W
Davey represented the inspector. The
latter suggested a fine of $25 On each
count.
Mr, Marchant said the eggs had
been delivered to Scott & Peden and
had been sent to the forces at Esquimau to fill the order in a hurry.
There was need for co-operation on
The Islander has concluded an ar-
ragement with The Family Herald
and Weekly Star of Montreal by
which we can offer the greatest bargain to newspaper readers.
The offer includes a full year's
subscription to both papers, an art
calendar with a most beautiful picture subject ready for framing, and
an opportunity to win a prize of
$5,000 cash.
In the Federal Election of 1921
there were 3,119,396 votes cast out of
a total of 4,435,310 names on the voters list.
How many votes win be polled in
the next Federal Election?
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star arc offering Ten Thousand Dollars lu 94 prizes for the best estimates
and our arrangement with the publisher of that great weekly gives every Islander subscriber an opportunity to make an estimate and perhaps
win the capital prize of $5,000. Some
person will win. Why should it not
be you?
Read This Bargain
The Islander costs $2.00 per year.
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star costs $2.00 per year.
We now offer a full year's subscription to both papers, including a copy
of The Family Herald Art Calendar
and the right to make one estimate in
The Family Herald's Election Contest.
All for $2.50
Estimates must be made at time of
subscribing, and no changes will be
permitted afterwards.
Watch for Saturday
Evening Specials
6.30 to 8.30 only
6.30  to 8.30 only
SPECIAL SHOWING THIS WEEK
Silk and Siik and Wool Fabrics
suitable for Evening wear in
CREPE   SATINS
PEBBLED CREPES
RIPPLED CREPES
Canton Crepes   -  Crepe De Chene*
Duchess Messalines, Gold and Silver
Tinsel Laces and Ribbons, also a nice
selection of Corsage Boquets
Was Afraid To Eat
Stomach trouble destroyed appetite
and made him miserable. Mr. Chapman now enjoys his meals and feels
better In every way. Gives the credit to Dreco.
"All spring I was a victim of stomach trouble,' says Mr. Frank Chapman, of Laura, Sask. "My appetite
was poor. In fact, I was afraid to
eat, as food would ferment in my
stomach and form a gas that made me
miserable. I was terribly nervous
and couldn't get any sound sleep at
night, and my whole system became
run down through lack of proper
nourishment.
"Betty Brown"
Dresses
JUST   RECEIVED    A   LARGE
SELECTION OF THE NEWEST
STYLES IN "BETTY BROWN"
DRESSES.
Brcdelia Flannels &
Silvershean Cord
with the sheen of Silk and the
wear of Wool at Popular Prices.
Finally, one day 1 read of a case | Special Values in Misses' Navy
where the symptoms were similar to j and Red Flannel Middies, with
my own, in  which Dreco had given | wj,l_ _urn up ljanJ
tIness that grows rapidly is like
weed, it soon withers. That whicli I the part of all parties to the trans-
grows slowly endures. Impatience action. The constant multiplying of
seldom brings success, but calm ami I regulations governing trade was hav-
prudent plugging away, and some day j ing the effect of hampering business.
you can put your key into a safety-
deposit box that bas something in it
besides blighted hopes.
ON THE
TRAIL
OF THE
MOOSE
Have yon followed the trail of the
moose through the flaming forests
of the north and heard him call from
the barrens or tracked the fleetfooted
deer over newly-fallen snow, with
the keen wind in your face while tho
trees cracked tn the frost and the
whole forest seemed vibrant with life?
if you have, you know tho real joy
The magistrate said tliat the charge
he felt to be the most serious was
that some of the eggs were not fit for
use.
Mr. Marchant held that this was a
description that could be questioned,
it was set out In the regulations that
the presence of blood in an egg rendered it unfit for use. It would have
been possible, he thought, to have
multiplied the charges still further
by using a little ingenuity in inter-
perting the regulations.
The magistrate fined the accused
$25 on the one count and $5 on each
of the remaining five.
Men's Wear
Men's Black Leather Oxfords, in the newest cuts, Earl
last, per pair   $7.50
Men's Brown Oxfords with Broad Toe and Rubber
Heel, per pair  $6.50
Men's Black Oxfords, Goodyear Welt, Rubber   Heels.
Per Pair     $6.50
Men's Black Shoes, Blucher cut, Leckie make, a good,
solid shoe, per pair $7.95
COLLARS AND TIES
Van Heusen Collars, the best soft collar, each .... 50c.
Tooke's Soft Collars 35c, 3 for  $1.00
A Good Assortment of Ties
Shirts, Sweaters, Sweater Coats, Underwear, Hosiery,
etc, ready i'or your inspection.
splendid relief. I decided to try
Dreco myself. Have just finished
one bottle and the improvement Is
wonderful already. My digestive
troubles are scarcely noticeable now.
I have a good appetite, sleep soundly
all night long and feel stronger and
more vigorous than ever."
Let Dreco cleanse your system of
clogging waste matter. It tones and
regulates each of the vital organs of
digestion and induces their normal,
healthy action. Try It yourself. It
is safe and reliable and contains no
mercury or habit forming drugs.
Dreco Is being specially introduced
In (iiniberliiiid by Lung's Drug Store,
nnd Ib s|»ltl by all good druggists
everywhere. 43,
Each
S4.50
Hosiery Special
SPECIAL   VALUES   IN   LADIES'   BLACK   AND   BROWN 7K/_
CASHMEREA PAIR  | _)(,
Flannelette Sheets
FLANNELETTE   SHEETS,   LARGE   SIZE,   PLAIN   WHITE   ENGLISH
MFG.      EXTRA SPECIAL VALUES AT (fin   f\(\
PER PAIR  ... *PO.«/U
Wrapperette Flannelette
WAIST   AND   WRAPPERETTE   FLANNELETTE,   IN   FLORAL   PATTERNS.      SPECIAL VALUES AT OP__»
PER  YARD   _  Mt)C
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Men's all Wool Flannel Dress Shirts,  in  colors  of  Maroon,
Khaki, Brown, Grey, Navy, etc., all sizes (fi~t   QC
Keg. $2.50.     Sale   «pl.*/t#
Mackinaw Shirts, assorted plaids (fiA  QC
Keg. $5.50.     Sale   «J5'4.__I _l
Mackinaw Coats (fi*7 PA
Special Values at  «P I •UV
10-inch Black Oil Chrome Bench made Pit Boot, suitable for
hunting, boot,     Reg. $14.75 (fil 0  Kf_
Sale Price  tP_L_5l._)U
Men's Black and  Tan   Grain   Leather,  Blucher   (fiA  QP
cut   Shoes.Regular $G.50   Sale Price   tpl.UtJ
See Special Poster for Grocery Specials
r
=__E
=___=
A, A. Brown
General Hauling
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or Diitriet
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Pleas,  leave  your orders at  .tt.*,
Mra. King. Stetfraerr Store
Phone ...
ASK FOB
Fletcher's   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNG PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market    D. Campbell    Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C. W.  Sillence        G. M. Swan Fraser & Horne
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
EEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
A. MacKINNON
Cumberland
Car   For  Hire
| Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
| Royal Candy
25
CUMBERLAND
Or Residence
22
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
P. Symons   •  -    Proprietor
New Car Service
GAK FOR HIRE PAY OR NIGHT
84—TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
DR.   R.   B,   DIER   AND   DR.
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. ot Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERK1 FIEM),    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
CmrBIRLANI. B.C. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
ii
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
The Judge; His Place Is In Court-Not fat Couitshlp- i» ______
OH IKNOW VOUR FATHER
\ERY WELL, ORA. I OOn't
SUPPOSE YOU ARE TO OLD
TO BE KISSED ARE YOU?
!_|__!l_|_|HI__!_!H_IBii?I^B__ra
Get Your
Seme   Cards
for that
Whist Drive
at the office of
The
Cumberland
Islander
FORESTRY BUILDING
FOR UNIVERSITY
VICTORIA, Oct. 24.—Sucll success
lias been met with in the construction of the new buildings for the Uni-
verstt- of D.C. at Point Grey this
year that thc government lias decided
to provide for a forestry building, to
be used as a testing laboratory. The
enrollment at _h,c institution for next
__]M_J_j_J_|_|___H_f_M
am
Frequently go together. Some people
only Buffer from Head Noises,
LEONARD EAR OIL
nlltvts both Deafneu  and Head
Noiie_.Juitrubitb«ckofthe«ar8,.n
■en In ooatrUt and follow directions
of Dr, J. B, Bergwon for Cat* of
Hearing/* enclosed In each package.
Leonard Bar Oil la for lale'cverywhere
Intonating descriptive folder
4j% . ten. upon requeo t      - *
-    ^'■nU-C^.WiA.e.S'*1'^
It's one thing to want to do a
good job.
It's another thing to know how
to do it.
Just one thing after another.
Simple, when you have the combination!
WE HAVE
THE
COMBINATION!
term Is larger than ever before and
the University of B. C. Is fast taking
its place in the front rank of such
institutions all over the continent.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
STAPLE INDUSTRIES
ARE PROSPERING
The staple industries of Vancouver
Inland are iu a prosperous condition,
:n spite of pessimism in some quarters such as generally felt on the
eve of Winter. The production of
coal keeps fairly steady, in spite of
continued, competition of fuel oil, aud
with only one mine dormant as corn-
Dared with 11123, the output of the collieries for tbe last completed week
wns equal to the corresponding period of last year, In fact shortages on
lhe larger collieries are more than
made up by gains in connection wilh
smaller sums which were in a development state a year ago.
TRANSPROVINCIAL
HIGHWAY TO BE
EXTENDED
VICTORIA, Oct. 24.—Another link
in British Columbia's highway syn-
tem is to be forged. Tenders have
been called for by Hon. W. H. Suth-
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road, Courtenay
or I and, minister of public works, for I Comox-Alberni districts as a whole
the completion of the Hope-Spence's ) made it very difficult to prevent mis
Bridge section of the Transprovincial
Highway, at a cost of approximately
$1,000,000. An additional $250,000
will be required for the construction
of a steel bridge across the Fraser
River at Spuzzum. The bids will be
returnable within four weeks and the
new Legislature will be asked to decide upon the granting of the necessary money.
A contract has also been let for
JGO.OOO to Fred Dawson, contractor
of Vancouver, for highway work between Golden and Yoho Park. This
will link up the circle route of the
Banff-Windermere  Highway.
CORRESPONDENCE
To the Edtior
Cumberland Islander,
D'ear Sin-
Will you allow us the use of your
columns to express onr thanks to the
Mayor and City Council, the executives of the Board of Trade and otht'r
Bodies and Associations, and to all
others who gave so freely of their
time and money ami trouble to make
the visit of the Premier of Canada and
.Members of his Cabinet, the success
which it undoubtedly was.
Being the first function of the kind
held here, we had no previous experience to guide us and the very nature of it, having to be hurriedly organized ,the short space of time lie
could give us, the need to take in
three towns and yet keep its character as  distinctly    representative    of
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
„__l_j__l_fl__j___E_____j__^
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a V_-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red-Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Silver Spring Brewery
Limited
_I_|_E_E/_I____BJ__M
Lager Beer
English Ale
And Stout
ask your vendor and demand
Silver Spring
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
understandings or hitch in arrangements which would have marred in
success. That this was accomplished was largely due to the good will
and harmony with which every section worked and co-operated.
A special feature was the lack of
party feeling and the Premier* expressed his appreciation of the some
what unusual manner in which all
parties united to welcome him to our
district, not as leader of a party but
as Head of our Dominion.
Wc feci sure the first, hand knowledge gained by the Premier and his
Ministers will ensure to the benefit of
the Comox-Alberni district.
Yours faithfully
Alan    W.    Neill,    MP.
P.  P. Harrison,  M.L.A.
PREMIER KING AND THE
SENATE
Premier King tells a Port Arthur
audience that he will curtail the powers of the Senate. As a great, champion of democracy Mr. King can do no
less.
No legislative body, bearing no re-
SYNOPSIS OF
UNO ACT AMENDMENTS
.Ions are
nd Com-
■dlug 01-
plled for
i prlnled
be  ob-
"Th. Most of the EWit far tha Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
11  LOAVES FOR $1.00
PHONE 11
_l__H___ffifflMa_ffl__MI_IB/__-__W!
CUMBERLAND
si__n_i_i_i_i_____y_i_i-_yi__^
Bponslbllity to tbe people of Canada,
sliouiil bo able to bold up progress as
the Senate bus done in the past three
years.
Moreover, of the 94 members of the
Senate 63 are more than 60 years old,
U are more than 70, six are more
than SU anil one is more than 90.
Mid age is not to be despired and
tlle .ousel of age Is to be sought and
respected,
But in a young country where the
energy of youth must prevail, this
elderly body is simply a barrier
against vigorous government.
And about lhe only way of reforming Hie Senate satisfactorily Is to
abolish it completely.—The Sunday
Sun.
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and hy aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, tonril-
tlonal upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ls not timberland, i.e, carrying over 5,000' board
feet per acre west ot the Coast Range
and S.000 feet per acre east of Uiat
Range.
Applications   for  pro-em
to  be addressed   lo  the  I
mlssioner of the Land Re
vision, in which the land
Is situated, and are made
forms,  copies  of  which   c
tained from the Laud Com ilssloner.
Pre-emptions must be oci jpled for
five   yearB   and   lmprovemei.tB   made
to value of |10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Orant can be
received.
For more detailed infomimioii see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received lor purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of flrst-claBS (arable) land ls (5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given In Uullollii
No. 10, Land Sories, "Purchase aud
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sitos on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may bo purchased or leased, tho conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveycd areas, not exceeding 80
acres, may be leased as homeslles,
conditional upon a dwelling bolng
erected In the flrst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land hns been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial »ur-
poses areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be loased by one person or n
company.
GRAZING
Under the Crazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permit, are IsBUed based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free, I
permits are available for Bottlers, |
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
MUNICIPAL ELECTION ACT
On or before October 31st, every
house-holder or license-holder must
register with the City Clerk to secure
_ vote at the coming Municipal elections to be held ln January, 1925, under the Municipal Elections Act The
qualifications for registration are:
.Must be a British subject of the full
age of 21 years;
Havo resided in the city  (or school
district, for Bchool vote), since Jan.
1st, 1924.     (This does not apply to
license-holders.)
Must have paid taxes (not Including
dog tux), to the amount ot at least
(2.00, or a trade's license fee of at
least $5.00.
OwnerB of property who have not
yet registered their property ln their
own name, may get on the list as
house-holders under this section if
they have paid the current year's
taxes, and register before the end of
this month.
The declaration must be made he-
fore a J.P., notary public, stipendiary
magistrate or the City Clerk.
The City Clerk's olllce will be open
from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5
p.m, dally. 43,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN TUK COUNTY COURT OF NANAIMO, CUMBERLAND,
In the will of Archibald McCallum,
deceased,
Take notico all claims against the
estate of the above-named decedant,
who died nt Cumberland, B.C., on the
22nd day of July, 11124, duly verified
must be presented to tho undersigned
on or before the 2oth day of November 11124. Afler which date the estate will In- distributed without regard to any claims nol then (lied with
.lie undersigned,
DUtod October 14th, 1924.
John   Baird,
F. D. Pickard
Executors of Estate of;
A. McCallum, decoaaod.
Address:
Cumberland, B.C. 4e\
LAND ACT
JfOTII E OF INTENTION TO APPLY
TO LEASE LA.NII
IN NELSON LAND DISTRICT, Recording District of Nanaimo, and situate near Village of Royston Waters
of Comox Harbor, Nelson District.
Subdivision of Lot Sii and Section 4
and Section 6-A: Map No. — Take
notice that the Royston Lumber Company Limited, of Royston, B.C., occupation Sawmill and Timber dealers
Intends to apply for permission to
louse Hit1 following described lands: —
(Foreshore) on the North boundary of
.Murine Drive distant 60 ft. from tho
West side of Royston Wharf: Thence
in a westerly direction following the
North boundary of Marine Drive and
high tide mark a distance of 1000 feet
to a post set On said North boundary
of Murine Drive: Thence at right-
angles North to approximately low
Mile mark .thence in an Easterly direction, following low tide mark a
distance of loon foot more or less.
Thence In a straight line to plnce of
commencement, and containing 10
acres more or less.
THE ROYSTON LUMBER CO. Ltd.,
per George K,  lYIilyamn.
Name of Applicant.
Dated October 8th, 1924. 49. PAGE FOUR
THI CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
Comox Assessment District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, on Wednesday, the 12th day of November, at the hour of
10 a.m., at the Court-house Cumberland, I will sell at Public auction the lands in the list hereinafter
set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes unpaid by said persons
on the 30th day of June, 1924, and for interest, costs, and expenses, including the cost for advertising said sale, if the total amount due for the period ending 31st December, 1921, is not sooner
paid.
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list where
the owner is a Member of the Allied Forces and is entitled to the benefits of Section 151 Sub-sections
2 nnd 3, "Taxation Act, 1922."
LIST OF PROPERTIES
NAME  OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
_:s
5 f
£     Cm
Comox District
Subd. Pt. Lot 166, Map No. 1845
North American Loan Company    Lots 5 to 7, Block A	
North American Loan Company    Lot 7, Block B , ....	
North American Loan Company     Lot 16, Block D  .	
North American Loan Company     Lot 1, Block E	
North American Loan Company     Lots 1, 2, 9, & 11 to 16, Block F	
North American Loan Company   Lots 2, 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19
and 20, Block G 	
Lee Sam     Lots 3 & 4, Block G 	
North American Loan Company    Lots 3, 4, 6 & 7 & 8, Block K +	
Higgs, Henry & Elco, Gust    Lot 5, Block M  _	
North American Loan Company     Lots 6, 7 & 11, Block M	
North American Loan Company     Lot 8, Block N ....  . _	
Subd. of Lot 186, Map No. 449
Smith, Percy    Pt. of Lot 2, Marked "B", Map 2234.
Lot 3  ,.	
Subd. Pt. Lot 205, Map No. 1645
.Martin, Chas., Martin, Douglas,
Towler, Bruce, and Towler, Alice E. Lots 4, 5, 7 & 8 . 	
Subd. Pt. Lot 221, Map No. 2548
Millard, Dr. H. P    Lot 1  	
43.96
Subd. Pt. of Lot 221
Jones, Mrs. E. E...... _  Pt. Lot 2
Jones, Mrs. E. E....,..._ <  Pt. Lot 3
Jones, Mrs. E. E..„,  Lot 4 	
Jones, Mrs. E. E.....    Lot 5 .....
Jones, Mrs. E. E .  Lot 6 	
Jones, Mrs. E. E  Lot   7   	
Idlens, H.
Subd. Lot 227, Map No. 1289
N.M, of Lot 9	
King, Harry  , ,  Lot 232 	
Hardy, Mrs. Mabel F.   Pt. Lot 239
51.00
227.50
94.00
Township 1
Holland, C. A.   Fr. N.W.% Sec. 3, E.V4 of N.W.V4
& N.E. 14 Sec. 4 	
Township 4
Grosseup, T    Pt. N.E.Vi  of N.E.Vi   Sec.  10 lying
North of Puntledge River, S.V4 of
S.W.Vi of Sec. 15	
Grosseup, T    Fr.   Pt.  of  N.W.y,   Sec.   15   lying
South of Brown's River 	
Horne, Frank    Fr. N.E.Vi of Sec. 32	
52.60
203.45
Nelson District
Johnston, Jno. R    Pt. of Lot 12—4 acrea	
Subd. Pt. Lot 20, & Lot 20A, Map No. 1840
Maruya, I., Estate    Lots 25, 26 & 27 .
Subd. Pt. Lot 21, Map No. 5226
McMillan, H„ Estate    Lot 10, Block 21 	
Hornby Island
Sutton, Frod    N.V4 of S.E.Vi Sec. 16 	
Group 1, N.W.D.
Turnbull, Jas   Lot  1213	
10.50
3.00
Subd. Lots 1372, 1373, Map No. 2732
Savary Island
McFarlin, Emily I  Lot 6, Block 8
Reefer, II. M  Lot 7 Block 8
Subd. of Lot 1479, Map No. 4830
Wilson,   John    Lot 9 	
Klnmoiul, Robt. D    Lot 1573
Tose, Harry     Lot 4943
20.00
20.00
4.00
240.00
24.00
Sayward District
Subd. of Lot 66, Map No. 1058
Zanonl,  Joe „ _    Lot 15, Block B  _	
Subd. of Lot 69, Map No. 1076
Hing, Ah  Lot 19, Block 2	
Kingsey, L. E  Lot 9, Block 10	
I.ongmore, II.  r .  Lot 20, Block 18  .......
Swanson, Mrs. Bertha   Lots 13 & 14, Block 15	
Falke, A. L _  Lots 23 & 24, Block 15	
Shouldice,   Geo  Lot 23, Block 17 	
Subd. of E.i. of Lot 75, Map No. 2078
Hallos, Frank  _    Pt. Lot 758—120 acrea 	
Holmes, Ralph E.
Holmes, Rail* B.
Township 3
S.W.Vi of N.W.Vi and all that part
of S.W.Vi Sec. 17, lying North of
Salmon River _	
1.80
8.00
8.00
8.00
7.00
8.00
9.10
36.00
65.36
Township 6
S.W.Vi of Sec. 25—160 acrea
6.40
38.67
14.96
90.70
16.86
12.76
120.31
30.81
6.10
12.75
48.66
6.68
1.18
12.75
20.61
7.60
1.20
12.75
21.55
44.50
6.09
12.75
63.34
55.26
9.06
12.75
77.07
13.00
2.05
12.75
27.80
25.16
4.37
12.76
42.28
8.00
1.22
12.75
21.97
15.50
2.62
12.75
30.87
9.66
1.67
12.75
24.08
13.75       64.10
213.47
33.00
13.75
260.22
8.00
1.22
12.75
21.97
87.60
9.66
13.75
110.91
75.00
12.45
13.75
101.20
76.00
12.45
13.75
101.20
75.00
12.45
13.75
101.20
75.00
12.45
13.75
101.20
75.00
12.45
13.75
101.20
13.75       73.63
13.75
13.75
279.92
122.71
726.00     109.29       13.75     849.04
180.00       27.45       13.75     221.20
8.16       13.75        74.41
30.89       13.75     248.09
119.89       15.30       13.75     148.94
1.78       13.75       26.03
1.22 12.75 ' 21.97
244.60 35.18 13.75 293.43
82.76       12.47       13.75     108.9S
1.15       12.75       35.90
1.15       12.75       36.90
.61 12.75 17.36
9.84 1,1.75 293.59
3.66       13.75       41.41
1.41       12.76       23.96
1.19 12.75 21.94
1.19 12.75 21.94
1.19 12.75 21.94
.87 12.75 20.62
1.19 12.75 21.94
1.22 12.75 23.07
6.42       13.76       55.17
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
o IH
Cortez Island
Allen, F  ,   Pt N.E.Vi Sec. 21—2 acres ....
Houghton,  Geo _ +  S.W.Vi of Sec. 37—160 acres
Rupert District
McCrimmon, Maria   Pt. Sec. 68—1.5 acres  _	
Wildman,  Harvey  Lot 823—174 acres 	
Flint, Mary E  _  _  Fr. N.E.Vi of Lot 1144—37 acres 	
Brown, Edmund  _  Lot 1314—159 acres  .	
McLnchlan,  C.       Und 1/3 Lot 15—163.6 acres, Quatslno
16.13
77.33
20.00
40.00
59.00
24.00
160.00
2.42
12.70
1.96
6.10
15.35
3.66
34.40
13.75 32.30
13.76 103.78
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.76
13.76
36.70
69.85
88.10
41.41
208.15
Richards, John
Richards, John
Township 1
W.V4 of Sec. 18—202 acres .
Township 2
E.V. of Sec. 13—263 acres .
Township 3
Wilson, Wm    N.V4 Sec. 18 & Sec. 19—960 acres .
Goodacre, L   Sec. 29—640 acres 	
Rupert District
Township 4
3.62
13.75       77.73
(1.26       10.(7       13.76
85.67
Williams, Mrs. Margaret & Oliver,
Mrs. Mlna   N.V& of N.% of Sec. 22 	
Mitchell, W. H. St. G  N.V. of Sec. 22 & S. % Sec. 23 .
B. C. Land & Investment Agency  Sections 33, 34 & 35 	
Township 6
B. C. Land & Investment Agency   Sections 16 & 17
200.00       22.50       13.76     236.25
300.00       33.76       13.75     347.50
960.00     146.00       13.75   1120.15
640.00       97.60       13.75     761.35
180.00 28.80 13.76 222.65
640.00 97.60 13.76 751.36
960.00     292.80       13.75   2226.55
1280.00     195.20       13.76   1488.96
Subd. N.E. v. Sec. 19, N.W.'/, Sec. 20, S.W. v. Sec. 29 & S.E.'/4 Sec. 30, Map 1667.
King, W. H  Lots 1 to 4, Block 20 .
Stabeck, C. O. R  Lot 1, Block 32  -
Stabeck, C. O. R  Lot 1, Block 38 	
Long Kwan Wah & Kok YIng   Lot 12, Block 60 	
Stabeck, C. O. R  Lot 10, Block 86 	
Stabeck, C. O. R  Lot 11, Block 92 	
8.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
Port Hardy, Subd. S.W.v. Sec. 30, Map No. 810
House, A. F _  Lot 12, Block 5  ,   7.75
Slpkus, John  ,  Lots 9 & 10, Block 24   4.00
Slpkus, John  Lots 1 & 2, Block 25    4.00
Slpkus, John  : .  Lots 1 and 2, Block 26  »     4.00
Cookson, C. M   .......  Lot 2, Block 27    .' ,  4.00
1.22
.61
.61
.61
.61
.61
1.70
.61
.61
.61
.61
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.76
Subd. Pt. N.W.'/4 Sec. 30, & S.W.V. Sec. 31, Map No. 700, Township 6
Sigurdson, Haldor  _  Lot 10, Block 3 	
Hannah, Mrs. W. T  Lot 12, Block 3  	
Vater, Fred   _  Lots 15 & 16, Block 7 	
Cookson, C. M  Lots 4 to 6, Block 21 t 	
Spencer, David, Ltd  Lot 7, Block 26	
Surrey, Mrs. J.     Lot 15, Block 26	
Spencer, David, Ltd  Lots 8 & 10, Block 28   	
Lang, Mrs. W  Block 52 	
Lang, S. F. McFadden, S., & Mould,
Thomas _  Block 63  .	
Vater, Fred   	
McFadden, Wm., McFadden, Susan, Block 55 	
& Lipsky, Alexander  Block 66    _	
7.00
7.00
10.02
7.00
7.00
7.00
4.00
43.45
43.46
32.00
43.45
1.19
1.19
1.51
1.19
1.64
1.19
.61
7.29
7.29
3.68
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.75
12.76
12.75
12.76
12.75
7.29       12.75
21.97
17.36
17.36
17.36
17.36
17.36
2220
17.36
17.36
17.36
17.36
20.94
20.94
22.74
20.94
21.39
20.94
16.20
63.49
63.50
48.33
63.49
Rupert District, Tp. 6, Port Hardy Townsite Addition, Pt. N.E.'/J Sec. 31, Map No. 1329
Dunn, Geo. I., Estate  Lots 1 to 4 Block 15 „	
Jacobson, Mrs. M  Lots 13 & 14, Block 23 	
Walker, John A  i  Lots 12, 14 & 16, Block 24  .	
Coombs, Mrs. S  Lots 13 & 15, Block 27	
Uchldo, Gentaro    Lot 4, Block 28  _ ....	
Jacobson, Mrs. M.   Lot 1, Block 48 	
Pettigrew, T. P.    .  Lot 16, Block 60 _...	
Subd. N.E.'/4 Sec. 24 & S.E:'/4 Sec. 25, Map No. 810A, Township 9
Hodgklnson, Alex  Lot 1, Block 47 _	
Griffith, J. O _    Lots 9 & 10, Block 68 	
Williams, Ed. T  Lot 1, Block 70  . „	
Levins, Robt. E  Lot 11, Block 87	
Bergeron, Eugene _  Lot 9, Block 93 	
Subd. Pt. N.E.</4 Sec. 36, Map No. 2178, Township 9
.loodacre, Mrs. Ada M  Lots 18 to 20, Block 1 _	
Goodacre, Mrs. Ada M _  Lots 1 to 3, Block 4 	
Goodacre, Mrs. Ada M  Lots 17 to 20, Block 4  _	
Goodacre, Mrs. Ada M  Lots 1 to 3, Block 5 	
Goodacre, Mra. Ada M  Lots 8 to 20, Block 6	
Goodacre, Mrs. Ada M  Lots 4 to 10, Block A 	
Goodacre, Mrs. Ads M _  Lots 1 to 10, Block B 	
Hardy Bay Cold Storage Co  Pt. Block D. Marked "A" 	
Township 11
Pacific Terminal Land Company   W. Pt. S.E.Vi Sec. 20—112 acres 	
Pacific Terminal Land Company   N.W.Vi of N.E.Vi, N.W.Vi of E.V. of
N.E.Vi of Sec. 20-.65 acrea	
13.81
2.20
12.75
28.76
7.00
1.19
12.76
20.94
9.00
1.50
12.75
23.26
7.00
1.19
12.75
20.94
7.00
1.19
12.75
20.94
8.00
1.41
12.75
22.10
8.00
1.41
12.76
22.16
, Township 9
4.00
.61'
12.76
17.36
4.00
.61
12.76
17.36
4.00
.61
12.75
17.36
6.00
.90
12.76
19.65
4.00
.61
12.75
17.36
• 9
3.00
.45
12.75
16.20
3.00
.45
12.76
16.20
3.50
.45
12.75
16.70
3.00
.45
12.75
16.20
12.50
1.80
12.76
27.05
5.60
.85
12.75
19.10
9.50
1.48
12.76
23.75
18.00
2.87
12.76
33.62
Township 23
Gelletley, Ethel G   S.W,Vi of Sec. 29—1 acre .
112.00       17.08       13.76     142.83
65.00 6.95       13.75       88.31
4.00 .61       13.75       18.36
Subd. N.E.'/4 Sec. 19 & S.E. 49 acres of Sec. 30, Map No. 2006
Falrbrother, Horace   Lot 4 _  4.00 .61
Barnes, Charles A.
Township 24
N.W.Vi Sec. 33 	
32.00
12.75       17.36
13.75       49.33
Township 33
Leonard, James  ,  N.V4 of N.E.Vi of Sec. 17	
Pringle, Joseph     N.W.Vi of S.E.Vi of Sec. 17
Calhoun, R. T. & Gelletley, R  W.V4 of N.W.Vi of Sec. 33 .....
Township 35
Solberg,  Peter    N.E.Vi of Sec. 4 	
Inglestad, Otto   S.W.Vi of N.W.Vi Sec. 10	
Township 36
 - E.V4 of S.W.Vi of S.E.Vi Sec.
80.00
12.20
13.75
105.96
40.00
6.10
• 13.75
59.85
160.00
36.80
13.75
210.55
160.00
24.00
13.75
198.16
24.00
3.66
13.75
41.41
Carlln, Mrs. Cecilia H.
24.00
1.66       13.75       41.41
Coast District Range 1
Vanstone, David   Lot 1 .....
Anderson, Ole  B.    Lot 840 ..
Ford, Martha L.  Lot 1448
Cederfeldt, Oscar  Lot 1669
Humphrey, A. E  Lot 1684
Norman, David H  Lot 1690
James, Francis R _  Lot 1698
320.00
73.60
13.76
407.35
151.25
24.21
13.75
189.21
56.00
8.58
13.76
78.31
24.00
3.60'
13.76
41.35
12.00
1.80
13.75
27.65
12.00 *
1.80
13.75
27.55
8.00
1.22
13.75
22.97
DATED at Cumberland, B.C., this 6th day of October, 1924.
WM. W. MOORE,
Collector, Comox Assessment District. SATURDAY, OCTOBER .5,
i   ■    '      I ii
1924.
_HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FIVE
IP
Sale of Mineral Claims for Unpaid Taxes
in the Comox District
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Monday.the 3rd day of November, 1924, at the hour of 10
o'clock in the forenoon, at the Courthouse, Cumberland, B.C., I shall offer for sale at public auction
the mineral claims in the list hereinafter set out, of the persons in the said list hereinafter set out,
of which Crown grants have been issued, for the the taxes remaining unpaid and delinquent by
said persons on the 30th day of June, 1924, and and for costs and expenses, if the total amount is
not sooner paid. ,
The Collector will be pleased to receive any information respecting the following list where
the owner is or was a member of the Allied Forces and entitled to the benefits of Section 151, Subsections 2 and 3, "Taxation Act, 1922."
LIST OF PROPRETIES
NAME OF OWNER
NAME   OF   CLAIM
Lot   Number
and District
Taxes Penalty Costs   Total
Deacon, E. J _  Blue  Bells 	
Deacon, E. J _  Gold Bug _	
Deacon,  E.  J  Dashwood 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Dorothy Morton, 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Eva 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Banker  _	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Comox Fraction 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Percy  	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Dorothy Morton Fraction
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Chimnang 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Douglas 	
Fairfield Exploration Syndicate  Maggie May 	
Twiddle,- Henry   Butterfly 	
Copper Mountain Mining Company  June  	
Copper Mountain Mining Company  Helen 	
Copper Mountain Mining Company.  Amazon  _ _	
Copper Mountain Mining Company  Olga   	
Copper Mountain Mining Company  Iron  Knob  _	
Coast Copper Company, Limited   Jinx Fraction 	
Vaughan, Wm.  J  Merry Widow No. 5 	
Jacob, John B  Boulder Canyon No. 1 ....
Kennedy, D. G  Mayflower  	
Kennedy, D. G  Humming Bird 	
Arnold, A. F  Limit Fraction 	
Arnold, A. F. & Glbbens, A. A  Dasher Fraction 	
Arnold Maud M & Adams, H  Independent	
Arnold, A. F. & Glbbens, Mary S  Independent No. 1 	
Arnold, A. F. & Vaughan, Wm. J  Summit  Fraction  	
Kessman, J., Sherberg, Ole A., Grey
Laura, Keeling, W. C. & Vaughan, W. J  Rambler Fraction 	
Grey, Laura, Sherberg, 0. A., Glbbens, Mary S  Dry Hill 	
Grey, Laura & Keeling, W. C  Independent No. 3 	
Grey, Laura & Keeling, W. C  Independent No. 4 	
Baker, Andrew  Snowbird No. 3  _	
.    235 Coast  Range  1 13.00 .65
240 Coast  Range  1 10.25 .51
248 Coast Range  1 11.25 .56
253 Coast  Range  1 13.00 .65
254 Coast  Range  1 10.75 .53
291 Coast Range  1 10.50 .52
.    297 Coast  Range  1 5.00 .25
299 Coast Range  1 12.50 .62
300 Coast  Range  1 6.00 .30
319 Coast  Range  1 13.00 .66
320 Coast  Range  1 12.25 .61
322 Coast  Range  1 .75 .03
1123 Sayward   Dist... 13.00 .65
180 Rupert    12.00 .60
181 Rupert    12.00 .60
182 Rupert    9.00 .45
183 Rupert    12.75 .62
184 Rupert    13.00 .65
1477 Rupert     4.75 .23
1533 Rupert    26.00 2.86
1546 Rupert     10.75 .53
4S16 Grp.   l.N.W.D... 13.00 .65
4815 Grp.   l.N.W.D... 12.50 .62
1553 Rupert    7.00 .75
1549 Rupert    5.35 .57
1550 Rupert     26.00 2.86
1551 Rupert    14.45 .86
1554 Rupert     5.00 .54
1537 Rupert     1.85 .29
1548 Rupert    21.00 2.35
1557 Rupert     15.00 1.64
1559 Rupert     14.45 1.57
1586 Quatslno     11.75 .58
13.75
27.40
13.76
24.61
13.75
25.56
13.75
27.40
13.76
25.03
13.75
24.77
13.76
19.00
13.75
26.87
13.75
20.05
13.76
27.40
13.76
26.61
13.75
14.53
13.75
27.40
13.75
26.35
13.75
26.35
13.75
23.20
13.75
27.12
13.76
27.40
13.75
18.73
13.75
42.61
13.75
25.03
13.75
27.40
13.75
26.87
13.75
21.50
13.75
19.67
13.75
42.61
13.75
29.06
13.75
19.29
NANAIMO CITY F. C.
IS NOW UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
13.7
15.89
13.75
37.10
13.75
30.39
13.75
29.77
13.75
26.08
DATED at Cumberland, B.C., this 7th day of October, 1924.
WM. W. MOORE,
Collector, Comox Assessment District.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOM,
SWN.LES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
ph-witr imkl c*"': 1,4X CourtM"l>'
rnv"OD lomcei 16» Cumberland
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Moat Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver leland. We Clean or
Dye ell kinds of Ladies' and dents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and aee Mr. lather-
land, our Agent In Cumberland, who
wlll advlae you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work  and   Service
Will Please Ion 11     11
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.      —      Phone 180.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Headaches
and the eyes-
/~VNE thing has been demon-
'-' streted without a Bhadow of
a doubt—It ls this:
QA% of all headaches are
^" caused by eye-strain, and
can be relieved quickly and permanently by suitable glasses.
T fit more cases for eye-strain
■*■ than I do for defective vision,
and the results are so gratifying
—bo conclusive, that you ought
to know about them.
/■'OMK In and make an ap-
*' polntment for examination
at Cumberland every first and
third Monday and Tuesday.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
KKGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-6:00   OFFICE   7:30-9:30
P.M.       II0CR8       P.M.
At a meeting held In the club house
of the Nanaimo City Football Club
an entirely new management was appointed to look after and carry on
the club. Owing to local conditions
the Western Fuel Corporation has
withdrawn its active control of the
business of the club. The company
will continue to help on the game and
the City Club as far as possible, and
has granted the club the same privileges so far as the club house and
grounds are concerned aa heretofore.
However, 1., future the club will be u
Nanaimo City Club In fnct as well ns
in name. New executive officers and
committees were appointed nnd they
look 10 football fans to give them
every assistance and support In carrying on the club and keeping the
soccer game going. The club ia financially solvent .and there is no
reason why It cannot he run successfully as a city club. At the meeting the following officers were appointed:
Hon. President—John Hunt.
Hon. Vice-Presidents—Jas. Henderson, Captain Duncan, P. Corcoran, Thos. Weeks, W. W. Gary, A.
Sampson, J. Shirass, W, Hart and Con
Reifel.
President—T. B. Booth.
Vice-President—R.   R.   Hlndmarch.
Secretary—Lai Booth.
Treasurer—Alex Forrester.
Manager—Jas Watson.
Trainer—Joe Barton.
Executive Committee—Sam Cow-
den, P. Seggle, C. Henderson, R.
Adam, A. Wardill, Wm. Thorpe, Joe.
English, Jas. Gray, and Nat Bevls.
Finance Committee—Nat Bevis aim
P. Seggie.
Grounds Committee—W. Thorpe,
Joe English and S. Cowden.
Emergency Committee—J. Watson,
Lai Booth, Jas. Gray and JI. Wardill.
ROMPING PONIES BRING
RICHES TO DONCASTER
LONDON.—The famous St. Leger
race, whicli was run recently at Dou-
caster In the north of England, is not
only a big sporting event, but one
which from first to last has added
not less than $5,0(10,000 In profits to
the municipality of Doncaster.
Every year the St. Leger, which Is
to the people of the north countrty In
early Autumn days what the Derby
Is to Londoners at Whitsuntide, adds
from $60,000 to $75,000 profits to Don-
caster's receipts to lessen the taxpayers' burdens. This is because the
Doncaster corporation owns the
course.
Doncaster derives profit both directly and indirectly from the big
race meet, which Is the most drastic
test of speed and staying power for
the heat three-year-olds of each season. Thougli never quite so large
as the assemblage on Epsom Downs
for Derby Day, the St. Leger crowd
usually exceeds 500,000.
CanadianNational
Railways
Old Country
for
Christmas
Canadian National Railways
Will Operate on Fast
Schedule
Special Trains
To Ship's Side, Halifax, for
Sailings of
SS. "Regina" to Liverpool
December 7, 1924.
SS. "Andania" to London .
December 8, 1924.
SS. "Saturnia" to Glasgow
December 8, 1924.
SS. "Pittsburgh" to Southampton
December 11, 1924.
SS. "Carmania" to Liverpool
December 14, 1921.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS
EARLY
E. W. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
SANDWICK  LOCALS
Me.srs. Ted, Lou und Walter
Cliffe and Mr. John Sutton left on
Sunday morning from Comox by
launch for their annual bunting trip
to the mainland.
Miss  Elsie   Redding of  Victoria  is
spending  a   few  weeks'   vacation   in
the district, the guest of Mr. and Mr
John Blackburn.
• •   «
.Miss Violet Parks ' of Vancouver
came up on Thursday's tralu and Intends to spend a holiday iu the Valley
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Merle Halllday.
• .   .
Mr, Frank Weir is building an addition to his home at Dove Creek.
• *    *
News has been received thnt Mrs.
A. Craik has arrived safely on u visit
lo her parents In the Old Country.
Car Turns
Somersault
windshield  and   mud  guards  of the
; car were badly broken and bent, but
the body and engine seemed little the
worse   lor   its   fall.      The  speed   In
l which  the  whole  thing  happened  is
shown by the fnct that Mr. Cliffe had
a cigarette in his mouth at the time,
I and when lie landed up against the
! fence  the cigarette  was still  lighted
: and in tiie same place.
Last Saturday night A Walter
Cliffe returning from Conic with live
people in his Star Tot ng car,
while crossing the dyke, li A a very
narrow escape from what night have
been a serious accident. It was very
foggy and the lights of an approaching cur made It necessary for him lo
stop his car. He stopped too close
to the edge, with the consequences
that when he started up again the
banking gave way and the car turned
a complete somersault landing right
side up against the fence. Lucky not
one of the occupants received any
more serious injuries than a sprained
wrist and a bruised leg.      The top,
Proven best
Since 1847
IMafces
ahuslyfciddy'
FREE BABY BOOKS
Write to the Borden Co. Limited,
Vancouver for two Baby Welfare
books.
SANDWICK WEDDINGS
Woods ■ Dawson
A pretty wedding of great local interest took place on Monday at St.
Andrews Presbyterian Church, Sandwick, when Dorothy, daughter of Mr.
Wm, Dawson became the bride of
Evelyn "Bunt" Woods, son of Mr. and
MrB. T. ('. Woods, pioneer farmers of
Comox Valley. The Hev. T. Menzies
tbe officiating clergyman came up
from Victoria tu conduct the ceremony.
The bride entered the church on
the arm of her father. The groom
was attended by his brother, Mr. C.
Woods. After the ceremony a reception was held nt the home of the
groom at which a great number of
friends attended to wish long life and
happiness to the young couple.
Mr.and Mrs. Woods left for a motor
tour of the Island and on their return
will reside here.
Vass - Walker
A very quiet wedding was solemnized on Sunday afternon, October 19th
at 2 o'clock in the Sandwick English
Church, by Rev. J. W. Fllnton when
.Miss Rachel Wittaker of Lancashire,
England, wns united in holy matrimony with Mr. William Vass of Sandwick. Mr. and Mrs. Hull of the dyke,
tbe latter a sister of the bride,
supported the bride and groom. Mr.
and Mrs. Vass will make their home
at tbe old Vass homestead on the Mc-
Kelvie  Hoad,   Sandwick.
RANGERS AGAIN FAIL
TO STOP THE UNITED
(Continued  From  Page One)
couver City team, was the best
back on the field in Saturday's soccer
match at Con Jones Park. McLaren
of Westminster United ran tbe former
Cumberland player a close second,
but Ackroyd bad thc advantage in that
bis kloks upfleld were inside the lines
and not into touch.
Aiirhiiivule With I .IU'.
Since losing heavily to City United
in their opening game the U.B.C. Foot
ball team have won both their starts.
On Saturday against South Hill at
Wilson Park they tried Harry Auchlnvole of Union Bay at centre forward,
and he scored both goals Club officials think lie is a "find", and expect
him to materially strengthen the front
rank.
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cake, and l'asteries
Large and Varied Selection—See our Window
OUR LEADERS
Apple and Raisin Pas—Just a Treat—Fresh every day
Scotch Oat Cakes   : Home-made Biscuits unequalled
Doughnr   —that taste just right.
Hot Pies every _   .urday—Once you try them you
al 'ays prefer them.
Our Superior Loaf—Give it a trial—Wholesome and
Satisfying.
Telephone 18
Cumberland
Messrs. DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Gentlemen:
I have just received your cheque for $1,_9.'!.06 in
settlement of one of my policies, No. 2910, with your
Company and I feel it would be unfair to allow it to
pass without comment.
I may say 1 have had eleven policies and have drawn
the cash value of all but two and theresults of the
above policy are far in excess of any of the other
Companies.
I am more than pleased with the results obtained
on my Dominion Life policy and I need hardly tell you
that my six sons will carry their insurance in your
Company.    You are at liberty to use this letter.
Yours sincerely, (Sgd.) JAMES W. LEE.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Branch Manager
.OG-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C. PAGE SIX
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1924.
THE AIMS OF THE
PUBLIC SCHOOL
(Continued From Page One)
back ot nil bad habit, back of nil)*!.
If not all of our social evils, there is
a warped and undeveloped judgment.
The ability to form correct judgment
about things will assist us in forming
those correct judgments about our
feilowmeii which is so essential to
good citizenship.
"Greater power  of expression—An
LONGDISTANCE CALLS |
ARE CHEAPER WHEN |
MADE AT NIGHT |
Under the new scale of night rates for long- g
' distance conversations the charge between ||
8:30 p.m. and 7 a.m, is the lowest in the ==
history of this company.     The new rates jjj
are on a basis of approximately twice, and ||
in some cases, three times, the day period, ||
at two-thirds the 'day, rate. ||j
One long-distance conversation will often do mere =
in expediting business than the exchange of a number g
of letters.     Speed is one of the principal, advantages g
of long-distance, and the effect of personal contact by ||
wire is also valuable.     While long-distance has for |j
years proven its worth as a servant of business, it has g
its place in the social sphere as well, for a chat by wire =
between distant friends is most enjoyable, and ar- ||
rangements regarding visits and other matters are g
speedily made through the long-distance service. |§
The rate clerk would be glad to answer any in- g
quiries. =
British Columbia Telephone |
Company       ~ 1
^ U,i,:^^i m!i: !^!l [i^lMiillillSlillillliiiilllllllllllllilfi
important principle in pedagogy is
this 'the Idea before the word.' When
the child has gained this experience
with his environment certain ideas
it feels the need of expressing them.
As a social being on entering school
it can only do so by oral language-
hut as the experience grows it finds it
necessary to increase its mode of expression and thus it adopts such
means as drawing and writing. As
the child progresses through our elementary schools development of power of expression is forced by increase
of ideas and much of this increase is
gained through geography, history
and literature. In the study of these
subjects the child is led into channels
from which ample material may he
drawn to aid in the development of
expression. In the study of history
the child learns the wisdom of certain
laws which as a future citizen he will
lie called upon to obey—of the struf.-
i gles which his forefathers had to un-
Ldergo to attain the freedom which he
today enjoys and which it is his
bounden duty to uphold. In geography the child is led from a study
of his own surroundings—his school
grounds—city—province—onward to
a general knowledge of all parts of
our earth which is so essential in this
age of easy travel. Through tho
study of literature which is begun ou
a small scale in the second reader, the
public school endeavors to cultivate
in the child a taste for the best in the
realm of books—which unfolds untold
pleasures within man's easy reach--
You want Better Beer
--try these
and
Beer
Produced by Vancouver Breweries,
Limited, under ideal conditions of
cleanliness and scientific brewing.
SOLD AT ALL GOV'T. VENDORS
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    .    (loanls.     .    Repair.
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. 0.
whether wealth or poverty overtakes
him.
"By means of physical drill—supervision of sports, teaching of hygiene and medical inspection the public school tries to aid the home in fitting the child with the lirst great'asset in life—a healthy body.
"The study of children shows that
the aesthetic instinct is a growth
which progresses with our experience
with beautiful things. What In chilli
hood we considered beautiful we do
not necessarily consider so iu mature
years. Children can be made to appreciate a poem by observing the
teacher's appreciation of It as expressed or imparted in her voice or gestures. So too a bird or a flower can
be given a new meaning hy the teacher's attitude to it.
"Lastly comes character building.
Character is not developed by avoiding contact with the realities of lite
—on the contrary. It is by entering
into this real life that the pupil learns
to estimate bis powers correctly to
realize his weaknesses and to gain
that self-control which constitute the
practical demonstrations of character.
The class-room affords ample oppor-'
tunity for the engraining of true morality. Here the pupil is made to feel
that truth and nothing but the truth is,
wanted and tliat ail carelessness in
observation and statement and all
slovenliness in his work—is a violation of the moral law and detrimental to his standing in the school—And
while religion is not set down as occupying any distinct place In the
course of instruction, nevertheless, the
public school does, too, accomplish
something along this. line. For instance, by the daily recitation of
'The Lord's Prayer,' at the opening of
school—the child's attention is called
to the fact that he owes his all to,the
Goodness of the Creator—that no success attends his efforts without His
help—that he must do to others as he
would be done by—and too the student of nature may be shown that the
more deeply he penetrates into nature's secrcets the more need he admire the wisdom of the Creator."
The President then introduced Dr.
Lamb, of Vancouver, an authority on
Tuberculosis. Dr. Lamb's lecture
was limited in time but his comprehensive knowledge of his topic enabled him to cover and- reveal to
bis audience a number' of interesting
and educational facts concerning this
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Closed Cars at
Open Car Prices
__i_____n_i_3__a_!i___raaiEMBiisia
Used Cars at
Standard ized
|Prices
_i__M_._._ItH_I_E__ic___-_l
FORD SERVICE - HONEST VALUE |
Corfield Motors, Ltd.     I
r'OIII) DEALER
fej       I'lione 10
Courtenay, B.C.    _=
iiiiiniuiiiiii
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  Mrvlce.
It  rooms,  electrically  _.at__.
Excellent culslnt—
For reservations P___e IS.
K. IATBS, Manager.
disease so prevalent throughout society. The disease was emphasized
as being very contagious, but preventable, curable and not hereditary
as so commonly believed.
Following the splendid address,
dainty refreshments were served. The
program was then resumed. A pkuio
solo by Mr. Thomas followed by a
vocal solo by Mr. Thomas and a banjo
solo by Mr. Jackson brought a pleasant evening to a close. Hearty
votes of thanks were extended to Dr.
Lamb, Miss Galllvan, Rev. Leversedge
Rev. Hood and those who so kindly
contributed musical items during the
evening.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
t>
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
Announcement of Change of
Business Ownership
The Meat Market carried on under the name
of Campbell's Meat Market has been taken over by
Wilcock Brothers (Bertram and James Wilcock).
Wilcock Brothers will commence business on
Thursday, October 30th.
We sincerely thank our customers for the
generous support extended since this Meat
Market was opened seven years ago, and trust
that our successors will have increased patronage.
All accounts due at above date will be made
payable at Campbell's General Store.
Campbell's
Meat Market
Big Hallowe'en
Cabaret
Dance
Gaiety Theatre
COURTENAY
Thursday, Oct. 30
Optional to book tables. For reservation phone 51M-64
Gents. $1.00 Ladies 50c.
COMMENCES 9:30
B.C. WILL HAVE
REPRESENTATION ON
RAILWAY BOARD
VICTORIA, Oct. 24.—Premier Oliver has just issued a statement tliat
British Columbia will have adequate
representation before the Hoard of
Railway Commissioners when that
Federal body sits In Vancouver early
In November. Despite the fact tbat
that B.C. Legislature will commence
its fall session on Monday, November
II, which will keep the government
ministry pretty well tied to Victoria,
complete arguments will be presented
in support of the Premier's drive for
the removal of all freight rates discrimination. Hon. Mr. Oliver has
recently pressed for a definite ruling
on the applications of this province
of a year ago and hopes for an announcement before the commissioners
leave again for Ottawa.
ter of marine and fisheries, the whole
question was discussed. Hon. Mr.
Cardin said the halibut question was
British Columbia's and he expected as
a result of the coming conference that
a satisfactory settlement between the
two countries would be reached.
HOW TO JUDGE MEN
George Horace Lorlmer, editor of
the Saturday Evening Post, glveB this
advice o_ sizing up men:
"Look iu a man's eye for honesty;
Around his mouth for weakness;
At his chin for strength:
At bis hands for temperament;
At his nails for cleanliness;
His tongue will tell you his experience aud prove or disprove bis statements as it runs along."
It is interesting to try this test out
on our friends and others that we
know. So many times these physical characteristics check up with the
dualities of a man that it ls not neces-
s iry to ascribe every man's success
to "pull."
MARINE AND
FISHERIES QUESTION
FULLY DISCUSSED
VICTORIA, Oct. 21.—In all likelihood, ns the result of representations
made by Hon. William Sloan, provincial secretary and commissioner of
fisheries, British Columbia will have
a representative on the international
board which will lie appointed to deal
with the halibut question in the near
future. During the recent visit ot
Hon. P. J. A. Cardin, Federal minis-
fin.9 sfationery^Aa
a facial'charm*
Fipai Organdie
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND ■ • B. C.
He was rushing through the station
when a pretty woman stopped him.
"Would you please help the Working Girls' Home?"
"Certainly, but I haven't much time
Where are they?"
WANTED—TO HEAR FROM OWNER
of good farm for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush,
Minneapolis, Minn. 48.
WANTED — TO PURCHASE SIX
White Leghorn Pullets. Apply
"Islander" P.O. Drawer 430.
WANTED — TO PURCHASE ONE!
dozen Rhode Island Red Pullets.
Apply "Islander" P.O. Drawer 430.
FOR SALE—PEDIGREE FOX TER-
rler pups from imported stock. Sire
winner of open class recent Victoria show, splendid type. Allberry, Sandwlck, P.O. Phone 8»F
Courtenay, 43.
FOR SALE—COTTAGE, CONTAIM-
mg four rooms for (250 cash, for
further information apply Box 112,
Cumberland, B.C. 4..
FOR SALE—TWO COWS AND SOME
heifers. Overstocked. Lelghton,
Royston Road.     Phone 95R.        VI..
FOR SALE — GERARD HINTZMAN
Piano,   In   splendid   condition   on
terms.      See  Mrs. J.  B.  Bergland.
43.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KINO GEORGE V.
m
Important facts about a whisky
are:
Quality—Age—Method of
Maturing
Read the label on every bottle of
u
.«
@.adiaN (Bl5)
WHISKY
Observe carefully the date on the
Government Stamp over the capsule
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & sons. Limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Montreal, Q_e.
Distillers af Fine
Whiskies since 1858
London, Eng.
New York. U.S. A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
•__.^-r/_j-'ji\. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
(It
Courtenay    and    Cumberland!
ors!
EVERYBODY  has  a  certain  amount of civic
pride-that sort of pride which helps make a village a town, and a town
a metropolitan city.
The growth of any community is dependent upon the support given it by
its citizens.   If you fail in your co-operation the town either stands still or retrogrades.
If you uphold the town by sustaining it wholeheartedly you help yourself and
the community.   The theme of this advertisement is: "Help your city; Buy at home!"
DIVIDE   your  dollars   among   your  merchants   and others who have the
interests of the populace at heart.   Help them and they will help you to greater values—for increased
volume means decreased costs.
The town needs your support and you need the support of the town.   Let's
get together and share our prosperity.
T. BOOTH & SONS
Courtenay, II.C.
—Tea Specialists—
Watagood Tea and Coffee
FELIX THOMAS
—The  Auctioneer—
Courtoimy, II.C.
Prompt Settlements
PIKET  ELECTRIC
Courtenny, II.C.
—Everything Electrical—
for the home and olllce
GEO. PIDCOCK
f nurtoiiii)', II.C.
Agent  for the famous
McLaughlin Dulck Curs.
GRAHAM & MONCRIEF
Conrtenay, II.C.
—Hardware Merchants—
Sporting Goods of all kinds
BLOT & EWART
Cniirtonar, B.C.
"The  home  of  the   'Chev.'
Courteous Service
Reasonable Prices
LAYERS
Courteniiy, II.C.
The Leading Ladies Store
Fall Coats Now Showing
THE  CASH STORE
Cmirli'iinj, H.C.
The little Store wilh the big
business.
CAMPBELL'S
CllllllllTlllllll,   II.C.
■Watch for our Saturday
Evening Specials
A. MncKINNON
CllllllllTlllllll.   II.C.
We have the very  latest
Slyles ami  Patterns
MATT BROWN'S GROCERY
For Service
anil Quality
CiiiiiImtIiiiiiI, II.C.
ROYAL STANDARD
Courtonay, II.C.
Consult us about your Cattle
and   Poultry   Ffeeds.
MARSHALL MUSIC CO.
Courtenny, H.C.
—The Music People—
"We Serve."
,1. McLEOD
Cnurtenny, II.C.
Waterproof Clothing
from head to foot.
CORFIELD MOTORS
Coiii'li'iinj, II.C.
—Ford  Dealers-
Oil      Gas     Tires
MALPASS ii WILSON
Ciiurtoiiur, II.C.
The Progressive Grocers
I'lione 40.
COMOX CREAMERY
Courtenay, B.C.
"Help us
and we'll help you."
MODERN SHOE CO.
Conrtenay, B.C.
Have you seen our "Gipsy"
King & "Gipsy" Queen Shoes
R  MUTRIE
Courtenny, H.C.
—Eye Specialist-
Vancouver prices
C. CAMPBELL
Conrtenay, B.C.
—High  Class  Tailor—
Specialists. In  Dry Cleaning.
B &  K FEED ANI) FLOUR
Courtenny, B.C.
Purity Flour for Good Urcad
Wo deliver.
THE COMOX TAILOR
Courtenny, B.C.
"Thc Little Shop,
Over the Bridge."
TARHEELS LIMITED
Courtenny, IM'.
Hardware       Sporting Goods
Paints. Phone 3').
BOOL &  WILSON
Conrtenay, B.C.
The store with just one thing
—Tires!—! —
SPARKS   COMPANY
Courtonay, B.C.
-Automotive   Engineers—
Radio  experts.
MISS E. M. E. JOHNSON
The
Exclusive  Ladles'  Store
Masonic Block,  Conrtonoy
.MAROCCHI BROS.
< iiiiiIiitIiiiiiI. IM'.
The most of the  liest
fur the least
FRANK  PARTRIDGE
—Everything—
In the line of Clothing
CiiiiiImtIiiiiiI, IM'.
,1. SUTHERLAND
The
Slyle Centre
CllllllllTlllllll,   II.C.
It. T. COOPER
Sandwlck, II.C.
—The Particular Merchant	
Everything   for   Everybody, PAGE EIGHT
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER .5, 1924.
Theatre
i
I
CUMBERLAND
Friday 24 & Saturday 25
i__iQ_a___«ja__ ___njw_nHK_»^^
Betty Compson
IN
YSEX'
Beautiful Women or pursuing men—which is the enemy sex? See them clash in
this story of ti vamp and her string of wealthy admirers. With Betty as the girl
who laughed at the flames—and escaped untouched.
The real inside story of the life and loves of a Follies' girl made by the man who
gave us "THE COVERED WAGON."
and Comedy Pictures
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2:30 P.M.—
DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT ILO-ILO HALL AT 9.30
COMING
Monday and Tuesday
Baby Peggy
and a big cast in a big feature play
THE
MILY SECRET
When a little child gets into trouble, all the world feels a tug at its heart string,
To discover that thc burglar in your house is your own father—that is trouble
"THE FAMILY SECRET"
is a picture for the whole family
Comedies and other Pictures
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, B.C.
LINING THE CONNAUGHT TUNNEL
Upper lel'tr—in spit. UI |H_V> miuwtitlls aim DBIOW Mill I...UIH ,„. mil .,. limits Uie lollltau.tll 1U1UICI la „M»t_UU_
throa__o-t tht winter months. Tlio cloud-wrapped liri.hu of Mount Abboll and _osa Peak aland aa weitera aa_tin__ of tbe
UtUe town.
Upper right.—Glacier, B.C., ahowlriji Mmnii rtiiu.i»r.alcl, 0,482 feet, through which the ti.. mile Connawht TaiUM) pawl..
East. Peak, 0,353, lo in the centre of tllc picture and Mount Sir Donald, one of the mosl beautiful peak, in tha Canadian ttedUea.
with an altitude of 10,808 feet, ia on the extreme right.
Lower left—The  resident cn.inccr'a  bungalow  nestles anions iriant evergreens on  lhe banke of the llleclllewaet RrraT.
Lower right,—Western   Portal  of
ventilate th. "big hole."
he  Citnnnu-lil   Tuunrl. .lowing the Inn i;ouae and the two huge 14 ft- steel fans which
High up on the crest of the lofty Selkirks with naif
a dozen of the finest mountain peaks in the
world hunching their snow-clad shoulders about its
rows of trim brown houses, lies the picturesque tuwn
of Glacier on the main line of the Canadian Pacific
Railway through British Columbia, 'three and a
half miles distant from this little construction centre,
which has virtually been culled into being through
the lining of the Connaught Tunnel, hangs the greal
Illecillewaet Glacier on the slopes of Mount Mac
donald and two miles nearer nestics Glacier House,
the annual mecca of thousands of summer tourists.
Pew of the surrounding peaks at Glatiiet ure leai-
than 9,000 feet in altitude The famous Cheops
Mount Sir Donald, Ross, Eagle and Abbot! peaks en
Circle the little settlement ln winter time a blnnkei
of snow enfolds town and mountains alike In spring
the brilliant yellow slide lilies follow the evei-rcced
ing mow line as it climbs higher and highei up th'
mountain sides Life is enlivened in the summei
time by the crowds of guests who throng Glaciei
House and transforms the scene again with gcneroui
splashes of orange, crimson and russet.
Common interest in the great engineering projec
under way has brought about a very definite com
munity spirit at Glacier For almost every young
star's daddy works in tbe big tunnel in one or othei
of the various brunches of work which the lining de
mands, and every household is regulated by a schedule
of working hourB which begin at 5 a.m. and end a1
1.15. Half a hundred children attend the little brovvi
school house and various clubs for the gnnvn-up.-
provide interests of a recreational and culture'
nature.
Engineers, foremen, carpenters, machinists, drillers,
electricians, laborers and train crews make up the
wage earners among the 600 residents of Glacier.
Single men live in a well ordered camp. Here, as in
the little homes where the men with families live, all
the conveniences of a modern city are enjoyed including electric lights and running water piped from a
nearby mountain stream.
The lining of this five mile tunnel, the longest
on the American continent, with a steel reinforced
concrete jacket represents one of the most interesting
engineering projects now under way anywhere in the
world.
Beneath 6,000 feet of mountain the Connaught
Tunnel cuts under Mount Macdonald between the stations of Connaught and Glacier. With the opening
of this underground short-cut in 1916 the Canadian
Pacific Railway overcamo the many difficulties which
the old Rogers Pass route had presented. Track
curvature to an amount corresponding to seven complete circles was eliminated; the summit attained by
the Railway was reduced by 652 feet; the trackage
was shortened by four and a half miles and more
than four miles of snow sheds which had been necessary on the slopes of Mount Macdonald were dispensed with.  '
The lining ot the 'big hole" was begun ln 1920
and when this work is completed the Connaught
Tunnel will stand as one of the finest and most complete engineering jobs in the universe. Undertaken
in the name of safety, the Connaught Tunnel has
always been a "safety first" proposition Throughout
its construction days, during the eight years it has
been in operation and the four years that it haa
already taken to line it, it has been singularly free
from accident.
Nearly 600,000 sacks ol Canadian cement will
have gone into the lining of the Connaught Tunnel
when it is finished. Practically all the machinery
.sed in the work is Canadian made, including the
huge compressors and powerful motors. The four
ypos of reinforced steel collapsible forms, which are
iced in the various stages of the lining process, came
from a western Canadian plant and the Sydney E.
lunkins Company. B.C., Limited, construction engi-
icers ure in charge of its lining.
The tunnel's concrete jacket is completed in sec-
ion" 22 feel long, each section taking about four or
five days to prepare, when it is sometimes necessary
o do considerable blasting, one day to fill with con-
•rete and three days in which to set. Six complete
ets of forms are at work within the tunnel which
neaiis a completed section foi every working day in
lie week, or a total of 132 feet in sin dayi.
More than lull powerful flood lamps illuminate tht
unnel at these six working points. Owing to the
eniiirliable ventilating system, which in itself is one
■ f the most interesting and important features of
ihe tunnel, working conditions are excellent At the
western portal two great steel fans, driven by two
'00 h.p four cylinder semi-Diesel engines, turn at
the rate of 255 revolutions a minute driving a brisk
breeze through the five-mile length of this great
mderground passage. The ventilation thus created
makes it possible for trains to pass through the tunnel with practically no discomfort to passengers and
for workmen to remain at their tasks for eight consecutive hours without detriment to health or vigor,
One comes upon many surprising things in the
course of a walk through the great double-tracked
tunnel. Grains of wheat fallen from the thousands
of cars of Canada's 1923 bumper crop which have
passed through on their way to the port of Vancouver
have taken root for many yards within each portal
and the tiny field mice ever in search of provender
scamper across the .racks within the very heart of
the tunnel. At two points In the tunnel wall doors
lead through the solid quartzite rock to the pioneer
bore and here in tliis miniature tunnel one finds two
brilliantly illuminated and immaculate "white
lunches." White capped chefs preside In these underground restaurants dispensing steaming bowli of
soup and fragrant coffee to the small army of workers
who are bringing to completion the lining oi tbe
Connaught Tunnel.
For Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE i.o
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo-llo  Theatre
CUMBEBIAND, B.C.
ALBERT EYAN8
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,    Soalp    Treatment
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered to All Parte of District.
Coal, Wood and Goede ef Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE  CHAKOBB
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
l'HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
NINE
ai
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
B11L-BARBE.R
,
iO?PORTUNI_T
IS THE MAN
WHO FINDS
WOLF AT
[THE DOOR AM
APPEARS IN THE
'STREET NEXT
WITH A
HII1C0AT,
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
THIRD ANNUAL B. C.
POTATO SHOW WILL BE
HELD NOVEMBER 27-29
The third annual Dritish Columbia
Potato Show and Educational Seed
Exhibit to be held iu the Manufacturers' Building, Vancouver, November
27-29, under the direction ot the Department of Agriculture and the Vancouver Board of Trade. The prize
list includes classes for certified seed,
exhibition and commercial potatoes.
A special class for gardeners and a
class for prepared dishes of potatoes
for the ladles have also been arranged
The official opening of the fair takes
place  at  2:00   p.m.   November  27th.
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery   J
Eat JlcP.rydc's 1009. Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives §|
the poison from lhe system.     He that is hailed as the greatest 3=
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the SS
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread." •§_
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking   S
guarantees the .tiality
HUNTERS!
Before buying your Guns and Ammunition for the
coming season which opens September 13th, call and
inspect our complete line of Shot Guns, Rifles, Hunters' Clothing, Compasses, Knives, Cleaning Kits, Rust
Removers, Oils, Etc., Etc.
All kinds of Metallics and Shells, comprising the
famous Ulack Shell in 3 grades: Ajax, Climax and
Homax, Superex and Dominions.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Courtenay
The STAR Car
"THE ARISTOCRAT OF LOW-PRICED CARS"
MR. MAN';—
In purchasing a cur do you realize the all Important factor
ot buying a car with a perfectly rigid frame?
THE STAR TUBULAR BACKBONE
The frame has exceptional strength, due to the Star Tubular Backbone, a hollow steel cylinder, hot-riveted through Manges at eaeh end of the centre cross members. The tremendous
tiii'llnnul resistance of the Tublur Buckboue holds these two
cross members absolutely pnrrallel to each other at all times
and they iu turn force the two long frame side members to remain always paiullel to each other. Consequently there can
be no twisting of the frame, with tho result that all mechanical
units are kept in perfect alignment and are Independently
mounted for greater accessibility and ease of adjustment. The
body ls protected against twisting at the joints and so preserved
from wear and noise. Aside from this, easier riding qualities
and greater security are given to the car.
Star Special, now equipped witli full balloon tires on small disc
wheels, bumpers, motoineter, wind shield wingstjl 1 /*A ||A
Star Regular Sedan, disc wheels and full bal-fljl PI A AA
loon tires.       Price    _>1U1U.UU
Star Regular 5 Passenger Touring ..Q^_P_ flft
All Prices F.O.H. Conrtenay
"A LOW-PRICED, HIGH-GRADE MOTOR CAR"
CALL OR PHONE FOB DEMONSTRATION
Bell-Irving Motors, Ltd.
COURTENAY, B.C.
During the exhibition demonstrations
will be given on the various ways of
cooking potatoes. A full program of
speakers is being provided to discuss various phases of the seed and
potato industry. Prize lists and entry cards may be obtained by writing
C. Tice Department of Agriculture,
Victoria.
FIREMEN PRESENT
DEPARTING MEMBER
WITH CLUB BAG
COURTENAY,—On Thursday night
about twenty members of the Courtenay Volulcer Fire Dept. met In social session to bid farewell to Mr. Wm.
Shilcock, one of the stalwarts of the
organization who is'leaving shortly
for England on a holiday.
Chief John Thompson was master
of ceremonies and performed his arduous but pleasant duties with such
diligence that he has added greatly lo
his reputation as a chairman. The
refreshments were In charge of Mr.
llobt.  Duncan  an  ex-member of tho
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
ROD B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONK SMS     VICTOBIA, H.C,
i department and nothing was forgot-
I ten that would serve to appease the
I wants of the inner man. Songs,
stories, recitations and dancing were
included in the program. The leading entertainers were Messrs Shilcock and Aston as Mr. Gallagher ami
Mr. Sheen, ant! in a duet "are you
working?" Mr. Frank rendered in
his own inimitable style "It I meet
Antonio Toredor." Mr. J. Thompson, Fire Chief, gave some very realistic impersonations of Harry
Lauder. Mr. J. Stevenson recited
Tam o' shanter. Mr. Black anil
Haggarty pleased with some fancy
step-dancing. Mr, w. Rockwell
song an original French song. Mr,
J. Thompson, II. Duncan, J. Stevenson
W. J. Haggarty and W. Rockwell appeared as dancers In a Scotch Heel.
Mr. Hugh McLean sung and also had
Installed a late model radio with a
loud speaker and entertained the
party with a program from Frisco.,
Vancouver and other coast points. Mr.
Percy Booth rendered some songs
which were very much appreciated.
Mr. Cawdell was at the piano.
During the evening Mr. Shilcock
was the recipient ot n handsome club
bag from lhe members of the department, the presentation being made by
Mr. J. II. Mclntyre, ono of the oldest
members in point of service of the
Courtenay Volunteer Fire Dept.
Mr, Shilcock responded in a brief
speech nnd in which he thanked the
donors of the bag for their expressions of good will. The banquet broke
up at 1:00 a.m.
COMOX VALLEY COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
MEN WANTED
To Learn Big Money Trades
Only few weeks required.
Choose the Trade you like best
and start training at once. We
teach Engineering, Auto Tractor Mechanics, Tire Vulcanizing, Welding and Battery Work,
Electrical Ignition, Tile Setting,
Bricklaying, Plastering, also the
Barber Trade (both Men and
Women Barbers.) Write nearest
Branch to you for Big Free
Catalogue and special offer.
Hemphill Trade Schools Ltd.
Winnipeg, Reglna, Saskatoon,
Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver,
Victoria, Toronto, Montreal,
Minneapolis, Duluth, Fargo.
Following is a list of cows in the above association tliat gave 50 lbs. or
more of butter-fat for September 11124.
Days
Fresh Name of Cow Breed
30
170
Darkey      Gdr. Jersey
Pinkey      Gdr, Jersey
Maud   Gdr. Jersey
Strawberry 2nd   Gdr. Jersey
Mabel   Gdr. Jersey
Betty   Gdr. Jersey
Molly   Gdr. Jersey
ltosclatid of Sandwlck   P.B. Jersey
Milk
Fat
lb.
lb.
Owner
774
52.C
W.  A.   Urquhart
1023
51.1
Prltchard  Bros,
1134
51.0
Butler Bros.
1162
62.6
W.  A.   Urquhart
90(1
58.S
W.  A.   Urquhart
1020
50.1
W. A.  Urquhart
741
53.3
W.   A.   Urquhart
S30
50.2
G.  Hornby
WM. ROSE, Supervisor.
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Healing1 Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124 Phone 167
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your   needs   wlll   receive   Immediate
attention.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Wrlto For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 26!. Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C
NOTHING DONE IN
ATTEMPTED ARSON
IN COURTENAY
COURTENAY,—At a recent meeting of the Courtenay City Council, it
wus pointed out by Aid. Cook that no
arrests bad been made lu connection
with the recent lire in the basement of
the -McPhee Block and as regards to
that matter things were practically at
a standstill. Aid. Cook thought that
the city ought to do something towards bringing the culprit to justice
and offer u reward for tbe arrest or
Information leading to a conviction,
Tills was the second lime within a
year that the same thing luid happened and if things were left witli no
action taken in tiie matter, it possibly
would not be the last attempt. It
was pointed out that the City Council
has received very little support from
the government and other bodies in
ihelr attempts to force law and order
and it almost appears as If things
were brought up to hinder rather than
to assist them in their efforts. Nothing delinite was done In the matter.
Mr. McKenzie of Vancouver who is
visiting his brother-in-law, .Mr. F. C.
Brock has been enjoying some splendid shooting. He leaves for Vancouver today.
*   *   *
On Saturday afternoon the Girls
Guides, under Capt. Meredith luid a
busy- lime at the Memorial Cairn.
.They cleaned the flower beds and
tidied up things generally, ready for
the Armistice Way Service.
Mr. Robert Hornal, Courtenny Chief
of Police, is erecting a line modern
residence on the Lake Trail.
*   *   *
Mr. G. W. Stubbs, Scoutmaster of
the 1st Courtenuys spent the week end
in Nanaimo,
Comox Creamery Butter
a Vancouver Island Product
and Comox Jam:- Strawberry and Raspberry
=       _l_!_!J_l_,_l_|__i_H^^
You'll like this Butter
Capt. nud Mrs. Llddlu entertained
a number of friends to bridge and'
dancing ou Thursday.
Mrs. Richardson is staying with her
daughter, Mrs. T. L. Butters.
What might have been a fatal accident occurred one day last week on
the Union Hay Road. Little "Bunty"
Butters running from behind a truck
went full lilt Into a car coming In
the opposite direction. Fortunately
the auto was travelling slowly otherwise the child might have been killed as it was, but for a few bruises,
she was unhurt.
.Major Hilton, who has been logging
at Comox this summer, has now closed
his camps for the season.
Mr. Felix Thomas Is making an extensive addition to his residence on
the Luke Trail.
Capt. G. Halley and Dr. Butters left
this week with L. S. Cokeley for a
trip up the coast. Mr. Cokeley Is
making a survey of Indian reserves
for the Department. Ills two guests
should have n splendid holiday.
Last week a cow was grazing on
the river bank opposite the Govt.
wharf when the bank gave way and
she slipped in. The water being
deep at that point "bossy" decided to
try the other bunk. When nearly
over, a spectator on the wharf tried
to rope her bul without success. She
eventually found a safe lauding near
the sawmill.
Cliffe Lands Hard
One In Third
(Continued  From   Page One)
in the ring proved conclusively that
Ihey bad been vastly underrated ao
mitw.elders, Each claims that Union
will not mix with Imperial and vice
versa ami they gave an ocular demonstration of tho fact. They were
striking on one cylinder only, leading
one fan lo suggest Ihat their sparkplugs were carbonized. This scrap
wns for throe one-minute rounds and
no decision was awarded.
Harry Jackson of Cumherland was
referee for Uie whole show, Jock
Thomson was timekeeper nnd John
Cameron and W. Woodhus were the
judges.
W. T. GOARD
1'IA.NO TUNKB
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall MlUle 0...
Ask your grocer for Comox Creamery Butter and thc whole family will be
delighted with this pure, fresh product of Vancouver Inland farms. The
richness and palate-pleasing flavor of this butter is the result of careful
manufacturing methods employed in the big, modern creamery at Courtenay. It is uniformly good—always dependable, always delicious, always
fresh.
Comox Creamery
Association
Fit's the Thing in
Men's Clothes
It's important .— the design and the manner in
which your Clothes are
cut! With the assurance
of quality woolens and
fine tailoring, style becomes tho biggest factor.
Through years of experi-
enc we know how to fit
you, how you should wear
your Clothes — and we're
now  ready  to  serve  you.
C. Campbell
CUSTOM TAILOR
Courtenay, B. C.
_J_H-Jr.:ffiM_ISe^ TEN
IVE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1924.
_l__j|_l_j_j_l_|_|__!l_l_l_l_j_l_l_l_^
Featuring-
Children's Wear
Children's English Chinchilla Navy |
Coats, In sizes 18, 18, 20 and 22 for the
little ones. Prices $_.__ to $8.95.
Children's Cashmere Coats, in
Cream only, beautifully embroidered,
in several sizes for tiny tots. See
these.
Children's White Bearskin Coats, in
all sizes for the little ones.
Children's Cream Cashmere Dresses In sizes 16, 18, 20 and 22.
Children's Wool Cord Coats, in two
sizes for baby, n real smart Coat.
Silk Coats, in Cream Silk, just two
of them, for infants and they sure are
smart. Specially for the Special
Baby.
Woollen Gaiters lor Baby.
Wool Overalls in the various sizes
for Baby.
Cream Silk Dresses, nicely embroidered, just what you want to present to
Baby.
Silk Knitted Bonnets, smartly made
for Baby.
Baby Buggy Covers in Wool, and
real Hider Down.
Pure Wool Underwear for Baby.
Dr. Arnold's Sleepers for Baby.
Every pair will give you value for
your money.
Circle liar Hosiery for Baby,
Rubber Pauls for Baby.
Kubber Sheets, made in a full size
tor Baby's cot or crib.
Local Briefs
Mrs. Weston left on Wednesday for
a short visit to Parksville.
A spoonful at night is the kiddies' delight. For coughs, sore throat, etc.,
"Flax-o-lene" being free from drugs
ls specially adapted for children.   43.
Mrs. George Wycherley left on Sunday last for Vancouver, where she
will visit with relatives for a few
days.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Millichamp representative
of Peck Bros., Vancouver Is In the
city on a short business trip.
* *   *
Mr. W. Walker left on Monday
morning for Vancouver nnd while in
the Terminal City wlll visit an eyesight specialist.
.   .   .
Mr. J. T. Brown left on Monday
morning for Vancouver on a business
trip.
Mr. "Toots" Plump has been called
to Victoria on account of the serious
illness of his mother.
Mrs. C. V. Dando was a visitor to
her father t_ Extension last week-end.
* *   •
Mrs. McKee, of Bamneld, arrived "in
Cumberland Thursday on a visit to
her daughter, Mrs. W. Woods.
* *   *
Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Nunns who for
the past month have been visiting
with their son Rev. Arthur Nunns of
St. Mary's Church, Oak Bay, Victoria,
returned to Cumberland on Thursday
last.
* *      Si
Mrs. S. Horwood left o_ Saturday's
train for a week end visit with friends
in Victoria,
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Banks left Cumberland on Tuesday for a week's holiday in Victoria.
* *   *
Miss Hannah Harrison and Mrs.
Harrison went down to Vancouver on
Tuesday's train for a short holiday.
Miss Fountain, provincial secretary
of the  C.G.I.T.,  arrived  in  Cumber-
j land Thursday evening to make ar-
 ! rangements for a conference and ban-
Ask   for   "Flax-o-lene"   at   Lang'.! j quet of that organization.
Sutherland's - - Cumberland
H__!_H_f_/21B_fflJ_^
The Best Battery For Your Gar
—and it cost you less to own
We sell Willard Charged Bone-Dry
Batteries in preference to all other
batteries, because we know this battery costs the car owner less to own.
"Reparations from Germany and new
insulation for a Charged Bone-Dry Battery The allies can't get the first, and you
car owners won't need thc second," says
Little Ampere.
Sparks Co. (Courtenay),Ltd.
Auto  Electricians an d   Radio
I'lione UK COURTENAY
Specialists
I'lione 119
Include Candy
for
Hallowe'en
One of the important
things that will make Hallowe'en a success will be a
box of Candy from Lang's
Delicious Chocolates and
assorted Candies that will
add zest and life to your
party.
Hallowe'en novelties, including pumpkins, witches,
lanterns, etc. Everything
for the Hallowe'en party.
LANG'S
DRLG
SI ORE
Drug Store.
43.
In Wednesday's Vancouver Province a picture of Mr. W. C. Hassell
appeared, with the statement that he
takes a prominent part In the radio
programs which are broadcasted from
the Province radio station. Mr. Hassell was formerly a resident of Cumberland where his ability as a baritone singer is very well known.
Miss Edith Bickle arrived in Cumberland Friday evening from Los
Angeles. Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bickle
accompanied their daughter up from
Victoria.
*    *   *
Remember the G.W.V.A. Masquerade Ball In the Ilo-llo on Tuesday,
November 11th, not On Monday as before advertised. 43.
Campbell River
News
Mr. W. C. Holt, of the firm of
Thacher and Holt, Victoria, visited the
River this week to inspect the heating
apparatus at the new gaol.
* *   ♦
Mr. J. M. Hill, of the Gosse-Millerd
Fishing Company, who spent several
days here in the interest of his company, left by stage on Sunday for the
West Coast.
* *   *
Mr. Samuel 'Watson, of Courtenny. I
was a visitor here last Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Grant, are
spending a few days at Buttles' Lake.
* *   *
Mr.   H.   E.   Elsden,  superintendent
of Government  Telegraph   lines  was i
In  Campbell   River on business  this i
week.
* ♦     4
Mr. Anderson, owner of the Cove
Cannery, arrived on the Venture, from
Vancouver on Wednesday morning.
* *   *
Mr. Robert McQuaig returned home
on Wednesday morning.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Dier and daughter registered at the Willows Hotel
last Saturday night and spent tho
week end hunting.
* *   *
Mr. Albert W. Snider and daughter
of Vancouver, spent the week at
Campbell Lakes hunting and llshing.
They were accompanied by Mr. W.
Griffiths.
* •   •
Messrs. George and Victor Spencer,
of Courtenay, and Everett Chandler,
ot Cumberland are a party of nim-
rods spending a few days at Upper
Campbell Lukes.
* *   *
Mr .and Mrs. Richard Rushton, of
Courtenay, spent the week end as
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Crawford at Campbellton.
...
Dr. and Mrs. Butters of Courtenny
were visitors of Mrs. Butters' father, Dr. W. A. Richardson, last Sunday.
.   .   .
Mr. Conrad Reid left on Tuesday
fnr Shoal Bay where ho wlll spend
'the next fortnight.
* *   *
.Mr. Thomas Hudson, of Union Bay,
waB n visitor to Campbell River last
Sunday.
* .   .
The plant of the Wilfred Lumber Co
Is shipping a scow load of lumber, one
hundred thousand feet, to Messrs. Edwards & Orr, Courtenny contractors
and builders supply dealers. Other I
fairly good orders have been recelv- I
ed and the mill will doubtless be
very busy for some time to come.
* *   »
The Pat Players, of Vancouver, with
Pat McCullouch, expert clog dancer i
as the star performer, presented an
Interesting program of songs and
vaudeville stunts at the LUeana Pavilion Inst Saturday night. The company has been making a lour of ths
various coast points in their private
yacht the Gunhlld. The entertainment here was well patronized, many
persons coming from outside points.
The dance after the show was an enjoyable one, the music being provided
by the concert troupe's own orchestra.
MEN FOLKS
These men are very simple folks,
1 like 'em.
: They take me out until they're broke,
1 like 'em.
I like 'em naughty, tall and lean
And fat and short and good and green,
And many other kind I've seen.
I like 'em.
They lake me out to a formal hop
1 like 'em.
They lake me to a candy shop,
I like 'em.
But when  they  show me tliat they
don't care,
And hug me roughly like a bear,
And crack my ribs and muss my hair.
1 love 'em.
TENDERS WANTED
Tenders will be received up to November 3rd, 1924, for the conveyance
of the Roytson Road school children
to and from school, leaving Royston
Road at 8:30 a.m. and leaving Cumberland Public School at 3:20 p.m. The
successful tenderer will be required
to put up a bond of $10,000 against
accident or Injury. Transportation
must be in a suitably covered conveyance.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily   accepted.      Further   information may be had on application.
A.  McKlNNON,
44. Sec. School Board
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
tl.e undersigned and endorsed "Tender for Public Building, Courtenay,
B.C.," will be received until 12 o'clock
noon, Friday, .November 14, 182 . for
the construction of a public building
at Courtenay, B.C.
Plans and Specification can be seen
and forms of tender obtained nt the
offices of the Chief Architect, Department of Public Works, Ottawa, the
Resident Architect, Department of
Public Works, Victoria, B.C., the Clerk
of Works, Department of Public
Works, Vancouver, B.C., and the Poet
Olllce, Courtenay, B.C.
Blue prints can be obtained at the
olllce of the Chief Architect, Department of Public Works, by depositing
an accepted bank cheque for the sum
of $20,110 payable to (lie order of Ihe
Minister of Public Works which wlil
be returned if the Intending bidder
submit u regular bid.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the forms supplied by
the Department and in accordance
with the conditions set forth therein.
Each tender must he accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Minister of Public Works equal to 10 per
cent of the amount of the tender.
Bonds of the Dominion of Canada and
bonds of the Canadian National Railway Company will also be accepted as
security or bonds and a cheque if required to moke up an odd amount.
By order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, October 17, 1924. 44.
LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN—FOX
Terrier, mouse colored head and
black spot on side and rump.
Heeds name of "Snookie." Please
return to Cumberland Hotel       43.
NEW SHIPMENT OF
"Wear-Ever"
ALUMINUM WARE
JUST ARRIVED PRICES REASONABLE
_l_Ji__J_|__tf____|_I_|_J_J_f_^^
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK END
Aluminum Daisy Kettle, each , _  $1.35
Fancy White Japaned Cake and Bread Boxes,
large size, each  $3.75
Copper Nickel Plated .-quart Kettles, each $3.65
Thermos Bottles, pints, each , 85c.
English China,  Cream Jugs assorted patterns,
a real bargain in 3 sizes at each 35c, 50c, 65c
GROCERY SPECIALS
Libby's Pork & Beans, 2 lb. tins, 3 for 50c.
Rowntrees Pure Cocoa, ' _>-H>- tin 25c.
Rowntrees Cocoa, 1-lb tin, each  50c.
St. Charles and Pacific Milk 16-oz tins, 7 for 95c
St. Charles and Pacific Milk, Baby size, 3 tins for 25c
or 12 tins for , 95c
King Oscar Sardines, 5 tins for $1.00
Horse Shoe Salmon, '/_-lb. tins, 5 for $1.00
Canned Tomatoes, 3 tins for   50c.
British Consols Tobacco, '/_-lb. tins, each   65c.
FILL STOCK OK KKESII VRVIT AMI VEGETABLES
Buy them A DPI  17 Q Buy them
by the box A| * L.E.O by the box
You Will Save Money
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
bs
Striped and White
FLANNELETTE
in different widths, of good heavy quality suitable for
nightdresses, children's underwear, etc.
Now is the time to leave your Christmas orders for
Embroidered Pillow Cases, Scarfs, Tea Cloths Centres,
Mrs. L.  Francescini
Cumberland
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
Don't forget we are
SPECIALIZING in HEMSTITCHING
having installed the latest machine for this particular
Class of Work.
H.
I
HR.  IT.   THE   PRINCE  OF I shown  being  greeted  by   Col. S.
WALES spent a delightful Maynard  Rogers,   Park   Superin-
day in the Canadian Rockies t   d   t       the      ival of his gpec.
when he visited Jasper National  ;,,.'    . T _. .,       _ .__
Pnrk, where he  was a  guest at  lal tlaln at JaaPer Statlon on the
Jasper Park Lodge.     Here he is I Canadian National Railways.
CARD OK THANKS
The Matron of the Cumberland General Hospital wishes to thank the following for donations received for the
Hospital: The Cumberland and Denman Island Church of England, for
fruit and vegetables from their harvest festival; The Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., one ton of potatoes;
Mrs. T. Graham, vegetables; Mrs. 13.
C. Saunders, preserves; Mrs. J. H.
Graham, fruit; C.G.I.T., preserves and
pickles; Mrs. Haywood, old linen;
Mrs. Hayworth, reading matter; The
Ladles Auxiliary, old linen. Also all
those people who so very kindly sent
flowers and reading matter to the hospital during the summer.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Services at 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Sabbath School 11:45 a.m.
Evening Subject 'Some of the Trees
Behind Which People are Hiding."
Rev. J. R. Butler, Pastor.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0068205/manifest

Comment

Related Items