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The Islander May 23, 1919

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Array tHi.Ution Hta*»
®h*
With which is Consolidated The Cumberland News.
TWENTY-EIGHTH     YEAR.—No. 21.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1919.
LOCAL   AND   GENERAL   NEWS
ISLAND ARTS AND
CRAFTS CLUB
When purchasing an auto see Thos. ,,„„,,„,„„ o( ComI,ctit,OI1 f„ Enconr-
Hudson,  of  Union   Bay,  B.C.,  repre
senting the Auto Transfer of Nanaimo,
nnd agent for the Comox District for
the Chrevolct, Overland, Dodge, Hudson Six, (udlllnc, Chalmers and Republic Truck.
age thc Study  ol  Art Amongst
Young People.
CELEBRATION THIS YEAR TO
ECLIPSE ALL PREVIOUS EFFORTS
"FOR SALE" AT THE ILO
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28.
$5.00
REWARD—LOST on May
8th, between Little Qualicum and Qualicum Hospital, a pair
of long thigh, black India-rubber,
leather-lined und soled, fishing boots.
Apply to Capt. I. S. MATTERSON,
c/o W. Lee, Esq., French Creek,
Parksvllle.
lor the following classes
A. Designs: object to be stated.
B. Still life or flowers.
C. Figures or animals.
D. Landscape or seascape.
.Minimum   size   of   exhibit,   121n
14ln.
'athc presents Gladys Hulclte and
'rcighton Hale lu "For Sale" In the
screen adaptation  from the play  by
  Fred Jackson, directed by Fred Wright
_._„_., .   , ,„   ,       , . .        and produced by Astra, at the Ilo llo*
The Council Chambers were crowded Wednesday evening when Tneatre 011 Wednesday, May 88th.
the various committees met under the chairmanship of Mayor    There is a remarkably sympathetic
new Pathe feature. "For
There will be two divisions:
1. 1G years and under.
2. 20 years and under.
Prizes will be given ln each division MacDonald to make the final arrangements for today's sports, appeal ln th
Collecting committees reported a collection in the neighborhood i)1,lc'" tllBt wl" n,ul re"u>' response
of $2000—fully $500 over any previous year.   Every member "',0'", u" tt'ho heL' ,lllB i*''°toi'lil>*- "
,, 7, .,7      -        .   , ,     ,,•    „,,,     , „, „   , ,   ..       which Gladys  llul
of the committee is out to make this 24th of May a Red Letter
ulette and Crelghtun
Hale play tho principal roles.
day.   The Recreation Grounds are in good shape—band stand    The  story  is woven with simple
x erected, grand stands and seating accommodation for the thous- naturalness, aud there is a powerful
ands which are expected to visit Cumberland today.    And the tenseness,   a   feeling   of   InBurgeul
ORDER OF PARADE
FOR SATURDAY, MAY 21th
1,—Mayor anil Council, of thc city of
Cumborland.        '
3.- City Hand.
3. - Members of the Groat War Veterans.
4,—May Queen and .Maids of Honor.
.**>. -Maypole Dancers.
II.—School Children.
7.—General 1'roccsslou of Decorated
Bicycles, Characters, National.
Comic and Representative,
8.—Decorated Autos and  Floats,
0.—Undecorated Autos, etc.
The Parade will leave tlie City Hall
p.   0.30   a.m.,    prompt,,   passing    up
LOST—On May 8th, 1919, in Cumberland, a draft drawn on and payable to
Yokohama Specie Bank, Ltd., Yokohama, No. S44, for 700 yen. Finder
please return to P.O. Box 587, Cumberland, B.C.
If there ure less than 5 entries in  committees jn charge of the sportg are ready to gjve them „ royal emotionalism running through It from  t'Urougb Fi„lt street "tor a'instance of
welcome.   The following changes in the program have been made ,1!'0 lM'Bi,1,li,|e t0 u'° BUi- WBlch. ">' two blocks, then turning est will pass
any  class  a  1st  prize  only  will  be
given.
If there are 5 or more entries In necessary
thc way, Is an unusual one. „Iollg Marypori Avi, ,„ ,ul,  Sl    aaa
Dorothy    Daniels,   played   by  MUs  ,iowu  |„  Dunsmuir  Ave    nasslna
any class 1st and 2nd prizes will be      Mine Rescue Competition will take place at 10 a.m. on Sunday,  HubHte, is a stenographer.   She IS etil this ■!•■•■   i,     i
May 25th. ' ployed In the ofllce ot a wealthy man.
Senior Baseball game at 3 p.m., on Sunday, May 25th. Prize $63. Waverly Hamilton.   jn„ Reynolds
Banking hours have cbangen. Commencing from May 12th ui til further
notice the following banking hours
will be observed: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.;
Saturdays, 0.30 a..m to 12 noon.
ship In the Arts and Crafts Club.
In addition to the prizes "Commended" and "Highly Commended" cards
will be given.
No competitor shall receive more
than one prize, but may receive a
special card for any other work adjudged worthy of same.
Prizes will be of the following value
1st to the value of $5.00; 2nd to the
value of $3.00; 3rd to the Value of
$1.50.
All work must be original and not
. touched by any hands except the com-
R. T. Robertson, of Victoria, repre- ,)etit01.
seating   Burroughs Adding   Machine,     Conied work wl|, be rejecte(,
arrived on Thursday. T„e competltIon wln be heW ,„ ,he
autumn on a date to be announced In
Mrs. W,. Robinson left for England the papers,
on  Friday on account of the illness AH works winning prizes, commend
of her father. ed,   highly   commended   and   special
 1 cards, will be exhibited at the Club's
J. Hannny arrived on Thursday on nnual Exhibition fn the autumn,
a visit to friends before leaving for The work of each competitor must
given.
If there are 10 or more entries in
any class, 1st 2nd and 3rd prizes will
be glven ™.uin,,"f.rv™Ti'rV" "7Z—nVu"«Sn"tr — z""J' pinc°|n i,or i,cart •"■" dcvci,M,
winners of 1st prizes in Division 2     Prizes for the Oriental Tug-of-War will be $70.; the conditions vlolont couglls  and hls 8Weetheal.t
'111 also be given a year's member- will be the same as that governing the tug-of-war for white men. frets.   Jim works upon hei
avenue   to   Canadian   Collieries
Entries for the Tug-of-War will be received up to 12 noon today.
bookkeeper ni  tlie  place, has  won
Mrs. Geo. Brown has received word
that her son, Sapper Geo. D. Brown,
who left here on Jan. 7th, 1015, with
the 4Sth Battalion, has arrived in
Montreal, and is expected to arrive
home this week. This ls the fourth
son to return from France, all of
whom have borne honors.
In the evening the Cumberland City Band will give a dance in ies ami Anally the girl persuades her
the Ilo Ilo Dance Hall commencing at 8 p.m.  The proceeds will be »elf t0 ask money from her employer
devoted towards the purchase of new instruments for the band
This is a dance that everyone should attend and help the band.
olllccs. and thence lo Sports Grounds.
The Parade, will be under the direction of Marshal T. E. Banks.
All school children of Cumberland
are requested to be in their class
r sympatli- ,.„tm,8 nnt latel. \nalx ,, 15 a m
Children from other schools will assemble on tho school recreation
grounds.
-o-
the East Indies.
be marked with an assumed name and
a closed .envelope attached marked
with the same assumed name with the
competitor's name inside.
The judging will be arranged by the
Committee of the Club.
Any further Information or copies
of this circular can be obtained from
> H. T. RAVENHILL,
402 Union Bank Building,
Victoria, B.C.
NOTICE
.Mrs. Robert Ewlng and daughter
returned to Ladysmith on Monday's
train.
Mr. and Mrs. W .Henderson, Jr., left
Vancouver on Wednesday morning.
James M. Savage, General Manager
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
Savage, arrived during the week and
are staying at Beaufort Place, the offi- a Mass Meeting of the Employees of
cial residence of tlie Canadian Collier- ljeries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., will be held
ies (Dunsmuir), Ltd. in the Ilo Ilo Theatre on Sunday, May
•   25th, commencing at 7 o'clock p.m.,
George Norris, a brother of Harry t0   discuS8   matters   of   ^VTUmce.
Norris,   of   the   Government   service, -Agreement Committee.
who   returned   from   overseas    two "—'	
weeks ago, arrived on Thursday on a The delivery wickets of the Post-
visit to his brother, and will spend the office will be open today from 8 a.m.
24th in Cumberland. to 9 a.m. only.
OPPORTUNITY
for Retail Merchants
THE next few years will
mark a tremendous
change in the business of
retailing.
Motor Transportation,
now reduced to a low-cost
basis, gives retailers a
great opportunity for business growth because it
widens their trading area.
The Ford Ono-Tcrh
your deliveries and open to you
the opportunity for business
expansion.
Complete Trucks—Two
Standard Bodies
Ordinary hauling and delivery
work can be best adapted to
two standard types—the Stake
Body and the Express Body.
These two body types aro
kept i?l stock ready for immediate delivery.   Thoy insure the
Track makes available this,   maximum efficiency from the
opportunity. It is Motor   Ford TrucIt<
Transportation at low cost
—low first cost, low main-
tenance cost, low operating cost. '
A small outlay will motorize
Both types have tho Enclosed Cab
with the two-way wimfchlch) which itives
the driver proper protection from the
weather.
See these complete trucks. Seize tho
i enlarge your field of
ua solve your delivery
opportunity to enlarge your field of
business,
problem,
Plica (Chaaaia only)
1750 f.o.b. Ford, Out.
Gffipel
Standard Ford Bodies
■Etn.    Gat our prices
The following is a partial list of the events of the day:
1.—0.30 a.m.—Junior Baseball. 1st prise, valued at $27.00; 2nd,
value $0.00.
2.—10.15 a.m.—Boys' Race, 6 years and under, 50 yards:  1st
prize, value $1.00; 2nd prize, value 76c; 3rd prize, valug 50c.
3.—10.20 a.m.—Girls' Race, 6 years and under, 60 yar'dss, 1st
prize, value $1.00; 2nd prize, value 75c; 3rd prize, value 50c
4.—10.25 a.m.—Boys' Race, 8 years and uuder, 50 yds.: 1st prize,
value $1.50; 2nd prize, value $1.00; 3rd prize, value 50c.
5.—10.30 a.m.—Girls' Race, 8 years and under, 60 yds.: 1st prize,
value $1.50; 2nd prize, valu $1.00; 3rd prize, value 50c.
6.—10.35 a.m.—Boys' Race, 10 years and under, 60 yards.: 1st
prize, value $2.00; 2nd prize, value $1.50; 3rd prize, value $1.00.
7.—10.40 a.m.—Girls' Race, 10 years and under, 50 yards: 1st
prize, value $2.00; 2nd prize, value $1.50; 3rd, value $1.00.
8.—10.45 a.m.—Boys' Race, 12 years and under, 75 yds.;  1st
prize, value $2.00; 2nd, value $1.50; 3rd, value $1.00.
9.—10.50 a.m.—Girls' Race, 12 yearB aud under, 75 yds., 1st prize
value $2.00; 2nd prize value $1.50; 3rd prize, value $1.00.
10.—10.65 a.m.—Boys' Race, 15 years and under, 75 yards. 1st
prize value $3.00; 2nd prize value $2.00; 3rd prize value $1.00.
11.—11.00 a.m.—Girls' Race, 15 years and under, 75 yards, 1st
prize value $3.00; 2nd prize value $2.00; 3rd prize value $1.00.
12.—11.05 a.m.—Obstacle Race: Boys ,15 years and under: 1st
prize value $4.00; 2nd prize value *2.50; 3rd prize value $1.60.
13.—11.10 a.m.—Girls' Egg and opuoV Race, 1 years and under,
1st prize value $4.00; 2nd prize value $2.60; 3rd prize value $1.50.
14.—11.15 a.m.—Boys' Sack Race, 12 years and under, 1st prize
value $2.50; 2nd prize value $2.00; 3rd prize vaiue $1.00.
* 15.—11.20 a.m.—Girls' Shoe Scramble, 1st prize value $2.50; 2nd
prize value $2.00; 3rd prize value $1.00.
16.—11.25 a.m.—Boys' Three-legged Race, 14 years and under,
1st prize value $4.00; 2nd prize value $2.00; 3rd prize value $1.00.
17.—11.30 a.m.—Girls Relay Race, 14 years and under, 3 girls
to team, 1st prize value $4.50; 2nd prize value $3.00; 3rd prize
value $1.60.
18.—11.35 a.m.—Boys' Pillow Fight, 15 years and under, 1st prize
value $3.00; 2nd prize value $1.50.
19.—11.40 a.m.—Girls' Potato Race, 15 years and under, 1st prize
value $300; 2nd prize value $2.00; 3rd prize value $1.00.
20.—11.45 a.m.—Boys' Cracker Eating Competition, 10 years and
under, 1st prize, value $2.00; 2nd prize value $1.60; 3rd $1.00.
21.—11.50 a.m.—Girls' Hopping Race, 10 years and under, 1st
prize value $2.00; 2nd prize value $1.50; 3rd prize value $1.00.
22.—11.55 a;m.—Boys' Race, 50 yards, 8 years and under, 1st
prize value'$1.50; 2nd prize value $1.00; 3rd prize value 50c.
23.—12 noon.—Girls' Race, 50 yards, 1st prize value $1.50; 2nd
prize value $1.00; 3rd prize value 50c, 8 years and under.
24.—12 to 1 p.m.—School Boys' Baseball Competition, 14 years
and under, for a silver cup, and prize to value of $18.00.
25.—1.00 p.m.—Chinese Sack Race, 1st prize value $5.00;  2nd
prize value $2.50; 3rd prize value $1.60.
26.—1.00 p.m.—Bocche Competition, 1st prize value $16.00; 2nd
prize value $8.00.
27.—1.10 p.m.—Japanese Obstacle Race, 1st prize value $5.00;
2nd prize value $2.50; 3rd prize value $1.60.
28.—1.20 p.m.—Single Ladles' Race, 75 yards, 1st prize value
' $5.00; 2nd prize value $3.00; 3rd prize value $1.60.
29.—1.30 p.m.—100 yards open Handicap, 1st prize value $10.00;
2nd prize value $5.00.
30.—1.40 p.m.—Married Ladies' Race, 76 yards, 1st prize value
$5.00; 2nd prize value $3.00; 3rd prize value $1.50.
31.—1.50 p.m.—Old Man's Race, 50 years and oi»r, 1st prize
value $5.00; 2nd prize value $2.50.
32.—2.00 p.m.—1st Aid Competition, 5 men on team, prize value
$25.00.
33— 2.10 p.m.—Pole Vault, 1st prize value $6.00; 2nd prize $3.00.
34.—2.20 p.m.—Chinese Football Match, 11 men a side, 15 mln.
each way, prize value $25.00.
35.—3.00' p.m.—Japanese Vt mile Race, 1st prize value $5.00; 2nd
prize value $3.00.
30.—3.10 p.m.—yt Mile Open, 1st prize value $8.00; 2nd $4.00.
37.—3.20 p.m.—Married  Ladles' Nail Driving Competition,  lsl
prize value $5.00; 2nd prize value $3.00.
38.—3.30   p.m.—Returned  Soldiers' Race,   100  yards,  1st  prize
value $6.00; 2nd prize value $3.00.
• 39.—3.40 p.m.—Committeemen's Race, 100 yards Handicap, 1st
prize value $6.00; 2nd prize valuo $3.00.
40.—3.50 p.m.—Tug-of-War, Japanese vs. Chinese, 10 men a Bide
prize valuo $26.00.
41.—4.00 p.m.—Football Final, 35 mln. each way, 1st prize value
$77.00; 2nd prize value $33.00.
42.-4.35 p.m.—Ladles' Needle and Thread Competition, let prize
value $5.00; 2nd prize value $3.00.
43.-4.35 p.m.—Bandsmen's Race, 100 yards, 1st nrlzc value
$6.00; 2nd prize value $3.00.
44.—5.15 p.m.—Chinese V4-Milc Race, 1st prize value $5.00; 21d
prize value $3.00.
45.-5.25 p.m.—1,-i-Mllc Open, 1st prize $8.00; 2nd prize $4 00
40—5.30 p.m.--Tug-of-War on the Turf, 10 men a side, 1st prize
value $70.00; 2nd prize value $30.00.
47.—6.30 p.m.—Firemen's Hub-to-Hub Race, to take place on
DuiiBmuIr Ave., a silver cup and $50.00.
to solid her sweetheart to Colorado.
It develops that Jim has already
stolen a large sum from his employer
and that is why ho is eager to seek
a  healthier  climate.    Jim   takes   the —	
money that Dorothy obtains for him,      •*'''• Thomas Hudson, Jr., left Tne,
not knowing that the girl has virtually day for a trip lo Anyox, B.C.
sold  herself  to  her employer,  since,
when the latter asks her to marry him
she  consents,  although   she   believes
she loves the bookkeeper.
As tho wife of her wealthy employer
she can command an allowance sufficient to keep Jim In the healthful
climate to which he has fled. Hamilton proves himself a patient and
considerate husband. As thc weeks
pass, Dorothy falls in love with ills
admirable qualities, it not with the
man himself.
Then Jim suddenly turns up, for he
I MON  BAY  ITEMS
George Russell Is home from the
U.C. University, for the Summer vacation.
Harold Walters Is kept busy these
days with ills gasoline launch transporting passengers to and from Denman Island.
The school hoys of Union Hay have
entered a team for the baseball and
football  competitions  at  Cumberland
for May 24th.   They say that they arc
has learned that Dorothy has married.  soillE t0 oaPturo both firsts In those
He spurns the Idea that she has made  ovents-
the sacrifice to save his life and  	
And that Is where the great big M'"s ''I'VH'" Partridge is home from
powerful finish flashes upon thc tIle B*C* University after putting In
screen. It Is a splendidly handled llel' seco,1(l J*car, and was successful
situation   and   one   that  has  already
established the siicccssvof "For Sale.'
In passing "Second Year Arts." She
has left again for Alberta where she
has secured an appointment ns teacher for the summer.
HENDERSON-FULCIIER
Thc marriage took place at Onion
Bay, on Wednesday morning of Grace
Edna Hall, daughter of Mr. John Ful-
cher, of Union Bay. to William Hend-
Gordou Laird, eldest son of Marshal
Laird, hns returned lifter three and a
hull' years of active service, most of
thai time spent on the lighting line In
Franco, and was In tho thick of the
erson, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wll- "ghtlng where the Canadians made a
liam Henderson, of Cumborland, B.C. ,'e|,[ml   '<"   themselves.     Gordon   Is
Miss Ethel Fulcher. sister of the bride, loo,tlnB wc» In Bplto of It all.
acted as bridesmaid, while Mr. Alex.	
Henderson supported thc groom.   Rev. BURROUGHS    ADDING
Gibson. Presbyterian minister at Union MACHINES
Bay.  performed  tiie  ceremony.    The
happy  couple  left on  the  morning's  |.|{i;i.; TRIALS
train   for  a   honeymoon   tour of  the
Sound cities.
II. T.
EASY TERMS
Matinee ut the llo lie Theatre Today,
Write—
IfOIIEIITSO.Y,
7-tr. Yates '■*.
Victoria,
MATINEE AT THE ILO Hn ln "Triple Trouble," will be shown
ILO THEATRE TODAY'at the Ilo llo Theatre.   William Fox
—  also presents Thcda Bara ln "Camilla,"
"Vengeance—and the Woman," epl- a picture of seven parts—a big show
sode No. 11, will be shown at the Ilo of nine reels at the usual prices.
Ilo   Theatre   today,   and  a  Dve-recl  o	
feature, "An American Live Wire." Featuring practically the same ream! comedy. The ticket ofllco for the markablo cast ot players who made
imitlncc will open at 2.30 in the after- "Tarzan ot the Apes" one of the out-
noon. The evening Bhow will com- standing film trlumbphs of recent
nience at 6.30, at the usual prices. >'oars'   "The   Romance   of   Tarzan."
 o  which dramatizes the conceding chap
CHARLIE   CHAPLIN tm of EiS»r Rice Burroughs' great
story of Jungle lite, comes to thc Ilo
EMDE & COKELEY - Dealers _    Courtenay, B.C.       on Tuesday, „Mb, Charlie chap llo Th^oon!
il
Subscription Price, $2.00 per year TWO
THK  ISLANDER,   CUMI.lCRLA.ND, B. C.
Published every Saturday at Cumberland, B.C.
SATURDAY, MAY 24th, 1919
GIVE THE KIDDIES A CHANCE
Every baby should have a fair fighting chance to survive the first year
of life undamaged.
At present one baby in every ten
dies before its lirst birthday, and more
still die before they are born, but
terrible as is this waste of valuable
young life, ihe child damage rate Is
an even greater menace to the country.
Two-thirds of tho children who attain school age arc found to be snlTer-
Ing from preventable physical defects
which entail suffering to them ln the
struggle for lite.
The National Service figures show
thai 4n per cent of the male adult
population are classed as C3, and
there Is evidence to show that the
statistics of the female population are
closely similar.
The waste of life and this damage
rate could be largely prevented.
At least half of these baby lives
could be saved and made worth living
—if we cared enough; if wc, parents,
doctors, teachers and all citizens,
worked together to give the children
a better chance.
Decide now that you will take some
direct share in the campaign for
saving the bailies. •
Give your own children every
chance to grow up healthy citizens by
ensuring that your home is healthy.
Dust and refuse should he burnt,
flies destroyed, your rooms flushed
with fresh air day and night, and
your children supplied with regular
meals of well-cooked, wholesome food
and allowed ample sleep.
Take an interest in the children of
your neighborhood.
Get all the information you can
about Baby Welfare.
Visit the nearest Mothers' and
Babies' Club or Infant Welfare Centre
and offer your help to the committee.
Help lo cultivate local public opinion jn support of Maternity and Child
Welfare work.
lug central power plants at stragetic
points throughout the country for
generating electricity in large units,
which is much more economical than
the operation of small Individual
plants. Lloyd George in referring to
this said:
"One of the most important things
the Government has in mind la the
utilization of our great mineral resources for the production of electrical power on a gerat scale. This will
enable rural industries to be c'reated
so that workmen should find remunerative employment under conditions
where they can bring up their children
in the healthier atmosphere of the
country. A great electrical power
scheme would also assist tn cheapening and increasing the efficiency of
our town industries, bo as to Increase
the output, diminish thc cost, and
thus enable all classes Interested in
production to benefit."
NOW IS THE TIME TO
WAGE WAR ON FLIES
Al  MEN  IOR AN Al EMPIRE
Two million of our men joined up
voluntarily at the beginning of the
wa r.
Six million didn't.
(me million couldn't, largely owing
to physical defects from preventable
causes.
"You cannot maintain an Al Empire
on C3 men," said Lloyd George, and
although he referred mainly to the
health of the body it is equally true
regarding the health of the mind.—
Sis Robert Baden-Powell.
 o
IIIIIAI,  INDUSTRY
The  government  of  Great  Britain
has announced a policy of construct-
Certain authorities are predicting
more than usual trouble with flies
during the coming summer, owing
largely to the comparatively mild winter. Whether or not the theory is
correct, no chances should be taken.
The common housefly is one of man's
most dangerous enemies. As a means
of spreading a number of serious diseases such as typhoid fever, dysentery
and tuberculosis the fly plays a sinister role. Its ability to reproduce
itself is amazing, the descendants of
a single pair numbering millions ln a
season under ordinary favorable conditions. Such conditions exiBt where
rubbish, filth and manure are left unprotected so that flics may lay their
eggs therein. Consequently the first
principle in exterminating the pests Is
rigid cleanliness and then more cleanliness. The fly avoids cleanly conditions as men avoid the plague. Dirt
and disorder are its natural habitat.
It is of prime importance that every
individual and every community
should see that the winter's accumulation of dirt and rubbish should be
carefully collected and destroyed.
.Manure should be so handled, either
in fly-proof pits, or bins with maggot
traps, as to prevent flies breeding.
It is important also that garbage be
carefully gathered and disposed of, for
it, too, provides sanctuary for files.
In addition to combatting them in
their breeding places, flies should be
killed by any and every means available, especially early In the season.
Further, It Is essential that food
products be kept properly screened
from files. Civic authorities should
Insist on shopkeepers bo protecting
their wares and endeavor by> every
possible means to have householders
take like precautions. The time to
begin is now. Far more can be accomplished In the springtime with less
expenditure of effort than at any other
season of the year.
'Save the surface and
you save all ^^
iQaintasa Matter^ HtlDB*
"IJouoWeittoyoiir S
own community to :
Veep your home in /I
perfect condition
faint is a
preservative
Which House Dominatos
Your Block?
SOMEWHERE in  "Every
O community" is a house which
always smiles at you.   It is always
a little more cheerful looking than
the others, brighter, better kept,
and—we.ll painted.
Inside that house lives a good citizen and a good neighbor.^ His
house is so inviting that it is like a hand stretched out to you.
You are bound* to fail gto-f that its owner lives near you.
BU  "EKCLISH
"H PAINT
70*/.KnWiltttMi
I,..,,...*. Cn..-* Ik)
J0% Purs Was Zsk
100% Pun Palm
Somewhere else in "Every-community" stands another house.
Its owner his become discouraged. He has quit trying. He has
lost his ambition and gradually has accepted his fate as a down-and-
outer.
You know that this is so, because his house says so. It is dingy,
beginning to crack and sag, and is unpointed.
Its owner is not a good citizen. He has not done his share. His
house stands out like a "sore thumb." It robs a whole neighborhood
ot legitimate real estate value. Buyers of new houses avoid ittj
neighborhood.
PPANPPAM.HEtMPKR:
3
SPECIALS FOR THE 24th OF MAY CELEBRATION
AT CUMBERLAND
LADIES*   DEPARTMENT
WAISTS—Ladies Silk and Crepe Waists, in all shades,
White Voile hand-embroidered Waists, sizes
34 to 44. <f»0 OK to ([»r7 rt\
From    $4.4t)       &/.OU
SKIRTS—Ladies' Dress Skirts in all shades of Silk
Poplin made in the newest styles, at popular
prices. Special Value in Black Taffeta Skirls.
Underskirts in Silk Jersey and Taffeta Silk,
in plain light shades and shot effects,
From    $4 75  ° $10.50
CORSETS—New Spring Models in C/C a la Grace
Corsets for style, fit, comfort and durability.
The qualities of C/C a la Grace Corsets are
unexcelled. There are models and sizes of
C/C a la Grace Corsets for every type of
figre. Special lines in pink brocade Silk
Corsets at popular prices.
READY-TO-WEAR GOODS—Ladies' Pique and Repp
Skirts, Middies and Middy Coats. One-piece
Dresses and House Dresses. A large assortment of Misses' and Children's Muslin and
Gingham Dresses. Ladies Misses and Children's Panama and Outing Hats. Special value
in Children's Wash Hats.
CANVAS FOOTWEAR—A complete line of Ladies,
Misses and Children's White Canvas Shoes,
in leather soles and Rubber Soled Oxfords and
Pumps, Sandals and Sneakers. We carry all
lines made in White Canvas in a full range
of sizes.
SUMMER UNDERVESTS—Ladies, Misses and Children's Summer Undervests, in Watson's make,
at popular prices. Specials in Sateen and
Stockinette Bloomers.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
CLOTHING—Men's, Youths and Boys, Clothing in the
. newest styles at popular prices. Special value
in young men's Form-fitting, two-piece Suits.
Made-to-Measure Clothing. A large range of
Samples to choose from. Style and Fit
guaranteed.
MEN'S HEADWEAR—Newest styles in Men's Walt-
hausen make Felt Hats in all shades. Men's
Panama and Boater Shape Straw Hats. Tweed
Hats and Tweed and Silk Caps.
SHIRTS—W.G. & R. Shirts in newest stripes and fast
colors, with reversible cuffs. Sport Shirts in
plain self-colors, also with fancy silk collars.
Boys' Shirt Waists with sport collar. Special
value in Boys' Black Sateen Shirt Waists, also
khaki duck Bloomers and Shirts.
MEN'S AND BOYS' NECKWEAR—Latest novelties
in flowing end Silk Ties, from 75c. to $3.00
Neat stripes in Derby style four-in-hands.
Novelty patterns in self-made Bow Ties.
Boys' Windsor Ties in checks, plaids and plain
colors.
UNDERWEAR—Men's and Boys' Merino and Balbrig-'
gan   Underwear.     Combinations   in   short
sleeves and knee lengths.   Special value in
Men's Navy and colored Athletic  Sweaters
with Roll Collar.
MEN'S AND BOYS' FOOTWEAR—White and colored
Canvas Shoes with leather and rubber soles,
Tennis Shoes and Sneakers. Newest lasts in
Invicts Shoes, "The Best Good Shoe for Men."
Special Value in Men's Havannah brown Neolin soled Shoes at $6.90; also in Boys, at $5.75.
License No. 5-19224
FURNITURE
Arrived this Week
Direct from the Factory
Handsome Bedsteads in a variety of colors.
Cribs
■
Coil and Woven Wire Springs in all sizes.
Wool, Felt and Cotton Mattresses, all sizes.
Roll-Up'Slabs, Pillows.
Dining Chairs, Kitchen Chairs, Rocking Chairs.
Morris Chairs, some very fine ones.
Couches, Bed-Lounges,
Kitchen, Parlor and Extension Tables.
Chiffoniers, Buffets, etc.
DON'T   BANG   YOUR   RECEIVER!
Banging the receiver on the hook in the midst of
the other person's genial "Good-bye," is like slamming
the door on a departing guest. Don't think he fails to
hear its clatter or misunderstand its significance.'
The telephone is a delicate instrument; otherwise
it would not register the human voice. It merits careful handling; thereon largely depends its satisfactory
working.. And, ust as important to the user, the all-
important impressions which ho makes by telephone
—whether in or out of business* hours—depend in great
measure on the consideration he shows other people,
up to the lsat faint click that should end the connection.
British Columbia Telephone Co., Ltd.
This extra fine assortment of Furniture is now on
sale on the 2nd floor of the Magnet Cash Store.
T. E. BATE
Phone 31 The Magnet Cash Store    =
IllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi
A.   STANFORD
Practical Automobile Mechanic
Cumberland, B.C.
Phone Q
(Night or day)    °
Oils, Grease and Gasoline. Cars Kept In Order hy Contract
Any Make of Cur secured on the shortest notice.
OFFICIAL REPAIRER  TO   ISLAND  AUTOMOBILE
ASSOCIATION
SPECIALITY:—A Real Self-Starter for Ford Cars,
fully Guaranteed—The Only Thing—Call and See it.
Don't let your new car fall to pieces—a little practical attention
periodically wlll keep It to its standard.
DUNLOP TIRES.        CARS KEPT IN ORDER BY CONTRACT.
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water Ktf Pure
Cascade Beer
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C. (ft
THE ISLANDER, CtiMSBRLAND, B.C.
tHree
j|. Don't Clean Your House this Spring m g
= until you have seen the Vacuum Cleaners we have just received. == =
=§ You can make the hardest of all household duties, cleaning, js =§
== a real pleasure with one of these Cleaners. E= F*jf*|
3f Will the handicap of the old broom and dustpan, the house- S| =||
*=*"= wife's honest efforts are reduced to DRUDOERY! IS 35
!H To put the acual labor, the hard part, on Electricity, Is = 5=
= better housekeeping, better living.   Save your time and strength. =s =
|g The BEST you can do with a broom barely approaches the •frs =E
=5 STARTING POINT of what a Vacuum Cleaner will do for you. = =
*== Stop playing tag with dust and dirt, quit chasing It from == |=
B| place to place with a broom.   Remove it once and for all with ^f "SB
***= a Vacuum I leaner! = *=
g3 Clean your carpets and rugs the Electric way.   Discover how m\ 3|
= easllyy you can reuiuve dust from your, upholstered furniture. ass =3
B Freshen up your portlerres and curtains. SEE s|
§§ Don't stoop for threads, lint, etc. =_ 3s
HI A Vacuum (leaner wlll clean those nooks and corners so \=. =
^ hard to get at witli a broom.    No necessity o move furniture, "= =
35 raise carpets—Just clean everythng where It stands. "j*****"*: "*=**=
ggj For hire of this machine we charge $1.00 for the lirst hour S =|
= und 50c. for each succeeding hour. = =
H| Free   delivery   and   removal,  free  demonstration  and  In- **s ==
= struction.
fH If you prefer to own your own machine we will sell you
S5 one on the very easiest of terms.
Hi Phone or call for further particulars.
H CUMBERLAND & irjilO.N WATERWOBKS COMPANY LTD.
35 WHEREAS, certain mischievously inclined persons have tamp-
== ered with the valves on the mains of this company, thereby
35 -      allowing a considerable amount of water to run waste, we
= therefore wish to point out hat It is a serious offence to
S3 tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties
= be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the very fullest
53 extent of ho law.
= m
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. 0. 314
nil m
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
Marocchi Bros.
FOR
Grocers and
Bakers
I Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H, CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
 License No. 8-25489
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$4.00
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM  JONES
Cumberland, B. C.
License No. 10-1606
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding. Cake* a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
NOTICE
The regular annual meeting ot the
Board ot Directors ot the Cumberland
General Hospital wlll be held ill the
Council Chambers on Friday, April
2Gth, commencing at 8 p.m.
B D. PICKARD, Secretary,
Cumberland General Hospital.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
4
*
•
* *      *
OK.  R.
Office:
Cu
• *    •
******
P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
*
Phone 116
*
KINO BLOCK,
oiberland, B.C.
•     *     *   *   *   •
*
SEASON - RIGHT
STOCKS-RIGHT
AND PLENTIFUL
11 GREAT BARGAIN DAYS AT THE
II FAIR DEAL STORE
3=     = :
||  A Word abou i the Most Popular Dresses in the Store:
"BILLIE BURKE" PORCH
• DRESSES
Really no dress of washable material
could be neater and more practical.
Many styles shown here. Have
long pointed collars and big roomy
pockets, while the balance of the
dress is of neat stripe or small
checked ginghams and d»Q A(\
print. $1.95, $2.75 and «PO.^U
ALL-OVER APRONS
A great value at today's d»-| AA
price. Each  tPl-UU
DAINTY WHITEWEAR
selling at popular prices. These snowy
white under muslins will delight
he lover of danty garments. They
are so nicely made and so neatly
trimmed, and the materials used
are of the most durable quality.
The prices will tempt the most
economical purse.
CORSET COVERS
Made of the finest cambric and nainsook, trmmed with Swiss embroidery.  Sizes 34 ,|E      to (
=        to 44.  Prices '
95c.
CHEMISE
Chemise made of fine nainsook, laced
*   yoke and ribbon and envelope style,
assorted sizes. d»rt J7C
Price..
NIGHTGOWNS
Nightgowns made of fine cambric and
nainsook, neatly trimmed with embroidery and fine lace. All the
popular strapped yokes are represented in slip-over and open front
styles.    $1#50to$2#75.
Prices..
PETTICOATS
A splendid quality of fine cambric
skirts, elaborately laced flonces.
These are extra well made and neat
ly finished. d»-|   p»n
Special at        «pJ...t)U
REMNANT SALE SPECIALS
For three days only. Including all
the latest stripes and novelty silks
and dress fabrics. Comes in dress
lengths and waist lengths,, and for
many other useful purposes.
DAINTY SILK CAMISOLES §f
Washable silk, in flesh and white. =%
Make:! very dainty and serviceable ==
camisoles; some have narrow lace
and baby ribbon at.the neck-line;
other:; have deep yoke.
Special, at	
$145 I
CREPE DE CHENE CAMISOLES 3%
35
Very dainty wide lace yokes combin- 3=
ed   with    flesh-colored    crepe-de- 35
chene gives the desired effect, fig- 11
urcd   baby   ribbon   enhances the m
combination.                 <£Q (TA 3=
Prices $1.65 to     tPtJ.OU M
|
PUMPS §j
Women's patent and black kitl pumps 3
the very latest style.   &A  A{T **=
Special for       *Pi±»&D =
SKIRTS §|
Silk poplin, plain or stripe taffeta and H§
novelty fabrics.         d» -| A   FA g
Price, .$5.75 to    «Pl<*l:.t)U M
GOME EARLY AND GET THE  BEST SELECTION 1
'=,„r$s EZZY  &   HADDAD
Per Pair...
THE  FAIR   DEAL   STORE
KAY8EJC8   SILK    GL0TJS8
aro   the-  host.
*'•-•'• *'•''"""" $1.60
Cumberland
Powell River
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
Agent for the HARMONOLA
All the latest Books,  Magazines
and Periodicals.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.    MERUIFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave..       Cumberland, B.C.
Canada Food Board License No. 10-4986
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONG, Cumberland
HONG CHONG & CO., Bevan.
,1 ™ ; ;
fOV''^*^**^-'-* '
-~^'
IL is a chc.-.p fuel for coolung- -Nr.
a*:he3 to clean up.   No fires to build
What could be Jcr.s trouble ?
A Florence Automatic wi'.h a McClary'n Success oven w '
^ive you tho best bakings you ever i roduccd.
No odor.    V.t wicka to bother with.
Save fuel, have a cool kitchen.
Call a:\d SCO tlie Florence in ac'ual operation.
"FLORENCE AUTOMATIC
OIL COOK .STOVES
Sold by
TARBELL  &
SON
A TUG OF WAR WITH and Long Ago," came to grief while forty yards from where men were al
AN  Aim lIII 1,1,0 he was attempting singlo handed to work, when an armadillo boiled from
  caplure an armadillo. hi;, earth and. running to the vry spot
When he waa a small boy, Mr. W.     One day, ho says. I was standing on where  I  was standing, began  vigor
H. Hudson, the author of "Far Away the mound at the side of a moat, Bonm oir.ly digging to bury hlmaelt in the
sol], Neii her men nor ttogB had neen
liito. and i at once determined to capture, liim unaided by anyone. I Imagined it would prove a very easy
task. Accordingly. I laid hold of h\*
black, bone-catted tail with both hands
and began Iiikp"^ t<> gel him off the
ground, hut could not move him. lie
wenl on digging furiously, and getting
deeper and deeper into the earth, ami
T soon found dial instead of my pulling him out he wns pulling me in
alter him. It hurt my pride lo think
tbal an animal no larger than a cat
was beating mo in a trial of strength,
and I held on more tenacknuslv than
ever and tugnnl and strained more
Violently, until nol to lose him- I
had to go down flal on the ground.
Hut ft wns all for nothing. Ffrst my
hands and then ray aching arms were
carried down into tbo earth, aud I was
forced to release no hold and gel
up to rid myself <if the mold that he
had been throwing tiji Into my face
ami all over my head, neek ami
shoulders.
WANTFD (.iti to do general housework, pjilj i > W. Henderfiou, Maryport Ave., Cumberland ,RC. - «J
POUR
THE 1SLANDEK, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Cumberland Motor Works
Auto Repairs,
General Blacksmithing,
Acetylene Welding
Accessories,  Gasoline and Oils
Sole Agents for
The Powerlight Manifold Heater
Gas Saver for Ford Cars
FREE   AIR
TIRE SERVICE
Thomson & Cameron
First-Class Mechanics
Phone Tt P.O. Box 595
MORE EQUIPMENT FOR THE FORD GARAGE
LECTRO
The Electric
Trouble Shooter
for FORD Cars.
It will burn out shorts in coils, which are caused by
pieces of wire, etc., getting across the contact, recharge the magnets without taking down the. engine,
in one and a half hours' time. We can test out your
motor in ten minutes and tell you if you have a broken
magnet. There is absolutely no guess about it. If
your Ford is missing and does not pull as it should, let
us test out your magneto.
A Test will Cost You Nothing.
A weak spark will case missing and a great
loss of power and waste of gasoline.
Re-Charge and Burnt Shorts, $5.00
THE FORD   GARAGE
The HOME of the FORD.
Phone Hi Courtenay, B.C.
THE FURNITURE STORE
WALL   PAPERS
New Colors and Designs
1919 Stock Now on Sale
Our Stock of Furniture, Ranges, Beds and Bedding
is well Assorted and Complete in all Lines.
A.   McKINNON
Our Special Price For
Groceries This Week
TOMATOES, 4 big Tins for 95c.
FRY'S COCOA, per tin  25c.
POTATOES, per sack $1.75
MALKIN'S BEST TEA, in packets, 2tb for $1.25
(Each packet contains a coupon.)
New Stock of While Summer Shoes.
K.   ABE   &   CO.
DEPARTMENT OF WORKS
NOTICE   TO  CONTRACTORS
Comox District— Highway Bridge over
the Tsable River, near Fanny Bay
Station,  distant  about  Four  Miles
from Union Bay, Vancouver Island.
B.C\
SEALED    TENDERS,    endorsed    as
above, will be received at the Department   of   Provincial   Public   Works.
Victoria, B.C., up to noon of June 5th
next, for the erectton and completion
of a bridge over the Tsable River.
Drawings, specifications, forms ot*
contract and tender may be seen .in
Room No. 7, East Wing, Parliament
Bulldllngs, Victoria, B.C.*, in the offlce
of the Dtstrlct Engineer, Court-house.
Vancouver, B.C.; and In the Government Agent's Office, Cumberland and
Nanaimo, B.C., on and after the 14th
Innetant.
Tenders must be accompanied by un
accepted bank cheque or certificate nt
deposit, made payable to the Honourable thc Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equal to ten (10) per cent, nf
the tender as security for the due
fulfilment of the contract, which shall
he forfeited if the party tendering
declines to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fails to
complete the work contracted for.
The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will he returned to them upon the
execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied
and signed with the actual signature
of the tenderers.
A. E. FOREMAN,
Public Works Engineer.
Department    of   Provincllal     Public
Works,
Victoria, B.C., May 12th, 1919.
TIMBER AND LAND
FOR SALE
Courtenujv-Lots 35 and 38, plan 311;
lots 9 to 1,4 Block 1; and lots 9 to
14, Block 2, plan 480.
Denman Island:-- 160 acreB, S.W. %
section 13, and 80 acres S. % of N.W.
'/t  section  13,   (known   as   Madfgan
Marsh.) 160 acres SW. V. section 22,
and 80 acres N. % of N.E. Vt section
18.
Union Bay:— Vt acre of Fr. S.W. H
of N.W.   >4  section  32,  Township  1,
containing two buldlngs.
Comox District:— 160 acres, Lot 171;
10 acres on Cumberland Road, part of
Lot 126.
Timber for Sale on Sections  13,  18
and 22, Denman Issland.
For further particulars and terms
write J. WILSON,
1843, 7th Ave., West,
Vancouver, B.C.
LEARN—These are the big paying
lines ot the future. Skilled men
and women are always in demand
In the after war re-adjustment
only trained persons will be wanted.
Start now to learn. Send for catalogue today. WHAT DO YOU
WANT TO BE? We train you In
electrical, mechanical, mining aud
steam engineering. Ship and mechanical drafting. Also courses in
Navigation, Agriculture, Stenography, automobile, languages, chemistry, telephone and other subjects.
International Corres pondence
Schools; P.O. Box 1121, Nanaimo,
B.C., J. H. Milsom, Manager.
HEPATOLA
Owing to the confusion in mail
ordorH of this meiiiotno, we are
advancing the price from $5.20
to $5.50, and paying all charges.
This will give our many customers quicker Bervice.
SOLE MANUFACTURER
MRS.   GEO.   S.   ALMAS
524 4th Arc, North, Saskatoon.
<r
a e
THE   BIG   STORE
ENAMELWARE
TINWARE
And ALUMINUM
The largest shipment ol' the above lines of goods have just arrived,
bought at Factory Prices and put on sale at prices which will effect a
quick sale.
For Prices See our Two Large Window Displays, with goods marked in
Plain Prices.
ENAMELWARE
PEARL COFFEE BOILERS
MINERS' DINNER PAILS
MILK PAILS
KNEAD PANS
DINNER PLATES
RICE BOILER
KITCHEN BOWLS
CEREAL COOKERS
MILK PANS
JELLY TINS
DEEP PIE PLATES
' COFFEE POTS
POTATO POTS
TEA POTS
KITCHEN BOWLS, Etc.
TINWARE*
FLOUR TINS
CAKE TINS
BREAD TINS
NURSERY REFRIGERATORS
KNEADING PANS
MILK PAILS
WATER BUCKETS
PUDDING DISHES
MILK SKIMMERS, Etc.
EVERWEAR ALUMINUM
One of the Bests Grades on the Market
LIPPED SAUCEPANS
STEW PANS
BERLIN SAUCEPANS
PRESERVING KETTLES
KETTLES
DOUBLE BOILERS
STEAMERS
FRY PANS
BREAD PANS
MUFFIN PANS
PIE-PLATES, Etc.
U
II
n
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8,
The Saturday Evening Post for less
than Ave cents u copy, S2.50 a year.
"Thc Country Gentleman" for less
than four cents n copy, $1.7", a year,
Including postage. Authorized agent,
A. II. DORAIS, 632 Broadway West,
Vancouver, B.C.
TO KENT—5-Roomed house, with 30
acres cleared, ready for cultivation
or information and particulars, apply to E. H. HICKS-IiEACH, Courtenay, B.C.
Make Old Clothes Look Like New
LADIES' SUITS Cleaned and Pressed  $1.75
SKIRTS Cleaned and PreBBed  $1.00
WAISTS Cleaned and Pressed  $1.00
GENTS' SUITS Cleaned and Pressed $1.50 and $2,00
OVERCOATS Cleaned and Pressed  $1.50 and $1.76
SUITS 8ponged and Pressed  75c.
DRESSES- Dyed and Pressed  $2.50 and nn
SKIRTS Dyed and Pressed  $1.50
WAISTS Dyed and Pressed  $1.50
GENTS' SUITS Dyed and Pressed $8.50
OVERCOATS Dyed and Pressed  $2.50 to $8.00
ALL KINDS OF REPAIRING AND ALTERING
R. B. HOWARD
CUMBERLAND DYE WORKS
Phou. 104 P.O. Box 191
REDUCTION IN PRICE
OF
Great West Tea
Now 65c. per pound.
Obtainable Only at
MUMFORD'S   GROCERY
Licence No. 8-17268.
Phone 71
.

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