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The Islander Jun 14, 1919

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Array 1 I
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; ^Wuhtion Library
WiVA which is Consolidated The Cumberland News.
TWENTY-EIGHTH     YEAR.—No. 24.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 14, 1919.
Subscription Price, $2.00 per year
HUN FIGHTERS STRUGGLE FOR LIVING IN BERLIN
bx-ueituan soiuiuis u,e nnuuig u uinicult to make a living. They
have been compelled to do most everything to eke out an ordinary
exh tence, i'hoto shows a former Hun soldier who sells cakes In the
si reds of Berlin.
AND   GENERAL   NEWS
FOR SALE—A 4-roomed house and
two acres of land, one acre lceared,
one and a half miles from town. Apply
P.O. Box 181, Cumberland, B.C. Cash
or terms.
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Fletcher, of
Nanaimo, were here on a visi. on 'rues
clay.
LOST—On .May 8th, 1919, in Cumberland, a draft drawn on and payable to
Yokohama .Specie Bank, Ltd., Yokohama, No. 814, for 700 yen. Finder
please return to P.O. Box 5S7, Cumberland, B.C.
.Mr. and .Mrs. R. Ktrkham, of Nanaimo, arrived on Friday and are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Taylor.
Miss Wilton arrived from Vancouver on "Monday on a visit to her sister.
.Mrs. Stacey.
Mrs. A. C.  Lymn returned from a
visit to Victoria on Tuesday.
FURNITURE     WANTED.—Highest     W' s- Wilson returned from a visit
Cash price paid for all kinds of second  t0 Vancouver on Thursday,
baud furniture and stoves, in large or
small lots.   Calls promptly attended
to.   I'houe 55, Courtenay, B.C.
-Mrs .J. H. .MacMillan is here on a
visit to her parents, .Mr. and Mrs. John
"MacKenzie.
The .Maccabees of Cumberland will
bold a dance in the Ilo llo Dance Hall
on Thursday, July 10th. Particulars
later.
T. W. Scott returned from overseas
on Saturday, and left for Victoria on
Monday.
Mr. and .Mrs. Frelone and children,
accompanied by .Mrs. Lena Frances-
cini and son, left on .Monday morning
for Vancouver. While in that city
Mrs. Frelone and Mrs. Francescini
will attend tbe Kebelcah Assembly, the
former being representative from Harmony Rebekah Lodge, of this city.
The employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., will hold a
mass meeting in tbe Ilo llo Theatre on
Sunday evening, June 15th, to bear*
the report of thc Athletic Comflffl_je%.
Miss Emily Blackburn, of Vancouver, arrived on Tuesday on a visit to
.Mr. nnd .Mrs. John Furbow.
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Macintosh returned from a visit to Victoria on
Tuesday .
Henry Devlin, Inspector of Mines, is
here ou his usual tour of inspection.
Dr. and Mrs. Welton are here on a
visit to Mr. and" Mrs. A. R. Stacey.
THE CITY COl'NCIL
The City Council held their regular
session in the Council Chambers on
Monday, His Worship Mayor MacDon
aid presiding, and a full board of aldermen present.
The minutes of the previous session
were adopted as read. •
The following accounts were referred to the finance committee for payment:
BC.  Telephone   $ 2,85
Thos.  E.  Bate     7.85
0, H. Tarbell & Son  10,65
Cumberland Motor Works  15.40
Government Telegraph     5.00
1. I. Olson   11.00
J. R. Logan   14.00
Instalment on adding machine... 19.50
The Remuneration Bylaw for Mayor
and Aldermen was read a second and
third time.
The Mayor Informed the Council
that ho had rented the City Park to
Bullers' Dog and Pony Show for the
sum of ton dollars.
The Board of Works was Instructed
to renew the covering of all manholes
when necessary.
The Mayor and Council decided to
notify the citizens that the Pound Bylaw will be strictly enforced, as of the
15th of June, and appointed James
Baird as poundkeeper. City Constable
Bunbury will also be asked to assist
the poundkeeper In preventing cows
and horses from roaming the streets
during prohibited hours.
A communication was received from
A. E. Foreman, Public Works Engineer of Victoria, addressed to the City
Clerk and stating that apparently all
the highways in this neighborhood
only make connection with the city
of Cumberland and are of use solely
for the local traffic of Cumberland.
None of these roads are what we understand as main trunk roads and as
a consequence we therefore cannot
participate ln their maintenance at thc
present time. However, the wishes
of your Council will be kept In mind
and brought up for further consideration at a later date.
In reply to the letter and for the Information of the engineer of the Public Works Department, the Council instructed the City Clerk to Inform him
that the main highway passed through
Cumberland'to the railway station of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Ltd., through West Cumberland, China
town, Japanese town and on to No. 4
mine of the Comox mines and Puntledge Lake.
The Vancouver General Hospital
requested the payment of $4.00 for
attendance to Mrs. Scawada. The
Clerk will instruct the Hospital that
the lady dose not reside within the
city limits of Cumberland.
Several other communications of
little or 'no importance were received
and filed.
RED SHIELD CAMPAIGN
OF SALVATION ARMY
Commence*, on June 23rd,   and
will end on June 28th, both
Days Inclusive.
AERIAL DAREDEVIL BIRDMAN PLANS NON-STOP TO PACIFIC COAST
The Public meeting held In the Coun
ell Chambers ou Friday evening to
make arrangements for the Red Shield
campaign or Big Drive, to raise $1500
In this city and vicinity In aid of the
Salvation Army work overseas and
for demobilization and reconstruction
plans waa fairly well attended by
citizens and returned soldiers, ills
Worship Mayor MacDonald occupied
the chair, and opened the meeting by
explaining the nims and objects of tbe
Red Shield campaign, and Informed
the audience that Ensign Nelson, of
Vancouver, had interviewed General
Superintendent Graham when over
here n few days ago, and then called
upon .Mr. Thomas Graham to address
the meeting.
In his remarks, Mr. Graham pointed
out that Ensign Nelson of the Salvation Army of Vancouver, had called
upon him and said that It was the
Intention of the Army to raise $50,000
within the Province of British Columbia. Of that amount Nanaimo was
attempting to raise $4,000, and Cumberland's share would be $1,500. Mr.
Graham spoke very highly of the work
accomplished by the Salvation Army
overseas and at home. He said they
were the first to aid and the last to
appeal. The Salvation Armj* went
down to depths that the churches did
not touch, and suggested organization
with the object of raising $1,500 to
assist them in their work of rescue
nnd In the building of hostels for returned soldiers from ocean to ocean,
the taking care of wives, widows and
orphans, and many other phases of
work to help humanity and to help
our boys to get re-established in cvlll
life.
Several returned men spoke vory
highly of tbe advantages of the Salvation Army at the front.
The meeting finally decided to arrange' tor the Big Drive to raise $1500
to aid the Salvation Army in their
glorious work, and to commence the
campaign ou June 23rd. The following officers were selected" to take care
of the Red Shield campaign:
Thomas Graham, President.
E. W. Bickle, Secretary.
Mayor MacDonald, Treasurer.
Tlie Executives are: John Thomson,
chairman; ex-Mayor Parnham, Rev.
James Hood, William Brown, and Dr.
E. R. Hicks.
After the meeting the executive and
officers met and decided to hold another meeting in the Council Chambers on Monday evening, when the
ladles of the Red Cross Society will
be asked to attend.
The world's most daring aerial ai 'obat, Lieutenant Ormer L. Locklear, plans a non-stop flight from New York to San Francisco, He
will attempt it as soon as he is rel< ised from the United States Army.
The big feature of his flight wlll be to take on gasoline through a
dangling lube from other "ships" high In the air at various points
along the route. The number of times it wlll be necessary to relill
his tank will depend on the capacity of his tanks and the speed of his
machine. When the man making the flight approaches, a machine
[will take the air and take up a position over and near the trans
American flyer. A long rubber tube or pipe with an»automntlc cut-
'off will be lowered, the end of tbe tube Inserted in tbe lower machine
and the gas turned on. All this time the two machines will be flying
along at the same rate of speed. Tbe big point of the scheme ls Us
practicability as demonstrated by experiences in (lying machines in
parallel courses within a few feet of each other and by his stunt of
dropping from one ship to another a year ago. Lieut. Locklear, who
ls in the aviation section of the army, is an aerial acrobat. Photographs have been made of him jumping from one aeroplane to another. He walks on the fusilage, bangs on a strut, calmly leans ou
the rudder, or gets a closer view of the land by banging from the
bottom of the machine. He is fearless and believes that there must
he pioneers in his business as well as in any other. Pholo shows
Lieut Locklear walking from rear of machine to observer's seat of
plane, while machine is travelling nt 60 miles an hour. Insert shows
most remarkable photograph ever made in the ah*. II shows Lieut.
Locklear banging from the wheel skids of his aeroplane while (lying
miles above tbe ground.
CUJIBEKLASK   CHORAL   SOCIETY'
Brief Facts of Salvation Army Work:
' TRINITY SUNDAY, Juno 16th.—
Anglican Services.—Holy Communion
at S.30 a.m.   Evening service at 7.
Edith W. Bickle left for Victoria on
Friday to attend the Graduation Ceremonies of St. Ann's Academy, which
takes place on the 20th Inst.
Get ready for the Salvation Army
Drive, from Monday, June 23rd to
Saturday, June 2Slh, both days Inclusive. Cumberland and vicinity will
endeavor to raise §1,500 to assist in
thc noble work of the Salvation Army.
Tbe usual Saturday night dance will
be held in tlie Ilo Ilo Dance Hall this'
evening.
Mrs. Charles Vater arrived on
Thursday on a visit to Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Parnham.
R. Hetherington left for Vancouver
on Friday morning,
I   William Coe left for Seattle on Friday.
The members of the above society,
and all who are interested in singing,
are earnestly requested to attend a
rehearsal at the Presbyterian Church
at 8.15 p.m., on Sunday, 15th Inst.
Selections for rehearsal are: "The
Glory of the Lord," Hallelujah
Chorus," from the "Messiah," and
"O, Canada." These selections are
being prepared for the forthcoming
Peace Celebration, early In August
next.   A full attendance ls requested.
1GNAOB JAN  PADEREWSKI AND PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE
Owners of cows, horses and live
stock are hereby notified that on and
after thc 15th Inst., the provisions of
the City of Cumberland Pound Bylaw
will be strictly enforced.
Horses running at large at any time
wlll be impounded.
Cows running at largo between tho
hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. will be Impounded.
Live stock, other than milch cows,
running at large- at any time wlll be
Impounded.
By Order,
A. McKINNON, City Clerk.
E.  G.   Baldwin  and  J.  H.  Vaughn
motored to Victoria on Saturday.
Three ships have already sailed with
Canadian supplies to restock Roumanian farms under the $25,000,000 credit.
The Canadian Trade ' Commission ls
"up to Its eyes" in work arranging the
clothing and other sections of the
order.
Polish pianist and Prime .Minister on his arrival In Paris to appear
before the Peace Conference iu behalf ot Poland's future. Left to
right: ..Messrs. Strakaos, Paderewskl, Cilchanowski and .Major Jwauouski
The working man is closely concern
ed In Canadian export trade, and the
Trade Commission points out that
working men are already realizing
that steady employment and plain
bread and butter are assured by more
dollars coming into the country by
added exports.
The Salvation Army has always felt
it was Its duty to aid wherever a need
existed, and was at work ten 'days
after the invasion of Belgium by Germany, administering to the temporal
end spiritual needs of the Allied
troops.
Over two million dollars spent on
war work by the Salvation Army. 1200
Salvationists engaged ln Salvation
Army war work. 100,000 Salvationists and adherents enlisted in Allied
armies.
65 Motor Ambulances provided and
operated by Salvation Army officers
and experienced workers.
Over 100,000 wounded men taken
from battlefields In Salvation Army
ambulances.
500,000 soldiers nnd sailors catered
for In Salvation Army navy and military Institutions weekly,
Hostels, containing rest, reading
anil writing rooms, also sleeping accommodation for convenience of men
are operated In chief ccntrsc ln Britain and France as well as iu other
parts of the world.
Hostels also ln Toronto. Winnipeg,
Vancouver and other Canadian cities.
Refreshment huts creeled nnd operated In training camps in England.
France, Colonics, U.S.A., and other
Allied countries.
Nearly fifty officially recognised
chaplains working under Government
commissions.*
In the Salvation Army huts, the
Army officers serve hot drinks and
food to men of all ranks; the Army
mends clothes, furnishes music and
entertainment; safeguards homo ties,
sustains morale, and Inspires faith In
the teachings of Christ. The Army
also maintains a constant stream of
parcels of comforts to the men nt the
front and wounded in hospitals.
Thc Salvation Army carried on extensive work in connection with tbe
Boer war.    Its  Naval   and   Military
League has been iu operation for near
ly a quarter of a century.
Thc Salvation Army works in cooperation but not in competition with
other societies.
Tribute fro in Sir Douglas ll.iii::
"The Salvation Army workers have
shown themselves to be of the right
sort and I value their presence here
as being of tlie influences on the moral
and spiritual welfare of the troops at
the bases. The inestimable value ol"
these,inlluenees is realised when the
morale of the troops is afterwards put
to the test .at the front.. The lints
which thc Salvation Army bus staffed
have, besides, been an addition lo the
comfort of the soldiers which has been
greatly  appreciated."
A Returned Canadian Soldier
"It is tlie Salvation Army combina
tion of hot coffee and outspoken religion Unit brings the soldier back to
himself again."'
SERGT. McBIRNlE,
With  tiie Find Canadian Contingent.
— o	
A dance will be held in tbe llo llo
I lance Hall nn July 1st. Dominion Hay.
Partii ular.i later.
K1TAMURA   STUDIO
Is Now Open for Business i'l the
WILLARD   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Ave., Cumborland, B.C.
PHOTOGRAPHS
Taken Every  Hay.
First Class Work Guaranteed.
The Season ior I'mnnll   Has   Conic.
Glnlarging a Specially.
Films  Developed  for Amateurs
KIT',Ml lit    Nil Dill
I'.o. Box in'! Cutnberla id.
YOU
cMm
NECESSITY may sometime compel yuti to surrender your Investment in War Savings
Stamps, but should this happen you get *;!l your
money back, with a good rate of interest it: a Idition
for thc time in which you have lent it lo thc
Government.
Sixteen 25-ccnt Thrift Stamps
will buy a $-1.00 War Savings
. Stamp worth.  $5.00  in   1921.
NATIONAL M'AII  RAVINOS COMMITTEE
Mlriliti t ulutubtfl  lllvKon)
Vnnoouvcr, D.C.
. Bvy Timn taunt
*'''.i:."i-*iTHrriTir("rr]*r rni -jimi iiiww.ii TWO
THE ISLANDER,  CUUiKttLAND, B. C.
Published every Saturday at Cumberland, B.C.
SATURDAY, JUNE 14th, 1919.
SEEDTIME AMI HARVEST
In the fall, when the ground has
been ploughed and harrowed until it
is soft and loose and smooth, the
farmer sows his wiieat. Back and forth
across the big field he goes day after
day until he lias finished. He works
long, and ihe labor ls hard. How
glad be is when he has made the last
round and turns the horses towards
home!
That Is the seedtime. Long months
nf waiting must pass beforre be sees
hinder as it makes Its rounds of Unit
ine tield of waving grain, aud rides the  .
same Held, bears the roar of the It was at the Boy Scout week-end
thresher and hauls uway the wheat, camp. The boys ,says the Argonaut,
II through the long winter he waited; had grown lived of repairing the cabin,
but the harvest came at last, as he So the wise scoutmaster suggested
knew It would, for Cod has promised that they have an impromptu concert,
both seedtime and harvest.    Because One boy sang; another danced. Then
his reverie ou the porch, remembers
the fall of the acorn and the years of
a life that have passed while the
harvest of that seedtime was coming
to perfection.
There is seedtime and harvest in
every life. There is home training.
There are schooldays. There are hard
ships and disappointments. There are
joys and sorrows. There are successes
and failures. There are temptations
met an dovercome.
If we bow the wind, we reap the
whirlwind; if we sow wild oats, we
reap tares. But oh, what rejoicing
there is In the harvest time of a life
that has sown Its good grain in the
seedtime and carries home the full
sheaves In tho evening!—YoutliB* Com
panlon.
THE llEtil.VNI.NO OF WISDOM
there was a pause.
"Come. Billy," said the scoutmaster
to a member of the troop, "you know
'How doth the little busy bee'?"
"I don't!" said Billy, examining a
fiery patch on his hand. "I only know
be doth It."
he expected the harvest he sowed bis
seed and waited through the long
months of growing and ripening.
An acorn falls to the ground. It is
very small and does not appear to hold
much promise; but the warm, damp
earth covers it, and it is lost from
sight. Thai is tlie law of Its lire,
without which there would be no hope,
for that is the seedtime of the acorn.
Now the harvest will come, for seedtime and harvest Is the order that God
has made.
How long it Is In coming! A little
shoot appears through the ground, to injured man, "you mu
be sure, but no one would call that an walking very craelessly.
oak tree. You could snip it off with
two fingers. Another year passes, and
you look at it again. It is a little
larger than before, but still not an
oak tree. An oak tree should be two
or three feet In diameter and strong,
like a pillar of marble. This Is no
larger than a man's thumb.
A generation lias passed away; The
small boy who saw the acorn fall and
THEY BOTH HAD EXPERIENCE
A large motor car driven by a
woman, says the Motor News, had just
run down a man on a street crossing.
"You know," said the driver to the
t have  been
I am a very
careful driver.    I have been driving
a car for seven years."
"Lady, you've got nothing on me,"
replied the man. I've been walking
for fifty-four years."
A  CAUTIOUS I'UKCHASEB
The Washington Times tells of an
Irishman who went into a jeweler's
who watched it grow year after year to  buy a clock.    The clerk  showed
is an old. white-haired man now, sit- blm one for ten dollars.
ting on tlie porch of his home.   Out in     "What, ten dollars for that bit of h
Ihe yard children are playing.    They clock!"   Pat   exclaimed.     "Is   there
aro his grandchildren.   They have a anything wonderful about it?"
swing bung from the limb of a great      "Yes," said the clerk.    "This is an
oak tree, and in the shade of Its wide- eight-day clock."
spreading foliage they have their play-      "And what's that?" inquired Pat.
ground. "Why," answered the shopman, "it
How happy they are! How many goes eight days without winding."
jolly times they have had under that Pat scratched his head in bewilder-
trree! About It have gathered all the ment. "So much as that?" he said.
joys of childhood. The oak tree has "Well, there's one question I'd like
a place in their lives with father and to be after asking you. If It goes eight
mother and home. It has always been days without winding, I'd like to know
there, to them;  but thc old man, In how long wlll It go If you wind It?"
Special Attractions
for this Week
!
The balance of our Stock of Ladies' Trimmed and
Ready-to-Wear Hats at a discount of 20 per cent.
A complete range of Ladies' Misses and Childern's
Summer Undervests and Combinations.
Special Value in Ladies' and Misses White Cotton
Bloomers.
Newest Novelties in Ladies' Waists.
Georgette Crepe and Silk Crepe de Chene Waists
in all shades, with beaded embroidered fronts.
White Voile Waists with hand-embroidered fronts
from $2.50 to $7.50.
Sleeveless Silk Sweater Coats
Shot Taffeta Silk Underskirts.
License No. 8-19224
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
ANNOUNCEMENT
■111
EXTRAORDINARY
ON TIIE MAGIC LINE
Continent's Premier Trained Animal
Exhibition will positively appear twice
daily. Full performances afternoon and
evenings. Grand—Glittering—Glorious.
Free Street Parade 11 a.m. rain or shine
CUMBERLAND, B.C |
SATURDAY, JUNE  14th j
2 p.m. and 8 p.m. •=
BULLERS' DOG AND PONY
SHOWS
One Hundred (100) Trained Performing
Animals, including Capt. Merritt
Bellew and his Troup of Sixty (60)
highly educated Shetland Ponies
and Tango-Dancing High School
horses, possessing almost human
intelligence, in a series of rmark-
able Exhibitions.
GEORGE DAVIS, with his retinue of
twenty-five (25) Trained Canines,
captivating, pleasing doggies, being
the last word i nman's control over
the lower animals.
JOHN WILSON presents his Monkeys,
gathered from afar, active, agile,
chattering Simians in their actions
and antics, almost human. Darwin's theory demonstrated.
AERIAL CRAIGS, America's Premier
Iron Jaw Artists.
FITZGERALD BROS., Acrobatic Barrel
Jumpers. Komical Kut-Ups.
MLL  SADIE DACOMA,   Hand and
Foot Balancer on the Rolling Globe.
HARRY CUBA on the Swing Bar and
Trapeze.
FUNNY FELLA FELIX on the Slack
Wire.
HARRY LA VARNE, old time Jester,
and his troupe of funny clowns.
Superb, Shetland Pony Military Drill.
'escribing the border country of California In Travel, Mr. M. E. Edwards
vividly illustrates the legal importance of the international boundary
line. From Yuma to the sea, he says,
for two hundred rough, rocky miles
the turbulent territory of Lower California joins our own—or is separated
from it—by this magic line, depending
} on the humor of the border"sheriffs
| at particular moments. A boundary
{ they used to tells us in school, is an
j Imaginary line between two countries.
! But in various jails hard by that long
j row of stone obelisks which marches
1 fro mthe Texas coast to the Pacific,
I marking>whsre the United States quits
! and trouble begins, there are many
i sad persons who deny that this bound-
i ary is Imaginary.
|     Once, at Calexlco, a. fugitive from
j American justice, hard pressed by the
|  Yankee  police,   fell   sprawling   fairly
j acrosB  this   line  with  bis  head  aud
shoulders In Mexico, his feet in California.     Rlghtmnnfully   his   Mexican
friends seized  him by the hair and
hands, seeking to drag him over to
safety.    But an  American  policeman
fell   heavily on   the   fugitive's   feet,
placed the muzzle of a pistol against
the American part of his anatomy and
bawled such ominous threats that thc
runaway squirmed hastily back to his
own country.
More than one border bad man has
bitten tho desert dust because he did
not know exactly where this line was
—or did not reach it In time.
REMEMBER THE OTHERS!
There's an obligation that goes with party-line
telephone service—an obligation shared by all persons
on the line an obligation whicheach owes to the others.
ik*£it ''*•■'
Inordinarily long conversations frequently cause
annoyance and even grave distress. Some other
person on the line may be trying to call a doctor or
make some similarly urgent call. Perhaps, too, there's
a most important message, incoming, for someone on
the line—perhaps even for the person who is "holding
things up."
Think it over! The obligation is one that will
appeal to all who give consideration to it.
British Columbia Telephone Co., Ltd.
PROF. W. H. ROWLAND and his unexcelled
Concert Band of Eighteen Real Musicians.
Many Cages of Animals, Hundreds of Square feet of Brand New
Waterproof Canvas and other equipment.
Thirty-five (35- Tiny Shetland Poniea working at one time in a
practical demonstration, and a most wonderful exhibition
of what can be accomplished by the Master Mind of Man.
This Performance is clean from start to finish. ..Street Parade
daily at 11 a.m.  A magnificent, educational and beautifully
presented Performance.
THE PUBLIC MUST BE PLEASED
Buller's Dog and Pony Shows Positively carry no Objectionable
Features of any Description.   Showing Here—
SATURDAY, JUNE 14th.   TWO PERFORMANCES.
All the reports that came out of
Russia pointed to the approaching collapse of tho Bolshevist Government.
Petrograd wns said to be in flames,
The Finnish, north Russian and Esth-
onlan armies were said to be postponing their final movement against
the city until they felt able to undertake Its provisioning. The Esthonlans
and the Bolsheviki were getting all
took Pskov, and on the north the advancing anti-Bolshevik forces were
Only nineteen miles from Petrograd.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
*s All parties having claims against
HI the deceased Mah Yuen Pooh, who
m died in Chinatown May 24th, 1919, are
33 hereby required ot furnish same pro-
Is perly verified, on or before July 1st,
= A.D. 1919, and all parties indebted to
= the said deceased are hereby required
55 to pay the amount of their Indebted-
111 ness to me forthwith.
HI WESLEY WILLARD
|K Official Administrator.
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beei*   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water &»«!»£ Pu,'e
Cascade Beer
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C. «
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.
'■■■■■■■■I
§§ Don't Clean Your House this Spring g jj
= until you have seen the Vacuum Cleaners we have just received.. 35 =
=j You can make the hardest of all household duties, cleaning, 3= g|
53 a real pleasure with one of these Cleaners. = H
5=. Wlh the handicap of the old broom and dustpan, the house- fs S3
S3 wife's honest efforts are reduced to DRUDGERY! = ^
35 To put the ncual labor, tho hard  part, on  Electricity, Is ****= **B
= better housekeeping, better living.   Save your time and strength. sis "SH
*^ The REST you can do with a broom barely approaches the fs f£=
5= STARTING POINT of what a Vccuum Cleaner wlll do for you. 5S =
■=H Stop playing tag with dust and dirt, quit chasing it from 53 *H=
1S5 place to place with a broom.   Remove it once and for all with SS 35
p| a  Uni inn (leaner! =5 3%
■:-;::- Clean your carpets and rugs the Electric way.   Dlscovor how = =
H easilyy you can remove dust from your upholstered furniture.
55 Freshen  up your portlerres and curtains.
B Don't stoop for threads, lint, etc.
S3 A  Viiclium (leaner wlll (lean those nooks and corners so
B| hard lo get at with a broom.   No necessity 0 move furniture,
= raise carpets—Just clean cverythng where It stands.
'/';' For hire of this machine we charge $1.00 for Ihe first hour
la and 500. for each succeeding hour.
5 Free   delivery   and   removal,  free  demonstration  and   in- 35
== striietion. j=5
ss If you prefer to own your own machine we will sell you 35
=■*■= one on the very easiest of terms. gs
= Phone or call for ftuther particulars. 53
1 |
m 11 .UHKIILAM) & UNION WATERWORKS COMPANY LTP. §|
=1 WHEREAS, certain mischievously Inclined persons have tamp- =g
=5 crod wilh the valves on the mulns of this company, thereby =*§
gg allowing a considerable amount of water to run waste, we **"= ;
S3 therefore wish to point out hat It Is a serious offence to =f i
jH taniper with such valves, and should the offending parties S3 i
== bo apprehended they wlll be prosecuted to the very fullest =S j
*= extent of he law. — '
MEN'S SHOES
Values that defy competition. Yes, we have
them—backed up by our
store policy—"We sell
for less."
to our store will prove to
you that we have the
goods and that if you do
purchase here you will
make a great saving.
REMOVAL SALE
Commencing SATURDAY, June 7th
Featuring a Budget of Bargains with this Removal Sale
to make a quick Clearance right down to bare shelves.
|   I CumberlandElectricLighting
J Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p, 0_ 314
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
Phones 4 and 61
I
A.   STANFORD
Practical Automobile Mechanic
Cumberland, ■ B.C.
Phone O
(Night or day)    "
Oils, Grease nnd Gasoline.        Cars Kept In Order by Contract.
Any .Hake of Cur secured un the shortest notice.
OFFICIAL REPAIRER TO  ISLAND AUTOMOBILE
*   ASSOCIATION
SPECIALITY:—A Real Self-Starter for Ford Cars,
fully Guaranteed—The Only Thing—Call and See it.
Don't let your new car fall to pieces—a little practical attention
periodically wlll keep It to Its standard.
DUNLOP TIRES.        CARS KEPT IN ORDER BY CONTRACT.
I
CORSETS
There is a choice of fancy brocade or batiste in white
or flesh and various stycls, either in low or medium
bust. Qualities are excellent and all models arr
specially well made and finished. '(UK QK
Prices _ $1.75 to *PO»UD
WOMEN'S   SHOES
Colonials and Pumps, in black, with French or Cuban
heels, in the season's latest styles, values &A Qp»
to $8.00,   Sale Price per pair     «pft UO
Pumps and Slippers in patent leather, (>Q OK
nearly all sizes,  Removal Sale Price  H>O.LiO
Ladies' Patent Leather Button Shoes, (J|9 OC
all sizes.   To clear at  *pO»*miO
Extra Special, 9 a.m. lo 12 noon only, tf»Q QP
Per Pair     <pu.VO
All Children's Shoes reduced from 25 to 10 per cent.
Novelty Silk, regularly $2.95, $3.50, $3.95 and $4.50.
all to clear at one price in this big sale, 36in. wide
per yard, $2.25. A variety to choose from, including
stripes, plaid and. plain novelties in the newest and
most favored shades, all at one price &S) OP
Per Yard   *PtUttUV
Fit the Children with new Wash Dresses. Take your
choice of Specials at 95c. and $1.50. Either group is
apt to supply you with the dress you want, for the
only difference is that the $1.50 dresses are in a little
more elaborate style and represent a higher cost to
s. They are as pretty and fresh as could be, most
becoming to little people, plenty of stripes and plain
colors, in good ginghams, prints, chambrays, and
cotton crepes; for children 3 to 14 years. It's a good
collection to look over. You can hardly buy the
material for such prices as we are asking. Regular
vales to $2.50. In this Removal Sale d»1 JTA
Price 95c. and   tplvlll/
Marocchi Bros.
• -~~i saga—
Grocers and
Bakers
FOR
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
License No. 8-25489
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double>ad)...$4.00
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,    '
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
"It.  K.  I'.  CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Plume 110
Offlce:   KINO BLOCK,
Cumberland, B.C.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE ItAItWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WIILUM  JONES
Cumberland, B. C.
License No. 10-1606
EZZY  &   HADDAD
THE  FAIR   DEAL   STORE
Cumberland
Powell River
*&Z?Bm?L!St-Z3:'Z32l
tXMSKMS
ACI2EAT comfort in thc! cat
of summer! No hot ran^c
to botlv-r with -no shaking down
—no nshet to carry out. Nn
\vick3 to clean. And remember,
no fuel ia cheaper than I.ero enc.
McCIary's Florence Automatic
with a McCIary's Success oven
19 th; fme3t baking outfit you
could U3C. '
Kaveacool kt'Then this summer,
lie l/cClcry's Florence Autdmatfc
at ion, 3
Sold by
fVKBELL  &   SON
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
Agent for tlie  HARMONOLA
All (he latest Hooks,  Magazines
and Periodicals.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
W.M.    MERUIFIELD,    Proprietor,
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
liiin.,imiir Ave.,       Cumberland) U.C.
Canada Food Hoard License  No. 104&88
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Hoots and
Shoes, Crockerj ware and
General Merchandise.
•CHARLIE SING CHONG, Cumberland
JIONC, CHONO & CO., Bevan. POUR
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Cumberland Motor Works
Auto Repairs,
General Blacksmithing,
Acetylene Welding
Accessories,   Gasoline and Oils
Sole Agents for
The Powerlight Manifold Heater
Gas Saver for Ford Cars
FREE   AIR
TIRE SERVICE
Thomson & Cameron
First-Class Mechanics
Phone Ti P-0. Box 595
HEPARTMENT OF WORKS
MORE EQUIPMENT FOR THE FORD GARAGE
LECTRO
The Electric
Trouble Shooter
for FORD Cars.
It will burn out shorts in coils, which are caused by
pieces of wire, etc., getting across the contact, recharge the magnets without taking down the engine.
in one and a half hours' time. We can test out your
motor in ten minutes and tell you if you have a broken
magnet. There is absolutely no guess about it. If
your Ford is missing and does not pull as it should, let
us test out your magneto.
A Test will Cost You Nothing.
A weak spark will case missing and a great
loss of power and waste of gasoline.
Re-Charge and Burnt Shorts, $5.00
THE FORD   GARAGE
The HOME of the FORD.
Phone 46 Courtenay, B.C.
THE FURNITURE STORE
WALL   PAPERS
New Colors and Designs
1919 Stock Now on Sale
Our Stock of Furniture, Ranges, Beds and Bedding
is well Assorted and Complete in all Lines.
A.   McKINNON
Try Our Groceries - Lower Price
than any other Store in Town
Van Camps Pork nnd Beaim Old Dutch Cleanser
8 tins for ,111c. 5fo  tin Mr.
Clark's   Pork   and   Beans Oold  Dust.8 pkg. for 91.00
2 tins (nr 25c. Pca8 6 Mli for 98Ci
Pink Salmon 'zlti tin 20c. Corn and Beans   4 tlniu 85c.
Red Salmon  26c. Ramsay Soda BiscultB 25c.
Tomatoes, 2tb tins, Northwest Family Soda BIs-
5 tins fur 95c. cults   85c.
K.   ABE &   CO.
NOTICE   TO  CONTRACTORS
Comox District—Highway Bridge over
the Tsable River, near Fanny Bay
Station,  distant  about  Four  Miles
from Union Bay, Vancouver Island.
B.C.
SEALED    TENDERS,    endorsed    as
above, wlll be received at the Depart-
ment   of   Provincial   Public   Works.
Victoria, B.C., up to noon of June 5th
next, for U.« vrectlon and completion
of a bridge over the Tsable River.
Drawings, specifications, forms nf
contract and tender may be seen hi
Room No. 7, Bait Wing, Parliament
Buildllngs, Victoria, B.C.; ln the offlce
of the District Engineer, Court-houBe.
Vancouver. B.C.; and ln the Govern
ment Agent's Offlce, Cumberland un I
Nanaimo, B.C., on and after the 14th
innstant.
Tenders must be accompanied by nn
accepted bank cheque or certificate 01
deposit, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equal to ten (10) por cent, of
the tender aB security for the due
fulfilment of the contract, which shall
be forfeited if the party tendering
■ declines to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he falls to
complete the work contracted for.
The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers wlll be returned to them upoh the
execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied
and signed with the actual signature
of the tenderers.
.      A. E. FOREMAN,
Public Works Engineer.
Department    of  Provincial     Public
Works,
Victoria, B.C., May 12th, 1919.
When purchasing an auto see Thos.
Hudson, of Union Bay, B.C., representing the Auto Transfer of Nanaimo,
and agent for the Comox District for
the ChreTolet, Overland, Dodge, Hud-
son Six, Cadillac, Chalmers and Republic Track.
BURROUGHS   ADDING
MACHINES
FREE TRIALS
EASY TERMS
Write—
R. T. ROBERTSON,
745 Yates St.,
Victoria, B.C.
L8ARN—These are the big paying
line* of the future. Skilled men
and women are always In demand
In tho after war re-adjustment
only trained persons will be wanted.
Start now to learn. Send for catalogue today. WHAT DO YOU
WANT TO BE? We train you in
electrical, mechanical, mining and
steam engineering. Ship and mechanical drafting. Also courses ln
Navigation, Agriculture, Stenography, automobile, languages, chemistry, telephone and other subjects.
International CorreB pondence
Schools, P.O. Box 1121, Nanaimo,
B.C., J. H. Mll8om, Manager.
HEPATOLA
Owing to the confusion In mall
orders of this medicine, we are
advancing the price from (5.20
to $5.50, and paying all charges.
This will give our many customers quicker service.
SOLE MANUFACTURER
MRS.   GEO.   S.   ALMAS
524 4th Ave, North, Saskatoon.
*
■**m$M>&#'
Standing, sitting and walking correctly
are the first essentials to good health
and that elusive charm we call style
A LL women wish to be well; but all women
l\ do not appreciate the vital importance
X JLof correct corsetry as an essential to
good health. The well-known medical
authority, Alice S. Cutler, M.D., warns us;
"As a physician who knows that if it were
not for ill-fitting and the wrong kind of
corsets we would have very few female in
valids, I am naturally determined to do
everything in my power to educate women
in thc proper fitting of corsets. Most
learned physicians now recognize the modern
corset as a hygienically healthful garment
and one that is often the best means of providing corrective support for many bodily
ailments."
GOSSARD
jib
77«? Original-Unequalled Front Lacing Corsets
have attained their unquestioned superiority
by assisting nature to perfect expression.
Every Gossard is hygienically correct. Properly fitted to the figure for which it was
designed it will give scientific support to
abdominal and back muscles, with no chance
of undue pressure at the waistline; the organs
of nutrition will be free from pressure; the
erect posture which is induced will encourage
deep breathing and the diaphragmatic mus
cles become strong with use. A woman so
corseted will have the undeniable beauty of
health and that grace of body, standing,
sitting, or walking, which is best expressed
in the one word, style.
We unreservedly recommend Gossard Corsets
as the complete expression of modern corsetry.
Our highly specialized corset service is maintained with a full appreciation of thc exacting
needs of the modern, active woman.
Gomi* aie priced at »2.!0 »2.75 S3.00 »3.S0 *4.°° »5.°° »5.S0™d more
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8;
1
♦**-
-«+-&3&g>:M»-
-♦;♦
The Saturday Evening Post for less
than live cents- a copy, $2.50 a year.
"The Country Gentleman" for less
than four cents a copy, $1.75 a year,
Including postage. Authorized agent,
A. R. DORAIS, Wi Broadway West,
Vancouver, B.C.
TO RENT—5-Roomod houso, with 30
acres cleared, ready for cultivation
or Information and particulars, apply to E. H. HICKS-BEACH, Courtenay, B.C.
Make Old Clothes Look Like New
LADIES' SUITS Cleaned and Pressed  $l-!5
SKIRTS Cleaned and Pressed  *>•"*
WAISTS Cleaned and  Pressed   $'-00
GENTS' SUITS Cleaned and Pressed  $1.50 and $2.00
OVERCOATS Cleaned and Pressed' *1JH1 and $1.75
SUITS Sponged and Pressed  '»"•
DRESSES Dyed and Pressed  $2.50 and up
SKIRTS Dyed and Pressed  $!•»«
WAISTS Dyed and Pressed  $'-&0
GENTS' SUITS Dyed aud PreBsed $3.50
OVERCOATS Dyed and Praised  $2.50 to $8.00
ALL K1NI18 OF REPAIRING AND ALTERING
R. B. HOWARD
CUMBERLAND DYE WORKS
Phono 104 PO. Box 191
REDUCTION IN PRICE
OF
Great West Tea
Now 65c. per pound.
Obtainable Only at
MUMFORD'S   GROCERY
Licence No. 8-17268.
Phone 71

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