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Cranbrook Herald Aug 28, 1913

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Array Legislative Assembly
Annl 34-11
JUB PRINTING
We art well equipped to
torn oat the beat class
of work.
THE CRANBROOK HERALD
ADVERTISING
Id the Herald Pays—Try
Our   Local  Colnmni
IF   YOU   WANT   CRANBROOK   TO   GROW.   PATRONIZE   HOME   ENTERPRISE
VOLUME  15
OBANBBOOK,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA,   THURSDAY, AUGUST 28, 1918
NO. 35
THE NEW CtTHOLIC
WORK  ALREADY   STARTED   ON
THK CONSTRUCTION—WILL
COST OVKK $16,000.
On Sunday last lhe trustees of the
Catholic schools arrived at a dclcr-
iitviliatIou lu go ahead witb the building of their, schools, the plans for
which were prepared by Messrs. -loncs
und As-pell, ot Vancouver, subject to
such inotliiiciilions as may be suggested hy lhe local architect aud
superintendent iu charge, Mr. P.
O'Haru. The outlay involved will
exceed (15,000, irrespective nf the
furnishing of the schools ami the
beaut Ideation of the grounds.
When the lots on the smith side or
Kaius street were put on the market
the trustees secured six on the south
cast side near the Parkins residence
and opposite the new residence nf
Postmaster Henderson. This week
they purchased from Mr. ('has'. Magcd
the two corner lots, giving them
eight lots with the south east corner
included. Thc new schools will bo
erected in the center of the eight
lots with the front of the building
facing on Norbury avenue and the
play grounds on either side.
The venture is a daring one when
we consider that no government grant
of any nature or kind, coming either
from th1: province or the Dominion,
can lie made in aid of this school, being denominational in its character.
There are those who think that re-
.igion and education arc things apart.
No doubt) they have their reward.
There ore those who think and believe that thc religion and the education along secular lines should ad-
vmc* with the advsneement ol the
child. Plainly, if moral training is
to be of any use, the time to inculcate it is when the mind is young
and receptive. What is the good,
they say, of teaching a child all the
wisdom of tlie sages, if his morals he
rotten?
The plans call for three large class
rooms, a wide, airy vestibule with
cloak roams and the usual entrance
accessories. In the basement will be
placed the heating apparatus, and the
greater part will be devoted to play
rooms, which can be used by the
children in inclement weather. On the
second story will he a school theater,
or hall, rooms for the teachers and
so on. The entire of tlie foundations, basement, basement partitions
and stairs will he of concrete and the
upper portion of frame. In general
aspect it will somewhat resemble the
present government ollice. Tbe carrying out of all the work has been placed in the very able and competent
hands of Mr. George R. Leask, who
since the 21th inst has been able to
procure no less than $7u() in contributions for Ibe work from the merchants of the city and tbe mills in
the vicinity. Il is particularly gratifying that tho Cranhrook Sash and
Door company was lhe lirst lo come
forward with a most generous contribution at Mr. Lcask's suggestion.
So, too, with Mr. Frank Parks anil
Mr. .1. D. Mcllridc, both of whom
see that in this matter ihere Is no
creed— thnt then* is no creed tn
question when the works are for the
benefit of all. The Fathers at the
Mission have already sent in pver
$300 worth ut the lines! lumber. And
so it goes. Wc are all ready lo help
those who help ami are able tn help
themselves.
One tremendous advantage these
school will have is that the teaching
will lie in the able bonds of the
Slfttera ol Chttrlty ol Providence, the
same order that bas charge of the
hospital hcto. No child can he
brought In,contact with those ladies
without being benefited by the example of their noble, self sacrificing
lives. Noble souls radiate goodness
and kindled spirits absorb it—as the
great Sir Oliver Lodge expresses the
idea: 'Star vibrates lo star ami
noble soul to noble soul." There is,
In short, an education In mere example outside mid Immeasurably be
yund nny llxed curriculum or thc
three Its.
The trustees decided to move at
about live o'clock on lust Sunday
afternoon. The actual work started
on Monday morning. That is how
to do things. We wish the undertaking every success.
WORSE THAN INCOMPETENCE
Reports,'of recent riots on Vancouver Island slate that the provincial
government has found it necessary tu
call out the militia to handL* the
strike situation at Nanaimo and other
coal districts ol Vancouver Island.
Is a result of strikes lasting many
months the miners broke out into
rioting which culminated in attacks
on (be police, much bloodshed nnd
fatal wounding nt one mail.
Tbis deplorable condition of affairs
is largely Uu* result id ib,- Inaction
or worse of Hon. T. W. Crothers,
Minister of Labor. The strike broke
out lasl September, and ever since
then tbe mines there have hen crippled, while of late the uperaling companies have tried to replace the strikers by non-uolon men.
For over half a year Hon. Mr.
Crothers refused to take any cognizance of the strike, or to apply the
legal machinery for dealing wilh such
conditions which had heen perfected
by the late Liberal government. A
month ago, however, linn. Mr. Crothers found ho needed a holiday tript
and he decided ta investigate conditions on Vancouver Island. His inter-
ventiau as Minister of Labor was
everywhere proclaimed in the Tory
press. The new minister was to display his skill in settling labour difficulties. He went there, spent some
time holidaying and accepting ban
quels. He tried to intervene hut
could do nothing, then returned, risking to disguise thc failure of his
mission by saying that he had enjoyed a magnificent trip.
Further, Hon. Mr. Crothers had a
law partner at St. Thomas, a Ml
Price. The minister wanted a pie-ii
ant companion for his holiday, so Mr.
Price was appointed a commissioner
to study conditions in the disturbed
region, and see what could be don.*
lo end the strike.
Mr. Price accompanied Mr (rdhers
to the coast and has rcma !..*d lih'l.d,
receiving all expenses and ;, fo\£(\ lei'
Vr his services as commissioner.
Tflie only result of this appears to
have been that conditions have become steadily worse, until now they
have culminated in bloodshed and the
calling out of the militia. A more
striking illustration of the incompetency and antagonistic altitude of the
present "millionaire" cabinet towards
labor could not be imagined.
NELSON FRI'IT FAIR
Present! indications are that the
Eleventh Annual Nelson Fruit Fair,
on September 23rd, 21th, 25th, will
surpass any Fair of previous years
not only in the May of exhibits but
also in attractions sonic of which
have been booked as far back as last
April, through the Western Vaudeville
Association of Chicago, the leading
hooking agents of the West who handle only high class acts.
One of the feature attractions will
lie the Hex Comedy Circus which will
without doubt be a delight to the
young and o'd, in this act the unusual sight will In* stnn of a oat riding
on a Pcuy, also a dog riding the
bucking mule, other lookings arc Waller Stanton as "Ohanttolet ihe Qianl
Rooster" an act that has- met with
exceptional success having appeared
in almost every quarter of the globe.
'•Les .tnrdys" n Kuropean Sensation
direct from Paris, France, the act
consist ing of three ladies and one
gentleman. "The Hlnchcs" nerialisls.
"Josh and Rube", tun in a bay wagon. "Texas" the strong man in
marvelous feats or strength. "Tbe
Dancing Qoese" one of the latest imported Vaudeville attractions. 1
Single far** for round trip will he in
effect nn all transportation lines.
01 PI! CREEK
OLD COLD DKK11MIS AUK RISING
DMVI'.LOPKD AND NKW PROSPECTS OPKNF.lt
It is gratifying to observe that all
recent reports from Perry Creek indicate progress towards the estnblis-
ment of tne mining industry on a
sound basis. Although this has been
a comparatively quiet season, much
honest work has been done. Many
MARRIED people, strong financially, have been
rrconoltering, and a steady advance
At the Baptist parsonage, this city, to reported. There are already sonic
Tuesday, August lflth, 1013, by tho very fine mine.; on which a eonsidera-
Rev. O. 0. Kendall, Mr. Win. .las. hie amount of work has been perfor-
W'atson, electrical engineer, nml Miss { need, and others nre being developed
Eunice Moscr, daughter uf Mr. and, and certainly will Im1 added to the list
Mrs. Gilbert Moscr.    All lhe parties ' of mines More long.
are well known in Cranbrook
friends and acquaintances join
tending best wishes to thc
couple. It is the Intention of
and Mrs. Watson to reside in
eity.
and >
u ex-'
happy
Mr.
this
plianccs they removed an unusual
amount of gravel and during the ensuing line*' years a large amount of
gold was taken out.
It was during the year 1895 that
the first quarts, location was made on
Perry Creek, and the following year,
in .inly, new prospectors discovered
thnt there were four or five distinct
ledges of gold quartz running through
the district, and ibis statement was
verified by the provincial mineralogist.
ELEVEN-MILE VEINS
Mr.  Robinson stated  thai  the lod-
tpti are true fissure veins, and can be
traced [or eleven miles. The surface
deposits item.1, decomposed rooks and
jf-rbunalcs, the mineral beuring
quart/ itself being a very soft formation seem lo be granite and aUglto.
The Ireml of lhe main lead has a
hearing of about 20 degrees east of
north, and seems to cross the creek
about two miles above the old shaft.
During the past year a number ol
properties have been developed, The
Homcslake group of live claims, own-
>4 by Gust Theis, has over 700 feet
of ledge is wide and carries high values in gold. We understand that a
syndicate composed of Toronto men
will send oul experts to examine the
property and the party Is expected t,
arrive in Cranbrook some time during tbe coming week.
SUNNYSIDE GROCP
The Sunnysidc group, owned by
Geo. Scott of Nelson and T. Corkhill
of Michel, is also a very promising
group nf four claims on which a considerable amount of work bas been
done. Tbe formation of th*se claims
■ similar to those of the llomestake,
the ledge not so large, the fiyart'/.
carrying values to $20 in gold. This
properly will tie Inspected by experts
in the near future.
THE GOL-DBUG
The Goldbug is another promising
property, tho quartz running high in
gold values.
The ledges are all free milling gold
qaartz, but owing to mining condl-
rjfcns only assessment work has been
lone, but now attention is being attracted and it is said that work will
be resumed on a number of very promising claims, and mine owners in
lhat vicinity are much elated at the
fact tbat capital is being interested,
also that Perry Creek seems destined
lo be a great gold camp.
| train into which it runs, before the
energy of the moving train has been
expended, and it comes to a state of
| rest. Furthermore, the higher speed
Imposes a mmh higher stress both
upon the   track and track structures
1 over which it runs. Thc distance between signals must be grcatlj Increas
' ed, since with brakes of the same efficiency ii would take a much longer
time to slow down the faster 1 ruin.
Mr Wesiinglioise, speaking upon
this subject, has recently slated thai
when emergency brakes arc s.-t on a
irain whicli is running at Hie rate of
80 miles ,,n   hour, the nam    will   be
still   running   ul no   miles an   hour
1 wln,*u il has advanced 1,100 feet Irom
the point of application of the brakes,
whereas u train would be stopped altogether IR 1,1 uu feet if its speed
were only 00 miles an hour.—Sclent
tfle American.
condition and that very promptly;
and with the increase*! activity of the
contending factious will come, it is
io Ik* feared, Increased danger to the
non-combatants in .Mexico as well as
those actually in the field of battle.
Tlie position of outsiders is always
trying and full of hazard where there
Is civil strife and a whole country is
upset. We should earnestly urge all
Americans to leave Mexico at once,
and should assist them to gel awav
in every way possible—'nol because
WO Wouldl mean i,( slacken in tho
Iheir
In-
[  the*,
risks
for
would
RETURN HFTEH FIVE WEEKS' PRESBYTERY OF EAST K001E-
TRIP
WELL KNOWN PLACERS
The Perry Creek placers were discovered in the year 187ft. Tlio diggings
then extended about two miles Mow
the old town.   Willi  their crude ap-
THE SPEED FACTOR
IK
How many ol the millions of people
who sit at the steering wheel of their
automobile realize how greatly the
smashing effects of a collision
arc increased by an increase of the
speed? Those who have heen through
n smash—and survived—have a more
or less intelligent apprcclationi of
this relationship. It would lie Interesting to learn how many out of
every one hundred drivers nf automobiles arc aware of tbe fact lhat the
destructive effects of an overturn or
a collision are increased, not in pio-
portinn to the speed, but to the
Square of the speed. A driver who
lias touched tin* curb or "side-wiped"
a fence al ten miles an hour and escape with unexpectedly] small injury is surprised at thu damage which
ensues in case of a collision at 20
miles an hour, and perfectly dumh-
founded—should ho survive the disaster— at the havoc wrought when the
speed is thirty or fifty miles an hour.
If he were conscious of tbe fact that
ihe smashing energy embodied in his
machine was four times as great at
twenty miles nn hour as at ten, nine
limes as great at thirty mites an
hour, and sixteen times as great at
forty, he might still contemplate thc
wreckage with dismay, hut not with
astonishment. Thc moral of this as
applied lo the automobllist is, lhat
an increase in his speed is a most imperative call upon him for an increase
nf vigilance aud caution, for a nicer
judgment of speed and distance, and
for the possession of a steady nerve
and quick wit—and woe belide him in
an emergency if he have not thc Inst
named)
Sb also, in the larger fleld of railroading, thc same laws exact thel
heavy toll with the same remorseless
precision, llroadly speaking, wc
might say lhat, not alone in Uie des
truotlve effects of collision—should It
come—but with regard to every clement, mechanical and human, that enters into the question of sate railroading, the risk and damage increase
as the square of the velocity. Thus,
if we raise the speed of an express
train from sixty to eighty miles an
hour, the momentum of the irafn will
be nearly doubled, nnd practically
doubled also will be thc amount ot
crushing and rending which will take
place, let us say, in lhe forward part
ot the train itsell or lu the after part
In lhe 0080 of a rear collision, of the
FOUL BROOD AMONG
PORTED BEES
MINISTER     OP     AflKU*l!LTCRI*:
WILL     KNFOKCK      PROVISIONS   GOVERNING   IMPORTED BEES.
Charles A. Cook, local quarantine
officer and fruit Inspector under tlie
department of agriculture, is in receipt of the following communication
from W. 10. Scott, deputy minister
at Victoria, with regard to the importation and quarantine of bees:
Sir: I have the honor to inform yoi|
that owing to the outbreak of foul
brood in certain parts nf the Okanagan district in this province, which
has been directly traceable to bees
imported from points outside of the
province, the Hon. tho minister of
agriculture has decided to enforce
part of the provisions of Section 10
of the above act, and thn following
notice has been inserted in this
week's B.C. Gazette:
"Notice is hereby given that in
conformity with section 10, of the
Foul Brood Bees Act, any or all
bees imported into the province of
Hritish Columbia shall be quarantined at the point of entry into this
province, or at such other place as
may be hereafter appointed, for a
period of not more than nine months
and if such hecs are found to be -infected they may be destroyed."
1 should be much obliged if you
would circulate the information
amongst tlw* officials of your staff
with regard io the importation of
bees and advise t he department
promptly as to any consignments of
bees Wing imported at any point on
your lines.
Thanking you for your kind attention to this matter,
I have the honor to be, sir,
Your ohedient servant,
Wm. B. Scott,
Deputy Minister
Victoria, B.C., August 13th, 1913.
0. S. WILL NOT INTERFERE
WITH MEXICO
INTERFERENCE HOPELESS AT
PRESENT TIME SAYS PRESIDENT WILSON IN MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.
Washington, D.C, Aug. 27.—President Wilson appeared in person before Congress today, and laid bare
to the world the details of this nation's efforts to bring about peace in
.Mexico, the facia concerning jHuerta's
rejection of the peaoo proposals, and
the policy to Im* pursued now by tbis
government.
The   President     announced the
position of the I'nited States, as
will he found in full below.
PRESIDENT   WILSON'S INTERIM
PROPOSAL TO CONGRESS.    '
"Meanwhile, what is it our duty to
do? Clearly everything that we
do, must Im* rooted in patience and
done with calm aud disinterested deliberation, Impaiiiiiiv on our part
would Ih* childish aud would lie
Iraugbt wilu every risk of wrong and
folly.
"We can afford to exercise the self-
restraint of a really great nation,
which realizes its own strength and
scorns to use it. It was our duty
io oiler our active assistance. It is
now our duty to show what .true neutrality will do to enable the people
of Mexico to set their affairs in order again and wait for a further opportunity to offer our friendly counsels. The door Is not closed against
thc resumption, either upon the m-
itlntive of Mexico or Upon our own,
of the effort to bring order nut of
tlie confusion by friendly co-o|ierative
action, should fortunate occasion offer.
"While we wnit, the contest of the-
rival forces will undoubtedly for a
little while, be sharper than ever,
just becauw it will Ik* plain that an
rod mtml he  made   ul    tlw existing
least our effort* lo safeguard
lives and their Interests, but
cause it is Imperative ilia
should take no unnecessary
when it is physical!j possible
them to leave the country. We
let every one who seems in exercise
authority in any part ol Mexico
..mow in the most unequivocal way
that we shall vigilantly watch tho
fortunes of those Americans who cannot get away, and shall hold those
responsible for their, sufferings and
loss to a definite reckoning. That
can and will be made plain, beyond
lhe possibility of a misunderstanding. .
"For the rest, I deem It my duty
to exercise lhe authority conferred
upon me by the law of March llth,
1012, lo see to, it that neither side
to the struggle now going mi in Mexico, receive any assistance from this
side of the border. I shall follow
the best practice of nations in the
matter of neutrality by forbidding
the exportation of arms, or munitions of war of any kind from the
United States to any pari of the Republic of Mexico, a policy, suggested
by several interesting precedents, ivnd
certainly dictated by certain manifest considerations of practical expediency. We cannot under the circumstances, be the partisans nt either party to the contest now distracting Mexico or constitute ourselves lhe virtual 'umpire between them.
"I am happy to say that several of
the great governments of the world
have given this government their generous moral support in urging upon
the provisional authorities of the
City of Mexico the acceptance of our
proffered good offices in the M>i'it in
which tbey were made. We have
not acted in this matter under the
ordinary principles of international
obligation. All the world expects us
In such'circumstances to act as Mexico's nearest friend and intimate advisor. This is out immemorial relation toward her."
"There Is nowhere any serious
question, but that we have the .moral
right in .the case or that we are
acting in the Interest of a fair settlement and of good government not for
the promotion of some selfish motive
of our owfti. If further motive were
necessary, than our own good will
toward a sister republic and our own
deep concern to see peace and order
prevail in Central; America,-this consent of iiiaii'jind to what we are attempting, this attitude ot tlie great
nations of Ihe world towards what
we may attempt in dealing with this
distressed people at our doors, should
make us feel the more solemnly
bound to go to the utmost length of
patience ami forbearance in this painful and anxious business. The steady
pressure of moral force will, before
many days, break the harriers of
pride aud prejudice down and wc
shall triumph as Mexico's friends,
sooner than we could triumph as her
enemy and how much more handsomely, with how much higher and
finer satisfaction of conscience and
honor.
LOCAL   SECRETARY  ATTENDED
THE Y.M.t'.A. TRAINING        j
SCHOOL AT ORILLIA
DIED
At the residence of M. E. Collins
near the government building in tbis
city, on Thursday evening, August 21
1018, Mrs. Proctor, mother of Mrs.
Collins. Deceased had been sick for
past eight months and was incurable.
Itie body was placet! in the hands o
Undertaker Macpherson and shipped
east to Almonte, Ont., where the fun
eral will be held today. The tody
was accompanied by Mr. ami Mrs
Collins and Miss Proctor, Mrs. tot
lins only going as far as Regina,
Sask. Mrs. Proctor had resided iu
Cfanbro-ok for tlie past year coming
here tn live with her daughter shortly afler Mr. Collins accepted the position of chief clerk in the C.P.H. superintendent's office.
II.   1). Cameron have
week's trip into
Tlie Cranbrook city band, under the
leadership of Bandmaster Austin, will
play the following programme of
music nt the band stand in front of
the government building Sunday evening at 8.15 p.m.
March—Honetha McFall
Overture—Criterion  Miller
Waltzes—Signora   Laurens j
Iniennez/o—Anona   Orey
Medley—Scotch Melodies	
 \rr. by Hackle
Mr. and M
returned fron
eastern Canada, where they went to
attend lhe Canadian Training school
for Young Mm's christian Association
secretaries, which was held at Orillli
Ontario. The school was in session
for about tv.ii weeks and was attended by about -uu secretaries from
Vancouver tu Halifax. A very enjoyable session was held. Mr. •!. S.
Teet, formerly the local secretary
here, was also in attendance from
Cartler, Ont,
Following the close of the training
school and convention Mr. and Mrs.
Cameron visited Niagara Falls, Buffalo, N. V., and Toronto. Tbey then
came west, to Winnipeg, where Mr.
Cameron met two of his brothers and
a sort nf family reunion was held.
Other places visited during their
trip were; Lethbridge, Medicine Hat,
Moose Jaw, Rcglna, Broadview, and
Cartler, Ont. Tbey arrived home
last Saturday on the Flyer.
Mr. Cameron expresses bis delight
In reluming to Cranbrook as secretary of the local V.M C. \. as he states
that he believes this eity tn be one of
the best in the Dominion now. He
heard a great many complaints from
the effects of the money stringency
in other parts of thc country, and
Bays that Cranbrook looks better
than any of the prairie towns.
INTERESTING     MKI-.TIXOS    HE-
ING IIELU— DTfeei SSIOS on
| CHI RCH l;Mn\
i    Al the invitation of the session   of
Knox    clmich.    tiie  ("resbyterj    ot
East Kootenaj uu I <h ih» church at
j 4.30 p.m. Wednesday, the K.\   w o.
Blake, of Creston, presiding.
I There was an excellent attendance.
I The Revs. Blake, of Cr.-WoriT •j'fnck-
ney, "f Trail, Logic, of Nelson.
Thomson, of Cranhh.uk. Stephens, of
Wardner. Dr Ferguson, superintendent of home missions, Co watt, i of
Waldo, and Messrs.Greenlee, of Hot*
mer, McXaught, of Fori Steele, Pear-
eck, were presrnt.
icon sederunt, alter
was constituted by
Mr   w\ Hackney,   the
SIT TEN THOUSAND STARVED
TO DEATH
CHARGES OF BULGARIAN ATRO
CITIES AT ADRIANOPLE ARE
CONFIRMED  BY   RUSSIAN
OFFICERS
London, Aug. 25.—Asbrnead Bart-
lett, Daily Telegraph correspondent
at Constantinople, has sent a three-
column report by Russian officers
who were sent by their government
to investigate atrocities on the part
of Bulgarians on the occupation of
Adrianople. Tlte report confirms thc
charges that Kulgars massacred many
Turks and Greeks, outraged women
and looted and defied the mosques,
looting among others thc library of
thc celebrated mosque of Sultan Se-
lim and plundered the homes of wealthy Turks, Greeks and Jews. Thu
spoils are said to have been sent to
Sofia.
The indictment of the Russian officials includes the allegation that 20,-
000 Turkish prisoners were locked up
Tlthout food and that 10,000 succumbed to cold and hunger. Gen. Yell-
chefl is charged with being responsible for tlie brutal treatment meted
out tf) the inhabitants of Adrianople.
NELSON WANTS FREE MAIL
March-Washington State    .     Young
God Save the King.
James Austin, bmidiiiastcr.
CLAIM THEIR CITY IS ENTITLED TO. PRIVILEGE ALTHOUGH
BELOW POPULATION LIMIT
Nelson, B.C., Aug. 25.—Expressing
the opinion tbat free postal delivery
in cities should Ik* made contingent
on a revenue of (20,000 per annum
and not, as at present on a basis of
population, a resolution introduced
by W. G. Foster and seconded by K.
W. Widdowson wns passed at last
meeting of the board of trade for submission  to th<* annual meeting of the
associated boards of trade of eastern
British Columbia at Kaslo in Sept*
enher.
I nder th" present regulations tttllOh.
provide thai a city cannot secure thc
advantages of free postal delivery until it has a population of 12,000 .ml
a post ollice revenue of $20,000 per
annum a city in tbe position or Nelson, where the local post office has a
yearly revenue of well over J2f>,-
100, but has not yet attained the necessary population Is placed in a less
tkwomhle position than, (or instance,
New Westminster, which, although
having h smaller annual revenue than
Nelson, has been granted Irce postal
delivery on account of its popul.ition.
In the two cases mentioned the reg**
ulations work out In practice in such
a way that although the larger citv
FfOVdeS less revenue than the Small-
Ir one, free postal delivery is provides! at a greater cost in the former instance on account of thc area to be
covered by mail carriers, than would
b* the case in Nelson, where tlw population is smaller but the revenue
liom the post office largei.
son.   of i oa) i
Al the afU
the Prcsbyterj
tlie moderator
clerk, mad the minutes of the previews gatherings held in Nelson last
February. After a brief discussion
these were adopted.
At tin* evening session matters
took a vcr\ interesting turn, when
Mr. Sarkissian. ,,f Hossland. moved
that we tr\ to get the famous John
McNeil, of DOokp'a church, Toronto
Mr. McNeils fame as a preacher, as
a wit, as ,i soul-saver^is world-wide.
For years he was Britain's premier
nport-
the
held
the
evangelist, visiting .ill the i
ant English-speaking towns in
world. For over ;, year he
Christ church. London, where
equally famous Mr F It Meyer was
pastor. Later he was called to
Liverpool, and then, quite recently,
to Toronto, where ahnndaui success
has attended his labors. Mr. Snr-
kisslan explained that if we had
Mr. McNeil in different churches in
awakening would ensue.
All agreed, and it was
would ensue All agreed, and it was
decided -,o eet into communication
with Mr. McNeil at  once.
All the ministers and missionaries
present reported that their churches
were making efforts, which were likely to be successful, to raise their
several assessments to th.- budget
This Presbytery is asked to raise
S1200.
Tlie clerk was instructed by the
Presbytery to call tin* attention of
the treasurers of the different churches to rule 68, rules and forms of
procedure, which says that the congregations ought to defray the expenses of the minister and appointed
elder who attend Presbytery courts.
The Kev. c. j„ Cowan, as treasurer, eave his report for the past six
months and outlined the different assessments on the churchr* for 1913.
Both were accepted.
Church union was lhe next topic.
This caused great interest and a
lively discussion. Dr. Ferguson, on
invitation, said lhat the state of the
country and the church Is confused on
the question of union. Divisions of
opinion for and against union exist itl
the Maritime Provinces. In (mtario
the feeling is mixed. In Manitoba
pro-unfon feeling is strong and now
the Presbyterian and Methodist colleges in Winnipeg have decided to
unite. Many (hutches la the rural
districts have united, in spite of the
delay of the general assembly. Tn
Alberta things are going along quietly; and in B.C. the opinion is divided. Dr. Ferguson advised the Presbytery to go slowly. Haste is
inimical to the welfare oi each of
tin- churches. He warned against
assuming ton much for granted, and
gave as a warning the decision of
the Lords in the great Free Church
dispute in Scotland, where Ibc decision was in favor af the few men
wbo     would   not   join     the United
Church.      The  whole tenor oi llie
address was "make haste slowly."
He advocated CD-Operation in the
meantime, which bad its difficulties,
though (boy were not insuperable,
Mr. Monro, Mr. Sarkissian, Mr.
Thomson, Mr. Kee and others parting
pated.
lhe Dame of the new minister of
Windermere, the Rev, W S Inclis,
was added to the Roll ol Presbytery,
The ladies of Kn'ix church are giving a dinner to the Presbytery tonight st 0.80 o'clock.
At the evening session tonight will
be heard the report on the Pre-Con-
gretS held recently at Toronto, Kev.
Munro, of <Jieenwoi.il, leading Kev.
Dr. Ferguson and Rev. T. Ileikie
there will In* short addresses from
will talk on "Home Missions" and
missionaries as to their work in the
field.
A short session tomorrow morning
will dose the Presbytery.
The situation in British Columbia
Is not a bit worse than anv other
continent, declared Mr. Campbell
Sweeny, superintendent ol branches
of tbe Hank of Montreal, a lew days
since, at Montreal. uBusiness is
SOUrM and the development id the
province in proceeding apace, I should
say that there.are few of the Canadian provinces in a more health) eo„-
dilion than British Columbia " THB CRANBROOK HERALD
ORAXBftOOK IlKftALD
By tbe Herald   Publishing Company,
J, II. Thompson, Editor and Manage
CRANBROOK, B.C., August 28th, 1913
EDITORIAL NOTES
"Fishing fo Good" is the cheerful
headlug which appeared ou ibc front
page ot lhe Financial Post last issue.
This information, after digesting a
batch of oiillooli reviews, slumps in
the stock market and causes, bund
sales, bud collections, etc., seems to
offer Un* only present Bolutlon for
business ills So long as fishing is
good, why worry? Take a few
months ofl and wait for tbe readjustment, which is sure In follow,
and don't ai tempi to diagnose the
reasons tot the present stringency
lesl you pul creases in your cerebellum, aud shorten your life. A tow
weeks in the bills and along the rills
will renew your youth, put you in
fighting trim, and give you energy
for work ai a time when it will accomplish something. Don't worry,
wait and fish.
What promised to I"' a molo-dramn
at Grand Forks Inst week was turned
into a screaming force comedy when
aboul eighty Doukhobor women drove
iB.it, two officers who were to bring
witnesses lo an iiunicsL whicli was
being held over the body of a Doukhobor woman, who had been secretly
Inn Jed, and afterward exhumed hy tho
■iiithoiiiics. The officers managed to
escaped with their lives, and the important witness wauled by the coroner
escaped. The provincial government
has blundered heretofore in handling
this problem but it is one lhat con-
front's them and must he handled or
Ihe Doukhobor colony will soon become the hotbed of anarchy. Law
must ol ther he respected or done
away wilh. The Grand Forks Sim
says thai n prominent Tory in that
cily was so disgusted thut he said
only a change ot government would
improve conditions.
Another evidence of increasing disrespect for law has been seen in the
rioting on Vancouver Island recently
The i,dicers must grapple these problems with the mailed hand and nail
them hard and fast. The destruction
(I property and small consideration
for life evidenced in these outbreaks is
discouraging lo tho philosopher who
believes the world growing better and
wiser. Klotlng will never Improve
the economic situation as between
employer and employee, and the union
which strives it, gain its pants t.v
It tl in Ida tion is following a long lane
of hlotid atul terror which has no
turning but into asylums, jails and
death. The legislature is the only
safe remedial agency and if one gov-
ernmenl will nol give measures of
relief t.i the struggling miner, he
.should fall hack „ii the ballot and
continue to turn oul the rascals until
honest men will occupy the. heads ol
goVermneni and see that they are
full j prot cci ed. The worklngmon of
the country have 75 per cent of Unvotes and if those In power are nol
iu tlieir favor il is their own Ignorance and faull that il is so. More
unity among Ibe working classes is
nil that is needed lo stop law breaking and violence.
la the pasl a big grain crop in the
Wesl has meant a lessening of interest
in live stock. It is doubtful if this
holds good any longer. There arc
indications, and ihey become mere accentuated every year, that the western fanner is becoming mure Interests d in live stock. There never
was a time in the history of the
country in which the demand for good
breeding stock was so keen and insistent as il is to-day. The only thing
Hint is retarding the movement is
lhe lack of ready money. Hut given
a good crop this season, harvested In
good shape and disposed of 1o good
advantage, anil the demand for breed-
ing slock iu the Wesl will become
greater than over before. And one
good tiling about this demand is that
unly the best is wanted. Breeders In
Fas tern or Western Canada, who
Hope to lake advantage ut this demand must be prepared to supply the
kind of stock the western farmer
wanls. The big fairs have tor several
years been educating farmers up to
what good breeding slock is. There
arc also many men engaged in (arming who came from the old Land and
elsewhere, who know good stock, and
what its value is. At no other exhibitions in Canada have we heard
more intelligent criticism of the animals in a show-ring, and the Judging
too, than around the rings at western exhibitions, There is au Inherent
love for good stock among many id
thc men who have sellled in the
West, and when they are ready to
buy they want the besl they can get,
The Wesl is no longer lhe dumping
ground for inferior breeding slock,
aud for thai matter anything else or
.in inferior nature, and those catering
to thc market there must beat in
mind. Those who have had dealings
with the West know this, and govern
themselves accordingly. Others who
may he looking for a slice in the future should be cognizant of it too. —
Canadian Farm.
morning, September 7th.
Preparatory     service, Friday evening, September 5th at 3 p.m.
mmm
MONEY IN A HOUSE
enn't always bo taken out. From foundation
tm ii t* ta the BiMoglofl there h.
Money Value in Houses Here
Our lionaea don't IHonu tn "bargain wiun-
Lw"|oblota-lli»j'r ig 1 for Mini.
Vnhir Increases nl! hotlBfl. on our list,   lluv
today before. I ulvol in ,,„„..
ACENTS FOR THE UNDERWOOD TYKWMTEI
= =   Thu   =====
Chapman Land & Inv. Co.
Two doors from the Rci Theatre
PHONE 401 P,O.Bos48S
AUSTRALIA   AND CANADA
i Uegina Leader)
"1 venture to predict," writes Mr.
.1, T. Hopkins, a citizen of Australia,
to the editor of the Vancouver News-
Advertiser, "that it is within tho
bounds of possibility that vet' (the
Australians) will within the next- Un
or fifteen years he able to eonslruci
a Dreadnought fur thn Motherland
made from all Australian material by
Auslraliun and Anglo- \ uslulian
workmen." That Is the prospect
which is before Australia ,i country
in which, as Mr. Hopkins further
points out, there is popular belief
"in keeping as much of the work as
possible amongst our (Us) own people."
For some years Australia tried the
policy ot contributing to a centr.il
Imperial licet. Then, having found
that policy unsatisfactory, the Cnm-
moiyvealth abandoned it aud set about
thc creation of an AuatraUin nav;,
Under that policy Australia is today
putting Australian material into warships built in its own dockyards, giving employment to hundreds of Australian workmen in thc construction
of the ships, manning the" vessels with
ber own sons and paying the bills for
the maintenance of thc shins. So
great has been the progress that already Australians can see in lhe near
future the time when they will not
only be able tu build the ships for
tlicir own fleet, but will find use for
Australian material and employment
Tor Australian workmen iu building
Dreadnoughts for the Hritish Admiralty.
Itttt in Canada then* is no, such
prospect. Premier Horden has abandoned llie policy of a Canadian navy
and adopted the policy which Australia abandoned as unsatisfactory.
Mr. Horden holds that Canadians
have not the industry and skill to
build warships nor the courage to
man them. He believes in giving employment to workmen in another
country and in having the resources
of other countries supply the material used iu thc construction of ships
Tor which Canada would pay. He
would have the men of another country hired to face danger for Canada
aud the taxpayers of another country
to pay thc bills.
In Austral!ia the workmen of the
country find rcmunarativc employment in the industry created hy the
course of the Commonwealth in establishing a local navy, and there is
before them the        pros
pect of still greater
things in the future. In Canada,
Mr. Horden has sel his face against
the creation of such conditions for the,
Dominion.
WRITS ISSUED AT FKillMK
Fernie, Aug, 25.—Acting for Attor-
ney-Genoral    Dowser,   Herchmcr   A*
Martin, barristers of this city, have
issued two summonses in the Supreme
Court of Hritish Columbia, in an action to recover penalties of $0,000
and 18,000 from the Toronto Alberta
Land Co., Ltd., nnd McCiilchcon
tiros., Ltd., the first for doing business in this province without being
licensed or registered, ami the second
(or acting as agents for an unlicensed
ami unregistered company.
CHURCH COLUMN
V'ATHOMC CHUROII.
Sundays—Low mass at 8.30 a.m.;
high mass, 10.30 a.m.; Sunday school
from 2 to 3 p.m.; Rosary and Benediction at 7.30 p.m.
Mondays and holy days of obligation—Mass at 8 a.m.
Week days—Mass at 6 a.m. at the
hospital.
P. Plamondon, O.M.I.
i > ■
KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Pastor, Rev. W. K. Thomson.
Morning service, ll a.m. Evening
service, 7.30 p.m.
Anthem by the choir.
S. S. ami Bible class, 12 a.m.
The Sacrament of the Lord's
Supper will be dispepsed on Sabbath
BAPTIST CHURCH.
Rev. (). E. Kendall, pastor.
Morning worship, 11.00k. Topic:
"Wild Grapes in tho Lord's Vineyard."
Sunday school 12,15 noon.
livening worship, 7.80k. Topic:
"The Kingship of .lesus in the Oreat
Commission—ot the Kingly Altcrno**
live "lie that bellevelh and is baptized shall he saved aud he that he-
1 levelh nol shall be condemned."
The public ate Invited to participate in ,, bright and cheery serWoo or
praise.
CRISTIAN SCIENCE
Mr. Editor:
Having already called attention io
the basic principle ol "no matter" in
this system of belief, we need not be
surprised    to learn tbere    isp no such
tiling  as  disease    in  existence.   "Nu
matter" is declared that disease may
be denied, and   disease is denied thai
no matter" may be re-allirmcd. These
propositions   are Inseparable;   prove
one false and the other falls with it.
Having   affirmed   the     fundamental
principle of   "no   matter"   Christian
Science does not scruple inthe presence    of appalling    disease,  sickness,
pain to deny   both.   We   shall again
Quote from the text-hook of this sys-
Uvn some   of its bald and   senseless
assumptions on this subject.
Page Hi.   The boil simply manifests
your belief iu pain.
17,   We have smallpox because others
have It; but mortal mind,
not matter, contains ami
carries the infection,
(ill*   All disease is the result of education.
385.   Catarrh,     fever,      rheumatism
or consumption   will follow,   nut because   of the
climate, but on account of
belief.
381.   The evidences of lhe senses  are
nol to be accepted in thc
case of sickness.
392.   Man is never sick,
400.  Sometime ii    will   he   learned
that the mind constructs
the   body with   its   own
materials.      Ilenet'     n|ri
breakage nor dislocations
can really occur.   Man fo.
not killed      by accidents,
injuries or disease.
112.   The child    may have worms If
you say so, or any other
malady.
<115.   Sickness is a dream from which
the   patient needs, to be
awakened.
The above passages   describing the
beaching   of Christian    Science   and
disease could be   continued indefinitely, but    to   no purpose.   All    sane
thinkers concede thc force of mind as
» /actor in thc cause and cure of disease.     But,   all sane   thinkers    also
concede the existence of disease to bu
caused and   cured.   Admit    that the
foregoing statements   are true ajid.it
involves us in the following unthinkable and blasphemous conclusions.
The centuries of research and discovery in the science of Medicine and
Hygiene serve fo submerge the raca
deeper and deeper in the quagmires of
false belief in the existence of disease
accidenit   and   injury.   Further,   thc
We have thc
Carborundum
Sharpening Stone
You have been looking for
F. Parks & Co.
Hardware and House
Furnishings
CRANBROOK • B. C.
RHEUMATISM, LUM
BAGO and LAME
BACK
can be   cured  by the great fruit kidney and liver remedy,
FIG PILLS
Branttord, Ont., Aug. 13, 1911.
Your medicine, Fig Pills, has worked   wonders for me.      The rheumatic
pains have entirely left me and I owe
everything to your remedy.    You are»j
at liberty to publish this.
II. H. Gailmau.
At all dealers 25 and 50 cents or
mailed by The Fig Pill Co., St,
Thomas, Ont.
Sold by The Cranbrook Drug and
Book Co., Ltd.
agencies of our Christian and cultural civilization, our sciences of Medicine, Surgery, Nursing, our hospital
system etc, are the monuments of our
shame, rather than of our achiev
menls. Again, christian Science ass
times to be "The Key to the Script-
turcs". These record almost numberless instances of disease, plague, sickness, pain. Hut this "Science'
denies the existence of these In
'rnlily. They are a false belief
Admit the truth ol this and we are
breed to the extremely painful conclusion that God was a triller, and
even a liaij. when he threatens Israel
with disease and plague for their
transgressions, Again -lesus Christ
was only an errant humbug and do
other for he recognized thc reality of
diseases, naming them and curing
tli em by actual bodily contact. Furthermore, the Bible as a record of
sickness, disease and pain, is an ins
t rument for the propagation of that
which is false and hurtful. Thc inexorable logic of "no matter" and "no
■lisease" leads us lo these conclusions. Hut, we forbear, with every
feeling of reverence for (lod and trust-
in man, outraged.
O. 13. Kendall.
FOLD MME 11
Ti SPOKANE FI
Polo, the most exciting of all games
or contest, will he seen in the Inland
Empire foi the first time in history
when the big 1913 Interstate Fair
opens on Sept. 15. Not one team,
hut many, including the champion
poloists of Canada and of the Pacific
Coast, will engage in a polo trophy
cup will be given the victorious team
nnd other trophies offered for lhe \ar-.
ions games and individual players,
The center field at the Fair Grounds
has been made as smooih and green
a lawn under the supervision oi the
Spokane Park Board, All hydrants,
light poles and other obstructions \
have been removed, anil lhe held will
give a clear view of sonic of lhe
most exciting polo matches ever wit
nessed by the American public, 'lhe-;
re is intense rivalcry between the poloists of Canada and those of the Pacific Coast, and Spokane is fortunate
to have the first Northwestern International Tournament take place on
ils field.
Southern California hns hitherto
monopolized most of tho Pacific Slope
polo enthusiasm, the tournament at
Coronado, Burlingame and Riverside
being world famous, but the contagion
has spread, and Portland, Boise, Vancouver, Victoria, Kelownw, Calgary
and many other Western Canadian
cities now possess teams, most of
which nre already for the Spokane
.mimes.
Willi the International matches between England and America at the
teutons Aleadowhrook Tournament iu
Uie casl and lhe contest at Spokane
between Canada and America, polo
should become known by and deserv-
popular with thousands of people!
who hnve never jet seen it played
Phone
43
Halsall & Co.
Ladies', Misses', and Children's Outfitters
Armstrong
Avenue
1968
FALL COATS
Here Await Your Choosing
Most women like to have their Fall Coat in
good time, as well as serving a useful purpose
We have many coats to choose from—many different styles. In all, eighty-seven coats. No two
coats alike.    Prices moderate.
Whether you are prepared to buy now, or later
if you know anything about the policy of this store
you know that you will be welcome to examine
these garments as critically as you wish without
being insisted upon to buy.   Prices range at
$10.50, $12.59, $16.00, $18.00, $21.00,     |
to $50.00 H
Pictorial Review Patterns now in stock.        Fashion Sheets Free.
Early Novelties in
Fall Suits To-day
These Suits are all ready for your inspection.
Whether you contemplate an early purchase or
are merely interested, we will be glad to have you
see them. The fabrics introduce many novelties
including Zibelines, Jacquards, Sponge Cloths,
Fancy Tweeds, Plain Serges, Etc., making a striking contrast to what has been shown in many
seasons.    Prices moderate, at
$20.00, $25.00, $27.50, $30.00, $35.00
New Shoes.   New Gloves.
New Waists.   New Sweaters
Above lines are all in stock awaiting your
inspection
THE LITTLE FOLKS ARE NOT FORGOTTEN
New Shoes, New Dresses, New Coats, New Hats
EVERYTHING FOR THE LITTLE TOTS
Corporation of the Cily of
Cranbrook
COURT OK REVISION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
tliat a Court of Revision tor tho pun
pose of revising ami correcting tho
Assessment Roll ol tho City of
Cranbrook and fhe Cranbrook School
District will be held on Tuesday,
September 80th., 1918, at the hour
of 10.30 a.m.(local time) in lho Municipal Buildings, Norbury Avenue,
Cranbrook, B.C. Objections to the
sold Assessment Roll must he liiuile
in writing and delivered to tho As-
Bessor, at least U-n (10) days before
lho silling of lhe Court of Revision.
THOMAS M. ROBERTS,
Assessor.
Cranhrook, B.C.,
August 12th, 1013. 33-tt
EAST KOOTENAY  I.A Ml
DISTRICT
Cranbrook, B.C., August 25th 1013
TAKE NOTICE, lhal I, Oeo. Kennedy, blacksmith, intend -ill days from
late fo apply lo Ibe Minister of
Lands for permission to purchase the
fallowing described lund, in the East
Kootenay district. Commencing at a
ottst planted on Cold Creek, about -1
miles from lhe 2nd bridge, thence
East 80 chains, thence South 40
attains, thenco West 80 chains, thence
Norlh 10 chains to place of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or
!*M8.
Geo. Kennedy.
35-lOts. Locator.
Three Big Days-Sept. 23,24,25
NELSON FRUIT FAIR
ELEVENTH
ANNUM
AT NELSON, B. C.
15
THE EVENT OF THE KOOTENAY8
—   BIG FREE ACTS, TWICE DAILY  —
15
SEE
(EC
       REX COMEDY CIRCUS      ^^^^
A uYliglitfor V ig nml 111,1
THERLUCHES LESJAROVS
Fin,',,n ti Buy Wagon A European Bengutlon
WALTER STANTON & CO.
rliniitirliT, the Giant booster nml tha I lanelng i ;,<■.<•
V. M. C. ». PYRAMID IUILOER* TEXAaJ, THE STRONG MAN
In Living Pyramids In Mnrvi'llittia Keataof Ktreiiglb
HORSE RACE* ROCK DRILLING
And oilier numerous Attract iniia
TIIK BATTLE
IN
TIIK CLOUDS
BI'KOIAI, HKATIIRK
" MITT'S FIREWORKS'
Da; ami Night
Al |,reseuteil at the A, Y. I\
TIIK
KLE0TK10
MJKKKN
Hingis Fare tor llie hound Trip nt, All Lllioa
A. II. KMflllY, President at. IIORBTKAO, Bec'y und Mgr,
P. ll. Ilm 800, N,.| ll l'.
Tobacco is exceedingly elllcacioiis iu
the killing of microbes according lo
Messrs. Langlais nnd Sarlory, who
state tlH'lr experiments have shown
that in five minutes tobacco smoke
will kill almost ail   tl"' microbes in
the saliva, thus nearly completely
rterlH/.ii.g the mouth. One oi the ex-
|n*rinii*nls carried onl hy Mm. I,an-
eJais and Sartory was to place several cigars ia water containing many
million cholera microbes to the square Inch. The tobacco sterilized and
destroyed tho microbes in twenty-
four hoars.
Newman Ki'b, president ol tlte Minneapolis & .St. Paul Kail road, recently estimated that thc automobile had
within the, last twelve years added
$2,000,000,000 to the farm lands or
the country. Not more than ton yearn
ago the (arm with easy railroad ae
cess WAS, he argued, wort!) about $7!>
an aero, while a farm twenty miles
back was hardly, worth ¥10 an acre.
Hut the latU'r nowadays is within1 an
hour's easy automobile run, and Its
value has enormously appreciated tor
that reason. The farmer with his automobile trannport twenty miles Ironif
tie railroad, is quite as well off as
tho farmer of tlw last generation
whose land lay within three or lour
miles ol tlw shipping point. THB   ORANBUOOK   HKHALT)
LIST OF SPECIAL PRIZES
EAST KOOTENAYS BIG FALL FAIR
CRANBROOK, SEPT. 18 & 19,1913
MAGIC read ™M
L;BAK.iNGrH
alum POWDER
Horses
1. Champion Mare. Ribbon and
J10.00 goods, Raworth Bros,
S. Champion Two.years-old (K. or
fl.) Ribbon, Bridle atul Hit. (Ireat
West Saddlery Co.
3. Champion one-year old Colt (F.
or «). Klubon anil $111.01) goods,
McCreery Bros.
4. Koal (1918), Ribbon and North
West Farmer for one year.
5. Best Team suitable for Lumbermen, Ribbon and pair of heavy collars, Valuo $111.1111. W. M. Park A
Co.
II. Beat Draft Foal (1018), Sill.till
cash.    Farmers' Institute,
7. Champion registered slallion—
J5.0II cash, W. E. Worden.
■«. Best foal, 1918, shown In (leti-
eral Purposo Class—$5.00 cash, W.
K. Wimlen.
Cattle
11. Best Dairy ,Cow and Calf. First
M.00. Second, $2.00. Farmers' Inst.
12. Champion Calf 1013. Ribbon
and $10.00 goods.  McCreery Bros.
18. Champion Bull (any age or breed)
Ribbon and $5.00 cash given by the
Calgary Herald and Farm and Ranch
Review one year.
14. Champion Dairy Cow(any breed)
Ribbon and $10.00 goods. Kink .Mercantile Co.
15. Champion Ayrshire Cow. Ribbon and North West Farmer, one
year.
18. Champion Ilolstein Cow. Ribbon and North West Farmer, one
year.
17. Champion Jersey Cow. Ribbon
and Calgary Herald, one year.
18. Champion Dairy Shorthorn Cow
Ribbon and Vancouver World, one
jenr.
19. Best registered butl—$5.00
cash, W. B. Worden.
Sheep
21. Best Rani (any age or breed).
Ribbon and Vancouver World, one
year.
M. Best Ewe (any age or breed).
Ribbon and North West Farmer, one
ye»r.
Swine
31. Champion Brood Sow. Ribbon
and $5.00 goods, McCreery Bros, and
$4.00 cash, Farmers' Institute; second, $2.00 cash, Farmers' Institute,
32. Champion Boar. Ribbon and
North West Farmer, one year.
33. Brood Sow wilh litter. First,
$5,00 cash by J, Brenna,, and the
Manitoba Free Press, one year. Second,$3.00 (feed) Cranbrook Trading
Co.
School
41. Pupil making most points in
School Exhibits, S5.00, Kink Mercantile Co. (goods).
42. Pupil making most points in
sports. $5,011 mitt, Moftat, Variety
Store.
43. A shield will be given by Mr. T
dill to be held lot one year by tb,'
East Koolenay schoolroom making
the best display in Nos.-ll, 11, 18 and
44 combined.
44. For girl under twelve, tatting
most pri/os in school section—Some
ntr hand bug, Miss McLeod.
Fruit
51. Boat plate ot apples grown within 25 miles ot Cranbrook. 13, Elwell,
$5.00.
Amateur Photography
57. Best Display. $5.00 cash. Royal
Bank.
5H. St\ heal photos on Vclos. Paper
(mounted). First, $5.00 goods. Second
$3.00 goods.   Ilealtie Mm|iliy Co.
M. SI* hest photos on Solio paper
(mounted). First $5.00 goods, Second
13.00 goods,   llciittie Murphy Co.
71. Best White Orpington Cock,
Cup.   A. M. Beanie, Waldo.
72. Champion Wyandotte Cock. Ribbon and $3.0(1 cash, .1. Levett.
73. Best pen (irpingtotui, Rocks,
Leghorns or Rhode Island Reds. Hib-
$1,011. Second $2,011, Farmers' instil-
bon and $10.00 cash, Nelson News.
71. Dressed Poultry and Eggs, 'rite
Cmnbrook Poul.try Association will
double lite first |ili/e iu oaoh class oi
section IS tllftl    bus  tc than two
en trios.
75.   For   the   best paii of Leghorns
I shown,   from    E. II.     Slater's eggs,
1918—Silver cup, E. ll. Slater.
and    location of
trliiy    wero    rais,-
Wattsburg Lumber
Ranch Review, on.'
nods,   Ilalsall & t
laud ou   which
Shield   $50.00,
and Farm and
ar.  Second SHI.
LINKS WILDERNESS
70.   For   Ibe     best
pair       ot   Pit
(lames     shown,   anv
bleed—$6.00,
Campbell and Playle,
77.   For  Ibe     best  (
ame cock, am
breed—$5.(It), Campbell
nnd Playle.
81. The member ol tlu' Farmers'
Institute taking most prizes. First
tlte.
Pen ot Wyandottes. $5,110, Rev. W.
E.  Dunham.
Fancy Work
Poultry
• 1. Plymouth Rocks, lirst male.
Ribbon. Cranbrook Poultry Association.
02. Plymouth Rocks. Deal female.
Ribbon, Cranbrook Poultry Association.
(8. Orpingtons. Best Male. Ribbon
Cranbrook Poultry Association,
64. Orpingtons. Best Female. Ribbon.   Cranbrook Poultry Association.
05. Leghorns. Best Male. Ribbon.
Cranbrook Poultry Association.
06. Leghorns. Best Female. Ribbon.
Cranbrook Poultry Association.
«7. Wyandottes. Best Male, llrbbon.
Cranhrook Poultry Association.
68. Wyandottes. Best Female. Ribbon.   Cranbrook Poultry Association.
60. Rhode Island Reds. Best Male.
Ribbon. Cranbrook Poultry Association.
70. Rhode Island Reds. Best Female.  Ribbon.  Cranbrook Poultry Ass-
83. Members of the Women's Institute only. Set of Lady's Underwear
3 pieces, with cotton crochet trimming. First. $5.00, Second, $3.00
Third $2.00. Women's Institute.
81. Best display Fancy Work. First.
An American Beauty Electric Iron by
the Northern Electric and Manufacturing Co. and $5.00 Royal Bank.
Second. Lethbridge Herald, one year.
OLD VI'Ko.N   TELEGRAPH LINE
MOST REMARKABLE ON THE
CONTINENT
I    THE KEJF LUXURY
Farm laborers an* or win* wanted
by Mr. I'lark, oi Fln-dltty, Dim., Inn
Uie chanced arc ">;•' lhe places are
all filled, Tor lu* advertised a riding
cultivator, an umbrella when tho sun
was Imi, sterilized foe water to
drink, and a supply ot ice cream
every other day. A sunshade, with
ice cream and sterilized ice wain,
would make life on Uu* farm a perpetual Sunday school picnic. h is
true lhat English housekeepers advertise many shillings a week and
beer, ba1 this is a temperance age,
and lhe including of beer in a contract ntfgM lead to trouble wilh
strictly Interpreted laws regarding
manufacture and saU*. lie watei
sterilized, and perhaps ft Hastings
sanitary drinking cup, would lie
Cooking
ill. Hesi 2 loaves bread baked from
Pride of Alberta or U. and K. flour.
First, $5.00 (flour) Cranbrook Trading Co. Second, $2.00 (flour) Cranbrook Trading Co.
To Members     of   Women's Institute
Only.
n. Layer Cake. First, $3.00, Second. $2.00, Third $1.00. Women's
Institute.
03. Six Tarts. First, $2.00, Second
$1.00.   Women's Institute.
0i. Two Pics with upper and lower
crust. First $2.00, Second $1.00.
Women's Institute.
95. For thc best display fruit canned in Kconomy jars, 1 dozen quarts
Economy jars complete with caps and
clamps. Kerr Glass Manufacturing
Co., through Ward and Harris.
96. For the best display of vegetables canned in Economy jars, 1 dozen
quarts Kconomy jars complete -with
caps and clamps. Kerr (Mass Manufacturing Co. through Ward A- Harris
07. For the best display of meal
and fish, canned in Economy jars, \
do/en quarts l-'.eonoiny jars complete
with caps and    clamps.   Kerr Glass
Maniifaclurinj; Co., through Ward and
Harris.
08. Two loaves bread, made from
Dgihie's Flour—First, 1 barrel of
Hour; second, 1-2 barrel of flour,
third, l-l banc! of Hour, lra Manning.
!>!>. If ihe flour used in the loaves
taking the lirst pri/c in section 85,
Class 1, was purchased from lra K.
Manning, he will give Uie winner
•s^ods to the value of $15.00.
100. If the Hour used in the loaves
taking thc second prtae in Section 35,
Class 1, was purchased from Iia H.
Maiming, be will give the winner
goods to lhe value nf $7.HO.
Dairy Products
tOO, Given by the R. C. Dairymen's
Association, llest gallon of milk exhibited in one half gallon and two
quail or (mil quail bottles. First
prize, spring dial scale and sanitary
milk pail, second prize, spring dial
seale, third pri.e, sanitary
milk pail. FoUt entries or
no third prize, three or mi
•cennd. Winners to become members
of the B. C Dairymen's Association
before reiviving prize.
101. lies! Display of butter in crocks
Illicit, nr prints In wergh al least 5
lbs. First $15.00, Second $10.00. H.
W. Supple, Manager Imperial Hank.
Grains and Grasses
102. drain in sheaves noi over 0 in.
in diameter to become lhe property
of thc Association. First $10.00'cash
Dr. F. W. Green and 10.00 cash O.
W. F. Carter. Second $5.00 in stencil
outfit (>r wall paper by Ross Carr.
103. Best collection of clover aud
fodder grasses shown by a member of
tho Farmers' Institute. First $1.00.
Second, $2.00.   Fanners' Institute.
111. Collection of Vegetables and
roots including potatoes shown by a
member ol the Farmer's Institute.
First, $4.00; second, $2.0*0, Farmers'
Institute.
112. Collection of vegetables. First
Second U'lhbridge Herald, one year.
Silver Modal.   Hnuk   of    Commerce.
113. Tho best collection ol (arm products raised In Kast Kootenay with
■ statement   of the  altitude, nature
Smithi-rs, II.C,, Aim. Jii -This new
(own is to he connected with lhe old!
Yukon telegraph line that runs notb-
i-ard for 2500 miles from Asherofl to
Dawson, in Ihe heart of the Yukon
Territory, and on into Alaska, It is1
the most remarkable telegraph line)
on lhe continent and it has no parallel anywhere.
It links wilderness with civilization- What thrilling tales it has carried lo the outside world-stories of
fbrtunes dug from thc frozen creeks
or tho North, 0f millionaires made
overnight, of wild stampedes to now
el doradoes, of perilous ventures and
golden discoveries, of Ulysces
triumphant. Over Ibis single far-
flung strand of wire lias been licked
c*f news of death on lhe trail, of disappointed hopes, of miners who pei-
tficd in freezing blizzards or were
•swept lo their doom in treacherous
rapids of northern, rivers in their mad
rush towards the golden lure of thc
North.
rtis telegraph line has told romance, tragedy, triumph and despair
It bas carried many a slory of life
and love, death, crime and new-found
fbrtune. It has run the gamut of
bAiman emotions. It has told of her-
ac exploits of the Northwest Mounted Police, who guard the outposts of
EmpiVe, of pursuit of outlaws, and
thc subduing of wild Indians. It has
told or the peaceful conquests of thu
Hudson Day Company, of the trek of
hardy piom-rs into the northern val-
'■eys, day afler day it has sung tho
epic of the North   over its   sagging
wires.
l*b this sensory nerve that streches
id long a way and listen for news
worth telling, Amundsen confided the
fact that he had threaded the North-
West passage, lhe goal of explorers
sine*' the days of tin* stout-hearlcd
Ilendrik Hudson, lie mushed overland across lhe neck nf Alaska frorrJ
bis last winter quarters al the
mouth of the Mackenzie river to
Eagle City, where he told his story
to the Yukon telegraph 'and trudged
back to his ship.
This line will tell of Slcfar.KOn and
Jc Canadian expedition to unknown
terihcrn lands. He expects to send
couriers' to its farthest outpost each
January. It will tell again-of Aniun*-
ds.*n when he fares forth next year
mer tlie icy wastes of the Arctic on
his contemplated three-year drift.
The Yukon telegraph has in thc
main followed old Indian trails. Its
Mgtniling was the line started north
tft link Amerioa "with Europe by
leans of a cable across Boring Strait
m gigantic project that was abandon*-
ed in ISO" when thc broken Atlantic
cable was repaired. This work, in
charge of Col. Hulkley of the Cnitcd
Slates Army, cost over $3,000,000.
Col. Hulkley left a completed line
into Northern Hritish Columbia1
spending his lasl winter in the fertile
valley that now bears his name.
In tin* feverish days of 1808, when
gold had been found in tlie North, the
Yukon extension wns begun and later
built to the Arctic circle nnd beyond,
a monument to the Empire that pro-j
lecls its own, no matter how far.
afield they stray. Thc line has never
paid and costs the Dominion Government approximately $80,000 a year to
maintain. Hut Ihis is regarded as'
money well spent. j
Along this thin thread of wire
which records the conquest ol the
last great wilderness of North America, arc strung the huts ot tbe opcr-[
ators Irom 20 to 50 miles apart. Thc
operator's chief duties arc the test-,
ing of the line and its repair when it
breaks, for through the mountains,
avalanches, blizzards nnd landslips,
wage constant warfare ou tlie telegraph. Falling trees lay the wire
low, floods wash away the poles at
stream Crossings, and bush (ires bum
them down.
Heroic service is required by the
lonely men In this string of cabins,
who, rarely see another human [ace
except twice a year when packers j
come with supplies. When their telegraph key fails to get a response
from the next station, they set forth
wilh their repair outfit to mend the
break. They are quick to meet tlie
attack of tire, flood or avalanche,'
traveling hy trail or canoe iu summer, and by snowsho:* in winter, intent only on keeping open Ihis tentacle
of intelligence lo ils farthest north-'
ern outpost.
(1)01) PONIES FOR SALE.'
Cheap. Apply Herald Ollice.
Phone iB. tt
the farm,   a beverage not   surpassed
by any invent Ion*, oncienl oi modern.
Their js notbiiii; said about a fan,
but lhat would be only a small item.
There is hen* a chance for an Inventor io attach a rolarj fan to the
riding cultivator or harcslei, thai
ibe cool breeze might percolate
through the whisU*rs of the operating
farm hand. Invention^ has not been
turned Inward making his life comfortable, but competition enables him
lo he insistent. It is almost impossible to conceive of a more felicitous situation Ihan thai of a man in
overalls perched on the automatically curved scat of the cultivator, the
draft from a rotary fan loving wilh
his lilacs1, an umbrella shading him
from the sun, and a picnic cone of lee
cream' iu his disengaged hand It
may be that even this fascinating
picture will ' nol tempt men away
from th,. wailing laud where they ca^
have farms ,,f iheir own. When Q
man gets a farm he Hunks he should
he able tn go out into the market
and get a surplus man lo work il—
lhal a scarcity of such surplus men
<an i,e overcome by ;l tempting umbrella and a few ice cream cones.
Why should any man pxpeoi to find
another wailing to be hired?
A human surplus, like anv other
surplus, is an abnormal condition.
We can bring it about iu Canada,
and probably will do sn. bj abnormal laws am! abnormal administration. Hut we will need h, applv tho
pressure nf neccssltj before those
earliest on the ground can live comport ably on ihe labor nl Inter arrivals. In the meantime Ihere i*.
nothing better Hmn tin* persuasive in
vilh Uu* vaunted ndvnnUiRe of the
bulk)   plougi, DVBr ,) ],]  i,;,!,,,     Ilf
Huencc nf |cu cream and umbrellas,
walking wilb    one fool in the      fnr-
rnv\.
wwwww*
•••#>——#—————
MMMMIMMMIMMM
COMING!
CRANBROOK
ONE NIGHT ONLY
MON.
SEPT.
Under the Finest Canvas
Theatre Ever Constructed
ALABAMA
Bigge.'tand Best Colored
Show Ever Presented
40 People 40
20 Piece Band 20
Augmented
Orchestra
10 Comedians 10
12 Singers 12
8   Dancers    8
Grand First Part
Lavishly Mounted
Gorgeously Costumed
Big Free Parade
On Streets at 3 p.m.
—————————
——————————
International Polo
Tournament
Daily Games between Canadian
and American Teams
$35,000 in Premiums &
Purses
Competition open to the World
The First National
Indian Congress
Approved by U. S. Government
SPECIAL CASH PRIZES
FOR THE CHILDREN
72<1 Seaforth Highlanders Band
$500 Cash Prizes for Better Babies
"Custer's Last Fi&ht" Nifthtly
A thrilling reproduction of this famous
battle with 500 Indians uiul 200 Soldiers
COMBINATION AUCTION
SALE OF LIVE STOCK ON
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
Fireworks Display Every Nifiht
Individual Farm Exhibit Prizes
$20,000 Race Program
Seven Races Daily
Poultrymen'sMeetinfe Wednesday
Dairymen's Meeting Thursday
Broadsword Battleson Horseback
EXCURSION RAILROAD RATES
C For illustrated Daily Program and
Premium List, address 505 Chamber of
Commerce Building :: Spokane, Wash.
The
Original
and
Only
Genuine
RHEUMA'
FOR ALL FORMS or i
RHEUMATISM   !
Uight away—the first dny you start to
take RHEUMA-the Uric Acid poison begins to dissolve and leave the sore joints
and muscles. Its action is little less than
magical.   50 cents a bottle—guaranteed.
Judge Barhorst of Ft. Loraime, Ohio,
•ays: "After treatment by three doctors
without result, I was cured of a very bad
esse of Rheumatism, by using two bottlet
•I RHEUMA."
Ili-altH- MurjHty Co.,  Ltd., Agent*
P.  BURNS & CO., LTD.
Wholesalers and Retailers
Special this week
FRESH KILLED SPRING
LAMB
PHONES 10,77, and 311
All our Meats are Fresh and Government Inspected
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ********************* '
****************************************
Imperial Bank ol Canada
HEAD OFFICE:  TORONTO
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED        - . SI0.000,000.00
CAPITAL PAID UP - . . 6,025,000.00
RESERVE AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS   -      8,100,00000
D. R. VV1LK1E, President.
HON. ROBERT JAFFRAY, Vice-President
Accounts of Corporations, Municipalities. Merchants
Fanners and Private Individuals invited.
DraftB and Letters of Credit issued available in any part of
the world.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT- Special attention
given to Savings Hank Accounts. Deposits of 11,00 and
upwards received and interest allowed front date of deposit.
Cranbrook Branch: H. W. SUPPLE, Mgr.   I
*******************************************
An Opportunity for a
Reliable Man in
Cranbrook
We havo some Gilt Edged Original Prairie Townsites
(not sub-divisions), which appeal to the intelligent investor, and we intend to put on an extensive advertising campaign in CRANBROOK as soon as we complete arrangements with a 6rst-class man, who can follow up inquiries.
We mail the district thoroughly. The ri^bt man who will
apply himself can make this a permanent and very protit-
able position. Apply H. W. McCurdy, 502 Temple Build-
ing, Toronto.
J
Royal Hotel
WM. STEWARD, Prop.
Well Furnished, Steam Heated Rooms
Everything New, Clean and Bright
Best of Service and Cuisine in our Dining Room
Only White Help Employed
Large, Spacious Parlors and Comfortable Rest
Rooms for Ladies
All the Comforts of Home.   Family Trade Uiven
Special Attention
Billiard Room in Connection
Cranbrook,
B.C.
• V*^VW* V*»W WWWW ^
A  Good   Home
is what is dear to every man. A home
is where Peace, Comfort, Contentment,
and Plenty is found, That is thu reason
men throughout British Columbia, when
"Cranbrook" is mentioned think of the
provisions Job. Brault has made for au
ideal home at the
Canadian Hotel
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
Incorpfirateti 1W,!»
HEAD OFFICE      -     MONTREAL, QUEBEC
Capital Paid Up $11,500,000        Reserve $13,500,000
II. 8. HOLT, President      K. I.. PEASE, General Manager
Accounts of Firms, Corporation.* and Individuals solicited.
Out. of town Imeiiiesn receives every attention.
BAVISQ8 DEPARTMENT—Pepoaltrol $1.00 and upwards received
ami Interest allowed at current rale.   No formality or delay in
withdrawing,
A General Hanking Business transai ted.
Cranbrook Branch : T. B. O'CONNELL, Manager
************ ********************************* THB   OHANBHOOK    HERALD
News of the District
$♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«
ELKO
(By Fred Roo).
The special train (.' 2, of the geol-
Ogical congress stopped at Klko an
Wednesday ami visited the Klk river
iiinynn. Tliey were greatly Impressed witli tin* natural resources surrounding Hie old historic burg, ami
they saw tracks that would make tolg
Same hunters load up and keep their
weather eye open, but tliey saw no
signs of the water works coming into
town. A liis German, whose Kaiser
William willed at bnlli ends, said
Klko was lhe most picturesque place
he liiul visited. The train pulled Into Klko at ti a.m. ami ono of the
patty blew a, penny whistle and thc
wholo bunch rose to tlu* call like n
trout tn a fly. Jim TWstlcbcak
said it wns lhe highest thing that
had struck town since -loins Bros,
circus slopped nn their way to Van
ciiuver.
Harry l'cltct, of Medicine Hat,
wite and sou, came in from t'ran-
lirnok, where th.'y had been visiting,
and led for Kalispcll in their motor.
They will visit (.lacier Park and return via Lethbridge.
Mis. !•'. Roo, of Roosville, is visiting Elko and Kernie this week.
This week hns heen line weather for
llie sweet ciini, nr if you have im
iiiim, Ihis is .ureal weather fur the
nasturtium crop.
IU. n. Miildletoii, of lhe agriuultur-
al department, was down to Baynes
Lake lasl week looking into the ro*
port, circulated hy snme member ol
the Royal Seed Planting Society,
that, sfiinllowcrs produced the pip.
Dr. Poster, of Gateway, the' government veterinary surgeon, and his
brother trom Yorkshire, seventeen
miles from England, wbo is visiting
the doctor, visited the Klk river canyon ami Roosville Kails this week.
13. .1. Palol) and Mr. I'mueroy, of
Nelson, me looking over the Tobacco
Plains country, and intend starting a
migar refinery.
Mr. .lohiisoii and son, Allen, of the
mail service, Calgary, nre. visiting
Klko this week.
It is bad form to complain about
torrid weather in August. August
was Invented lor that purpose,
It pays to advertise it you know
how. Continued advertit-ring breeds
confidence.
The Green banquet will be held in
cither Klko or Kemie. Wattsburg
and Cranhrook are in the discard.
Dig Hill Murdock, tbe Tobacco
Plains booster, came up from King-
stone and left for Calgary on Friday.
Clergymen arc also going to take
an active pail in tbe good roads
work in our fair province, Jim
Thistlebeak says that ev<*u tin*
straijj;bl and narrow oaths need to he
draped occasionally.
Mr. and Mrs. K. Cooper, of Gallo-
uav, arc spending iheir honey-moon in
Klko.
treasurer; and an executive committee composed ol Frank Callt'iwlcr,
i>. Simmons, James Compton, W. .1.
Uttlejohn, W. 11. Kent and 0. J',
VYigcn were- elected. The enterprise
is receiving the hearty co-operation
of all residents and every indication
points tu Crcston's first fair being a
huge success.
Lieut.-Col. Cooper, ol Wynmdel, was
a visitor in town on Monday.
R. s. Hcvau and Fred G. Utile
will go through to Cranbrook tomorrow by automobile Tbey will
Ik* the first over the new government
road that connects Creston with
Calgary. George Huscrolt, foreman
in charge, expects to hnve the road
completely finished by the cud of
this week.
Campbell DQW is occupying the teller's cage at the Canadian Hank of
Commerce.
'I'hc public school will not open lor
two weeks yet, owing tn the new addition not being completed.
Krickson ranchers are shipping 300
crates of tomatoes and cucumber
daily.
BAYNES LAKE
The Baynes Lake Trading company's store on the main street was
closed last week alter a meeting of
Ihose interested in the concern.
Mr. Mo ran, of tlw Gmit Northern
section bouse has l>een transferred to
Kernie.
All tbe oats are now in. It was a
small crop owing to poor seed.
On Thursday tho EH«) Anglicans
gave llieir Sunday scbool a most enjoyable picnic to Waldo, and the
same day Mrs. Nutt, of Mayncs
school, returned from tlu* recent
Strathcona Trust course In physical
training, recently held at the Nelson
center,
The I lay lies baseball youngsters
have been quite lively of late and
have taken a series of beatings with
exemplary constancy and patience.
The Adolph Lumber company has
put up a tine lumber dry loading shed
on tin- Canadian Pacific rallwiay siding, lately installed. Samuel Morrow
has ahlv conducted the erection,
which is 180 ft. by 10 ft.
ll, Adolph, solicitor, of Brandon,
Man., is paying a visit to his brother, K. Adolph.
Dr. Lash and family, of Waldo, left
for England today.
A project is i.n hand for running a
cattle ranch on the free ratine obtainable botwoou Baynes and Klko,
whicb, given Oapablo local management, should prove a very remunerative investment, with winter feed
provided on Irrigated lands near.
A school benefit ball is to be given
by the ladies of Baynes in the
Adolph hall on Friday. The well-
known Baynes Lake archestra, whicb
bas lately been strengthened by tht
accession of two new members, is engaged. Ice creams and bouquots will
be in evidence.
CRESTON
Al a largely attended inwting ol
the citizens of Creston and surrounding district on Saturday evening lo
the Auditorium it was decided to
hold (l fruit, vegetable and poultry
show on a date lo be decided on
later, Walter V, .Inckson was elected   president; W.    Ilenlb, secretary-
INVERMERE
(Special correspondence).
Tho first three days in Soptemlier
are to be gala ones for the Windermere District as within there limit
there will he held the annual exhibition nnd tie District Horse race
ineef.
The prize list lor the exhibition
•ets out thnt there will be. three
thousand dollars in awards beside
many handsome cups and special prizes given to, the successful competitors. This will be the third annual
exhibition which has been held. Tho
two former ones were great successes
iu demonstrating what can lie produced In this part and tho prospects are
that this will distance its predecessors, it is diuYrent from the ordinary modern fair in that there will be
ttt special attractions and side shows
to draw, thc show will be an exhibition of agricultural displays nnd
handicrafts only and solelv.
During the last two days of the lair
tin* race meet will be held for the
rixth time. This year it will be on
the half mile oval adjoining here, The
evi-nls will he under the Canadian
Racing rules with Mr. W. Holden and
Mr. Harry Drew in the judges stand,
'flu* prixes include some very valuable oflerings ranging from twenty
ive dollars to one hundred and lift \
for first money. Tiie races will be in
tbe afternoon and there will Ik* six
twents in each session.
A general meeting of tlie Windermere District Hoard of Trade will be
i*'ld on Friday evening when amongsf
tfther matters whieh will come ul
for discussion arc the various subject?
which it may be deemed advisable t<
place in thc form of suggestions before tbe convention of the Associated
Boards of Trade of Eafctcrn British
Columbia on the lilth proximo. Il
is likely that thc delegation Irom
here will cross thc Selkirk Mountains
to Kaslo where thc convention meets.
The route to be chosen In that event
will be by way of Wells Pass to tb
Kootenay Lake.
Another victim of drowning might
have saved his life if be hnd in earlier days learned how to make a few
strokes in tlw; art of swimming. This
was the case when Mr. Chas. IL
Baker, lately of Spokane, Wash., was
drowned in sight of his friends and
within tin feet ot the river hank.
Tin* death of Mr. Baker marks one of
tbe lirst fatal accidents whioh have
occurred in this locality on the construction of tbe Kootenay Central
branch of the Canadian Pacilic railway. From the report of eyewitnesses it appears that Mr. Baker,
who was the loreman oin Messrs.
Burns and .Ionian's pile driver, was
stooping over to measure the height
of the water in thc Columbia river,
when be lost bis balance. He was
then about ten feet from tbe river
bunk and about forty feet from bis
fellow workmen. Had be been able
to swim a few strokes he could have
reached the hank, or had he known
tlie art of floating be could have been
readily rescued. Apparently not
knowing cither he was unable to save
himself and before help could reach
him be had sunk finally to the bottom. At least one attempt to rescue was made when a workman pursued the drowning man down thc
river, riding alter htm on a pile. He
got within about six feet of Mr. Bak-
er before the latter finally sank. It
appears that Baker came but recently
from Spokane to act as foreman on
the pile driving gang. No trace can
lie found of relatives, though it is
understood he has a wife living in
San Francisco. He was a large
man, weighing when stripped In the
neighborhood of two hundred ami
forty pounds, with a chest expansion
of forty-five inches. He was about
forty years of ngc. In spite ot
every effort possible to recover thc
body, It was only recently recovered.
It was then in such u state that Immediate burial was a necessity. In-'
terment was made in the Union
cemetery at Windermere.
WARDNER
(Special correspondence).
Mr. Itoger   Lund left on Wednesday
for Medicine Mat, where he lias scoured a position   with the Western Canada Lumber company.
Tbe show entitled "Pa's Picnic,"
was put on at the opera bouse Wednesday night and created plenty of
amusement for the large attendance.
Thu receipts went to lhe benefit of
tbe junior ball team.
Mrs. Stayley arrived to join her
husband. the Rev. Stayley, on
Thursday before leaving for their
home in Chicago.
I{. II. Bohart was a Kernie visitor
on Thursday of last week.
.1. D. McBride and party of friends
motored to town on Friday.
Mr. .lohn Lawson. of Morrissey
Mines, was in town Friday on business.
Thc senior hall team intends going
to Kernie ou Monday, September
1st, after the big money.
Mr. Graham Donaboo had the misfortune to fall from his horse on
Monday, confining him to his bed. We
trust bis recovery will be rapid. Dr.
Davis is attending to his injuries.
Pete Lucler returned home on Monday after some days spent in and
around Kamloops.
Miss Verle Martin left on Sunday
morning for her school at Moyie, B.
C. This is her first school and we
hope she is more than successful.
Mr. K. Lucler left Sunday lo
visit with friends near the coast.
.lack Wright was a Cranbrook visitor on Monday.
Chief ol Police Miuty, of Kernie,
was in town Kriday on official business.
The senior hall team visited Kernie
on Thursday afternoon and played a
six inning game tliat was called on
account of darkness by I'mpire Kastner. 'fhe result: Fernie, runs, 4;
Wardner, runs, 5. Batteries, Fcrnie,
Crowley and llovan; Wardner, Davis
and Stinson. The game was very
fasf.
Mr. Geo. Powell, ot Cranbrook, Is
wiling P. Lund's residence for ihe
installation of a few gasoline lamps.
Wardner has been in darkness since
the power plant burned.
Mrs. Sprague, Mrs. ('has. Drown
and Mrs. Geo. Lessclyoung were
Cranhrook visitors on Tuesday.
Peter Lund, manager of the
Crows Nest Pass Lumber company is
'n Chicago and points east on a
business trip.
Tom Hedigan and Arthur Lund
were in town Sunday to see tbe hoys
play ball.
School re-opened Monday morning,
with a fairly large attendance. Miss
Mnnkley bas charge of all divisions,
the Irustecs being unsuccessful ii
gel ting a second teacher. They hnpp
to fill the vacancy in a few days.
The Crows Nest Pass Lumber company has completed the installation
of a new set of cash carriers in
tlicir store.
Wardner agains defeated the Fernie
team on lhe local diamond Sunday
afternoon. The score was twelve to
one in the seventh inning, Fernie
having to quit at this period and
catch a train. Tnis is three straight]
wins for the home team against
Fernie, and Wardner (wis proud of
the fine aggregation wearing tho
Wardner uniform. Batteries: Vftird-
ner, Davis and Stinson; Fernie, Crowley and Ho van.
otto Wisner was in Galloway Tuesday on business.
Mr. George Haywaid has sold bis
comforlablc little cottage, and will
move with his family to the coast in
a few days.
Mr. A. B. Fenwick, or Fort Steele,
came into town last Friday in his
motor ear.
Next Monday heing Lahor Day, aB
places of husiness will be closed lor
the day.
The regular monthly business mooting of the Ladies Guild was held in
tbe church last Wednesday afternoon.
PILE
You will find rallef In Zain-BiikJ.
It tun tha burning, stinging
pain, atopi bleeding-and bring*
ease. Perseverance,'witr) Zam-
Buk, mean* cure. Why nol preve
UlU7   MDrumU.gjA,Bt**
am buk
Tor All. £
TIE UNITED STATES TARIFF--
ITS EFFECTS ON BJ
(By C. M. Battle,   in Canada Lumberman.)
Should the present United States
tariff bill pass Scnute as it has pass-
eti the House ot itcpresentatives, il
will, I think, materially affect the
price of standing cedar timlicr in
iliis province and give a ninth broader market for cedur shingles, siding,
etc.
Along the Pacific const, cedar timber Is scarce except in Washington
and British Columbia. It Is being
out very fast iu Washington and it is
only a question of a short time before British Columbia will be furnishing
the bulk of thc shipments of cedar
lumber to the United States, especially if the present tariff bill passes.
Now as to fir lumber, the three
states of Washington, Idaho nnd
Montana will ship five times as much
common lumber to the Northwest as
British Columbia will ship to tho
Stales. This condition holds good
rtctber tbe tariff passes or not.
The principal murket for British
Columbia is in the great Canadian
Canadian North West, and taking
ttare of our local trade in this immediate section.
For the last few years
the       local       trade        hav       ab
sorbed from forty to fifty per
cenl. of tbe output of the mills, but
with the money stringency, building
will he entailed and naturally the
lumber business will he more or less
depressed until we are absolutely assured of a good crop in tbe North-
fest, ami also ont'il "*ao feel the ef-
tecls.of castor money In the Kast and
abroad. 'Ibe mills in British Columbia nt this time are producing more
lumber than thoy ate selling, and the
market is Bainowhnt depressed for
these reasons.
In addition to the local and Northwest trade, our export business is
increasing year by year. When the
Panama Canal is ready for, husiness
cfcxt year, if the tolls are rcasonnablq
it will do more to stimulate tbe lumber business than anything else. We
will then lie able lo lond a ship with
lumber of all grades, including culls
and shingles, and linn" a profitable
market by shipping to the different
points on the Atlantic coast in tho
United Slates and even lo points In
CanndV
As to standing limber, British Columbia is supposed to contain one-
half of the standing saw timber in
Ctanada, bul a large available timber
ia very much over estimated. It is
uot an easy matter at present to buy
good standing timber accessible for
logging, at a low or even a reasonable price, as limber is getting into
tbe bands uf the larger m anil fact m-
Hg concerns who arc able to hold it.
Wilh a few exceptions, (be price of
limber has nol only held its own,
but has materially advanced during
tile last two years. This advance,
however, has hardly begun, for Bri
tish Colunbia is no longer considered
as the jumping off place of the world
£* a region populated by Kskimos
and polar hears.
Vancouver already has three trans
continental railroads, and three more
are building and will be running into
Vancouver within the next two years.
Ill addition lo Ihis, two railroads
Wo building up through Vancouver
Island.
The forests of the Fast and South,
including the Southern pine, are being
depleted at an alarming rate, and
each year brings here an increased
number of lumbermen who have cut
their holdings in those sections and
are looking for standing timber in
order that tliey may continue the
manufacture of lumber, that vocation
ll life which ibey know and love so
well and lhat tbey may preserve the
spirit ol the woodsman which they
inherit (rom tfieir forefathers.
FRANK DEZALL
Agent tor
IMTERMATIOMW HARVESTER CO. S
MACHINERY, WACOM, AND REPAIRS
BICYCLES FOR SALE
BICYCLES REPAIRED
CEWERAL HLACK8MITHIHC
Shop rlicmo 00 lleaidence 40
CRANBROOK, B.C.
MACHINERY_F0R SALE
1 have the lollowlng machinery for
sale and in order to clear them out,
offer them at the prices helow, which
are about one-fifth the price that
now machinery would cost:
1 Chandler and Taylor firebox boiler, 6l"xl8' long. Pressure 80 lbs.
last II. 0. inspection, 48 h.p. Price
loaded on cars at McNelllie, near
Croston, D.C., J175.00.
1 Atlas Return tubular holler,
5fi"xM' long. Pressure 80 lbs. last
11. 0. inspection, 45 h.p. Price
loaded on cars at MeNeillie, near
Creston, B.C., J175.00.
1 refitted Atlas automatic tut-off
engine, H"xlG" stroke. Price at
Cranbrook, B. C, $200.00.
1 saw husk complete witb top saw
frame and mandrels and saws and
20 teet extension shaft, $250.00.
1 four saw edgcr with saws. Price
at Cranbrook, (200.00.
1 Hoyt planer and matcher, 24".
Price at Cranbrook, J100.00.
Also a quantity ot shafting, etc.
Apply to
THOS. W. LEASK
Elko, B. C.
FRANK  CARLSON
POOL CIGAR STORE
HANSON BLOCK
FIRST-CLA8S CIGARS AND
BILLIARD TABLE
Hiivt* a KiimiMit n.u-K-bnll Pocket Wl-
liurdrt.  *-' Bfl priso for next
IlijillPHl HGOrO
One Month Free
f hv imiiiiH of tin bXb Bonus Tuition Plan)
on n course uf UUARANTKED training
in Hiiiikk.'ci-iiiir, Shorthand, 1'entnani.hlii.
Typewrit ini: ami bi.nini.,H'i miliJecU at tlie
Auk for parUdulara and free booklet
RAYMOND V, KELLRY. Principal
Jonas Bullilinjf, North of I'lHt Office
Spokano
HARNESS AND STABLE
SUPPLIES
of nil kinds hero. Bridles,
bits, lmlters, collars, extra
ruins, os well iib whips,
Brushes, Comb.,. Blankets,
oto. If it is for n horse we
hnve it. And be assured no
mail order house gives ns
Kood values as we give right
here. Those who know will
tell yon so,
W. M. Park & Co.
EVEIIVTHINC FOR TIIE HORSE
CRANBROOK, B. C.
E. A. LEZERT
BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR
All kinds of Kepair Work
Get my ptices before you build
P. (). BOX 183
Headquarters for all  kinds of
Repairs
Satisfaction (jmiruntio.l
JOE   MARAPODI
The Shoe Specialist
Hotel International
Geo. l.tiNi;i*iiK. Proprietor
Situated at Ktngpgate, B.C., on
the Boundary Line, in a spot of
rare ecenic beauty and tlie pjtortB-
man'a paradise.
Headquarters for Com mer.
cial Men and Tourists
KINQSOATB       -       B. X
Electric Restorer for Men
Phosnhonol restores every nerve tn the body
H , to its proper temlon; restores
vim and vitality. Premature d*>cay and ail sexual
weakness averted at once. Phuiphoaol will
muke you a new man. Price JS a box, or two lor
tit. Mailed to any address, thaSoobeU Drag
Co., It. Catharines, Out.
For sale st Beattie-Murpby Co.. hU
Hotel Coeur D'Alene
Spokane, Wash.
Howard Rt. snd Trent Ave,
A NEW AND
MODERN
HOTEL
(KUROPEAN)
A mnilern equipped Cale st moderate
prices
Rates $1.00 and up per day
Our bus meets all trains
|    PROFESSIONAL CARDS
•(■anaMaBaaaMBBBaBa
THOMAS   P.  MBCREDY
{Successor to W. V. Quhd)
Barrister, Solicitor, and Notary
1'. U. Boi H5!l
CRANIiKOOK,  B.C.
HARVEY, McCARTER, MACDONALD
& NISDET
Barristers, Solicitors and
Notaries
Money to Limn
IMPERIAL BANK BUILDINC,  •  CRANM00K I. 0.
DRS. KING & QREEN,
Physicians and Surgeons.
OMce al KnUeict, Armstrong, ttt,
OFFICE HOURS s
Forenoons 1.00 to 10.0*
Afternoons - - ■ 9.00 to 4.00
Evenings - ■ ■ ■ 7.10 to I.M
rtumlaya ■ ■ ■ ■ 1.10 to   4.11
CRANBROOK :i    ll    ll    n    ». O,
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE   HOURS:
I to 12 a.m.
1 to  • p.m.
7 to   ft p.m.
Office In Hanson Block.
CRANBROOK -       •        - B. 0
Cranbrook Cottage Hospital
MATRRNITV   AND uBNERAL NURSING
Terms on Application
MBS. A. SALMON,
Phone 25!) Matron
I'. O. Box 8i5 Garden Are.
BC.  LAND SURVEYORS
McVITTIE    &    PARKER
Cranbrook and Fort Steele
IRRIGATION AND RAILWAY WORK
A SPECIALTY
**********************
J. Q. CUMMINGS
IRRIGATION ENGINEER
DOMINION AND PROVINCIAL LAND
SURVEVOB
' TeiVo".™ Cranbrook,B.C.
**********************
LAIDLAW & DE WOLF
Civil aid Wlalai'EafIntra
British Columbia Land Survtyors
CRANBROOK    ■     B. C.
W. R. Boattr, rua.nl Dlraetos
Cfubrook B.C
Phone 34tl P. O. Box 688
F. M. nACPHERSON
UNDERTAKER
Norbnry Ave., next to City Hal!
Day Phone 233 Night Phone 351
Frank Provenzano
Ganaral Merchante
Employment Aganta
CRANBROOK    •     B. C.
P.O. BOX 1(4 PHONE 144
Dr. de Van's Female Pills
A reliable French regulator: never fails. Then
pills are exceedingly powerful la regulating tha
generative portion of tlie female system. Kttuse
nil cheap imitations. Dr. «*)• Tan's art sold at
IR a linn, or three 'or |1U Mailed to any address,
TIM •oabell Uric Co., Bt. CMbarloH. Out
For wis «t Bcmtlf), Murphy 4 Co.,
The Coeur D'Alene Company
rRUPRlKTOKH
JABOB 00ETZ, President
HARRY F. BAER, Secretary
n-tf
For Sale
One Oxford EiiKino, 11x11. Price
$850,00. Miiy Iki soon at Benedict Skiing, ono utile ciist al
Mayook, B. C.
One Oxford Snw Carriage, complete with rack feed, 8 blocks,
:i post dogs. Price $250.00 al
Elko, B.C.
One Oxford Friction Feud, complete with cable and sheaves and
drive pulleys. Price $150.00, at
at Elko, B. O.
For further particulars apply
Leask & Johnson, Elko, B. 0.
STORAOB ROOM TO RENT at
reasonable rates—Apply Herald
Ollice.    Phone 18. tf
I CHAS. S. PARKER I
Bticeeaaor to P. T. P. I'EHKY
DRAYIHG AND
TRANSFERRING
AGENTS FOR _
| THE IMPERIAL OIL GO. I
ANO CALT COAL
*******
fSTAR CLEANING I
WORKS
QnotU called fornnd delivered.
Good work only.   Prompt
Servico
| Telephone No. 405 \
P. O. Box 793
Works : Armstrong Avo.
'**************'
The Home Bakery
Rmia-RT Frame, Prop.
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pics, and
Pastries of All Kinds
PHONE 87
Norbnry Ava.      Opp. City Hall
^^^       Cranbrook    Lodge,
Wr Reeular meetings oa
•"•paW^   the   third   Thursday
Visiting brethren welcomed.
F. B. Miles, W.M.
J. L. Cranston, Sec.
Cbbsoent Lodge No. 33
KNIQHTS "oT PYTHIAS
Cranbrook, B. C.
Meets   every   Tuesday at 8 p.m. a*
Fraternity Hall.
Aloe. Hurry, C.C.
V. M. Christian, K. of K.&S.
Visiting brethren   cordially Invited
to attend.
I.O.O.F., KEY CITY LODOE, No. 41
Meeta every Monday
night at New Fraternity Hsll. Sojourning Oddfellows cordially invited.
.1. H. Tiitnley, W. M. Harris,
N. O. Sec'y.
DURHAM ENCAMPMENT NO. 12.
I.O.O.F.
Meete first and    third Wednesdays
In eacb month.
A  cordial reception extended     to
visiting brothers.
Officers July 1st to December 81st.
W. M. Harris, Chief Patriarch
II. White, Scribe.
MAPLE LEAF REBEKAI1 LODOE
No. 19.
Meets every second and  fourth Wednesday at Fraternity Hall.
Sojourning   Rebekahs cordially Invited.
Sis. Maude Mickcnbotham, N.Q.
Sis. Ada llickcnbotham, Kit. Sec.
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS
COURT CRANBROOK, 8943
Meets In Carmen's Hall Second end
Fourth Thursday ot eacb month at t
p.m. sharp.
.1. Mcl.achlan, C.R.
I.. I'earron, Sec, Box 618.
Visiting brethren made welcome.
OVER SEAS CLUB.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 1st and Srd
Thursday every month at 8 p.m.
Membership   open   to British   cltl
teas.
E. Y. Brake, L. Pearron,
Prea. See.
Box 618
Visiting members cordially walcom
ed.
W y. Knr.F.a, Dirt.
Cranbrook Lodge
No. lots
Mart* every serond and
fourth Wedntwda* a 18
p. ru. iu Ro>al Black
KnlKlits' Hall, Bakrr
Btrwt.
II. 8. GaaatTT, nre.
ANCIENT    ORDER    OF   FORESTERS.
Pride ol Cranbrook   Circle, No. IIS,
Companions ot tne Forest.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 2nd aad Mb,
Thursday ot each montb at I
p.m. sharp.
Mrs. A. Laurie, C. C.
Mrs. A. E. Shaw, Secretary.
P. O. Box 442.
Visiting Companions cordially welcome.
LOYAL 0RAN0E
LODGE, No. 1871
Meets 1st ami 3rd Thursdays at 8 p.in. in Royal
Black Kn iglita oil lelanil
Hall, Baker Street.
Fskii. W. Swats, W.M.
K. L, Williams, Kev.
THE CRANBROOK POULTRY ANO PET
STOCK ASSOCIATION
rrtwiilnnl: C. R. Ha KIM1* HP
Mii'tH ivgnlmly tlm Unit J*'riiltt»f«iiinf «u*b
aottlb,
liifnrnuiiiiHt mi Poultry iimtiA'pt hu|)|)Hm1  .
Aililnwft tht* H«vii>titrv,
a. H.Aurrii,n.tiN;.ii
Ii you want satisfaction with
your washing; send
it to
MONTANA LAUNDRY
(Special pricei for family work.
CRANBRO0K-FERNIE
FARMERS' INSTITUTE
President: J. II. McGi.ims
Secretary: 8. Macdonai.ii
For information regarding lands
. ami  agriculture   apply   to the A)
♦ Secretary, Cranbrook, B. C.
f Meeting—
z       Every second Wednesday
********M*ML^a**tm*
CENTURY RESTAURANT
Opposite C.P.R. Station
THE    PLACE    TO     OET    A
QUICK MEAL ANr   ,
OOOD MEAL.
ROOMS ITO RENT. THK   CHANBBOOK    HE KALI)
News of the District
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»»»♦♦
ELKO
(By Fred Roo).
The special train C 2, of the geological congress stopped ttt Klko an
Wednesday ami visited the Klk river
canyon. The) were greatly Impressed with the   natural resources   Burr-
( ding   tin*   old historic   burg, and
they saw tracks that would malm lilg
game hunters load up and keep their
weather eye open, but tliey saw no
signs nt the water, works coming Into
(own. A his (leiinan, whose Kaiser
William willed at both ends, saitl
Klko was the most picturesque place
lu* had visited, Tin* train pulled Into Klko al li a.mi. ami one of the
.party blew ;v penny whistle ami the
whole hunch ratio to the call like a
inml iu a Hy. -'im Thisllehcak
said jt w.is tlu* biggest thiug that
had struck I own since .(ones Bros.
circus stopped on their way to Vancouver.
Harry lMtct, of Medicine Hat,
wife and son, came in from Crau-
■brook, where thoy had boon visiting,
nml left for Kalispcll in their motor.
They will visit Glacier Park and return via LolhbrWgc.
Mrs. F. Roo, of Roosville, is visiting Elko anil Fernie this week.
This week has heen line weather for
lhe sweet corn, or if you have no
corn, this is greal weather for tlie
tias! in t nun crop,
M. S. Middle I on, of the agricultural department, was down to Haynes
Lake hist week looking into the report, circulated by some member oi
lhe Royal Meed Planting Society,
that, sunflowers produced the pip.
Dr. Foster, ol Gateway, the government veterinary surgeon, ami his
brother (rom Yorkshire, seventeen
miles from England, who is visiting
the doctor, visited the Klk river canyon and Roosville Falls this week.
K. .1. Patch and Mr, Pomeroy, of
Nelson, are looking over the Tobacco
Plains country, and intend starting a
sugar refinery.
.\li. ilohnsoii and sou, Allen, of the
mail service, Calgary, are visiting
Klko this week.
It is had form to corn-plain about
torrid weather in August. August
was invented for that purpose,,
It pays lo advertise if you know
how. Continued advertising breeds
confidence.
The Green banquet will be held in
cither Klko or Pernio. Wattsburg
ami Crattbrook are in the discard.
Big Bill Murdock, the Tobacco
Plains booster, came up (rom Flagstone and left for Calgary on Friday.
Clergymen are also going to take
an active pail in the good roads
work in our fair province. .Mm
Thisllehcak says that even the
straight and narrow oaths need to he
dragged occasionally.
Mr. and Mrs. K. Cooper, of (lallc-
wav, are Bpendlng iheir honevmoon m
Klko.
treasurer; and au executive committee composed of Frank CalleiHler,
0. Simmons, -James ConipUm, W. .1.
l.ittlejohn, W. II. Kent and l). -J.
Wigen were elected. The enterprise
is receiving the hearty co-opevation
of all residents and every indication
points to Crcston's first lair being
huge success.
Llcut.-Col. Cooper, of Wynndel, wus
a visitor in town on Monday.
It. S. Itevan and Fred (i. l.ittli
will go through to Cranbrook tomorrow by automobile. They will
lit' tbe first over the new government
road that connects Creston with
t'algarv. George lluscroft. foreman
in charge, expects to have tlie road
completely finished by the end of
this week.
Campbell |)qw is occupying the
lei's cage at the Canadian Hank
Commerce.
The public school will not open
two weeks yet, owing to thu new
dition nol being completed.
Krickson ranchers are shipping
crates
daily.
300
of tomatoes    and cucumbers
BAYNES LAKE
The Baynes Lake Trading company's store on the main street was
closed last week after a meeting of
those interested in the concent.
Mr. Mforan, of tire Great Northern
section house has been transferred fn,
Fernie.
All tin* oats an* now in. It was a
small crop owing to poor seed.
on Thursday the Klko Anglicans
gave tlieir Sunday school -i most enjoyable picnic lo Waldo, and the
same day Mis. Null, ol Baynes
school, ret in ned (rom the recent
Strathcona 'Crust course In physical
training, recently held at the Nelson
center.
Tlie Haynes baseball youngsters
have been unite lively ot late and
have laken a series ot beatings with
exemplary constancy and patience
The Adolph Lumber company has
(nil up a flue lumber dry loading shed
on the Canadian Pacilic railway siding, lately installed. Samuel Morrow
has ably conducted the erection,
which is 120 (t, by 40 ft.
II. Vdolph, solicitor, o! Brandon,
Man-, is (laying a visit to his brother, F. Adolph.
Dr. I.ash and family, of Waldo, left
for England today.
A project is dn hand (or running n
cattle ranch on the Iree range obtainable between Baynes and Klko,
which, tu\en capable local management, should prove a very remunerative invest ment, wilh winter teed
provided on irrigated lands near,
A school benefit ball is lo be given
by the ladies of Baynes in the
Adolph hall on Friday. The well-
known Haynes Lake archestra, which
has lately been strengthened by the
accession of two new memliers, is engaged. Ice creams and bouquets will
be in evidence.
CRESTON
Al a largely attended meeting ol
the. citizens of Creston and surrounding district on Saturday evening lo
the Auditorium it was decided to
hold a, fruit, vegetable and poultry
show on a date to be decided on
later. Walter V. Jackson was elected   president; w.    Heath, secretary-
INVERMERE
(Special correspondence).
Thi* lirst three days in September
are to be gala ones for the Windermere District as within there limit
there will be held the annual exhibition and the District Horse race
meet.
The prize list (or the exhibition
•ets out tbat there will be three
thousand dollars in awards beside
many handsome cups and special prizes given to, the successful competitors. This will he the third annual
exhibition which has been held. The
two former ones were great successes
in demonstrating what can be produced in this part and the prospects are
that this will distance its predecessors. It is different from the ordinary modern tair in that there will he
tD special attractions and side shows
to draw, the show will be an exhibition of Agricultural displays nnd
handicratts only and solely.
During the last two days of the tair
tin* race meet will be held for the
rixth time, '('his year it will be on
the half mile oval adjoining here. The
events will he under the Canadian
Racing rules with Mr. \V. Ilolden and
Mr. Harry Drew in the judges stand.
The prizes include some very valuable ofterings ranging (rom twenty
he dollars to one hundred and lift*,
for lirnl money. The races will be in
the afternoon and there will Ik* six
ttents in each session.
A general meeting of the Windermere District Hoard of Trade will he
tf'ld on Friday evening when amongst
other matters which will come ul
for discussion are the various subjects
which it may he deemed advisable ti
place in the form of suggestions before the convention of the Associated
Hoards of Trade of Eafctern British
Columbia on. thc 24th proximo. ]t
is likely that thc delegation from
here will cross thc Selkirk Mountains
to Kaslo where the convention meets.
The route to he chosen In that event
will be by way of Wells Pass to th
Kootenay Lake.
Another victim ot drowning might;
have saved his life if be had in earlier days learned how to make a few
strokes in the art of swimming. This
was the ease when Mr. Chas. II.
Baker, lately of Spokane, Wash., was
drowned in sight of his friends and
within ten feet of the river bank.
The death of Mr. Baker marks one of
the lirst fata! accidents whioh have
occurred in this locality on the const met ion ot the K ootenay t 'entral
branch of the Canadian Pacilic railway. From the report ot eyewitnesses it appears that Mr. Baker,
who was the (oreman oni Messrs.
Hums and Jordan's pile driver, was
stooping over lo measure (he height
of the water in thc Columbia river,
when he lost his balance. He was
then about ten feet from tbe river
bank and about (orty feet from his
fellow workmen. Had he been able
to swim a lew strokes he could have
reached the bank, or had he known
tlte art of floating he could have been
readily rescued. Apparently m>t
knowing either he was unable to save
himself and before help could reach
him he had sunk finally to the bottom. At least one attempt lo rescue was made when n workman pursued the drowning man down the
river, riding atter him on a pile. He
got within about six feet of Mr. Baker before tbe latter finally sank. It
appears that Baker came but recently
from Spokane to act as foreman on
th? pile driving gang. No trace can
lie found ot relatives, though it is
understood he has a wife living in
San Francisco. He was a large
man, weighing when stripped in the
neighborhood of two hundred and
forty pounds, with a ohest expansion
of forty-five inches. He was about
forty years of age. In spite of
every effort possible to recover the
body, it was only recently recovered.
It was then iu such a state that immediate burial was a necessity, Interment was made In the 1'nlon
cumelery at Windermere.
WARDNER
(Special coirespoiidence).
Mr. Roger   Lund left 0n Wednesday
for Medicine Hat, where he has scoured a position   wilh the Western Canada 1.umber company.
The show entitled "Pa's Picnic,"
was put on at the opera house Wednesday night nnd created plenty o(
amusement for the large attendance.
The receipts went to lhe benefit of
the junior ball team.
Mrs. Stayley arrived to join her
husband, the Itev. Stayley, on
Thursday before lea1 ing tor tlieir
home in Chicago.
R. II. Bohart was a Fernie visitor
ou Thursday of last week.
.1. I). McBride aud parly of friends
motored to town on Friday.
■Mr. .lohn    Kawson.   of   Morrissey
Mines, was in town Friday on    business.
The senior ball team intends going
to Fernie on Monday, September
1st, after the big money.
Mr. Graham Donahoe bad the misfortune to fall from his horse on
Monday, confining him to bis bed. We
trust his recovery will be rapid. Dr.
Davis is attending to his injuries.
Pcli* Lucier returned home on Mon-
dtty after some days spent in and
around Kamloops.
Miss Wile Martin lefl on Sunday
morning for her school at Moyie, B.
C. This is ber first school and we
hope she is more than successful.
Mr. K. Lucier left Sunday to
visit with friends near the coast.
Jack Wright was a Cranbrook visitor on Monday.
Chief or Police Minty, ot Fernie,
was in town Friday on official business.
The senior ball team visited Fernie
on Thursday afternoon and played a
six inning game that was called on
account of darkness by Umpire Kastner, The result: Fernie, runs, 1;
Wardner, runs, 5. Batteries, Fernie,
Crowley and Hovan; Wardner, Davis
and Stinson. The game was- very-
fast .
Mr. Geo. Powell, of Cranhrook, is
wiring P. LUnd's residence for the
installation or a tew gasoline lamps.
Wardner has been in darkness since
the power plant burned.
Mrs. Spraguc, Mrs. Chas. Brown
and Mrs. Geo. Ix'sselyoung were
Cranbrook visitors on Tuesday.
Peter Lund, manager of the
Crows Nest Pass Lumber company is
'n Chicago and points cast on a
business trip.
Tom Hedigan and Arthur Lund
were in town .Sunday to see the bovs
play ball.
Sellout re-opened Monday morning
with a fairly large attendance. Miss
Monkley has charge of all divisions,
the trustees heing unsuccessful in
getting a second teacher. They hopo
lo till the vacancy in a few days.
The Crows Nest Pass Lumber company has completed the installation
or a new set of cash carriers in
their store.
Wardner agains defeated the Pernio
team on tbe local diamond .Sunday,
afternoon. The score was twelve to
one in the seventh inning, Fernie
having lo <|iiit at this period and
catch a train. Tnis is three straight)
wins for the home team against
Fcrnie, and Wardner feels proud of
tlie fine aggregation wearing tho
Wardner uniform. Batteries: W.ud
ner, Davis and Stinson; Fernie, Crowley and Ilovan.
Otto Wisner was in Galloway Tuesday on husiness.
Mr. George Haywaid has sold bis
comfortable little cottage, and will
move with his family to the coast in
a few days.
Mr. A. H. Fenwick, of Fort Steele,
came into town last Friday i,, his
motor ear.
Next Monday being Labor Hay, a'l
places of business will be closed (or
tbe day.
The regular monthly business meeting of the Ladies Guild was held in
the church last Wednesday afternoon.
PILE
You will find relief in Zam-Buk 11
It taut tht burning, •tlndno,
pain, stops bleeding arid bring*
ease. Perseverance,'with Zam-
Buk, means cure. Why not prove
this? Ma*«>%'£f,'—
am BuK
sorhed from forty to fifty per
cent, ot the output of the mills, but
with the money stringency, building
will lie c ntailed and naturally the
lumber business will he more or less
depressed until we are absolutely assured of a Kw,d crop in the -North-
test, ami also until wo teel the effects,of easier money in the Kast and
abroad. The mills in Hrilish Columbia nt this time an* producing moro
lumber than thoy nre selling, and the
market is samewhal depressed tor
these reasons.
In addition lo the local and Northwest trade, our export, business is
increasing year bv year. When the
Panama Canal is muiy for business
Cfcxt year, if the tolls are reason nab h]
it will do more to stimulate the lumber business than anything else. Wi
will then Ik* able to load a ship With
lumber of all grades, including culls
and shingles, and find a profitable
market by shipping to the different
points un the Atlantic coast in tho
United Slates and even to points in
Can a it V
As to standing timber, British Columbia is supposed to contain one-
half of the standing saw timber in
flinada, but a large available timber
is very much over estimated. It is
unt an easy matter at present to buy
good standing timber accessible for
logging, at a low or even a reasonable price, as timber is getting into
tlie hands of the larger manufactur-
■ji concerns who are able to hold it.
With a few exceptions, the price of
limber has not only held its own,
but has materially advanced during
the last two years. This advance,
however, lias hardly liegun, for Brt
tish Colunliia is no longer considered
as the jumping oil' place of the world
cr a region populated by Kskimos
and polar bears. ,
Vancouver already has three transcontinental railroads, and three more
are building aud will he running into
Vancouver within the next two years,
EM addition to Ihis, two railroads
ne building up through Vancouver
Island.
The forests of the East and South,
including the Southern pine, are being
depleted at an alarming rate, and
each year brings here an increased
number of lumbermen who have cut
their holdings in those sections and
are looking for standing timber in
order that they may continue the
manufacture of lumber, that vocation
B life which (hoy know and love so
well and that tliey may preserve the
spirit ol the woodsman whieh they
inherit from their forefathers.
FRANK DEZALL
Agent lor
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTS CO.'S
MACHINERY, WAC0NS, AM REPAIR8
BICYCLES FOR SALE
BICYCLES REPAIRED
CEN1RAIISLACKSWTHINC
Shop Flume 50 llcsiileni-e 40
CRANBROOK, B.C.
MACHINERYJOR SALE
I have the following machinery for
sale and ln order to clear them out,
offer tbem at thc prices below, which
are about one-fifth the price that
new machinery would cost:
1 Chandler anil Taylor firelioi boiler, 64"il8' long. Pressure 80 Ids
last II. C. inspection, 18 h.p. Price
loaded on cars at MeNeillie, near
Creston, B.C., $175.00.
1 Atlas Return tubular boiler,
5fl"xl4' long. Pressure 80 lbs. last
II. C. Inspection, 45 h.p. Price
loaded nn cars at MeNeillie, near
Creston, B.C., J175.00.
1 refitted Atlas automatic cut-off
engine, ll"xlfi" stroke. Price at
Cranbrook, B. C, $300.00.
1 saw husk complete with top saw
frame and mandrels and saws and
20 feet extension shaft, $250.00.
1 four saw   edger with saws,
at Cranbrook, $200.00.
1 Hoyt   planer  and matcher,
Price at Cranbrook, $100.00.
Also a quantity of shafting, etc.
. Price
24"
Apply to
THOS. W. LEASK
Elko. B. C.
E. A. LEZERT
BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR
All kinds of Repair Work
Get my piiccs before you build
P. 0. BOX 1SI1
Hcaili|iiarti'rs for nil  kinds of
Repairs
Satisfaction (iimraiiti ol
JOE   MARAPODI
The Shoo Specialist
Hotel International
Gko. LonoPBB, Proprietor
Situated at Kingsgate, B.C., on
the Boundary Line, in a spot of
rare scenic beautyaml tlie sportsman's paradise.
Headquarters for Commer.
clal Men and Tourists
KINOSOATE
B. X
HE UNITED STATES TiFF-
ITS EFFECTS ON D.C. LUMBER
(Hy C. s. Hal tie,   in Canada Lumberman.)
Should I be present United Slates
tariff bill pass Senate as it lias pass-
i'ii tlie llonsu of Representatives, il
will, I think, materially affect the
price of standing cellar timber in
B»is province und give a much broader market fur cedar shingles, siding,
ell'.
Along tlie Pac|flc coast, cedar timber is scarce except in Washington
und Hritish Columbia, It is living
(Sit very fast in Washington and it is
only a question ol a short time before British Columbia will be furnishing
tho hulk of the shipments of cedar
lumber to the United States, especially if the present tarift bill passes.
Now as to fir lumber, the three
stales of Washington, Idaho und
Montana will ship five, times as much
common lumber to the Northwest as
British Columbia will ship to tho
Slates. This condition holds good
rtctlirr lhe tariff passes or not.
The principal market for Hritish
Columbia is in the great Canadian
Canadian Nortb West, and taking
care of our local trade in tbis inuiic-
dlatc section.
Kor tho last lew years
the      local       trade       bus       ah
FRANK  CARLSON
POOL CIGAR STORE
HANSON BLOCK
FIRST-CLASS CIGARS AND
BILLIARD TABLE
IIllVi' ll gilM-Mif II.im-IiiiII I'nrki't Hit-
Hiic'Ik.   $2 "ill prigo for next
highest tii-oro
One Month Free
M>v nuxiiiN of tho sXb H.uiuh Tuition Plan)
on n course nf UUAKANTKED training
in Bookkeflplinr. Slmrthanil, Penmannhlit,
Typewriting nnd business subjects uttliu
Auk for piiriiriilur-t anil free booklet
R-WMONII v. KBLLBV. Principal
Jonu .<uiiMif.it-. North of Punt Office
Spokane
HARNESS AND STABLE
SUPPLIES
of nil kinds here. Bridles,
bits, ludters, collars, extra
reins, as well us whips,
Brushes. Comb.>. Blankets,
eto. If it is for n horse we
have it. And be assured no
mail order house gives as
good values as we give right
here. Those who know will
tell you so,
W. M. Park & Co.
EVERYTHING FOR T^IE HORSE
CRANBROOK, B. C.
Electric Restorer for Men
Phosphonol restores every nerve in tlie body
■    , -—to Ui proper tension ; restores
vim and vitality. Premature decay and allsttxuil
weakness averted at once. Fbusphaaol will
make you a new man. Price JB a boa. or two for
IS. Mailed lo any address. Tha BoobeU Drag
Co., St. C»th»rlne«, Ont.
For tale at Beattte-Murphr Co., Ml
Hotel Coeur D'Alene
Spokane, Wash.
Howard St. snil Trent Ave.
A NEW AND
MODERN
HOTEL
(KUROPEAN)
A moilorn equipped Cafe at moderate
prices
Rates II .00 snd up per day
Our Iiiib meets all I rains
I PROFESSIONAL CARDS I
■•■■imMBBtaaBiii
THOMAS   P.  MECREDY
(Successor to IV. P. Guhd)
Banister, Solicitor, and Notary
P. O. Box H59
CRANIlltOOK, B.C.
HARVEY, McCARTER, MACBONAID
& NISBET
Barristers, Solicitors and
Notaries
Money to Limn
IMPERIAL BANK BUILDING,  • CRANBROOK B. C.
Jl.il
DRS. KINO & OREEN,
Physicians and Surgeons.
OBct at RmMmm, Armstrong in,
OFFICE HOURS :
Forenoons • ■ ■. i.oo to 10.Ot
Afternoons • -
Evenings - - -
Sundays - - -
CRANBROOK   l
• 1.00 to   M0
• 7.10 to   I.M
- 1.10 to   4.M
II     II     H     I, O,
DR. P. B. MILES
DENTIST
OFFICE   HOURS:
I to lfl a.m.
1 to  I p.m.
7 to   I p.m.
Ollice la Hanson Block.
CRANBROOK -       -       - B.
Cranbrook Cottage Hospital
MATERNITY   AND  QBNERAL NURSINO
Terms on Application
MRS. A. SALMON,
Phone 25!) Matron
P. O. Box KI5 Garden Ave.
B C.  LAND SURVEYORS
McVITTIE    &    PARKER
Cranbrook and Fort Steele
IRRIGATION AND RAILWAY WORK
A SPECIALTY
**********************
J. O. CUMMINGS
irrigation engineer
dominion and provincial land *
surveyor ;;
p.°no?i«8 Cranbrook,B.C. i
**********************
LAIOLAW & DE WOLF
Civil sod nloloi Eniloeeri
Brilisli Columbia Land Surveyors
CRANBROOK    •     B. C.
W. R. Beattr. funeral Dlnetat
Cranbrook B.C.
Phone34U P.O. Box 585
F. M. riACPHERSON
UNDERTAKER
Norbury Ave,, neit to City Hal.
Day Phone 233
Night Phone 351
Prank Provenzano
General Merchants
Employment Agents
CRANBROOK    •    B. C.
r.0. 10X114 CH0NI144
Dr. de Van's Female Pills
A reliable French regulator: never falls. Then
pills are exceedingly powerful In regulating the
generative portion of the female system. Refuse
all cheap imitations. Dr. do Tan's are sold it
IK a box, or three 'or 111). Mailed to any address.
Thc .kw.Mll Drag Co., St. CMh»rlnt* Out
For Ml« at Beat.*, Murphy A Co.,
The Coeur D'Alene Company
PROPRIETOR.*.
JABOB OOETZ, President
HARRY F. BAER, Secretary
n-tf
For Sale
One Oxford Eiinino, 11 x 11.  Price
j    $1)50.00.   May Im seen at Beue-
ilit't Sicling,  one   mile east of
|    Mayook, B. 0.
One Oxford Saw Carriage, com-
.    plete with rack feed, 3 blockB.
8 post dons.   Price $250.00 at
Elko, B.C.
One Oxford Friction Feed, complete with cablo and sheaves and
drive pulleys. Price 1150.00, at
at Elko, B. C.
For further particulars apply to
Leask & Johnson, Elko, B. C.
STOR AO.E ROOM TO RENT at
reasonable rates—Apply Herald
Ollice.    Phone 18. tf
**********************
CHAS. S. PARKER I
Bficeesaor In p. T. f. PERRY
DRAYIHC AND
TRANSFERRING
. AGENTS FOR .
•;THE IMPERIAL OIL CO.-
ANO CALT COAL     *
I STAR CLEANING I
WORKS
floods called forand delivered, i >
flood work only.   Prompt
Service
i: Telephone No. 405:
P. O. Box 793
Works : Armstrong Avo.
[
SOCIETY AND CHURCH
DIRECTORY
Cranbrook     Lodge,
No. 34
A.F. & A. M.
m
UP Regular meetings oo
•"^flSPsTl^   the   third   Thursday
^W ol every mouth.
Visiting brethren welcomed.
F. B. Miles, W.M.
J. I,. Cranston, Sec.
The Home Bakery
Robert Fbamb, Prop.
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pl«, and
Pastries of All Kinds
PHONE 87
Norbnry Ave.      Opp. City Hsll
Crescent Lodge No. 33
KNIQHTS "oT PYTHIAS
Cranbrook, B. C.
Meets every Tuesday at 8 p.m. at
Fraternity Hall.
Alec. Hurry, C.C.
F. M. Christian, K. ol Il.&S.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited
to attend.
l.O.O.P., KEY CITY LODOE, No. 41
Meets every Monday
night at New Fraternity Hall. Sojourning Oddfellow, cordially luvlt*d.
.1. II. Turnley, W. M. Hauls,
N. O. Sec'y.
DURHAM ENCAMPMENT NO.
l.O.O.F.
la.
Meets first and    third Wednesdays
in each month.
A  cordial reception extended     to
visiting brothers.
Officers July 1st to December 81st.
W. M. Harris, Chlel Patriarch
II. White, Scribe.
MAPLE LEAF REBEKAII LODOE
No. 19.
Meets every second and  fourth Wednesday at Fraternity Hall.
Sojourning   Rsbekahs cordially Invited.
Sis. Maude Hickcnbotham, N.Q.
Sis. Ada Ilickcnbothaii), Rcc. Sec.
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS
COURT CRANBROOK, 8943
Meets in Carmen's Hall Second and
Fourth Thursday ot eacb month at •
p.m. sharp.
.1. McLachlan, CR.
I.. Pearron, Sec., Dox 818.
Visiting brethren made welcome.
OVER SEAS CLUB.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 1st and 3rd
Thursday every month at 8 p.m.
Membership   open  to British   cttl
tens.
E. Y. Brake, L. Pearron,
Pres. See.
Boi 618
Visiting members cordially wslcom
W M  Kbi.eb, Dii't.
Cranbrook Lodge
No. IIUO
Maeta every second sail
fourth Weilneailiiy a 18
p. ib. In Roval Biai-k
Kiiiglits' Hull, Baker
Street.
II. 8. O aiibktt, He,'.
ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.
Pride ol Cranbrook  Circle, No. 119,
Companions ol tne Forest.
Meets in Carmen's Hall 2nd and 4th
Thursday ot each mont* at I
p.m. sharp.
Mrs. A. Laurie, C. C.
Mrs. A. E. Shaw, Secretary.
P. O. Box 442.
Visiting Companions cordially welcome.
LOYAL 0RAN0E
LODGE, No. 1871
Meets 1st snd 3rd Thursdays st 8 p.m. in Roysl
Black Knights of ltelaml
Hsll, Baker Street.
Fbkd. W. 8wain, W.M.
S. L. Williams, Sec.
THE CRANBROOK POULTRY AND KT
STOCK ASSOCIATION
I'rittiili-nt: ('. H KllN'l'AH.)
MiH't« M'unlinlj' the tin) Kriduy t-vfiiinf Miro
tuontti.
Infnrniuiitin mi Poultry inntifru «u|ij>lle.|
AihlniiH tin* HwiHury,
A. II. HjUITII, HoiH.-.a
It you want latlifaction with
your washing tend
It to
MONTANA LAUNDRY
N|ieciil pricei for family work.
i CRANBROOK-FERNIE
FARMERS' INSTITUTE',
President: J. II. MoOlcbb
Secretary: 8, Macdonald
i For information regarding lands <
■ soil  agriculture   apply   to the t
' Deoretary, Cranbrook, B. 0.
' Meeting—
'      Every second Wednesday
CENTURY RESTAURANT
Opposite C.P.R. Station
THE    PLACE    TO     OET    A
QUICK HEAL ANf   .
OOOD MEAL.
BOOMS JO RENT. THB  CRANBUOOK   IIKRALO
Th* IfajgjL Sty*
Tha Store with a Reput iitiim
Kootenay's Greatest Drug
and Book Store
The Beattie-Murphy
Co., Ltd.
Where It Pay. to Deal
CRANBROOK, B.C.
Diamonds
Are not solely vanity. They
aro reooaniaetl liy bunks an
collateral. A liiaiiiiiiul is
money invi'stt'il on t) rising
market, Cor prices of tine diamonds nre Increasing yearly,
Whi'ii n iiiiin irivi-s liis wile
or swi'i'lhi'iirt n diamond !io
presents licr with perhniiB tbe
most lx'uiitifn] tiling in tlio
world to wear, It is ulso Unit
much invested money III onso
of emergency; nor will it ever
go out of fashion. Flawed
diamonds have little intrinsic
value. Wilson's diamonds,
down-to the very smallest, are
pure, white, and flawless.
W. il. Wilson
Jeweler and Optician
TOWNJOPIGS
Meet me at Bob's Place.
Rev. 0. E. Kendall visited Fort
Steele on Wednesday.
Walter McLeod, ol Fort Steele,
n-as in the city, on Wednesday.
R. L. llutt of Movie, was in th*
City this week 0n business*.
Mrs«. II. R. Mather of Fort Steele,
was over last Saturday sliopplng.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Make of Skoo-
kiinu'liuck were in the city last Monday, on business.
.Valtcr Van Arsdalen of Perry
Oheek, was among the visitors in the
eity Monday.
Oeo. 1 humant ami family of Spring
Wood farm, Wasa, were visitors in
town last Monday.
G. \X. Mole, the new Fernie baud
master, motored Into town last Saturday, returning on Monday.
Frank. Murphy returned hist, week
from a several day's triii through the
Winder mere to Calgary.
Harold Hailing spent a few days at
Wasa on business the lirst of the
week.
Mr. nnd Mis. C. \V. Johnson were
in from Wasa in then motor ear **n
Wednesday.
Mv. ami Mrs. V. 11, Pollen, who
have boon visiting the eoasl tor the
past few weeks, returned t<> tlio eity
on last Tuesday,
Miss Fraser, of Nelson, is thr guest
of Mis. John Patterson lot a U'\\
days, being on her way to MoORo
Jaw, Sask.,
Mrs. P. K. Wilson and children,
who have lieon Spending lllfl past iWo
montlis ul Proctor, leave returned to
their home in the riu.
T. Lacey, bralu'insu on the i' P It
train is wound again attrr m*\i1,iI
Weeks illness at the St. llugeui* tins
pita) with typhoid fever
Mrs Ralph Wltebel left yesterday ln«
VWBOUVpt via Spokane lor a short
Mt.it with her relatives and friends in
that eity.
Tenders   are being   called   for the
Didn't you know there whs
such u thing ns u lucky wedding ring V Ask your niur-
rlecl friends. Or inquire of
nny lueky couple who havo
been joined in holy matrimony with n ring bought nt
this storo.
Wc Itiivi* thorn nt nil prtoei nnd in nil
wolsliti    Wflryi i Imrblnvorar
goal luek,  Co  in   both of you,
RAWORTH BROS.
JEWELERS AMD OPTICIANS
CRANBROOK AND LETHBRIDGE
building of ;i largo one-room school
house at JalTray, D.C, hy thc Department of Public Works nt Victoria.
Meet me at Bob's Place.
The September meeting of the Poultry Association will ho postponed tilt
Friday, tho 12th Inst. Members
please take notice.
Dancing, deportment and calisthenics. Miss Marion Rumsey will resume her classes at the Masonic hall
on Saturday, September Oth, at 3
p.m. 35-2t
It. Bingham arrived Wednesday to
take (charge of the tailoring department at the Kink Mercantile company. Hotli ladies and mens' suits
will be made by this department.
We want more room foi- our
plumbing and heating lines. See
our big window. -Patmore Bros.
Methodist Ladies Aid Society
hold    their       nexl regular monthly
will
111)1(1 I III   I I III   A I       IIL,UI.II       llll'lll ,11 t
meeting at thc home of Mrs. Rutledge on Garden avenue on next Wednesday, September 3rd, at 3 p.m.
Uev. Dr. J. Francis Perry, pastor
of the First Baptist church, Vancouver, was i» the city last Friday,
thc guest of Rev, and Mrs. 0. E,
Kendall.
Miss l.angdon, who returned Irom
her holidays- al I.ethbridtie last week,
was immediately taken to St. Eugene hospital witli typhoid fever a,rfj
was very low for several days, but is
now reported slowly Improving,
Rev. W. K. Thomson, pastor of the
Presbyterian church, held services nt
Fori Steele last Sunday. Uev. Stephens occupying the pulpit, horc in his
absence.
Mrs. Harold Darling and children
and little Katherine Hunt are due to
arrive in Cranbrook on Saturday afternoon fiom Vancouver! where they
hflVO boon spending the summer.
Claire Patmore, who has been in
the hospital at Lethbridge for several weeks suffering with an attack
of appendicitis, is reported improving
although he did not undergo an opei
a tion.
See our big window for bargains
In Enamel ware.   Patmore Bros.
tail QUI,• who has been at Fort
Steele for tlte past several weeks in
the capaoitj of chauffeur for K. M.
Young, Bupertneenrtcnl 61 construction
on the Kootenay Central,,was ,ivi*i
this RTck visiting Ins parents.
.1 Unite Brown, nf F. Parks and
Co , has returned (rom bis holidays
Bponl Visiting Lho coast and witb
friend.. In a house boat party on
Kootenay lake ;il Nelson. lie reports a most enjoyable time.
Mr. and Mis. M. A. Beale, Mr. find
Mrs. A. II. Macdonald. .las. T.
Laldlaw and Mr. 11. YV. Supple composed a wook-otid motor party, which
left lasl Saturday [or St. Mary's
lake and after a   very (successful fish-
ECONOMY IN BUYING
FURNITURE
ing season returned on Tuesday.
Meet me at Hub's Place.
number ol blooded Ayrshire stock.
Patmore Bros, have decided to
close out their Kitchen Enamel-
Mrs. W, .1. Scully, sister of Mrs. I*.  ware and Tinware department.
Woods, and   children, left   for   tlicir   in order to give them more room
home   in New York city,   last week | for Iheir Increasing business in
after ., year   spent at Cherry   I'rcck tie plumbing and heating lines.
All  Kitchen   Enamel  and  Tin-
wares are to be  closed out at
once at a   big reduction,     fee
their big window for bargains.
Hani-li. They wore accompanied by
Miss Vanallcy, another sister, who
has for some years made her home
wilh Mrs. Woods.
is (.o consider
Comfort
Durability
and Price
Our niin is to giro our customers
all of these, nlonir with satisfactory
terms of PAYMENT
Cranbrook Co-Operative Stores
I.i ml I oil
Stock up with Enamel ware
while you can buy at greatly
reduced prices We are clearing
out all our Enamelware. Patmore Bros.
Wrs. H, MaeKiulaiir and little
daughter, Marjory, returned last
week from their vacation fast. Tboy
roturnod ., month earlier than tln*\
oxpecbed on account of lhe Illness ol
the tilth *.
Iluck Taylor, wlm liasibeen covering
tin* district lieiween K.ngsgato and
Yahk as provincial fire warden, has
been transferred to i'ranhiook and
will cover tlte territory iwtwecn hero
and Kimberley.
Waller ami Llddlcoat! have completed their work (in the city cement
walks having laid new cement walks
on holh sides o( Armstrong and Norbury avenues and on Louis street
totween the Cranbrook Electric Light
office and the Fraternity hall.
A. P. Noble returned to the city
last Saturday and is a^ain prescription clerk at Heat tic-Murphy company's, alter an absence of a year,
during which time he was employed
by Mr. Beattic iu his store at Calgary.
The regular monthly,meeting of
the Women's Institute will he held on
Tuesday next, September. 2ml, at 3
o'clock in the Carmen's hall. Recipes
on pickling will he given. Any lady
knowing recipes kindly bring them.
All ladies cordially invited to attend.
Bargains In Enamelware at
Patmore Bros. See our big window for bargains.
Mr. and Mrs,,f<j, T. Williams were
in from their farm south of town
this morning. They have recently
received a large consignment of
chickens from near Spokane and now
have about, three hundred birds to
keep for the winter.
Fred Little, "mayor of Creston,"
H. S. Bcvan and V. S. Hyekmaa
came over Irom Creston on Tuesday
in a Kord car. Tln*y claim to be
tbe first to make the complete trip
by motor. The trip took about
seven and g half hours, Including tWo
hours lost time in Moyie and at a
bridge in construction where the car
was jerked across hy block and
tackle.
H. K. Davis returned Monday from
a several weeks' trip through Un*
prairie and reports the harvest nowi
In progress with every prospect of a
good yield. lie says that the farmers who have carefully cultivated are
reaping much better results than
those who have adopted careless
methods. Most uf the former class
are securing good returns.
I. 1). McBride drove Mrs. .1. K.
Smith, Misses Delia Greaves, Frances
Drummond, Dorothy Webb and Gladys
Hfekenbotham through Wardner and
Hull Hiver last Friday in hts.blg car
on a membership campaign lor the
Cranbrook Agricultural association.
They report a successful trip.
Mike McCarty ot Creston, who has
lieen in the St. Eugene hospital lor
the past week with asthma, is recovering and will return home at the end
of thc week, lie is one of the old
timers in this country being a steam
shovel engineer and worked on the
construction of the C.I'.R. in 1883
at Ton [.foody. Mrs. McCarty i.-i also in the city visiting her daughter
Mrs. Moon*.
All our Enamelware Is high*
grade goods All going at a big
reduction.   Patmore Bros.
I). C. Patmore, of Spokane, passed
tin Bros , was a business visitor at
lo Wardner with the plans lor tho
new planing mill which Is soon lo he
constructed by the Crows Nest Pass
Lumber company there. Mr, Patmore is a nephew ol the Patmore
brothers of this city ami a member
of a prominent firm of architects in
Spokane.
.lames Martin, ol the firm ol Martin Bras., was a business visitor at
Marysville ami Kimberley on Wednesday ami reports business more brisk
than usual in tliat section. The mills
are beginning to receive i eastern orders for lumber and mining is exceeding its previous records.
Watson S. Hall, trainmaster at
Maeleod, and formerlv of this city
was here this- week shaking Iwnds
wltli bis many old Iriends. He is enjoying a two weeks summer vacation.
.1, A. Prlnglc, proprietor ol the
Hillside Dairy, is on the prairie this
week hilling more cows, as his demand for milk fs exceeding kit lup-
At the Y.M.C.A. Secretary Cameron is planning starling evening classes, which tie will conduct during tho
winter months. These classes will
Im* open for both men ami women,,
Instructions will Im- given in the following subjects. First aid, air brakes;
Pitman slum hand, typewriting,
arithmetic, penmanship and composition. All desiring to t-iilir Ihese
classes should communicate with
Secretary Oftincron ,il once.
King i'.tln ud school will re-open on
ton day next, September 1st, at »
o'clock,   kindergarten ,it   10 o'clock,
On Saturday alternpotl a very successful American tournament was
played off on the Cranbroob Tennis
courts, the result of which wus &fl
follows: Mackcisey and Newton, 22;
Miss Pye and MaeKlwainc, 21; Miss
Patterson and Mac ready, lft; Dexter
and (lurrett, Ifi, Hicks ami Cocki, 17;
Miss Cherrington and Mahood, lf>,
Miss Service and Raworth, 14; Miss
McBride ami MeKlwcn, 11; Miss Mac-
ready and Bourne, 7.
Bishop MeNally, accompanied by
his secretary, Father Hearlngton, arrived in the city on Monday evening
from Calgary, after officiating in a
dedicatory service at Lethbridge,
The bishop remained .over Tuesday
visiting the Mission, and expressed
himself as much delighted with the
advancement shown hy the Indians In
matters of education and stated that
they were more intelligent and apparently more receptive to educational influences than In most localities
in Western Canada. At any rate
they wore far in advance of those
surrounding Calgary. He returned,
to Calgary on Wednesday morning.
EL H. Small returned this week
from Canal Flats, where he has undeil
construction a new hotel building
which is being completed as rapidly
as possible and which he Intends to
open in about a month or six weeks.
The new structure Is a two story
frame building and will contain thirty-live rooms. Mr. Small says t
his new location is one of the best in
Fast Kootenay. .lust now there is
a large force of men employed by
Burns and .Ionian on construction ou
the Kootenay Central. Canal Flats
also is tributary lo a great area ot
line standing timber, which has not
yet been touched by the lumberman,
but whicb will take years to cut.
I. I). Laldlaw arrived in the city
Urn first of lhe week from Si. Mary's
Out., looking much better af,.-r a
serious illness, being confined in the
hospital there lor several weeds, lie.
mar ted west on August first and «is-
ited several ol thc prairie cities en-
route. He is disposing of his in ten MS
here and is not decided just where
his future location will lie. lie owns
a fine home on Baker hill and is hca-
<Hy interested in the Kink. Mercantile Co. He expects to remain I ere
lor a few days looking alter husiness
matters and will then visit the coast
before deciding ou his final location.
Billy S. Clifford in "Believe Me,"
at the Auditorium on Friday night
was well worth seeing. As announced in the play bill, no attempt was
made to tie serious. Thc sketch afforded was produced for laughing purposes only. Mr. Clifford was always
cleverly funny and the musical interpretations were all good, especially
thc instrumental numbers by tlie
three musical Weston sisU-rs, and the
Scotch songs iu character hy Miss
Mae Collins. A word ol extra praise
is due K. C. Clifford for his two
songs uncommonly well rendered. As
a midsummer production "Believe
Me" was well worth witnessing.
C. B. Garrett has returned to the
city after several months absence
spent at the coast,
Another of the old landmarks of
the eity is being remodelled to meet
the requirements of the growth of
the city. A new front is being built
al the Ettlson theatre this week the
carpenters being busy, pulling down
the old wooden front which will be
replaced with brick veneer. The building which is opposite the Hanson
Block, is owned by P. Matheson and
tbe Baldwin Bros., have conducted a
moving picture theatre therein lor
the past several years. A few years
agio this theatre was the finest in the
city and was pointed to with pride by
the oldest inhabitants. Now the
other theatres have outstripped it in
the race for supremacy ln exterior
decorations and thc proprietors In
order to keep abreast of the moving
spirit of t-lie times and proposing U\
again make the Kdison the most attractive theatre in the city. ■ The
I front will be of brick
with a '"'I »rch, decorated with electric lights. Thc
I ticket office will stand in the center
■nd the whole front will present a
very attractive appearance when it is
finally  completed.
Ladies' Garments
and Shoes
We cordially invite your inspection of Ihe many new styles we are
showing in the above lines, and you will agree with us that for distinctiveness of styles and values offered there is nothing omitted.
Suits from
Coats   "
$15.00 to $50.00
10.00 "    40.00
Ladies' and Children's Footwear
Our stock in this department is larger and better than ever     Every
line absolutely dependable and guaranteed.
You will find many new and pleasing lasts in Blacks and Tans al a
variety ot prices.
McCREERY BROS.
Cranbrook's Dry Goods and Clothing Stores
Ten local members ot tbe Journeymen Bnrliers' l.'nion of America were
conveyed to St. Mary's Lake lasl
Sunday in one merry picnic parly,
all being taken in one load in Ham
son's big motor car. In consoojuenec
there are ten different big llsh stories
being unloaded at the various barber
shops   this   week. They   caught
everything from a spouting whale to
a strange water spider known only
to the inland waters of British Columbia, scientifically vnown as the
Cecropla Peltata. Twenty kvoq
dollars worth of beer aud 75c. worth
of sandwiches were taken along, and
they have been trying to find out
ever since who it was threw his
money away on the sandwiches. They
had a good time, however, caught
somewhere between thirty and thirty
thousand trout, had a picnic dinner
at the tent hotel, and returned in
the evening. Those In attendance,
and who will be expeeted to give
their official reports at tlw next
union meeting were". T. K. .South, W.
»M. Erjer, -Joe Van Meter, Terry Mc-
Qoyern, -foe Devlne, L. C. Messenger, ft. 0-. Nelson, Joe Furabaug,
Wnv Erler, jr., and Prof. .1. A. Ferguson.
Harry Roblchaud is in St. Eugene
hospital with tonsilitis.
P. Rabichaud, of Marysville, was
in tlie city today.
An international tourist party-
passed through Cranbrook today
from .Salt Lake City in a motor-car.
Those composing the party are: F.
L.'N'ethercott, local, manager of the
International Securities t'o. of Calgary, (Ieo. Sproul and Mr. Delaney
and.they are driven by A. P. Strat-
ton. They will go from here to
.Spokane and theme to the Mormon
eity.
WANTED.-A young girl to . assist in housework. Apply phone No.
363. 85-tf
♦
Bid MINSTRELS COMING
Cranbrppkj is to  have the pleasure
of seeing the Famous Alabama Minstrels Monday, September 1st, they
will play here on the above date in
their big canvas theatre, which tbey
are carrying lor their summer tour,
which ends at Seattle soon.
Thc Alabama are known in the
.States as the biggest and best of all
colored shows, which claim they live
up to as there is about lorty performers, aud musielans with the company, chief among tht; fun makers this
season are Watts and Edwards billed
as Americas greatest colored entert
liners. Watts is the original Alaba
ma Blossom and has a greater string
of comical victories to his honor thar.
Walter Johnson the great pitcher of
the Washington, American League
Baseball team. Edwards, his partner is one of those little fellows with
a pair of light feet that can get more
noise out of dancing with an ordinary
pair of shoes, than the average dancer can with a Pa'r of clog shoes on.
Others who will figure prominently in the entertainment will be Hi
Henry Hunt styled the King of l-'irc
Eaters.
Clark Brothers, dancers who dance
everything Irom tbe Mobile Shuffle to
t
some later dances ih.it are supposed
to have their origin in San FranclHCo..
.las.  II.  McKailand and a big dou
ble quartette of solo singers, render-'
ing all of the best popular successes ol
the day, besides some of tlie old time
melodies that still cling in our Memories. '
A colored ladies sextette who are i
all said to l>e queens of the Ethoptan
race. j
Arthur Prince thc   man who has a
hundred trained hoops   tbat     bourne,
and roll over the stags with seemingly bursas IntelHgenee, ;
W. Edwards in ... <• winging wire,
on which he ran do more i'tgcHng
than most people can on terra finny,
closing his act with a realistic imitation of a drunken man on the win-,
it seems hard enough to represent a
sober man on a swinging wire, hut
when it comes to trying to devise a
way to fall, and fail in the attempt
ft seems about all there is in wire
acts.
The first part opening the performance introducing the   thirty different
performers,    and    the   big   orchestra
baek of them on their mounted   platform is the first to ever be presented
is the first  minstrel organization    o[
any consequence   to appear in a tent.
As a good    closing   number th* Ala-
bamas    have   chosen    Billy    Youngs
screaming   burlesque "The   Southern
Sullragctes" which deals with an old!
darky preacher trying to convince tin-
Southern mammies where they    will I
lie benefited by their supporting   th.-
voting question.    When the men Snd
it out there    is some     lively times, I
but    all       ends      with      a      general forgiving and a
dancing contest   where some dancin
fast and furious will be seen.
The big band will give a parade t,
the main streets at 3 p.m.
WANTED.—Furnished      Imuse    or
housekeeping rooms Vpplj  to .s.
B. Householder, Cranbrook      steam
laundry. :*.<■,-»•
First-class      democrat    fo
eheap.      Apply   llerald.
sale.
Pair of light boh sleighs for sale
cheap.     Apply Herald. :,.-•
FOR SALE.—Brown mare, aged
\\ years; will drive single and
double; also broken tb saddle; guaranteed sound and gentle. Apply Mrs.
K. J. Deane, city. si*
Mrs. R. A. Racklyeft wifl re-open
the Cianbrook Kindergarten un Kd-
hd wards Street! Tuesday, Soptem-bet
2nd. 88*4t
Good si*t of democrat harne&a and
firstKrla.^s democrat lor sale. Appi,,
F. Dezall. 27-tI* '
TO LET.—Exhibition .Stalls in the
Main Building on the Agricultural
Kxhibition grounds for Sep 18 and 13.
Apply, A.H. Webb, .Secretary Agricultural association.
LOST.—Tennis racquet, Hackett
and Alexander make. Reward.
Bring to Herald office. 26
Look at This
WANT ADS.
•■ )»er arriril lor drat wa*k, unil Ir [#r
tvoril for each .wk nltir
FOK SALE.-Holstela bull,
dress llox ••(','• Herald office. 35
WANTED.—A nurse maid dad),
from I lo 8 p.m. Applv Mrs. K. II
Miles.
FOR SALE.-Oae baby carriage,
one lounge, one refrigerator and Mine
other household effects, at a bargain
Apply residence W. I). Laldlaw, any
evening or Saturday afternoon la-
twecn 2 and I. .'15-lt'
KOR SALE OR RENT.-I.arge
warehouse1 wilh frost prool basement and electric light; very large
dry.      Apply llox 3, Herald.     19-tt
LOST.—Bunch ot keys with while
tape and hook t„ attach Kinder
please leave at St. Kugene hospital.
KOR RENT.—Five roomed house,
from September 15th. Apply Mrs.
J. S. Drake. 3:1
ROOMS KOR RENT,
J. S. Brake.
Apply Mrs.
33
WASTED.—Cook and house maid
for family of two. Applv Mrs. .1. W.
Rutledge. 34-lt
LOST.—About seven weeks ago. one
black silk umbrella with rough woo,)
handle; also one black feather boa.
Finder please leave al llerald office.
Reward. 31
Set of democrat harness for sale,
almost new.    Apply Herald.        34*
F
O R one month only,
to   show    the   |jeo|)le   of
Cranbrook tbal we ,lo the
liest work in the city, we
will press
Men's Suits for
Trousers
50c
25c
Ladies' Suits
Will be pressed for 50c and 75c
Skirts    ■ 25c and 50c
French Dry Cleaning
Ladies'Suits - $1.50 and fl.75
Skirls • 50c and 75c
Dresses   $1.25 and $1.50
Gootli Called For ami Delivored
Cranbrook Steam and
Dry Cleaning Works
Phone 1">7
P.O. li..*-:!
ONLY FAULT
DRINK HABIT
Many Good Men Itnl.twri of High
I iu Hi i ir ft ami Social Stindiiiu
by Drink
Currd at
TIIK NKAI. LN8T1TDTK
In tlini'iIbvh
Bns .'Iii.". Ofttilirnok, It. O. THB   OBANBBOOK HERALD
ATHLETIC SPORTS TO BE PILLED
OFF AT HOOK Fi
September 18th and 19th
Four baseball teams must, compel* in oilier   lo   gel tlm second
in Ice.    Fifteen days' residence qualification    necessary.    The, preliminary games will lie played oil on Thursday ulternoon   und Friday
morning, to suit lho convenience of  the loams  as far ns possible.
Teams from  llie east to lie In al "bout    I o'clock Thursday and
those from the vu'*l about I o'clock, llie same   day. Finals to lie
played on Friday in the afternoon.
TIIK PROGRAMME.
First. Second, Third.
Baseball competition $100.00 $ 150.00
Junior baseball. Three entries to gel second
|lr|M     20.00 5.00
Log sawing  ■■   80\»° 15.00
Log clu Ing    ii,M mm
Hoys race, till yards ilasb (under 100   lbs).
Modala ('1"',, Silver Bronze
Hoys race, 75 yards dash, Hi years and umler.
Medals       Hold Silver Bronze
Hammer throw      8.00 5.00 2.00
[•tilling shot       0.00 5.00 2.00
a Ills race.     Medals (told Silver Ilron/e
Boys standing broad Jump.  Medals Gold Silver Bronco
Half mile (open)      15.00 10.00 5.011
100 yards dash (open)     15.00 10.0(1 5.00
Standing broad jump (men)       8.00 5.00 2.00
Running hop, skip and jump       8.00 5.00 2.00
l-l mile race       8.00 5.110 2.00
Boys potato race.    Medals       Hold Silver Bronze
fill yards sack race.     Boys, 10 and under.
Medals   ito'd Silver Bronze
Cllrls ogg and spoon race.    Medals Gold Silver Bronze
Hoys relay   race, 1-2 mile (4 boys) A medal for each ol Uie "Wag team
Five,   aside   football   competition.   A meils' fur each o! the winning team
Running high jump (men)       8.00 5.00 2.00
220 yards Oat race (open)     15.00 10.00 5.00
Running '■•••ad jump     8.00 fi.oo 2.011
•'"i yards obstacle race      15.00 10.00 5.00
Standing high jump      8.00 5.00 2.011
Hole vault      8,00 5.00 2.00
120 yards hurdle race III :u It. hurdles      8.00 5.011 2.00
Mile race      15.00 10.00 5.00
Girls race, aged 12-10.    Medals      4.00 2.00 i.oo
Olrls race, 100 yards.    Medals  Gold Silver Bronze
No third price if less than five en ter.     Entries taken up to one   hour
before the event.
A properly arranged time table for the events will lie sold on the field
on bulb days ol the Fair.
GREATER VANCOUVER'S EM-
jiiy Ronald C. Camptwll-JohnBton
Mining and Matallurglcal Engineer
AN" OPTIMISTIC) miTMlOK
"As lor mining*—do you know Lhal
in im association of thirteen years
Willi tin* Department ol Mint's in the
Province of British Columbia, 1 cannot recall a lime whon the mining
Industry nf the country wns more fulls
nf promise for a glorious future ilian
it is today?"—lion. Sir Itichard Me-I
Bride, K. C, M, O.
Tlii! man in the Btrcot for somo
years now has been continually buoyed up by promises inado concerning
large Iron and steel plants ahout to
he erected at or near Vancouver. His
imagination has been excited by
towns!to owners who predicted and
vouched for populous iron centres
wilh hives <if Industries which were
to spring up at once, II not sooner,
near Port Mann, Coquitlnm, and
other really favorable points where
the concomitants for an iron smelting
establishment were to assemble.
However, since waiting makes the
heart grows weary, scepticism begins
to suggest that such a consummation
as real furnaces to turn put actual
1'ig Iron on our Pacific coast Is a fallacy, aud maybe an impossibility, or
tliat puddling furnaces to produce
Steel brooms from pig Iron to rolling
mills exist only as pipe dreams Tho
Provincial Government, lhe boards of
trade and commerce, and the loeul
business mm have not hitherto lieen
as energetic as I hey might have been
in finding out for themselves and then
demonstratrating to the outside manufacturing and investing world that
such a Hvc enterprise could be put on
i firm paying basis, and so build up
« payroll towards swelling our gene
rat trade.
Surely now is the psychological
hour for the Progress Club In (ill the
breach, sift out tne pros und cons
concerning thc future of our embryo
iron industry, benefit lhe whole community, and confer a lasting advantage to all concerned. It is hoped In
this paper to state, hi ;, cursory way
only, most ol the [acts known up to
date about possible iron production,
KAW MATERIAL
To begin, then, at the root of Uie
subject., the supplies of raw material
must he studied, their adaptability,
qualities, eiivironnements und localities noted, and the economic spots for-
stalled where to bring together iron,
lime, coke and charcoal, each fitting
iu with power harnessed as electricity
from waterfalls. That the supplies of
iron ores, of a kind, are immense, is
already an apparent lact, from tho
government and professional reports
of the mining fraternity. Thc largest
uo far proven deposit explored is on
Texada Island, and others arc an
Itedonda Island, Price's Channel,
sides, Shoal Hay, Knight's Inlet,
Smith's Arm, Klmsqult nnd many
other places not named, for this list
is not Intended to be comprehensive.
On Vancouver Island at Campbell
Itamsay Arm, Frederick Arm on both
Nootku, Barclay Sound, Alberui Ca-
tlil, Port San .luaiv, with Qordan
Rivor, Sootoe and oilier points; on
Pitt Island lu the north; Louise,
which Is one of the (Juccn Charlotte
group; inland on the *uppfr Mass Hiv
er; at Deer Park ou the Arrow
Lakes; neat Kamloops at Cherry
Creek In the Similkameen; Pitt Luke,
and up the Pemberton Meadows by
Green Lake—all these deposits- are
magnetites. Near Spenee's Brodge on
P. Miner Creek are bods of micaceous
iron ores of grat purity. At Creston
in East Kootenay, and near Draw-
ford Hay on Kootenay Lake, are
hematite ores of good quality. At
Tatleyoco Lake at the head of Ham-
alko Hiver from Hute Inlet; along tho
Rainbow Hiver at head of Bella Coo-
Ih and Hatharko Rivers; on Tatla
Uake near Stewart and Bahine Lake-
are spathic iron fires, tl variety ol
hemalile. t'p Copper Hiver trom
KltBolas and the Skccna Hiver; oi
Whilewater at the bend of the Chile
oten country, including Haneovtllf
deposits, at Quatslno on Vancouver
Ifclaud; on Bella Coola near Its
mouth, and at other points on Harrison Lake, are bods of limonile, bog
i ron ores. other i ron deposi ts
throughout the province not mentioned in this list will occur to iuvestiga
ators.
Apart from the Texada Island deposits, which have already shipped
moro than twenty thousand tons to
lie, converted inito ship plates for
American cruisers, and other objects,
there has been hitherto no .justification, technically, to block out, ahead
ot requirement, extensive ore bodies
in sight, which can be measured ac
eiirately in tons, assay plans tabulated, boundaries and intervening dykes
and intrusions deducted, and necessary preliminary development carried
out. All tliis must be effected prior
to the expenses incurred by the Installation of iron smelling furnaces,
then later steel hearths, puddling
rolling ami manufacturing mills, with
all the costly machinery requisite to
turn out rails, girders, bridge irons,
boiler plates, forged castings, rods,
pipes and sundry items, to lie later
remodelled and reformed, where necessary, into bolts, nails, nuts pad a
hundred everyday articles in use.
IMPORTS
Our imports of such articles as
could Im* made locally is endless, and
our people send Out cash that could
he advantageously invested, much of
it in building up a Greater Vancouver.
K'xact quantities of these articles
Imported, however, have not been
given since 111(18, when Minor Linde-
man, M. K., gave the consumption as
2,282 short tons. It is hardly possible, however, to value this importation in dollars without accurate divisions of the separate items being taken
into account, but wc know that business hlock building, railway construction1, and other electrical, tramway,
and general installations havo subsequently increased many-fold this
yearly importation.
It is partly because this suddenly
growing markel has only lately been
permanently created that delay is
being experienced in the local commercial production; and partly because treatment of magnetites, our prey
ailing variety of iroa ore supply, has
up to now lieen of a complicated, un
perfected chemical character. Today,
however, the treatment of magnetites
has happily been brought to a commercial success, as will be later ex
plained.
MAGNETITES ON' THE COAST
First, however, let us discover only
why the local ores occur as magnetites, nnd, moreover, why deposits of
hematites along the coast are therefore a geological impossibility in conjunction with the terrific subsequent
volcanic actions ensuing, thus relegating these latter commercial ores
alone to the less eroded, less disturbed interior vluteaux.
It fo along the coastline, al the
contact of the Dcvono-carlionlforous,
uplifted and distorted sedimenrtary
roevs of the Palaeozoic era in geology, that these extensive beds ol magnetites'are found. Their source, from
which are segregated and concentrated
thc massive bodies, is tho later
Triassic basis eruptive rocks of thc
Meso/oic era. Again, yet subsqucnt-
ly, to accentuate and further develop
these concentrations, came the far-
teaching, that is trom a structural
point of view, Jurassic, Coast Range
batholilhs (meaning deepest-seated or
Plutonic rocks), also of a late period
in the Mesozolc era, whicli have altered and siticlfled almost beyond recognition the earlier rocks mentioned,.
One conception of this theory of the
genesis of magnetites is that the last
named Intrusive Jurassic rocks met-
wi.orplHiMcd oi transmuted Iteinittlles,
the original chemical compounds, into
magnetites. This constitutes a reaction which reduces peroxides into
protoxides (containing litis oxygen iu
their make up) through means of an
incipient chemical process, set in action by the excessive heated rocks.
The presence, also, possibly ot coals,
for most other of the world's coalfields lielong to this period, aided the
results, combined with carbonates ol
lime. The completion is a very
Stable chemical compound such a»
magnet ito, one hard to treat, split
up, and reduce to metallic pig iron
tree Irom its oxygen, rather than Die
original peroxides, as hematites.
Those latter are more easily smelted
with less beat required. They are
similar to the ores now treated elsewhere on a commercial scale in blast
furnaces al other iron centres.
ORIGIN OF MAdNKTlTES.
.1. P. 'Kimball (vide O. E. Leray
M.E., Bulletin No. 996, p. 42) sug
gests the origin of tlte magnetites
as follows:
"Thc magnetites are secondary, and
have evidently been produced by the
decomposition of the basic eruptive
rocks of the Texada group. These
rocks, wlK'ii examined miscroscopie
ally, are found to he made up largely
of secondary minerals, among which
magnetite is a most productive mem
ber. In the formation of these bodies
She ore solutions have followed the
line of contact between the eruptives
and the limestone, replacing the latter by magnetic ore.
"It seems to have been a direct
precipitation of ore, with a liberation of lime carbonate, as the contact between the magnetite and lime,
stone is always sharp, and iron carbonate is- never, and ferruginous limestone rarely seen. All the bodies
were formed at considerable depth
and subsequent erosion has removed
the overlying and surrounding limestone. . . The period of formation
was prior to the intrusion of the
Coast Range bathollths. . . This
intrusion altered the limestone, and
produced new cooling stages ol the
rock, formed tlie copper deposits."
We have therefore to accept the
fact that as in Sweden, the predominating iron ores of this coast are
magnetites, and that also, to prod
uce economically suitable pig iron of
high tenor, and subsequently steel
we have to utilize ores by themselves
without blending and mixing hematites from the interior of our own Province, or from China, California or
Mexico.
ELECTRIC SMELTING
This realized fact, then, limits us
to the use of the electro-thermic process, or electric smelting popularly
called, whereby alone excessive heat
can be generated to split up a protoxide metal afresh into pure metal
perse, and at the same time economise carbonaceous fluxes by emitting
carbon, dioxide (C.02.) carrying to
waste less carbon, rather than carboa
monoxide (.CO), from excess coke in
the furnace gases passing away into
the air.
FORT   GEORGE
Before going into the details of this
metallurgical process, or discussing
deleterious impurities ol the magnetites, It is imlicy to state that Fort
(leorge or its vicinity will undoubtedly become, in tlie near future, also
an iron smelting point of considerable note. This Is assured from Ils
central proximity to tlw llmonltes
iK#urlng in the Chtlcoten country, the.
svathic oies from Talta Lake, and to
the future mechanically sorted hematites throughout both regions, although \fo: last-mcntloncd at present are only ores of low Iron tenor,
averaging say thirty per cent, in Inr-
ge quantities. All raw material will
he assembled by many railways entering thnt place, that the iron ores
may Ih* combined with local limestone, nnd co'.e produced from tlw coal
beds of Hear River or thc Bra/can
ami other Rocky Mountain collieries.
FUEL AND CARBON
Thc question of fuel, as coke, anthracite, and charcoal, or for carbon
electrodes, is comparatively simple of
solution, when freight rates, over the
various roads* centering here, of moderate proportions arc adjusted by the
Government Railway Commission,
permitting the cheaper carriage of
coke and coal from the Rocky Mountains to the seaboard. Along that
range, for at least one thousand miles, arc frequent and considerable deposits of splendid coal, from the
Crow's Nest and Flathead in tho
south, then Rolnff north-westerly
through   Hatifl,   Itrazrau   and many
M
R. ROBERT BINGHAM has arrived, and is ready for
your order.   Mr Bingham has had years of experience in
the large cities making Women's and Men's Clothing,   You
are thus assured ot strictly first-class work.
We will receive direct from New York, every week, a lithographed Style Book. This is a great expense ; but we want the best
and most up-to-date ideas.
MAKE certain of complete success in your concrete work
by always using
CANADAPortiand cement
We tre supplying Canadian fumen wilh the highest quality of Portland Cement it b potable
lor human still to make.
We have reduced the price of Canada Portland Cement until it ii within your null (ot practically
every purpoM.   It it the only building material that it not increasing in cost
Be sure to ask for Canada
Cement, in bags.
Canada Cement Company Limited, Montreal
tj ton have not received a fret copy of "What the farmer can do with Concrete," write our Information
Department and get one.    It's a complete practical concrete encyclopedia.
other intervening coal fields, to tlie
Peace Hiver, continuing on to the extensive Oroundhog anthracite fields
and even further north for all the
seams everywhere are numerous, of
large commercial size, ot contemporary cretaceous deposition, with walls
of similar formation' throughout thc
whole length. Charcoal made from
tree slumps when clearing land, from
branches of felled frees, or Irom the
deciduous trees bordering tlio up-country rivers, is not a difficult commodity lo procure close to cheap transportation.
Tlw Wollman-Scavot Company ol
Cleveland, Ohio, jn A report cstiinat-
ill the cost of making pig iron on
I'uget Sound: "Kor blast furnace
I'lanl properly arranged and located
at tidewater, using coke as fuel, the
coke at. tidewater at $3.75 and the
ore al $2.75, we would estimate the
cost per ton ol pig iron lo lie appinx:
Imntely ns follows:
l.ll Ions ol ore at $2.75 per
Ion	
2,800 His   ol   coke nt (.1.7.1
per ton 	
Labor 	
0.0 Ions of limestone nt $1.20
per ton 	
Ilepairs, supplies, etc	
0.60 ton ol   limestone at
$1.30 per ton 	
I-abor   , 	
Hepairs, supplies, etc	
.72
ore: $1 00 bonus on a ton o   48 per
cent, ore S1.00 bonus on a ton ol 52
2.00   per cent, ore: $1.20 bonus on a ton '<
.50
Total	
Comparison
        $13.07
of cost of production
ol pig iron in the charcoal blast (urn-
ace with lhat produced in. electric
rtinft furnace, by Professor
60 per cent. ore.
-f-
BREAK1NO I,(K*KS.
$   I. Ill
I 511
Total        $12.25
The plan af making Iron and steel
on the Paciiic Coast Is, Ini our opinion, a sound one. A large amount uf
iron is used on the coast, which all
has to come from the east and south,
consequently burdened wilh high rates
of freights."
Cost ol   making   Pig at   Irundnle
Pinnaces (actual):
2 tons of ore at $1.80 per
ton        $  3.00
1.20 tons ol coke at $5.00
fer ton   «.M
Last week a man got a sentence of
7 months and a woman 2 months lor
von M- entering the  Peckbam's houses      at
•Jstiernii,   Sweden.   (Eugene Haancl,   Fish Lakes.
It seems a little thing to brak a
lock on a gate or on a house: tnit
breaking the lock Is a serious criminal offense.
The law is right: tor thc real ol-
fender Is tlw one who brake the look,
that opens the way for tbe thief and
invites thc thief to steal. Also as
nunniimities acquire a Irtgher civilization, trespassing becomes rarer,
and it is less customary to commit
misdemeanors on other peoples' lands.|
Thew Is a protect for a community ol
summer houses at Fish Uike.
' >
Ki.l).).
Cost of pig iron per short ton
Charcoal 0.115 Ion at $8.00
per ton 	
Electric energy 	
Labor 	
Itepnirs and general cxpen
ses	
$ 7.00
nil
1.00
1.50
Total 	
ELECTRIC
         $I0.t0
SHAH' FURNACE
$ 2.110
Charcoal 0.27 per ton 	
Elcelrlo energy0..1 E.H.P.
year ut $12.00 	
Labor	
Electrodes, Wilis, at .1 ccntB
per II	
ltepairs, elc 	
.1.00
1.00
.30
1.511
Total          $8,511
i saving thus of $1.55 should lie effected in tlie production by the elcct-
rothrrmic process.
The local cost of pig iron In British
Columbia is ns follows:
Brands
ISi.lcar (1) $22 to 25 per long ton
Olcn-Oarnock (1) 20 to 30 per long
Qlcn-Qarnock(l) 26 to 30 per long
ton: .Summerless (1) 26 to 31 per
long ton.
The Dominion Government pays a
bonus of two  dollars and   ten cents
($2.10)   upon each   ton ol pig made
Irom native ore, approximately.
$0.00 Imnus on a ton ol 43 per cent.
Little Mary's father had denied hrr
a pleasure which she bad eimlldenlly
expected to enjoy. That night, when
she said her prayers at her mnlhcr's
knee, she concluded with this petition,
—"And pleaso don't give my papa
any more children. He don't know
to treat those lie's got now."
NOTICE OF  .APPLICATION   FOK
TRANSFER OF LIQUOR
LICENSE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN
'hat 30 days alter date application
will bo made to the Superintendent
nf Provincial Police lor the sale ol
liquor by retail in and upon tho
premises known as the Falls View
Hotel, Marysville, British Columbia,
Irom ,1. W. Colburn, to Mrs. Hell.,
Barclay.
.1. \V. Colburn, holder ot license.
Mrs. Bella Barclay, applicant (or
transfer.
Dated this first day nl August,
1913. 33-4%

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