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Cranbrook Herald Jul 14, 1921

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Array fllK NATIONAL ADVERT1SBH
KNOWS THK BUST MUICM-
IIK PATRONIZES TIIK HEKAI.D
THE CRANBROOK HERAJLO
A PATER FOB THK IIOME-
TIIE INTERESTS OK CRAN.
BROOK   KOKI.M.IST   ALWAYS
VOLUME 28
CRAXBROOK, B.C, THURSDAY, JULY 14th, Ull
■* fi uu
NUMBER *!0
Vernon Man Named
H.S. Principal
Gov't Grant Towards Central
St-liool Addition Probably
Ahout 80% ot Cost
PBOVIXCIAL OFFICIALS
OF G.W. V.A.HEBE j
BACK FBOM PT. ARTHUR
Ab the regular meetiug ut tlie Board
ur School Trustees held last Friday evening at the city hull, only three trustees wero lu attendance, theso being
Mr. VV, ll. Wilson, chairman, Mrs. j.
.1. Jackson and Mr. B. ll. MoPhee.
Following lho reading ot tbo vol
uni'iuouB minutes ot the uieetingtt of
tho provlotiH month, Mr. J. II. Mo Lean,
caretaker at the high Bchood usked the
flchool board to grant him three
iniiiillis leave of absence from his duties, undertaking in the meantime to
provide a sultuhlo substitute, whom
lie would Instruct iu thu work before
Iiu went away. This was later granted by thu hoard ou tbat understanding'
Mr. McLean ulso drew tbo attention
of the board to some little matters
that Should he attended to at the high
school building hefore school opens,
or us soon us possible.
Dr. J. H. King, minister of public
works, Victoria, wrote the bourd respecting tho visit he had made to the
school while recently In tbe city, when
tbo need for Increased accommodation
nt tlie Central School was brought to
bis attention. He stated that the amount .which the government would be
willing to grant to assist the board
would be thirty per cent., and he advised that formal application be made
to tbo department of education for assistance, when the matter would be
looked Into by an inspector, and any
grunt made brought before the legislature at the next session. On a motion the letter was filed, and application will bo formerly made as Dr.
King suggests.
It was learned from the Superintendent of Education, Victoria, that
any regulations as to fire escapes at
tbe high school building would come
under the scope of whatever city bylaw, tliere was la that connection. As
there doesn't appear to be any, the
hoard will likely be saved some expense that was anticipated in making
tbe alterations at the high school this
summer.
It was reported that the appointment r.f High School principal lind
been offered to Mr. \V. C. Wilson, B.
A., recently ot the Vernon High
School. Mr. Wilson comes well recommended by Inspector DeLong. He
ban ..mdo ph>'K.-K, ehcmi.-U-y aad mathematics Ids special subjects. His
salary to commence will be $2640 por
tatinum and Mr. Wilson has definitely
accepted the appointment.
As assistants in the high school a
number of choices were made in case
it was found some could not accept.
Mr. E. C- Richards, B.A-, of Duncan,
und formerly of Naramata, a University of B.C. graduate, was made first
choice for tlie position of first assistant, at a salary of $2000 per year.
Mr. Richards is reputed to be a good
disciplinarian, and has bud pome three
yenrs high school experience. Second choice for tliis position ♦.-as gtven
to Mr. Lincoln Raker, formerly of Ferule, and third choice to Mr. J. W.
Young, of Port Alloc. The Hoard has
since beard from Mr Richards that
be cannot accept, having taken another position, They ore now communicating witli Mr. Baker
The position of second assistant it
was decided should he Ottered first
to Miss M* M. Miller, ot Matsqul, at
a salary of $1600 pir year. Second.
third uud fourth choice was also made.
Km* u commercial teacher a salary
of $8000 per year will be pa* The
board hopes to got ln touch with
someone ut Brandon, failing which
the position will be advertised for in
Winnipeg, no suitable applications
having come from the Coast.
Formal record was mado on the
minutes by motion of the appointment
of Miss Mary Stuart, of Ducks, to Division 111., at $1250 per yoar; Miss
Vicars, ot Salmon Arm, to Ihi first
toucher at tbo South Ward nt $1250;
and Miss MoCaUum, ot Orand •Forks,
to Division IX., at $1100. One more
vacancy at the Central remains to bo
filled, at a salary of $1100.
Tho tender of Jones & Doris of $90
for a cement retaining wall at the
northwest comer of the high school
grounds wits accepted, and tho same
firm, who submitted the lowest price
on tho alterations to the high school
building to admit It to the commercial
course were to bo asked for a price on
V-Jolnting tho partition up to the celling, tbo samo as the other tenderers.
Tbo passing of tho monthly accounts
and a llttlo discussion thereon brought
out the statement that the school
board has up to now kept within its
estimates, despite increased expenditures Jn some directions, which have
seemed unavoidable. Closevupon $20,-
000 has boon spent up to now, out ot
tlie estimates of about $38,000. There
nre no salaries to pay for the next
two months, * however, which constitutes by fur the largest Item of the
expenditures of tbo board.
The matter of providing turnace
beat for the Kootenay "Orchards,
Bchool was taken up, and the board;
wilt ondeevor to work out the most
economical method to give the magi-
mum ot satisfaction.   An estimate of
Messrs. Walter Drlnnan, and C.
Carmichael, secretary and vice-president of the provincial G.WiV.A. organization, were in tlie city over
Tuesday evening, on their way back
from Port Arthur, where they have
been attending a dominion executive
meeting of tho O.W.V.A. Later in
the yeur, In the fall, u dominion-wide
convention or tbe G.W.V.A. Is to he
held at lho sume place, at which It Is
staled that Fluid Marshal lluig of the
Imperial Army, and Marshal Foch, of
the French Army, muy bo in attend
unco,
Messrs, Drlnnan and Carmichael
Slopped off at Ferule on Monday, and
conferred wltb tbo O.W.V.A. of that
place lu regard to tiie uuestlou of
beer-eel ling, which tlie veterans thoro
have heen continuing, though selling
strictly to members only. The upshot
of tbe conference was that the Q-W-
V.A. thero bas been Induced to hold
off the sale of betr for ten days, or
until such later tlmo as seems best.
In the hope that In the meantime
an authoritative ruling will have been
made to settle tlie contentious question. Messrs. Drlnnan and Carmichael stated clearly to the Herald
that there Is no desire on tbe part of
the Veteruns in Fernle or elsewhere
to engage in tlie sale of beer if it ls
properly decided to be contrary to
the new law, but what they desire la
some definite decision on the point,
up to which they are prepared to live.
On their return to the Coast the
matter will be put up strongly to the
attorney-general, who will be pressed
for a show-down on the matter.
WELL KNOWN RAILROADER
MARRIED SATURDAY AT
BONNER'S FERRY
Mr. Reg. P. Johnson, well known
railroad man of this city, effected a
real surprise on his friends here by
arriving In the city on Tuesday morning with his bride, formerly Miss Mary
Bates, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos.
Bates, ot Klngsgate. Mr. and Mrs.,
Johnson were married on Saturday
last, July 9th, at Bonner's Ferry, Ida-
bo. Exactly a year ago on the day
of tbe wedding Mr. Johnson suffered
his bad railroad accident near Moyle,
as a result of which he has not been
able to work since, and will probably
bear tts marks for a long time yet.
The tnfde and groom art -staying
for a short time ln their home on Burwell Avenue, but a little later, probably next week, they will return to
Klngsgate for some time. In the
meantime they arc receiving the congratulations of friends in this city,
who will all unite in extending to
them best wishes for the future.
Shaping lip For
Fine Boys' Camp
Two Weeks* Outing nt Premier
take Promises To He A
11 rent Success
Boys, how about your vacation?
Huve you decided to go with tbe
bunch to Premier Luke, August lst to
13th? If so, you bad better begin U>
get your kit bat; ready. If uot, de-1
cide lu a hurry, or you'll certainly
miss the besl time of your life.
The camp is open to every boy between tlie ages of 10 and 17, and will
bo under tho direction of J. M< Clark,
assisted by a corps of able leaders.
Parents can rest assured thut everything will be dune for the safety and
welfare of tlie boys ami the buys elm
bunk on ouo great time. The cost
tor tlie entire outing will only be $8.
Through tbe kindness or Mr. E. L.
Staples boats will bo provided, material for a largo raft whicli the boys
will soon make when they get to
camp, with spring hoard und chute—
wowle! what fun. Besides ull tbe
sports, iiere are some uf the things
you will learn to swim, to dive, to
row, to play new games, lire saving,
first aid, to make your own bed aud
keep It clean, to wash dishes, to play
the man under all conditioi s, to think
of the otlier fellow, and a hundred
other important things.
Now for a list of things to take:
Three heavy blankets, bathing suit,
cushion or pillow, woollen sweater,
gym. suit, change ot underwear, handkerchiefs, pyjamas, two or three pairs
ot stockings, running shoes, heavy
boots, old suit of clothes, bath towel,
soft shirts, soap, comb and brush,
toothpaste and brush, pins and safety Plus, baseball glove, books nnd Bible, musical Instruments—mouth ur-
gan, Jew's harp, cornet, bugles, drums
or any kind of musical instrument-
camera, games, jack knife, small mirror, vaseline, oil of citronella, dessert and tea spoons; knife and fork,
white granite cup and saucer, and
deep plate, your best disposition. We
want no drones, shirkers or deadheads. Pack all your troubles and
leave them behind. Mark every article plainly with your camp number which will be assigned when application is made- Make a list of
your things and leave It with the
camp clerk who will return it to you
for comparison when packing up to
go home- No firearms, alrguns, to-
bftq-aa p'pyinc cnirija. or anything
else that might be harmful or offensive to any camper will be permitted.
Cut this out and keep for reference.
For further particulars see Secretary
Clark, of tbe Y. M. C. .A.
More news next week.
DOM  GOV'T. AUDITORS
VISIT BUSINESS FIRMS
IN CITY THIS WEEK
NELSON PROSPECTORS
SEEK CREDIT FROM
GOVT. ON SHIPMENTS
The Nelson branch of the Prospectors' Association at a meeting this
week, resolved to petition Sir Henry
Drayton. Minister of Finance, for the
establishment of n credit by tbe dominion government to enable advances to be made on shipments of ore
sent to tlie Trail Smelter, for which
Immediate settlement cannot be Itad.
Tlie Nelson Prospectors were unanimously of tbe opinion that such a
stop would bo greatly to the benefit of the minlug Interests of tbis
section.
What ls sought Is a certificate thnt
could bo considered negotiable up to
a certain value at the batiks, It being felt tbat something of this kind
would help to solve the financial difficulties some of tlie smaller operators
liavo been laboring under. With a
little money thus available for -shipments already made to the smelter,
some mines would be able to go ahead
wtth somo further development, pending tho full returns for their ore nl-
ready shipped.
The Nelson Association hns ulso endorsed the resolution put forward by
the Trail Board of Trade asking fur
a protective tariff on copper rods manufactured in Canada.
A- Singleton, Canadian Pacific ac
ountiint ul Yahk, was In the city for
a time on Monday of this week.
STARTING UP BUSINESS
IN YAHK? BUYS OUT
WELL KNOWN STORE
NEWT HARDWARE CONCERN TO OPEN UP IN
CITY NEXT MONTH
Messrs. Delaney and Pocock, of Ret-
law. Alta., were ln the city last weck-
d, spending some time here, und nlso
visiting some of the surrounding district. They havo arrived at a decision to open up a hardware store here,
expecting to commence business about the lst of August. Tiie new firm
will trade under the style of Delaney
& Co., and will be located in tbe lister Clapp store building formerly occupied by Armour and Co., on Baker
Street- Bltli members of tho new concern are experienced hardware men
who havo been doing business in quite
a large way on tbe prairies, and have
expressed full confidence at thc outcome of tlieir new venture here.
SALE AT FINK STORE
THIS WEEK BEING
WELL PATRONIZED
$550 for excavation of the basement,
and cement walls, wns received, but
this expense was not considered warranted, and it Is probable that the excavation will be made only sufficiently large to take a furnace and provide
some room tor fuel.
Tenders for scribblers and other
school supplies from local firms were*
taken up, but nothing was decided at
the meeting, and a special session is
to bo held this week to consider the
matter.
The work of beating the now commercial room at the high school will
be done by Patmore Bros-, and the
boiler will also be covered with asbestos plaster by the same firm, for
the sum of $525.
The board adjourned at quite a late
The big mercantile sale events In
tlie city use Herald advertising to put
them over—uud get results. Reports
from tlie Fink Mercantile Store this
week Indicate that their big July
Clearance Sale which was announced
In this puper lust week, and hy posters put around the district tins been
thoroughly successful. Monday, the
first day, provided n fine opening
to the event, and was uu exceptionally busy day ln tho store, especially on
the ladles' side. In results tho July
Clearance has almost come up to tbe
big January Sale held early In tli
year at the same store, which was the
biggest the firm has ever engaged ln
It Ib announced that the sale at the
Fink store will continue till Saturday
evening of this week, so tliere is
still time to get in on tho exceptional
values offered- A visit to the store
will well repay any thrifty shopper
looking tor good values.
O. H. Code, of Ottawa, general auditor of Customs and Excise, and J
W. Henderson, of Vancouver, one of
the resident B.C, auditors for the department, have been in the city and
district tliis week checking up local
firms' returns, and assisting In the
determination of the sales and other
tax levies which have been made on
the business concerns of tbe country
by the Dominion government. By
virtue of bis position Mr. Code conies
armed with tbo authority to clear up
some points which have been more or
less uncertain, and on any Imiwrtant
question-* gets rulings* by wire from
the Commissioner of Customs at Ottawa. In tills way a great deal of uncertainty has been removed from the
minds of many retailers and business
firms, wlio now know where they
stand iu regard to the new taxes. He
lias had prepared a properly defined
list of exempted lines, and has already
some fourteen thousand rulings by
him to which reference can be made.
Nevertheless new situations are continually being met witli, on which
rulings linve to be obtained from Ottawa.
To tlie Herald Mr. Code stated It
was expected the sales tax alone
would produce a revenue of one hundred and fifty million dollars for the
country during the present fiscal year.
Incidentally Mr. Code is also looking after the matter of the excise
tax on the slock of liquor held ln bond
by the provincial government, and on
which it has been ruled that the regular levy must be pai3. This amounts
to something between half and three-
quarters of a million dollars. Mr.
Code left today for Yahk, aud expects
to bo in Calgary on Sunday to confer
with Alberta departmental officials.
To Entertain
Mining Engineers
Making Preparations   to   Give
Party Expected Next Month
Good Time In District
L- J. Johnson, formerly of Bull River, where lie waB engaged wltll js-
cur Jostad iu y general store, has
bought out the Anton Dahl store business nt Yahk, and' is commencing
business tliere under his own name.
Mr. Johnson was in the city this week
business In connection with his
new venture. Mr. Dahl, It will be
recalled, died last winter, and the
business has since been conducted by
Mrs. Dahl, who having disposed of It
now to Mr. Johnson, left this week for
Europe.
KIMHKItLEY-WYCLIFFE
CHURCH CIRCUIT;
SEUYICKS EVERY SUNDAY
From now on the church services
conducted by Hev. Evan Baker on tho
Klmberley-Wycllffe circuit will be:
Service at Sullivan Mine 10 a.m.
Sunday School at Klmberley   12.
Service at Wycllffe 3 p.m.
Service at Klmberley 7.30 pm.
A cordial Invitation Ms extended to
all to attend these services.
LOCAL DEALER ATTENDS
MEET-OF STUDEBAKER
AGENTS AT CALGARY
GOLF   NOTES
The approach and put competition
held on Wednesday the 13th was won
by Mrs. Oreen, after a tie with Mrs.
Beale.
Mr. Bealo, Dr. art ecu and O. Hogarth who tied for first placo In the
approach and put competition held on
June 29th, played off on Wednesday,
wltb the result that Mr. Beale and
Dr. Oreen tied again for tint plant.
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Dezall returned
last week-end from Calgary, where
Mr. Dezall attended the conference of
western Studebaker dealers.
Mr. Dezall reports a very good time
at tbe meeting of the dealers, whlcb
took place on Wednesday evening at
the Palllser hotel. That evening a dinner was given by the Studebaker
Company to tbe visitors.
W. G. Palmer, Canadian sales manager, and former resident of Calgary,
told the dealers of Studebaker's remarkable selling record since the
first of the year, pointing out that his
organization had .old more automobiles during the first five months of
this year than during the entire twelve
months of 1920. Mr. Palmer reported
excellent crop Indications throughout
the prairie provinces, and In view of
this situation lie predicted an active
demand for automobiles In Alberta this
fall.
Following Mr. ralmer's talk, the
dealers were addressed by M. F. Rig-
by, advertising manager, who outlined
tho value nf newspaper advertising lo
selling automobiles. Mr. Rlgby urged
the dealers to make use of their local papers, suggesting to them that
through such advertising they are in
a position to "talk" directly to their
prospects. At tiie close of the evening,
the dealers were shown the moving
picture ftlm illustrating the manufacture of the Studebaker light-six car
In Studebaker's new $20,000,000 plant-
This factory, covering 85 acres, ts reputed to be the most modern automobile plant in the world. It Is equipped throughout with the most modern
machinery In order to ensure the accuracy and production of automobile
parts In quantities. The capacity of
tbe plant is 500 cars a day.
Messrs. Palmer and Rlgby have now
started on nn overland tour extending'
throughout the prairie provinces and
on to the const. Their contemplated
tour will cover five thousand miles,
all of which will be driven In a Studebaker light-six ear.
A party of about twenty-five mln
ing men, mostly from the western
States, many of whom will be accompanied by their wives, it is expected
will visit the city aud district next
month, arriving hero on August Hist,
and remaining for about three days.
Tbey will visit tho district under the
immediate auspices of the Prospectors' Association, who are expecting
to receive material assistance In thc
project from the citizens at large, as
well as a graut which has been made
by the board of trade towards tbe expenses.
A public meeting is being culled fur
tomorrow evening, Friday, July 15,
ln the city hall, at 8.30, when the details of what arrangements are found
to be necessary will be gone Into. It
ls proposed at present tb give the visitors a trip up to the Sullivan Mine at
Klmberley, possibly On the afternoon
of tlieir first day here, following an
excursion In the morning up to Perry Creek, with lunch at the old town.
Tuesday may be spent at St. Mary's
Lake, with an excursion for the men
up to the claims on Alkali Creek,
some ten miles or so higher up. While
It Is too early yet to lay uut a definite program, it Is quite evident that
to put anything like this over properly those In charge must feel tbey
have the citizens at large working
with them. The loan of probably
thirty or forty curs will probably be
necessary, for Instance, besides help
with a dinner aud other entertainment it Is proposed to tender to the
visitors.
This is the outcome of a project up.-
on which Mr. J. F. Huchcroft, secretary of the East Kootenay Prospectors' .Association bus been worklpg
quietly for the past year or thereabouts. What It may mean to lho district is hard to estimate if it Is taken bold of by everyono ub it should be.
What Is ultimately aimed ut is the in-'
erestlng of active capital in the de-
elopment of the mining resources of
thlg section. Thero are many promising claims In the East Kootenay in
a wide variety of ores which are crying out tor development, but which
have hitherto not been brought tu it
state ot production, probably for
•some pertectly legitimate reason. ■ if
he men with engineering skill and
the practieed eye ln mining matters
can be brought in touch with these
propositions, some development is a
likely corollary.        #•
It Is hoped that the meeting called
for tomorrow evening at the city halt
will be attended by as many as possible.
KEY CITY LODGE, I.O.O.F.,
INSTALL OFFICERS FOR
CURRENT HALF YEAR
The new officers ot Key City Lodge,
I. O. O. P., were duly Installed In their
offices at the regular meeting on Monday evening in Clapp's Hall. The Installing officer was DD.GM. J. H-
Cameron. The new officers are as follows:
N.G F. O. Morris
V.O.  T. A Wallace
Rec. Sec W. M. Harris, P.G.
Fin. Sec H. White, P.G.
Trees W. D. Gilroy, P.G
R.s.N.o W. Johnson, P.G-
L-S-N-Q A. Pantllng
Warden 	
Conductor ...
R.S.S	
US.S )'.
R.S.V.G. ....
L.S.V.G	
.. EG. Dingley
... R. L. Burch
,. J. S. Thornley
F. A. Williams
 F. Russell
,(.. J. Gammon
I.Q  A. Kemball
0.0 S. Fyles, P.G.
Chaplain  ft. P. Moffatt
Following the Installation ceremonies tight refreshments were partaken
of,
A tentative proposal has been made
to hold a joint Odd Fellows' and Rebekah picnic some time this summer.
Preliminary plans have also been
drawn up for a two-storey hall about
36 by 70 feet, and are now under discussion.
INVESTIGATION OF
LUJUOK  WAREHOUSE
DEAL AT COAST LIKELY
Premier Oliver recently notified Mr.
it. J Cromle, of the Vancouver Sun,
that if iiis paper was prepared to le-
terate tlie charges which have been
made in regard tu the recent Vancouver liquor warehouse deal, the Government would mako some Invest!-
Lion of the mutter.      Mr. Cromle
irthwltll appeared with the requls-
ilo charges concerning tlie episode,
staling that while the Investigation
ought properly to have been held some
.uie ago, it was better late than nev
r. arid further, that if tlie promised
Investigation did not materialize within   a   certain   lime,   tbe   Lieutenant*
lovernor would be petitioned tu Institute u royal commission to look Into the transaction.
Accordingly liie Sun has circulated
copies uf a petitiuu tu which slgne-
tures ure invited by Mr. Cromle, the
publisher, which read us fellows:
To tbo Honorable
The Lieut.-Governor of B.C.,
Victoria, B.C.
dir:
Wo, the undersigned citizens of Bit
tish Columbia, petition that a Itoyal
Commission be appointed to Invest!-
gate lho lease nnd subsequent purchase by the government o tbe Campbell warehouse property in Vancouver,
known as lots 15, 16. 17, 18, Block 6S
I). L, 541, with a view to ascertaining whether the government was justified In leasing and subsequently
puchaslng said property, and to ascertain it tbo manner In which tbe properly was leased and purchased was
proper, und further to ascertain, If
any, what monies bave been impropcr-
y paid, either for rental or purchase
of said property.
LOCAL L. 0- L. PASSES
PATRIOTIC  RESOLUTIONS
ON TWELFTH JULY
MAPLE LEAF REBEKAH
LODGE INSTALL NEW
OFFICERS FOR HALF YEAR
At the regular semi-monthly meeting ot Maple Leaf Rebekah Lodge
No. 19, held on Wednesday evening,
new officers elected for the ensuing
half yearly term were Installed a
follows:
N.O   Mrs. T. Drew
V.O Mrs. W. D. Gilroy
Rec. Sec. ... MrB. W. M. Patton
Fin- Sec Miss M  Emslle
Trees Miss Viola Sarvls
U-S.N.O    MrB.   I.  Baxter
L.S.N.O Mrs. D. Campbell
Chaplain Mrs. J. McCallum
Conductor .. Mrs- W. S. Johnson
Warden   Mrs. H. Dingley
\.Q Miss Matilda Stevens
0.0 Miss Alice Brown
D. Cut M»- L M. Baiter
Tuesday of this week was Orangemen's day. "tbe glorious twelfth." and
u accordance with tbelr custom the
ocal Orange Lodge was opened iu the
morning and remained open all day,
and the Union Jack was flung to the
breezes above tlie Maple Hall where
tbo lodge meets. Some resolutions
appropriate to the occasion were passed upon, ami are to be forwarded to
headquarters.
In the evening after the business ot
the lodge bad been completed, a social time was enjoyed by some seventy-five people or so. dancing being in
dulged iu and refreshments served.
Among tbe loyal resolutions passed
by the lodge in session on that   day
wero the following:
Resored—
That this body of Orangemen and
Protestants assembled at Cranbrook
on the twelfth of July do hereby express our unswerving loyalty to the
person and throne of King George V.
and we hereby declare unalterable opposition to any movement which may
tend to tbe disintegration of the Bri-,
tish Empire.
Tbat we hereby declare onr continued belief in the principles of the Orange Association, believing thii they
express true democracy, Christianity,
and British loyalty, and tend to the
uplift of humanity and extension o(
liberty.
That we hereby extend our entire
sympathy with uur brethren in Ireland fn their figtit against the ruthless forces of the Sinn Fein, and declare that tbo Orangemen of Cranbrook aro prepared to tender them any
assistance possible In their magnificent struggle.
That this meeting declare that all
separate schools in the Dominion o»
Canada should be abolished, and the
principles of National Schools
throughout the length and breadth of
tho land tends tu unification of the
youth uf Canada. leading ultimately
to a consolidation of tlie entire Dominion.
That tbis meeting Is of the opinion
that Inasmuch a* the French language
is only entitled tu statute as an official language iu thn province of Quebec, Federal Parliament, and Supreme
Court uf Canada, thai blllnguallsm In
British North America should cease
to exist except as herein before stated.
That we os loyal subjects of His
Majesty King George V-. de hereby
assert that tbe Self-determination League for Ireland should find no place
In this Dominion of Canada, and we
call upon all British loyalists from the
Atlantic to tlie Pacific to protest
strongly against tho seditions and
treasonable utterances of this league.
Prices Drop But
Output Increases
liCJt) Report of Dept ol' Mines
Huh Interestiim Kiirnres; Big
Zinc Output oi' the Sullivan
Despite tbe full in tiie prjee of metals, mineral production in British Columbia for tbe last year totalled $35,-
543,(fS4, seven per cent, greater In
value than tiie production 'of 1919,
which was valued at -$33,296,318, according to the annual report of the
Hon. William Sloan, minister of
mines, made public last week.
"It is extremely gratifying that B.
C.'s mining Industry bas been so well
maintained, notwithstanding tbe flue-
muting metal market, and despite generally unsettled conditions, that it is
possible to
over the
1919,
report-an
1 in 1920
value of the production of
says the Hon. Mr. Sloan.
"It is to be remembered too. that
oilier mineral producing sections of
America have of late been announcing
reductions iu mineral output, a fact
which emphasizes the very satisfactory showing of tills province."
Some Big Increase
There was produced in British Columbia last year an Increase of more
than 2,-100.000 pounds of copper, 10,-
000.000 pounds of Stifle and
long tons of coal
ductiou of these
year
Placer gold am
tion, how-eve
00.000
otal iyo-
precedlng
nautili'    Value
ll.OSO ? 2^1.600
WO.CUS   U-.4S1.392
"..MS   3.235,980
kii.-.C   T.S32.S99
IS1.818   I'.SlO.llS
S0S.S8S   3,077,979
1^.975,625
474,544
2.426,950
llllllon
Mr- and Mrs. K. G. Drown and child.
of Waldo, spent Tuesday of this week
In the city.
Canada's ordinary revenue, 1920-21.
was $451,360,020 ($380,832,507 in 1919-
20); expenditure (rqnsolldated fund,)
1920-21. $357,515,278;' ($340,880,668 In
1919-20.) Tlie complete national out-
Iny for 1921-1 on consolidated fund
and capital account will bo $591,437,-
697. Current revenue wilt provide
$378,258,101 of this. leaving a balance
of $218,179,596 to be met. Net national debt, March 31, 1921, 92,311,
294,443.
ami lode gold produo-
tell off by 8,800 ounces
and 32.000 ounces respectively.
Details of last year's mineral production is given by tho minister as
follows:
(
Gold, placer, ozs.
Gold, lode, ores.  .
Stiver, ozs    ;
Copper, lbs 4-t
Lead, lbs 88
kinc, lbs  4',
Coal, tons. 2.240
lbs      2.595.125
Coke. tons. 8,240
lbs.	
Miscellaneous prod-
Nearly Three-Quarter.!
Last year's figure? bring the total
mineral production of British Columbia for all years, since records have
been kept, beginning with 1852, up to
$706,192,978. Hon. Mr. Sloan explains.
Of this grand total. British Columbia bas ao far produced $75,944,203
worth of placer gold. $102,753,823 of
lode gold. I53.66S.2S4 ot silver. $161,-
513.864 of copper, $46,637,221 of lead,
$19,896,466 of zinc. J2is,673,492*Of coal
and coke. $32,168,217 of building stone
and bricks and $1,037,408 of miscellaneous minerals.
Snrpa*»ed Only By Uur Years
The total annual mineral production
of the province bas oniy three times
exceeded the mineral production of
last year, the report points out, and
these three times were in war years,
1916, 1817 and 1918, when prices were
high and production artificially stimulated. The greatest annual production was in 1916 when the total was
$42,290,462. IW year 1917 was only
$1,500,000 ahead of last year, while
1918 was $6,000,000 ahead.
Gold Production Costly
The uadnction of B. C. for 1920
shows a decrease In value of $734,153
from the totals of the preceding year.
"This might bave been expected, aa
the mining of gold with its fixed value
has been in these times of high cost
of labor and supplies tor .some yearB
past offered little encouragement, and
even less at the beginning of this year
on the eve of what promised to be a
period of unstable- price--.." Hon Mr.
Sloan explains.
"With what is now an assured promise of lower costs of supplies and
living, it would seem thatjpld mining
would again become profitable and we
may confidently look for an increased
gold production in the near future.
Not Below Profitable Level
"With the other metals during the
last couple of years, it bas been a
battle ot prices, with wild fluctuations
in the market values of the metals,
causing an uncertain market demand
for ores, for smelters could not buy
ores in the face of an Impending drop
in tbe market values of tiie contained
metals and the subsequent Joss.
"It Is quite apparent from the price
chart, tbat there has been a great drop
from war days In all metal prices, but
for all this, it is to be noted that the
market pricte even at the f*nd of the
year are not lower than the normal
pre-war prices, at which profitable
mining was carried on.
Copper Market Stagnant
"By the end of the year, production
copper mining all over tlie American
continent had been greatly curtailed,
with many mines closed down entirely. This state of stagnation in the
copper mining industry will prevail
until the prices of the elements entering into and making up the costs of
mining and treatment of ores uro reduced, or when the market prices of
the metals are raised, nnd with some
assurance of continuance of such higher level.
"There seems to be a tendency to
a material reduction iu prico of the
essential factors making up mining
(Continued on Page 4) PAGE    TWO
TIIE      CRANBROOK      HERALD
Thursday, July 14th, 1991
■ruble Modal, formerly $85.00
Now  148.00
Online. Model ln Mahogany,
formerly $130.00
Now *»o.oo
The first I1WI1 grade machine
lo go buck to iire*war prices.
COME IN AND SEE THEM
Also tin- latest In Records
RAWORTH   BROS.
(Next Post Office)
Cbe Cranbrook Rerald
Published every Thursday.
P. A. WILLIAMS. .Editor £ ...imager
.Sulmriptlon l-rlco
To United Males .
#2.in, per year
. J2.f>U ]icr year
-With  ■   HlMloni  Without  ■  Haaile'
l-rlatcd bf I nlon Labor
No letter* to tbe editor will be Inserted except over the proper eiKbalure
sod addrela of the writer. The rule
edmlta of no exception.
Advertising Hatel on Application.
C)ianK«e for Advertising MUST ba In
this office Wednesday nuon the current
week to secure attention.
epilations have still been selling it, die threatened proceedings in most eases having been
withdrawn, Then the liquor
board very sagely announces
these cluba can no longer secure* beer from them. This
ii indeed a drastic step when
all the clubs have to do to meet
it is to ship in the beer from Alberta.
Signs are not lacking that
the government has weakened,
and that the forthcoming fall
session will be made the excuse
to introduce a more liberal beer
clause. Prohibition was uiieti-
forcable, the government said.
Under moderation just as. big
or bigger |an organization
seems to be coming into existence, but the enforcement of
the law has not yel lieen very
thoroughly Ibrought home, ns
witness the beer fiasco.
That the desire is not meiely
au attempt to embarass the go.
vernment, bul an honest attempt to get a legal ruling on a
debateable poinl is made clear
by Ihe intention of the veterans' clubs, as announced by
their provincial officials, to refrain in the future from selling
beer if the government will fr
cure from the courts a rilllfi
covering the case.
CKANUUOOK,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
THURSDAY, JULY Mil, llim
AUK YOI! ONE
"m
Furity.Qaalit/.Economj'
Tlte combination of (turfy-
quality and economy «*
hat made Magic Baking
m-Powoet the Randaro^
i HK-Mng powder of Canada.
jffipositfvely contains no
!i alum or other injutioi-.s
1 substitute*.
It* us s Insures pes-fect
satisfaction.
"Co«t<:. no tvsc.ve than the
ordinary fends"
Mado i:t Catud.t
E.W.Cn.t.CTT .;  )-,.r.-»l'/ TIMITF.D
once more on the green isle. If
it be peace with honor for both
sides, time the great healer will
be able to get iu its benificenl
work, and on a new page of history Ireland will write its best
story yet.
Lluhii'iiiu^ u|i
Thore la uu
ment Ih be
Blriiigonox,
went forth
II iM't'llilllnlv
i secret llmi tho govern
:; lined wiili n financial
The  rail   inr  economy
months ngo, ono ac-
CRITICIZES GOVERNMENT;
ANNOUNCEMENT TO HOLD
FALL SESSION OF HOUSE
PB4CB FOR IRELAND?
There are some iieH.siini.sts at
large in thn city. People who
think that times are bad and
know they are going to be
worse. They are sure of it,
There is no remedy for such a
condition of things, these preachers of a dismal doctrine pro
claim—we are in for it—there
is no escape.
Delve down into the mental
processes of these individuals,
and an interesting conclusion
is reached- They have heard
such and such a tiling Is going
to happen, and so what .else
can result but hard times, uud
business difficulties?
This species of reasoning
might take more hold if its pre
mises were more sound The
doctrine of the pessimist is always founded on something
that has not yet happened, and
may not—but it might, the individual of that ilk say;*.
Shake it off. The worst troubles are those that never come.
Be content with the situation
that today brings, profit by it
to what aver extent you are able
with all fairness, and iet next
week, next month or next year
look after itself when it comes.
There is nothing in the outlook for CraubrODK that calls
for pessimism. There is a lot
that ought to call for faith in
the future and should arouse us
to the courage of our convictions. Be an optimist—not a
blind fool who won't season his
cheerfulness with reason or
foresight—but be among those
not affrighted by a shadowed
spectre of the future which will
surely melt with to-morrow's
rising sun.
Furthermore when a pessimist stops you to tell you how
bad he finds things and how
much worse they are going to
be soon, talk him down. Times
are only as bad as we make
them.
Devout well wishers of the
Empire are hoping that the
move now afoot across the water for a settlement in Ireland
will not prove abortive. The
conference between the factions
at variance which has been cal
led seems surely the practical
and sensible way to settle the
question.   Both sides have held
TWENTY YEARS AGO
H&tract* from tht Cranbrook
Herald ot thii date, 1900
Conductor Tom Caven 1ms resumed
work on the Crow.
Next to the LeRoi the St- Eugene
ranks as tlie biggest producer In B.C.
A subscription .paper fs being circulated to raise money to buy band instruments for Crnnbrook.
Work has been inaugurated on a
telegraph line to Kimberley by tlie
Canadian Pacific Railway.
        H
ct ui iiutcil when tho difficulty of floating tho lust provincial flotation of
$.1.000,(MO wus met with. Thu price
ut which thoso bonds were sold, 98.68,
was not. such as to oilthllse the members of the govern men t. Orders were
issued that various departments should
curtail tlieir outlays uud, in conse-
(|uence, there lias heen a drastic cut
in public works. Many plans for new
work for the year have been revised
and curtailed, uud. as u result, there
will be little work curried ou during
July and August—Victoria Colonist
TIE CONTRACTS FINISH;      |
31II.L AT KITCHENER
CLOSES TEMPORARILY I
It is said that the Penwlck Brothers
have discovered an Immense Iron deposit in the Sand Creek district, just
back of Jaffray, und thut reliable as-
,   , ,    ,       i Sfly8 show lt to be a flue quality   of
their ground during all  these mineral.
bitter years, and the Sinn Fein] —
must now be convinced that the
British government is not to be
coerced into taking a single
step. The solution which has
been proffered, namely, separate parliaments for Ulster and
and South, is a decided concession, aud might well be tried
as something in advance of
anything which has as yet been
advanced.
On the other hand, the resolute continuance of its policy by
the Sinn Fein, however questionable it may seem, must force
the conclusion that here is no
passing agitation. To some it
is a matter of conscience; the
progress of the movement bears
all the earmarks. As such it
would seem futile to attempt to
stamp out Sinn Feiuism by any
show of force, or yet to await
its subsidence.
Many anxious eyes are peer
ing across the ocean hoping to
Archdeacon Pentreath of the Anglican church has been visiting Crunbrook this week. The Christ Church
congregation has now become self-
supporting, and It Is necessary to find
more accommodation.
A crusade is being inaugurated in
the city for better Sunday observance.
A joint meeting was held In the Presbyterian rhurch last Sunday evening
to discuss the matter.
The Last, Phase
Everybody remembers the huge statue of Hlndenbiii'g which was set up
in Berlin during the war; it wus made
of wood, and was destined to be coated
with the heads ol' nails driven into lt
by the people. At first tlie Beiiiners
lined up and clamored ior the privilege
of performing (at a icasonnble charge
per nail) this rather gruesome ceremony, reminiscent of niediuval witchcraft, but Hindenburg was the idol of
Germany just then; Inter on, when he
had not driven tbe Allies into the sea
and captured Paris, thp crowds of
nail-drivers dwindled ami disappeared.
Ho did the statue, and nobody troubled
to inquire whither; it passed into decent oblivion, until Ihe other day It
was advertised for sale, either whole
or in pieces—for firewood.— London
Sphere.
FROM THE VIEW-POINT
OF
OUR CONTEMPORARIES
What the Farmers Think
Premier Oliver's government cannot
find the money wherewith to undertake either new construction or the
paving tbe old roads little more thuu
series of mud-holes, but his colleagues
can find hundreds or thousands—yes,
millions—for a liquor warehouse and
contract plums In the form of a $600,-
000 courthouse at Prince Rujiert, not
to mention the lucrative aud not laborious positions of its friend:-, on Ihe
Liquor Board at $7,500 per year each
The wastrels at Victoria must go. -
see that peace is going to settle |b.C Farm and Home.
Medicine Hut Klcctlen
The election of tbt Farmer candidate in Medicine Hat wus not unexpected. The prairies ure still swayed
by the Crerar free trade theories.
But tho prairie provinces ure a
small part of Canada- If the protectionist forces of the eastern provinces
and British Columbia cun get away
from petty prejudices and bend their
energies to tiio promulgation of a policy that is for the advantagd1 of the
whole of Cauadu rather than for any
section of it, tliere is no reason to
fear for the future.
Time is playing on tbe side ot tlte
supporters of suue government. The
Farmers huve been in power in On
tario and tjieir extruvugance. their
Backus deal and tlieir Biggs' road
scandal huve sapped the strength of
the movement in this province.—Toronto Telegram-
(Victoria Colonist)
The holding of an autumn session
or tbe Provincial Legislature raises
some inUretttnc points. Although
th-*re hat beeu no government announcement to this effect It Is generally supposed that the coming session
will mean that one will be held early
in 1922, and since one must be held
each year the government may adopt
the policy of making autumn sessions
the rule of the future. This would
menu It would be desirable, lt not actually necessary, to change the financial year of the province so that It
should end either October 31 or November 30. At the autumn session it
will be necessary to vote supply to
carry over the groa'cr part of 102:
aud this will place the government lu
a quandury, for the receipts and expenditures ot the present fiscal yeur
will not bo known by that tlmo, si
thut unless the financial year Is cliuu
ged there fs more than a probability
of confusion, to say nothing of opportunities arising for the wastage of public funds. The government should
muke un eurly announcement of what
are Its plans respecting the financial
year und of Its policy affecting thc
annual data at whieh the Legislature
will meet in the future.
Belief for municipalities, the unemployment question, the increased salaries to Ministers and raised sessional indemnities for members, as well
ns the outstanding question of amendments to the present Liquor Control
Act, will be among some of the chief
features ot the forthcoming session
It promises to be lengthy, for the program will be more comprehensive than
that which occupied the last session,
and debates are certain to be more
prolonged. Since unemployment will
be a foremost subject it ls ouly right
that the government should give au
early indication of its Intentions regarding a budget. Unless a budget is
brought down It will be necessary for
the Legislature to meet again before
March 31, 1922. This would mean,
owing to the increased sessional Indemnities, tbat each member of the
Legislature, within a year, would
have drawn $6,000 from the public
treasury, something which public opinion is not prepared to tolerate. Owing to the considerations upon which
we have touched briefly, we feel sure
that Premier Oliver wil make an early
announcement of the government's
plans affecting the forthcoming session, and how Uie autumn gathering
will govern future meetings of the
Legislature.
(Creston Beview)
Timber shipments from this point
are not very extensive at present,
about the only thing moving just now-
being a little lumber from the Sash &
Door Compilny stock, whicli is going
to Cranhrook for the new theatre.
While the demand was good Kitchener
supplied poles and posts for points
south us far as California and Missouri. It the past two years it Is conservatively estimated that well over
100,000 lies have been shipped from
Kitchener.
Having finished the lie contract they
had with the Canadian Pacific Bull-
way, the Crauhrook Hash &■ Door Co.
mil shut down ou Thursday lust, but
part of the crew is now at work put
ting in a storage dam at Meadow
Creek.
The People's GLoke
For Over 70 Years
for digestive disorders has been
Beecham'sPills. Youcan have confidence in this remedy for biliousness, headaches, flatulency, constipation. Sluggish organs arc
stimulatfd and the whole system
benefitted by
BEECHAM'S
■•^PlLLS'S"
TIIK   WKATIll.lt   BULLETIN
Official Ihorinomoter waitings nt
Oranbrook.
Mill. Mux.
July  7       llll S7
July 8   48 SO
July 9   46 SO
July 10    85 82
July 11     87 SO
July 12   28 79
July  12    87 80
IT IS r.Mtl.l.."!
Canada's building permit vulue und
construction work waa $189,000,000 lu
1919; $2f..-,.000,000 in 1920; estimated
ut *:soo.U(io.ooo In 1921.
THE BEER QUESTION
A   UNIQUE
COMPASS.
BACK LONGTITUDES
The ship of state ln B.C. is
being dangerously rocked by
barrels of beer- It is proving a
troublesome cargo, and there
are indications that the skipper is anxious to jettison the
Btuff by introducing at the next
session of the Legislature
something in the way of a beer
clause. True, this would be
letting all semblance of control
off the beer, but then, what
else can the government do?
It failed to keep the dog tied up
in the days of prohibition, and
now with more rope the pup is
giving trouble- ergo, ln the Interests of safety first, we must
let go of it, so the government
attitude on the beer question
seems to say.
Clubs which at the outset
were threatened with prosecution for infringing   the   beer
rHEFACE OF THE DIALS*COMPASS
A silver mounted coir.pHSH which
Is oearly 200 years old and lu titled
with a sundial, also lon-xltud.s und
latitudes of Important cities and
P-iits, wus pn-Hcnlud by a Mltw
Hockley, k piisKi-ticiT on board the
Canadian Pacific liner Metagatna, to
Mr. E. Cox, the third chiHN steward,
as a token of gratitude while on a
voyage to Cunndu.
Mr. Cox Mat..* that thu Squire of
tbe parish of Weston, Norfolk, presented the compass many years u«o
to the Rev. Uuckley of Weston, who
was Miss Buckley's grand fattier- uud
when be died ho left It to her. The
compass Is In a well-preserved fff-SW
shag case, inside which Is (he following Inscription;
"This compUFs and dial was
given me by Sir Goorgo ■
Oxenden in l77-'i ll having
been Sir llasll Jlrwc.ds,
made at Pftt Is about thc
year U27 II. II."
When opened the sen dial and
compass Is on the face, while on tho
hark of the com pirns are tin. longitude:- and latitudes.
it wa.i found a very vulual.k Instrument for tarrying lu tiio old
hunting days.
£^ifCASE,COMPASS frDJAJfj
WINNIPEG.—The removal of the
restriction reserving all vacant government lands within nrteen mites of
u railroad for soldier settlement has
caused a boom in homestead settle,
ment. and Government Lands' offices
are being beseiged wtth applicants
Since May lst nearly two hundred entries for homesteads have been made
ut the Winnipeg district office, the
majority of prospective homesteaders
being British and American.
MIME HAL  ACT
(form V.)
(TKTIFM'ATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE
"Hex Fr.," "Creek," Daughter," "Sol
oman," "Thor," "Hiram," "Major,*
"Horeb," "Sojourner," "Joshua,*
"Hagia," "Sarula," "Ruby Fraction,'
"Sims," "Mount Morluli"
MINERAL. CLAIMS
situate In the Fort Steele Mining Division of Kootenay District.
Where located:—
on Sullivan Hill, at Klmberley, B.O,
TAKE NOTICE that E. (I. Montgomery, F.M.C. 36091-C, acting as Agent
for the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, Free
Miller's Certificate No. 86083-C, In
tends sixty days from the date hereof
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 87, must bo comnuncod
before the issuance of such   Cerllft
cate of Improvements.
Dated this 22nd day of June, 1921.
TIIE  CONSOLIDATE!! MINING  k
SMELTING COMPANY OF
CANADA, LIMITED
Per B. G. MONTGOMERY,
17-20 Agent
The
ORIfllNAI.
•nd
only
GENUINE
Beware
of
Imitation*
Sold
on the
Merit*
of
MINARD'S
LINIMENT
To quietly lock the cellar door he-
hind you when descending to sample
limited supply of home brew.
To hold a foreign language, boolc
right side up when pretending to read
It In public
To reduce the speed of your car to
at least 26 miles an hoiy when joined
on the road by a motorcycle poll'
mnn.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
rilANHItOOk TKAIN TIMES
NO. «7 DAILY—To Nelson, Vancouver, Spokane, etc. Arrive 12.10 p.
in.; leave 12.20 p.m.
NO. AS DAILY—To Pernie, I-nth-
bridge, Medicine Hat, Calgary, otc.
Arrive 4.10 p.m.; leave 4.20 p.n*.
t'ranbrook, YVycllffo,  KhiiWilej   Her-
■i Ice i
No. 828—Leave 1 a.m. No. SIM—arrive
2.10 p.m.
('runt-reek, lake Windermere nnd
-Nnlden Serluvr
Monday and Thursday, each week
—NO. 891. leave 9 a.m Wednesday
and Saturday—NO. 8*2*2. arrive 3.38
p.m.
For further  particulate  apply to
any ticket agent,
J. B. PROCTOR.
District Passenger Agent. Calgary.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
Canada's forests are the main resource of Its character In the British
Empire. Annual production value has
reached $14ti,000.000 from over 3,000
operating plants, found In every province, with exports representing half
of this value- Canada's present supply of commercial timber exceeds 500
billion feet board measure, besides
pulpwood timber.
Canada is a laud of free schools in
the main, while in the arena of higher education there are 22 universities
and 43 colleges. Nearly 110.000 elementary schools, with 22.000 teachers,
have an enrolment of nearly a million and a half of pupils. "Canada's
achievement In Its institutions of learning Is one of the most striking features of Canadian lire-"—Lord Hum-
ham.
DRINK FOWLER'S
FRUIT JULEP
"First for Thirst"
In  bottles and  at  Fountains
NELSON BUSINESS COLLEGE
LEARN TO EARN
Practical CommercUl Course In
Shorthand, Typewriting
Bookkeeping, Commercial htm
Penmanship
Spelling
Commercial English and
DAY   AND   NIGHT   CLASSES
i'or Particulars Apply lo
C. W. TVLKIt, Principal
P. 0. Box, 11, Nelson, B.C
Office I'lioue 2311    l-.O. Mux »
lies. I'lliinr 210
B. A. MOORHOUSE
A.*w. Mem. Can. Sot. C.E.. & H.C.1..S.
1'IIOV.   LAND   SURVEYOK
Olllce — Hniismi muck
I'ninlirook     •      •      -     B.C.
fDH.W.j
m\V
A . F E It OI I:
DENTIST
Campbell-Manning Rlmk
Plione Hi.    Office Hours:
9 to 12, 1 l» .-> p.m.  Sals. 9 tu
1
Dn. Oreen & MacKinnon
Physicians and Surgeons
Offlce at residence, Armstrong
Annuo
OFFICE HOURS
Forenoons   9.00 to 10 00
Afternoons  1.00 to   4 00
Evenings T.30 to   [M
Sundays   2.10 to   4:<0
CRANBROOK. B. C.
DR. F. B. MILES
DENTIST
Offlce ln Hanson Block
OFFICE HOURS
I te 11. a.m.
1 to   I n.m.
CRANBROOK, B.C.
F. If. MACPHERSON
Undertaker
Pkeae IM
Nerkary Art, neit to City HaU
lhe Mripetipaei^e'Bisctitt
SOCIAL TEA
Ml
TRY THI-M TODAY
jpl  NORTH-WEST   BISCUIT COMPANY L™
EDMONTON.    ALTA
Mr. CoiiRiimer:
Fernie, B.C., May 10th, 1921.
Aro yon aware that Fernie Beer Is the most popular appetizer of the ilny? It ls in evidence at all good
Motels and Clubs. Likewise lt Is to be found in many
of the belter class honios. It gives zest to the most
jaded appetite, and in addition ls a decidedly wholesome and palatable drink.
Have you tried our Bock and Porter? If not,
a great pleasure awaits you. These facts are backed
by our many satisfied customers.
We nro now in n position to supply your table
with those beverages, also with Aerated Waters in all
flavors. When ordering your supplies, be sure these
are on the list.
PHONE 90   ::   FOR SERVICE
Pernie-Fort Steele Brewing Co. Thursdny, July HIh, 1921
Till'.      CRANBROOK     HERALD
PAGE TIIItEE
LATEST HCTORIA
£-..
NEW 3
TAME CANADIAN BEARS
i^bmdtaito-^^reten^eBA oiderlf,
ed to bis new acquaintance.
He fed blm again and th«7 parted
In mutual confidence. Thla went on
for some days, until finally tbe bear
was ho well-acquainted with his new
friend tbat he would wait in the timber until call-Id by a whistle. Re
became a show bear for tourists.
Others of tbe mountain bears apparently kept an eye on tbe original discoverer of the pile of tins. Doubt-
hiB well-nourlsbed appearance
caused envy and jealousy. Undoubtedly tbey watched and followed him,
because It wae not long until others
-were dining at the pile of cans.
Taught by the actions of tbe discoverer, they never displayed temper,
anger or doubt when humans came
near.    They continued well-behaved
black bears tbat a year ago were tha
wildest of the wild, who ■_;■.: dodged
trappers and hunters for years*
learned In a few short days that tha
men and women wbo came out to
see them meant them no harm and
expected to receive none. Tha beara
throughout the past summer hart,
been gazed at, photographed, band-
fed at times, and have < ons latently,
conducted themuolves with cxem«
plary politeness. Next Spring the*
will be there again, for normal beartj
never were known to desort a good,,
safe, easy feeding ground. And they,
will be In Increased numbers, bo-
cause there will undoubtedly lie furr»
little cunning cubs, rolling and playing with each other and slappinf
empty   Una   around   for footballs*
Ul.tm,  4
■—-—     -  - -*4 PAGE FOUR
THE      CRANBROOK      HERALD
Thursday, July 14th, 1921
OMl-TIMKltS OF FERNIE
ELECT OFFICERS FOR
THEIR ASSOCIATION
There wort titty-two members of tlie
Ferule District Old Timers Association present at the annual meeting last
Thursday evening. The following officers were elected for the ensuing
year:
Hon. President—H. J. Johnson.
Prcsideut—Dr- Bonnell, M.P.
Vice-President—Arthur Fenwlck.
Vice-President—-Aubrey Snow.
Vice-President—T. Labello.
Chaplain—A. C. Liphardt.
Physician—Dr. Corsan.
Sec.-Trens-—J. A. McLean.
Canada has over 4,000 elevators,
with capacity of 11^5.000,000 bushels-
New ones being constantly added.
Sold by all Drug-
i General Stores.
Fowler's WANTMORE
SALTED   PEANUTS
"The   Tnsto   Tolls"
Sold Everywhere
ASPIRIN
"Bayer" only is Genuine
m
{(51}}
Warning! Take no chances with
substitutes for genuine "Bayer Tablets
of Aspirin." Unless you see the name
"Bayer" on package or on tablets you '
aro not getting Aspirin at all. In every
Bayer package aro directions for
Colds Headache, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Earache, Toothache, Lumbago
and for Pain. Handy tin boxes of
twelve tablets cost few cents. Druggist!* also sell larger packages. Made
In Canada. Aspirin Is the trade mark
(registered iu Canada), of Bayer Man*
ufacture of Monoacetlc-acidester of
galley tcacld.
PRICES DROP BOT OUTPUT
INCREASES
costs, which will eventually so reduce the cost of mining us tu penult
of operations being profitably carried on.
Reflects Industrial Slump
"A rise iu metal prices, until these
meet the eost of production, is bound
to come eventually when tlie world's
markets again approach normal conditions. When that will be depends
upon how soon tlie world—particularly Europe, where our great market
lies—settles down to pre-war industry
and is able to buy our | redacts.
"During 1020 prices of all metals
wero held up to a fair and unt'nm
prico during the first nine months
of tho year, nnd then, pbout tho pud
of August, ■'ill metal prices simultaneously dropped about forty par cent,
to the present prices, which are unreasonably low an' lialow the coal **f
production.
"Tills sudden collapse of prices was
not due to any condition of mining
or of tlie metal market, but was the
reflex action of industrial conditions
the world over, entirely apart from
the mining industry.
Copper Production Creator
"It Is reassuring to find, in the
face of all those untoward conditions, |
that nevertheless the metalliferous
mines of the provinco as a whole, stitl;
mado a production valued at $1!),(!65,-
UC5, as compared with a production
in 1919 or $20,036,998—a nominal decrease of only $871,033, equlvtlent to
less than two per cent.
"The fluctuations of the market
have caused some strange anomalies.
For instance the quantity of copper
produced in 1920 Is greater than wus
produced in 1910, bul the average yearly price of tho metal was so much
lower in 1920 that tiie value of tho product of tiio metal Is less than in 1919.
Zinc Output Surprises
"Tiio production of gtnc under the
existing conditions was unexpectedly
largo and Is entirety due to the Increased operations of the Consolidated
Mining und Smelting Co., at the company's Sullivan mine iu East Koolenay.
"During the last half of the year,
in otlier places there has been littlo
or no market for zipe ore, and a very
small volume of sales or the metal.
Several of tiie larger zinc mints and
refineries in the United States cloned
down early in tho fall.
Con! Almost Makes Record
"The collieries of the province have
more than held their own this yenr.
The total value of the colliery products for the year was $13,450,109.
"The net coal production for 1920
exceeds that of the previous year by
827,584 tons, and, as a matter of fact,
it has only twice been equallod In
quantity—that Is. in tho yenrs of 1910
and 1912, when lt was but slightly
grenter.
"Falllng-off of the California oil
supply has caused a greatly increased
demand for coal, particularly from tiie
Coast collieries. There was no coke
made by the Coast collieries tliis past
year- The Crowsnest Pass Colliery
produced 07,792 tons, an Increase over its laat year's output."
Some Miuea Ship, other* Idle
During tlie "year, tlie report shows,
there were 221 mines shipping ore.
Sixty of them shipping more than
100 tons during the year. Altogether
there were 2,178,187 tons ot ore shipped by these mines.
In these shipping mines there were
3,351 meu employed. 1.921 of which
number work below ground.
Besides tho shipping mines, 251
non-shipping mines have reported to
the Department of Mines. Of this
number 72 are working and 179 aro
idle. Mines of this group employ a
total of 328 men. Most of the Idle
mines are in tlie Slocan district wliere
tliere nro thirty uud In tho Boundary-
Vale district witli forty-one. Nelson
and Ainsworth district each ims twenty-one Idle mines.
HOW MODERATION
WORKS   OUT
IN    FERNIE
(Fernle Free Press)
The jail was full of drunks on Saturday night.     Ttiey all had government permits.
Tho only effect the government control has had so far ln Fernie ls to
try to put the local brewery out of
business for the benefit of tlie big
coast breweries.
The Veterans' Club Is getting in
beer from Lethbrldge everyday. All
the other clubs will quickly follow suit
and it will only be a short time till
the government control wll have their
hands full trying to do business. Booze
can bo imported cheaper and in greater
variety than can be purchased from
the government "stocks.
COLUMBIA VALLEY
CATTLEMAN BUYS
AVItSIIIKE HERD
Canada lias developed only 12 per
cent, o flier available water-power of
nearly 20,000,000. Her water-power
resources are \ono of her ilchest assets, and tho high tension transmission of electric energy is one of the
most important factors In her present
day development The Ontario Hydro-
EtGctric transmission line is not only
the longest, but the largest public
ownership undertaking in the world.
248 jnunici pall ties are partners In It,
the chief source of power being Niagara Falls. The present total output
of the system Is 325,000 horse-power,
which will be increased to a million
when the Chippawa-Queenston power
canal is completed, and similar great
transmission plants are found in almost every province. The projected
international St. Lawrence water-power scheme, with five dams, will produce 5.000,000 horse-pewer.
(Special to the Herald)
1NVEKMEIUS, July 9.— In tho ro-
eeut dispersal sale of the famoijs Ayrshire herd owned by the Shannon Brothers which recently took place at Ch>
verdule it is noted tlmt one of the largest sales made was that of twenty-
three head to Mr. Lawrence Mitchell
of Twin Creek Ranch, twelve miles to
the south of Golden in tho Columbia;
valley. Mr. Mitchell is reported as
having mado the purchase on account
of tho Ayrshire Breeders' Association
of the Columbia Valley. Mr. Mitchell
is one of tho most wide awake of the
dairy cattlo men of this part of tho
Kootenay-Columbla river valleys, and
has been most Insistent and persistent
In his efforts to get this part put upon
the map us a staudurd dairy brooding
district and also a part whore the dairying Interests aro bound to prosper.
In the pursuit of his hobby he has
been most insistent in season nnd out
of season and as a result ho has a
largo band of followers with him -aa
the purchase of this bund of cuttle
will show.
Particulars in regard to the cattle
aro not at present to hand but if the
majority of them have reached tlie
milking period when they are coupled
up witii the others it wili give a good
foundation stone for tho starting of
the long hoped for creamery for Uie
Columbia valley. Iu this Mr. Mitchell
is to be congratulated. There are now
situated in the Columbia valley the beginnings of thirteen herds of purebred
Ayrshire cattle which are showing
most splendid results. All are working
In the R. O. P. tests and there has
beeif no evidence of tuberculosis in
any ono of the herds. Owing to the
dryness of tho*climate of the Colum
bin valley it is thought by many to
be particularly wel suited for the
Ayrshire breed, who also have to
their credit the feature of being good
rustlers and able to pick up a living
on ranges where tlie more timid and
less active might not thrive.
The Shannon Brothers herd of Ayrshire was started in the year 1909
when tho nucleus was purchased from
Robert Hunter and Sons of Maxvillo,
Ontario-
WAPTA   LAKE   CAMP
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Wapta Camp from East End of Lake looking towards Kicking Horse Pass.
About eight miles west of Lake
Louise Station on the main line of
tho Canadian Pacific Railway just
before entering the Kicking Horse
Canyon, the traveller notices a very
beautiful sheet of water named
Wapta Lake, sheltered from the
north by a high and massive mountain capped by eternal snow.
On the shores of this lake, facing
a magnificent Alpine panorama, a
rustic bungalow Camp has been constructed, which opened for visitors on July 1st, and will provide
a comfortable and convenient centre
for those who desire to explore one
of the most romantic aud pictures-,
que districts in the Canadian Pacific
Rockies. The Lako itself is at an
elevation of 5,190 feet above sea
level, and faces peaks scaling up to
over 11,000 feet. It is only half a
day's waik from Lake O'Hara, which
hns been selected as the site of the
Annual Camp of tho Alpine Club of
Canada for 1921. Lake O'Hara,
however, Is moro than a centre for
Alpine climber.*-. It was selected by
John S. Sargent, the famous artist,
as one of the most beautiful places
he could find in the Hookies, surrounded as it is with mountains of
wild and rugged grandeur which at
the same time compose into pictures of unfailing beauty.
Wapta Lake is actually in British
Columbia just ovor the Croat Divide,
■which will undoubtedly be a fnvorite
trip from tho Camp, Ten minutes
walk to the west of the Camp the
Kicking Horse Canyon begins, down
■which one can walk, ride or drive.
From the west end of Wapta Lake
to Field ta less than twelve mllea,
jrUlo tha -tfet-uce to Yoho Falls in,
the Yoho Valley is ten miles, and to
Emerald Lake is fourteen miles. Towards the north, one can reach Slier-
brooke and Ross Lakes in about an
hour and a half, so that the variety
of excursions offered to those who
3tay at this Camp is remarkable.
Wapta Lake Camp is constructed
on the same lines as the Lake
Windermere Camp, which proved so
popular last summer. It has a Central Community House for dancing
and recreation purposes 30 foot
square with a wide gallery round the
sides. The kitchen is u large building, 20 x 26 ft, while the cottage,
nre of varying sizes and design-
double cottages being 24 x 14 ft. and
single cottages 14 x 12 ft. Each cottage is equipped with a small heater
and stove pipe on account of the cool
nights natural to this elevation. The
Camp is within the jurisdiction of
the Dominion Parks Authoriti;s, and
subject to the Dominion Parks regulations, which are particular ir
guarding against forest fires, pre
vent the cutting down of green tim*
ber In the vicinity of the Camp and
forbid any dealing In liquor on the
premises. The Camp occupies an
area of three acres, and the rustic
bungalow character of the Cabins
gives it a very attractive appearance.
About 50 visitors can be accommodated at one time. Two bath houses,
i.i for men and one for ladies, are
supplied with hot and cold running
water and toilet facilities,
Hector Is the Station for Wapta
Lake Camp and for the convenience
of visitors a motor launch will connect with a landing stage ln front
of tha Camp. Transfer charte from
■tattoo to Camo is 81 Mate
way. Saddle horses and guides will
be available for those who wish to
ride, and telephone connection with
Chateau Lake Louise will make it
easy to communicate with those who
have engaged any of the Company's
Swiss Guides. These guides are Itt
great demand, nnd their services
should be requisitioned well in advance.
One of thc most thrilling trips in
the whole Canadian Pacific Rockies
can be made from Waptn Lake
Camp. This is by way of Lake1
Louise over the Victoria Glacier to
Abbott Pass under the great preci-j
pices of Lefroy. After the summit
of this Pass one reaches Lake Oesa,
-front which one gets an exquisite
view of Lake O'Hara down below.
From Lake O'Hara an easy trail
down Cataract Creek brings ono back
to Waptn Lake. This, of course, is
a somewhat strenuous trip and re-'
quires Swiss Guides.
An easier trip on saddle ponies,
through magnificent Alpine scenery
is through the Yoho Valley to Emer-1
aid Lake or over the Burgess Pass toj
Field. A four-in-hand Tally-ho will!
drive down the Kicking Horse Pass,
on a road which follows the old1
C. P. R. spade.
The rates for Wapta Lake Camp
are very moderate, being $5.50 peri
day for those who can make only a;
short stay, and |5.00 for those who
can stay a week or more.
The C. P. R. passenger trains will
stop at Hector while the Camp ls In
operation, with the exception ofl
tralna Nos. 3t 7 and 8.
The Cms wttl U operated b*
ColoMlPilLlUma»4fiTe.MoejeJ
If it is not marked
MACDONALD'S
it is not Macdonald's
FORMER COLUMBIA
VALLEY  RESIDENT
ELEVATED TO BENCH
INVERMERE, July 9.— The announcement has recently been made
from Victoria that Mr. Thomas Arch-
dale Pope, ot Pentlcton has .been appointed stlpendary mabistrate for Pentlcton. Mr. Pope's friends are pleased
to learn the news. His clear judgment
and foresight pre-eminently qualify
lilm to hold this judicial position-
Prior to residing In Pentlcton where
he has now been for a little over a
year, Mr. Pope for several years previously resided in this part, having a
beautiful little ranch caled Westcliff,
on the benches above Wilmer. Prior
to reaching here Mr. Pope had for
many years been In the Civil Service in
India In the capacity of a surveyor,
a post requiring much judgment and
tact In dealing with the natives. His
native home is Scotland.
SHIPMENTS OF ORE TO
TIIE TRAIL SMELTER
The following ls a Wit of the oro
received at the Trail Smelter during
the week ending July 7:
Mine Location Tons
Surprise,  Republic,  Wash       57
Company mines    6912
VICTORIA CONFERENCE
REGARDING PROJECT
OF FLATS RECLAMATION
With n view to discussing with tlie
provincial government the proposed
investigation into the feasablllty of
reclaiming the Kootenay Flats, near
Creston, through co-operation between the province of British Columbia, and the state of Idaho, Governor
Davis, of that state, conferred with
Hon. T. D. Pattullo, minister of lands
last week at Victoria. Hon. Mr. Davis
was accompanied by Mr. W. F.
Swfjndsen, engineer for the Idaho
Commission of Reclamation.
Tho proposal to reclulm the Kootenay Flats and thereby render available for agriculture development between 75.000 und 100,000 acres of
lund on both sides of the International boundary lands has been put forward for some years. Two years ago
a resolution was passed by the provincial legislature authorizing the government to get Into touch with the
Dominion and United States authorities to the end that there might be
co-operation in a joint investigation
Into tbo whole plan. Stops were taken by Hon. Mr. Pattullo to that ond,
and thc Provincial and State authorities have been corresponding through
the medium of tho Dominion and United States federal governments. At
the last session of the state legislature an appropriation of $2,000 was
voted towards paying the expense of
a preliminary investlpntlnu.of the advisability and practicability of tho
reclamation plan nnd in this tho province will co-operate.
About 80,000 acres of tho nnnunlly
overflowed area Is within Uie province, but -any plan of reclamation
must apply to the entlro area, and
unless It Is Inaugurated on this side
of Hit boundary no.Hcheme would be
feasible for the lands south of the
lino only.
Tho province, Hon. Mr. Pattullo
has stated, will co-operate by directing Its engineers to visit the area,
and there co-operate with the state's
engineer in an investigation of the
whole situation. No step will bo taken on any plan until this preliminary
data Is avnilablc.
B, RIVER AND RAMPART
GAINING FAME IN
MOVIE SCENARIOS
GRAVES OF SOLDIERS OF
C.K.F. WHO DIED IN
B.C. TO BE MARKED
Col. H. C Osborne, C.M.G., secretary-general of the Canadian agency
of the Imperial War Graves Commission, hus arrived ln Vancouver, and
in an interview has outlined thc plan
Tor marking graves ln aCnada of men
who died while In the Canadian Expeditionary Forces or by reason of
tlieir services overseas.
As a result of his tour of the Dominion, for the purpose of Investigating conditions regarding the burial
places of Cunadaln soldiers and sailors, Colonel Osborne was in a position to state definitely that steps
would soon be taken to mark all
graves with granite headstones set
In permanent concrete foundations.
This would be done throughout British
Columbia in all cases where the graves
had not already been privately marked.
Miss Priscllla Dean and her company of thirty motion picture artlBts
that reached Cranbrook last week,
will first work at Bull River, where
some of the hair raising episodes of
the exterior work are to be filmed.
Tiie scenes around Rampart will be
featured after tho main work nt Bull
River Is completed. During their
stay tlie company will make several
journeys between Crnnbrook and Bull
River.
Miss Dean was enthusiastic when
informed of the scenic beauties and
motion picture possibilities of British
Columbia. She take;, an active interest In her stories and locations. It
was only through her abilily and per-
sev-f-runce that iu u few years she
has come up from a little struggling
ambitious girl, to a top notchcr in the
film world.
The Universal Film    Company    is
greatly responsfbe lor this, inasmuch
| as they go to tho extreme   In   cost
I and trouble to procure efficient dlr-
| ectors and high class stories and always to surround Miss Dean with an
all-star company.
"The possibilities for tho development of agriculture In Canada are unlimited."—tanud Ian Minister of Agriculture. The largest percentage of its
population Is engaged ln lt, and dependent upon It. There are 730,000
farms. Vulue of field crops In 1.120
broke all records with $1,466,244,050,
from over a billion bushels.
LIQUOR BUSINESS
SLOW Al
KASLO
(Creston Review)
Up to Ilie present tliere has been
little or no demand for permits undor
the new government liquor control
act. It. Hewnt, who issues theso iter
mils at Kaslo. and who was here last
week, stated (lint between tho 16th
nnd 21st he had call for but one of
them in all thc Kaslo district.
Canada's fai'ni wealth, Including value of land, live "stock, Implements,
etc-, estimated by Census Bureau at
nearly $7,000,000,000 In 1917. Tho
1920 grain erpp alone yielded a billion
bushels, again a record figure, wheat
totalling 289,000,000 bushels and oats
5&(>,000,000 bushels.
CORNS
Lift Off with Fingers
/
ONTARIO TO GO DRY
NEXT WEEK FOLLOWING
OVERWHELMING VOTE
When Importation of UquOr into the
province of Ontario ceases on tho
morning of July 19 as a result of
federal action following the referendum on the question, the much-advertised "Sandy" bill will come Into effect. The Ontario government has
passed the necessary order-In-conn erf**1
to bring the act Into effect and a formal proclamation based upon the order will be Issued ln the course of n
few days.
The bringing Into effect of the Sandy bill means that the Drury government will supplement, bo nr as It Is
able, the federal measure making Ontario "bone dry." The bill was framed to put an end to short circuiting In
the event of Importation being prohibited and operates by prohibiting
the movement of liquor within the province.
New Insurance business for ' 1919
reached me enormous sum of half a
billion dollars, an increase of nearly
$200,000,000 In* a single year. The net
death claims in the same year were
$16,927,000.
K-^F
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a little
"Freezone" on nn aching corn, Instantly that corn stops hurting, thon
shortly you lift It right off with fingers.   Truly 1
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle of
"Freezone" for a few cents, sufficient
to remove every hard corn, soft com,
or corn between the toes, and the cal-
lusses. without soreness or Irritation.
Fowler's Pedigreed Cider
APPETIZING, COOLING, REFRESHING
"MADE AT HOME"
Qrapt, Lognnbtrry, Orange). Lemon. Raspberry.
Strawberry, Cherry and  Blackberry
One bottle makes three gallons of delicious
Cider.    Less quantities in proportion.
PRICE—$1.00 PER BOTTLE
Sold by Grocers and Druggists or Sent Direct
Postpaid on Receipt of Price.
Great for the Kiddies—and the Big Folks, Too
R. L. Fowler & Co. Ltd., Mfrs.
CALGAKY, ALBERTA
»«eo •*■»■«>•**«
TORONTO.— Reports have reached
here of a promising discovery of gold
in the township of Midlothian, ln tho
Gowganda mining division. The discovery lies about fifty miles southeast from Porcupine, Judging from
tho great variety of minerals being
found. It would appenr as though this
may develop into nn important centre
of mining activity. It Is noted that
within n radius of n dozen miles or
so, gold, silver, high grade hematite
ore, asbestos and barlto, have ull been
found, nnd In each case In commorclal
quantities with the exception of iron,
a deposit Which la aald to be tho highest grade so far found tn Canada, trot
Ue volume of which le In doubt.
J     TWO DELIGHTFUL .RESORTS
IM   TIIK
Canadian Pacific Rockies
LAKE WINIIERMEKE .'AMI'
A lliiniraliiw Camp Built Amcmir Fir Trees un u
Ten-arc at the Film* of Lake W.mli rnii'ic,   n
Lovely Warm Wafer Lake I.jIiik in flip Iti milt*
In) Columbia Valley.
A ramp where you ran enjoy Mountain'Si-oncry
LAKE    WAI'TA    ('AMI'
lleiirheil from lhe Halo I.Ino of III. ('.uindli-i
Pacific Hallway ul Hector, Beautifully Situated
nml -tv.lliln Easy Heath of Yoho Vul'i", Kick-
im-. Howe Canyon, Fnti-ralil Lake, Volio I'nlK
niul  I uie O'llarii, Where Rome of tlu- Most'     (I
hHIi every form of Outdoor lilterslon. Miiirnlflriat Nrcncry Ih to ho Sri'ii.
Moderate Priced Bungalow Camps
Consisting of Central Community Hull fur Dining nnd Social Recreation, and a Number
of Small Bungalow Type Buildings for Sleeping Quarters
A  DEMtlimTI, SPOT FOB THU  FAMILY •
Special 14-I>ny Fares from (nltfinj. Edmonton, Medicine lint, l.clliliriilgc and Macleod
NI'MMER TIM'IIIST FAKES
To the PACIFIC COAST Will Allow STOPOVER AT LAKE WAPTA CAMP, IIF.CTOH, B.C.
ONLY A SHOUT SIDE THII- FROM UOI.DEN TO LAKE WINDERS KICK
■■formation ui Fall Particulars will be gladly furnished on application tb uj Agent of tke
CANADIAN   PACIFIC   RAILWAY »-» Thursday, July 14th, Mil
THE     CBANBROOI     HBBALB
PAGE    FIVE
Hay - Fever
SUMMER COLDS, ASTHMA,
spoil many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively stops theee troubles ■
Sneezing, weezing, coughing,
weeping eyea aren't neceaiary—
unless you like being that way*
81.00 at your druggist's, or write
Templctons, Toronto, for a free trial.
Sold By
Beattle-Noble, Ltd.
if a motorist runs down a pig It le
nine to In. a blooded Berkshire. Every chicken slang lite red is a pedigreed
bird wortii $-10 or *5U. A yellow barnyard cur is a wire-haired fox terrier.
A calf Ih always <>f Alderney or
•Guernsey blood* -in fact notlilng seeuia
to Improve live stock Hku crossing it
with nn iintoiiiobllu.
Work mi tho reconstruction of the
concentrator and mill at Britannia
Hon iii will commence at an early
dato, il is understood. It Is antlcl-
patod thai It will take about twelve
mouths lor the installation uf tbe ne-
cosB&ry machinery* und that uu ex-
pendlture of $1,000,000 will be involved.
LIQUOR STOCKS IN THE
CELLARS SHOULD BE
SEALED BY THE lfith
FERNIE BREWERY
CLOSED DOWN AT
BEGINNING OF MONTH
Canada lmd. a fow years ago, 30
chartered bunks, but amalgamations
have reduced tho number to 18, with
4.500 branches, Increase of 1,500 since
1014.
-iJrfyal
DENTACL0R
TOOTH PASTE
^ WHITENS "t
"CLEANSES
%\'\   PRESERVES
RELIEVES PYORRHEA
J tAfaal "■*-
Sold by
Inspectors Being Appointed to
Chock ap Working of tbo
Aetj New Stores Open
It waB announced from Victoria last
week tbat all private stocks of liquor
must be sealed and recorded-before
Friday, July 15th, by order of the Liquor Control Board. The person with
liquor In their possession for private
consumption ls required to register
with the proper officials the quantity
and nature of the private stock held,
und is given a label or seal to be affixed to each bottle. No charge Is
made for these seals, und they are
supposed to be attached to the liquor
bottles hy tho owner, but a little later
IiIh work Is to be checked up by an
Inspector! "Possession Approved" Ib
the wording on the seals to be attach
ed to private stocks.
An Inspectors' department "is now
being organized to work first of all In
the larger cities- later It ls presumed their activities will extend also to
the smaller centres. The appointment
of these officials is not to be made
public, It Is announced, their work being In the nature of a "secret service,"
and their efficiency might be Impaired
If they are surrounded by too much
publicity at the outset, it is officially
given out. *
A number ot new stores are ln process of being opened at different
point. At Nelson,, J. Fred Hume, at
one time a minister In the provincial
cabinet, ts the vendor in charge of a
new store. In Courtenay, Vancouver
Island, Hugh Stewart, former Liberal
CRESTON.—John Keen, ex-M.P.P.
for this riding, was here from Kaslo
for the week-end, and tbe roads committee ot the Liberal association kept
him fairly busy on trips to Valley
points, where lt Is especially desired
that the highways should have attention before the end of the season. A
couple of miles of the trans-prov in*
clal highway between here and Kit-
member for the Comox riding and de-jchener—where survey is .now being
feated at the last election, Is taking made lor a better grade and a new
charge. Other stores are to be opened and! wider road jto be conistrtfcted
shortly at Kelowna, AbbotBford, Rosa-j later on—received careful Inspection,
land, Chilliwack and Trail, and pos- While in view of the fact that the
According to tbe Fernle Free Press
of last week, tbe Fernle-Fort Steele
Brewery ot tbat city, employing about
twenty or twenty-five man, with an
annual payroll of $4-0,000, bas been
forced to close down, owing to its inability to meet the terms which the
government liquor board sought to
lay down for tbe purchase of Its output, for consumption at tbe Fernle
liquor store- It is not known yet
whether the suspension will be temporary, or permanent, but it Is announced that the plant is at present
closed indefinitely. In u stutement
published in tbe Free Press the company says:
"Wo decline to condone to the co
erclve measures and we are purposely
being falsely placed ia tbe public eye
as the responsible party. We are being discriminated against, und tbe
public of this entire locality are being wilfully victimized In order thut
this discrimination may be effectively
practised."
WINDERMERE DISTRICT
NOTES
C. R. C.   NOTES
CRESTON LOOKING FOR
ROAD IMPROVEMENT:
KEEN LOOKS THEM OVER
slbly other centres.
OTTAWA—Canada adopted the Income tax In 1917, and during that
year collections totalled $9,000,000.
Australia in her first year, 1915, collected $18,000,000- In the second year
of the tax, Canada collected $27,000,-
000, and In the third year, $46,000,000,
while the collections tor last years tax
are expected to be far In excess of
any of the previous years.
EDMONTON, Alta.— The cultivable
area of the fertile mixed farming sec-
Beattie-Noble, Ltd., Cranbrook; tions of Central Alberta may be added
 I to considerably as a result of surveys
OPERATIONS
UNNECESSARY
HEPATOLA removes Gall Stones
corrects Appendtct.lt la 24 hours
without pain. Reglstere4 under
Ptiro Food and Drug Act. $6.50
NOT SOLD BY DRUOOIST8
Sole Mnnutucturer
MRS. GEO. S. ALMAS
Boi lil.!i MO i tk At*, t,
I ItANHHOOK   CARTAGE
AMI TRANSFER CO.
ForwnrdliiK nnd Distributing
Agentfe for
l.tllilirltlit.- nnd (Ireenliill ("oil
Distribution Cars u Specialty
lirmlnt-   nnd   Tn.nstc.TlnK
liln'ii   l'niiiipt   Attention
TOWRISS & ADAMS
rimne llll Proprietor.
Frame's Bread Is GOOD Bra*
Ills Plea, Cakes nnd Paltry an
made lu a tasty manner which
Invites tbo most exacting par-
Bon to call again, at
TIIE HOME I1AKEHY
I'lioue 8J      -      Norbury At*.
I'll tNMIHOOK I'OTTAHS
HOSPITAL
I'rltnlo Nursing Hoae
l.lconsod   by   Provincial   Oovt.
Maternity and Uenernl Nursing
Massage ond Rest Cure, Highest
Iteferences, terms moderate.
Apply Mrs. A. Crawford, Matron
rhino IBB P. O. Box 845
Address, ISnrden Ave. Cranbrook
being conducted with a view to drain.
Ing certain large lakes. The largest
Is Manawan Lake, containing 23,000
ncres, and others Chip Lake, 19,000
acres, and Lane'B Lake, 3,000 acres.
If the schemes are found to be practicable, ditching will probably be put
under way neit year.
new road will shortly be built, it is
not expected any large amount will
be spent at this point, It was forcibly
Impressed on Mr. Keen that In view
of tbe steadily Increasing tourist trif-
fic this particular bit of road should
be kept in good passable shape, and
he assured that the public works department would be equally emphatically impressed with the need of acceding to the request of the local
roads committee.
BIG TIMBER DEAL IN
NORTH OP PROVINCE
LATELY PUT THROUGH
LODGES AND SOCIETIES
CRANBROOK
FARMERS' INSTITUTE
Reftlar MeeHtf
8ECOXD SATURDAY tf mt*
nor.tl. m . p.RL le tie City Hall
WOMEN'S INSTITUTE
^-5^
Meeta la Ue
Parish Hall
afteraoM et
Int   Taeedaj
at B a.m.
Pres:   Mra.
Constantino
Sec-treas: Mrs. 0. Taylor, - - Box 258
All ladlaa co-dtelly laritea
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Oraa-ttw*. ■. 0.
Meat! every Tin-lay tt B »m ta
Ike mtemty Ball
o.«.
.0.0.
f<L H. (MUM. X. sX <% i.
TltltUg trttkra eertlally la
«N-tf to att-al
MONUMENTS
Kootenai* Granite A Monumental Co-, LU.
General Stone Contractors tat
HoaaaHoUl WertB
front it, Xeleei   r.0.ktaMB
Montana Restaurant
Cigars, Cigarettes ali CaalT
Meals tt All Hours
CRANBROOK STREET
Opposite the Bank of Commerce
FOR PAINTING
-Am-
PAPERHANQIN0
■to,
Telephone
JOHN QARD
Phent Um. Wt
Craabrook,   .    .    . B.C.
I. O. O. F.
KEY CITY LODGE, No. 4*
^m9m\Ou\msLm^    Meels every
H Rlliinli! night st
jfetnSSfV   Clspps Hall
Sojourning Oddfellows cordially
invited,
K. O. Morrle.w. M. Harris, P.O.
Noble Grand. Rec. See.
I.ETTHM
ARE
INTERESTINfl
Last week we asked for a recipe for Yorkshire Pudding. We
hava not counted tbe letters received, but tbera are quite a
number. All the recipes are
very good. We tried tbem. Prom
another standpoint auch communications have a great interest to us. Nearly every woman
haB something nice to say about
the general use ot Pacific Milk
for cooking and baking.
Often we learn a new use for
the milk In this way.
PACIFIC MILK CO-, LTD.
MS Drake M.
ruttrleatlAkkttttwa a La-laat
One of the biggest timber deals put
through ln tble province for some
time lias been consummated at the
Coast by the acquisition of the British Columbia holdings ot the North
Empire Timber Company by the
Prince Rupert Pulp and Paper Co.
The timber area Is one of the most
accessible for sawmill operations In
tbe province, and ls situated only a
few tulles from Prince Rupert. Tbe
holdings are approximately 1.000.000.-
000 feet, ot which fully 90 per cent, ls
spruce ar.d hemlock.
The North Empire Timber Company
Ie largely controlled by tsterests ln
Cedar Rapids and other cities In the
state of Iowa. While the price paid
for the holdings has not been made
public. It is understood the price runs
Into large figures. With the acquisition of this new timber area the
Prince Rupert Company Is now one
of the largest timber holding concerns in-the province.
FOREST FIRES SO FAR
THIS SEASON HAVE
BEEN LIGHT, IS SAID
Forest fires ao far tbis season in
the British Columbia forest belt have
totalled one hundred and fifty-eight,
up to tha end of laat month, according
to a report Issued lately by P. Carer-
rlll, the chief forester. Showers up
to that time In the Vancouver forest
district, mhlch includes Vancoufer Is
land made that area the aofest from
the standpoint of fires, the total of
which was thirty-seven, lt had cost
the province up to that time some two
thousand dollars to fight tre prevailing fires.
In the other districts the fires were
Nelaon 19; Vernon 2, Kamloops 28,
Cranbrook 11, Caribou 11, Prince
Oeorge 20, Prince Rupert 30.
(Special Ui Hie Herald)
INVERMERE, July »._ Mr. R. P.
Mills, who for over two years bas
been provincial constable for the Lake
Windermere district, stationed at Atf*-
aimer, has been transferred to Michel,
and W. L. Heuley of Vanderhoof has
been appointed iu his stead.
The tlrst bush tire of tbe season
broke into violence yesterday near to
the portable camp and lumber works of
Messrs. Campbell A- Meyers some
twenty odd miles to the south of thla
place. Fortunately the ground and
tlio underbrnsh Is very damp wltll a
succession of rains and a large body
of men are now fighting vigorously
against the spreading of the flames.
It Is hoped they may shortly have It
under control. No details are at present available. Fire "Warden Qeo. Watson Ib ln charge of the fighters und
Oswald McGulness of Brisco Ib assisting.
The launch Coleen. Rev. O. E. Davis
of Qolden at thc helm with Frank
I.ang of Golden us passenger and Jack
Hambly of that place us cabin boy and
aeneral factoteni. cleared from here
on Wednesday morning down stream
for Golden. Several days will be spent
on the journey visiting ranches along
the way. The Coleen Ib a twenty-
footer, witli five horse power gasoline
engine and has a capacity of eight
knots an hour. Tills ls the first craft
that has essayed lho trip by way of
tlte Columbia river from the north
since navigation came to an end wltb
the construction of thc railway In 1914.
The Journey is a pleasant one and
covers about 100 miles through a
comparatively well settled though rugged part of the country.
Rev. F. Bertram Atkinson, In charge
of tlie Church of Kngland ln this part
returned this week from a visit to
Creston where he was relelvlng Mr.
Varley for one Sunday.
Summer tourists are arriving In care
from tlie U.S. and otlier parts.
Major F. B. Young of Solklrk ranch
was appointed as director of the Wool
Growers' Association of tbe provinco
of BC* at the last general meeting ot
the members of the Association. Major Young Is keen on sheep breeding
and has quite a good nucleus for a
flock.
Mr. 1-ee Walsh, son of Judge Walsh
of Calgary, who Is practising law at
Barons, Alberta, Is spending part ol
his vacation nt Luke Windermere
Camp. Mr. W. G. Egbert, a practising solicitor, Is bearing him cotapany.
Dr. and Mrs. Grlsbach ot Spokane
aro spending tlieir vacation under can-
vns in this neighborhood. This Is the
socond season they have spent In part
In the Lake Windermere district.
Mr. J. Murray Gibbon, of Montreal,
general publicity agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been going
over tlie ground here for some tlmt
past getting fresh data relative to tbe
pleasures ot this pa" f°r tourists.
.General Manager Murphy of Calgary, manager of the western llntt
of the Canodlon ajaclflc Railway, and
Assistant'-'Superintendent Cottrell of
Vancouver, arrived In their private
cars on Monday evening and start-!
here till the following day. They had
Islt to the Invermere golf count
enjoying a friendly contest with «oi
ot the local players.
Miss Florence Erlckson, lately i
Spokane and Cranbrook, it nbw hert
for a prolonged stay with her fttbtr
and mother. Miss Erlckson recently
graduated from tbe Spokane hoapltal.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Palmer, Mr. tnd
Mrs. W. D. Oilroy and daughter, tU
of Cranbrook, accompanied by Mn.
Cookson and Miss Anderson, ot Michigan, spent part .of Tuesday here tn
route by car from Cranbrook to Gold,
en and returned by car. Thay tlu
visited the Sinclair Hot Springe, remaining tliere over night.
Word has come from Vanoouvtr ef
the death at Shaughnessey Heights
Military Hospital there of Lieutenant-
Colonel H. M. Cherry. Col. Cherry
was for many years a resident of Calgary, later moving to Winnipeg end
Brandon. He- was an officer going
over with the first contingent with tht
18th Winnipeg Rifles. Last summer
he made a visit of soma length with
friends here.
Tbe members of tho entertainment
committee are requested not to fOrget
that the committee will meet on Tucs-
ATTRACTIONS OF  THE
WINDERMERE BEING
ADVERTISED AT COAST
Considerable attention is being at*
day evenlug. the lath, at (lie home of, traded lo the Windermere district as
Mrs. MeQuald. a liullday resort in the Coast sections,
^ as a  rasult of a  publicity  campaign
Members, don't forget that tlie 11b-
QUEBEC—An extensive plan of reforesting Its timber limits has been
decided upon by tlie Chlcoutlml Pulp
Company- The conyiuny hus obtained
the servlces-of the' Quebec Forestry
Department to make a complete sur*
vey of Its timber reserves and the best
method of their exploitation- It is
said that the company will adopt rig-
Id regulations In order to Insure the
permanence of their forest capital.
Tht outline ot tbe project haB already
been adopted and the company has
lately sent one of Its employees to
Europe, where be will study European
methods on the ground und consult
with the best-known practitioners in
this field.
BAPTIST CHURCH
PASTOR W. T. TAPSCOTT
Services at 11.00 a.m. and 7.30
p.m.
Sunday Bchool tt 12 noon.
Prayer   Meeting   on   Thursday at B pm.
YOU ARB WELOOMR
HAVE YOU EVER!
(By Orville Leonard, Fire Ranger)
Have yon ever seen tbe smoke
clouds from a forest fire burnlngT
Have you ever lived for hours In
that crackling bright Inferno?
Have you had your shoe soles burned off in that feathery floor of aabee?
Have you seen men shouting wildly
though you could not hear their voices
for the roar and hies of leaping
flames, the howl ot winds engendered?
Have you ever met a settler driven
from his fired homestead
While years of labor on his flelda
were wiped out In an hour?
Have you ever seen a country where
the furred and feathered wild things
Lie scattered ln the debrit of their
desolated mansions?
Have you ever seen a woodland when
the fire fiend has finished
The blackened stumps of noble trees,
the rich soil stripped and barren?
(If you have, friend Reader, you'll
see that your camp fin lt put Deed
Out and you'll look where yo» throw
jour cigarette.)
raxy is open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 1 to 4 p.m. Miss Edltli
Cummlngs is taking Miss White's
place as librarian aud books may be
obtained from her. Mr. Mirams will
put someone in charge of the library
on Sunday ufternoons so that books
may be read in the reudiug room.
The chlldrens picnic will be held
on Saturday the 16th. Curs will leave
the Club early ln the afternoon antl a
good time ls promised.
The Club Is giving a dance on Wednesday, July 27th, when the Bass orchestra from Fernle will be in attendance. Watch the uaper for further
aunouncemeote.
We wish to announce that tlie Club
membership list, which was closet! for
a while, Is now open again, antl anyone wishing to Join will receive a
membership and full Information from
Instructor A. G. Mirams. Don't sympathise with yourself theso warm
days, get a membership for tlie club
and you won't need sympathy bbcaust
the water In tlte pool Is always ouo!
Instructor Mirams hits Instituted t
"general Information fond advisory
bureau." Tills Is especially beneficial to the flappers, who seem to need
It, the Information and advice coraiug
In ulte handy sometimes.
The Flappers hold Ihelr usual dance
Saturday evening from S.llll to 10.30.
The O.R..C. Junior Juy.z orchestra
furnished the music and a good time
was enjoyed by all.
MONTREAL.—Accord
in. tu roport,
a Iut-k-j contract has b
• ii closed for
tli« oxiMirt of pulpwooi
from Canada
(o Hollumt, shipments
to    bo    mado
monthly ut the rate ol
■ 00,000 cords
per  annum.     The  euti
■* contract li
for ti.uoO-UQO cords,  sp
eud   ov-vr   a
number of years,
Canada has 1,200 trrlg
ition and wat-
er supply projects, eitht
r complete or
put un by tlie Canadian Pacific Railway. A recent issue ot the Vancouver World had the following in regard to the pretty little holiday camp projected. The Canadian Pacific Rati-
established laat year on the shores of'way !iaa speM many millions on 18,-
Lake   Windermere: ] 750 miles of ditches. Irrigating a mil-
"There is opened to tourists a new  Iion acres.    "Dry farming" is an aa-
OTTAWA.—Compilation of the sixth
decennial census In Canada since Confederation la now under way- lilvery
man, woman and child, as well as
horses, cattle and other domestic animals, In Canada ban been registered.
resort of rustic design in the Canadian Kockles. on the sandy beaches of
Lake Windermere, the loveliest warm
water lake in British Columbia. Lake
Windermere is situated about one
hundred miles south of the main line
of the Canadian Pacific, and is reached from the main line at Golden, or
from Colvalli on the Crow's Nest, the
station being Lake Windermere.
The scenery of this region combining as It does, pastoral softness with
rugged mountain grandeur, will at-
iract visitors from all parts and become a favorite playground.
The summer visitor here will find
everything tl.at ho could wish for,
bathing, boating, riding ou mountain
ponies to great canyons and glaciers,
golf, automoblliug. fishing and big
game hunting in season.
Tho Canadian Pacific Company has
erected a number of cabine fully equipped witli every convenience of Uie
modern home. An auto road from
Banff is in course of construction by
the Dominion Parks Board.
sured fact in Western Canada.
t*Bȣj
FocusYourWants
Classified Want Ads.
will 811 all your re*
qulfwnents. They act
»• * lens which will
concentrate oil your
need*, and bn.-;, them
to a perfect focus of
aatiafactory results.
-j-Hrtliotust CI)uifh
SUNDAY HUT
Mr. J. M. CLARK will conduct   service.   In the
morning
Sunday School:   12 Noon.
Mr. O. T. MOIR will conduct service in the evening.
- A hearty invitation to all —
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada Limited
OFFICES. SMELTINQ AND REFINING DEPARTMENT
TRAIL,    BRITISH    COIXXBIA
SMELTERS AND  REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper and Lead Ores
Producers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Bluestone, Pig Lead nnd
Zlne  "TADAXAC  Brand »
IN times of adjustment when people consider
carefully what they get for every dollar they
spend, a product of merit, properly priced, receives just consideration. Also the standing and
reputation of a manufacturer is given much
thought in times like the present. These
are the reasons why the great Studebaker
factories are taxed to capacity to meet the
present demand for Studebaker cars.
•'Built-in-Canada"
F. H. Dezall
District Agent - Cranbrook B.C.
NEW PRICES OF STUDEBAKER AUTOMOBILES
f. a. ts. WatAervitle, Ontario, .ffeetiee Jem. I, JMf
Teerln. Cor. one' Reeiltetl CsumsesU Setatse
LIGHT-SIX 2-PASS. ROADoTF.R IISSO UCHT SIX COUPE ROADSTER KISS
LIGHT-SIX TOURING CAR   1SS5 UGHT-SIX S-PASS. MOAN  2«85
SPECIAL-SIX J-PASS. ROADSTER  227* SPECIAL-SIX 4-PASS. COUPE  352S
SPECIAL-SIX TOURING CAR      2326 SPECIAL-SIX S-PASS. SEDAN  3S25
SPECIAL-SIX 4-PASS. ROADSTER  232S RIG-SIX 4-PASS. COUPE    3M5
ilG-SIX TOURING CAR     27SS BIG-SIX T-PASS. SEDAN  4008
ALL   STUDEBAKKR    CARS   ARE    EQUIPPED   WITH   CORD   TIRES
77i/s is a Studebaker Year PAGE    SIX
THI      CBANBBOOK      HKBAL»
Thursday. July 14th, 1821
MacDonald's
Grocery
Preserving Apricots,
per crate     $8.00
DON'T DELAY IN PLACING  YOUR ORDER  FOR
THESE AS THE SEASON
IS VERY SHORT
Blng Cherries, 4 liusk- ...
els to crate W.OO
Blng Cherries, per
basket   -H-SO
Calllornla (.rape Vruit
•2 for   -*■>-*
tlhtiiiairan New Spuds
per Hi.
Sugar,
Q U A K E 11    B K E
IS GOOD BREAD
Tlto regular monthly meeting of tlte
icily council i.s being held this ovoning   i-'iursrtiiy, at tlto city hall.
+   +   +
Tht Knights of Pythias are having
tlieir liall painted whieh will make a
decided Improvement to the premises.
+   +   +
MEN'S KUAtl COMBINATIONS
Clearing sale. reg. $6.25, now at MXt
Moffatt's Vnriety store
Social-Personal
J. Henderson, o[ the Jafft-ay hotel
was In the city on busluess Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. P, Crozlor ot Spokane
have stopped off hero Tor a few days
on tlieir way to Calgary, and aro visiting with Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Clark.
Messrs.   11.   I,,  iintl  Arthur Burch
spent the week-end fishing at Perry
Creek,  returning with u fairly -good
Jackson and daughters!bug.
th
PHONE  7«
City Items of interest
Insure with Bealo anu Elweli.
+   +   +
A couple of artistic window signs
are going to adorn tho windows of
the government liquor warehouse, Uio
work now being under way, so that
the thirsty may be led aright to their
oases.
APRICOTS  FOlt  I'llKSKIIVINII
TO AltHIVK NEXT WEEK.
IlllOCIt kai.lv
Hour cherries $-.-.r> for 4 basket crate, we order and get them
fresli for you.
BUTTER—-No.   1   Creamery
Mountain 3 lb:t. $1.15
Now spuds 80 lb.J new cabbage 10c;« watermelon 10c lb.;
new apples It lbs. 40c, cantaloup
uric each; cucumbers 2.ric; Victoria hothouse tomatoes 40c u
pound or $1.86 lor 5 lb basket;
Blng cherries Jil.liO case or fl
per basket or 25c lb.
Oats, No. 1 *:14.00 ton or $1.75
cwt.
No.  1  Timothy   $40.00   ton    or
$2.10 cwt.
Bran $80.00 ton or $1.C0 cwt.
Crushed oats $80.00 Ion or $1.85
cwt.
Whorls $82.00 ton or $1.70 cwt.
Wheat, local, No. 2 $75.tm ton
or $3.80 cwt.
Wheat, Alberta, No. 5 $70,110 ton
or $8.00 cwt.        .     ,
Corn, whole, No. 2 $«2.00 ton or
$3.15 cwt.
Corn, cracked, No. 2 $84.00 Ion
or $2.25 cwt.
Hurley,  No.  4,  $42.00    ton    or
$2.20 cwt.
Hurley chop $44.00 Ion or $2.30
^RANBROOlT
TRADING Co.
Tlie monthly meeting of tiie Women's Conservative Study Club will be
held  next Thursday afternoon,  July
21st, at the homo of Mrs. K. L, Staples. Wycllffe.    Cars  for the ladies
who wish to attend  will  he at
Ma'plo Hall at 2.:i0 p.m.
+    -t-   *
Tlie Ladies' Aid of Knox ehureh will
hold a Garden Tarty nn the evening of
Friday, July 22lld,    on   Mr.    tl.   J.
Spreull'a lawn, Lumsden Avenue.   Admission, sllvtr collection,     Tea, coffee, Ice cream, candy cake anil sandwiches, extra.   Thoro will also be n
short musical program. 19-20
+ + +
The new electric fire alarm over the
fin hull was given a try-oat on Mon
day afternoon, much to the wonderment of u good many wlio heard It.
It seems to he the general concensus
of opinion that so fur as volume ot
sound goes, tho new alarm doesn't
compare wt/[l with tlie whistle nt the
power plant.
-1-   +   +
40". OKI' AU, STRAW HATS
for uext ten days.
Moffatt's Variety Store.
+   +   +
Two dozen tourist cars havo registered at tlie board of trade information
bureau from tiie lirut of the montii
up to the beginning of this week. Most
of them are cominv fiom a considerable distance, and the well-to-do tourist with an expensive car, touring up
from California to '■ee the scene.*;/ of
the* Canadian Hackles is now cotnUs
more in evidence. ,
+   + ' +
HOYS' WASH HATS
Clearing Sale, regular fifx., now at *!■>
Moffatt's Variety Storo
+   +   +
W. S. Cameron of Skookumchuck,
was a visitor in the city on Wednesday of this week.
+ + +
In line with its announced policy of
retrenchment wherever possible, the
provincial government lias shut down
on most of its roadwork in this district, as well us elsewhere. The government anticipates there will be a
good deal cf unempoyineiif. to con-
I lend with this coming fall and wlnler,
and is endeavoring to conserve work
I (wherever possible to meet, the situation thut may arise, It Is announced.
I Some contracts Tor which tenders have
; been called ure being held up on this
account.
Mrs. J. J
left last week-end for a holiday visit
witli relatives at Portage la Prairie.
Mrs. H. L. Harrison and son Cyril
left today for Vancouver where they
will holiday for a month or so.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hlnton nnd fum
liy returned today from their two
weeks' visit to Pincher Creek.
C A. Towriss, of the Cranbrook
Cartage & Transfer Ct)., was in Lelh-
brldge tliis week for a duy or two on
business.
Mr. uud Mrs. W. Q. Morton ure
holidaying at the Coast, Mr. Morton
being ou Ills annual vacation from the
Customs uud Uxcisc Office.
Mrs. Walker, wife of Headmaster
Walker, of Cranbrook, is u visitor
witli Sirdar friends at present, tho
guest of Mrs. Whites Ute a.—Creston He-
vlow.
Ititr Smtp, Niiturilny Hperlnl
Only
Beautiful Bohemian Vases, regular $1.00  _.. 50c ea«h
25c below cost,   for   one  day
only- j
Moffatt's Variety Store
Mr. Pred Harvey, of the Dezall Gar-
uge staff, went to Lethbrldge on Monday to bring his wife and Tamily to
this city, where they are taking up
residence.
LAMES' OVERALL Al»HO>S
Itegular $1.40, special    $1.10
Moffatt's Variety Store
Mr. Duve Sutherland and A. H. Bullock spent Wednesday afternoon fishing at the Reservoir, Wuttsburg, and
brought home a nice catch of the finny tribe.
A. A. Cameron left tliis week for
Hochester, Minn., to get medical specialist advice for bis young son, who
has accompanied his father on the
trip.
Mr. P. H. Grimmett, recently of tho
Cranbrook Drug and Book Co. staff
and who went to Bull River lust week,
entirely changed his plans nnd left
for Calgary Saturday last, future activities undecided-
Mrs. H. PlaHtow and daughter who
have been visiting, for the past two or
three weeks at tlte .home of
Mrs. Haslam, returned to St. Thomas,
Ont., Tuesday last. Mr. Plastow and
the remaining members of tho family
will remain here for a month or so.
1 Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Gilroy and llttlo daughter, accompanied by Mrs. P.
N. Cookson and Miss M. Anderson, of
Manistee, Mich., who are visiting with
them, and also Mr. and Mrs. J. h.
Palmer in their car, made an early
start on Tuesday, morning for the
Windermere und Golden, wliere they
are spending a short holiday. Thoy
are expected to'return this eevn'ng.
13. A. Hill cume in Saturday afternoon last from Nelson, near which
city he hus beeu camping with his
family ou holiday [or a while. He remained in tlie city for a duy or two
and returned again to Kootenay Lake.
J. ft, McLennan, formerly uccount-
int at the Bnnk of Commerce here,
lias been promoted to the position of
manager at tho Trail branch ot the
hank, the former manager there having been transferred to Vunderhoof.
Hev. It. W. Lee and sons Kuslaco
and Cyril left today for u camping
site on the Kootenay l>ake near Nelson where thoy will take a camping
holiday for u while, Mr. Leo will return at tlto end of next week to tako
the usual services that Sunday, aud
attend a district Metliodlst meeting
Mr, A- G. Langley and daughters,
lho Misses Sophie und Murjorie, are
in tho city, arriving Wednesday from
Revelstoke. Mr. Lunglef is well
known as the resident district mining engineer for this section, and ho
is now co-operating with Dr. Schofleld In the geological survey work
the latter is undertaking.
THE    RIBBON
BRACELET
The snug fit and neat appearance of theBe new ribbon bracelet watches appeal to those tfho like
things just right
For Ladles* Watcbes
There are no niftier styles
than those we are showing. The movement*-, are
dependable and our prices
most moderate.     •
"w. 11. WILSON
Jeweler
Saturdar Night The
July Clearance Sale
ENDS!
Alderman R. J. Binning returned to
tiie city lust Thursday arter his short
holiday in the east, and has been busy
at his studio. Mr. Binning reports the
family reunion, the first in twenty-
five years, most enjoyable, but the
ixtremo heat encountered on the trip
to be far front it.
R. P. Moffatt and J. S. Thornley
spent a day last week-end fishing on
the St- Mary above Wycliffe. Out* of
the oddities of the day was that R. P.
landed a beauty which he hooked at
the reur end.
A PUBLIC MEETING
FRIDAY.  JULY  15
at 8.90 In the
City Hall, Cranbrook
To discuss arrangements for entertaining a party of
Mining Engineers who are to visit this district accompanied by their ladies to look over mining properties and possibilities.
Tlie importance of their visit and the benefit H may
have to the district cannot be over-estimated. It should be
regarded as a personal obligation on the part of everyone
interested In this section to make their viBit a success.
TIIK PROSPECTORS' ASSOCIATION HAS PERSUADED THIS PARTY TO VISIT US. NOW DO YOUR PART.
O. .1. SPREULL, Chairman.
H. lt. Piper left on Wednesday tor
Cranbrook wliere lie lias opened an
offiee and established a fine connection us auditor and accountant, and
wliere h6 will make Ms home in future.
Ho made the trip tn the Pord car he
purchased last week from G. Topliss,
and which lie will require in attending
to audit work at points outside of
cranhrook.—Creston Review.
Itev. nnd Mrs. Geo. Knox, of Creston, have heen in the city for some
days, and are leaving this week for
Windermere. They have been camping out near tlie Kootenay Orchards
Sehooi for a time, and Mrs. Knox left
on this morning's'train for Windermere, intending to go up to the Sin-
■lair Springs, and Mr. Knox is following by car.
F. Lurmour and M. I.. Smltli, of Atli-
amer, were in ('ranbrook over Hnndn)
last.
Mr. I,. Douglas Rengger, Baritone,
(Imiierlal Conservatoire, Moscow,)
voice production and violin, studio
201 Burwell Ave.   Phone 141.
— i* •
Official announcement was mado
from Victoria last week-end of the
appointment of Mr, F. J. Gulmont of
this city to the provincial game board,
succeeding Mr. F, A. Dunn, now of
Wattsburg, wlio has resigned. Mr
Gulmont ls well known as the capable
and energetic secretary of the Cran
brook Hod and Gun Club, and his appointment to tbe board will be a pop.
ular one with sportsmen of the- district.
MEN'S OVERALLS
Special   clearing,   three   days only, 1
Regular $3.00, now   tS.50 each |
Mofl'utt's Variety Store
Tbe funeral of the Infant daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Foster, of St.
Mary's Prairie, took place last Fri
day afternoon, Rev. B. W. MacKay, of
Knox church officiating. Tlie little
one died last Wednesday after a very
brief Illness, and was but two years
old. Much sympathy has been expressed for the bereaved parents In
tlie Biidden removal of their little one.
THIS SALE HAS HEEN A OKEAT SUCCESS, THE
REASONS POR WHICH ARE, ADVERTISING BAR-
CAINS WORTHY OF CONSIDERATION AND CARRYING OUT ADVERTISING TO TIIE LETTER. WE DO
NOT SAY THAT WE ARE GOING OUT OF BUSINESS
HUT WE DO KAY THAT WE WANT TO CLEAR OUT
ALL UNSEASONABLE HOODS AND ALL ODDS AND
ENDS AND WE BELIEVE THE PRICES WE HAVE
PLACED UPON ItlllAltli; MERCHANDISE NOT
STUEP BOUGHT ESPECIALLY KOR SALE PURPOSES
-WILL HAVE THE DESIRED END.
WE HAVE ADVERTISED FOR TWENTY-POUR
YEARS, AND ARE STILL DOING IT.
"YOUR MONEY HACK IV YOU AUK NOT SATIS-
VIKO"— THIS IS OUR MOTTO AND WE BELIEVE
THAT OUR REPUTATION WILL BEAR OUT THE
STATEMENT THAT WE HAVE STUCK STRICTLY TO
OUR MOTTO.
THE SALE DOES NOT CLOSE UNTIL SATURDAY
NIGHT SO YOU STILL HAVE TIME TO SECURE SOME
OP THE MANY GOOD BARGAINS WE ARE OFFERING.
AGENTS I'OIl WILLIS PIANOS
KSOX CHURCH S.S.
HELD ANNUAL
PICNIC WEDNESDAY
CLOSING OUT SALE
'THE ENTIRE STOCK OF
THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP
.1. II. McLEAN, Prop, HANSON AVENUE,
To be Cleared Out at Cost
AND LESS
BARGAIN PRICES IN ALL LINES
New antl Second Hand Furniture
Brass and Enumel Beds— Coil nd Woven Springs—
Mattresses—Chairs—Dressers, etc.
WIDH VAKIKTV OF SECOND HAND goods AT VERY LOW' prices
HOUSEHOLD    FURNISHINGS,   KITCHENWARE
.     AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS, ETC
BUILDING AND BUSINESS ALSO FOR SALE,
Call nnd See how tow the prices aro
DON'T MISS YOUR CHANCE AT THESE BARGAINS
OLD CURIOSITY SHOP
HANSON   AVENUE
"Winnipeg to Vancouver" on a bicycle—some stunt—but that is what
a chap is doing who arrived here this
i morning, Thursday, and who continued on his way after a brief stay-
Upon being interrogated the principal
in the case declined to enlighten enquirers as to the motive of his rather
peculiar undertaking but he buzzed off
and Cranbrook people will not suffer
In the least through his silence.
SPECIAL, THREE PAYS 0>\y
Ladies' Silk Hose, regular $1.25
Now    t   ttOc
or  3 pairs (or  $1.75
Moffatt'B Variety Store.
Edraond-aon's Orchestra made a vis-
It to Kitchener on Saturday night lust,
when they played for a dance which
was held on the open air dancing
platform, about 26 by 40 feet, which
has been erected there. A very good
time was enjoyed by the dancers, in
spite of the fact that the weather was
a little cool. There is expected to be
another dance at the same place this
coming Saturday. Edmondson's orchestra is also filling an engagement
tomorrow evening, Friday, at Wardner.
MessrB. W. F. Attrldge, W. H. Wilson and Geo. Wragge who went nut
to Kitchener laBt week-end for some
fishing seem to have found plenty of
good sport on the rlvtr, and got au
abundance ot fish. They got some
other excitement also that wus not
on the schedule, in the shape of a vn
tt to their cabin by some tame deer
who probably came to size them up
as hunters and guessed it safe enough to come well within shooting
distance. At another period of thc.
trip things seem to have gotten so
exciting that ono of the party could
not wait to get his line In, but had
to go in head first in his hurry to get
the tish out.
The proverbial bull in a china shop
did not have anything on the mooley
cow that got into the Chinese restaurant ou Monday night, and otherwise
upset the -quiet Berenlty of a number
ot Celestials in the Chinese quarter.
The cow was being brought in to the
slaughter house, but broke loose and
ran amuck leaving considerable excitement and consternation In its
wake. Perhfl|ps the animal sensed
what was in store* for It, and put up a
game fight setting out to upset as
many Chinamen as possible while it
had the chance. It succeeded in upsetting ths dignity or quite a few before betas brought trader control.
A party of Canadian Pacific Railway
officials arrived, in the city on Sunday
froft Kootenay Landing, and left on
Monday with their private car, "Rupert's Land" attached to thc Kootenay
Central train. In the party were Mr.
Chas. Murphy, of Winnipeg, general
manager tu weste-jn lines, with Mrs.
mid Miss Murphy; air. F. Lee, permanent way engineer for western
lines, und Mrs. Lee, and Mr. C. A.
Cottrell, assistant superintendent for
B.C. lines. ,
Mr. J. H. McLean of the Old Curiosity Shop announces that he Is selling off Ills stock of new and second-1
hand furniture, household and miscellaneous goods of every description,
and with his granddaughter, Miss Lena Little, will leave shortly for the
east on a three months' visit. Mr-
McLean will visit St Thomas and other points in Ontario, and also go on
to West Virginia and Nebraska before
returning, and it Is possible tlmt Miss
Little will remain In Toronto to take
up further music study. The whole
of Mr. McT^ean's business and stock
ls for sale, in whole or In part, and
the building ae well. See his ad. in
tills issue.
The annual Presbyterian Sunday
School picnic was held Wednesday
afternoon, tlie 13th, on a site east of
tiie old King lumber mill. Cars left
from .the church schoolroom a; 1.80
ar.d about 300 were ■convije-l '.a tlie
picnic grounds.     ,
,An exceptionally good program of
sports was gone through, baseball and
football included, and prizes were up
for eacji event. ,
Healthy appetites were appeased
with abundance of good eats which
were partaken of about 5-30, and the
happy young folks continued to enjoy
themselves until about 8.30 when the
cars began bringing the merry-makers
home after a day of real enjoyment.
TIMMINS, Ont.— The Holllnger
Consolidated Gold Mines have secured
from the provincial government the
rights to develop power at Kettle Falls
on the |Abltlbi river, about sixty miles
north of here, tt Is understood 35,400
horse-power can be developed, costing approximately $1,500,000. A preliminary survey is to be made immed
lately.
SEE TIIK WILLIS PIANOS NOW HERB
Club dale Re-Opened
UNDER   NEW  MANAGEMENT
Largest and Best In the City
SUNDAY   SPECIAL
Farm House Chicken Dinner :   :   :  75c
WANT ADS..
TYPEWRITER tor Sale.     Clieaii tor,
quick sale.     Particulars at Herald
Office. 20-?
ALI. .•HILlHU.Ji'fl DRESSES
In tlie store to clear at W/.. lMscoimt
Moitatt's Variety Store
HOT WEATHER
NECESSITIES
Perfection
Oil Stoves
give quick results w'lth
little oil. Once tested,
always used. Fine for
the warm weather.
SEE OUR BALL BEARING LAWN MOWERS.
GOOD VALUES.
Our Mlltl-Ped Garden
lltisc gives the Maximum ol Service.
PATMORE BROS
WANTED TO RENT—Oood hand or
power sewing machine. Leave word
at Herald Office. *''-*•
WINNIPEG.—Some interesting data
has -been compiled by the Dominion
Lands Department on the taking up
of free lands In the provinces ot Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.
From 1900 to 1920 over Ave hundred
thousand entries were made for free
homesteads In the three prairie provinces, involving 8,000,000 acres ot
land.
OTTAWA—All of Canada's automobile plants in 1919,11 ln number, were
located In Ontario. Alberta had two
plants for the manufacture of automobile accessories, British Columbia 6,
Manitoba II, Ontario 'its, Quebec 3, and
Saskatchewan 2. The amount of money invested in Die Industry was |G6,-
04:1,018. Wuges paid to employees In
automobile, accessories, and ropalr
Plants totalled Jin. 389,742 during the
year. The vulue of the products was
$101,196,700.
et ra-.ckh.-l lha knssrtsel paklte,
Th-.li- Mall CMS ta IMI Ml •■-
pc-iM, bul mi Ihv-MmMtl which
will rctarh Urga -Uvl-UhCti
18-tf
WANTED— To hear trom owner of
good farm for sale. State cash price,
full particulars. D. P. Bush, Minneapolis, Minn. *-9-24
SAPETY RAZOR BLADES—Resharp-
ened, hollow ground, velvet edge,
35c per dozen, enclose fee. B. C.
Razor. Sharpening CtjgBox 97, Victoria, BC. 19-22
POR SALE—Slightly used Mahogany
Piano, splendid tone and condition.
Reasonable and terms it necessary.
Pink Mercantile Company 20
KOR KALE McLaughlin Touring car
1918 model, four cylinder, first cluss
condition. 1800.00 ensh or short
terms. Willis i'luno Store, Nelson,
B.C. 20-22
Kill SALE—A number of Jersey and
(lucrnscy cows, nlso White Leghorn
hens and rooster. All prize winners. Apply Mrs. A. St. Eloi, Cranhrook, n.C. -M-2*
SALESMAN WANTED—Wo are placing on lho market a vacuum cleaner
at $ir>-00. Although a recent luven*
Hon 1511,0011 huve been sold In the
Eastern States.' Our Kamloops ag*
ent started Juno 24th and in four
days sold 21 machines. Address:
Sinclair Sales Co., 914 Vuncoiiver
Block, Vnncouvor. B.C. 20tf
LOST—On Sunday eovnlng. July 3rd,
between Blnck-beur bridge, Klmberley, and Marysvllle, a gentlemans
watch with gold-plate case. $5.00
reward If returned to Rev. Evan
Baker, Klmberley. 19-tf
STAB 8EC01TO HAND STORE
Phone t.
Wo pay tho boat prices going for all
kinds ' of furniture. Wo buy anything from a mouu trap to aa auto*
PHONE 20
BEALE*ELWELi
AreNOffering
FOR SALE
Small Cottage on Hanson Ave # 800
.Small Cottage on
Cranhroolt St. ..
700
6 room Cottage on
Hanson Ave     800
5 roomed Modern Cottage on Hanson Av. 11 no
Urlck Collage on Hanson Ave 10(10
Modem 2-storey rosidf
once nnd :i lots. .. SHOO
Modem 2-storey residence and 2 lots .. 8500
Large residence suitable for Boarding
House, centrally
located      8000
EASY TERMS CAN HE
ARRANGED
TITLES GUARANTEED
FOR FULL
PARTICULARS
APPLY TO
Beale & Elweli
Cranbrook,   B. C.
PHONE 80

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