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The British Columbia Retailer Jul 31, 1925

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Array The British Columbia
Vancouver. B. C. n it v     «AA.
VOL XVII No 11       JULY,   19Z5
10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
Seventeenth Tear.
Twentieth
Annual Dominion Conuention
Retail Merchants' Association ol Canada, Inc.
Vancouver, B.C., July 27, 28,29,30.
Hotel Vancouver, Headquarters
Si.   I'rui.'r.iiiiiiii*. pJiu'i* Is
Annual Provincial Convention
British Columbia Branch R.M.A.
Vancouver, August 10, II, 12 A True Statement
1870—1924
CANADA is luch a new country, it is almost incredible tint
psper bags have been made here for a period of over 50 YEARS
—IT 18 nevertheless TRUE
It is EQUALLY TRUE, that by no other policy thsn that of
maintaining at all costs, the high standard of quality in our bags,
together with efficiency of service could we have retained Um
reputation of being manufacturers of the most dependable paper
bags on the market today.
-3 GRADES-
STANDARD LIGHT KRAFT HEAVY KRAFT
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAG8.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B C
Phone: Seymour 781
YOUR CUSTOMERS
APPRECIATE THE BEST
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD
VANCOUVER, B. C. Tl
1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
3
V
JP
>
...»
We are putting the World's Ef
greatest sales-appeal at H&
work   for YOU!
Many years (if experiments
have proved to Kellogg*
that advertisements with an
BppctitC     appeal     bring     the
greatest sales,
This  summer,  in  a  dominant
campaign running in every
Important     Canadian    daily
and weekly newspaper, the
Kellogg Company has harnessed this appeal in a mas-
lerl\    manner   to   hring   sales
to your store.
Link up with thi"*. wonder
ful publicity feature Kel-
logg's in your window -
suggest Kellogg's to every
customer who comes into
your    store    and    like    hun-
•
dreds   of   other   grocers   you
will (md your summer profits  quickly   grow.
Alto motion of
KflloU'. AIIRran,
KtlloM's Krumhle*.
Kcllo***'. p^ anj
KelloM'i Rran Flaket
w«h other ports ol
whrot.
SB
^ S     Im a
Some National Advertisers Who Used
"BRITISH COLOMBIA RETAILER"
Daring the Past Year
Ford Motor Co. of Canada, Ltd.
Palmolive Company, Ltd.
California Packing Corporation.
Holbtookt, Ltd.
Holm A Co.
International Business Machines Co. Ltd., Toronto.
Canadian Toledo Scalo Co. Ltd., Windsor.
National Cash Register Company, Toronto.
Caandian Postum Cereal Company, Toronto.
Kellogg Corn Flake Company, Toronto.
Royal Crown Soaps, Ltd.
Dominion Canners B. C. Ltd.
Borden Company Ltd.
Fleischmann Company.
P. Burns A Company.
W. Clark, Ltd., Montreal.
E. B. Eddy Company.
Carnation Milk Products Co. Ltd.
E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd.
Beech-Nut Company o fCanada, Ltd., Hamilton.
Swift Canadian Company, Ltd.
McCormick Manufacturing Co.
Lake of tho Woods Milling Co., Ltd., Montreal.
Connors Bros., Black's Harbour, N. B.
N. K. Falrbank Company.
Hedley Shaw Milling Company.
A. Macdonald A Co., Ltd.
Tuck A Lightfoot, Ltd.
Canada Starch Co., Ltd.
Thos. Davidson Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
Canada Colors A Chemicals, Ltd., Toronto.
Qurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto.
Meakins A Sons, Hamilton.
Dominion Oilcloth A Linoleum Co., Ltd., Montreal.
Brandram-Henderson, Ltd.
Martin-Senour Co., Ltd.
Beach Foundry Company, Ottawa.
Minard's Liniment Company.
Canadian Paint, Oil & Varnish Manufacturers' Assn.
Dominion Cartridge Company.
Marshall Wells B. C, Ltd.
Peerless Underwear, Hamilton.
Chlpman Holton Knitting Company, Hamilton.
Monarch Knitting Company, Ltd., Dunnville, Ont
Circle Bar Knitting Company, Kincardine, Ont.
Atlantic Underwear, Ltd., Moncton, N. B.
C. Turnbull Company, Ltd., Qalt, Ont.
Penmans, Ltd., Paris.
Continental Paper Products, Ltd., Ottawa.
Interlake Tissue Mills.
J. C. Wilson, Ltd.
Woods Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Winnipeg.
Northwestern Mutual Fire Ins. Co., Hamilton.
Canadian Postum Cereal Company, Toronto.
Dominion Glass Co. Ltd.
Hudson's Bay Company.
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Co. Ltd.
Gait Knitting Co. Ltd.
Rock Island Overall Co. Ltd.
Royal Baking Powder Company.
Save the 8urface Campaign.
Etc.
The Recognized Medium for
covering Britith Columbia,
Alberta and the Yukon. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Saves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—vou sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto ii "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you foods cheaper than any other firm is in a portion to do, but w# CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
&££°" WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA. B. C
Wholesale Grocers
MMMMWI
SHAMROCK RRANP
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up hy P. Burns * Co.,
Limited, whieh means they sre the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARY
EDMONTON
mm** 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
f Made from fittest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
IPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
lln packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tins, 24 to a case.
Mb. tins, 12 to a ease.
104b. tins, 6 to a ease.
20-lb. tins, 3 to a ease.
Perfect Seal Jars, 12 to a ease.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANOOUVER, BC. 6
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
IIV
Are You Getting Full
Value for Your Money ?
When purchasing gooda for your store you always specify the best
Are you as particluar when ordering your Paper Bags >
"CONTINENTAL" PAPER BAGS
are superior because
Quality is always maintained
Faultless in manufacture
Larger reinforced bottoms
The ContinentalPaper Products
Limited
OTTAWA, CANADA
Also manufacturers of Paper Bags of every description.
Vancouver   i
vi**.    / SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
Edmonton
Calgary
'Using a Continental Bag it Bag Insurance."
■*wJr
Ordered your fresh stock ?
/
M
This Season's Pack
(if fresh, Hriti^h Columbls grown fruit*   strawberries, cherries
raspberries, also spinach, string beans, peas, nil prepared is
perfection in Quaker kitchens end retaining their full, natural
flavor.   Tell your customers shoul them   they will sppreeiats
it niul nunc again.
L
QUAKER
Brand Canned
fruit and vegetables
Dominion Canners of B. C. Limited
Vancouver, B. C.
Trade Mark 1926
8fr
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RjLTAILER
With which It Incorporated the II   C, TRADE RKVIKW
Published Monthly.
SEVENTEENTH YEAR
QUNBRAL MBRCHANDISB
OROCERIKB. DRYOOOD8,
HARDWARE. FOOTWBAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF BC. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in W-stern Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: One hollar IVr Year, payable In advance.
Advartlslni Uotoo on Application
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTO.
Suite 101-2 Marchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C
Telephone Sojr  3IS1 Cable Address- Shipping—All Codes
F.dltor. J 8. Morrison W. N Code, Husiness Manager
Entered at Ottawa as Second class matter
Secretaries,  Rapraaantlwi tha fallswlm
Branches R. M. A.
Armstrong w. H. Grant.
Cranbrook c. J. Lewla.
Kamloops j. Ratchrord.
Kelowna A. Fraser.
Lyttoa B. Rebagllatl.
Nanaimo N. Wright.
Nelson .E. F. Gigot.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley...D. Stuart.
Revelstoke R. F. Young.
Vancouver W. F. Ing.
Vol  XVII   No 11
JULY, 1925
Vancouver, B.G.
The Dominion Convention
A Hearty Welcome is Assured to Members of Dominion Executive Council and Dominion Board, Retail Merehanta* Association of Canada, Inc., and Delegates from nil Canada who are to Attend the Twentieth
Annual Convention in Vancouver
Vancouver's Retail Merchants will bnw nn opportunity to welcome into their midst Dominion executives
of tho H. .M. A. ittitl delegates from every province In
Canada, when t-lo-v meet in this eity lor their snnal
0 t
convention, which in to take plaec in the Hotel Vsncouver July '27. 28, 29, 30.
Ah ciUxons, wc arc becoming each year more aocus«
tomed to see (inventions of various fraternal, racial,
commercial, educational and religious bodies, take place
in Vancouver, but it is now live years since a convention
of such Dominion-wide Importance to the retail trade
has hern held in our city.
To lhe man iu the street, bonds, processions, wicrd
costumes, ami the gonoral air of conviviality accompanying th< proceedings of many convention parties,
appear to denote an absence of business scumen, and
tin* Impression gainod is thai thc sole object of participants is to amuse themselves and the citizens with their
antics, while the business side of the convention is practically Ignored Business, combined with pleasure, is
one of llu* best summer tonics extant, and if delegates
visiting 0 new centre are prone to givo undue attention
to the pleasurable ingredients (especially when visiting
0 city like Vancouver), they must not nv unduly censured, and for those who arc unversed in the procedure
of convent ions, let it be known that a large volume of
serious business is deliberated upon during the sessions,
and the entertainment committee sees to it that no expedition or entertainment interferes with that business
or the more serious elements of convention activities,
The success or otherwise of any convention cannot
be determined lolely by the attendance.' It is rather
the constructive results of serious deliberations upon
subjects of real importance which tend to make the issue successful and there appears to be little doubt that
administrative reorganization which is down for discussion at the forthcoming meeting of the Dominion
Hoard will tend towards a more comprehensive service
to members of the Association and to strengthen the
bonds of co-operation among the various factor*-? of dis-
tribution, while fully protecting the retailer's interests.
Resolutions tabulated for discussion arc of vital
moment to the retail trade, and it is seemly and wise
thai the Provincial Hoard should have advanced the
usual dates of their annual convention, in order to assimilate the ideas and decisions, brought down at the
Dominion Convention, into the proceedings of their
own gathering.
No effort is being spared by the entertainment com-
mitteo to render the visit of the delegates and their
wives an enjoyable one, and it is well to note that an
Inspection of Vancouver's harbour development has
been included in the programme,
Among the more important questions coming before
the Dominion ("onvention is that of "Price Maintenance." and it is expected that a national policy will be
urged in this regard to prove the possibility of a
strongor CO-opcration in the field of distribution, and
engender a more general consumer confidence, by sub-
dlting the confusing tactics of the pricc-cuttcr.
A most hearty welcome is assured to the visitors by
Vancouver, and the outcome of their discussions will
he awaited with interest by Association members of
British Columbia, *
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Jul-,
GROCERIES y PROVISIONS
GENERAL BUSINESS
Vancouver, July 12th,
July business with the retail grocery trade Is away
to a good start, particularly iu the out of town districts.
July and August are usually slack months with city retailers, although volume has held up very well to date
The heavy tourist traffic has no doubt materially helped the general business tendency.
Reports from coast summer resorts indicate the biggest yeftr yet. Where opportunity affords, ice cream,
solf drinks, etc.. will be found a very profitable addition to the general line.
Fresh fruits and preserving requirements demand
special attention at this season of the year. Sugar this
year fortunately is reasonable, ami Indications arc for
a big fruit crop in B, C, with the exception of straw,
berries, whieh were a much smaller crop than in previous years. Indications are for a bumpt r paek of home
canned preserves. A point should be made to feature
prominently fruit jars, rings, and other preserving
needs.
Canned Salmon.— Notwithstanding reports from
the north of a very heavy catch of Sockeye salmon, this
year's prices are going to be much higher than those
prevailing a year ago, The tall si/e will probably open
at about |16.50 per ease, and halves flat about #!7 2.Y
Cohoe prices will also he slightly higher than last year,
while Pinks and Chums will probably be a little lower.
The export demand will, of course, have a bearing on
the opening prices of the last two Lines.
Canned Milk.—Indications point to a firm market
on canned milk. The evaporators are paying 28c per
KM lib. more for buttermilk than they paid during July
of last year. Cheese is another dairy product that
bears watching. Ontario prices have stiffened considerably during the past few days. The commodity can
be stocked with safety for some time ahead. The firmness of dairy products has also been reflected locally on
the price of butter, the line having advanced 2e per Ib.
on July 2nd.
Table Figs opening prices for 1026 pack Smyrna
table figs have jus* been named, and show an advance
of 2c per Ib. overl ast year's juices.
Sugar.—Effective Friday evening, July 11th, local
sugar prices were reduced 10c per 100 lbs. on all
grades, making the present price for It. C. granulated
in 100 lb. bags, $0.65. A decline at this season of the
year comes as asurprise, although it was reasonable to
assume that the exceptionally heavy world production
would keep prices down, We would suggest cautious
buying, bearing in mind, however, the abnormal demand during the next two months,
Cereal Products.—Indications are for easier wheat
prices, owing principally to the wonderful crop reports
from the prairie provinces, Generally speaking, the
priee of wheat effects the price of a great many other
cereal products.   For this ream n lower prices on other
lines of cereal products whieh have advanced with
wheat, may be expected to react
Jam.— The short peek of strawberr) jam has .,!
ready had the effect of advancing the Opening pric,  Vv
per dosen to (0.50   The report also cornea to un v
local canners will probably make a 2*> jxr cent, delivery,   Jobbers will also be compelled to pro nt.i their
orders   The packing of other varietlen is w,\\ under
wav.
**
Canned Meats.—Wm Clark a Company snnounm!
early iu July a ver) big advance in corned and roasl
beef, the No. I -d*. advancing irom 0*2.4A in **', IS p.r
doa., and the No   m si*,   from $."» (6 to ftf.20 p< r do*
bunch tongue i* also up slightly Other \m** ,u>* un
changed, whib two other well known brands of corned
beef on this markel have been temporarily withdrawn,
owing to higher cos! I'urth.t advance* on other line*
are expected
Devilled Ham. The manufacturer* <-f I nderwiMxla
Devilled Hknt announce a reduction in pric, on the l\
and ttg's, and .'»re Intrnduein to this market * new mju
'*. which will retail at 10e per tin This is a qualit)
product in l»ij* demand during I-hi   RU III in el monl
WILL CONDUCT CLAS8E8 IN RETAIL SELLING
ON GOVERNMENT 8TUDIE8
U. 8. Federal Board for Vocational Education Outlines
Series of Letton* -First Move of IU Kind to give
Aid to Oroc<*n to Improve Their Efficiency
Of consuming interesl to th.* entire grocery trad- on
an outcropping of tbe convention of the National K*m
eiation of Retail Grocers in the Cnited states recentl)
is the extensive plan of the government to foster an
educational campaign which is to he nation wide in Ih
character to uri\*■ assistance to th. retail grocer* nf lhal
country    Tin* whole scheme has for its purpose making
lhe retail grocer* mori proficient in their busin*"»v   ' :
to that end has devised an educational plan Under "
Federal Hoard for Vocational Training which will i
brace high tehoola ami others in which merehondlsii *
in all its phases will he taught
Some conception of th. magnitude of this. ffeel i
be gleaned from the fact that the first lustalluoti' of
this service, which is to cover "retail selling" onlj w
embraced in 20 parts    The entire programme wan
signed in the nature of recommendations for lh< National Association of Retail <«r rs and » complete
outline of the methods to be followed, a description
each "lesson" is ffivsn and cooperation will be
plied through the Federal Hoard for Vocational Trn
ing.
The Government, in other words, has concluded
render assistance to the merchants of thai oouui *
along somewhat similar lines to that given to the fai
ers as there is an appreciation that education is nei
by retailers in order to enable them to more effect Iv* y 1925
oft
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
serve tho public and at the same time make better mer-
.liants of them. It is intended to secure the co-operation <'f local and state school authorities so as to pro-
7U\V teachers for classes of retail grocers and their
clerks.
INDIAN TEA
Policy of Fine Plucking
Calcutta,
The appeal by the Tea Association for a'j'telUloil
from coarse plucking in the m*w season has undoubtedly made an impression, though not so deep a one as
ih.* fall in prices.    But while many linns will adhere
ihis year to the policy of line plucking, the writer's Inquiries do not suggest that action in this sense will he
unanimous shortage of labor will exercise a restraining influence, hut that factor is adventitious, am! might
disappear in the event of a had monaoon miking lahor
more plelltilul.
In their annual review of the Calcutta la season,
vl.ssrs Thomas ami Co, remark that though the mar-
kel is still unsettled and traders ami distributors are
still nervous, there is every ground for taking an optimistic view of the future, prn\ ided that agents and
director* keep a proper control -,f plucking and manufacture, Cor this view tiny assign three main reasons,
Stu.ks, though large, include a considerable proportion of coarse tea, for which demand is restricted, and
..f whieh further production, they predict, will be correspondingly curtailed. Secondly, tea companies were
never iu such a strong financial position as today, Tho
largo profits of the last three v.crs have been v< ry wisely handled hy agents ami directors,    Dividends have
been on a conservative basis, cash reserves have Vcn
laiilt up, and the gSfdcih have he ii ii :t into liist class
order, The industry is t\o>\ in a position to regard a
temporary   setback   with   comparative   equanimity,
Thirdly, prices are still on a Icsi-. which show* a satisfactory return to lhe product i\
i»n the other hand, c.e,*s ar. rising steadily* To
Home extent this its.* is dm* I • highci' lahor •'• st* and
higher costs of material, lit;1 it is also due to the large
amounts which have been spell! out of revenue in replacements, the better upk* ep of the propel th's. and tba
higher commission . which lint * bectl paid on tin* higher
prices realized     Sh ••' *i lower price, come costs can bo
approciobly rcdu •■• I
Labor shortage continues to be the most difficult
problem.    If affects quality as well as quantity, for
without an adequate lahor force it is nmpossihlc to
pluck the flushes before the growth becomes coarse.
IT WILL 8EEM LIRE THE MILLENIUM TO THE
OROCER WHEN-
All credit accounts an- paid in full exactly when
due,
None of the men customers make any alleged funny
cracks about the supposed spirit nous nature of the contents of the bottles on the store shelves.
A whole week goes by without any church fair or
charitable entertainment soliciting the store to huy
tickets or make donations.
None of the employers ask to use the delivery truck
for joy riding purposes,
Thc landlord lets a month go by without suggesting
that it is high time to increase the rent.
"npHE boss said to me:
JL " 'There's a lot of XYZ soap we've got
to get rid of. Try and sell it to people when
they ssk for other brands. Tell them it's
just as good, only they don't know anything
about it.'
"But say—you can't sell goods that way,
not nowadays. All the answer I got was,
'I never heard of that brand. Give me
Palmolive.' (I say Palmolive because that
is what most of them asked for.)
"Next day the boss said:
" 'Pile up that XYZ soap on the counter
and put a special sale sign on it. How much?
Exactly what it cost us.' (But even then it
was days before the last cake was sold.)
"And the boss said—'Never again V
* *    *    ■*
"Well, this taught me a lesson. You bet
when I get my own store I won't tie up my
money and space with a lot of unknown
goods.
"I'm going to specialize on the brands that
the people ask for. The ones that do their
own selling. I'm not going to offend my
customers by trying to work off unsalable
goods. I'm going to give them what they
want and make an easy profit."
* *    *    *
Palmolive is the leading "asked-for" brand
in Canada, as it is everywhere else in the
world. Actual figures prove that it is used
by at least one-third of the population.
2M» 10
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•bib
7*:
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured bjr
CANADA COLORS AND QICMICALS LIMITED
Toronto
Winnipeg
Agents:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Vancouver
IV4XW,
Isil tlwstt tag "tint*, rtspi
W
Shelly'h 4X Quality and
speedy Delivery together
will give you absolute satisfaction.
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
GILLETO LYEJ
EATS DIRT        ^4k
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise. A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on your
shelves until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
E    W   GILLETT  COMPANY   LIMITED
T( >»•< <H T i
5
I
THE GOOD ROADS MOVEMENT
i«
means more movement on good road* and more* p«n<
for your nupply of Hark'* Prepared foodi
A full range Including Canadian llolled Dinner, I '"'
Meat*, Veal Ham and Tongue, l.tmrli Tongue miri Ol To |p*
Spaghetti With ChiM<*<>, etc. etc. glveit you added Opi* '
UN for larger nul-nn.
Ul lha CI.AIIK Kitchen* help fSS to heller bu
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
Establishments   st   Montreal.    P. Q.   St. Rem).   P. Q-    ",d
Harrow, Ont.
m«mt»**mmi*t*iiM:***-*»****i 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B.C. Off lots and Warehouses:
1M0 Uohards Stmt 1614 Btors Strstt
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
'•• •«% * tm Oaaaam Caa».a* *+*
STCHARUS
EAGLE
BRAND
(Sweetened)
ST. CHARLES
BRAND
(Uniwsftensd)
Vou are building a permanent and profit-
able milk business If you are featuring
thess two brands.
%t\Tmtin,&4mimd
Offices*. Vancouver. Condensary, South 8umas
A week goes by without any woman of the neighborhood spilling their family troubles to the store and
asking for sympathy.
Some traveling salesman springs a really new joke.
That box of high-priced cigars whieh the store purchased in a moment of temporary aberation is finally
sold out after all these months.
A whole month goes by without any unexpected expense or increase in taxes bobbing up.
None of the store's phone customers lay the blame on
the store because they couldn't immediately get a connection when calling up the store.
No one pops into the store just at closing time.
It is possible to pay cash for everything the store
buys.
No special discounts are asked by people who pay up
long-standing accounts.
There isn't a bit of grief in the grocery business for
one entire day from morning to night.—National Grocer
GROCERS' PICNIC
Eighteenth Annual Holiday Held at Nanaimo Voted
Huge Success.
As in former years, this annual event, organized by
the Grocers' Section of the Greater Vancouver Branch,
R.M.A., proved an unqualified success. A party of eight
hundred merrymakers embarked on the 0. P. C. S.
"Princess Adelaide." leaving Vancouver at 9 a.m., arriving at Nanaimo at 11 o'clock, During thc passage
over, the picnickers were regaled with music supplied
by Shelly*8 popular musicians, and "Princess Gleam 0*
Hope," Shelly Bros, candidate for premier honors at
the forthocming Vancouver Exhibition, was in attendance, also representatives of Vancouver wholesale provision houses, and parties from the leading bakery
plants.
Bands met the party at Nanaimo and led the way to
the picnic ground, where a day of glorious sunshine was
devoted to sports and jollification. There were no less
than twenty-seven keenly contested events during the
afternoon, ami every credit is due to the various committees in charire. who spared no effort in making the
outing a success.
Valable prizes were donated by local wholesale pro-
vision houses and prominent manufacturers, which
were eagerly competed for by the contestants, many of
the events providing excellent fun for the spectators.
The children were well taken eare of, and had the time
of their young lives, for they were provided with oranges, ice cream, and other toothsome delicacies gratis
bv thc committee. At six o'clock a tired but happy
throne boarded thc steamer on her homeward trip, and
there were no dissentient incidents to mar a perfect
holiday. The following committee had charge of the
day's proceedings:
Picnic Officers.
Chief picnic officer. Hugh Morrow; assistant picnic
officer. W. Allison: chief snorts officer. J. F Merilees;
general secretary. Walter F. Ing.
Committees.
General executive—Messrs, H. Morrow (chairman),
Clarke. J. S McKnv, B. II. MeTagirart, R. Whiteside,
,T. Harkness, J. F. Merilees, G. W. Bell. W. Allison, C.
T. F. McDowell. W. Beaton, T. H. White, W. Robins,
M. S. Brazie, E. Hickman. 12
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
md
•aVi
mootr
frfaftoide
1*
•**»TS&
•5
.^jK
vd ie sure vou SOj
DatJamO ofht*^
The dtc«a>on you make new—«n ordering canned
fruits— determmts your success for a year ohooO
it's doubly important, therefore, to remtmber th«
bg advantages the Oei Monte brand offers.
First—the -assurance of being eble lo turn your
stock quickly. Vou know in advance that you have a
market—a quick, ready acceptance of every item in the
whol* lint.
Second—Del Monte advertising! It's stronger this
year than ever before. It's directed right onto the
homtt of your best customers—building new volume,
persistently, month after month.
And most important of all. Oel Monte quality!
it's tha good' am of every item In lha Itna that makes
tha advtri-sing so successful—and brings back to you
th« kind of steady, rtpeet business you want
Why not make up your mind NOW.* Say Del
Montt to your jobber when h# cells—and gel ready for
the biggest year you've ever had on canned fruits
w^
.    r-i   I
vooo SPl^Vv
jvir succssrtoms
lOght   ni>*    Ihia*   hot   ■!.»•
»r  «r*  iiraine  ritllll ■»■••  ot
hoQSeWlVSS    Im     "fr«i«.a«>    I**!
Muni*   Ki 'iii-*   in   lh«   • «»>
Try ll)l» |.lr,« ) i.>it •«.,•* m
titan trttlui* It won >.>>ir
trade- ••»!  |»ut   n«w  ill**  in
».»ur    •urnntrr    . ulnn-l    fruit
MlldM.
W» run >»ii|it>l> trim •1*0-
I'Uv rriMlrrl*) ur Ira fir !• f"i
»>.«lf . tmloinrr* .Ir*. ill.Ili«
IM» n. *• rurili.Hl l.rl im
know )«>ur rr«i>i[i*#.i»u'ni« A«l-
tlraaa i'r..iii.,i!o»i I'r[.,«i imnil.
« ullf.iiiiiii    I'mhlrtK   ("orixir-
ation, n*n PrsJtown, I »n*
touts.
Juli
-J 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
Transportation—Messrs, R (}. ()rr (chairman), W.
Robins, T. White K. Whiteside, A. Vigors.
finance -Messrs 0. Clarke )chainnan), J. Hark-
,,,-ss. .1. F. Merilees, K. H. McTaggart.
Sports   IV  Higginson  (chairman), J. F. Merilees,
Announcers and starters -Messrs, |\ Higginson, W
i> Tullidge, J, A. Anderson, G. Lincoln, .1. B. Stinson,
Judges' Messrs. T, II. White (chairman), and representatives oi wholesale houses.
(Iroundsmen- Messrs. Robert <■. <>rr (chairman).
\v Stafford, <• Lincoln^ II K. Lyon, J. S. McKay, Sam
Pritchard.
Kntertalnmont--Mr. W. Robins and committee.
Prizes Messrs, T. IV McDowell (chairman), K. 0.
Jones, John Stevenson.
M A TUCK A CO, LTD., REORGANIZE
New Manager Appointed for Tea and Coffee Deptrt
meat.
II   Iv Crook who for the last ten years has been
manager of the Western Grocers' Tea and Coffee Department at Winnipeg, has been appointed to take
charge of the tea and coffee department of M. A.
Tuck  a Company  Mmhed, successors to Tuck &
Light fool  Limited, packers of Tudor tea and coffee.
Mi Crook commenced his career as r. pupil on the
Mincing banc Market, London. England tho hub of
tin* ten industry of the world and has spent all his
life in tin* tea and coffer trade. It is significant of
the growth Of Vancouver as a distributing centre for
prairie points, that such an eminent authority in his
line should move here from Winnipeg, and he is assured of a warm welcome by the tea and coffee men
"it the coast
■"—H*""!*""'"^""*""™™"'^******
■■■
A Quality Product!
ronizeJJ
I MM***- imm mmmm        mmWSW
OCNUINB
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. MitkUeton's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C.
Baking Powders
to recommend
Both Royal Baking
Powder and Dr.
Price's Cteam Baking Pourder are made
with cream of tartar
obtainedfromgrapes.
The superiority of these baking
powders, carefully maintained
over more than a half century,
has taught four generations of
women to depend upon them.
To you, this means prompt,
steady, year 'round sales.
Both are made in Canada.
Sell Your Best Customers
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
And you'll be sure to keep
their business. The quality
justifies your strongest recommendation.
Hilled in Vaneouvtr
by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANOOUVER, B. 0. 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
"ilV
W
ANNOUNCEMENT
7 K WISH to announce that wo have reorganised and are changing
tho name <»f our firm from Tuck &   Light fool   Ltd.   lo   M    A
TICK & COMPANY LTD
We can assure all our old customers  thai our  reputation  for quality
and service will be fully maintained nnd that orders entrusted to ns will re
reive the personal attention of Mr  II   K   Crook,  who  for  the  pnnt   twenty
years hase heen prominently associated with the Tea and Coffee trade of
Western Canada, and is now in chary nf our Tm Blending and Coffee Roast.
ing Departments
WRITE FOR SAMPLES OF OCR IMPROVED MLKNDS
M A. TUCK & COMPANY LTD.
Successors to
Tuck & Lightfoot Ltd.
1069 HAMILTON STREET
VANCOUVER 111
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Tht following art prieoo quoted for principal llnoo of loading wholtMlo flrmo.   f-Mcto quoted ort no<«ooarily
•ubjoet to market fluctuation*
B. W. OILLSTT  CO.  LTO.
Royal Yeaat—                                 Par rooo
I dot. pkft  In caaa 110
Pur* Ploko Lya—
4 dot. In com IH
I  caaee      l li
10 caaea. 4 dot  In caae  (10
Magic Batclna Powder—
4 oa. 4 dot  411
I oo. 4 dot  7 71
I oa.  4 dot  • »
11 oa. 4 doa    1210
t% i caae tola.
Mafia Soda, Caaa Na. 1—
1 case (40 l-tb   piukii *••*•«» I (0
5 ••■••Mi or more (40
■I-Carbonate of Soda—
US lb. kef", par kef   7.U
400 Ib. barrela, per barrel 23.70
Cauatle Soda (Granulated)— Per tb.
10 tb. canlater (100 tho In roto)  I&H
140 Iba.   Iron  drums ,.    )IH
Cream of Tartar— Par doa.
% tb. papar pkga. '4 doa. In «m),..1.»
% Ib. popor pkffi (4 doa. In cut). J 40
H lb. com with aeraw eovora (4 doa.
!■  COM)    ...- tlO
1 Ib. moo arrow cotare  (I dor  In
com)   .  4 M
f Ib. mmto eanlatera % dot. In
MM)   -.. ■ -  **%
W Ib   woden i-imi -j**,
SS  Tb    WiKMlrn   p(*l!l «D
100  tb    lined   kaga 1»H
M0 tb   lined barrels ]7
KtLLV.  DOUOLAS a CO..  LTO
NoOoO Producta
Alleplce, No   t. line -lm | oo
Haklnf I'owder. 41 t! oa . doe 1 41
lloklnf  I'owder.  II I He.  dot no
IM kin* Powder, 4 Se. doi ti to
lloklnf Soda. 40 le.  raee | ie
llaklng Soda. 14 He. doe «o
Moral.  Ha doa   , ?i
Mack   Popper.  Una.  doa | oo
'•elery   -la It. (lm  doa j o«
Nabob Coffee,  email  tine,  earh 11
Coffee,   la tt> 43
Cuatard  Powder, doa | oo
Wulnk Taplora. doa I oo
Chocolate  Pudding,  doa 1 oo
Oilll  Powder, email, doa . | so
Cinnamon, t oa   line, doa | io
•Cayenne Pepper. I tine, doa I lit
Clovea. email, dos . 1 40
Curry Powder, 4 os  glaee. doa I 71
Cream of Tartar, 1,
Cream of Tartar.   He,  tlna
Cream of Tartar H".
flicrfor,  email,  dos
I!Mini In   IH   or.   dos    ..
HSxiracti ;*..*   dot
1,'xlne t«.   I  ot    Aot
Extracts, i <*t   «i<.i ||.oq
S&l
I 10
I 14
IM
ur.
». tt
• Mi», i* t< <>« >\**t
%ta,-a, •omit, non
Nulrnrf    tmjil,   «|'ii
1'aprlka.   •mall   flM
I'mi r apire.   ]  lim,  ib-i
I'oullrr   I'taaaittg    Haga    Hat ■<*
Thyme.   Turnerir.   tine,   tos
Plrktiitf  »l'"*    SM    N"   1
Mar-Warn    Mint.   CereUr
While   l'epp»r.   line    *b*e
GtJtff 'Ml,  I os   •»•■•
• '*etor oil. 4 M dos
•tfpeum Halle. H» An*
P>uu   Colore,   1   ot    <1o«
Iclnfe  (Chocolate.   Hoee.   Pin*.   Lf»0«
Vanila.  While.   AtfOORd   OrOBfal Otst
Jolty  Powder*  doc
l.err>onede  powder.  d"S
Muetard.   le,   dot
Muetard.    Se    dot
Muetard.   H»   d»s
M i •! a el    3  *!   .lot
flulpbur.   He,  doa
Tea. Oreen label.  H». I**** to
Tea.   nrvati   l-ahel.   le,   per  S>
la   tt.   iMrkaaee
6 tl>    |»erka«ee
Tea,  «l«  I.use,   Afternoon.   I  to
Tea de l.use,  Afternoon H» I*' "'
Tea de l.use He per W>
Vineter. dos       .......
(CODtiOUtd on P«K''  IW
: u
■ 0
: II
1 It
I 54
I*
I II
I II
: JI
I W
(J
i :i
• ii
til
I 10
1 i«
j <fl
li
:i
-i
M
<**.
ti
s!
11
: i" 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
It
The Biscuit Basket
is creating
greater sales
Thr 12 varieties contained in tin* "Biscuit Basket" have hecn specially designed to provide n sweet biscuit that will appeal to every
taste
Those distinctly different buscuits will establish themselves as favor
Ites with your customers, who will discover them in the "Biscui
Basket," ami buy them regularly by the pound.
nit
Mc CORMICKS
BISCUITS
•PHONE   FOR   FOOD"  CAMPAIGN  GAINING GROUND  IN
UNITEO STATES.
WhSl do the women think*
There's S question ni old on man
Tht answer to It. ne applied to the "Phone (or Food" cam
palgn, ha* been obtained by The stimulus, lbs official publication Ol  the movement, which le backed by the National
Wholosalfl Grocers' Assoclsiloo.
Thin magaslne has ne»rl> completed n national canvass In
which || propound*! tie query, "What Is your marketing
method -tfllophonfl or personal"*" to thousands ol the most
promlneni women tn ths United states
Answers hSVl been obtained frtnn editors, clubwomen, artists, sculptor*, actresses, welfare workers, authors, office
holders, business women housewives all. the home managers who blSSfl lhe trail lor the masses, the kind who plon-
flflrod with eli-cirlc lights, vacuum cleaners, electric sewing
machines, snd all cthuUuiics ol thfl "tiny Nineties." that
have become necessities of 15125.
On the baoli of the replies so far obtained, more than »u
per cent nf tlusc women scorn the old drudgery of shopping
OS flu* hoof  fighting counter crowds and bundle carrying.
A provtoill canvass conducted by the wholesale merchants
lllOWfld that BO per cent of all American housewives • I hone
for Food " The Importance of the new nndlngs are obvious
In flow of the fact that humanti>. since the first Invent on
has "followed the lender" lhe man who firsl put rock on in.
-nd of an arrow, the genius who built thfl first Ore. be DW
tailor and draper, who skinned Ihe slain leopard and won
flic fur,
Here's n college professor who says:
"Of course. I phone for food. It works oul excellently
Save myself trouble and—lhe cook slays."
Here's a famous nclress saying: ,
"Why Shouldn't  I  Phone for food?   I qui!  playing hOW
when I graduated from pinafores"
H.re vou have Ihe sentiments of « woman attorno*.
"II saves my lime,   Thai's money to me."
A noted writer asserts: ,        , . ,„,,,„„..
"t couldn't be nn author If I wasted my tlmo Snd energ)
cnrrylng bundles "
And that's the overwhelming tenor of the replies catalogued
and tiled In The Stimulus office—under such signatures as
those of "nillle" Hurke (Hrs. Florenz ZiegAeld), the actress;
Fannie Heaslip Lea. the writer. Miss Mary Whlton Calkins,
professor at Wellesly College; Miss Adelaide Steele Taylor,
home economist of Washington, D.C., and Innumerable others.
Hut you retailers haven't got the story till you hear
the other side—the minority that tells you why every woman
doesn't telephone for food.
Miss Carolyn Sherwln Bailey, author, New York, sounds
thc predominating note in this criticism, when she says:
..iv  neighborhood so far as selecting perishable roods for
"I have not been able to depend upon the merchants in
freshness and economy and quality is concerned. I believe
this is due to the clerks nnd not to the proprietors."
In nearly every adverse answer to telephone shopping the
women declared their eagerness to use the convenience, but
asserted they "couldn't trust the grocer."
There were also many who followed both methods of shopping, ordering only staples by phone and adding they would
be glad lo buy by phone exclusively when the retail merchants are educated to give them fair treatment.
During the last month the "Phone for Food" campaign has
received a tremendous impetus, according to reports coming
"to the campaign headquarters at 1801 Byron Street, Chicago.
Hundreds of grocers have written In telling of sensational Increases In trade under the stimulation or the movement,
The use of sticker stamps has exceeded 15,00,000, each of
these carrying the message "Phone for Food." Several million inserts have been used also, together with posters for
wagons, window sets nnd newspaper advertisements.
Also the slogan is entering bomes on millions or paper
hags, gummed tapes for sealing bundles, brendwrappers and
on many othflr devices.
Like Daddy
"Black chile, what yo* doin't"
4,l ain't doin' a thinR, Mammy/'
My, but yo* is gettin' mo' like yo' Tappy every
day.
ii 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Job
SI
45
12
31
UM
21
P. tURNS 4 CO. LTO.
Shamrock Products.
Ayrshire rolled shouldaro, p«*r tb
Bacon, Shamrock. 6-8,  por Iti
Baked ham with droofttlgi pflf ". .   .
Creamery  lluttcr,   Hhnmrock.  cartona
Cheese,  Canadian,   luifw,   per  tb
Cheese, Canadian,  twin,  por It-
Compound, Carnation, No. &, U*caM 10 IS
Compound, Curnatlon  No   3   2»-ca*»e W 2°
Cooked  Hums,  Hhionr.uk,   t»«»r  tti    40
Dominion Hums. 12-16 tt>s 2»
Dominion Ilucon, 8-10 ttis. per ll>     .    31
Dominion Macon. 10-14 tba   per n» .Ti
Dominion ahouldem. boOOd nnd rolled   .24
Drlppinf. beef.  4-n..  bricks U
Hums. Shamrock, per tb 33
Hums, boned and rolled imt lb.. .   .*•*»
Head Cheeae. i-lb tins aach I*'*
JoUlad tonfue, par tin   1(0
laird. No. 5. 12 to cane 13 15
Lard. No. 3. 20 to case  13 20
Lard,   carton,   13-lts        .    231*
Lard. No. 1, cartons, 30 tba 23
Mincemeat, kits. 26-lb, net,  per tb...   .14
Meat Loaf, per Ib 11
Pork plea, per dot  .40
Pork, roaat lef* with dreeainc. par lb    31
8moked ftsh, k(p|M>rs. 20« per n> 10
Smoked Sah, kippered salmon,  10a
and Ws. per Ib l«
Smoked Cod, SOs per lb 14
Selected fowl, per lb 2t
Salected Chicken, per U» II
THI ROYAL CROWN SOAPS. LTO.
Vanoouver   Prleo   Llat—F.O.i.   Vancouver,
or Now Wtatmlnatar.
Terms *$*** SO Daya.
Soap Flakes. M 1 Ib pkta. boi 4 10
"Apai" Soap Flakes. It I tb pkta, boa I 40
A La Francalse Caatlle,  boa ot tl  4 01
Dlua Mottled, bot of 10  ...„.„.,« III
Crown Oatmeal, 14 Is.  boi of 144 411
Cllmai  or  Montreal  (wrapped)  boa  M 100
Uoldclt WhI, ta In,\  f|  I Ma , | 00
Uolden llnr,  boi of 10 .  IM
Klondike   (wrapped)   U>i   of   IS   ........... 109
Klondyke  (unwrapped)  boi of IS     ... IM
Klero Oiycerlne.  boi of ISS.. 194
Mnen   (unwrapped)   boi  of  100 M IM
t.liiuld Ammonia, 3 «». i   qt*  boi of M - 4 II
Uquld Blue, t doi   qta  boi of 14     ...   4 10
Mechanic's lint Tar.  boi of  100 .     .114
Mechanic » I'lne Tar.  boi of io 2 9*
Olive Castile, cakea. boi o: 100 . 4 M
Primrose (wrapped)  bui of M 4 40
Kitra  hard  unwrapped.   Urn  nf Jo 2 44
I'erfect  (unwrapped) boi ot Iw J Ot
Write for Toilet and Hotel tkmpa
Hpeclal  prim* on 1.   10.   24 and  100
besot
lendray a I.ye, boi of 41 . I M
I'endray-'a l'owdered  Ammonia,   boi  14. I ti
Spar Ial prices on J.  10. 14 and  !*>'
bo ies.
PanOray'g  Water  Olaaa,   Iff  Preeerver—
Caaea 24 tins per ruoe        .4(0
Ited Crown.  Un o  fli .440
lloyal  laundry  Flake*.   14%.   In  M.U    14S
(Special pti.e on contract)
Itoyal Crown fc»*p 4a 144a    4 40
Itoyal Crown  1'owder.  U.«  34a only JO*
Itoyal <'rown IViwder. lib, Off of 40 .4 00
Itoyal Crown Cleanser. 40 sifter Una 3 t*
Itoyal Crown I.ye, boi of 41 , 114
Itoyal Crown Naptha boi of '.oo .. 4 10
t>0
4 10
Itoyal Crown  l'owdered  Ammonia
While Wonder.  Uu of loo
White Swan Soap. 4a boi of Uo
While Swan Napiha. boi „f j^
While Swan Waahihf |'oWll.r. ^ llf u , ^
TMB CANAOA STAftCH CO   LTd
Laundry Starehea—
Canada   Uundry  Htarch,   to lb   i„ ,
i anada   While UloOA   1 tb   okSu
Acme  While UUttm.   lit)   pk\a
No    I    While.   1001b   ham,
MvaJdfllllUI Silver -Uluee. l-lb ta.,
40 tb "
Kdwardfburf   Silver   i)ioM   | |.
fancy tin ranietere. 41-Ibe
latwarduburf   filv.r   tikmo.   100.ft.
Celluloid  march,   (boiea  of  Hi*a*
per eooai r "
•Si
'S
II
*i%
•*<s
Culinary Stan-hee—
mmmmtn e  C«l*br*t»d   l*r.*.»/.,i   <*>(ir!l
40 tb  U>t«a.   imr  tl>
Canada Corn 8lar<* 40 fb U it*  («,
tb
Ch*llenfe  Ctim  Htarch  40 tb   I   im
p*r n»
*\s*t*t l*t*.uto FV»ur 44 lb l»*.*   rti
Maiele Oi»—
ll«a..U (Ml.  ts
"   H   ....
"   4e
"   4a
Cern Syrup*—
Crown 2a. 94 to >«••
1*.   13   to   ruoe
i«e 4 t.> ones
t*m.   3  lo eoaa
l.lly te.  94 to taam
ie.   19  lo c*»#
148l   4   to  «**••
Karo.  ta  24  In rate
le.  12 to ra»*
io«. 4 to aan
^-\..
famous
SARDINE
MEALS
i ;'.
fii'.la
i * y     *
i<y/,- .-
*%/?z,
mp / UaS **— •
I VZZ2? *&* '**
\Z£*e2Six
l*TB 1 ii — •***»
, *eyt w__—
■••••••*»aeeJ5'
SfS-S!
FREE
to the Grocery Trade
the only book of its kind
over published.
Sutoon pogoa of ttmptinf ougg*-.
Hona  for   economical   taoty meal*,
from tho loading kitchtna af Amor
lea.   Printed in colora and iHrsel
Ivtly bound.
The Srni edition la Untied
All rOQOlStUOOS will Im* BHwl
In thi* order roccived Writ••
ua atulilif how man) fainill' '
you nerve-.   t»ne btMik for earh
family will b nl you abnolu
lely free.
Cftuors Bios. Limited
■LACK'S HARIOUR. N B
I'arkera of
BRUNSWICK, JUTLAND and
GLACIER SAROINE8
ll
*»l
"41
141
11 II
I'M
t i'
( .*
lit
l**\
1 ***
(tt
Mi
lit
t;; 1-925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
17
Aggaooit—
Haioher, J —Bsporlsd commencing, (gorosr).
Aldtrgrovt—
Urom, K. A— Commenced,    (butcher).
Armstrong—
Northern Okanagan Creamery Ahhii.—Reported »old lo P,
liurtiM A Co„ Ltd.
Bonnor'o Ferry—
Sherman—Reported commencing
Burnaby—
Swindell. W. 8.— Repotted commencing,   (grocer).
Cloverdale—
Kournler. A—Commenced,    (rent and bakery).
Chilanco Forks—
Piper. Robert.—Roporlod news succeeded  b>   wnuaniH
UkS Trading Co. Ltd,
CHriitlna Lake—
Brown, 0  C -Commenced    (grocer).
County Lino—
WsJdii F. 0 -Reported sold oul to T. J  I»al>.   go.).
Muirle, 0. R~ Reported SOtd out to Harry Slmma.    (Jew
elry).
Cobbit Hill—
Wragg. Jai C ~~Reported aelllng oul.   (gro )
Oundaravo—
McKeiule. A  J.-Commenced    (bakery and confy).
Kamloops—
Klddea.   lbrt   *   Co.--A.   K.   Mulrhead   reported   retired
(men's funis)
Langley Prairie—
JurfODSOtl, Mrs, 0-Reported commencing    (fancy goods)
Merritt—
Clarke, Mathilda (Mra. T) -Reported holding sale and dl»
confining,   (mill)*.)
Moyie—
PoderSOQ I  Mlll«~ Commenced    (meat*).
Neloon—
Ovsrwattes Company   Reported opening branch.
Steele. R     Reported opening     (gro.)
New Westminster—
Vldac. L—Sould oul lo \V   Hall     (butcher).
(iranvllle * Tabbutl -Dissolved partnership,
Penny-
Wall. T  II -Sold oul    (gen  more),
Quesnel—
Dnvle. C. II.—Repotted oold oul
Ruskin —
IVIkey. F. I) S M. tJ.-Reported sold oul to Ruokln lash
Store*,
Troll—
Kelderman. A. at*   oported commencing,
Curlew Crenmery Co, Ltd Opening branch.
Lyons, W. K    Commenced,   (drugs.)
Vancouver—
Bosly, W. R  A C. Ltd -Applying for change on name to
W. R. Itealy Chemlcala Co.. Ltd.
DUOO Waterproofing Co..  Ltd-Applylng  for  change or
name to Outex Waterproofing Co,. Ltd.
(llbbons. W. W.—llellltTs aale reported held.
Ooddird, M. (Mra. Thot.)—Roporlod oold out.    (confey.)
Truffle* Chocolntoa Lfd.-Applyln* for change of name to
Inea Chocolate* Ltd.
II. C, Jewelry * Uan Co-Reported aold out.
Canadian Hardware A Implement Underwriters-Licenced
to transact buaineaa In R. C. . ,   .
Mission Confectionary Co.. Ltd.-F. J   Carter appointed
liquidator; meeting of creditor* called.
Vancouver Mtlla Limited-Applying for change of name
lo Vancouver Milling A Grain Co.. Ltd.
Bsbs A Hnddnd   Incorporated,   (silk lloolory, etc.)
Chrlolte, John VV.-Closed Vancouver branch.   (I). 0.. etc.)
ROBINSON'S
CANDIED PEEL
MiX IV i'ii   I
tt" itiWIHWi i " f
i Cll-Rim     OWIVNCil-
"ml*:.   '
TT
— —ohmmCA.'
SSTS
'■mmesa
PACKEO IN  11b. CARTONS-24 IN CASE
ALSO "WHOLE OR CUT"
LEMON  -:-  ORANGE
CANADIAN CITRON
Satisfaction is Assured by tho Unvarying High
Quality for which Robinson's Pools are now
Recognised
ORDER FROM YOUR JOBBER
WM. ROBINSON LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C*
WAFFLE BRAND FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
Note: Wo could not improve tho syrup so we have
improved tho oontainer.
KeUy Confection Co. Ud.
1100 Mainland 8treet
VANCOUVER, B. C. 18
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
July
.ao
Twentieth Annual Convention
Retail Merchsnts' Association of Canada, Inc.,
Vancouver, B. C, July 27, 28, 29, 30.
Hotel Vancouver—Headquarters
Monday, July 27th—
Registration of Secretaries.
I'all the meeting to order.
Ueail correspondence calling meeting
Address of Welcome .
Roll Call of Secretaries.
Read Minutes of last meeting,
Discussion of Group Questions,
New business.
Tuesday, July 28th—
Registration, Reception and Receiving Certificates
of delegates.
Call the meeting to order by the President
Read notice calling meeting.
Address of Welcome by Officers of tin* British Cul.
uuibia Provincial Hoard.
Replies to same by visiting delegates,
Roll Call of Officers.
Read Minutes of last meet ing.
President's Address.
Appoint Committee on Credentials
Read Correspondence.
Secretary's report.
Chairman's Report of Representative Committee,
Treasurer's Report.
Auditor's Report.
Receive Resolutions.
Wednesday, July 29th—
Consider and aet upon resolutions and reports
Arrange date and place of next meet ini*?.
Unfinished business.
Entertainment Programme.
Monday, July 27—The programme of entainiiunt as
st present outlined will commence with a scenic drive
sround Vancouver and environs.
Tuesday, July 28— Delegates invited to attend
luncheon given by Vancouver Rotary Club.
6.00 p,m, -Informal dinner tendered by Vancouver
City Council at Stanley Park Pavilion, after which
delegates will proceed to the immigration wharf where
they will embark on the Harbour Commissioners'
launch "Fispa" for a trip around the harbour, viewing
facilities in regard to docks, grain elevators, etc.
Wednesday, July 29—
Evening—(1 renter Vancouver Branch of the Association will entertain visitors on a moonlight excursion
to Howen Island on a Union Steamship Company's vessel, leaving the dock at 6 p.m.
Thursday, July 30—At noon delegates will attend
Kiwnnis Club luncheon at the Hotel Vancouver, when a
special programme of interest to the retail merchant
will be rendered, and it is expected that Hon. II. II.
Stevens will be the speaker of the occasion.
After Luncheon delegates will leave for New West-
This convention which prom ise* tu In- one of the
most importanl gathering** *>( retail merchant* ever
held in tin provinee will give exceptional iinpetu* ■*.
thc scthllics of the Association in British t'oimhin .six!
afford delegates from all over tin Dominion an ..|»»»*.r
(unity to become acquainted with Canada'x Paeifir
|n»rt
An elaborate programme has been arranged, iml the
entertainment committee has spared m» effort m pro
-riding opportunities f«»r delegates and their wives to
enjoy the iconic beauties mrrounding Vsncouver
Members of the Greater Vancouver Branch will bt
hosts of the convention
M\
hosts of the convention
official notice has been received by provincial wc
rotary Walter P Ing of the intention of ever) pruviiin
in tin- Dominion having representatives nt lhe convention,
Ontario has intimated  that  imt onlv will thi   «
a*
official delegates from thai eit) attend bul in addiii
tin* chairman of tin* vsrious trade sect ions hsvr Mgi
tied their intention of being present
PROVINCIAL CONVENTION NOTES
British Columbia Branch will Meet in Vancouver,
August 10, 11 and 12.
The annual convention nf tin* British Columbia
Board «»f Ihe KM A  will bs held in Vancouver  \ug
10. II and 12
Theae dates, which arc later than usual, have been
chosen tot the special reason that resolution* brought
down at the Dominion Convention which la also !»• ing
down at the Dominion Convention, may be fr**!*. dw
cussed at the provincial iroth«-rinu in outlining activl
ties fur the coming year
It is expected that the attendance at thin cotivi ntion
will exceed thai of any previous provincial gath rang.
Owing to the fact that dates correspond with Ihoac 0i
the Vancouver Exhibition, and Buyers' Week, when
reduced fans and the opportunity of making fi
chases with the possibility of having total Irav*
expense refunded, will make a strong appeal
merchants of British Columbia.
A number of branches have already Intimated
they will send delegates to the convention, which j
ises tO be of unusual interest, judging from datn
in possession of the provincial secretary, relative
Dominion Convention.
It is advisable that all wishing t<> attend thj*
ing should be sure that  their names are i,nl
Provincial Secretary Walter IV lug. at the earth
siblo date, since reservations will, in any ease 1"
Cult, owing to the unprt dented number "I '
visiting Vancouver this summer.
our
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ihe
'hat
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liffi' ITO
I'll*** BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
19
Conditions in Canada's Footwear Industry
Growth of United
Over 130,000,000, mostly Canadian capital, is in
vested iu the factories in Canada, numbering about 190,
which manufoclurcr leather boots and shoes. Tin* pro*
duction beam n deservedly high reputation, but of late
years the manufacturers have been passing through a
:nmI led period.
l„tst year *J4 ahoi -manufacturing (Irms failed or dis-
continued business,   Since the war about four times
that number have proved unable to weather the storm
which  has assailed this  industry  more  fiercely  than
any other i" Canada, with the possible exception of
woollen manufacturing, Businessea whieh failed have
in en reorganised or have been taken over by new proprietors, who have endeavoured to revive them with
fresh capital.   Intense domestic competition has com*
pelled the •*< ptanee of prices which left little or no
profit to the manufacturer Although factory selling
prices uf Ii ots iml shoes have been reduced almost 50
per cent from the peak prices of 1919, and are now
hut 30 per cent, above those of 1918, only very mod*
riate reductions have been made iu wages.
In normal times Canadian exports of boots and
shoes hav ii'»t been of great importance, but during
the war and immediately after exports were very
large, and that fact is one of tin* causes of the present
difficulties. Canadian manufacturers enlarged their
plants considerably in order to meet demands, which
have now been greatly reduced, lu the financial year
ending March, BUM. the value of exports amounted to
$304,000, compared with $5,679,000 in 1920.
The advance in prices of agricultural products has.
however, Increased the purchasing power of the rural
population, and is bound to stimulate thc demand for
manufactured products in general.
Though prospects look brighter than for some time
past, Canadian shoe manufacturers are not yet out of
the wood. Competing imports of British inanufaetur-
■ ix largely man's boots and shoes, have increased durum the past few years to a remarkable degree, thotiirh
ille total imports are less than some years ago, as the
following table shows, the values being given in thou-
Winds of dollars:
Imports Into Canada of Boots and Shoes.
Value of Boots and 8hoes of Leather
fiscal year
ended March
Prom Cnited
Prom other
Total
81
Kingdom
Countries
1913
$4s;>
!*p.i, •••-•.
$4,008
1914
577
8,659
4,*i2!»
1915
491
2,909
8,400
1916
215
1,905
2,120
1917
17:1
3.274
M.448
bus
146
3,017
3,164
1919
7H
2,815
2,694
Kingdom Share.
1920
94
2,617
1921
358
1,816
1922
335
991
1923
410
794
t!>24
707
S21
1925
1,014
728
III
1
2,711
2,175
1,327
1,204
1,529
1,773
This, for the year ended March 31, 1925, the value
of the imports of leal her boots and shoes amounted
to $1,773,000, which is less than that of any year between 1913 and 1921 inclusive. In both 1913 and 1914
the imports were worth over $4,000,000. It will be
seen that the figures have increased from $1,327,000 in
1922 to $1,773,000 in 1925, but. even so, they are
mueh less than those relating to the years 1913 and
1921, notwithstanding that prices are about 30 per
eent. higher today than in the early years of that period, ami consequently values are inflated in relation
to quantities,
Prom the point of view of the British manufacturer
the most interesting feature of the table is the growth
in recent years of imports from Great Britain, and the
decline in imports from the Cnited States, whieh supplies marly all the imports shown in the table as "from
other countries." por the year ended March, 1925,
Great Britain supplied $1,044,000 worth, or just about
four times the average annual value for the eight years
just before the war and nearly twice is much as the
highest total prior to 1924.
Canadian Production.
Tin* decline in imports from the United States is
even more remarkable than the increase in imports
from Great Britain, and on balance the total imports,
especially when quantities and not values are taken,
have been very much less since the war than in the
years immediately preceding it. In 1923 the production of leather boots and shoes in Canada amounted
to $45,596,000, and the total imports to $1,632,000, a
figure representing 3C» per cent, .as compared with
4C, per cent, for all imports. Such figures show that
the imported product is not n very serious competitor
with the domestic production.
Fifteen or twenty years ago British boots and shoes
were rarely seen in Canada, the market being held almost entirely by Canadian and American manufacturers. At that time the British manufacturer went in
more for quality than for style, and the shape and last
desired by the Canadian consumer were lacking. British boots were excellent in quality, bur seemed clumsy
to the average Canadian. Styles in the Dominion followed those prevailing for the time in the Republic,
though extremes in such styles were never in general
favor and did not find extensive acceptance in tho
Dominion. Now. however, thc improvement iu ma-
chinerv and methods of production in British factories, 20
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Jul
i\
largely the result of American competition, has been
accompanied by an improvement iu design without any
sacrifice of quality. This factor combined with oner-
gctic sales organizations, has ousted the Americans
from the premier place in the Canadian import trade,
a position which a few years ago they held to be impregnable. Thc result is that the British manufacturer
benefits substantially, the Canadian manufacturer is
not affected, and the Canadian consumer enjoys the use
of boots and shoes of a better quality than those imported from elsewhere.
Of course, the British manufacturer is assisted in
the Canadian market by the operation of tin British
preference rate of duty in the Canadian Customs Act.
The general tariff on leather boots and shoes, which
applies in thc case of the Cnited States product, is 30
per cent, ad valorem, while the British preference rate
is 17*•_» per cent. In addition, this advantage is increased by a discount of 10 per cent, of the tariff in the case
of British shipments when made directly to a Canadian
port. The Canadian import duty naturally affords
some degree of protection to the Canadian inanufaetur
er. but with the preference clause it also protects the
British manufacturer, for if tin* imports from all countries were allowed into the Dominion free of dul) the
British manufacturer would find it difficult, if imt impossible, to compete there against the powerful shoe
manufacturing concerns of New England.
FALL SHOE TONES TO HARMONIZE WITH
HOSIERY COLORS
In a supplement to tin* 1925 Call Color Card recent-
ly released for general distribution by tin Textile
Color Card Association of New York, there i.s contained the six shoe and leather colors selected by lln* joint
Color Committee of the Allied Shoe ami Leather Associations.
These colors will be found to harmonise with many
of the new silk and wool shades as well as tin* hosiery
colors soon to be issued. This is resultant from the
close co-operation of the various committees in their
selection of colors for Call ami Winter.
Autumn blonds one of the shoe and leather colors,
is a natural shade paraded on the 1925 Call card by a
wide range of beige tones, whieh are still so much iu
VOgtte, tones of subtle nuances such as bloiidiue. noil
gat, bisque and hamadaii ami mosiil in the ensemble
wool and silk group.
India tan. a soft ami lovely brown, also Itugbj tan.
of a golden * till combines with many silken colors ami
may be matched as well to hosiery colors found on the
standard hosiery color card. Woodland brown, a deep,
rich shade like autumn foliage may be worn with many
neutral tones which have the same subtle suggestion of
purple as Sarouk ami Kermanshah.
Rosewood, re-oehoed in leather, from the 1925
Spring season card, is one of the most important colors
in this group. It is of rare beauty iu color as well as
in name—rosewood or bids de rose, iu exquisite harmony wit lit a host of shades to be particularly emphasized in any forecast for Call, such as Sierra, Cordova,
Koreo and Sonora.
Natural grey, one of the most popular shades of
grey, is in the same family as the group portrayed in
silk called moonbeam, frost grey and (lint.
PRINTED CREPE TO CONTINUE POR 8UMMER
DRESSE8
lnoliu
fashion V pivl'i reilCC I'm* printed er. p, this Spring
whether combined in the ensemble null with nil,
terials .u* used for afternoon and sheet frocks !
come so marked  that   this style j„ n,,w   f,»uml
materials for Summer dresses Combined witharii
silk, a verj allraetive effect is obtained in all v,.l(|, *,
ami colors with self-toned stripes ami cross-bars „•
artificial silk Bmbroiderctl ami brocaded silk and pot-
ton combination have bun popular, but tin demand
for the printctl crepes has become no great in Canada
and tin* Clllted Stales that Knglish manufacturer* L,\,
evolved ji inu lim     lln   printed silk and eotton    Thi-.
material cornea in widths of 3*8 Inches, in mauve, iiim**
browns ami teds, with printed flower and conventional
design in contrasting colors A material turn]* ni nrtl-
flcinl silk and eotton crepe* is, naturally, very much
less cXpemdve than the original crepes    As a m*u not.
lerlal for Summer, its popularity prombtes t*> i« great
MALE HEADWEAR
Wider Bnmi Por Pall
The prevalenn of wide brimn in Ihi straw hat* this
Mason will undoubted!) nave sonti effect on confirm-
ing  this nioile  in  f. It   hats  fur  fall     Tin*  "American
Heller" stctes ihal brims of 2:V| and 2\ Inches ait
finding inert uteti support in lhe fail orders ul retail
• r*s, and lhal even I inch brims ate nut Uncommon It
also notes tin tendency for wider brims with n flange
having   lim*,  of sn   upward   sweep  at   tin*  sides  that
whieh characterised spring beta
Bound edges •-Milium to be favored, ami iu fact an
more wanted lhan ever, bui th. D'Oraaj curl which
was the l>;>ling effect iu t. spring is no |oiik-< r sii
preme, and tot fail a medium round ent I will bf equal-
ly in demand Tie com bins tion of flatter st I snd smaller curl makes the Ihrw-ineh brim today reall) loo*
tin* part, in i ontra distinction to the high toll and heavy
enrl whieh made some ol the wide brimmed ipring hat*
look quite moderate
While the wii|, loin, seems to be the immediate goal
nf fell hat Style, and praelieally in every case I hi ■">■
accustomed to the wider effecta of spring and atiwtaef
w ill in- ready lo secepl a more generous brim dm* union
lhan last Reason, it would be obviously unwise I"1 !'"
retailer in a eoniuoitv white 'JV. Inch brims hav been
the favourites to jump too abruptly to tin «** It'll
Xineh effecta On tin other hand, when* the) hsVJ
been taking '2'\ and 2'4, inch brims, the "J:s and I
widths will be readily BCCcpl d for fall
Pearls ami grays continue to be tl» bin silli'i
to thc retailer for fall    These, of course, will lie
by a variety of trims, giving the en*Ire hai a till
east, according to the baud, whether it be black
brown or green    This variation h.iidlv h eno
ient to save the vogue of grey from -v *n!ilal Wfti
end lhe adventurous retailer, with the ability '""
ligc to sponsor a new color boldly, shoul-! i'i'"1 I
Joiners receptive (iml even though he utijrttl not
the current of the fashion, should be able In ''
few extra sales by offering a welcome wricly.
I
I'll
III
hi
ni
in.
is-
a 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
The Summer is Now "Dress Up" Time
Men Now Pay More Attention to Their Clothes in the Summer Than in the Cold Weather, so Thsre Should
Be No Letup in Efforts to Put Over the Idea of 'Dress Well and Succeed "-Apply it to Outing
and Sport Togs.
Instead of the Usll.il "hot weather blues" the retail-
er can sing an entirely different song this summer, if he
takes advantage of every opportunity that presents itself for pulling over the "Dnss Well and Succeed"
idea Tin* hot weather would appear to be a very poor
time tn talk about business building campaigns, but it
is ipiite evident that the logical time, in which thc retailer ean plan out selling ideas, ami experiment with
them is al tin* time when he is not rushed with details
of work In h;s store A certain amount of summer dullness is inevitable Why not take advantage of this to
boost along the idea of MDress Well ami Succeed"!
This summer promises to be a rather notable one in
regard to dn ts    Both men's ami women's apparel have
taken on a colorfulnesa not equalled iu the experience
of the present generation So far as women arc concerned, tho** who dress in quiet, sombre colors are the
most conspicuous, ami men are wearing colors that
Would just about have started a riot a few years ago.
Think what a sensation there would have been had a
man worn one »(f tin new jacquard sweaters ten years
ago Now they ate seen in the windows of men's wear
stoics in e\( rv eitv and on the golf links or the street
Ihey pass without comment. The brilliant neckwear of
today would have biased like a torch ten years ago.
We scarcely notice It now. The popularity of tweeds
has clothed men iu garments several degrees lighter
than was cvt r before the case in this country, and the
proportion Of linn who wear grey tlannel or homespun
trousers, or cream flannel trousers during the warm
weather has increased trcmcdously.
This summer will see clothes that will attract attention ami consequently more thought will be given
to clothes than has been the case for a long time. Anything pertaining to clothes will be a matter of interest,
and this in Itself affords the clothier ami haberdasher
a big opportunity to pill over propaganda work for
"Btess Well and Sik d."
No special plan is more effective than the persistent
showing in window displays ami the persistent advertising of this slogan.    The biggest danger it is faced
witht is that retailers who did somehting with this
slogan during the spring season will neglect it during
the hot weather, audit ng real deal of its effectiveness
will be |ost
Por In-Betwccn Seasons.
When you come to think of it the time when the application of this slogan will do the greatest good is not
«<t the start of Pcnsona bul in between seasons.   The idea
of "Drcsa Weil and Succeed" is not "dress well at the
start of the spring ami fall," but "dress well at all
times." When a man buys a new spring suit, new hat,
new shoes and haberdashery to accompany them at the
start of the season, he has but taken the first step towards carrying out the idea of "Dress Well and Sue-
ceod." His new straw hat, for instance, purchased at
the end of May or the first of June is getting rather
shabby around the middle of July, or it may have met
with an accident before this and it is not looking at all
what it should. The summeit is only half over at this
time, and "Dress Well and Succeed" is an impelling
motive for him to buy a new one. His spring suit is
not suitable for hot weather wear. The successful men
of business, professional men, etc., whom he meets, are
wearing light-weight summer clothing—clothing that
not only has has comfort, but also style. "Dress Well
ami Succeed" is a strong argument as to why he should
have a lightweight summer suit.
In the matter of shirts, neckwear, hosiery—all the
exterior apparel that a man wears, "Dress Well and
Succeed" says that he should keep it right up to the
murk throughout the season, so it will be seen that this
slogan can be matle to work twelve months in the year,
and it should get in some of its best work in between
the seasons.
The Dress of Champions.
This slogan can be made tt) work effectively in reference to apparel for outdoor sports, such as golf,
tennis and bowling. Only a few years ago the idea existed that the proper clothes to wear at these games
wen1 your old clothes. This idea has been gradually
losing ground, but there are still many who persist in
it, and it must be said that many converts, who have
been gained for the itlea of proper clothes for sports
wear, have been more the result of the force of example
than of efforts put forth by the clothing and haberdashery trade. Men have seen other men wearing these
clothes, have liked them nnd have insisted on getting
them, and in many eases they have been just about two
jumps ahead of the clothing and haberdashery trade in
this respect.
There is still, however, a great deal of good work
to be done in reference to sports apparel. "Dress Well
and Succeed" applies with equal force to the winning
of the ganns as to the winning of material success,
(•lance over thc pictures of famous golf champions or
tennis champions. They are all dressed in apparel
matle especially for thiol* game. The apparel does not
make them champions, but the knowledge that they
are rightly dressed gives them self-confidence, and it
is also ti mark of thc respect they have for their game
Display ihis slogan with every showing of sports
apparel. But the slogan "Dress Well and Succeed" on
display cards. 22
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Make a Special Drive on
DOMINION
INLAID
LINOLEUM
HERE is a product that fills a long-felt want
—an Inlaid Linoleum, made in Canada,
and reasonable in price. Thousands of
housewives have wanted Inlaid Linoleum in their
homes. Now they will buy. because genuine
Dominion Inlaid can be secured at prices they
will willingly pay.
Your wholesaler carries a good stock of Dominion Inlaid Linoleum, thus ensuring prompt delivery. Plan to carry an adequate stock on display. You will have no trouble disposing of it.
Many beautiful patterns. High polish finish
Dominion Inlaid Linoleum will sell on sight.
Plan now to get your full share of this newly-
created, profitable floor covering business.
Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Co.
LIMITED MONTREAL 1025
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
,< U X XX XX X X X X X X X X XXX X « X N X UK X X X X X X XX XX K X XX XX i;,
1 (Stf^HE MODE"
li      As Seeim By
Jeatmiette
,?(XIXX XXfX'XXadXlXIXIXKXX'XIXfXiX X XX XX X X X X X X X X X X X X XlXX?
Certainly white has enjoyed amazing popularity so
far this season.   Everywhere one sees the smart white
coat and small white felt hat, There are the heavier
white flannel and lialluiggan s|mrts clothes, although
one should only use the term heavy to distinguish between the cloth and tin silk, for certainly nothing
could he lighter ami cooler lhan tine French flannel
and lialluiggan. Tlu-n there an- the more formal sport
clothes of white clepe ami even chiffoll; Slid then
dancing frocks of slim beaded lines, with flaring skirts.
„r froek> of chiffon of floating, fluttering petals, with
which one wears the stunning white Spanish shawl,
Much .arlier iu lhe season. Chanel created a •'kick-
pleat." a small inverted pleat, which gave movement
and variety to the usual tailored simplicity. It seems
tn have taken lhe mode l»y storm, for not only is it
vecu in mosl smart sport elothes. Imt appears in a gnat
many afternoon frocks, ami some of the evening frocks
This pleat has heen enlarged upon to include perhaps
several pleats across the bottom of the skirt, or to comprise a group of pleats at one side or at the front nf
tlie skirt.
The flat hack, with all fullness placed in tin- front
of the dress, has been so very smart, ami now Martial
et Armiliul have launched a flare for the hack. After
one glance at the changed silhouette, one wonders it
such a change will be allowed to come to pass. Certainly the innovation is not a flattering one to thc figure, slim as one's tigun has of necessity become, It i*
hard to imagine the silhouette returning to anything
like the old bustle.
Wide brimmed hats are very much to the fore at
present, and the large hat that is trimmed with velvet
ribbon is by far the smartest. For the most part, taffeta is the*favorite material iu use. although a great
ileal of straw is shown in different weaves. Itnnkok.
k of course, still the most chic, hut it is nearly
always seen ;n the small hat.   Purple is being worn P
great deal, ami usually accompanies a frock a few tones
lighter in shade.
The vogue for pastel shades is not exactly passing,
it is still very smart for sport clothes and accessories,
luit the smart woman is seeking something a little more
vivid for evening frocks. Km broidery and beads are
trimming many of the important gowns in great brilliance.    Fringe is still being offered, while applique is,
as usual, a favorite trimming. Velvet is extensively
used for bindings, flowers, and girdles on chiffon and
laee frocks.
Illoiid satin and metal cloth continue in popularity
for tin* evening slipper, although a great many variations and combinations of materials are being shown.
Smartest among these is a slipper of woven silver and
gold metallic strips. For afternoon wear, kid and alligator are being worn to the greatest extent.
HUDSON'S BAY REPORTS PROFITS UP
C333.733.
The Hudson's Hay annual report, presented recently in London, shows an increase in net profits, exclusive of land sales, of £333,730. Fur collections decreased.
Land sales were £238,484, whieh. after meeting all
expenses and placing £25,554 to capital reserve, leaves
a deficit for the year of £8,536,
A dividend of 10 per cent, was paid in January and
a further dividend of 5 per eent. with a bonus of 5 per
eent. less income tax. making the year's total from
trading, account 20 per eent.
Unsold lands in the company's possession January
31, 1924, amounted to 2,882,412 ocres,
Commenting tin the eompany's report the London
'inancial Times says: "The lagging of land sales is an
unwelcome feature, showing that the opening up of
cultivatablo areas in Canada needs quickening. 24
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
WHY CUSTOMERS BbY TRAVELLERS WE HAVE MET
mu
Ity Paul W. key.
All of us have certain qualities, All of us have certain likenesses. The -psychologists call them "ill
stinets." They are lln* very fibre of our beings, bred
into us through thousands of years.
Whenever you approach a customer, you may be
certain lhat the following Instincts an* a pari of him.
They are levers to sales.    Learn to operate them.
Self Preservation
The first instinct is self-preservation.
Hack iu the caveman days man fought iu order to
protect himself from wild animals ami other cavemen.
He fought hard. For centuries the human race has
struggled for enough food, shelter, and clothing to
maintain existence.
Hut now. self-preservation has an entirely differenl
meaning. People are now struggling for certain kinds
of clothing, food, ami shelter. If you can show them
that a certain style is being worn, they will huy
We are not satisfied with "just food." We musl
have tropical fruits, and the hramls must !».* right We
are not satisfied with "just shelter." We musl have a
certain kind that expresses our Individuality. Wc
are fighting to preserve a new kind of "self," It is
the "social self"- -what others think of us.
Analyse the customer. Sav to yourself, "What in
this man lighting for! Is it social esteem * Is it money '
Is it education'" Pull the corresponding lever ami
see if it will not ring up sales. All nf us haw a kind
of "self" we are trying preserve. The salesman's iuis
iiiess is to locate this motive and use it.
The next instinct is posses.sion. When you get a
thing in your possession the tendency is to hang mi to
il. I like to experiment with children. We are all just
big kids after all. A mother is buying a doll fur her
little daughter. The dull is put in the child's hands
Her mother than says. "Now give it tu the man so he
ean wrap it up." Does the man get the doll? Mo, that
child hangs on to it and refuses to let it go. because the
instinct is strong to keep what we have in our posses-
sioii.
A merchant displayed a lot of flashlights on an
open talde in his store. Customers would pick up a
flashlight, press the little button, and many were hrok
en. It was decided to display them iu a glass ease
Hut it wasn't long before they had to put them on tIn-
table again. There were none broken when displayed
in the glass ease, but there were also few sales. IW
session, even for a few seconds, apparently stimulates
purchasing
Vanity.
The next instinct is vanity. Everybody is vain.
but some people are more vain than others, How can
you appeal to this instinct.' Kirst, by calling customers by name. When you call a customer by name,
you compliment him. you appeal to his vanity. When
you say, "Good morning. Mr. Hrown." you single the
customer out. you individualize him, you make him
appear more important.
(Jet interested in what the customer talks about
Repeat some of his remarks.   Appeal to his vanity by
showing that you are endeavoring to phase him.
Companionship.
The next  instinct is companionship,   Ninety-nine
per  cent, of  people like to  make  companions and
David Hoekaday, whose photograph is rein.. ,.,.i
lure is one of the representatives of that "Naliotiallv"
known f 1 i'i ti Tin Thus Davidson Mfg Co |,i,| „„„
of the old depends bios established in I860, mV it la
interesting to note that tin Vancouver Is |i«i\ |
r T.." including as it dies. W S Hover, || M M*|,(t*|
and Dave Hoekaday
Dave i** one "f th.* most popular members of ih< op,
der. his good nature ami willingness io hi lp, whenever
and wherever po-wdbte, moke him a real nssr? tn ;*,,
I   c*iv as wi II h*. tu thi tinn lo represents
Speeiali'mu   as he does,  in     Knauulled and Hheel
Metal Wares,M you can rcadll) understand whal in
acquisition he i* t»» th. membership committee in iheir
tight to r* tain the famous Cram! Council ' si!*.- • rup "
Dave is interest, d iti all kinds of good wholesome
ould ior sports and io verj keen on helping lht young
sters of our members to learn how in "play Ihe gnu'*
friends Only sbotll on,- per cent of ut sre hi rmitl
Introduce info your sabs talk things to show hos thr
merchandise will lo lp make friends for the purehssel
I went into a furniture store t" Imy a •!?*-%« n|o"f  I
had a certain price in mind Afii r showing me severs!
in my price elans, th.- clerk said "I will sill yon tor
one you came in for. hut I want you lo see !'lls ""''
also " ||e sliownl me a higher priced dsvetlpoti nl1''
gave a gi„,d sales talk picturing t*» no* how my friends
would enjoy if     II.   sold me hy pulling ihis level "'
companionship
Parental
The next instinct is the parental father and mother
love  A man who i, selling vacuum cleaners plcturi
mothers how their children playing on the carpet* -.*<■
dust iii their lungs   He pictures 'he Inluriomi • 'H''
(pieiiees so vividly that  mother* can almost set
hear e coning up the street, f
He than shows how a vacuum cleaner lakes
the dust ou! of carpets    This argument has n   '  >M
appeal
I believe in nppciling to the parental in*-*1'
long as it is honest and fair to do SO, hut I dm
lieve iu nulling en the heartstrings of mothers ,!
am nrettv sure whal I say is true
This is * powerful instinct     I'se it when J
justled in doing ho.
Sll
IV' 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
The R.M.A.—Its Functions and Its Influence
Bcncrtts of Association Shared Equally Between Retailer and Community.
of less than live dollars in value. The Conditional
Sales Act, or rather the amendments secured to that
Act. at the last session of Parliament, are of perhaps
more importance to the individual citizen who sells a
second ham! ear than to the Automotive Section of the
Retail Merchants' Association.
Prom the time of the first organization of the re-
tailors, their Association has had certain definite views
which might truly be called "ideals." Everyone recognizes the change that has gradually come over the
business .of merchandising during the last twenty years,
introducing into it a spirit of competition  whieh is
This is an age of co-operation, combination, amalgamation,    Tin   individual  citizen  standing  alone  in
any British speaking country was never so powerless,
hence the increasing trend to group Into societies, associations, unions, amalgamations, so as to give to individual opinions ami aspirations the weight of numbers n" of capital, Labor was never so well organized as it is today, Great commercial interests arc every
day pooling their interests by means of mergers, Commercial understandings between shipping companies
and between great allied enterprises are accepted facts.
That catchy phrase "Cnited we stand. Divided WC
fall." has, after many years, become a part of our lives.
It is part of our parliamentary system ami works right
down through our commercial and social structure until today tin  most unimportant of us belongs to some
society, brotherhood or association
It is a curious fact that the retail trade of the Do.
minion was about the last, large body of allied interests to form an association, ami it must he remembered that collectively they actually represent the largest
amount of capital invested iu the Dominion and are
probably the biggest employers of lahor.
The growth of this Association has lieell slow but
very sure. It was a lug undertaking to bring together the tens of thousands of retailers scattered all over
the country.
Tin* founders of the Association could offer no inducements in the way of increased profits and iu this
ihey differed very mueh from the associations of interests lugger iu point of individual capital invested
hut insignificant in point of numbers. Such associations or whatever you care to call them, can effect immense savings by a pooling of purchasing power and
management The necessity of such merging of interests is the natural result of the deadly keen competition
which has become the normal condition of the commercial Structure from manufacturer down to retailer.
The retailer had no such inducements to become associated. The inducements held out to mm were simply the advantage of uniting for the purpose of obtain-
ing new ami amending existing legislation that affected
retail merchandising The advantage of having central offices for the settlement of trade disputes, the collection of accounts, the advantage of heing able to con-
Milt their Association's lawyers, make use of thc traffic department and such like services, iuvaluahlc to
lhe country merchant.
Many fai sighted retailers not only joined the Association at its inception but worked for it with such
enthusiasm that it was from the start an assured sue-
••ess. Prom its commencement the Retoil Merchants'
Association has always had the good will of other
associations of a similar nature interested in commerce
and above all they have had the good will of legislative
bodies and the general public The reason is that the
policy and work of this Association is purely unselfish
ami in a great measure educational.
There is not one piece of legislation obtained by the
Association that is not of equal benefit to the community as to the retailer. The Small Debts Act. Conditional Sales Act. ami unite recently tin1 Dominion
Stamn TVx Act. of which every citizen will feel the
benefit when he finds it unnecessary to stamp cheques
steadily increasing in its intensity.
The Assoealion believes, and its members believe,
that the right ami proper way to meet competition
from w hati ver source it comes, is "service, service,
service"; honest and fair dealing, cheerful and effie
lent service to thc puhlie whose servants they are. The
buying puhlie are keenly appreciative of good service,
and arc always ready to reciprocate.
The Association has another ideal, which is to bring
manufacturer, wholesaler and retailer closer together
and to induce them to see and appreciate each others
difficulties ami have some kind of fair trade platform
that will fissure the husiness of each interest coming
through clearly defined and legitimate channels. Cooperation of this nature would help the retailer in his
efforts to give still better service and value to the puo-
lic.
The measure of service given by the Association to
its mem lars is the measure that is asked for. Some
do not need these services so much as others, but they
work for their Association just the same on the generous principal that they are helping their brother retailers ami the retail trade as a whole.
Thc Provincial Convention which is held each year
is a very line thing. It gives every member the opportunity of meeting his brother merchants and introducing into the work of lhe Association a spirit of camaraderie and good fellowship that is all to the good.
The Retailers' Association stands four square for
better merchandising. Much useful information is published of a helpful nature, to attain this end. The
speeding up of retailing has heen so rapid that it is
today less oi a trade than a profession. The general
merchant of today has to carry a very large stock of
THC PURE WOOL
UNDERCLOTHING
THAT WILL NOT SHSINS
Points to consider
when owing UnowTwesnr
^Ht MAKER
THC NAME
TRAD!
MARK 26
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
infinite variety. He needs to be a keen buyer, good advertiser, first class salesman, and give a generous measure of cheerful service. Doth he and his brother retailers have to make a constant study of their business,
always striving for improvement along the lines of better merchandising, and by means of their Association
they arc abb to keep pace with the times and gradually
and continually effect improvements necessary to face
all competition.
Briefly, the Retail Merchants' Association exists for
the protection of thc nailer, helping him to attain a
high order of merchandising and securing for the public service, coupled with the gootl values that result
from skilful buying. Self interest plays no part in its
policy. Improved methods of business, improved legislation are of equal benefit to thc community and the
merchant, ami the retail merchant can only realize on
his efforts for improvement by cashing iu on resulting
public appreciation.
(Ince each year the members of the Retail Merchants' Association meet in open convention. It is the
retailer's great opportunity to keep abreast of the times
by exchange of thoughts, ideas ami difficulties. Many
of the latter can be removed by discussion, mutual understanding ami legislation. It is the duty ami nothing
less than thc duty of every member who has an idea, a
suggestion, that would be of benefit to do SO. Underlying all the Association's work, and there is much
splendid work done by individual members as well as
by the Kxecntive. there is the great pleasure ami satisfaction of knowing that the efforts of each member,
while of benefit to himself, are also benefiting his
brother merchants and tin* community in which he
trades ami lives.
CANADIAN WOOL CLIP.
Fleeces of the 11)25 wool clip already have commenced to arrive at the war-house of the Canadian Cooperative Wool Growers of Saskatchewan and Manitoba branch iu Region. The big ruch is expected this
month.
A phenomenal Increase in the membership of the
branch is reported. A total of Hi!) in the two provinces
having contracted to sell through tin  association 14
433 fleeces as against 424 growers with 23,029 fleeces
last year.
A Dead One.
"Boss. I must have a til) raise," said a young clerk,
"Vou have had two raises in the last two months."
replied the Old Man.   "Why do you ask for another*"
"Well, sir." said the young fellow, "I know you
can't get along without me."
"But suppose you should die. what then?"
"Well, yon WOUld have to struggle along without
me, I suppose."
"Then you may consider yourself dead." replied
the boss.
A Bad Mistake.
Teacher—"Johnnie, I am surprised at you; you
didn't wash your face; I can see what you had for your
breakfost this morning."
Johnnie--"What?"
Teacher— "Kggs,"
-lohmiie—"Shucks, that wasn't this morning, that
was yesterday morning."
'<JC*
UGHTHOUSE BRAND
Triple Stitch
OVERALLS
MAlways on Ihe Job"
i»n   farm,   in   factory,   construction
and railroad work ami wherever
overalls  an   worn   LIOHTHOU8B
BRAND are gi\ing holiest wear and
saving the workman's dollars The
triple stitch means triple wear at
the Mains, and no puckering No
skimping   of   material. LIGHT
HOU8B BRAND an* made roomy to
allow of easy movement
Ml LIGHTHOUSE BRAND,     the
triple   stitched   overalls,    ami   sell
ratisfsetlon
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island, Quebec
R. M. Fester, 3S44..J2ad Ateaae Wtit
Vsaceeftr, B.C. 1925 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Colorful Language of Bargains
By 11. It. Simpson
27
"There are two kinds of advertising I like to write
more than other kinds, confided to me hy an advertising man known to many readers of this.
"I like to write the cultured, rdincd stuff, like I
have done for Blank &. Blank just as finished in its
exquisitencss as thc costly merchandise Blank &. Blank
sell. 1 get a thrill out of doing my finished products
or finished borders, dignified layout and hand polished,
llow ing sentences.
"And I get another thrill, and I don't know hut a
lugger one, when I write the language of bargains with
reckless enthusiasm and abandon—and two mornings
inter drop down town to lim! my copy has tilled tin*
Jinx & Jinx store with a howling mob, Sure I like
lo write circus bargain copy! There is the same opportunity there to be an artist with words!"
Side by side with this, we wish to put a fragment
of a conversation with the advertising manager of a
very successful "Price" department store.
"Of course," he concluded deprceiatively. "ours is
only bargain advertising, But you would he surprised
at the ability and pains that can he put into it!"
There is no question whatever hut that advertising ability of a high order can go into advertising of
a bargain nature. In fact, there has been, and is so
much bargain advertising, that the individual advertiser, for self preservation, often must be a real artist,
to get his message over.
A Question of Plausibility
B.'irnum, great circus advertiser, declared the puhlie liked to be bunked. Veteran bargain advertisers
know something more fundamental ami important to
them, namely, that the public wants to be persuaded.
Bargains have been offered promiscously for years
and years, and a proportion of the bargains have hecn
anything but that t'ommonsensc tells the reader
that "something for nothing" is not offered by merchants in business for profit. Yet they always want
to believe that bargains advertised are as they seem.
Plausible presentation again and again convinces a
public whieh long ago should have been hard-boiled
ami sophisticated.
Notwithstanding that, discussions with many bargain advertisers convinces one that it is many, many
times as easy to advertise successfully a genuine bargain as a make believe one.
Inside information on thc facts again ami again reveals that, though customers "stormed the doors,"
tho firm took a substantial loss on the total of goods
Hold. The compensation was in conversion of an over*
stock into cash or the securing of new customers who
might afterwards become permanent, or something
else.
However, whntever the nature of the bargain event,
plausible presentation is a cardinal requisite. A section of the public will believe nearly any reasoning
with the semblance of possibility. And certain explanations will convinco the great majority of readers,
Bargain Reasons Whieh Convince
Bargain soles having their basis in bonnfide distress of the dealer, repeatedly "go over" in 1986,
I hough hundreds of thousands of them have been held
in the past. These "quitting business" reasons for bargains qualifies as one hundred per eent plausible with a
great many people. So docs the "closing-out" sale,
when applied to eertain lines carried by the store.
"Fire" and "removal" sales also rate high as to
plausibility-particularly if the fire has been a spectacular one.
"Reorganization sales, "must-raise-money" sales,
arc markedly less convincing, but very enthusiastic detailed copy often put them over. The reason may not
be so valid, but they do offer an explanation to bargain
prices.
Clearance sales also rate high as to plausibility.
There have been a great many of these held of a bona-
fide nature. They furnish a background of plausibility,
against which much successful bargain copy is written.
One of the reasons often given for offering bargains
is to advertise." There are many people who are persuaded by this. ,
There are indirect, and quite simple ways of making bargain copy plausible. For example, an engaging
frankness concerning the quality of offered goods often
reacts very favorably to the retailer. Mentioning that
thc supply is limited, that sizes are not complete, that
goods arc slightly damaged, or otherwise indicating the
truthfulness of copy gains credit for all such advertising, although it may reduce sale of the items to
which it is applied.
Another old plausibility device, extensively employed by the local retailers and sponsored by no less
authorities on bargain advertising than the giant mailorder houses, is to quote real bargain priees on merchandise of known value, and not so real bargain prices
on other goods.
Now and then, an advertiser at least attempts to
make his bargain copy "convincing" through more or
iess solemn affirmation of its truthfulness. Several
square inches of a flamboyant bargain advertisement
before the writer, for example, are used to declare that
the offered bargains, in contrast with much bargain
advertising which has disillusioned the reader, are
genuine.
Yes. the other day. we even found in a bargain advertisement a reproduced affidavit of a dealer. He had
taken oath before a notary of the genuineness of advertised reductions at a sale.
Finding New Descriptive Terms
One of the elements that an advertising writer,
much given to superlatives, as bargain advertising
writers for years have been, is that every little while
he runs out of super-adjectives to describe "super"
bargains. A writer who has used gorgeous mixed colors throughout his copy has some difficulty in finding
verbal contrasts for bargains which stand by merit,
above the rest.
Of course, one way out is to use larger type, more
description. Another practice is to use some special
"super-special" word. t
Thus   we   find one store using, "golden special,
aud (mother, "red-hot special."   Still another calls a
bargain a "bluebird."
The plan of another retailer is, additional to many 28
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
July
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Firearms        Ammunition        Shotguns Came Loads Cutlery        Cath Regi*(
• • 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
regular special prices, to prominently display u "sur-
prlso" special.
A daring retailor uses, on Oceanians, n "lowest-
|uiccinto\vn" special.
Still another has u "gratitude"  Bpeclal—one  on
which lie takes u loss, frankly offered in appreciation
(lf thti business customers arc giving him.
Circus Stuff in Gopy
We have had presidents, and many famous men,
who turned t<» lurid detective stories for relaxation iu
literature.    Personally, we confess a similar interest
for bargain advertising of this type, the kind copied
(lonely after circus-hill methods. There are plenty of
people who «(t fully as much pleasure from reading
;i circus hill, of the old time variety, with its numerous
alliterations and its many syllabled exuberances of language, as from witnessing the performances and
viewing the animals. Sometimes much more pleasure!
An artist with words can just as surely paste romance
around a bargain sale.
A "bargain wizard" held a sale for a merchant in
our town a few weeks ago, Not the smallest and IcJjst
interesting feature of his "wizardry" was to forecast
in advance for the merchant within three or four hundred dollars of the total receipts of a sale which ran
to a number of thousands. Reference here, however,
is primarily to tho fact that thc word, "bargain
wizard," was played up in all sale advertising. Advertisements were jammed full of copy, much of it in small
type. It was exciting advertising literature, besides
which thc run of bargain advertising in our town was
Sunday school talcs of Willie Smith, who never played
with naughty children. The old time thrill of the circus hill, produced hy the clever and inspired writing ol
the publicity man was duplicated in this,
On the other hand, a very -successful bargain sale in
this same town was recently held hy a merchant who.
in his copy deliberately treated thc affair in a humorous light, He actually joked about the bargains, He
made humorous references to other bargain sales with
which the town  was  flooded.  People  laughed—and
cams to his store and bought, because, somehow, he got
over the idea his sale was a genuine   bargain  oppor-
Wtao Beads Bargain Advertising?
Every retailer, probably, husbands the idea that,
no matter how alluringly bargain advertising is written
only a section of the community will be interested in
it, and will respond to it. This is absolutely right.
The re are some people, who, on principle, though they
may read some bargain advertising, will never buy
from it.
Some interesting light on this question is thrown
by a "price" store, whieh every now and then holds a
special sale and floods the eity with hand-bills. This
is a fairly large eity, with a definite wealthy elass.
There is a small section of the eity it does not cover
with hand-bills because experience has shown distribution will not pay. This is where the wealthy live.
The percentage of houses not reached is around ten
per cent.
Iu other words, at least on occasion, advertising
can be distributed to ninety per eent of a territory's
population with business-like prospects of profitable
results. Undoubtedly in many communities, especially of a rural nature, it can be distributed to practically one hundred per eent.
Some of the least successful bargain advertisers, arc
those who use the stimulant continually. And, on the
other hand, to make a complete picture, it should be
stilted that some of the most successful bargain advertisers are those who use such little copy—exclusive,
charge account stores of very high standing which on
rare occasions use priees to move goods. The public
has a surprising habit of rising enthusiastically to such
ba gain events.
A Hog Story.
Tourist—"What's that beast t"
Native—"That's a ra/orback hawg, suh."
Tourist—"What's he rubbing himself on thc tree
fort"
Native—"Jest stropping hisself, suh, jest stropping
hissclf."
THE VALUE OF A SATISFIED CUSTOMER
Realise what one satisfied customer Is worth.   The H tall Credit Men's National Association recently sent oul
questions on Ihe subject «o a latfS number of stores allllUted with It.   One store reported that nn Investigation of
100 esutomer account* which were newly opened by tl a year ago showed an average net profit
six months later of $8.00 each, which would Indicate $1,000 net profit for the 100 for a year.
One lame store said that fitly new accounts, taken at random, Indicated au average net purchase of $117 for the year. A prominent speaker at a recent convention of the Interstate Merchants Council gave It as his opinion after careful study, that the average customer on the
books of a clothing store, for Instance, represented a cash value of $85. Get yourself In the
habit of visualising a definite amount of money, whether tt be $25 or $100, flying out of your
door wlih every disgruntled customerwho goes uway from you, never 'a return. 30
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTA1LEK
•Tilly
:
i
i
ROASTS!
Salads an* the thing on tin* lalde just now, Imt it
won't lo* Iniiu before |M*i.|i|r will want Koinctliili-U
more substantial.
They'll want roasts,   And roasts mean they'll
want gomething tfl roast in.
Nothing Mils the lull like Davidison'* Crown nnd
Sterling roasters, in enamelledware or abeetirou,
round or oval,
They make the best roasi taste better.
Ami. incidental! v. it's time you trot in your order,
either through our salesman or direct
7Ai $*«+** §a/#m&"
V
^ranches:
Established I860,
Head Office and Factory: MONTREAL
Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary
Vancouver HO
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31
HARDWARE, OL and PAINTS
mARKBTS AT A GLANCE
Manilla Rope.—New prices have declined one cent,
pound.   The Manila market is considered unsteady.
King Cutter Razors. Kinu Cutter razors are now
higher in price. The prices SaOW shout live per cent,
higher than old prices,
Bolt* and Nuts—Dealers state that orders have
iccii fairly good.   Stocks an* in good condition with
irieen unchanged.
Builders' Hardware.— Orders are coming in nicely
mid jobbers an* pleased with the volume oi business
lln y arc doing Sales have increased over those of last
year, Prices have remained firm with no change re-
curded.
Shells and Cartridges.—Hooked orders for shells
and cartridges are now being shipped out at advance
dating.
Niagara Mounted Grinders. — Niagara mounted
grind stones .in* now quoted higher.
Cow Bells.—A slit-ht decline is noted in the new
([notations ou cow lulls
Automobile Accessories—Mom no nt of accessories
has lm n good during the pa.nl few weeks, Tins are
nlto filing well    The hulk of thc orders are for Inl
ine
ediatc delivery.   Prices are the same.
Miners' Lamp Wick lower. New prices slow s low-
1 lint' in price of four cents a Ih.
Wire Nails Decline.—Wire nails decline. Latest
prices show a decline of twenty-live cents a ken lower
than old bast price.
Lace Leather—t'oeheco laee leather. New quotations show a slight decline.
Lawn Sprinklers.—Tollman line of sprinklers lower
hy 121,4 to 80 per cent.
Crescent Wrenches.—0re seen! wrenches are now
lower in price. Tin- new prices show about nvo pet
11 nt. lower than former prices
Loose Grindstones- Loose Grindstones advance in
price. New notations show advance of one to one ami
half cents a Ih, according to size.
Advance in Certain Watches.—Prices have been
advanced on Ingersoll jewelled model watches. Non-
jewelled models remain unchanged.
Heavy Sale of Nails at Present.—With considerable
new construction and repair work in process at present throughout this district the sale of nails has kept
up constantly in splendid volume.
Sales of Shovels Continue Steady. — Distributors
state that sales of shovels continue steady. Active
construction work and farm work stimulates sales at
present.
Refrigerators.—Priees ore the same at last year.
Glass.—Sales have heen fair. Stocks are iu good
shape and priees are firm.
Oil Stoves — Demand continues good with priees
unchanged from those of last year.
Painting Materials.—Prices are holding around recent levels    Current demands are good.
NEW GOODS ON THE MARKET
Water Gun for Garden Hose.
The Petihcrthy Injector Co. have introduced a new
lawn spraying device known as the Penberthy Water
(Inn which can he used in the same manner as an ordinary hose nozzle or used as a lawn spray without changing any parts.
No 3903. Retinned Potato Ricers, malleable frame,
aiamd(,r :|., ins., depth :r.ns.; weight per do/cn-1 Ihs- 32
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Julv
DOES NOTACIUALLY
BUY PAINTeVARNISH
once convinced she is
a dood salesman
Property owners may now have their homes painted
and pay later by the Convenient Payment Plan.
Paint and varnish manufacturers will gladly supply
foil details. Or write direct to us. This plan presents
a great opportunity to increase paint sales.
SAVE THE SURFACE CAMPAIGN
610 Km** Building M"n,rwl > THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Summer "Dog Days" Can be Made Busy
in Paint Department
33
A Plan for Gathering in 8ummer Paint and Varnish
: | Follow Up with Special 8ales Letter-
Win w; isn't it hot. It's worse than that. As your
, \. drifts lazily over these pages your mind is far away.
SVhfil i* the use of staying in town while the slow sea-
,un In nn. you think "I can't sell any paint for a
I'uitple of months to come, hut I am sure that I could
[itch a lot of llsh right now."   As the perspiration
trickles down your wishbone yon doze off. dreaming
of rushing trout strains and the joys of a nomad's life.
\n.| that is exactly why business is dull right now. You
grumble, or cuss a little because you perspire, not once
thinking of the good it i* doing you, of the poison that
it is removing from your system. If you had something
iu do you wouldn't notice the perspiration.
Cut to get back to 'he paint. You admit that you
w ould he glad to stay in town if you could sell a rea-
tunable I'uiiouiit of paint In fact, it would be your
dut) to st'iv All right, pull your chair up to the desk.
M i ymir per,eil and paper, and see if you can't map out
i programme that will return you a handsome protit
while your Competitors are trying to vamp the bathing
beauties at the seashore.
Need Prospects.
Flint, before We sell paint. We lllllst have prospects.
S'nmcS WOn't dO. They must be holiest to • good lies prospects, Suppose we jump in the old ttiver and tour the
town Every house, every barn, every garage, every
fence, every wooden structure of any kind that needs
painting We will make a note of, adding all the inform-
it ion we gather Probably it is only a porch, or porch
furniture that needs painting, but we add it to our
growing 1i**t of prospects. When we have thoroughly
covered thc town (or a particular section of it. if we
ii* in n big city t, we will start a card index for paint
prospects only All the data that we have gathered
will be entered on these cards. Thus, we have completed the first sti p on an active summer campaign.
The next step is to prepare special sales letters -not
circular letters, but letters written to and for each in-
li\i«liial prospect.    In these letters we will show the
prospect thai we are acquainted with his problem, that
we know what should be done We will suggest two or
three appropriate color schemes and tell him approximately how much paint he needs and just what it will
cosl him.   We will tell him. not only how painting will
improve! the appearance of his place, but how it will
lengthen its life enough to pay the eost of painting
several times over, and how it will increase the renting
"'• selling value of the property. Also we will stress
•!»■' desirability of painting during the hoi months, for
Ihcn the wood is dry and hardly absorbent, and a better appearing, longer lasting job of painting is possible.
Advertising Copy.
After tin se letters nre prepared, but. before we mail
'hem, we will start our advertising campaign, Each
dny we will feature a different article, or group of articles, deoending principally upon nn attractive cut to
secure business. One dav we will feature exterior
painting, another day it will be blue or white enamel.
»nd paints, then waxed or bathroom, next varnished
furniture.   The copy must be concise and interesting.
Business—A Card Index for Paint Prospects Only—
-What to Tell the Prospect in the Letter.
The reader should be able to get the message, the brand
and the name of your firm in one rapid glance over the
page. If you use eare in selecting your cuts the illustrations will hold his attention long enough for him to
grasp the essentials, probably start him to thinking.
The copy then should convince him.
If he then receives one of your personal letters he
will certainly be in a receptive mood. You will undoubtedly find it profitable to enclose a stamped, self-
addressed envelope in each of these sales letters that
you send out. A prospect i.s mueh more likely to reply
if yuo do so. and the eost is almost ncglible. A single
color card or folder might also be enclosed to advantage.
Link Up Windows.
Tie up your windows with these letters and newspaper advertisements. For example, while you are advertising kitchen enamels, feature a model kitchen in
your show window. If your window is large enough,
exhibit al<o :i kitchen that is the antithesis of the model.
This means work, of course, but there Is NO SUBSTITUTE FOR WORK. With each change in advertising,
change your window displays, calling attention to the
windows in your advertising, and in your sales letters.
This newspaper, window display and direct mail advertising should brine many customers to your store who
are alrcAdy half sold before they talk to you or your
salesmen.
Tn the meantime, replies, enquiries, and some orders
should begin to come in by mail. Record all new information on index cards. Keep your index complete
to the least detail, even jotting down the sending nnd
receiving of every letter, and substance of every interview, for this record should form an endless list of
prospects that will keep you supplied with customers
the year round, enabling you to sell more paint than
ever before. Follow up every letter that comes in either
with another letter, or with a personal call. Do some of
your selling outside the store.   Keep hustling.
Before yon really open your selling campaign, how-
ever, it would be a good idea to make arrangements
with some good painting contractor to handle all the
|ub« that you are able to push his way. Tf business is
dull with you. it is dull with him, nnd he wiuld be glad
to take these jobs at the lowest possible rate. This advantage you could pass to your customer, thus building
good-will that will insure future business for both of
you.
There nre several methods that you could use for
obtaining new business. You might offer a bonus to
vour salesmen for each order that thev land out of the
store after business hours. That would induce them to
do a little outside hustling. Or. you might build good
will and increase your business by first giving something to vour customer for nothing. Hive him enough
cmunel to finish one piece of kitchen furniture, and it
will look so good, but will be so conspicuously attract-
ive that he will want to do the balance.   Or give him
il 34
11
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
"RAVEN" Monllk
"GARRY" Utht Kraft
"RUPERT" Heavy Kraft
Brands of Paper Bags
Represents the best in
QUALITY
SERVICE
SATISFACTION
PRICE ARE RIGHT
ipmcaiiD.
163 Water St
Sey. 7868
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Agents for B. 0.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
* m
The Demand for
PERFECT SEAL
Wshy it is so great ?
/
t*Om
•••«*
s*
iV
I l*..l I.**,
f:
ri
rf
m
Perfeel 8p«1 fan Ml
beesnor   of  lh<   ttfij
]ta.pulArit\   th« \   .!, a
* * V   t
throughoul i .i: nli
^* .*. mf |
M Ih* aptuig n*mum ^m   m j,M|liral,tll,| ,     |j(j
br|o,r «*» the   Prrfrel   s      ■
/
,„•*'*
5*   A
td3
<»iire^ sound ■*- ding
with S minni-Mi ol
effort nn th« p..*• o(
the hoUM w if*
Tin Illustration
iwj Uh> lid tad oprtsi sm
wngs i. hei„w „ur      l. ft ihows how id
ihi
J
«««^t
3/
rf
• Inn |tH |op w|ri, M a|cS
*»<l pull down ftftlnx <**,•
u»u«l
it ii tu ne*eure iik*!
••j tin dealing
There in Hiilind bu-
bi Perfect Seal .11) !
proved (lew Jaw
nn-
ORDER FROM YOUR
WHOLESALER
DOMINION   OLA88   COMPANY
LIMITED
iwmninmnMini ,. ,	 B25
THE BRITISH COLUMBU RETAILER
35
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following art priees quoted for principal lines of leading wholeesie firms.   Prices quoted sre necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
Loaded Shot thollo.
M
|lt 71
. 4*.00
u::
it oo
ttv,
it it
ttu
. tti
.... t4\
Iti)
.    (10
 6 46
:t«
  100
. 7 io
io ut n>».
lominlon:
,i»Hich.
* it x tt x Ms) On
i q % tt a iii eh
Iii perlil.
i a x tl * IVk oS,
.  % || |  l*** ch .
' *m C  Nliro Hub 11 (J i It I IVfc ch
i eieri High liun
M I*   Arrow II U 1 II I  llirh.,.
i iters  Ptewlef      - - 	
MtUHic Ammunition.
„ -minion
.: nIk-h Smokoleoa    -
:: u>mt Smokeless
..    I.     Witlr   HmakoUMO
.. 1,   llifto Lreinok
A ruffle Ml*.
JJ  Short  Hmuk»l»M   . . . 	
.'.*   Long   Hmoheloea
:j  I.   Rllto Hin..kol»aa
:.i.   iti(ir*  i^>md»Ii        .       .   ..   	
sNVll.-i   Tutor Wright. loR.t
over in n-« s>-
WIS   IW.yV Ate*. IS t1>i  |UtO i<> tn so
' i     d«>ubl»  bll  *■*»».   unbundled.  ||] 30  tu
I    tO dOI .  huntere etee,  tUOO dot. tingle
I  M..I  ism,   unhandled.  |U 30  tn tit OO dot
MMts   ('tot, IMOti por 100 tbt
i i tin-*}   Leoe. rtwhtde sides, ll so; rut
• tl I.* |S |..-i  *.'*ti tool    \ nl M lo |x<r ioo
■ ■*     >•(   ill   M '•"  |>. I   |U0  fret
HOLTS,   CARRIAOb -On   full   package-**
'-,   •• I »m»llrc  up lo ••In   long.  lea* 13  1/3
ft list; over ty% in   ITS off Hat   Not-* new
irtof   all lengthe. Iom 30 off UM. Koto now
il prices in nffnwt
I'I T H   MVIHISK-  S end oinollor up to
<   n   long.   !«>*«••   41   off   lint;   over   4 in    le»«
>*n   UM;   S   ITS   unit     %     Iom     IS    off
«'     Noli now UM nrlcoo in effort
HOLTS. BTOVB-Leog || off um
l»-I.Ttf    TIIIK   I.aaa   30   o<M   1<-'V   on   fill
ill* fur broken package*
I "Mll».   lU«iv»r    |*w   1,000   lo  1.000   foM.
HI tt per i.ooo foot
IMLKRK    RANOK*
Kl'ILDlNQ   I'AI'KR
SOgoU   113 W ooch
    Tarred.  >»<•  lo 11 N
r .11.  »<• ording  lo hub lit),  plain 70c to
cor roll
ontlquo eoppor ond
3H per polr ll***: 3*1
t 4H per polr Mo
nUTTS—Plated, tit.
dull li** am flnlth SH >
(3*4  per pair 37c; 4*%
HI'TTS-Wrought Steel No 104. 1V4>IU.
II II per dot . SH i SH tt K |»«r dot . IH *
4W. |« M por dot
I'ARI'BT  KKLTIt ts*   W-lb  tS Tt mil
i'atciiks. C?OTpnOMU>—OU tajsar •»■
•lull l.r«M nnUh. Ill to por hundred
I'MAIN-Onll 11. eleHrlc wold. IU. tttw
cr 100 tht; H. Ill 40 por 100 Ibi I-It. Ill •>*
1'i-r IfWl tbt ,     ..
'MIAIN I^gglter. I It I It. WOO each*. H
t 14, II fl oorh ... «.
I'llnl'I'KHS FOOD" I'nlvorool No 0. 133 1"
•'*•• ; t'nlveraat No 1. 1ST «0 dot; t*nlver«»l
Vo J  Ml «0 dot : fnlvornol N«> >. M* J* "*?»
Homo, Ko  tt. ll to oo*t\, Heme, Ifo  •*•
1.    ■(,   each
<iittiiNs. rarrbi,~-No  o. iio 7o taebi
No I. Ill 10 oorh; No I. Ill M Mrh; No. t.
Ilt.fl  oorh
■ I.KVIH, MAI.J.KAIII.K   I'or H)   1«V
<'I.OTIIKS I.INi: WIIIK—Ptf Mfh. to O ,
M 10 dot: l"« ft  M *
1'UILI.H -III! Mock IS/I off now list;
tilnr-ttitnUh H-ln  tt/t off now IIM.
KAVTHOUOH- |«or 100 fool, tin |l tl;
"in |«t0; Il-ln   ITH. .„   .
ni.KS*>(lreat Wootorn. tt% off list; HUch
I'lnmoml 16% off Hot.
OARDRN H08B~ln W ft l»nalh«. «»•
<»i|>lrd. for Spring dollvory. IMS-Tormlnei
Hty, Sply, H-ln H0 0«: *H-ln lltoo*. %- n
IM.Oft! 4-nly H-ln SHOO; H-ln IllOO; «•»
IH.«0; Wlro wound, t-ply H-ln Ml »••
S In 117 00; \ln ISO 00; Corrugol<»d. 3-pW.
•r In 111.00, H-ln. W6.00. H-ln $17 00
COUPLING!, ATTACHBO-H. "*, ***• Ml
li-
■HAMR TRAPt-Victor. P»r dot No 0.
tl 10; 1. || 40; IH M.IO; I. M.40I Lft,Wiu
H s nVs-os. No. o. saw; l. l»oo: 1V»-
I7«0; I, lift .10; I. lit 40. 1M    ..... t
Jump-No I, per dos. ft 10; 1H. M*Hl «
1710; I. It tt
HINUK8  Per <u»t   poire—Hosvy utrnp. 4 VISKS,   WARREN  SOLID  ROX—tj n>e
•n   IS.M; tin   12 70; fi-ln   S3.00;  H-in. I4.78. $10 00 MCh; 60 tbt, 112 00 etch.
CORRWOATKU   TBK—I'or   il«»t..|i   pairo — D.lklT, Alu_ ... _
4-ln   13 6"'; «-ln 12 3"; h-ln 16.00; 12-ln $12 5.'.. ■?._!/* AND OILa.
IK HI-IK BHOES-lron,  Nos  0 to  1. liHG ■rsndrem.Mtndersen
r SH'l- lM0' Noh   2 u,", lar,t,,r' ,9&° »*» ',Kn«n»h" ordinary color. _„|"2
^inKwti    nn   rr»\fM«.v   r..r   ion   m. _ g«H "BngUsh" Whlto  4 60
a ffiP.& Si?Mf.  i  J  ?«7rn..   m, H-M  Kx,c'*'»»* Oil ShlOfflO Staln-
| n.o and over Moi I, I. »n<l t ros. »c. ordinary colors, In 4 gal, cana     II V
^.".'"J4?^   ii u 1. ilm-p   .,iA,m-       m »•!! Anchor Shingle Sisln-
LR0"u^£K«!!l?Bul^riWP^« Ordltiory colon  in 4 goi cana  l.IK
guago   15 60:   M  rastS   It 10;   18-20  guago. Orrona and Greya. In t gsL oens   IV
It 10. 2t gunge It tO. PAINTS
IRON. GALVANIZED 8HBBT- I'rr 1»0 Ria Gallon
—21   gungr   Amorlran   «r   KngllHli   17 63;   24 Ordinary colora, in 1 gtil. cana $4.30
guago |7 25;   H-2'i fUAgt  17 06 Martin   Banotir  DOroh  paint  4.30
KNuHH,  RIM  DOOR* Jopunnod.  13 75 per Martin Senour  Niuitone  white  3.76
dot Martin Senour N'outono color   3.71
LAMP   nilMNKYS    A.   prr   caao   I   dot, Martin  Btnour  floor  paint    4.16
II 30 por dM ; A, por dot.  II I". B.  DOT caar Shorwln   Wlllluma,   white  5.76
( dot   II 40 prr doS . B, P-*r tl"*   II 75. Sherwin   Wllliomt,   color 4.30
I.ANTI'KNK   Shnrt   or   Ion-*   globe,   plain, Sherwln   Williuina,   porch       4.30
lit 10 dot    Japanned, in 6j dot Sherwln Williams, tw  4.15
LAWN MOWKUS i'lTTV—                                      I'er  100 tba.
,..,..     ... f.„.   ,,_   r   i.tiiflo Hulk,  barrels |00tbl $6.60
.tfiSprH!t IS Waa-1!??5! hUdatiStt' "»'»<■ Irons ioo tbt   7.75
tu76   tif. btadellt.M: is % j bia.ie iu.», B lh< |(ufi> M       ||0
30 II blade II* M. Tlna, 5 iba; per lb    SH
STAR   lln   wheel.    3   knives,   oaih.    l.-in ^   •   ,„(   ' K  ]j%
II tt;  H-ln |»»;  l«-m 18 5"; 4 knivea. 12- UNSEBD Oll/-^          Gallon
In II to;  14-ln t\o%: lt*m 111 00. U,IW   \ t„ 2 barrola  $1.65
M\TTui'KS -ll.k.     M.IO    'lo» i     '"uttor, Rolled. 1 to 2 barrel*   LSI
Il*.i dot ,'KA"' WH1TB IN oll^-          I'or 100 R>a.
NAILS   WIRT.   Beat  M t<>  fob   Vancou- 1,000 tba. to 1 ton   lt.86
-SntM^Ui •■•« ■»*. * «»• * ,VW7B?: 0ln«
oo. h.  H g»i- *f„,,.B1,;h4.   ., en „.„ 1M mi VARN1SHB8—                                     Galton
I'l.ASTKR <»K I'AUIS    $1 6'\per 100 n»i« KlaMir   No   1                                       .   I ISO
RVirtS AND BURRS-Blaoh eearlafa. Mb gJJHJ ^J J2 — * \%
Ma    I    Sic  lb:   aaaorted   copper   rl\ei*  ana \i«Pin«   Snnr                                         7 10
and  burr. Sic per lb   f*0; S «>PP«** ****** ,y ^    ,„ d 0„     4,W
17o   per   lb:   Coppered   rlveta   26c   per   TO Lona 33 1-3 per cent.
Coppered bona no per To. Lacquorot  S6.1S loss to
ROPB   BASB—BHllah   manila,   t«w.   .3c:
,,m„ Bumtto beao rTj« to. Automotive Price List
ti ti.i.,i *»   V.,   Ill   $42 "fl eacn. WO   wia
ST4-00* HaTxiS»00 suhjool «<> It'll dl* ABSORBERS SHOCK—Float A Ford No
, K^fiTO^'!TSf& »0bi lUaiS! l ACcSlBRATORS   FOOT-Wlre.oa.   Ford
Ultd apeakor. N«    IIM. *<*>)]%,"     Vm||1|; at 1175 each.
phonea, |7M osch. «"*bl««* 'a, "Jg fi!,0*j ASBORTMBNTS-Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
Rolttrlea. No   7 66. It 46 each. No   107, fi.'v Kr|n J8c <Jnch;  St,t wr6Wa JOc wch; Mr.
each                                                   ... ,rt  ... ohlno serew 76c each; Machine nut 75c each.
HAWS. IU'i'K    HapMLjSfflff'wS t II16S0 BATTBRIBS-Hot Shot |2.9« each.
Happy Idea 116 60 dot. DISStOM No. 6 |lt M BOOTS-TlTO Mn. |1 25 each,
dot                                             ,    t..   ,,..    - BUMPBR8—Hoover Twlnbar, $10.00 each.
BCBJBW8-Bright   Out   bsad -•JJfWJJ" CAPS—Radiator, It oo each.
Hat   bright round head. 65 10 off Ust! bratj CARBORUNCLUM-VslVO grinding t-oa. |t
Sat  head i7«»  10 Ott ItSt! braaa round Head dofc
66 to off iml OARR1BS—Luggage, rollopalble 12.26 each.
BORBWSiCAP--M ott Hit CEMBNT—Radiator, V4 R> Wonder Work-
m'RKWS   SBT—M °tt llat er $6.40 dot.
itmvKtJI   UND   BPADBS-OldS  or   Foi. OHAINS-Wood 30x3'4  16.36 each:  listH
• if li ilr doa  N Jones or Rulldog 111.71 per ,700 ggohl Slx4 |7.70 each; 33x4 1120 each;
111 II por aoa   -» 0|) weh     [4Mg 30^,
"g*j i: l&t sma.               m Witt Wtaur-oi-i »«
IO.DBR    ; » ». ""•* "•'"•        ' „,.„; ,i„|n-K-l>«jr. il.so ugh.
It*. s.v i^r ».. COILS—at*Tt   .ln»le   $5.(f6   enfh:   Spt.it
*Wfft& nwn p.ri«on*-« i»*. ''™|*,,'1^oi5-wlnd   .djuww. m»
^>{3^^uriftT«* "waimhi p.. j.. u,»... *,.,..»..
tba  In full koga: •?TO,Wafiu Wonder  Worbor It 10 dot;  Martin Senour
1,0 50 per WV 'V   ff n-w Ust ffi'ffl, Mft eaofti 1/M ISc each;
H^B*3n^roS-5 point, CatUO, V/lt 31c J«ch;  * S* each; U »«c esch; %
,rt..r:!k.,npi AiN   Ini.VANIZrav-Par   »00 noRNS-Bleelrle $5.75 each.
«.W^Ki  MI0   No   11   ••««■            .«   .too- JACKS-No.   200  12 00  each:   No.   t  S3 2»
*W&i!Jr»^'A-POf 1W» Iba. No. 10. M-00. Mch. No. 41 l«00 each.
n*RKNV,.KS.   PIPB   Trl.no,   lea.   I-   IST llSra^a^O^,                            ,
<%$t c'loTH out of stock, vsmwjj. JAfCi ksoni.ow Mch. No , 75c |Mh.
ii Jwlr 100 W. ft: Galvanlltd, out of ttcHh. ww eajn^ ^^ 36
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
lly
*<v
enough varnish stain to finish a chair, and In* will
eventually buy enough to finish all tin* furniture. Thus,
you will he continually gaining new business snd build*
inn good will at tin* sanu* time, with little or no expense tO votl.
Now do vou it.'illv think there Is a dull aeasonf Ol
* a
course not. There Is an inert in season. If you dig Into
n selling campaign and slick to it you will forget tho
heat, gel most ot" the business of your community, and
the "<li>u days" will bring oul the perspiration from
your rash relgster, too.
k i • *n
BUTCHERS* CORNER
Upon application from thc B. C, Board of the Ke-
tail Merchants1 Association, tin* U, s. Department of
Agriculture has supplied a scries «»t* "Five Talks to
Meat Dealers," by Lawrence A. Adams, Assistant Mar.
keting specialist, whieh we are reproducing fop the
benefit of our butcher readers.
No. :$.
Wages a At the end of the week when the retail
Big Expense,   meat store owner pays tin- meat cutlers
and clerks, he pays about !»•!'.«   of the
eost of doing business. That is. for every M eents paid
out for wages and salaries, ho has only 17 eents for all
other expenees, whieh Include mil. wrapping material, iee, etc., etc. For each 63 eents spent for wages,
the store keeper spends three eents for wrapping material.   Wages nre over twenty times as Important
Are they watched twenty times as ean -fully I
Idle Time The   employer  is paying   tot   every
Expensive to   idle minute of his employees.   Three
[tore Owner, employees may be necessary for tin*
evening rush, l»ut is there demand for
hrce clerks during the early afternoon Perhaps this
rush could be eared for with two employees if th*
steaks were cut and the meat prepared ready for wrapping. Two employees CONSTANTLY busy instead of
three employees OCCASIONALLY busy is tin .lifer
eiiee between success and failure to some Store owners.
Are Employees   None of i would intentionally pay an
Properly employee   $40  a   week   to  do   work
Employed? Which could he done by a •*-•<• em
ployee, a well organized itore ew«
ploys skilled meat cutters and uses them where skill
will pay the most  Skilled butchers sre necessary to
properly cut up a carcass. Imt any one can wrap pack
ages, and any trusted employee ean make change, ARE
YOUR EMPLOYEES DOING THK WORK THEY
ABE BEST QUALIFIED TO Do?
More Sales Will      For each dollar which the store.
Reduce Expenses,   keeper receives, he retains from 20
to 26 cents whieh will pay his expellees and pay him a profit. If thfl merchant can tiud
ways of selling more goods, he will nalurally have more
money whieh to meet expenses, and his profits will be
greater.   Courtesy and good service are the two
est means of increasing sales.   Advertising mav ,
An additional line of goods has been profitable
dealers.    KEEP  YOUR  EMPLOYEES  BUSY "uv
BRINUIN-a IN MORE CUSTOMERS
Method of What is your wage expens.
Computing Wage centage!   It may be easil*, i.    ,|
Expence by adding together all the ue-ney
Percentage. you spend for wages, except .• ju".
ery Wage*      Add t., thin th,   hi    .,„„'
of your own salar* based on what would has. •, i„
paid to some outsider to do the same work h .v
this total amount of wages by the total amount of ,!,,
for the sano period The snswer is the wagi >\mjiM
percentage. Compare this with the figures of uther
merchants
Wage Expense In 1021 in Ave Wisconsin eitiw *.\u
Percentages. most properous meat dealers I ,| n
Wage expense from tj '" 12" I -Tho*
merehsnts with a percentage <»\<r l'J*, wpn si ih
advantage, ini023 in three large cities, y* to l; wai
the average for wages Smaller cities had sn sveragf
under 10*51 Row does your wage percentage eoiapnn t
The twelve p< r cent lim* in ordinarily the danger
mark In medium large cities, the store with leas than
I-'; wage expence will have a good chance tu make
profits Th« store wi'h wage expense o\«r 12 h I
a decided disadvantage The chances are lhal il will
lose money
DONT FORGET THAT SIXTY THREE « IMS
oF EACH DOLLAR SPENT GOES POR WAOR8
CANADA 8 IMPORTS DECREASE
During the twelve months ended April  '-   issi
Canada's im|H»rt« fell *iit ami lor . \|H»r*s Iner. wrtl M
compared with the corresponding twelve month pcriou
in 1923 and 1024
Total import* l*n.M, 1823,065,110; 1024, >f»5.3fW
688; 1926, 1795,864,401
Duty collected lirj:l. 1134,090,462; 1924, II M Ul
VIT. 1925, 1120,197,938
Total exports 1923,1996,971,872; 1924, •! 063.953..
666; 19%, |l,0l&561f749
Trade with United Sutcn
Imports from the Cnited Statin iu ttn twelvi moit-
ths ended April 30 last wen* |W7,740,355, oi nearly
142,000,000 lem than in tin* same period in 192-3 mid a
deer, ase of *S«I.ISSMSS( as compared with 1924
RxportS to the Cnited States iu the pssl ittv\\t
months wen* 1420,281,894, or an ipproxlmati ii "l"
over l!lj:i of 141,000,000 and *'.mks»,ihni Im low ll m*
figure
Trade with Britain
Imports and exports from and to the 1 nit- I KjjMr
dom both showed increases over two yearn u' ' "
most notable increase was iu the export tru j
trade with the Cnitnl Kingdom for the twelv< mown
period ended with April WSS ns follows
Imports -1988, 1145,288,886! 1994 *li"J"
1928,151375,602. ...M
Exports .1928, 1385,049,266; 1924. *»•'• M'"
1926. 1402,686,049, ,      ..   lhl,
The Cnited Kingdom flirures, given M Isau*     ^
Dominion   Hrm of Statistics,  inclde  the   I
State prior to April 1, 1924. 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
37
Buying
•mportant Question Discussed From Many Angles —Timely Information for Merchants New Considering
Their Fall Purchases.
liuylng goods for a retail store today Is quite differ-
, im num buying for a stor.* twenty or thirty years ago,
\ generation »k«» merchants bought poods in rather
lnrgi« quantities.  Transportation facilities were not as
,|, |*„ ndahlc as they are today, except for those mer-
,!, ut> who lived iii large cities. Rents were low and
nearly every merchant had plenty of storage room for
,'Ni-eSS Stock.
The merchant of thirty years ago was not worried
h\ many brands and ever-changing styles, ami so eould
wifely purchase in larger quantities. He usually dealt
only iii staple articles. He bought few kinds of things,
lm! In* bought a lot of them at a time.
Today this has changed. Transportation has im-
proved.    Railroads,   trolleys,  and   motortrucks   have
hruujrhl every merchant many miles and many days
Hearer his sources of supply. Wholesale houses ami
distributing points arc more widely scattered over the
country,
Rents arc higher today, aud except in small villages
or towns no merchant as a rule can a (Tor. I to pay rent
or taxes on lar**.* warehouse space.
All these changes have encouraged more frequent
buying ami buying in smaller quantities,   Where the
old merchant an a rule bought staples articles uiily. the
modem merchant buys staples and a number of side
linecu or specialties an well,
The old-time merchant tried to make his profit mi
quantity purchasing at favorable discounts. In other
words, he tried to make money on the buying end of
lhe husin.ss The successful merchant of today tries
lo make money on the selling end. He buys staples, on
which In* makes only a small profit, in such a way that
hi will have a large number of turnovers and thus In-
iti ase his yearly profits.   He buys specialties on which
hi can make a larger profit through i higher mark-up
The merchant of today, first of all, buys the goods
his customers want and nee.! the staple articles which
ihey come into his store purposely to get Second, he
buys those things which he believes he ean sell to his
customers,
Buying Staple Articles.
Buying staple articles today is n simple matter com.
pared to what it was years ago.    Prices, brands, and
* ven Styles have become standardized everywhere The
moat important thine, a merchant has to do in buying
articles is to steer | straight course between the rocks
■>f buying too little at a time and buying too much.
Buying too little often means being caught with a
shortage—ftn unpardonable thing where staple mer-
•'handlse is concerned.
Buying too mueh means having an unnecessarily
'tire amount of money tied up in merchandise. It
means deterioration and shrinkae of stock, both of
whieh mean loss.
Study your stoek. know your customers' preferences
'""I demands, know your storage facilities, your trans-
imitation service, and the sped with which your
wholesalers and manufacturers can make deliveries.
NiPn try to huy your staples iu such a way that you
will never be enught with a shortage and so that you
will have the smallest possible amount of money tied
>'» in staples.    Few merchants ever quite reach this
-■■--■ . i uM    imt the
loal condition in buying staple men
handise.    But the        not e,u
successful merchant works to got as close to it as he
can.
He buys frequently to avoid shortages and to have
as many turnovers of stock as possible, and he buys in
smaller quantities so that his loss through stock shrink-
ago is cut to a minimum.
This naturally Increases his working capital so that
he always has the ready cash for buying bargains and
is always prepared to add some profitable specialty or
side line to his husiness should the opportunity arise.
Buying the Specialties.
The merchants who are making money today are
the merchants who are devoting only part of their
time and their business to the buying and selling of
staples, Th.y arc putting real effort into buying and
selling associated lilies.
Staph- articles in themselves do not yield largo
return. Most of them are well advertised and standardized and for this reason sell on a very narrow margin. Competition is keen, because practically all merchants in a given line sell the same brands at nearly
the same pries.
Buying and Belling the profit-ranking specialties is
when* real merchandising comes in—the kind of merchandising that made John Wanainakcr and Marshall
iel.l and Baton — and that makes successful retail stores grow* in places where only hand-to-mouth
stores grew before.
Buying specialties implies selling them, because customers as a rule will not buy them of their own accord
as they buy staples.  They must be sold.
Buying this kind of merchandise requires careful
selection—first of the new line and second of the merchandise that makes up the line. It requires a thorough knowledge of your customers, tt also requires
considerable knowledge of the kind of people who pass
your show windows and the kind of people you ean
teach through advertising, for remember that when
you begin to sell specialties the whole community becomes your prospective market.
Iio slowly in introducing side lines and specialties.
Consider every angle of the subject carefully. Visit
other stores in your line of business and see what they
are carrying In stock. When you do finally decide to
introduce a eertain line of goods in addition to your
staples. In* sure the new line is complete. Don't make
the mistake of having only a makeshift line.
It is a splendid thing to take on a new salesman or
saleswoman who has had experience selling the new
\\m, This person will be of immence value in helping
vou buy as well as in helping to sell.
When onee the line is in your store, you must maac
n real effort to sell it. You must tell people the goods
are there. Put the goods in your windows. Advertise
them In vour local newspaper or through your mailing
list. Display them prominently in your store. The
sales you make will bring you real profits.
How to Avoid Incomplete Stocks.
Nothing is more damaging to your business than a
reputation for "always being just out" of things whieh
vou should have. Even though the article on which
vou are short mav be of little, value, your trouble docs
not cud with the loss of the few cents' profit you would 38
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTA1LKK
have made had you made the sale. You stand a good
chance of losing the customer together with many
friends who will hear that you do not have a complete
stoek.
A "Failure to Huy" record showing why sales were
lost i.s valuable iu a retainl store. The idea is for each
salesperson to have a small notebook which he uses
every time a customer asks for something whieh thc
salesperson is unable to sell her. In every case the date
and the reason for not buying is entered. Maybe the
item is out of stock; perhaps the color, shape, or style
did not suit the customer; or possibly there was a short-
age in the particular size that the customer needed
With the aid of information gathered ever a period of
several months, many errors in buying can be discovered and remedied.
High and Stock Limits.
ln many stores it has been found practical to fix
high and low limits for every item in stock From the
records of sales in past years, figure out this year's sel-
ling requirements at stated times during the year.
Then find the average number of turnovers during tin*
year for each item from a comparison of your inventory, purchases, and sales records. Compare the number of turnovers just found with the average turnover
rates in other stores for that particular class of merchandise, if available. Then decide how many turn
overs you wish to obtain for the coming year.
You can obtain the retail vain.* of the average
amount of stock you should carry to obtain the number
of turnovers by dividing the estimated sales of each
item by the desired turnover.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St
Vancouver, B.C.
L
Bruises        Sores
Sootht tht tort mutcles er liga-
mtntt by rubbing in M'nard't Lint-
mtnt. It ptnttratti, rtlitvti and
htali. It iimi inflammation and
rtitortt tht Injured part to htalth.
Spltndid  for  cuts  and   sorts.    It
■ttrilitta and htals quickly.
July
how
your
• ■i's
a
Cor example,  suppose you  wanted  to  ki:
much stock (at retail value I you should carry
cigar department in order to have twenty tun,
year, your annual sales being about ♦ IIHHH)
'20  ♦lOINM.   *rm
100
Five hundred dollars is, therefore, the retail vain
of the itoek which WOU should always have on || nd ,',',
have twenty turnover* From this figure \,,„ t-outel
easily ti\ a high and a low limit for the amount of
stock to l»e carried in your cigar departmeni
When a certain line of merchandise sells m *-,.,,,
idly than you had anticipated, or when its delhi n ha/i
heen delayed, you will find that you are short If
your goods sell (.Mi slowly nnd deliveries nr.* regular or
ahead of time, you will tln.l thai you have \ ...l, i
your high stock limit In the lir*t Instance you mmi
of course, buy more goods and in th.* iccomi instaan
you miiHt make n special effort to sell more
How Many Brands 8hould Be Carried
With the constantly increasing number of brand*
ami itvl.s of certain goods, the merchant face* tin pro.
Idem of how iinny brands niul Styles of a certain arti
cle he should carry     It is advisable, of QOttrsi   lu have
m.ist of the popular brands on hand     Bul ii in noi
Usual!) Decenary to keep more than three of four
brands of any article if they are practically identical
in character,
In some lines where little national advertising hai
been done, it is Unnecessary lo have (Bore (hail •'!'.'
brand of the same item on hand The brands >•>; earr)
ahould, of course, d< j** ml in a large measure ui*-it their
SALES THAT
'ATISFY
Kv.ry merchant likes to make Sales
Satisfy   For utmost satisfaction to
seller ami purchaser we strongly r< •
mend
Keystone Brand
School Supplies
Ity   reason  of  the  generous  quant it,*■•
paper supplied and its excellent <ju■»'
thlNK!   School   Hooks   please      Tin    <i*
receives a satisfactory margin of profil
Shall we submit Samples ami I'ri*
tl tl
both
'•till
IVV
m% taMSN I Wl* 1*
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE
RARER DEALER!
V1CT0RIfl
VANCOUVEI
■M 192;
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
39
tie
••a-
an
he
.1.
pop larlty as well as on their merits.   And national
Jl(l,   lisiug is a big factor iu creating a demand.
|t in well, especially for the merchant who is just
|)( gi uing busines, to carefully consider the advantages
0f i rrytng nationally advertised merchandise. This
handise ia nearly always of a high quality. It is
•■■ sell ami the manufacturer of such merchandise
iHitally willing to supply merehanta with dealer-
mid selling information to aid in its sale.
he retailer who sell* advertised goods- especially
is staple lines—is in a position to take full advan-
(Agt. ni the manufacturer's special campains in his local
newspapers. These campains are particularly profit-
;,|.|. lo the "neighborhood" merchant who cannot use
ui ivspaper space to advantage.
(loodfl that are not nationally advertised, but which
Rr." v, ell known in your community, of course, are just
as i my to sell as the nationally advertised lines ami
should be carried.
Remember that your big problem is to sell your
staples quickly. You make only a small profit on them
ind you don't want to carry a line of staple goods that
requires a lot of explaining every time you make a
sali Save this time and energy for selling specialties
and you will make more money.
Where Shall Ooodi Be Bought?
One of the big problem* of buying is whether to
ord* r from only one or two houses or to shop around
among the wholesalers, jobbers, and manufacturers.
(•using from different lOUreee. This question must be
decided by the merchant himself, who should baac his
judiMiient mi the peculiar circumstances in which he
Hilda himself.
There are many advantages in buying from only
on* or two houses. Ity buying in this way you can
ofb n purchase goods in large enough quantities to win
exl ra discount*. If you are placing most of your orders
with one wholesaler, be will be more likely to extend
y"U credit at a time when you are in need of help. He
will do this because he knows you well ami has a personal interest in your success.
In choosing a firm to do business with, don't over-
look even thc smallest particulars. Prompt deliveries
are absolutely nceeasarv.   Careful attention to time of
deUvery, to the accurate filling of your orders, and
cheerful adjustment of your elaims-these arc all essential.
A concern which is ready to help you sell your mer-
''handise and to advise you on what is in demand, is a
good one to trade with. It.it you must not rely too
tuueh on the judgment of others in buying. Get all the
information you ean for yourself about what your customers want and what they can be induced to buy.
Think ol Mrs. Smith. Mrs. Jones, and Mrs. Brown and
all the rest of them, when you are buying. Ask yourself what kind of merchandise they require. Then
govern your buying accordingly.
TIP8 POR LIVE CLERKS
THINGS CUSTOMERS DON'T LIKE IN CLERKS.
Customers are just as human as clerks are—perhaps more so! When one walks out with a peeved air,
having told the clerk things not pleasant to hear, he
may be venting sheer oneryn.ss. The elerk may be
blameless.
Still right or wrong, what the customer thinks of
the elerk is mighty important. What is involved is not
justice but sales. Every clerk should so conduct himself that even unreasonable customers like his ways.
V.t sometimes, of course, the customer with entire jus-
lice dislikes service received.
Tin- subjoined list of reasons why customers take
•a dislike to clerks, and carry their patronage elsewhere,
is something worth scanning. We are listing clerks
who drove away business. The retail salesman who
sees to it that in* is never one of these is sure to be a
source of satisfaction and joy to his employer.
1. A clerk who lies. Enthusiasm is necessary in
good selling -but it should always be sincere. Every
little while, ev.ry clerk has a chance to make a sale by
lying Other times, he may think tliere is a chance to
sell by telling something false concerning an artiele. He
may think he is clever enough to know when he ean
tell a lie ami uget away with it." and when he can't.
No cl.rk is that smart!
Customers fight shy of thc clerk they detect In lies.
Thr
In* one
BRING A FRIEND AND DIVIDE
raeeees or the chain «lru* .tores mot others with with their so-called one-cenl sales (two ot a product cost-
cent morr thro, the ngnta retail price ot one) hsi beta remarkable. A Pennsylvania realtor WSI l»er-
hap* inspired by these lalSI when be InitUUted hb *li. lag n Friend and-lnvlde Sale.'' This man
happened to be In ihe clothing bslneat. It one ot hit regular customers brings In a friend and
ihey both „rder suits of the isma *alUG at the same time, he sells the two for only $10 mere
than ihe regular eost of one,  But lha idea la applicable, with some variations, to almost say
type of business.   The essential part oi  II  Is that ll brings a new customer Into the store
Introduced and *eon*0red by an old ous.omer;  and new customers are whal every business
usiomers approach the store's goods and services In
h  the  same endorsement  as a certified
rlieek.
seeds. Under moh eircumatsacet, new <
the moal favorable of attitudes    And they have nun
the friend whose good* opinion   Is valued doing the certify in* 40
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Even if they continue to do business with him. they
have no confidence in him. He loses gales which, possessing the customer's confidence, he would make.
2.    The clerk who gossips.    Customers are siispie
ions of the chap who has unnice things to say about
local people.   Every little while, a customer will think,
"what docs this fellow say about met"
'.\. Thc clerk who insists ou conversing with the
customer after the order is given and tilled
It is hard for the customer politely to pt away lie
regards the clerk's chatter as a nuisance. Clerks should
learn when to talk and when not to and how to be
friendly and poiiyte, and yet not consmc valuable time
4. The el.rk who gives discourteous service There
are many forms of discourtesy, ranging from the superciliousness of a clerk nervous in his attitude toward
the individual customer, to the clerk impatient when 8
customer is long in making a choice.
5, The clerk unduly persistent in pushing a sail
Customers   do   not like clerks who will not bt them
leave without buying.   They don't like men who persist in effort to sell after the customer has given an emphatic negative.
ft, The clerk who has offensive personal characteristics. Had breath, sloppy at tin-, offensive personal
habits, are things to avoid.
7. The clerk who doesn't know merchandise    for
ever must make enquiries of f.llow clerks, read labels
and messages, or confess his ignorance
8. Thc clerk very slow in service Most customers want quick service. They are ipiiek to be peeved
by "cold molasses" responses to their Inquiries and
orders.
9. The clerk who "works ofT" old and off-grade
goods. He will "get away with it." with mttii but
others arc sure to catch him.    And. then, good night!
10. The clerk who wraps  bundles poorly     Poor
wrapping can cause mu<h grief ami annoyance
customers remember it.
The foregoing are not all the clerks whom,
reason, customers take dislike to. They are the principal ones, however. Mark them well ami don't be
one of them!
And
with
STAMP TAX RECEIPT*
Lack of knowledge of the regulations governing tbe
application of the Stamp Tax on Receipts will render
you I in bio to « $50 penalty.    An erroneous impression
is held that acknowledgments by mail are covered by
the War Tax affixed as extra postage.   This used to
be the ease, but the amended law is set forth in Circular
No. 237-0 of July 4. 1928.
Revised Regulations and Rulings.
The following rulings are issued on questions which
have been addressed to the Department —
Counter sales slips and cash register tickets are not
taxable, provided no words implying or stating acknowledgment of the receipt or the payment of money
appears thereon.
pay-rolls—signature of employee thereon being re-
ceipt for wages-taxable, in respect of each such signature,
Rcecipts for payment of legacies are taxable, A
receipt for money in a deed or mortgage is taxable.
Receipts for payment of taxes, except those given
to, or by, thc Dominion Government or Provincial fJov-
ernment, arc taxable.
Individual freight bills ami periodical stu
of same, acknowledging  receipt of payment,
able.
Customs House lookers' receipts are taxal
All insurance policies, whether lire, lif... „
casualty, wherein tin* payment of money is
lodged, are taxable
Receipts drawn out of Canada, but not rsl
countersigned in Canada, are taxable.
Voucher cheques and cheques with receipt*
e.l thereon, when drawn upon or addressed lo
are not taxable, as receipts.
Remitter's counterfoil, being part of a tax
pns money order, is not taxable as « r dpi
Julv
t-emenu
ire t;,v
Ic
iriiic or
tckijow,
id until
1 llil-.-s
a hank.
ihi.   >\.
CONVENTIONS
It is regrettable that a report of the proceedingso(
th. Dominion Convention cannot, owing to our puhlUh-
Ing date, appear in this banc of the "Hritish Columbts
Retailer"   Reports of Dominion and Provincial tawi
logs will be dealt with in tbe August number   r.ir •
Mistaken.
Uali Oucat   "Ooah. but I'm thirsty I"
Hostess    ".lust a minute. I'll get you dom* K.ii'r
Mai.  Cmst    "I said thin»tv    nol dirty "
Something 8oft
"Jones is v.rv kind hearted to animals '
"That sot"
"Yes. Why, wh.n he found th. eat sleeping in thi
coal bin  he order, d a ton of soft coal
Profit by Supplying This
Demand
v« o recall of * i»uje«« sfjrtff'tiftfif campsite th*** it
mand for FlM-o hm<tmv"» XfttM In gxuwliig (tail)     ffell
mesas pmtit tm fee
For rcsseaifof   rcsst-for'HeatUi nsfcee hwdihj   '*
loners -tbe i>u> more «»t *vtr) Utlag res iell
IdtaUfy roil state *ui» on* saiteaal a-SvwUsfni to
»hoi»ifnt the Hetschsiean package dlepla)    Voa'll
«e|| more Kl«'l«chn»»nit'll foSS\ *fol other fun*'-1*
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The Flebchmaon Company
SERVICE
Courtesy
Characterize* the work of
our long-distance operators
IIITISH COLUMN TIIIMMI COMMIT, LTO. I'i'.!
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
Mn. Maine's Marmalade
ORANGE
GRAPE FRUIT
FINE APPLE
2645—4th   Ave.,   Wtsi.
Phont: Bay. 133
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
Representative
Dean Armstrong. 1814 Larch St
Vaneouvtr, B.C.
Phont:  Bay. 501L
DAYTON    SCALES
Meat    Ulcere,    Mtat    Choppers.
Coffee    Mills,    Chttst    Culltrt.
Bread Slictrs.
INTERNATIONAL   BUSINESS
MACHINE   CO.   LTO.
P. C. STRICKEN.
Local   Rtprtstntat.vt
*>*« Seymour St.   Phont:  Sty. 2S3
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E   H. ROWNTREE. Rtprtstntativt
207 Hastings Witt, Vsncouvtr.
Phont:  Sty. SS
Milne *i\f Mid-Jetton
Llmlltd.
Wholesale Drygoods
347 Wattr ttroot Vaneouvtr.
Phont: Sty. 1S2
QUAKER J 4MB
DOMINION CANNERS. B. 0.
Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phont: toy. SSS2
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear ami hand knitting yarns.
Represeated In Hrltlsh Columbia
8. D. STEWART A CO. LTO.
31S Homer St. Vancouver, B. .C
Phone: Sey. 7525
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island, Quebec
Representative:
R. M. Fosttr, 3544— 32nd Ave. W.
Vaneouvtr, B.C.
Phont: Bay. 5030V
Paper bun*, wrapplag paper,
for ail reqairemeaU.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
103S Hamilton 81. Vancouver, B.C.
Phont: Sty. 8822
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L. P. MA80N & CO
510 Hastings Wtst.
Phont Sey. 2908
THE   BRITISH   AMERICAN  WAX
PAPER CO. LTD.
CONSOLIDATED    SALES    BOOK
ANO WAX  PAPER  CO.  LTD.
HIGH   ORADE   WAXED   PAPERS
AND COUNTER SALES BOOKS
Distributing Agent for B. C.
vJ Vtbx Paper Specialist ^/
^^■"IosTmamilton STwrer
VANCOUVi*  » c
Phont: Sty. 3112
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St. W. Phone. Sey. 3911
Vancouver.
Canadian Postum Cereal Cl, limited
Head Office      - Toronto
Local Agents:—
McNEELYS LTD. Phone:
739 Hastinge St. W. Sty. 9337
Phone:   High. 3889
C    t^1
J IDEAL CONE COMPANY
\m
Manufacturers of
ICE  CREAM  CONES
Purest Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
DfltrJoRi-J.
I
B. C. Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser A Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers   of   Prossers'  Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTO.
6t5 Pender St. W.   Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Ofti»;f
332 Water Street
Phone: Sey. 6383
STORE EQUIPMENT
Scales. SHcers, Cutters »"«* Cabin-
tts-Nsw, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE  SCALE  SHOP LTD.
Sey. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer. 42
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Juh
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1088 Homer Street.       Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 781
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured In British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTO.
GLASS  JARS
••Improved Gem" A "Ptrftct Star
Local Rtprtstntativt: R. G. Moort.
Deauaiea Glass Caspar Ltd.
510 Hastings St. West.    Sey. 5138
1WCMU-N
NUTTINC CO. Ifl.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
Phont: Sty. 3061
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIEftY
WATCHES.  CLOCKS,   JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambit Sts.
Phont: Sty. 2765
PAPER  PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURERS
CONTINENTAL    PAPER
PRODUCTS LTD.. Ottawa, Ont.
Local    Rtprtttntatives:
Smith, Davidson 4 Wright
Davit and Homtr Sts.     Sty. 9565
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM SOOA8
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1160 Hamilton  Street, Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
Phont: Sty. 3412
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
Tht British Columbia Retailor will
bo pleaeod to furnish subscribers
tbt names and addresses of rtpro-
eentatlvee or agents of eastern
manufacturers In Vancouver. Wo
will also advlae where their com.
modltlee ean bo purchased.
Glass - Mirrors
BEVELLING SILVERING
GLAZING
WESTERN GLASS CO. LTD.
Importers,   Manufacturers
Wholesale and Retail Oealere
158 CORDOVA  STREET  WEST
Vancouver.
Phone Sey. S6S7
Hams & Bacon
Swift'a "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTO.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     ANO     WRAPPING
Nerfelk Paper Ce. Us!.
1M WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 71
Water Repellent Clothing
i BEAR
f>
R. A. SIME, BC Distributer
tmottma amat am toot
SOS Mercsntllt BlOf.. Vancouver, ■   C.
GAIVANIZQ» IRONWEAR
THE THOS. OAVIOSON MFG. CO.
LTO.
123 Powell Street Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 4866
ftCOISTKRKD.
CHIPMANHOLTON      KNITTING
CO. LTO.
E. H. Walah 4 Co. Ltd., Agenta.
S1S Homer Street,       Vancouver.
Phono: Sey. 1666
QUAKER
Brand Canned
FRUITS 9 VEOBTABI.KS
Dominion Canners of B C Ltd
Vanoouver, B.C
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC UNOERWEAR LTD
E. H. Walah A Co. Ltd.. Agtnu
316 Homer Street Vaneouvtr,
Phone: Sey. 6*67
TIGER BRAND
UNDERWEAR
J. J. MACKAY, Agent
SOt Bower Bldg.   Phone: St,   )os*.
Tee CALT KNITTING CO LTD
Gall. Ontario
11CEETEE "
Pur* Wool
UNDERCLOTHING
TURNBULL'S of Colt
Local Office   SIS Homer Strati
Phone: Sey. 7*2)
T. 0. STARK
F. W. STERLING
Telephone
Sty. »1M
STARK A STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'  AOEMS
1048 Hamilton Slrtti.
VANCOUVER. B. C
Addressing
MaMine Lieu     ttttt.it*fPUii
rocolmttaaletter-. t*4dlt*t. "*
Direct Mall Campaign•*
UooStoO lfftcU-n'1*-
Mracteries. Ud
MS Naellna* *
sn »7» Ihe ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
ssseeeeessssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssBsssssssssssssssssss
"SIMPLEX"    -   Ligkt Manilla
" MAPLE LEAF" Ligkt Kraft
"LION"      -    -     Heavy Kraft
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllttlltlllltlltlltttlltlllllllllltllltlttttltlll
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
OB
Premium
Vr2
Or*wW
2&
fr
Whether it be the dealer or the consumer--
"Quality First" is a safe rule to follow in buying food products. Swifts "Premium" hams
and bacon will measure up to the highest standards in eve7 respect, thoroughly cured, hardwood smoked, parchment wrapped, superior in
flavor and with the quality that distinguishes
them from lower grade stock. As a dealer you
will And it to your advantage to stock "quality" products, as you will be able to build up
a good volume of business, and on a profitable
basis.
SWIFTS   PREMIUM" HAMS AND BACON
ARE A MADE IN B. C. PRODUCT.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED I
ey uitvYou Your
host Profitable
Kind of Sale

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