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The December Retailer 1926

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Array THE DECEMBER
BRITISH COLUMBIA, ALBERTA, YUKON
VOL XIX, No 4
VANCOUVER, B C
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familiar labels
like familiar'
faces are always
welcome &V
Christmas time
The Canada Starch Co.,
Limited
MONTREAL
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10c per eopy; $1.00 per jaar S&*4lW^l*Jtta^^
PAPER BAGS
Paper Mills:
LacHutt 4 St. Jeroma,
Qua.
Manufacturera  ainca  1870
Popularity and goodwill is increased by a standard of
excellencfc in store sen ice detail. Strong and good-
looking paper bap assist this merchandisingprinciplc
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"     "LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
ii
Built for Strength and Appearance—ALWAYS*'
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturer! of
PAPER BAOS      WRAPPING, TI880E AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailors.
1068 HOMER STREET. VANOOUVER. B 0
Phone: 8eymottr 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
WMlW2i*\^ 1926
THE   RKTAILER
Saves yoa Urns when cnstomeri ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee/'   Tbat'a exactly what Nabob ii.   Thc vacuum tin
isepe lha flam in~you sell it "fresh from the roaster."
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
IaboB
HMAND
vANCOU*.f P "
WILSON BROTHERS
EsUblishsd 1890
Our Motto is " SERVICE
«*
We oaaaot offer io sail you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but ws OAN
gire actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with ns
SSf^u WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA, B.C.
WKoUiale Grocen
SHAMROCK PRANI
HAM. BACON, BUTTER. LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
•    - r £ — — —
P. Burns & Company. Limited
VANOOUVER
0ALOARY
EDMONTON THE    RETAILER
BRITISH COLU1SBIA-ALBBBTA--YIJKON
December
DAYTON
PORCELAIN SCALE
Low Counter Typ**
Style 556
TTHE DAYTON Porcelain Scale is the aristo
JL crat of weighing machines.
It is ACCURATE This accuracy is ensured
by DAYTON principles of construction, proven
reliable over a period of 35 years of actual use.
It is strictly SANITARY. All working parts
arc enclosed. The special porcelain finish-
smooth, non-corrosive, non-stainable—makes it
easy to keep clean and sweet.
It is DURABLE Without sacrificing accuracy,
iu mechanism has a practical sturdincss that
bears long years of daily use without trouble*
some adjustments or repairs
And lastly it is BEAUTIFUL Its rounded
surfaces of spot lew **hitc. its bright nickel
fittings, clear-vision churt-glavi and bevelled
end-mirrors, give it an air of clean cl tit lent y
which attracts and impresses thc customer
Only the resources of a vast organization manufacturing for a world-market, could bring this
Aristrocrat of Scales within the pricc-runge of
ordinary scales.
DAYTON Porcelain Scales, either low or high counter type,
are told on easy terms. Generous allowance on your old scale.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CO. LIMITED
Factory end Head Office: Wsst Toronto, Ontario
INTERNATIONAL
osMoroto tmm avaraaa
MADE IN CANADA
TMM ai
IMM arosaoo
Smkt and Salts Offutt in alt Ptirulpel Citlot
OAVTON
mat atiaaaa
■aa?
aaaaaa mitt
awtr-aa •wrtaaa 1926
, TELE   R ETA I LER
YUKON
®s*
RtTAILLR
I'ubliahid ih'tli <>f every month
With which Ii inro-poraOxl th« II   0. TRADE RBVIBW.
NINETEENTH YEAR
OW4MUL MHRCIIANDISB
OROCERIRS. DRYOOODS.
HAROWARR. FOOTWEAR,
OFFUIAL ORGAN OF BC. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan
diaiitf and ths Development of Commerce in Western Csnsds.
Bl'IIMCRIITION  RATE. On* Ix-iUr V*t Yrar. payable in advance.
Advertising Ralaa on Application
Whan spare reserved final forms plow 12-th i.i month.
ftattsherei progress publishing co. ltd.
ewtla 10'2 Marthanti' Eichangt Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
T»t»ehoA» So*  Ml Cable Ad<tr«-»8   Shipping-All Codes
Bailor. 1 S MorrtaoB W. N Code. Business Manager
f Tstierstll Advl stsnsfer
Enter-") at Ottawa ai Second clan matter
Vol. XIX. Ko  I
Th« following rtprtatnt R. M. A. Branchaa
In tho Province of British Columbiat—       Jy
Armstrong H. S. Armstrong,
Sec.-Treas.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Sec.
Fertile  Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, See.
Lyllon B. Rebagllatl, See.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
Nelson „1, P. Qlgot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley...D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, See.
Vancouver C. Dallas, Act. Sec.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DECEMBER, 1926
Mail Order Business : Its Effect Upon
Domestic Distribtion and Domestic
Development
By It  B Dougla-s Secretary Manager, Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Ine.
Iltairilitiiion ol in* rrhnn.liM is our of lhe greatest
factor* of our eeonainie lift" ll »>■»* chsngidB great
t\*n\ from tlt«> limes of ••barter md ■ whan*e lo tne
present day ef "money eaittt " or "pairs Many new
plana and methods have been sdopied within the more
reaent mra, with the rrsnli ihsi g bare now beiug
distributed by ual only th. • Individually owned ami
operated Hare/' Imt by --departmental stores, •
nnd tm eent itarea.' •chain slow aa*oj*rai\e
te^etiea," "dlreel to consumer wiling m*"°™ ,
houea»" " unsolicited plans snd customer chains
sale,' vie .   ,
Kmm u »M*.l.v.i« m«d« -M r*». wt temi »W
CmuU mtmx. nstosim lln. ''''•";'';,;,
iltoptW Ui.it. w.n ■rii".<»"r,,,,h   s °Ld
mwV.11., .h- null baring»' <'"- :""",'„*
«•* •^-W^A'^^
nn svrrnirc of approximate!? *•*>'"      • ,      .   ()1*
n„ nml child.   Hy m»Wng a ewi^risoi ; y a lit.
our atport nnd Import trade which amountiw   ^
tic over fg.000,000.000 last year, w J *     lr;l(i(, of
wimc iden of the Importan ■' ""' ' '     ;    oi t!l,
this country, nnd yet when eomparetf |w|
single line industries, nueh an nanriinn ^   ^^
yesr produced ipproximalelv * •<'- , , pYell
W,000f000, mining imeOO.000, m ™m
greater differences are apparent These comparisons
will give some idea of the importance of the domestic trade of Canada and the service rendered to the
public of this country by the distributors.
The Status of the Retail Merchant.
Tin' business of tho merchant is to select merehan*
disc and place it iu stoek to satisfy the requirements
of the consumers in the various communities in which
In is located. Largo amounts have been invested in
property and real estate suitable for thc storing and
displaying of these large stocks. It is estimated that
the retailers, together with their employees, represent
as much capital invested and pay as much taxes as
any other class in the Dominion of ("anada. They arc
large contributors to the development of the communing in which they are located, and are, in most instances- the promoters of community development. A
large portion of the eost of maintaining schools,
I lunches, hospitals, good roads, and other public util-
•;ii,s, as well as charitable institutions within the community is paid for and maintained by the merehants
resident in those distriets.
The towns and villages of our country ean only bo
made attractive and business opportunities provided
bv the investment of money, nnd the reinvestment of
l|10 earning power of that money within those commun- 6
THE   RETAILER
imiTtSH OOLUMBIA-ALBKRTA-TUKON
December
it ies- A dollar spent within the community is estimated to circulate fifteen times before its earniiur power
has been used up. if you send that dollar out of the
eommunity, its usefulness is employed in the place io
which it has been sent.
This introduces the subject of purchasing merchandise out of your eommunity or through Mail Order
Houses.
Growth Restricted.
This is a mutter whieh is certainly engaging the
earnest attention of the business people of Canada,
who nre interested in its future development. The cosh
sent out of the various communities to Mail Order
Houses, to be employed by them in restricting the
growth and prosperity of the smaller towns, villages
aud rural communities, by taking from those communities the opportunity of employing the operating costs
of distribution and profits within their districts.
Towns or villages, through this lack of development, lose their prestige ns live and attractive centre*
and property values, of not only the merchants and
residents of these communities,but farmers as well tributary thereto, are mueh reduced iu value. No one
wants to live in a dead district. Of the dollar spent
with the local merchants, the money is left in thc community to help build up its social and economic life.
It would seem advisable that we should examine
the conditions under which the local merchant operates* and compare them with the operations of Mail
Order Houses. Thc local retailer anticipates the requirements of the people tributary to his place of business, snd places in it stoek for the convenience nnd
inspection of his customers- He expects to pay to the
wholesaler or manufacturer the value of the goods, as
ho rcalizea that just as he ia entitled to a living wage
for the service which he renders, so thc wholesaler
or manufacturer is entitled to a remuneration for their
contribution to production and distribution.
Compared with this method, however, I would like
to present the following paragraphs from an article
reported io have been written by Mr. Clarke K. I-ockc,
former advertising manager of the Robert Simpson
Company Limited.
"The weapon of buying—an expressive
phrase with a world of meaning- Money makes
money, and with the unlimited credit at his
back, a Department manager ean buy on more
favorable terms than thc small merchant."
"Sometimes this weapon is used with particular telling effect. Manufacturer**; often get
into financial difficulties and then—ready cash
means more than profits."
"A Department manager con go to the
manufacturer and offer him huge sums in cosh,
provided thia purchase aaa ba effected at eoat
price or less. Thc result—the manufacturer
geta cash when he needs it most; thc store gets
sn opportunity of selling goods at a ridieukraa-
ly tow priee snd yet of making money."
Catalogues and tha Post Office.
Now that the purchases have been made by the
local merchant and the gooda taken into stock he ad*
vertiaca locally thc gooda which are seasonable, trusting that aa a result of thc advertisement the local con*
stimei-wwilr come to his store to buy his merchandise.
Tha Mail Order House.whcn the stock haa been secured,
undertskes the preparation of a catalogue which eosts
thousands of dollars, and which is distributed at the
minimum eost to the public not only in the district in
which they are doing business, but throughout the
whole country. Ihis catalogue is glowingly prepared
and very attractive, and business is solicited on the
motto "goods satisfactory or money refunded," and iu
oinler lo make mail order purchases as convenient nn
possible, advertisements appear pertaining to a great
quantity of the merchandise such as "we pay all transportation charges."
These catalogues are not sent out from the place of
business in the ordinary way, but in most instance*,
arc sent by freight or express to the village or town
from which they wish to have them distributed, and
placed in thc Tost Office there, thus reducing the cost
ol distribution by the reduced |Nircel post rate ob
tained when sent out within the twenty mile radius
The average catalogue weighs about three pound*,
whieh if distributed within Ihe twenty mile raditi*.
eosts 7e., whereas, if it is sent out tjcyulid the twenty
mile ana, but within the province, the eost would be
20c., nnd if sent from one province to the adjoining
province on either side, the cost would be 24c, and if
sent to the second province on cither side of the dis
tributiug province the charge would lie 30c, and to any
of the other provinces tt»c
As Mail Order Houses are doing business not only
in the province in which they are located, but iu all
thc other provinces, this method of distributing their
catalogues is reducing the cost by avoiding the regular
us-* of the mails, while at the same time the I'ost Office
Department has been lotting large sums of money Tm-
mendous sums have been invested by thc Post Office
Department to take care of the parcel post system, ami
the Mail Order Houses are the chief users, yet when
this system can be partly avoided by a cheaper method,
the cheaper system is adopted and the IWt Office De
part ment lose the revenue, .lust here I would like to
ask the question, llow can the Mail Order House take
advantage of the parrel post rate for their catalogue*
which are printed material and not mcrrhandisi»1
Printed material is distributed at the rate of one cent
for two ounces; a catalogue weighing .'I Hw. would cowl
24 cents, yet ihey are sent out within the twenty mile
radius for seven cents. The weekly or monthly cats
logucs are distributed at the Printed Matter rate,
why not the annual or semi annual as well!
To give you some idea of the way in whieh these
catalogues are distributed, in September, 1925. lhe
local weekly in a small western town in Alberta, eon
tained an editorial headed "The Mail Order Flood,"
"Three tons of mail order catalogues,—this is the
quantity of catalogues from one mail order house that
were unloaded here a few days ago for distribution
from the —— post office, all within thi* twenty mile
ralius of —-**
»»
 is a town of some 2,400 population, and the
chief reason of its existence* presumably, Is thst the
fanning population in the surrounding territory may
have a market place where they may secure the vsr-
ious commodities they require st retail.
The local scribe continues: "The entire country
is under a deluge of artistically illustrated well-print
ed books of 500 pages each, advertising thc wsres of
one of Canada's greatest mail order concerns, snd
inviting even the most remote prairie sel tier to send
hjs money sway to Winnipeg for whatever he may re-
quire to eat or wear- 1926
T|I E   BETAILE1
nrtwu ,v        iV J *-* '* iv
nillTISM
0OLU14B1A   ALB1
'UTA-YPKON
"No home is
too luxurious for this emmissary of
the mail order house to enter; no eottagc is sn humble
lhat Ihis printed salesman will psm it b\
"Three tons of cataloguest Yes, six thousand
pounds of printed salesmen for this po«| office Pig.
ure it out for yourself, and you will s,, that that one
Shipment equals the combined weighl >>i thirty .five
yood husky salesmen of th. human variety
"A few quick passes of the pencil show us that
there are exactly 2,4*00 catalogues, weighing 2| . Ihs
each, in this one batch One salesman and one of
proven producing ability), will be at work in every
one of 2,400 house* iu ihi* district during the n»-xt «ix
inontha He will ba constantly oa the job, eager to
tftsplay his good*, ami ever ready to solicil an order
for the mall order house Two-thousand four*hundred
salesmen ar*' now at work in the district, sell
ing goods for a Winnipeg mail order house "
*> *********** Is not the only town in Canada where there
are loud complaints about the depredations of the
mail order house
Silent Salesmen
The next step in ihr process ui distribution of goods
by the local merehanl i* to pel] them t>» tho customers
.♦.bu eome into his store    He renders (hem a service
by telllllg tbem lhe qtiaKt)  of goods, giving thriu an
opportunity to inspect them, delivers (hem, if required,
mid in most instance* extends credit if desired. Th<*
mail order houses, once ihey gel llu-ir estaloguca Into
the homes of the consumera, bsve a sUcnl salesman in
thai home for 968 day* iu the yesr, soliciting an order,
«»r in alhef word*, theae ealalogm n <*.r» really transient
trader* or silent peddlars In order lo obtain the mer*
• !>andi*e it is necassary for ih«* consumer lo decide
upon lhe class of giwid* which he requires, make oui
nn order send the order through the Posl Office,which
of course musl W seeompanied by cash; the order i*-
msde up by mail order firm, delivered generally to the
Post Office Department, and lo due curs,' arrives at
thc post office of the consumer who in turn has lo call
for it snd take it home
This comparison af the conditions under which busi-
ness is conducted by the local retailer snd tho mail
order house shows clearly lhal th.* policy by winch
the mail order house* conduct their business is Ihrough
ihe post offices, of which In the yesr 1924*25 there
were 12.37* In urban and rural centres, and at the
end of the calendar year 1W-I Ihrre were 68.000 miles
of rural mail foule*! nerving over 20&000 rural ma.
Inixcs    ll is elearlv evident lhal without the postal
«ervire and the parcel poet rates which are consider
ably leas than the express rates, ihsl the mail order
businewi coiibl not I* so advantageously eonduewo,
nnd yet we find thc postal elerks and peatmen1 all oNer
Canada proteaUng that they are under paid,    im
Mail Onler Houses, who depend on the postal Jjnp ° ;
res for thc operation of their business, colli da 111wu 1
pay well for this service rendered   Why na\e     j
all these advantages over the local merchant [01
distribution of their merchandise?
On moat parcels less than nine pounds m wag*
noatal rales are much leas than the expnai 1    ■ •
lellv
the postal rales sre mile
as, for instsnec. a parcel of five pounds can ;• >i
atad to any post office within the province ro  .   j
whereas the minimum axpraai rate to w*™" «
produce auch aa Ontario thc OOfl oi *entun*
(Continued on page '■■
GOODWILL TOWARDS MEN.
bristmaa, being the season of the year devoted to
■ih expression of goodwill towards our fellow men, it
a expedient that even those who, throughout thc year
nave been our bitterest competitors be tendered this
expression oi cameraderie which, through the ages, has
,H"» uppermost in tin- minds of men at this, the annual
commemoration of the most revered episode in the
world 8 history.
Differences which have occurred during the past
vear between individuals, families and communities
must be cemented, otherwise the Holy Day passes for
I hem without significance.
It has been said that true sportsmanship among business interests is on the wane. An everlasting attempt
to "get ahead of" the other fellow, with the almighty
dollar as the goal, may not be altogether conduce to
a full measure of forbearance twixt contending parties,
but it must be borne iu mind that ever since the birth
which we annually commemorate, similar competitive
conditions have prevailed, and the world still looks
npmi this celebration as the most important in thc calendar.
Tht refine it is reasonable to attribute n great measure of the progress of civilization, and thc goodwill
existing upon the earth today to tho undiminished influence this event carries with it from year to year.
Christmas is a period distinctly devoted to the hap-
uincss of children, for the reason that they may be
schooled to the significance of the holiday. Thc
giving of gifts to the little folks encourages that spirit
of goodwill which in the years to follow becomes establish d firmly in the minds of future generations.
When this paramount ideal is fostered at Christmas time, a sure foundation is laid iu thc small mind,
which, as the years pass, results in an overwhelming
desire to encourage peace on earth and goodwill to-
*>i aids men. 1    ■
w
PROSPERITY'S MAGNETISM.
In the November issue of this publication, somewhat
extensive mention was made of the sale of one of Canada's largest chocolate manufacturing plants to thc old-
established English firm of Rowntree & Company, of
York, England. At this plant products of the company, commensurate with the growing demand, will
be distributed to the Canadian trade.
Now comes the notification that yet another well*
known English lirm. Messrs. Crosse & Blackwell Limited, have decided to build a factory on thc shores of
hake Ontario, which will cost a million dollars and
dye employment to some 1,500 persons.
In recent months, conditions beyond the control
of English manufacturers doing extensive business
u ith this country, have prevented shipments from overseas reaching consignees on thc appointed date, and it
is in nart to successfully overcome such conditions that
the expediency of erecting Canadian branch factories,
has been recognized.
But also, were any indication of Canada s pros-
Mrous trade conditions locking, it were surely evid-
;„,0(| j,, the faith of these men of vision, who,tfrim£
,- „. m.,nv vears with this country, have scanJg W
im,„so opportunity for expansion of sales-fin tW eah*
""in a young country such as this, manufacturers,
\;
\.-*A 6
THE    R E T A [LEB
niUTISH OOLUMHU-ALUEnTA-YUKON
December
who, through.lean and prosperous years have been
building up their businesses, may perhaps be pardoned for looking with some measure of disfavor upon
the intrusion of these highly capitalized concerns, into
their fields of endeavor. Hut. even if nt first sight
competition with century-old established linns appears
to be an une<|iial st niggle, the realisation that such
competition is likely to have no other effect that to
maintain thc quality ni Canadian-made products on
the high b-vel necessitated by such competition, will
prove a benefit to manufacturera and the country iu
none nil. /
Wholesaler's Attitude Toward Specialty
Items and Their Sale
Offends -Jobbers Whe Feature Private Brands to Prottct
Chain Stores Whieh S«ll Spoclaltiti
A sharp retort has been received to the address of Frank
D. Bristle)-, president of the American Grocery Specialty
Manufacturers' Association, and which appeared In the November issue of Ihe "Retailer," by a sell-known wholesale
grocer, who contends that the Independent -grocers ol thin
country made possible the sale of Nationally known and
advertised products, but since the chain and department
stores make a football of them, leaving no proOt in their
sale, the retailers are merely acting as slot machines when
they encourage their sale.
He maintains that private brands are packed by responsible manufacturers, that they contain quality equal lo spec
ialty brands, and in addition can be owned cheaper hy the
retailer and sold at a more reasonable figure to the consumer.
With practically SO per cent, of the distribution in the
hands of the independent grocers, ho asserts, "it Is no credit
to manufacturer or jobber to pass over the plums to the big
buyers, and hand the pits to the submerged nine tenths."
Entitled to Know Both Sides.
'Your columns recently contained an article on jobbers
private brands, but therein only one side of the picture was
preaented.
"I herewith submit the private label jobbers' side of tho
controversy, which you are al liberty to use or reject as you
deem best, but the Independent retail grocer Is entitled to
know both sides of a much discussed question."
"In the majority of cases jobbers private brands are put
up by experienced reputable and successful manufacturers-
manufacturers who have equally as high Meals, and take the
same pride in doing (heir alloled side as well as any other
manufacturer.
"Now I submit the question to an Impartial mind Is there
any reason why an experienced canner .enjoying a low operating cost and packing good merchandise should Injure that
merchandise by putting a jobber's label un the can? Hy
what sleight-of-hand Is the quality of that merchandise altered by (he acquisition of a jobber's trademark**) label? Hy
what law Is the price of that merchandise raised above other
merchandise of equal merit?
Jobbers Are Not Foolish.
"I wonder If Mr. Brlstley thinks that a jobber who haa
been In the food business for years Is so foolish ss to psck
merchandise under his own label and expert to charge
(taller for It. In the first place, no jobber with an ounce
loe would put hia name on Inferior merchandise. And
a jobber with ordinary intelligence knows that If he should
put scrois shoddy merchandise at a higher price the reaction
from the retailer snd consumer would soon settle the question.
"It may be, of course, that here and there a jobber com*
Indtptndtnt   Retailers   Against   Ruinous   Competition   by
at Cut Prices to  Attract Business.
mils privets brand sulfide b> permitting the trademarked
label to ko on shoddy merchant!;ifl This error »• a human
error to whlrh a jobber's label ma> b** more susrepllble than
a nfanufarturcr's label The offender, however, inflicts his
own penalty. in other word*, lo* hang* himself
"The retailor and jobber should be one entlt) Tl** jobber
Is In close pergonal contact with hi* retailor, helps finance*
him, helps work out hi* problem* nnd ts vitally Interested
In his success Hln lun-FM l$ our snd our I* his The man
Ufacturer's contact Is purely o *»»!«-# contact because he col
lects from th»* jobber Furthermore m MHBS UnSOS, it l* a
sales contact whlrh Is Injurious to the retail merchant
Jobber'a Contact Far Reaching
Now If the msnufsrturer • Contact Is admittedly a sales
Mintart. and the jobber's rontsrt Is one of ******* reoperation
In a financial, moral as well o* * sale* •*>. whlrh contact
In more healthy for the InuVi* ittlrnt merchant* Quite true
some of the manufacturers reach over the head of the jobber*)
and sell some of the larger retailers eVrect those (turn mitt*
have the capital to ntore and purchase in jobbing quantities
"We. as jobber*, are Interested In the *mall and medium
slxed retailer who COBStitStSS, I would gueas. SO per rent of
the dlstrlbut on among the independents It is no rredit to
manufacturer or jobber either, to pass over the plums to the
big buyers and hand the pits to the submerged nine tenth*
The big buyer class embrace* the rut price department store*,
lhe corporation rhalns. the drug stores, the lOr and 16c
stores.
"All of these and more may be brought In a group who
are featuring well known brands of groceries principal!* for
advertising purpose*
Use Manufacturtra' Brandt at Bait.
"They are not Interested fnm a profit standpoint -the
profit comes out of their major lino of merchandise What
they want is a convenient vehicle to persuade the consuming public to come into their places of business I toes It
work? New avenues of distribution have been opened In
Ihe last few years.   No doubt Ihe volume Is tremendous.
"We can take you to department stores who are ualng
grocery commodities as advertising leaders who have standing lines on Saturday and you can't blame them—It's cheap
advertising. Hut let us ask a pertinent question.---Why are
the well known brands 'good leaders'? Mr. Kdltor, they sre
good loaders because thousands of smalt and medium slicd
retail groceries for the last twenty years and more have been
passing them out from behind the counter.
"They are good leaders because these merchants have recommended them, put their money Into them and thetr sales
effort back of them.   They have worked day and night, year
_^_ __
MB 1916
•'"Iv   R ETA ILK
BRITISH
R
OOLUMBIA-ALBBRTA-TUKON
9
ID and year out with llttlo compensation, slot riuu-hlnin** then
, ommodltlea out to the public.
Rttailtrt Art Slot Machins-*.
-They have reared famlllea. boiptd builtt eoaanitnlUts,
..aid la*»s and liave contrlbuteel their full quota ol las moral
nbre and backbone to their respective communities. These
••nod leaders' for which they have <-r«ati-d a -|«-maiul natur
,,lly would make 'sood leaders' for the department ttora ami
,i.rporatlon chains    How could St help but on.*,
"Could you advertise and sell Ford rare at half price, It
mould bo easy, wouldn't It? Their marketability in beyond
,,.*,. Mlon Ukewlae the marketability of :<«•.■! prodoetl is be
Mind question. We don't deny tt A ran of tuna flsh m.ik-n
a good leader* for the eat but thrifty boSMWtvtl an* too
tr'.lllgeot to serve It. They know the pesslty of extrava-
uance.
"Similarly tbe retail grocer Is beeomlt*.** aware of the fact
tha! he can't make a living slot ma*-htning Ofet the counter
the chain and department stor-m' gotnl tetdsrs.'   It shouldn't
1AKI Ml,     '
■an 1****'%
mint f*ar
oil* tiuf
hi> sasfs
muM v
j | l*A1 M <X0
HUT  WET11H
pt ss cub
■ man's asanas
i ma* * fViti
HUM*a um
^
A Ticklish Preposition.
be surprising therefore II jobber*' hramls eOBtiaea to filter In
aad supplant certain wetlknonn pptcWlJ brands It H »
very natural reaction
Rotailtr. Jobber Int<*r Department.
"We have said before that the retailer!
lueeesi 1* t*u*
jobber's mtorra*. and If the >*ber <*.m 't flrt 10 Ua re Ui
customer brands of merchandise that the illicit ronieetlior
ran't set-this jobber shouldn't be tt» iba wholesale pots >
business, because he has no ai| ot b-ms Ct OS) eeastrtteOfi
service lo hit retail distributors
"It Is a travesty on justice thst lha tndepesdent raw
merchania are Invited lo continue to ps) laiai  PW       j
Pty salaries, buy a home, give their children a <^™™,
education on the profits from the sale of this pw
rlaa. of merchandla^the kind that es*eieUea chain ,.
department ttoret are using as advertising hai
"Hut this Is not all.  The jobber hai wtendtd th re™
credit   He want* his relall customers to sell fOOtIS si a^ ^
Now the retailer ha* three choices    It he cull n« p       ^
sacrlflcea hit prolil.   If he maintain* Mi prieei aaa
volume he alto lotet his profit
Thirdly If l"1 !'«' In S *!?
n i rciionsble
teoted lias of jobbers' labels whieh assure hU ^
profit ho ean swlns his volume of sates Into
Sunland wishes you for 1927 an even greater success than this year—and hopes to make raisins
contribute to It
)
Give yourself some
new steady customers
for Christmas
You've seen how Christmas shoppers
flock to the stores that glow with
holiday atmosphere. Thia year, maka
your store Christmas food headquarters for blocks around.
You'll see new faces in the place if
you drees it real Chriatmaa-like. Fill
the window, load the countera with
the Yuletide fooda that everyone
lovee and needs!
At the head of your liat A Sun-
Maid raisins-for the fruit cakes,
plum puddings, cookies, raisin and
mince plea. Displayed, Sun-Maid
raisins lend a holiday touch that not
only makea extra aalea, but attracts
new Christmas shoppers!
Sun-Maid Puffed, aeeded reJaine
that aren't sticky; Sun-Mald Nectars, seedless raisins with the flavor
and fragrance of the fresh grape-
they will bring theae cuatomera back
for more, help you to win theae new-
comers as steady cuatomera!
Sun-Maid Yroducts
Distribute by
ul41111 SAlll coora*ATiva Association
SUKLANO   \ffijgfasi thO WOrld
chandise. 10
THE    RETAILER
-BRITISH OOLUMDIA-AI.BBRTA-YUKON
December
Chaint Profit on Own Brandt.
"If he does this he Is doing exactly the same as the corporation chains are doing—namely, getting their sales Into
their own profit brands and using the well known brands
ns advertising leaders. The corporation chains are smart
enough to know that If their stores can get HO per cent.
of their sales Into their own profit brands they don't toed to
worry about tbe other 20 per cent, of the specialty brands
••old at close to cost.
'And the manufacturers and jobbers of this country should
realise that It Is only a matter of time when lhe welt known
brands will be the brands that the retail distributors put
across. The retail distributor should bear In mind thst ho
cannot continue to eke out an existence In the sale of mer
chandise that It under tola by Illicit competition for advertising purposes.
Houtt Brands Protect Retailor.
"In other words, the retailer knows that he can enjoy the
fruits or his own efforts In establishing these private brands
In facl, the protected private brand Is doing more to promote tho profit of the independent retailer than any other
agency.
"The private brand jobber Is also doing considerable lo
promote the interests and well being of hundreds of Independent manufacturers. Theae manufacturers, some of the
best known In their craft, are working hand In hand with
the private label jobber In an effort to give the jobber sn
honest value at a reasonable price. Their co-operation Is
wholehearted and constructive. It Is this kind of manufac
turer-jobber cooperation that will improve and fortify the
precarious poa Hon of the retail grocer today.
"Summarising a few points we would like to stress again
the following facts:
Summarlitt Hit Polntt.
"1.   Thai so-called private brands are packed by reput
able manufacturers snd Ihe jobber is given a label allowance
on his invoice, and-that a value correspond ng to the socallcd
nationally   known  brand   can   be  owned  cheaper  and   sold
cheaper.
"2 That private brands are positively the only guarantee
tlie jubh-r tan give his retail trade of proper protection.
"JI. That protected private brands give tbe Independent
retailer a chance to capitalise the profitable point a of the
ctissessful chain atores.
"1. Cheap goods will hang themselves without referene
lo the label, and a jobber Is going to he very particular what
kind of merchandise he puts bark of his name
"5. The chain and department stores' good leaders vet*
m-ide Rood leaders by the Independent retail grocer"
FLEISCHMANN COMPANY  WINS JUOOMINT  FOB
ttCe.430.
A judgment for I20S.I00 has l;e«n rendered In favor of
the Fleischmann Compan) as a r suit ot a auit Instituted by
that company In the tnitod States IHstrict Court at Cleveland against the Beyer Company a Cleveland concern, lor In
frlngemenl ot patents covering the proms* of using yeaat
focie!. known aa Arkady. In the manufacture of broad.
The Cnited States District Court held that the patents
had been in ringed and the suit wns taken em appeal by the
Bayer Company to the Clr-ult Court of Appeals This court
e-e»nftrated the decision of the lower court.
Kfe-utlves of the Klelarhmann Company state thai this
suit la Ihe flrsl of series of « ml lar anions that they lelemi
lo Institute and vigorously prosecute agaiuat manufacturers
of yeast food Infringing the so-railed Arkadt-/ patents
Ht Cbri8tma8»time, 1920
Merchants Are Building Fast Turnover With
AYLMER
BRAND CANNED
Fruits and Vegetables
They are putting their 'Heart' in the aale of thia well-known brand, becauae it
paya dividends both waya, being Canadian made with Canadian Fruita and
Vegetablee-THE BEST EVER.
DOMINION CANNERS B.C. LIMITED
VANCOUVER IMS
SSL "IAILM
man coLUK$A^AU*mTA^*TUfo
na iti-mi
YUKON
ii
OUTCRAL
Rclall frocera report an exceedingly good Christ-
mas butdtieaa. Trade haa been as good •■-, expected
with every iml lea tion that seasonable lines will i>,. w»ll
•lisp-teed of by the turn of the year. Thi larger stores
have attractive, tnd templing window displays, and
have done math to promote the general apirii of Christ*
ma*. Christmas poultry is In ing featured by most
retail grocers, srtth very g-ood results While this is
not a permanent featore of the grocery trade it can
lie developed with profitable returns thi* sesson of the
year, lha aggrumivc merehants get their orders
Istetked two or three weeks in advance, nnd need only
to boy ta ewer their actual trad.*
ligBr haa advanced ihne times in tin- last month,
Hiking the presenl basis of grsitulaled in KM) 11*
aacks 96.95, or an advance of 55e Curtailment of thc
t'ubsn erop and an esl im a led shorter production pro*
u'ramese for the Ruropean nations has been responsible
for tho priee changes. The raw markel continues very
firm, and we would not he at all surprised to st*? itill
further advance-*.
Aa art go to pre** advice* have reached this office
fiow Havana that President Machndo hatl called n
meeting af hie Cabinet to r»«c« i\. thc report of the advisory committee he had appointed t.» devise ways and
means to accomplish restrictions of the nea crop, serving; much to confirm previous report* lhal the res*ric
Hon deem k about to I* signal localise of the well
known opposition of planter* to the cutting down of
ihe erop to 4.500,000 ton*, which was understood to
have hern tha original intention of ihe president, 1? ih
though not Improbable thst he m«> somewhat i'»^«^'
the quantity permitted to W made, possibly by i5,0W
tons. Argumenta advanceel in favor of a lew rigorous
restrictive measare are smaller Kuropcsn crops than
have been expected shortages in oihi r cane producing
countries snd the heavy cane crop in Cuba this year.
over popular Japanese orange w
Wlllf hai higher then last
fhe pro*
of two boxes
ia dstt have not been
lap Otiagea.  The
with ua again*   Pri«*
year, namely $1.56 per bundle    	
duce dealera report that leer-p.*- ...... • ■■- ,
nearly large enough to take care - ■ tl" ■"">
from I*, a end points essl lo Ontario
Oeanad Fn* and Vegetables M-^^Tf
commoditlca remaina steady with no 1ri. *™™*nnmim
note.   New pack eastern
corn 1
lu.
sOlll
ewhal tower lhan
January 1st wil be $1.55 dosen. >,,,.. --.-•• - i(1
rformer qnatatlotut.   A eN™'1? *>     u^\Uo ,„.inff
peara, and pluma arriving in annunr;
affered al very attractive priees
Dried fwHa-Ncw crop llullnwi date* w^*
! «
liie III
available at 10e per lb.   Mm™
let will be about one rent lower  hai in       (
Csllfontls prunes in some sires an  ■ n    .
~ "    are haldlng firm at preaeni P"<
figures
, n iicr
"he
few Australian raisins, both Valencias and Sultanaa
that reached this market this year met with very pop-
ular approval, and it is to be hoped next fall a mueh
greater volume of these lines will be available for importation into Conada. White figs from California are
holding steady, but the blaek variety are very weak.
Smyrna cooking figs in mats are moving well They
atv more desirable than the California products, ow-
tag to their distinctive flavor, and are no higher in
price.
Muffeta, the new whole wheat cereal, has been introduced to B. C Tho sale of this product in the U. S.
has been phenomenal, being introduced to the American public just a year ago. A big Csnsdian plant at
St. Catherines Ontario, will be ready for operation
alsmt January 15th, which will take care of the Canadian and British market. Muffcts sre packed in easee
of 24 pkgs. at $3.40 per case, and arc at a maintained
priee of ISc to the consumer in Vancouver, Victoria,
and New Westminster, and 20c per package at other
outside centres.
Tomato Soup.—Campbeil's tomato soup will advance oil January 1st to $1.60 per dozen.   .
Marmalade.—Xew seasons marmalade will be available early in the new year. Advanced sugar pricea
make this line attractive bnying at present prices.
Cereals.— White beans at present pricea are very
•jood buying. Kotenashi and Lillooeta can be bought
for 4»4e. per lb., whieh is less than jobbers replacement eost today Higher priees -may be expected.
Barley, sago, and tapioca are somewhat higher.
Rogers Syrup.—In conjunction with advances in
mi car. the local refinery has advanced Rogers syrup all
sizes 25c per case.
Rice.—There are rumours of comparatively large
sales of this commodity to foreign niarketa, which, if
proved correct, will considerably strengthen prices.
Fair buying of spot parcels hss been the rule recently,
and the undertone of prices is generally eoneidered
Hrm. Seasonal sales arc reaching a good volume.
Mexican Oranges.—The importation of this fruit
into Canada, which formerly sssumed Urge proper-
ti„ns is again in evidence. Shipments are being made
from" the Montomorelos district of the state afTamau-
Hnaa in refrigerated steamera entering Tampico.
Three will be shipped to New York, and thence in bond
to Mont real arriving December, January and February.
,! J, antieinated that at leaat 3,000 boxes weekly will
be available from Mexico
Id
11   *
in
tsttto   Nuts furnish peruana the moat active fie
?    »"' 1 .iio aroccry line. Wslnuts are selling free,
»tt*^w,,H
(Continued on page 1-i)
11
•«
1 "■- '' ' "
foaamtji
THE   RETAILER
BMTIMt COtUIIBIA-AUIIWITA-TimOM
D*eenb«r
(Sroiinga
tt   n
RETAILER FRIENDS
we extend hearty
YULEHDE
GREETINGS
nnd our beat wiahee far the coming
year.
Srik, tails* I Wiijat Ut
MANuaACTumita and wholuali
mpih dialim
flOfOBU
SSBSSS
YOU CAN TELEPHONE
TO KAMLOOPS
NOW!
BSITISN COLUMBIA
*sm
"i mwm m m w w roans-
Oae grocer, who bad a bed caae of holla, ana ad*
viaad to take yeaat Re ssys: "laalde of a montk I
waa ansetetsly clear of bolls and am bow ta tbe teat
af health. I tssthfUUy newatmand roar yeaat fee
aolla ami ran down eondition. and take every oapor-
tsnlty la doing so to my cuatomera snd Mends*."
Recommend Yeaat for Health to YOUR eastern-
era. Healthy customers sre bigger buyers af every-
lata* sad tbsy some 4o your atore regularly far
their supply of yeaat.
REBCHMANN* YEAST
TW Rdiclwuui Conpaqr
SERVICE
*«^iatasf*aT«cafwa#ys«.*
CLARK'S
XETOfUP
More sad more people tn Canada aad abroad are IMag
von over to Clark'a Tomato Ketchup by tbe detteete fruity
flavor of the "Northern" teasaioes which are prodscid fro -i
seeds sod plsnts from tbs Clark Nurseries st it feast P.Q.
aad Harrow, Oat
It la one of tbe many Clerk Freeared foods which are
maklag boose keeplag eeattr and are asewtag kuger soles
sad more profits for dealers.
W. CLARK LisuteJ, Msstrcsl
IstaWisamsota at  Montreal.  P. 0. R
Marrow, Out
Momt  "• %)* sue
2XdmM
EAGLE BRAND
Since 1657 the So* infant food.  Soles
greater than all others combined.
2f*2foieJeVev-&^M^
Offloeai Vansewer.
*•*-.:,
**mdmm**v**,<l~t~M<..i..
■»».;».» «H..liii>.»ttt
mHmS\'.:, ':.,;.»aifc'..-^V «*;i'l»». ■■ '■ ■■■U.iialu
Hl*altlHMMIiaMB
**** IMS
THR   RE
BRITISH COLtJKBlA-
urgant demand for Chriatmaa require ni, , ; ,,
nuta. NetwiOartaiidliig that thia yearn almond nsck
waa ehneet twice that of the year before, buying has
been going on at such a rapid rate thai ihe (it ,„."
ket la new reported to be ncsrly elestied up The 2r
ket lor almonda, Alberta and Hrarii nuts continues
quitei aethre. Meat foreign nuta, eapecUlly almonda
rule lm aa tea erope abroad were smaller than was the
caae a year ago.
UILEB
AI.HKRTA-YUKON
13
ft BLiOKWBIrl TO ERECT MILLION
DOLLAR PLAIT » TORONTO-
On -tbe abnreoof Lake Ontario, three acres of land
have bean purchased by the old-established English
Arm of Ci-cane 4 BlackweU limited, where a million
dollar plant, capable of employing 1,500 people will be
erected.
Tba produeta of Crease k IwVU.-!!. known all
over tbe worM, bave enjoyed a law *»l. in this eoun*
try, and are carried by leading wholesale grocers.
It la now five yearn aince the ft-mmti >n of Creese
4 BlaebweU. Canada, Umited, when head offices wore
ciCibttabed Ul Toronto, with brnixh."* in Montreal,
Winnipeg and Vancouver, under the direction *>( How*
aid Manatee.
Tba trade ef thin firm boa made §uch rapid ex pan-
afon an tbe North American continent, that plains will
ba erected bath -la Canada end the Cnited States, ae*
cording ta • recent announcement hy .1. C Uoff, managing director and chairman of the l«»nrd of tlo- par
eat concern in England, who recently effected pun-has.
ea af property far this purpose
Mr. Ooff, befare nailing for Kngland, stated lhat a
fall staff ef expert ebefa would be wnt out from Bng-
land. and that tba quality of all r k It. pnalucta
would ba ef tba aame standard of \« rf.vti.-n that has
been iaaiatafned for the past two hundred years. It
ia alee nadcfutood that many new linen, thai can bo
made to Canada better than eleewhe-re. will be produced
by Game 4 Bleekwells new plant for shipment to
world parte.
Tbe fine baa already fsetorn** in llemtondsey nnd
MttveHewa In London. Kngland. niul other plants in
Dundee, Cork. Dnblln. Peri* and Helgium.
OH OAHADIAH FLOUR
Canidlaa milling interest* bti\<- heen ureing thnt
efforta ahould be mode hy th.- Ih.minion llovcrnuicnt
ta obtain Mare favorable entry f,.r Csnadlan four to
countries which at preocnt Import Canau.an wheat nui
bnpeat eertoua dmerimlnatory import duties on flour
In hia addraaa ta tha abaivholders of the Ogilvie I »
Villa Oompony, Limited. Mr. NV A. *«<V ;K
dent aid Snaring director, said that alihot It e
flour mimne industry waa one of th. greatest m •>"
ada, uShaaat deserving of anpnort it hsd not -. iyc-i
U» eoaatdcretlon due to It by the ^MU'^i ,ur
Ml*or yeaia peat/' he said, "it ' - ■»»'l'*«,,,
Wheal la be shipped to, and milled in, country
Ing mOa or no duty on whest and a very.... i
dnty on flour.   A firm atand on the p«rt o •
amment would force auch countries as jetm
criminate againat our flour to place both
flew on amore equable basis, for thr
abt aa to tbe iMeeaalty of their r^nnn
tavWcatcm wheat In the milling ■'"»•■■
making."
phan
\   ills*
i nnd
h,< no
tlroutx
*:*'. mi-
Speed Your Sales
of Palmolive Shaving
Cream by displaying
it prominently.
Here's the Reason Why.
Palmolivs 8haviag Craant displays Uu up with
Palmolivs Shaving Cream advertiaing in magaiinaa
and newspapers. And It's a known fact that affae*
tlvt tie-ups produce tales.
Every Palmeliv.- Shaving Cream ad. carrlta s
coupon offering a generous trial supply gratia.
Thousand! accept this offer daily. Ths majority of
them become steady users—some of them trsds In
YOUR store.
For men haven't the shopping instinct woman
have. They don't like to ssk questions ss to
whether you keep an article in stock or net Thsy
buy where they KNOW It's in stock—where they
can pick it off the counter and haad to the elsrk ts
b-< wrapped up.
Let the mknow then, that you handle Palmolivs
Shaving Cream by displaying It where It osn bs
readily seen.
DISPLAY MATERIAL IS FREE
Palmolive Shaving Cream displays not only st*
tract customers, but also brighten up your stars or
windows.  Thus they are of additional ben m to you.
Write for display material today. Supplied free.
Prove to yourself that sales increase with thslr use.
I
m pHWjn mm « emus
MONTREAL
LIMITED
TORONTO
WINNIPEG
S4S0C It
THB   BETAILEB
0RIT18H OOLUataiA-ALannTA-TUKOM
December
8ALM0H FAOHHO INDUSTRY BfJOTTJf0 OOOD
DHIAMD AUD PBI0I8.
*'The year 1926 will rank aa one of the best years
in the history of the British Columbia aalmon packing
induetry," declarea Robert C. Oosse, president and mau.
aging director, of the Oosse Packing Company v Ltd
"There haa been a good pack," atates air. Oosse.
"The demand from both export and domestic markets
haa bean gratifying, and nrieea have been aatiafaetory-
4'Up to the present time tho Oosse Packing Company,
Limited, haa packed over 400.000 eaaea of aalmon, aa
against a total of 306,000 eaaee during the entire season of 1925. In apHo of the fact that the total paek of
soekeye on the Britiah Columbia coast is smaller than
that of last year, the Goese Packing Company! peek of
soekeye thia year ia practically the same aa ita soekeye
of last year, whieh exceeded 50,000 caaea.
"The Goose Packing Company ia the largest producer of flab-eft and fish-meal in Britiah Columbia. Thia
branch of the buaineaa haa also been very aatiafaetory
thia season. There ia always a ready market for these
products."
Ifr. Goose waa questioned concerning the outlook
for tha Britiah Columbia fiah-pneking industry generally in future ycara.
"The outlook ia deeideriy favorable/1 he replied.
"The market for canned aalmon haa completely recovered from the conditions which resulted from the war*
The demand for Britiah Columbia aalmon pradocta
throughout the world ia steadily expanding. Tha
count rice of South America have developed a liking for
British Columbia aalmon products, and a steadily in*
creasing demand from that quarter le one af the outstanding featurea of the present market.
"The salmon-parking industry haa an assured supply of raw material and an ensured market for ite finished products. Hence the industry rcaolvea itself large*
ly into s problem of operation—of economical and efficient methods of catching and canning thc flab aver a
great and widely divetwffled length of eeeaUlae,"
DnLATMBfl OlUB OIOAJTHID V
VAJfOOUVML
At a banquet attended by over 40 dleplaymen from
the various retail establishments, independent service*
and associated cmfta of thia eity, tbe Vancouver Display men's Club was organised recently.
This club pledges Ha efforts to extend tbe great
benefits to he derived from associated efforts ta members of tbe profession In general, and alt of theae who
may be intcreeted in mercantile display*
Offlcera were elected aa folowa: President, P. O*
K. Healea, Hudson's Bay Co.,; vlce-prealdent, Walter
Rimes, Henry Blrka ft Sons; secretary, I*e Oaborne,
Ingledew Shoe Co.; treasurer, Harold Settock, Hudson's Bay Co.
PAPER
BAGS
■■lent Kcsft
AH 100% B. 0. PRODUCT.
Maw that lhe HJghcct Grades of Paper Beware bain amde in a^
be careful ta always specify Um B. 0. abends.
"inmi" Manilla Quality.
"*AOro"-~Ught Kraft Quality.
"OOAfT'-Heavy Kraft Quality.
—White Sulphite Quality.
Manufactured in Britiah Columbia by
Bartram Paper Products Co. Ltd.
VAIOOUVIR, B, 0.
•ale Agenta for British Columbia:
Tie Norfolk Paper Co. Ltd.
VAiooura* B. 0.
afp"
\'l 1926
T H E   E E T AIT- F n
BWTHH »LtJitm4£^t.Tt5oN
15
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
■■■■»
TUe fsUswiae acs ectsos cooted for
>WtOlf^*tii*F*mmtomwm**W.*«
tu
IU
tl a* saacr aaaa te
% ft aajp aagu, ct
-van  	
I m saaa ssrsw seven <i e«e ia
ta caaa)-. tu
ta case) - tit
(teat
III
SSS m, mi tenete
kill*, oouotae a a. ltd
Nwcer, el ll ea
aaUag fevOar. ia sua.
•aaaisg ^soCsr* e oe* sat
toksos mtMmUsm —- -**•**.
*•■■■■» mwarwm** wsasmmm ^^»
I so Oat Oss.
Item, i
Qarnrrewcy. e so earn aaa
-taeam es •attar* l*
sf Tartar, tea tlna
ct Tartar Ita
mia.1
let See.
tea. ase
■gees* a oa ass .
BklnaM. IS -aa. Saa.
^^^v^m^^^^^ma    saw   ^^^^   *^^^^^*
2   ? Spa al?
l^T * I?-'"1 ***** f,rmi<   Pr,cii "uot" «• -•H^r.ly
subject to market fluctuations.
v**iry Spice, j tin**-*, dot „ _,. ll(j
I'o-oJiry Urcaatng, Sag-, Savory. Thyme,
Turn-Tic.  tlna.  dot    l.H
Ivhllnc 8plc*. dot. Ko. I ...    .14
Ma-r-Jaran, Mint, ftrsley  l.ll
White l'epp«r, tlna, dot. „ u   1.10
Gutar oil. | oa. dot.  . i,||
<*M!«»r Oil, I os. dot. . „ . 2,10
i:poom Roita, Ha dot     „ „.  .10
Frwlt Colon, t os dot  , 1.71
Utogt (hocoltta. Hone. Pink, Lemon
Vanila, Whltt. Almond, Orange) dot.   1.11
Jolly Powder, doa ****** »   .10
I-amrtBiri Powdtr, dot. ,.. ^—. iu
Mutiard.  la doa,  . «OS
Mutrfard,   Ho,   dot.    ****** — 4.S0
Muotard,  *%$ dot. m •«. ,.~- 1.40
Mitourd.  % dot.   ., ., „.«-.- I.tt
Sulphur.   %*.  dOS.  *mtm«*m **********   M
Ti*. c,rt#o Ubol, *■*-»». l*' tb, ■■- M
T**, llr«Mi (Abel, la per Ib        .    ....    63
i Its. Una ~     67
Xo Ib   package* - — 60
I lb. package*   U
To*, do U»e, Afternoon, 1 lb.  ***   .71
Tea da Lui*. Afternoon V»o por lb M
To* da Luie>, 14* P*r ** •-- '+-.    M
To* and Coffee Amu. Ml lb. lot-s. Ic p«r lb.
T*a and Coffee Atwl  WO Ib. toi*. 3c per Ib.
•ra°pss • te.
Vinegar,  doa.      *■••
p, BURNS S CO. LTO.
Shamrock Product*.
Ayrnhir*-. c*»iM nhoulder*. per tb....
23
.'&
4S
43
.11
nst
16%
Uwn, Shamnn-k. 6-1 p«r Ib.
|u,kr.l Ham, with drewlas. P*r lb. •••
lhamiook Handy IM!*, 1 »> carton* ....
Cheoeo. CSoadlan. large, per Ib	
t'htts*. Canadian, twin, por Ib 	
'Vmpousd. Carnatloa. No. 5. II <*•**»
Compound. Carnation. No. 3. 10 ca*«*   *lt
i\*.k««t ll»i". Shamrock. p«r tb. *****   J<
nonunion Ham*. IM« H*. ******	
POBtlBiea I«*w. 1° »N   V*r tb.  |<
m,miniun lucaa. IMS »*. |»r lb   -...   •«
Demiales saoahfeis. nmed «««> ™'lt%d ■*
Prlpplng. beef. 1-lb brt*S
Ham*. ISStWWa' iH'r "'-      ..
lUrn*. turned ami rwetl 9*** ,b-
Head Cbeoao, 1-lb tlna each	
i\**ed -rosea** t'fr ,ln*5 ,u*
Urd.   N«»   *.   ti  » «*
Uir.1. N<»   »• w «° ""^ 	
uni. eartaaa, »"• i1-
Lard, No. i. osctoas. so ib«	
SSSial,  ki... «lb. not.  per lb  .lltt
Mw«t  Uwf. P<r tb.    -   .40
ftn vm I ,,rv ^inir. p« **■ *48
Pork. r.»n*t W »»" " lb n
5aa*»55ii?*.
«*. Pf lb * 1K* _.     ,a
•Smoked Cod, ti* Por lb-  	
Hobxled Ui«l f#£ J*^ wind
4tflrcl*^l chicken, pn  ».
THE  ROVAL CROWN  SOAPS LTD.
Pre Ll.t-F.O.B. Vancouver,
lv^;rNe* Westminster.
Torm. N.tt M Day*.
ntkss n i ft p"»*£: ' J
lib. pkta. boa MB
bos of « — IS?
„.,m..~~~~*~*    *J-!Z
.1!
.36
.39
U
3.00
,1»U
.19***-
.18
.18
.11
.34
31
Vancouvi
11 lib. Pkta. box 140
ln roKsboV"of '»~rrnr^n. iio
Klondyke (wrapped) boa of II «
Klondyke (unwrapped! bos of II
Kloro Oiycerlne, bos of 144 —.
Linen (unwrapped) boi of 100
i i...u » •-  »■•»--
"Ape*
"A|'«*
A
.So*|
• s,»»p l-'l*k«a.
Crown c'attiirwi.
Uquld Ammonia. I dos. qts. bos of 14
Liquid Blue, 3 dos. qta. boi of 14
Mechanlc'a Pine Tar, box of ISO
Mechanic's Pine Tar,, box of 10
Ollva Caatlle. cake*, boi of 300 -
Primrose (wrapped) box of U -
Royal Crown Lyo, box of 41 «
Pendray'a Powdered Ammonia, box 14
Special price* oa I, 11, M and 100
botes.
*   *       ,    .*.'■■
Pendray's WaUr Olaas, Bos Preserver*-
t  aafn,     70 'ffltn    Pt>r* CSSe)    n*ma*a$**a***aaaam>**m-QOOOSS   WoW^f
Royal Uundry riakee. N%, la bbl*      10
(8oeclal price oa contract)
Royal Crown Soap la 144e .*.„.******„* %M
Royal Crown Powder, box 14 only.-—«.-.I.IO
Royal Crown Powder 1-lb. box of M — 4.0B
Royal Crown Cleanser. 41 alfter tins ** I.H
Royal Crown Powdered Ammonia. 1 lb.  LSI
White Wonder, box of 1*00  1.11
New White Swan Soap. 100 am
White Swan Kaptha. box of 100 —— 4.IS
White Swan Waahlnf Powder, box of 14 LM
Q. P. 0 J. OALT LIMITBD
BLUB RIBBON 00000
Coffee (Vacuum Pack)—
1 Ib. Tlna, per lb.
Tea (Bed Label)—
1 Ib. packages per lb. ..„..
H lb. packflge*. per Ib.
SH lb. package*, per Ib. ...
5 lb. package*, per lb	
Tea (Japan)—
1 Ib. package*, per lb ...
H Ib. package*, per lb. **
1% lb. package*, per lb.
Baking Powder—
13 ot. Tint, 4 dos. caae ........
IS oa. Tlna. 4   "
3 Ib. Tlna. 1 dos. case
5 lb. Tina, 1 doa case
..**.*.*****9*m**a*a*m***am*aamammmaao
.11
,.*m.**mm.+**i
M
«. .ei
m    .11
taamo      0%tQ
tmaam      •Wa
—   .11
..wM.OO
...11,11
7.41
.ltes
THB CANADA STARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Starch**—
Canada Uundry Starch, eS-lb. box
White does. 1-lb. pkfa. ,,..,.■ ,.,.
Acme Qloaa, 1-lb. pkfa. ■ .■- *..,**
No. 1 White, 100-lb. k*f*
.11
.1
3
KdwardaburB e'lWer Oloee^ l-IO. pkgs.
40-lb. ********* .Uti
KdwardSburs SB?er Oloea t/S*
faacy tin caalatera. 6i"SSiir
Bdwardsburt Sll*rer Oloea, ISO-lb.
l^oldTurch"'(boxe* of U-pkfs
Cellu
per caae)
,••»••••*••••••••••*••••••
.ten
its
Culinary Starehoo—
Benaon'a Celebrated Prepared Cora
40-lb. boxe» per lb.
«W-ia.    w.n.    %**.    .*. , .11
Canada Cora Btarch 10-lb. boxea, per
ID,       -*.*.~*m,**ma**aa*ama*aa%*it**a*oa*wa**am»»to*o*naaat***m*aaa****m*' W\%
I IP,        Hnn»im'imwiin*nnMiimif|i i
Challenge Cora Starch 40-lb boxes
Caeco ftUto*&^
Maiola Oil—
Maaola Oil, Is
Ss
,,    4i
Corn Syrup*—
Crown la, 14 to
le, 11 to eaee
iv* o \o ca** **************
-30*. I to caae ***** ****.
Lily Is. 14 to caae .,*.... ,*....**...*..*»
Is. II to case
10a. I to else
Karo, la 14 to case
le, 11 to ease
10s, I to case
•a
.is
T.M
jia
jam
MMIM*,«HNM
••••.•o« »•*•••••**•••'
,«-M.**«-M**1pV*^V
lllll-Ml Wl    90 1*
a as
mte**0**** *y**wtuJ
* I40S
— i.m
,»a*a*o*ooif* ii 11 issmsaias
a ■■a*
16
THE   RETAILER
nnmaR oolumwa-alb.ota-tu.xoii
December
■
/V   .',. x
Peter RabbitPcanirt Better
Coot* No Moro But S*U* Ftsttor
TN* TOY MIL MUOHTO TM* CHILMIN
OMOLAV A CM*.   IT WILL MLL ITOILF.
Kdy Ceifecbsfl (a Ltd.
HOjfl
I   1taa Maloleml
VANCOUVM, Il C.
1VE again express our thanks to all G>ntinental customers for
™ their goodwill, without which our continued success would
not be possible*
We hope they will abundantly share in the prosperity which
Canada will enjoy in 1927.
The ContinentalPaper Products
mMmmamama llMITID
OTTAWA OAVADA
Ba)*a^ft^^^n^^niSt*aae)SsBamm e
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
VANCOUVM, VICTORIA, IOMONTON, CALOAHY,
i-emm-i.^A.  '...-. - 7  , 1996
TEE   RETAILER
YUKON
17
_ _   Of  Oram!   Vm'*,  announce.
nmalBsmailen eHh Miller, oandorr ramiwi*.. i,ni, umi.-r ih*
otlfu of tteelf A Miller (not Incor)
K at. DeSSS, eneeial. Nrw WoeUnln*-     I,a« moved to a
txw leoatlea nt TCI Colombia at wt
L Wrtnaiefr ffoesry el Ntw WratmiuM-r  u repoiu-d
ooiaioj. H.~
The aealaeea ef Um Nanaimo Meat a Produce Company,
NanaSSSb. la roBOTtod closed, wllh wort* a ■*<•«« in poa*t-**lon.
SMSvrsal Neeesam, I
House.
J. T.
ef NaaaUwi, general store
hart pvrrhaaM tb«< bu*ii»«i ul Wll'lam
M*
aeacec-ded M H wuiiaaii glow, of
A eew aaaa'a same store aaa comm.-n< .-i bu**in«t* at Trail
ttftoar Um Mile "Mac a Mac "
rtetener ifStaus. old •fta-btlah-m} mu*t< *l in*? rumen i doal
eve of Otnaettlo nt-reet, Vaw-wim b»\* adv*rtt*<*d dis-
coattaeaoee ef Imstaass. to tak* effect i»...miM-r 3i«t.
Tea Weetem Pacalaa Corporation i.»mu«-4, Vancouver, ha*
laSoo Oftr llto aastaom Ot llfdload a Compan) of Canada,
JtaHiMssa Brotbefe, ***w**t* an owning a branch at
I tit Rlapsmr, Vanceem.
A meettaf ef etedltors of u» King Beach (IMO) Mann-
faotmiaa Campany eras fcoM No-matt* r Kito
the taeaer reBocstod si flouih Vancouver by Messrs.
J. tacklS A Co. I****. Vancoo«rr .*»» burnt out m^ntly.
 *k*$sjtf Vuu*V*w). l«**l   »|-r r-eport-Ml in 6n
snttrnl e*n«olt*es.
Bmillto 4 Qomeaar. drjsw-l" merchant* of Vancouver,
neve laBBeaaeaaai.
J. W. Itself Waaa C-amp*-.* -Limited. Vaneostsr and Vie
term, era anoafoiose to a* ci©*ii-.« ■■"' "■'•• victoria >tore
Oocenter Slat
I. MeKer* SfOdteo d**Jor Of Victoria. !»** lacorpuraied aa
Meier Pecdaeta Cu. Ltd.
Tae aaieeeee Imaaeaa of oraaam a* Montthi. at cour-
teear ean at sw*4 tiee***   I* vui* • i- !*"* operatins.
It'la reeertei taee Untold R-*i lU^T*tJTtTt\o^k
cmaaaetaaeL la eJestne©at hie bu>* «• ** •*?••■ **)yin* m- M,M *
It le aaaaisiani tent k**it * *>«««• w,,,n« oul mr
^^^^^^Ttoas al KorHn-*0*
■torn o a ****** *t •»«*». "t-7*.*•«•'"""•""
'   "    ief Caae. ret«t*oa a to «i udvamiia,
Tim Mnetca MaidfJt--"o Compan) si IHoUrtoo. sre tnov
Ief la eon srsmlin saortljr.
is u     -—- il.. |UMnan> I.Ua»i«l. furriers of vail
it m rseeeisa tarn mrw***»*        ,*u,*rus\ *ett emein
r, base emeeatlaaH bosin--^ ,"1 *'"n '
•r»i~a:c«ii >-.««»-"-' - *™ """"°	
an aaatmmm mw**mu*£*r\™£.\uV
'. Sam ***t atork «.l <»""*' '" '"'"
■MIA imm. •**-* -y^^ZvlZ
mtotm s*t ****** *t ****. t» k...ci .i'i»""
Tea
Meel Msrfc*i. Vsaoeavor commence aptt
^ TaeMdaea OWee Bneeiy c^%ove£ .j-.!i"
aaa nilpil; creditors moeiioa hew n««»mi m
le li aieveae aaa eeM eat Ms eieron-basio-
-("SBwa^^^g* SB
ea^vape4pV'w •aa
■Uett of VIsteHs. has
,oi.l hia bttieher besiBMi lo
Forthe
Customer:
Quality and Satisfaction
I
Because of their steadily main*
tained superiority Royal Baking
PowtUr and Dr. Price*s Cream
Baking Potvder have been statsd*
for over a half century* Both are
made in Canada*
For the
Dealer:
Prompt Saleand Fair Profit
A Quality Product!
RQ^IJEjJ
OSMUINB
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. MiddMan's feod Praduds
Company Limited **
Vancouver, B. C. 18
THE   RETAILER
narnen ooLUMniA-ALanaTA-TunoN
December
Chloride of Lime
New Style Weietprool Package
§Bjpn]led by AH Wkaleialan
\m BtadtttrA IVktBMBl^a\.
m^m os^monm^mm ^**^wsjBB^me^me^e
Wlnnlcee
STARK*
VANCOUVIH,
BBsaanaaaeaaaaB
It
xs^MlfllbBQ/f
cOFFE^
TW (Vd fcfebk'
ae •mw*mf  ^s^mf*m*W   W^**a*»ae^MeaMr
OAVADA
M1A1LY IAUP A
will mot oit
toubrth
QUAUTT
. 4 ai. GALT LIMITED
TIAA, OOmi AND iAKINO POWDt*
VAjfoomm, b.o.
r
To Out Friend*
the Retail Trade
eiliriatmaa
(SrpftingB
LET US CO-OPERATE FOR
SETTER BUSINESS IN 1927
•st
in *
VANCOUVM
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
NOUTM VANCOUVM
Ntw wtaTMiNaTin
as
"    la#
n  sjC
m
With Othor Good Thinge
JhClaswt
EMPRESS
Pa.fUMa.Ju>
In Chrtotmao Order*
ON ACCOUNT OF THE HIGHEST
OUAUTY RECOMMEND IT FOR
THE CHILDREN AND THEY
WILL RETURN FOR MORE
ESPIES BIG. 00. UD.
▼AMOOUVBB IM*
THE   BE
Raman COLUMBIA.
T A I L E R
-AI.FIBtlTA-TT'KriN
If
Mara-ball Caafc *Mor© I* tin* uunw of i*,.- nam 1100017 Md
.IrvBiMidN bualiM'** row-**s*11y utaj'i-wl in N. * \\\   mloatei
it 1* eaderstecd that n j Msrsastl ba* sold
in tbe Quality Meal M»tk«t. New Weotialnatei
1111 m 11 rem
|»i>u-r White hat eommsocod * nt****i bnauimt In Sea
W«*Mndn»t«r
ccMTA. ha* lw«» appointed irsste- foi ibo Vonablea
Supply r«arw|«»»i»). ><«Ui Vam <>u<ht
A  rl  Rltrltl-n im ib*» ismm pruprletoi .,1 m- f**wrs! More .•(
I'ltMior. Barsnert] operated bj »; ,\ Rdgn-umty
It i« rffHiint tli«wt W K«*i*« 1 in negotiating '>,r i*. tatt)
•of iii» general aitttf ni Dajrwafd to Stmt*) taaitli
Mritittiaid a timi, *m reported tt* have wantnenwd ,1 men'i
•ear *w>r«* at Trail
The 11 C Teal •* Awntni Costpaj ■ Ud bare anuiKa
Mtatrtt wi'h "   11 lones a foa*i Vaeeewest   fbo lailer iriyle
win ee edeiand
0 1» « »tti|i!ji«vH hdiii **>k? Iii* sraeerj byalaeti in Vaneoit
\**t
TeadtlS host* •sees *»!*«rt.*.»; ion parcl 1 • ol -assets ol
Baaatra i*tn*# f*Mpt*iy Comaes?, Lm, Vsaeoover
Wattei I •frsier A r«> Md wboleaale and i<*u*i hard
aafO, Vlrhui*. host* bOOS ««' •W • N S) W 8 CVSSOt "tu
pamr  Md
Thr heJeaee ut Hw iteel el V «wi * Frosi men's faro
taJtina**. virion*. Ua* b*« S icM to i wamlnm I Go sad basi
11 m i-eaarted ih*t ibew i« 1 ttoriagt in tbt rteible wv
j»rv ni eels a."   Wall, laal nootWi depsada aa *ye»ll**t<
r
1
fBrrni
Christinas
*t
aad a
froBytf-oiui 192?
to you
from -All of un at
Vancouver Milling
and Grain Co., Ltd.
VAHOOUVEB. B C
0
Mitonof
BOYAl BTANDABD rtOUB AND      ^
WILD BOBE PABTBY nOOR «
Howard Menzltt, Managing Director of Crosse and Black well
Limited,
wh»» will bave complete charge of tho Crosse*. & Dlackw-eJl
IiiimIikhh in Ciinnda. He linn had extenatoe business cxpet**-
I'-nri- In thi- Dominion, and la well known' to too-trade, especial!) in \V itiiTti Canada where after returning Irani Londoa*.
Kngland, in 1920, lie established an office and organization
in Winnipeg, for Crosse and Hlackwell, to thoroughly develop iheir distribution in the Went, which was very successful, and going to Toronto in 1925, took over the general matt*
Rguaeat of the business at their head office . The decision
tu erect a million dollar factory In Oiuarlo,. la due to his sue*
Wilful management and the rapidly Increasing demand far
i'. k 11: products throughout Canada. Crosse and BlackwcJl
iir» also building another large factory at Baltimore, Mars-
land, to supplj their United States trade.
ALBERTA TRADE NOTES.
Tin- Hordenave General Store, Bordenuve,  has been ad*
wrtfsed tot wis.
The grocery business or Nell Macl'arlane, Laconrbe, han
been purchased by the Jenkins Groceteria at Calgary,
H  ft, Pasta lm* sold out his confectionary at Calgary
The Viioinrn Cereal of Vancouver has opened) a branch at.
'lit: Mnelean Block, Calgary.
\V. II. McLaughlin has taken over the drug business of
K. It. Banna lyne at ciuny.
The Corotmttfla MercnntllH rompaay at Coronation hSH
boon restored to the register of companies.
Henry Koullliard has discontined his confectionery bunt-
in ss ut Kdmonton.
Vogue I/idli-s Wear at Kdmonton has been closed out.
K J. Hill ft t'ompjiny department stom at t^thbrldgo-haa
advertised cloning out sale.
Mm rv Hunter has bought the general store business ol
,\   J   Hiovlgny at  Millteent.
K  K. Franklin luu sold out Ilia gonomt at»»r-« ui Cor-onade.
n Is umlerstoott* that K. (». Wood* la aettlng our hltr gro*
i ry IiuhIihvsh nt Di umhtdler.
The grocery store of 3. A. Williams at Kdmonton has beetu
sold,
W   P. Spence Is reported to have sold out his general'
store bushiest, at Ilosedale.
Th* C. C. 1. T JS haa tteem aesetoOHt traatee of thc gee*
i nil store business of ffugh. Conn. Seba lleach.
tho Uanff Grocery at Banff Is reported to have dissolved!
The general store formerly operated aa Gordon A Gordon
at i'liipaian. la now a*jrt*d> Hsnitva iionstm,
Tltie Ratt*>ra Wnnnaanr* «t BdHwntoa Is ;»dv»«rits-ae far sate. 20
THE   BETA[LEE
BRITISH C»LTJiCBIA—Al»BIJRTA—YUKON
Doeombor
^joronto, Canada,
1926*1927.
A. NELSON,
Managing Ihr tht
mmmmmmmmmwmm*«mm
*Chc Management of
Suwntrw $c (to* tfetaiial fitmttri\
Jesire to express to J»u their hearty thanks and appreciation for the wonderful
supporl and co-operation you have given this Compan}) since its inception.
Wishing you a oety profitable and successful season's business, a Merty Xmas
and all Happiness and Prosperity during the coming New Year.
We rxtrnii to all mtr frirnha
(Horotal -Utalira for a Ulrmi flUjriatmaB anil a
froa-perouB Nrrn $rar
VANCOUVER CREAMERY CO.. LIMITED
15 23 ALEXAHDER STREET
I M UVINOSTON, ManaK» r
VANCOUVER, EC
(HliriBtmaB CSmthtp
I,.
At this SeMon of the Year we are prompted to with our Customer, ami Friends
alappiuruu nnb frnsprrity
STEVENSON   BROTHERS  LIMITED       jf
Bahtr* ta tha Cracary Trail* *U
805 17th AVENUE WEST VANCOUVER, B.C. R
	
WE. THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF !i
AKERS OF RED ARROW, NATIONAL BISCUITS I
AND HAIDA CONFECTIONS *
Take thia opportunity to wiah You and Youra
A merry (fUjriatmaB and a ifappu, Nrui flrar
VANCOUVER. B.C.
mmmmmmmmmmm^^
yit'ii* *     ' i im
m
1,11 ■<    -< KTA I LER
MmaM COLUMBIA   ALBkFiTA-YUKON
21
Tba lle»k«»ih Met annle OmunSf, Kcsketb.
rerUMNl lor aalc
bai boon ;ui
RAISIN CONSUMPTION.
O   Klrkrlund tin-* nold not hl» grocer)  \
tin** llat
i,* Caaaditwiae Dfsi < saiaaay,
;.i;   ao*>r
Mui n.
I'U-in..,, »|  m,.,),
i» sdvi rtised
( general itore at
hiuvin, .in
•.**%
(Hat t*   it•.«■ sen *  i d   •> * nn d
*>t**iis. atvt i« leceUas)allleaallo
C u Perryaa* eptrsiiai * ihmtaI
seaaeee Ws laiae-uos io tsuen to Land
Tb«* Oaraese Caaa Orocari
Ktfcwmtnn
The fUneral   Ku»r«   b(i»ttir«n «{   1*   \   Math*   HsMM, In
t,('*.t'*i  lor  sols
ha* KOld QSI ! I W   II   li.'d.ihl,
llals.ii consumption in the United States under co-opir-
atiye guidance, over tbe past two years has reached the enormous total ol 400,000,000 pounds annually, according to a Year
nook released by Sunland Sales So-operative Association jUI-
n| agents lor the Sun-Maid Raisin Growers or California, and.
i lie (liifornla Peach and Fig Growers Association. Bxpirts
" < allfprnla raisins have almost doubled in the same period
under Sunland Sales, having Jumped from 77,000,000 po'mds
I" 1923 Io 126,922,000 pounds in 1925,
Thll rat of COI sumption Of raisins Is said to be sufficient
10 dispose of the crops grown under present plantings lu Cai
Ifornia, The presenl selling year was undertaken bv sunland
free irom carried over crop or previous year. Thu introduction by the coop native last year of Puffed Muscats, a seeded
TKAOI   MARK   REPLACED
Th.
•xiusvun mtokt't base tot so mesi )*\u** used I*,*.
.t\. IfeSBJStOB t'annrr*. Iiaa baas re-placod I* Dm- A)lmer"
irtansl* arxl Sunt*   »hifb if^jMRain la ".•• eilrertis«taettl in
tini* ia**C*> Tl»«» pta«» or** i<» 00*** bai dU • caanH ;>».hM«j(j»
un4*t   tUO   ' Aitmt't    I? rami  ttUUi  • -**'  10 i**a»*
NATIONAL   aUVINO   POOL   OF   JOBBERS  IN   U.  8. COM-
MENCCB BUSINESS IN TWELVE CITIES.
,\l!h«Hlgti B'» Iwrittal public SSAOSSeMS*»l lUU l"«n vouch
attiiti nt thr tort it |i «»..i<nt thai u,<* mu< h discussed plan
lor a gtgantw stA-gar ■>•• asssrtosa wbaJeaala ptr*»rer> bouses
fjmt-i coast io n»a*t it** n»>»  lOoasoaied oal si a great jhwI
*tt  •fco!«'»*)*i   ffr«Krr,«»    traffctllS   <**■■•-■'•■*'  Oe   tOt  bu>lllK ex
• hangi ba*i« tmt siso se ordlnal Ins Willi retailers la rarSous
local I IIm along Un«» sol uniiin* chain store systems
Tbe i4*n oojuMuutuhttao n$r***u*t I bj srbalaselaffi lo jointly pur* ho*** tusmma* un* *a grotrriM »• favorable prices
<Hr*»«ct trows n-tanu-fart tit i* *n<l bat* lbs r«» Si distributed
isrw rata atn«mg ih<* irtMMesSta aieaibeM "i" f * * *^ ibt wttoie
iaai*ir oas Ut ateeo, place orgasli* * ■■ '■*■• ffoecra inio groups,
•orUrot *ab*iattUallr «nd-»r hi* basaet pUihlni bll brum!*.
r-o-aprtatlna >n a«h«--rl I ntt* ***m* ■•• *'"'•' ,i',<,"*»,;,"i dllpla)
Hr, and u«mg the sssn t>*«>" si lb -'.nth lb#j net* * regular
chain ot Soutun, hut miiwat losing lh« individual owneritlip
b^nrflt
Th# BOVenaOl I* el n*tlonal io 'portion*, and Is «*:ab
!i.hr«| in t»ri»^ n n lp«l n*f«- M.umjfii the Marketing
BpaelsWeie. lim. Hilnaan   TN   *»caao compan) rt»pr<e*eirti
l«W VtMllfvaalr grwrrr.  in  iar.oni CiUOS  **'" *t!l (,(1'   i{" '""'
nrrmu, Th*lr Balled psraesslns i*,,"'r *,u l)'" K",u1,'r man
that of an>  food grtiup In asisleaci!
- ~w    -¥ i«»» fvwi   vi   ■  ■**'   \%   iri\i«v«v-3| n soei
ra'sin thai isn't sticky, created a demand which sold.out
Muscats ol the 1925 crop early this year.
Tin- Year Hook is a statement of the setup and operation
of Sunland Sales a development of tin? pas I thro;-' years in
co-operative marketing, The purpose of Sunland Sales ia
summed up by Ralph P, Merritt, president and managing dine tor, In a ion word as follows: "Widened markets at low-
• red costs through the cooperative merchandising of soundly
related food products by a jointly used staff, responsive sole-
Ij to tin> producers—all without sacrifice to the independent
existence and control of the organisation behind each product—Is the purpose ot Sunland Sales."
The Year Hook is Illustrated with photagraphs and charts
whieh sel forth vividly the progress and purpose of the or-
ganittation.
AMERICAN CORN BELOW AVERAGE.
**-
A Prlie-wlnnlne Window.
Only 72 Per Cent, of this Season's Crop Merchantable.
on lhe basis of its condition in November, the United
States com nop of 2.M3.963.000 bushels is d* dared by the
iroj. Reporting Hoard of the U. S. Department of Agriculture
to le of very low quality, adding that only 72.6 per cent ot
the crop is of merchantable grade.
During the l»»t ten years the percentage of the crop of
merchantable quality has averaged 81.8 per cent.   The low
niiiiliiv this vear. tho board declared, results chiefly from too
.much rain In some of thi Corn Belt States, drouth in the
Western iHirtion. and some frost damage.
Below Five Year Average.
While lhe estimate of lhe crop, as given by the board,
ihows an Increase of 14,000,000 bush Is over the quantl y
ratimated on the basis or the October 1 condi Ion It Is 211.-
000 000 bushels, or 7 per cent, below the produc Ion of last
year and 168.000000 bushels or 5 per cent, below the average
production of the last live years.
PRIZE WINNERS IN COMPETITION
Tlvis Interesting window display was
awarded first prize by tho W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd, Vancouver, B.C., in a
window dressing competition during
the  recent  National  Canned  Poods
Week,
The window depicted is that of Bell s
Grocery Ltd., 1602 Victoria Drive, Van-
eouver. It in full of human interest
nnd attracted public attention both to
the store and the goods displayed. It
shows the good ship "Appetite" wrecked on the rocks of Monotonous Menus,
regardless of the shining light of " Malkin's Best" products, which would
have guided the Appetite into Channels of Appetising Variety.
Other prizes in this competition
were awarded as follows: Second prize,
MacParlana'a Mngec Grocery; third
prize, Borthwick & Killick, 6313 Fraser
Ave.; fourth prize, J. Harkness, 2492
Forty-first Avenue W.
1 22
T II K    R B
IIKITI8H COWMWA-
T A I L K Ii
-ALBKHTAYUKON
DeOl'inlHT
1   The Members and Staff of  I
THE
i
§ W. H.  MALKIN |
I        CO. LTD.       "
1
!
I    Qtyr (EnmylimrtthJ of thr
f foaaim
extend to their friends throughout
British Colombia and Alberta
9
I
i
i
a
WM WW WW WW fflsW WW WW WW WMRR,
i
J IRrrrQ <f liristmns to nil tlir $xai)t X
AT THIS 8EAS0H   X
OUR THOUGHTS ARE
niLED ONLY WITH
THB   0CCA8I0N   Of
THE CHRI8TMA8
HOI IDAY8. AMD
THAT IT BE A
MERRY ONE TO ALL
18 OUR 8INCBRE
WISH.
Wholesale Distributors
s
i
XaffW&M^*& \\\\m\\*mW*Momi
•W^I^'W-Ji^l^W **trt\^*\**\ mmWt\^**\-%\ S*mWt\i^0ms\ a*m\Wt\*^0mm OmWtS^*mm% m%Wer^Sm\ a**%*^t\^*mm\ om\Wfs^Um\ *W*I mU\We*^Sm\ o%W*\^0m% SmW*\^m*% |^P|^H -^^V^W a^P*>^W S^PtrW  mmW%S^km\\ S»t™ k^m^t^****
i mm IMPORTING CO., UD.
a
1
Established 1807 M
317321 Colombia Ava. Vancouver, EC. E
DEL MONTE
SPINACH
—another popular staple with
jptctW advertising to tspaed ii» mlm
Tin- lar«f volutin-- of Ihihiih*m enjuvml
hy reUtJI«r* on DHL MONTH Spinaeh in
the reatilt ot it** uniform liiuii t.ii-iliiy ih*l
youra of a«lvtkrttaiti|{, sOfnti-nValty mi ihw
pr-odliitt.    Ptiifi'M, like tlo<w    oio-wr.  iii-iti,
SOU fypieill Of till' llll'KHUUl'♦ Wm Mil'   a llllilt|(
to ih« humaaof your eilnlKineiWi
Our URL MONTH Spiiiiuili «nlvoiiiaimfi
ia i*iitin*ly naitlt* from our n-tftiinr ml-voi**
Jaainif on fhe wliolu Him. & offer* Him
poaeihilifiim fur new lltiaitiiiNa on llHft
growiiiic staple' THK   RETAILFR
imiTiKii
HTA-YUKON
roup of Policies Affecting Competition
1 wm •'oil tM im4m at lhe time, ami had heen look*
ing forward to the Winnipeg slop for two weeki 01
all my frienda in tht trade, Will Steve,,*.., (noi bis real
name, but ii will do) waa the most congenial.
Will greeted me with manif. *t pleasure, and a look
it atrurk me, though I eould not understand, of neat
relief. Then he aaid, "Tonight. Harry. I haw some*
thing important to tell you. IMsn for a long evening
at the house.   Now, well talk btuinosa "
I amUe today aa I think of the worried look on Will
Stevenson *a faro- He owns now various large enter*
prleea in the country. A toot-mand i* no bigger to him
today than a few dollars were in those day*. Hi-* whole
eireer, so I look bark on it. reaUy began si that time,
awvattl years ago, when Will um m» anxious to discuss
• "dirk metier" with me.
Ill Ml Underground way, he had heart! that at last
hk "tossy picking" days werr over. A eompany owning a large store in Kaat<m <'anada had heen scout-
Ing around with a loeal lea** in view Will had made
money feat at Winnipeg, but had never been fat-headed about it-
Ho kid always aeid he waa a lucky boy. Yes, there
Wire oampctitora In his territory, hut none of them
were of the live wire, eepable type represented by Will.
It WM child's play for Will lo get business and to keep
It -growing As a nmtter of faet. every man in the
trade fn hie territory waa making money, and Will
knew It He appraised accurately, as a good business
man, the Importance lo him of a favorable competitive
*^Pw^ W^^W U*Wwor SO*
Now, that longdreaded "real stuff" competition
WM to appear   And what was he to do about it f
I eau*t say that 1 offered Will any advice of par
tlcttlir consequence. However. 1 market! lhe faet that
Ike boy, learning of imminent competition, was not
quiet He waa talking the situation over with ever)'
available person who eonld poaaibly help him.
Right here, it seems to me, is the firsl policy a deal*
•r ahould have with regard to competition. If the pre-
•ent competitive Hne up is about to be changed, the
proper thing ia not eomplaneently to wait and see what
happens. Thc proper thing in t*» investigate lhe situation In detail et onee. iwlyse it. determine how sen-
one the new competitor will be.   Thai is what WW
•Btevcnaon did. . i «i
At • miller of fad, he  -h oY-irettbmttd UM
oomprtitlon ol tte new »t*.rv   On th.' itrengtli •'>."•
tetfMtd ■ eon»olld.Hoii with »competitor, Bgurtog
that th* nkrH brndnc*. •*""•'• lm-v!" kfS
tHlM. Mil mor. .Mclcntly. Md "it down owhond.
Rt Introdoeod t htlf-dotcn efficiency ld»^«" *"*
ketpltf *f*i*m. ou or two new eniployew. "wur^ • »
miterhlSTpriet. but ol known vnluc o *
•««.   Ut tpiritd up hit tdvcrtWng, doubling bt «•
*1te S*»p.tllor tin., but th»t ye-r IMM'■•*
morr money th.n ho ovor ted before Shown te £»r
toutl pow«*rt, te tefM to look -*»*".•"* ,5L "£
up t Mor* (Ift;- mile, north, .nd h«d 1 **m™« ™°t
eWullr within t month. Right then It w •»•««
te eould not te ttoppod. A» I rid 1" °P«*** «*
Mt Inttrtttt now um t Urge territory.  And t great
H K. Simpson.
dea of the credit for the new order of things, I am eon-
v need, Ko(,H back to that dread of competition, Ii
Htaisisalss ed him jarred him out of a rut, it was a migh-
ty SOod thing for him. ™
There is an old saying to the effect that competition is the life of trade. To the man being hurt by
competition, who gees a competitor taking business"
.amdly away from him, that old adage has a vinegar
taste, Si'ill there is enormous truth in it—for the mer*
chant who does not quit in the face of competition,
who does not lay down, but who gets out, at the ftret
warning, and works to beat the band. Por such a mer.
ehant competition is a tonic. And—while the acute
Htauc of competition eventually passes, the merchant
and his store arc left with a princely heritage in per-
manent greater efficiency.
The following are rules respecting competition
which I have found outstandingly successful merchants
follow:
1. Don't worry about threatened competition—
when rumors come, investigate and cither verify or
prove their falsity. If competition is coming, plan just
how you will meet it.  Don't worry, but work.
2. Have toward competitors st all timee a calm,
impersonal attitude. One of the worst mistakes a box*
er can make is to lose his temper. No matter what
weapon a man contends with, or who his antagonist, he
is most successful if he is cool—end the man who haa
lost his temper is not cool-
3. Thc Chinese have a proverb that two men in the
same trade always hate each other. Modern businesses
knows that two men iu the same trade can have a
sporting attitude toward each other. To insure the
same altitude towards you, by competitors, be a good
sport yourself.
When a merchant cherishes enmity againat compel iters, he is everlastingly doing things, or not doing
them, not for sound business reasons, but because of
his personal feeling. To handle competitive probleme
successfully, a merchant is best impersonal and a good
sport.
4. Before making a competitive move, analyse
what the competitor's reaction will be, and what the
status of affairs will become if he meeta your move.
If one merchant makes a concession to customers which
■a competitor ot once matches, they arc in the aamc
place relatively as before—and both selling on a narrower margin.
When milking concessions, cutting prices, consider
if you arc doing something which both you and vour
competitor cannot safely do; To one time it ie sound
business to sell an nrtie'e or service at a loss, there are
a host of times when it is ruinous to. On the other
hand, when a merchant is in an economic eondition,
because of thc general efficiency of hia business, to reduce orices, he cannot be aeirerely criticised if he doee
so He is still operating successfully, snd perhaps hie
competitors, charging the hifherprices, areaskingtoo
much. Generallv speaking, however, it is better poliey
for a store which could reduce to maintain at the cur-
rent trade level. It will proeper much more by doing
so.
n
j
!
i i
****** THE   RETAILER
Dtttmtwr
Sell the Underwear
that is asked for
byname
a
The line that nets you the biggest profits
with least effort is the line which is so well
known that your customers ask for it by
name. There is no underwear sold in Canada
to-day that is more generally popular than
KNBffl|W^
*.» .■. *
Vflfl*'
Materials and workmanship equal to tbe
world's finest — intensively advertised from
coast to coast—generous dealers1 sales helps
—"CEETEE" is a most attractive selling proposition. Follow the line of least resistance and
keep your stock of "CEETEE" up-to-date.
m*mm**Smw^^    wSw    ^a*WS^^9U^w*9   w*W
THE C. TURNBULL CO. of GAIT
.J±A- y\.l.   '.. .
'iLiMhOiil
****»''™- -•
-'*-■■■ <■■■■—*■■
'   ■    ■    -'■■■-"'   ■*-■' THE    KKTAILKR
/i.-v.-iuoA ••AUBKIlTA -YUKON*
Clothiers Show Interest in Fall 1927 Good
Many huge manufaeturm of men'i clothing whose
lines weft Stat to open, arc sir**ad> beginning to glye
serious eoMnderation to the woollens which thev will
hay tat the Wl of 1927, and within the next week the
Seat of the buyers to leave for foreign pine goods mar-
heti era be on their sray abroad t»» mnk<* advance se-
ketiona for the heavyweight linen for nexl Fall.
It it ©aly the menufsetun-n who sjx Halite iu doth-
ing of tbe highest quality, and who n* a large pro-
portion of Imported fabrics, who begin m early to
fee-naff for tae aeaeon ahead.
Sene of these houses use a* high as •*> j». r cent, of
exetualva patterns confined lo themselves alone, of
whieb 75 per eent are imported from Ureal Britain
aad tbe Goatiucni
Thia aoeeeaairlly mesne buying early to make mire
of aatiafaetory dellveriea and buying in large quan-
tttlae for tbe reason that at lenM four pieces must be
bought from the mill in order to have (he pattern eon*
tned aichtaively to thc buyer
Coaeeqaeatly. aa a working bssis, some of these
aiaaalaetuma figure on an ear)) purehaac of around
70 per eent of the eoirasponding sesson'a require-
•eata ia tbe year preceding The remaining 30 per
seat eaa then be bought lat«*r, leaving an adequate
balance to cover special itqulivmenta that may de-
tulap during the season's selling
Of Selection
Naturally, theae parens* d early will he those upon
Which tbt UMUUfaeturera feel they ean figure with eer-
taiaty as oolort and pattern* th.it »ill he in demand
When tbt merchants and the puhlie aw ready to huy,
Wills the balance to 1» eo\en-d hy duplicate orders
fbeed later. Will Include the uo-rc extreme style (level*
eesaeats that eome Into prominence as th-- «'ii^i« draws
la eonsWerlng thc problem of colors, patterns,
types ot fabrics, and the priee t. udei.eK buyers oper-
Stat tn tha foreign markets miM be guided very large-
fr by the orders placed by retail* in for the season just
1W example, the woollen buyers who will be busy
Mat Ibh month and January making their se lee-
tloualor tba fall eeaeon of lW7.will h»ve a« th.ir guido
Carefully Ubulated reeonls of what retathrs have .*
ready bought for the aprimr of 1W7. and wi 11 Ic kept
cunoUntty informed of any new developments a home.
thus the epring buying of tha#e«ailcm from 'It ng
manufootureni fnrnlahcs the cue by whieh tin lami
Will ba tabled In the purchase of fall fabrics.
WbOa pnwnlnent manufacturers speak in ont in   t
term, af spring buaineaa booked to date amU h b »t
ta e fact that eome of the factories have started cutt
on a large aeale. and are preparing for a buss as on.
there la a dispoaition among certain other    m , in
of the medium and smaller factories, to
•'•"'•plain of the reactance of retailers to place advance
orders for the coming season.
Influence of Bngetry 8yitem.
Tho faet that retail business was backward in many
eltles during recent weeks is thought to be largely re-
sponsible for this condition, although it is not surprising in any ease, in view of tho policy of the retail trade
in practically all lines to regulate their buying on a
hand-to-mouth basis, and in accordance with a predetermined budget.
Reports from retail centres indicate that fall trade
has shewn more life and manufacturers feel that it
retail activity is continued for any length of time, it
will soon be reflected in a more favorable attitude on
the part of the merchants towards their advance commitments for spring.
Tailors' Section R. IL A., Montreal, Urgea Increase fat
Peddlers' Licence.-Woollen Mills to Seek Tariff
Protection.—Yorkshire Weavers Settle in
Perth, Ontario-
Montreal, Dec. 5,1926.
rnanimoiiH support was accorded a resolution, passed nt a meeting of thc merchant tailors' section of the
Hetail Merchants' Association of Canada, Montreal, recently to the effect that the eity executive should be
immediately petitioned to include in this year's H&t of
suggested amendments to the charter one calling for
the increase of the tax or lecenae imposed upon ped
dlers who come to thc city, take rooms at a hotel or
elsewhere, and sell suits and othor tailored garments.
A similar recommendation was msde prior to thc
last session asking the council to raise the license, which
was then $200, to $300, and this waa done. Resolution
calls for a further increase of $200, which will bring
the license up to $500. Opinions expressed by members
present were to the effect that a great loss waa Buffered by local retailers through thc activities of those
travelling salesmen, who had no city taxes to pay. It
was stated that the petition to council would this year
have the approval and endorsement of tho Board of
Trade and of the Chamber of Commerce.. ■
A resolution was also passed asking for legislstion
against peddlers from door to door of cloth and suit
lengths, and n petition will be sent to provincial and
civic authorities asking that the law forbidding lotteries be enforced against clubs being formed by certein
tailors who carry on a lottery to which the eubscrip-
,ion is $1 a week and thc winner Of which each week
receives a suit of clothes. .
\n application from Price, Peterson, Ltd., of Vancouver, for a reduction of the duty on "tops'' be*.
Deeted to start a campaign for a general overhauling
if the many tariff items relating to woollen gooda. The
tariff on woollens has been a storm centre of theJa*
two general elections, particularly in parts of eastern
I I
1
■i THE   RETAILER
Deeember
Ontario aad Quebec, where a number ot woollen mills
has* Wca e-Werd down. It ie reported that the Tariff
Adtfeeey Board will aeon have before k an application
aatf* ts *• *ftb belter protection far makera of
A aaert at Yorkahire weavers who soiled from Uv-
eeaaal are tbe advaaee guard of a number of families
horn various Yorkahire towne, whieh are to operate
leoma ia a largo weaving abed whieh baa beea opeaad
at eria, Ontario, by Arthur Moore, a woollen amrehaut
af Hadderefield. The idea, it Is stated, ia to produco
wuaUea materials auitable for ladiea' clothing in Canada by Britiah weavers aad tbua aavc the 25 per eent
duty oa Britiah woollene imported into tba Dominion.
TBI OOTTOM OtTfLOOE.
Acreage Eedaetftoa in tba United Itatea sad Egypt
Withdrawal
*awm    v^W^^UMP-If
^^g aaa eaaaaava^^u^a^w/ ee a ms^w u^w w^^waa^^^^m^umw*^^ •
A eotton earryover of 9,000000 balea on July 31
next, in tha event that tba priee for tali season aver
ages 13c, ia tbe prediction of U. 8. eotton cxperta
There k conaiderable speculation aa to tbe probable
effect of the propoocd acreage reduction, coupled vltU
the withdrawal from commerce of 4.000,000 balea af
thia year'a eotton erop.
Ktyptian eotton planteiu bave reduced their lfiKfi.
fl eotton aereagco only 7 per eent deapita a law re-
etricting acreage to one-tMrd of tba ealttvatabW laud.
Failure of the mora complete operation of thia law ie
aaid to be due to tbe foot that It waa paaaed too late
for planters to change their plana to aow eotton. Tba
decree in question applied only to the 1926-27 season
and the Egyptian Minister of Agriculture baa recommended ita renewal for tba coming aeaaon.
Tba chief reason for iaeuing tbe decree Is, of course,
to raise the priee whieh growcra receive for eotton,
but it ta alao argued oa tae ground that eertain lands
ere becoming exhausted aad eropa are not eufficiently
rotated.
The Egyptian report k of particular inter-ret. it is
aaid, in view of tbe campaign beint eondneted fai Amer-
iea for a 831-3 per eeat redoction of eotton acreage.
Tba Egyptian Government to keen ap tba priee of
cotton produced la that country, in addition to restricting acreage, haa aim engaged fa tbe purehaae of raw
eotton. Tba effeetlvenese of Government buying bu
varied fai proportion to the amount bought. Tbe Egyptian government eeeme to bave atadlcd to enter thf market only when the price waa ao low that further decline was fanpoeslble and improvement fairly definitely ia tbe offing. In every eaee following government intervention, except in 1125, then baa been
a eertain rise in price, but it ia not to ba concluded
~ it tha improvement waa entirely a remit of Intervention- In all eaaea there are, with the exception of
aeaaon of 1921, other good and euffident reasons
for eaeh improvement*
It ii faapogglble, of course, to tall what effect with-
drawint a -fivea quantity of eotton from tba market
wiD ban upon priee daring a aeaaon. It la quite ap
Seat that than la much more eotton available than
sadad for spinning during tba current year. Tha
aaaatloa my. be ssked whether, If eotton ware with-
drawn from tha market and held In the hands ot far
dtviduala witbout any -guarantee aa to when or bow
Every Man AM a
LIGHTHOUSE brand
BUCKSKIN cloth
SPORT JACKET
* *^***m tamsm jb^hviq mow wmw wnivi Vf WIQ *Wm epVfw
far eSiliM. eaallM-
Ins- bootleg, fee golf and practically every ether eai*
alatfli wUla*t* Uafca
u»wwi   wooourpu   ww*\o*a*mW
JBw-WH 99 UM flPflfl-eu
Wrist
la
Maes la light ee dark gray, ohamol% dark
roHioeee ercwa* Alee m Mookinsw sloth
a variety cf cetera.
Reck Mud Ovsrall Co,
hook latANo, aul.
I
Dletriaateri
a. A. SIMS, I1S Heater Street, Vancouver, a. C
OL^emSm
tMrnWrntmi.:
r,:.,. ■... .V'-.i ».'•■'...-
^SMSMiommn It*
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH OOU'MIUA-AI.BBRTA-YUKGN
97
it would ba sold, tbe withdrawal of (hat amount would
have aa great aa effect upon priee as would the par*
chase of an equal amount by a single organisation with
a formal tasrsntee that it would not be sold until at
1,-ast after tbe next erop has been bsrvested.
OPEWIO Of WOOL HOflllY LIKES DELAYED
mmt	
Maaufecturera of woollen hosiery lines are for thc
moat part "msrking time" un th. matter of opening
thc lm seaaoa.
It hi true that Imaineaa hss been Uniked for next
year, la-eluded Ul this business being what are de-
scribed aa a number of good sized «»rd*-rs. hut gener-
ally epeehlag. there will be no rush to operate on wool
gooda aa a dam
HapEaate ordera in aatt»fart<»ry quantity nre com*
ing ta aaittmf aganta right along and capable merehants ia tba primary markets M thst it in not good
tactics ta pseh Bast year's roeirbamtuw when ine
iradcl Interest ia ao obviouidy eonccnied on immediate leajainanata
niganlblg pricea, there i* no doubt that numbers
-vntabsbltaJarte percentage o( eotton will show enn*
aldcrabla redaction, bat for better numbers it ih not
rspocted that any reduction worth talking about will
rv«rtaatfr Tbe recent atrrngth of the raw wool mar
krt prgdadea any teal reduni-*n m lines made up «noi
ly or fat large part of wool
Tba Primary market U quieter than it has been tor
aetae mJathTbat a very fair volume h heist done mm
week to week fcpmatativr mill, deajr any fore*
eaat wdaetioae oa mm a rayon number*and m
fashioned heaiefy. ImtaUmiea ■« ^^jg
Impoaaible ta this latter Held, on sccount of expsnoca
output
mnnws&i ttissxi
Thm k mmti*nlik r-:^> mffifJZ
asmmmr warms, **A buying ta. *   £ »
Ud tk*ol* -j*n..nl m**. ***« " 'i ? Ita h-W
ml «5*Ulloi. rt*p»(th-*»« '''; "' „ , ,c k .» when
Wright U». will -Ao*  .Um**""-  r,","MH
aaaaai Mit mmaa .      „r (|„v.
8MM «ll.r. «ln..in ttat • «*JJ*T £• »
t»*y ha*-*, ta tain-* in-H-rt"'- « "«, ,„, .ddl-
ttal it«ta in Ik. tand. »f '«>,*• ,r"ruS nowta.
tfeMl .rnhMdh. b ******** for eurr.ni
It I. (Mmlly wrf**»•' J"™ *£ , Uve con-
Wit Smtattt mlfW *'«rt ,rom "   '
j 0*lm H'« <>"• *"£ ,„ tnprN. *<
^ST^^ k     thMtrlcsl gesture.
S'.w&'s srss s y «»< «*- —!
SLt mee,- ertcl the Sect. ^^^^JiSmS
Tefh^ege^tkVusi two thai-* r«-
Paris, November 17,1926.
Textiles for spring sport clothes for the Riviera and
California and Florida rcsorta arc now being ahown at
the important Paris fabric houses. From the number
of suiting fabrics shown there is no doubt that the
taillcitr will be increasingly popular, with the resultant
demand for these materials and a new array of sport
weaves has come to replace those of the post season.
Maison Rodier's new collection is predominantly
materials for taillcurs and sport. The most airikin*
novelty displayed by this house at thia moment is Toile
Buranic for sport. It is a fine wool fabric, oordered
at each side with a contrasting color and ia seen in all
eolor combinations. It is interesting to note that one
Of thc combinations is made with a light blue border,
as this shade of blue is regarded as a sure favorite in
the new season. Dressmskers sre featuring *t in their
mid-scason showings snd Rodier has included it in
*V°BttS Jeapeeia another good wool for sport and
is shown in two shades, including blue.
Varied TaiUeurs Featured.
\ new material for coata, for sport and travelling,
shown by S * G™*' which, while it looks like
a he vy fabric, is really Kght weigh andI so*, and
ahould prove popular with the active girL  It cornea in
a It SS tt£« are varied to suit the meet
r VL? tastea from those who insist upon the gar
<hHE7ITio the gentlewoman's travelling suit. Rod*
Tu e2f tWa divere y of demsnd with sn interest-
.spaced an inch JI*Wj ?Sg wouW make up
mz ss&hp «odic ***** w^^i
,,„• which <*jXm\T**£** rffwt* 'U*
i„; m*n*******colon"   M, u
Ohm tat J****!* *****-   tl    .J
r.„««ited by Cr.p.U», » thin whit.
Ji Ji. h km^-Hgyj XkX c.>». 4
SS^-Jflffl^Bi - -*in'new
flaked ««h whrto, m fl: «^      .      for weat,™
Trovers jcrsetaeta to « «"«   fc'   rfng ^r.    A
-
,.«.»«.•«'««•"•* THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUHBIA-ALBBBTA-TUKON
Deeember
r
4tN*Rfat*oTe*t^
**
REORGANIZE!* AND THOROUGHLY
UP-TO-THE-MINUTE IN MANUFACTURING
MEWS WORK GLOVES
and MITTS,
Leather Vests, Costa, sto,
SOLD ON A WIDE OPEN GUARANTEE.
SATISFACTION TO OUR CUSTOMER AND
YOUR8,
SERVICE, QUALITY AND AT A PRICE
THAT GIVES YOU A BETTER PROFIT.
WRITE FOR PRICE LIST NOW.
SANDfll GLOVE k, lid.
Omnvffle aad Htb
;B.O.
-PRIDE OF THE WEST99
Lumber Jack Shirts
.
Lama Variety Fancy Pkide la Mi Wool
rlaaaela, aad Heavy Maddaavrs for
e Delivery.
Made by
SmIv sria, but s (j.. iwts
VAivtoova, i.c
Wholesale Drr Oeoda. Man'a FnmisldnM
, ■ww^us^so^^^uwo^^  W*mw' ^*t^t^^   **wp^» tm  •**» ■s'PBsamHf
*m*w* u&w^^s^b^j
aasm
ATLANTIC -  IT    LASTS
O WE AR Atlantic
Underwear is like
transferring the warm,
woolly eoat of the Marl*
time sheep to the back
of the purchaser*
That's why it is such a
food repeater. It makes
friends and keeps diem.
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR
MONCTON.N.R
B. M. WAUH 4 COMPANY
MONraau aai lasmeio
^UflLu Stl^^^mm* S^mm *S*^^a*^mt  m**^^L^^m*m\
mmm^*\j isn^w J9w oKjLwawa ***USU**SU
<SMST **UUUtU wrwwmmUUO
. • !?i     * >
mr,:U7i'„,,o .V., .,
MMtAi'A***:* .■.t-.iif'A.',:.i.t....     .......■'&.,„" .m,, ■''-.* IMS
HHITISII OOtUMW
vanr bt width ia tbe different pattern*, but arc alw ,va
wide and never vary in the name pan.-™ They nre of
every poaaible eolor, Including light i,|„,, llia|fl:Ilta .
white
The tendency to be taibin-l U *t rough ••vi«l«nco(t
in thia seaaon'e mode. Straight In, hmnIi-In with lm
aleevce, either Sting smiglp to thr arm, ur sKjrtitly
full, are particularly appropriate for th, street, sml
for Informal afternoon wear. Tl.. s. tin-sses are very
amart la silhouette when worn with th- now high
crown beta, ao popular at the ni»tu<iii
Tha really amart woman dor* not look for est rentes
in fashion. She doea not jump abruptly from the ex-
sggcratedly loot ahlrt. to one equally short. Ami thc
Parle couturiers, those masters of feminine psychology,
know tbla batter than anyone else Thin is why tlie
smartest arbiter modce are not start ingly different—
the well drceacd woman would not wear conspicuous
elothee If they were presented tu her Imt they an* the
logical aseeeaeore of thc Fall collection*, with slight
changes fa arrangementa of plait * the manner of wear*
Ing a salt, aad all the other small, but important de-
tails. Caaaarvatiam appears to b.- th.- dominating note
bt tbla year'a winter fashion* And this being the
caae, H followa that there ia an immense variety, and
lattitade la what tbe amart woman may wear
The aSboatte ia in the main straight and slim, hut
Its sllmaeaB conceals plaits thst allow freedom of move-
meat*
SbiliS SIS abort, but uneven hem Knit- that lire
lengthened at tome point are used to advantage by
name women who cannot wear th<- severe short cut of
JwmjimOSm
Tba waistline ia of exceeding importance, and is
ahowa bt moat frocks. Ib fo usually found nt the very
top of tbs hip, attention being called to it by belts.
firdlea aad Mouse*
Tba appearance of extreme simplicity in the mode
ia very deceptive, for this mueh desired effect is
achieved only through intrieaey of cut, nml sRiiinu
THB   KKTAILKR
ITIMI rv.l nam***. X *** li **
Wltb trbamiaga rcatrin. I to the introduction of
eoatraatinf ar aalf materials classic fur ^ndin^ and
atralsbt fringe whose fundi,... » t« ,>n^'!,',n^;
much Sttention is paid lo detail, nml fine workmanship
ia eaeeatlaL
*uJB
UTAH MH0BANT8 OF JAPAN
rot nil merehan*
has been for-
e
Ia response to enquiry regarding
JMfW hi Jsosn. thc following aeeount lias on    .
SI by STsf Tokyo's leading merchants to th
" Retailer. *'**—
Th. i*a*rlai*al .tor, .yte-n ^S^tt i*S
tory of only lw.nty um but .lu n** *« » , „t
H Mid. mm a rem.rk.ble de*elopmen^     ^
It luw
PNMOt Wfml moi. ol hit department »to
tinted In Tokyo, 0-k. «.«l«f«* «■•'•'•
big cities,
**-*!     .ilTA-TIIKON **
wjaye, Ukaahimaya, Sogo, Daimaru, Matsusakaya
and Matey.  Our department storea were fomoriy
Ngood   stores, and on this account a department
itore and a fayyd.store a,c eonsidered asthessSc
1 h   eason is that from feudal times these dry-goods
utores have invested « large amount of capital, and it
wns not difficult for them to he converted to the dc
BSrtmwl Btore system.   The Shirokiya was the first to
idonttfceayitom, although it was a very imperfect one.
in 1886 the Store started a foreign clothes department
•"ul in 1902 it started a department for miscellaneous
goods, excluding toilet articles. However, thc Mitsubishi can claim the reputation of being the first department store in Japan in the true sense of the word.
In 1903 it adopted thc department system of the Wcet
after elaborate investigations and preparations. Of the
seven principal department stores above mentioned thc
Mitsubishi is the largest.  Thc Mitsukoshi can be
traced baek to thc drygoods store called the Echigoya
which was opened at Nihonbashi, Ledo, (formerly
Tokyo) two hundred and fifty years ago.   The Echigoya was afterward called the Mitsui, and in 1904 it
was made a joint stoek concern.  Having such an old
history the store is regarded as the most representative
store in Japan in every respect.   Next comes the Shirokiya, which also has an old history as a drygoods
store.   The main feature of these stores sre skilful
decoration whieh gives agreeable feelings to the customers.  The Takashimaya is noted for keeping dry-
goods of novel designs.  The Matsusakaya attracts cus-
tomers for goods of practical use.    The Sogo try to
attract people by constantly holding bargain daya. The
Daimaru is open day and night thus attracting the cue-
turners who arc too busy to go marketing during the
day. In all these stores thc goods are classified and
exhibited in sueh a manner as to be easily recognised
by lhe visitors.   Each store uses a peculiar art in the
arrangements of thc goods. The following nre the chief
goods: drygoods, Western dresses, miscellaneous goods,
precious metals and stones, provisions, fine art gooda,
toys, furniture, drugs, musical instruments, snorting
goods, books, etc.   Thc greatest importance ia placed
on thc drygoods and especially on all kinds of Japanese
kimono.   As to the designs of kimonos competent dyeing artists are always consulted, and elegant and novel
designs are constantly being produced.  These etoree
enjoy great popularity with the general public on account of thc careful selection of the go6ds, both home
and foreign products. They also endeavor to diffuse a
knowledge of the various branchc8 of science and learning among thc general public by holding from time
lo time various kinds of exhibitiona for children, worn-
en, and people of all classes.    Thua thc department
stores have become very important organa in onr daily
life   They carry on very useful acrvicea for foreign
visitors who go shopping.  Foreign tourista can pur-
chase the same kinds of gooda when travelling aa those
thev get in their own countries.    Not only that, but
they are able to get in a short time ell kinds of souven-
irs such as kimono, porcelain and pottery, embroidery,
lnemier-wares. which contain local color or Jaoan, or
those toys which represent thc tsatea typical of the var-
ions aces of the east.   A Japanese department store ia
just the combination of an American department store
and thc one price shop.  By the side of precious stones
and metals which cost two or three thousand yen, cheap
articles of five or six sen each are sold.
|
f
5
)4
i  i
*]• hO
THE   RETAILER
IIRIT1BII COLUMHIA-AUMntTA-WKON
Lcccamocr
TBI CANADIAN 8HOB IHDUSTIT.
SILK PROM CANAOIAN TSItS.
Statistics Show Increased Output for September
R. H. Coata. ominion Statiaician, who analyses the
the progress of the industry, and furniahca comparative returns of production, supplies the following figures covering the output from 170 factories in Canada.
Mr. Coata estimatea the capital investment in thee hoe
industry at $30,000,000. with 14,000 employees, and an
annual payroll of $14,000,000.
The eUtietica of the present report arc baaed on
the returns of 107 faetoriea out of a total of 170 factor-
lee in operation in Canada during the month of September. Two faetoriea in Quebec and one in Ontario
failed to make return- The quantitiee leather and felt
footwear made during the month totalled 1,644,674
palre, an increase over the preceding month of 118,45
palre or 7 per eent The quantity of boots and ahoea
with leather or fabric uppers increased by 127,415
pairs, or 9 per -cent, while the quantity of felt foot*
wear of all kinde and doth slippers for houae wear
shows a decrease of 19-958 pairs, or IS per cent-
The elaadScation of boota and ahoea with leather
or fabric uppera according to kinds, via.: Men'a, boys'
and youths; women's; mioses* and children'a; babies'
and infanta', ahowa inereaeea for all of the Heme. The
daaaifieation according to process ahowa inereaeea for
welta, McKaye and all imitation welta and pegged,
acrew or wire fastened, while turna and atitehdowns
ehow decreaaed production. * The following table sivea
the total production of footwear for each of the
months, January to September:
January
-February
March ~
April-.
1,198,661   June
1,434503   July
1,550,274
1,571,101
1,531,217
1,644,674
1,762,446   August ....-
1,527.538   September
1,455,807
The flgurco in the above table are exclusive of lar-
rigane and ahoepaeka aud Indian slippers and moccasins, It ia proposed to include these items on thc eched*
ale of monthly production for 1927.
The cumulative production of leather and felt footwear for the nine months ending September 80,1926,
waa 13,676\216 palre, or an average monthly produc
tion of 14119,580 pair*, The average production per
month for the year 1924, the latest vear for whieh
complete statistics are available, wm 1,420,896 pairs.
ATTIMOS CONVENTION.
Harold a Uekle. aatea msaagar ef I. Leekle a Company
limited. well-known Vaaaaaver shoe umnufueturen. haa bean
hasy attaai'og eanventJoos oa this continent Oa December
1st Mr. Leekle attendee the coovsotteo of tha footwear
Style Show at St t***nfs Missouri, aad on December 14th ha
waa present at the convention of tha Shoe Maaofaetorsrs at
Montraul, afterwarde vtaltlng New York. Boston sad Chicago.
When wc gaaa on a great forost trco It Is not caay to visualise It la thc terma of rieh cloth and silken raiment And
yet man. aot content with silk, cotton, wool, linen, and a number of leaser source of clothing material, now taiptoya wood
for tlie maamactnre of ths lateat ot the testUee—nrtlScial
ailk, or rayon, aa It la called by tho trade. Tha baala er all
srUSeial silk Is eetlnloee, nnd ceimiosa Is tha principal con*
aUteont of wood.
Aa long ago aa IIM Coast Mltaira de Chardonaat produced aniadal adk ccaamerelnlly, bet It haa taken many years
of Incesssat labor to bring tae vartoea preecaaia te umt aiaga
of perfeeUna whieh la caasatlal to commercial leeeeea. TMt
-Um todeetry haa new become a grant nndertaktng to shown
by thw fact that tho worlds production In loaa haa anaan tram
7.WC In MM, to nn eatlmated 1M.SM far thia year.
Tan general principal underlying tho maaufactortug meth*
ode la the trantment of ths cellulose with eaemtaal reegeata
to give a gotattaooa eolation which enn ev forced through
n musber ef mmnte oosssso Into n bnth of aotauon tor m one
presses mm air). Tbla solatloo causes the coagnlatien ot *he
liquid emerging from the nosslta nnd taw crsnies the actual
filaments ot artificial ailk, though the material haa to gaaa
threngh eaveml other stages, earring with the grosses, he-
o**i*^n^p   ow   oH^-se^n^   wmno*"0t^***^w   ^ev   oo^^e-a   ggo^^^n^v^oov^jg   we-^no^^p^^^nn^^wn   ^saju^^^^^m
tout m which wo see new an accustomed, hat which would
have amend many n nlneteenth-centery graadmether.
The poeetbUitlee for rayon maaafaetare ta Ceaada, with
her vest pelpwood arena, sre enorssoas. The eeeatrlce which
were Srst to develop the Industry, however, were aet theae
ww w-rap-ra f^^^^^^***^^^^^r*su  Hs-Uram anew   sB^roowe -rous^  *w^ae  wsw^^^^u  ^u uv^n»ue enoo*w^^^n^
Mg testlle taduetry. Thus, shortly before the war, Svnnce,
already predominant In the mnnufnctnie of aatarat ettk, took
the Iced, followed hy Swltaertand. New tha big proinsnrs
and exporters are the United States, Orcet Brttaln aad the
countries of Central Rerope that are prominent la the aatarat
ailk trade.
Per n good muny yeses Canada ban snsftteS ssach nf the
eulphlte pulp used fee that purnoeo ta thsee conntrfae. In
ltlt the Natural Recoermc latelUgence Branch of tan Department of the Interior nubllahed a report drawing mention to the unnsunlly favorable condltlees for the devetaa-
ment ot artificial silk ssannfactnrtag ta Its entirety. within
the Dominion. The following year Messrs. Canrtnnlde, Ual,
the largest rayon aeaaefaetamre ta tho Hutted Kingdom, seat
engineers te Canada to lavesttaate thsee reafasentailena with
the result thnt a pleat wns sstnatlshsd ta CeraweU. Ontario,
ta 1114 at n coat of IsVMSMa
Thia would appear lo be hot the pnllmlnary ef many
othera. Caandlnn Celaaeee, UA. oaptlallsad nt IT.eM.Me, Is
new eenstracttag n large pleat nt DrammaedvUle. Qanhee;
snd the Howard Smith Paper Mills hnve formed a eadeldlsry
company called the Canadian CeUnleee Company, which mill
else bo operated at Cornwall. The Britiah Colombia Palp
aad Paper Company, operating pulp mills ta British Columbia, haa heen curryteg nn chemical rtesureh fnr seese time
ta the utlunsUen of homlech for the pradncUen of MttataM
nnd certala resalts aad eeeetaalooe hnve been ranehcsl whieh.
It la etated. amy determlM the cempnny to proceed with to-
stallaUoa ef a new plant for the manufacture of tide sort of
palp. Maay other compnnles. variously located, nam the
Marttlmtj provisoes te the PactSc Coeat. are also tahtag ste*
or eooslderiag mesas to enter this held which le se profit*
able, so large and which Canndlnn reeourcee, both of weed
rseerves snd natural newer supplies, ere partlenlarly adapt-
ed te rapport 1926
THK  -RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA -ALBBftTA—YUKON
31
OBITUARY
It the pnttaing of Walter P. Inu* who t ir the past
four and s hull yam haa occupied, with tt steadfast
devotfoa 1° ^-y* Uts position of I'rovMcial Secretary
fur the Retail Merchant*' Aafocisllon cf Canada, mer-
rhania of Hritlah Colombia have loal a ditecre friend,
hi.I one who waa eter ready and abb te straighten out
iheir difference*
Tactful, and latterly, with an enormous power of
endurance under ever»recttrrlng period* of severe
physical strain. Walter Ing poamssed thai charactcris-
tir, tai e«»rntial for one tiling such n position ss he,-
the ability to grn*p a iJtuetton rspidiy. snd sel without prejudiee «r frar
Tae bate wsnst f la*
UU opinions upon mailers of J*^]^^, and It
and provinrial. here oil luace a- ^ lhal
was |»crha|^ e«|».*eially "I-'"!'" ,.m\m\\y vai
the lsts seeretsry'a kanwlrd* *« I
liable i ,, 1  Mt  Inu come oU! Ul
A native of Winder. Bnglam   Mri a     ^ hd
thia country st n J*>Pfrnli^i' ||, flrsl bream*
spent many yean »' "»» V™ vshlU appointed sccrc.
aasotdated with It M. A. an aim lhc ot.u;1111/a-
tary of the New Wratmi.i»»    BjJJ^Uy for icven
thin, a portion which he held
>«,,ir* ,,,        m Hougham from v,ancJtt;
The departure of gorge * u tentative for
ear l» cover the Domtoion as spec* ^provtoc,a, See*
the Association, left man' ih« P» e(liBlcly chosen
wtar^aadiliolit^
contact, cither in a business or personal manner. Whoever his successor may be, his ability and secretarial
knowledge must be <»!' a high order to measure up to
those from which tlie Retail Merchants' Association
has Buffered such untimely bereavement*
MAIL ORDER BUSINESS: ITS EFFECT UPON
DOMESTIC DISTRIBUTION AND COMMUNITY
DEVELOMENT.
(Continued from, page 7)
pound pared by express Irom Ottawa to Toronto
would It- 45c. and as far as Hamilton 55c, whereas
if the panel was going as far as Fort William thc rate
would be 75c- This difference in rates between two
public utilities places them in open competition with
"tie another for business, and as the pareel post rates
an* favorable for the Mail Order business assisting
them in their open unfair competition with thc local
retailer,
The Mail Order Houses have not only the advantage
of low rates on their parcels sent through thc post
office department, but have the advantage over local
merchants of selling their merchandise in all* the var-
iotts communities without making any contribution in
any way towards the maintenance and development of
these communities, They pay no local taxes, they do
not assist in the social life. They take away rather
than add to the community.
We believe that Mail Order Houses serve a purpose, but if the local consumer would give the local
no reliant the same opportunity to secure the merehan*
dive which cannot be purchased from thc local store*
as he gives to the Mail Order House, by purchasing
num the catalogue of the local retailer, the eommunity
store would be abb- to supply all the requirements of
ihe consumer in that locality and, in many instances,
at a lesser price than is being paid the Mail Order
llollse.
Tax Suggested.
The question was taken up with our solicitors, and
we were of the opinion that the provinces would have
the right to tax a Mail Order House for the privilege*
.. ■    •       *■-■ •»»..♦ .»™ivini.t> and an effort was
in
he right 10 lax ii man *w,„,. ......
if doing business in that province, and nn effort was
made to introduce legislation in the provinee of New
Brunswick, in March of thi* year, when a Bitt was
suggested entitled "An Ac* to Tax Mail Order
Houses." A largo delegation presented this Bill to
the New Brunswick Legislature, and the Premier, Dr.
Baxter, referred the eonstitutioii'ili, v or the Bill to Mr.
N sl.itt. K.C., of Toronto, who adviud that* in his
opinion* the Bill would be ultra vice; of the Provincial
ade.
01
Government.
ivernment. .   .    „llirire8»ion was made
','11" "ri""i|ft ,"" .I      by X Clnco «n that
, „ ,„„ could bo i'l«   I  J* ' ™ ,        th „rfl,ri,
ih. buBtneM I. taio w OUASa l worn ^
«* !'*V'.";', Mit * KS meSto... the ens-
„r w thoul thc I "Ul< *„', „.:„ 0«er is uooeptod and
, or rosi I therein. *****e«er«      l
tha
tin
• House to which it is fiunrew^, ..,.., .„
is thereby concluded that the sale is actually made
within the Province-
The Provinces, under the Biitish North America
(Continued on page 36)
i    i
■       <
' w
\i
«l
1
I.
n 32
THE    RETAILER
BHITIHH OOLUMBIA-ALBKnTA-VUKON
Deeember
Ice-O-Matic refrigeration opens the door of every
electrically equipped home in Canada to Ice-O*
Made dealers.
What is your share of this market?
Electrical refrigeration ia the nextcoming industry
■—get in on the ground floor with Icc-O-Matic—
manufactured in Canada by a Canadian com*
pany, owned and operated by Canadians for
Canada, the British Empire, and the export field.
Ice«0*Matic has many exclusive features, both
in its product and merchandising line-up. Get
in touch with us at once relative to territory-
it is a money maker.
IC&O-MATIC REFRIGERATION CO., LIMITED
WALKESVILU - ONTAJUO 1936
THK    KKTAILKR
BRITISH *'• •!.■■• Mill A -AliBBRTA—VUKON
33
on
HARDWARE. OIL <w PAINTS
Hantaan men nil over the provinci hsvc been busy
.luring lhe |»n*t two weeks, with their attention fixed
nlmeel exclusively upon Christmas lales Ksch sear
t hiHttns* bttdneei in the hardware store is becoming
more profitable, nml the old Idea that the hardware
s!,»re ws* m»i a place for gift seekers i« entirely exploded.
Popular gift* art* tu W )u\*\ in \ .*.-*; variety, ami with
i-.it** in window display the hardware merchant ean
reap a rieh harvest at tbla icaaon K«jH.rts to hand
indicate thai aalea are ahi nd of 1925, a tremendous vol*
nine of mcrt*bamll%e *uttnl»l«- for Christmas t'ifK hav.
•jntf p*t«im-il over the retail hardwsr* merchant's counter
Primary market* nn- not showing much activity,
and the prediction 'hai nil metal prices WOttld advance,
i»r *how an up*** ani tendency has not malerialised
Oo-pnef enntinoca **«*ak. lead smd sine pricea lit far
from lining, ami even the hiith pn-'- of tin i* »»*»t hold*
ing a* firm a* wa* rxpeeii-d
Any alight advances mad« during lhe pa**t few
muntha Mill hold, and in Hen of Ihi fact thai sheets
an- l-M-inf !*«.'■*•.I for flrsl quart--r requirements at un
«haiigo.l prie«**, t\**r% not indies te tb* poasilmtly of sny
immediate advanei- at the present lime
Kmifittf ma!* mii have hij.-vmI ,111 «>\c!l-nt vol-
uim- of iraile diirinir tb* season, slid there m no in-
dieation that pric*** on this commodit} will show any
wrnkne** Whatever change mas occur In schedule
will m«iv hkely affect general |*dicy than quota-
Hon* It i* frnerallv noticed lhal It ' change in quo*
tstiom ia aniiei|iat.d. bn-fere trill all tlfh! until the
new prirr* an' Mined, in order
' » s
the salt- of turpentine continues very fair nnd a great
deal of interior work seems likely, that will help to
keep this commodity moving very well through the
w inter months. While the future of this market is un-
eertaln it does seem that present priees are quite low,
if crop reports from the south are an indication of snp-
plirs in reserve,
i      *-  .    ■
der lhal they mav nap
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE.
Heating Accessories.—Very satisfactory husiness is
reported in the various items under this heading.
Cutlery.—So far this holiday season all kinds of cutlery have sold in larger volume than most jobbers anticipated,
Building Paper—Plain huilding declines seven eenta
a roll, while the tarred declines six cents a roll.
Weather Strip.—Demand for weather strip holds
strong.
Gloves.—(irders for eotton gloves continue to reach
jobbing houses in fair volume.
Vacuum Bottles.—This line is reflecting stronger
interesl on account of the approach of Christmas.
Carving Sets.—The approach of Christmas finds
some reflection in the demand for carving sets-
Electric Goods.—The holiday demand for percolators, table stoves, toasters and waffle irons is heavier
than usual.
Galvanised Ware.—Very strong demand is reported here tor this line, with prices well maintained.
ii—	
new pners ar* wanco, i»  •    Mrll for  „,
aomc benefit  from th<* change    ii i m^ a^Mories—Sales are normally good
the itabiHty «f the roofing *******     nI-1(,(IHV itttom0bU'f^^lland for winter items.
been no tdarftnrin* off .due apparent!) to conn Q yc    s«t»stactoiy demand Ior
exprewu-d ill prraent qimlaln '
n rvo
-,.      .     m    -1       iKni t.ire. consumers ol nn-
There is Mill evidence lha lam .    |V.
aeed oil are he*itnting In placing     ^      J» R{efl(lv
tralretuenta   The naaaecd marm »        -aee(1 \m
I ut I, the United State* and l anafla
than last ynr. while the   *•■"««»»' tr°P
heavy.   Knight mien will
W -        t *
M li'	
nO* V   A   ft'i a!   deal   to   i
Chain..-1'ii.™ are unchanged «* ,ic thMn8 e8pCC*
tally ar. In active demand.
Io, Skat*.-Sales «ro extremely good a» the hoi.-
,l„v Benson approaches,
tCon eents a gallon.
heavy.   Knight ratee wu  »-    n «ntl the situation
with the future priee of lm-'  something to       -.,.,.„ ,.,.„,, .. B	
iu rvaprrt to fuel will, of wurac. nau .     tUiclinc ten oentg a
do eXtm - ^^.wa *■ ,«^
joyed a good ^f^n h»d still keeps the move*
eonaiderable no ww oi* » » . . lumc. prices on
ment of this oomroodityat a
"il, remained unchanged.
Ih. eonsldored it is well to »'te    • ^n last
on flaxseed nml OH »il »"' «>*** '"fl"    .^ible, bill
yenr at Ibis lime.   Further dcclinca an.^^ |( wor,h
nol bv anv means a eerlaint>
wntelring. however.
p south vary
IMh- MUotatioiiH on turpentine in mm |.(lMUllIIV r_
tm day to day- *P » ** - t.t ,,,,,,!., qnUe ^ Barn W^gf* Z trveTand
amount, so that the fof nre 0 th    • ' |nflMnfltion «w neW ,     ot • ceUwdtn^n
uncertain,   targe HB^jtf^ is announc*      JJ^ ,   ?927, spring     ^f()Kng an ex-
0f ^,,-den and harvest tools
nam.   uu*~w* ********  ,    ne j„ aniWu»<
v for the future when a aUg&ta o th> pri fl
it before many largo orders »*       bly, Loeally
na again and sales drop ofl eonsici
to buy
ed. but
»Hffens aga 34
THE   RETAILER
nniTISH OOLUMniA-A».nKnTA-YUKON
Deeember
ccllent season, and orders for these nre being placed
in good volume.
Window Glaaa.—This fall has been an exceptionally good one in reaped to sales of window glsas. Present quotations are quite firm.
ROTARY LEMON aQUEEZER.
•"Qllchrlat"
8eueesei lemons of all iliea quickly and efficiently; oper
ator doec not need to touch squeeaed lemon with hia hand*.
Lemon while heing ■queried Is automatically rotated against
the rlhs of the perforated cast aluminum cup. The strained
Juice is delivered into the glass conveyor which discharges It
Into the tumbler. Operating mechanism is composed of a cot
worm and a cut.geer. Insuring smooth operation. Metal parts
coming in contact with the lemon are made of cast aluminum;
frame and handle nickel plated and highly polished.
Length of stuerser proper • Inches, length wtth tumbler
fully extended IS Inches; width 4*§i7 Inches st widest point;
weight each 816 lbs.
Discharge This Hindrance
It*h surprising what a difference in ani*** the
lighting of your display windows will aetually
make.
The poorly ■illuminated window — p<rhap«
mulerlightcd; perhapa too full of di*plca*dng
glare ia na much of n hindrance to the growlh
of your buainrsn as lhe blustering, inefficient
aalea elerk. You know how long you'd n-
tain hia arrvirr*. For lhe very name n-aaon-
you'll Ami it will pay you handsomely to rv*
place your out of date lighting (Uturea with
modern concealed window lighting itnilv
We'll be glad to arm! our window lighting engineer* to investigate your diiplay lighting
problem   without obligation, of emir*-*
fall Seymour 6000, Light ami IWrr Depl
hmsntamnff
1 PWPWl^P-Wl^i^E-W^
OUR WISH TO YOU!
A Kigfft IHerry (flljriBtmaH ani a ^appg and
Prnapf roua N«» fear
CANADA ROOF PRODUCTS, LIMITED    M
2027 AJtBUTUg 8TRET VAKC0UV1E. BO. £
a**
Igulettoe greetingg
*$bat tberc mat be a lexeme "ripple Snieb" to tour fmae feetivitlee; tbat tbe
"boab" of true frlenbablp mat em enburc, "blottlno" out all bab luck; tbat a
?our "otoch" mat oo up. tour "lebflcr-abect" ebow proflte. tour patbwat be I
omootblt "coateb" anb tbat bealtb anb bapplneee be toure In 1027 io tbe bear***
wiabof
COLUMBIA PAPER COMPANY, LIMITED
Of VANOOUVER ud VICTORIA
l*m*l**m.immtimmtimmtimmimm^
iswiimisw^nsw^Mi^Bwi^imiimi'Swinn'nasvasvasvaseiseailPiMB. \m
Til K    1M.TA I LER
IBITtSH COLUMBIA -ALBERTA—YUKON
35
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
VM fslltwioe are prices quotto for principal IISM of leading wholeaaie firmi.   Pricea quoted are neceeaarlly
eubject to market fluctuation!.
M
1*1
ti   t
;> i >
H ii
M M
1> IS
i I
|.T1
* >
AMMUNITION.
ts«SoS S*«t Snooo
etMStlaai
CiattffS.
il *i a H i IS ch
i 'i i a i is •.»*•
lUkSSHSlt
11 il  a  M  i   IS  rh
u i a i lit rk
AMSfttSS.
l   MC   NMf-s «1ut» II ft t m i ts
l tin** High (tun
I  M «'   Att-tw  IS 0 S IS S tH eh
latata   Vtatt-.irt
M*HalO< Ammw-AiHOA
tt/mtt***** see i^^^^
it **\ ti a«>'*4i*'..**•
ft   **ttsj   t***.*-ha,**a
:s i    it.n* a«M.»«s<*.
ii   L    n f*»   l#»M"t
amtrtcaa
;j atwut a«»*»fc*u*»
J J   l*»»v*f  tonnmata-am
rti, itto* a«*»ak•;••*•
rt   l.    lir.a   lumtt.fOi
»N\lL*    I mtat   HiiM
*****  o»tf- a***, ih n • in M *<> i ; M
*.-l . *A«»MU)t« tkil •%•• unh«i»<n*<4 |i.' ."
lit It mo* | ImMM• •••« 1st *> 4-1 * t *
IU** Ot-M. «*K*64U*J. IK !•* t<* I'S t-a il
BAMS <*»•*-»*• $11 «* |mm 1*4 n.»
mn.UVl \jata tarn**.** *m*O0 ll tl *
i M il It «» eof «*# !••( S »l II :♦ ;-»r !♦*
'••»    HllllUH-  IM t—t
iKU.lft,   ranitU'.i:.   oo   fii»  |t-*aswi
•yoM ewatt*** up In I Ia   *»*ms   ■*•• •'<
torn**, oil w«tta». !•«• i* off t>»t Not* ;■"
tut pi Woo In offoc!
1**1 TS  iACMlKfr- S **** aataliet «
(la lass,  too* ll «ff  »•«,   *****  t in
%i ttt  Hot    ***%   ttlA  tM   \   W<m.   V   0(1
Vol*  ita*   li*!   Mi*r«« In  • ftiwl
•otft. "rrovt-toM it •>-* »•«
IIOR
oat let
j«»r  !(?*
III'
< rt.
i:
IX*
un
roa.
It.in,
Koa   o t<> l, 19 "*■
: ami larger, l-10
INK    KA|«    COMMON    Par   IM   lb»-
»r,t ovtr : C   3, I. nnd I fbl  13c
• **.   HAND   Par  lM*R>a   lVk-ln   M 00;
M* '   I Ifl   l«
.VISES—0'L«ry Solid Hot, 50 lbs.. $12.00
nch; '.<i Iba, !i>'*< I each; hid Um. $23.oo.
PAINTS AND OILS.
BranOram-Hendereon
Par Oallon
per   lo-'H)*"—  16
1S-S0 guage,
I  ■<.Y  HLA< k  umbkt
»g*.   li t     . i  guagi   !'•
li k itaga   M '-"
*.   UALV AMfcKD Sll KIT    Per 1
M  |. t\   vsi • ii ..I. oi   Engllah, I"
tot*   it' *   ."  K.i   Ke    M 66
KXotJS   RIM DOill   Japanned, SS.S6 p**r
no tt.h
it: 24
AMP
("IHMM'.ys   a. par caaa I dot
1     • M'
i    I   I    It «
!   INVI ll
ft. <
l.ittS   **t
loi . A,
t »
on a   lo  tit  ■' '
11
1
lit
I*
p+r not r. 10: u par "-'a**'
mi doi   B, par d"» I' *l
, s.   m ..-(  (.r  Hin-* globe, plain.
... ::*»: blade, HS.fO   14 % 6 blade,
■r-v i ,,.*..• |U 10; ISxS btaaa, 111.76,
Mada 111,v .    .. i„
,  B   vhMi   1   kolm,   each,   ll-ln
I r  t* M  i«-ln . »" '"'■ I knivaa, 11*
1-   b   l|i U; ll-ln . HI 00.
m,k.   MW   do*.;   Cutter,
MATTOCKS
'■ " **"'   ,. ,,.i    ii  ...   l\ "'. f ii li   V.inoiu-
v ill ««   v, w.t.  n.«M'   *~i .* *
,„ r i ***** »•irt f"'1 v»nr:H,v«r
PICKS     ClOt     *   '   tt'*    *M"   ,,*',1, ,     tin
,jNK T4H   ! tai   H10 etch;  «4 gal   -^
.»
r arti
< *«
'■ I   '« G    '*',.,«   n tn p*r 100 tba
B#ft^wMS^'^ML8
.-     \*     » aaaoriad eopparad riv»»
,. 7*1   iii £    wwrtad eoppar rlveta and
,v ;.;,/;   v.'»    rted   eopparad. burra
ind b im '*'
.-.•   t^-'   tt'
. •   . mi   Ml   h   '
,,-r n-  No » eopparad ourra
Kpi»r'#<l  HvalJ  ll«  P*r *
.   Iff   tkr'  ft' ,,„,
u .I:.v  manila   baae,  ne,
to   | tO*   ta*i
Ulfii * ''
f»
i
}R
;      «    ■* 11     I   tat**1    "PC,
RADIO ni>'r:ivi\.*, •sfn's ••- The new
nMivintHif  ; i *  hmao i«m jo (t>r cent;
Thormlndf-ne Tfl   H15.00 leaa Jfl
A'e«r;.|',j!ii. lit 00 ItOt J3 1-3: Truna
|TIM Wi ss l-s, Premier Rnaatn*
I t«    |4l  ':<•■**. tt  1-J
I/»tT> SP*SAKt*JRS  Poee type Jawatt. ISO
m --Ti-ttiK-J    No "ti', |i «5 each; Nc. "67,
|( |a rv■*,
HK*>I> P1IONBR
„  rar uano
n ii   Engllah" ordinary colore 14.11
H-ii "ESngllah" white Jam
H*H Extorlor <>u .sinriKio Bltln—
Ordinary colore, In 4 nui. cana -....IU'
■ it-H'-iH nnd Qreya, In 4 gul. cana I.M
HII Anchor Shingle .Stain—
Ordinary colora, in 4 gal cana  1,1k
Qrreni and Oreya, In 4 gul. cana Ml
PAINTS
Qallftn
Ordinary colors, in l gal. cana 14.40
Martin  Senour porch paint  4.40
Mu i'ii Senoiir .Ne.ilone white 1.71
Mai tin Senour Neutone color  3.71
Murtln Senour floor paint  „ 4 16
Sherwln  Wlllian*.   white  4.76
Sherwin Willlama,  col»r  4.40
Sherwin  Williams,   porch , 4.20
Sherwln Williams, lloor  4.U
Hl'TTV*- Per  100 Iba.
Hulk, barrela, MO His ~ I4.20
Hulk,   Irons,   100  Iba.  i7S
Hulk. Ions.  26  Ihs 5.78
Tini. 5 n.s.  „    8.40
Tins.  1 Ih,     10.W
I.INSKKli Ml.— Gallon
Raw, l to I barrela ....11.01
Boiled, l to '. barrela     1.0*
LEAD, WHITE IN OIL- Per 100 Iba.
1 000 H>s.  to 1 ton  _...|14,36
Kvss .     ,« 14 73
 „    14.00
Gallon
 |116
Gallon
 11.11
    T.4I
    1.10
 „   7.11
    Ill
    I.M
I tram ham's Ceiuilne
Tt'RPWNTINE-
lapp?
,'V«-nr.w3
SHght f1"'
Wm-*"**** a ww*      *r* w - - -  —•        '• ■
HOI.TSL this.********** t*
laoUo Um tssomoo \**ttoa~
miAMM. Sea*** **m »
111 ** ***** ****** *•**' ,   ... u
in.«i trust ha s* i m **> a*** i\ ■ \
io iu»in»j i*Al'KM  Tsrtva  i. "
Mi r»a #«*w»di»-« *>* i*******   i'1*
%i*Trs^t*toioA   Ml. aattmjre '.\     „"*'***        ,.      nrandet Superior, It.
, iu f^. |M-.f »Jr. IS » *\\ »*;'"., .*u      iJi W per .■«*"   , ,,r    „ ' „m 111 ■» doi.
It ai ao* *****   IS a IS I* * «*' ■ UtWf Idea IIIsfl l1' ■  #
4V^?feXlJ}iJ Sir"?-
.Ml »»»- ftnlah   H* I**  "*"?;*'.<   itlM
oiAtv- *\»ii n •«^«r" ••JJ. i ii Inn
^ar»—iai. Mi s ll •»«-     *
K<i I  IIS-M -Me    1'nU"«» K«  »  I*     ,    g
Homo.   N«   M.   It»  SW*!   """^
n« i. in ii **to no i. ••' ■• M
,Wr**VvM.i.rAiniT;:r.Ln>
ll^tTIII"^
toot
naiu^ w«
Sla-%awMH u '
wvrrsm
'•rR^S-,S*^.V,*JST^i «*» •>«.... ««*'-
TOES&Aa.*rft*" "
cwpWd T»n»»iniit ciirje»»«-
. .   _ ...    at* m.    U Ira*   I1
I barrel lots
VARKIBHK8—
Mlantlc. No   1 	
K'nsllc,  No   2  	
iv Linoleum	
IV  Marine  Spar  	
IV Furniture  	
IV Pale Hard Oil 	
I,*** SS 1-3 per eeni
ROGERS BRUSHING I.ACJ1IER.-1 gal.,
10 86; Vi Kill.. 15.18; ■*, gni.. 12.71; S gal,
1148; l-i«th gal. 87c; l-32nd gal, S7c.
Less 40 pt-r cent.
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS SHOCK-Float A Ford Ko.
1 nt |21 5«
ACCELERATORS   FOOT—Wlreleu   ForS
it II 75 each.
A880*RTMENTS—Cottar pin llo eaeh; Cap
nt-rews 38c each; Set acrewa 30c each; Machine ** rew T5c ench: Machine nut 76c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot |2.W each.
poors—Tire 4-ln. |1 26 ench.
lit'MI'ERS-Hoover Twlnbar, $10.10 each.
CAPS—Rndlalo-, $1 00 each.
lint. PARKORUNTI.tTM-Valva grinding l-oi. 14
ps   i*»M«   ii*   Foi.      dOI
Bulldog US *<■ Per       CARRIES-Luggage, collapalbla $1.16 each.
Iul    * CKMIWT-Radiator, Sib Wonder Woik*
f r 16 41 do«
CHAINS—Weed SflxSS $1.36 each; 32i3S
17 00 en h; 3H4 17.70 each; 33x4 11.10 eaeh;
J4i4 19 00 ench.   Less 30%.
RID o sKin-SftxSs W76 pair; MxlH
ISM, nnir: S4xSS M in p«itr; 30x4 $311 pair;
J3«4 M 5fl m»'r. I****. tin%. .  .
CLEANERS, WINDSHIELD—Praato $1.11
each; Raln-E-Pay. 11.60 each.
C01L8—Snnrk   nlngla   16.66   each;   Bparb
double IH no eech.
_,,.„   .  nRFLECT0R3-Wlnd    adjuatabla   I1I.N
T',,,1.;,   m **: r***h adnptlos. HI na»li. KNAMRI/_H pt, Jet Uc t««o doa: l-oa.
,   How**.*** ifi'A* doa.                 ,„ VVon(,„ worker $4 80 dot; *Ma;tln Sanour
wire harheo -Per m«-*4 ^ ™* Q„,rk nrylnr, t/M tsc each;,1/11 lie aaoh;
H is   i Dotnl ho*  W ';;',■; Jj' m t/1l 3lc each; U Sic each; U ••<> wohj H
head    70/10   Off
""Vnr.ws   m'a"' ""' , J off list: i>r«ss
s- rr^r^;^^hMd
flat hr-*»'i ■*■*" "
tft  \0 off H»' ,, .
„rrw CAPS  WoffUa-
bcrbws. bkt w off w       np ro,
^'"VF'f   ^"jonet cJWot W-w P"
in |0 pef &** N * Mj, *
7- •HB7jwar>**^*
'"if,tSi I, Wrt «^ ,.,„. ,„. p., lb;
i.or.ii
wm*********   _    a>. <a  «,fK     r."    »■ si'l.l'I.'.                                                                                u
B* » '■ •"  JI. ■Sir-^-.w !■;. in w -»""■"■
!»u.KA*»i.*»rr.-o,",';;;,.,.i •',:"*;'.<,.« '-■'",.",,'.;;„ um»
i.im: WIM    *"■ * ,V..r„.|.,*J> Mlwij**,,"?'Sulirr MlllM.
n    ..„>     .1    "I.  "•«   ""' P»   '" "'".iTnli  in full tm*    ,..,
i;**",'."tjr..          . t*^" .'.".!.''-■.-■'■<'"'•"■,o:""
•WnV-TnopJm. h ", «"irSS     »'";",,"•-"- «.*,SS » -   iu. -"    w   , "  VT
•v%^''J^r,-r..*t.Mr
4 m |Slb:l-«n M Wl •*,nff w'
MIRRORS—Reer view |s on men,
oifr-Mnnamobile, llirht $1.66 gal.; medium
It an ml : h<>avv $1 70 gel.
r*t*ottv*o r*s r\*\tf o?'T—T,-<oV»ite Vo. I
69 00 doi; No. 3 14 00 doa; No. 6. $100 doa.
PMvipsu.g»#n »|nn each
PLtTClS—Spark Champion lie each; A. C
Titan lie each: Het-F1, lie each
Sno 36
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-ALBRUTA-VUKON
Decern be i
MAIL ORDER BU8INB88.
(Continued from \mx.- ;ll
Act, have the right to control property and civil rights,
and have thc right to tax thc local merehanta for the
right to tlo business within thc privonee, which riirhl
is delegated to the various municipalities n which these
merchants are located, and th*' merehanta arc certainly
taxed and taxed heavily, yet the Mail Order Houses
who are doing millions of dollar* worth of business
within these provinces are not paying any taxes to the
municipalities in whieh they are doing business !»y mail
order. The local merchants being taxed, and although
the Mail Order Houses, in some instances, are dot tg
as mueh business in these municipalities as th.* local
merchants* yet they make no contribution either to tl»«'
municipality of the provinee for that privilege. This
indeed is very unfair ami tends to place the local dealer
in a disadvantageous competitive position.
Equal Basis Demanded.
Wc are all of the opinion that there must be a
certain amount of competition in business and freedom
of action, but there are two kinds of freedom, one i*
false where a man is free to do what he likes, and the
other is true where a man is free to do what he ought.
The Mail Order House appear lo be doing what ihey
like irrespective of the consequences to llo* communities in which they are doing business or to Canada as
a whole. They are building up individual businesses
and at the same time we know that it is impossible for
the business of this country to be conducted altogether
by Mail Order Houses. If this is true, and the local
merchant is a necessity and is rendering a service to
the eommunity in whieh he is resident, then he is entitled to be placed on a fair competitive basis with
other firms doing business in the district in which he
8 located, and the Mail Order Huiise should not Ih- free
from taxes any more than the local merchant, and
ahould not be able to do what it liked, taking advantage of the free privilege of doing business and the
advantage of parcel post rates to carry on its business,
but should be placed in a position where it should be
free to do what ought to be done for the benefit of the
communities and of Canada as a whole.
Wc must not look at this problem from a sellish
71
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
L
308 Water St
Vancouver, B.C.
point of view, but rather from the general development
of Canada*
Failurea Recorded.
When we realize that iu IU24 there were 1.72(1 retailers tailed in Canada with liabilities of 21,834,089,
and at the same time there were 025 manulaeiurcr*
with liabilities of eio.VI.!!•>. the failure ol whom to
a great extent is caused by the failure* of the retailer*
to pay them the amount*** which they are owing, or a
total failure of trader-* and retailers amounting to '22***'*.
with eo7.Miii.747 worth of losses, and when we an* ad-
used that of these loxsc* only some one quarter to one*
third can be attributed to 'incapable*, WC must coneiud-*
that business conditions are not just right in Canada
when these conditions exist
The Hetail Merchant*' Association have not onlv
been advocaoting that a lax should be placed on Mail
Order business which la having a detrimental effect on
the genera! retail business of Canada, but that a H«
tall epartment should Is- established within the department of Trade and Commerce, to make an invewti
gallon of the domestic distribution business of 'hi*
couniry, as we feel quite certain that if a complete investigation was made, that the iKparttiteut of Trade
ami Commerce would undertake to see that some of
the unfair not hods hy which gooda are being dish i'i
uied were discontinued, nml lhat every merchant
.should n*»t only be given an equal opportunity of fair
competition with his fellow merchant, but that these
loaeee which arc not only serious for those who h.,i\*"
failed, but reflect back upon the community ami i'i
turn are reflected in lhe price of goods generally would
be reduced. Such a department within the Depart
ment of Trade and Commerce would have a tendency
to stabilise business conditions in this country ami
would, we are certain as a result of the investigation
ami the reports which would be submitted thereon,
not only show conclusively that Mail Order Hottest arc
ke.-pint* back the proper development of community
life, but that they should be placed on a fair compel i-
live basis and -should In* required to pay for the privilege of doing business iu these various communities in
proportion to the average legitimate operating eotts
of the merchants located there,
A WELCOME QIFT.
Ilrltlali Columbia iicHor »'» would »|»|»r-«cl*le tin* «'hr»at
msa Klft presented Ontario csr owners. Tlo* r-wlurtion of •>•
la the license fee for plMtanre r«r* will Assn-fair about $1.
700,000.   Thc Mvtnf represent* tiu»n> icsllona of gsaollne
L Am.                      171
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
teethe tht sere muselee er life-
ments by rubbing In Mlnsrfs link
ment   It penetretse, relieves snd
hesls.   It asses Inflammsllen snd
rtsteres the Injured psrt te heeltb.
tplendid fer eule and eeree.    II
atarllliaa and hesls quickly.
1
fP       1       II
Essssjywo)
**mswa.'o*
*W*OtTw*t*tB*m 1W6
THK   RETAILER
imiTIHH COLWCBIA-ALBBRTA-TUKON
3?
SOME   NATIONAL   ADVERTISERS  WHO
HAVE USED THE   RETAILER   THIS
Anglo B. 0. Packing Co, Ltd
American Oaa Co, Ltd.
Atlantic Underwear Limited
Barnes Seals Co
B. 0. Sugar Refining Co. Ltd
B. 0. Ptah Packing Co, Ltd
Borden Milk Co, Ltd
P. Burns Co., Ltd.
Canadian 8alt Co, Ltd
Canada Surch Co. Ltd
California Packing Corpn
Canadian Toledo Scale Co, Ltd
Canadian Paint, OU A Varnish Manufacturers *
Association
Cnipman Holton EnitUng Co
Canada Colon A CnimicsU Co  Ltd
Connors Bros, Limited
W. Clark, Ltd
Continental Paper Product* Ltd
Dominion Canners B C Ltd
Dominion OUclotn A Linoleum Co. Ltd
Dominion Olaes Co, Ltd
Rmprtee Manufscturing Co  Ltd
flint Paint A Varnish Co. Ltd (Duco)
Fleischmann Co. Ltd
OaUEnitttngOo. Ltd
0. F. A J. Oalt-, Limited
t. W Olllctt Co, Ltd
Hudson t Bay Comoany Ty
IntirnsUotul Business UseWm Co, Ltd
Interlake Tlasuc MilU Co, Ltd.
lot 0 Matte Manuf sctut m   Co  Ltd
artfSr-sK-a*-
uSieVf the Woods Mimn. Co. Ltd
W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd
MinardeUnlniwtCoLd
Monarth Enittlng Co   Ltd
National ■gftJ^^JJinsurance Co.
North Weetern Mutual Fi   in
Nonsuch »^f^unnlC°Lt(
Palmolive Co. of Canada, IM
Penman's Ltd.
Quaker Oats Co., Ltd
Rowntree Co., Ltd
Remington Arms Co
Eoek Island Overall Co _ Ltd
Royal Crown Soaps Ltd
Royal Baking Powder Co
Sun Maid Raisin Co
KJaule Surface Aaeeciatton
Swift Canadian Co, LW
0. Turnbull Co., Ltd.
Wabaceo Cotton Co.,
J 0. WUson. Ltd.
Weetern Packing Corpn
THE SMALLER THE BIOOER.
A Tale With a Moral.
Ltd.
Seated in the rotunda of a large hostelry in the eity,
sal two travellers converging,
T,H' one. elderly, prosperous and of vast experience,
[Mated amusement at thc optimism, and seU-saUsfac-
non oi ins younger confrere-
Thi» latter was telling of a killing which he had
made that morning at "the great big store over thc
way, where In- had landed a live thousand dollar
order-Ms quota for the territory. "All from under
•'in-roof, mind you. wattiiiobouthat?"
The elder of the twain continued lo smile, remembering his experience of ten years ago, when he obtained a similar order from that great big store. For
three years ho had continued this "single-roof" killing. l»ut his price was forced closer and closer to manufacturing cost- until the fourth season, when his firm
wrote him as follows-. "Hold off this one-store stu4' —
no money in it. (io after the smaller fellows, who sell
on a quality basis, not on a priee basis—they are the
salesman you want."
And now these salesmen merchants, as he calls
tin in. eom prise his steadily growing list of loyal customers.
Musing thus, he glances over his order total. It
stands at 7,8li2.f>7 for this particular territory—awny
ahead of that one-call $5,000 order of ten years ago-
He gives no exclusive gants, and has fifty or more good
friends upon whom he makes regular calls.
What of his fellow traveller? Has he the friends he
nn ds in ease . No. he has but one in the territory, lu four years lime will be have any? History
repeats itself.   Do your own figuring.
The experienced traveller realizes that the big fcl
lows do not hold the high percentage of the annual
turnover in the larger cities as is popularly supposed
Less than 30 per eent. is computed to be their
share, and not 70 per eent. or 80 per cent., as some
suggest
What steps are travellers taking to obtain the goodwill of the smaller stores doing probably 70 per cent.
of the cities annual merchandising turnover?
Moral.
" Place not eaeh and every egg into one container,
nor yet sell all thy line 'to a single house."
ALBERTA SUGAR BEET CROP TOTALS 40,000
TONS.
After what is considered a satisfactory run the
sugar beet factory at Raymond, Alberta, concluded
operations for the season November 0th last.
Beei tonnage was somewhat less than 40,000 tons
ami was disappointing, but the sugar content was well
over Hi per cent-, or 2 per cent, higher than last year.
The net result is that about 20 per cent, more sugar
was extracted than a year ago. Growers this year
have been given a guaranteed priee of $6.25 per ton.
The 1927 contract calls for a guarantee of $7 pr ton,
with an objective of 9,000 acres.
Toueh On ths Pedestrian.
•One moment, sir. before I Oil In your application." the life
insurance agent said, "What make or car do you drive?".
■l don'l; drive any; I hate them," the proactive client
9al'Sorrv sir, but our company no longer insures pedes*
tHans." 'The agent regretfully turned away. 38
WESTERN GLASS
It making ntw friends regularly
with
CLASS OF QUALITY
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW GLASS
Strvict Phont Sty. SM7
Western Glass
Co-*-* Ltd*
151 Cordova St. Weat, Vaneouvtr
Scales. Siictrt, Cutters and Cabin.
ete—New, Rtbuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
The Scale Shop Ltd.
Soy. 2SS1
See Cordova St. W., facing Homer.
Fancy Silk Hose for Men at
the "Right Price."
Write for samples.
R. A. SIME, BC. Distributer
tut aiaca ssANurACTURsaa co.
til Homtr St      Vancouver, B.C.
DomiaiwSalcsCompatiy
eSS RICHAROS ST, VANCOUVER
Dial rl but ors for:
Fairy Dyes Ltd.—..... (Fairy Dye)
Harry Peck 4 Co. Ltd
(Moat Pastes)
Crottona Ltd. . (Lemon Curd)
Plalttowt 4 Co ....(Confectionery)
O-Pee-Chee 4 Co.
(Popcorn 4 Wlntoes)
Robert Watson ....(Confectionery)
Nstionsl Chicle Co. (Count linos)
Hunts Ltd  {Funn* Faces)
Martha Jane Products  (Bars)
Nicholsons Ltd.
(Blueing and Pollshoe)
Phono Sey. 7121
VANCOUVER
T. D. 8TARK
P. W. STERLING
Telephone
sey. em
STARK A STRRUMO
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
104S Hamilton Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUMBIA-ALBHRTA-VUKON
December
Phone: High.
IDOL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturer of
ICE CREAM  CONES
Pureet Made     Cott Ltee
33S PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
PwfrjBti
Addressing
Mailing Lists Multlgrspblng
DIRECT MAIL CAMPAIGNS
Handltd Efficiently
Wri-jliy Dirtt.to.iis, Ltd.
IM Hatting, W. Sty. 100S
I
SERVICE TO OUT OF TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
-Tht Patellar** will bt pleased to
furnieh subscribers the names and
addreeeee >f repreeentativet or
agente of Eastern manufacturers In
Vancouver. We will alee adviee
where the r commodltiee can bo
purchattd.
Manufacturera9 Agents
(Vancouver, un leaa otherwiee stated).
(Insertions under this headlns are
charged at tho rate of tl 20 a line,
for els months, payable In advance).
DRYGOODS
Atlantic Underwear Ltd.. Moscton.
N.I1.-E. H. Welch a Co. Lid.. Ill
Homer Street.   Soy. 1597.
The Black Mfg. Co.. Seattle ~-R A.
Slme, SIS Homer Street.   He*  IMS.
Chlpraan Holton Knlttlns Co. Ltd.
Hamilton. Ont.-~K. II. Walsh A Co.
Ltd.. 311 Homer Street.   8ey. 1617.
The Oall Knlttlns Co. Ltd.. Oall.
Ont.—J. J. MacKay. 104 Bower Bldf.
Sey. 3091.
Monarch Knlttlns Co. Ltd.. Sll
Homer Street—8. D. Stewart 4 Co.
Ltd.   Phone Sey. 7536.
Penmana Ltd.. Parla, Ont.—J. J.
Thompson, 615 Hastings West  8ey.
7377.
Rock Island Overall Co.. Rock Island. Que—R. A. Slme, S1I Homer St.
C. Turnbull Co. Ltd., Oalt, Ont.—
8. D. Stewart 4 Co. Ltd., Sll Homer
Street.   Sey. 7635.
GROCERIES.
Borden Milk Co. Ltd. — Montreal
Que l«ocal Of lice. 333 Water Hire!
Bey, IStt.   J W. Nunn. Manager
Canada Colors and Chemicals Ltd.
Toronto Stark 4 Sterling. 1403 Ham
llton BtresL   Soy. SI96.
Canada Starch Ca Ltd., Montreal.
K   11   Rowntree. 207 Haatinga W.
Sey   5»
Canadian Postum Cereal Co. Ltd..
mt$ C   Ltd .  731  Hast.
inn* West.   S«->   9337.
W Clark Ltd. Montreal. Que.-C
P. Stark. 123 Hamilton HI.   Sey. 3040.
K W. Ollleit MIS. Co. Ud -I*
McFarlane. 600 Heady 81. Sey. 1391.
ui (itnAila Lid. London,
Ont. L IV Mason A Co. 610 Ileal
inn* Wni    s«y :•*>»
Uk* of the Woods Milling Co  Lid
-1300 RwbardS Street.     Sey. 3131
W.  II   l>'.\r>>. jr. manager.
Canada IUm-uii Co. Lid. London.
Ont. Local off ke. 1160 Hamilton St
Sey  3112    C  II   Kenny. Manager .
Palmolive Company ol Canada Ltd,
Toronto. Out -ttaan Armstrong. It3t
Urth Street    Hoy   601L
The Quaker Oats Company.—IacoJ
office. 526. 610 Hast ngs West. O. 8
Thompson. Sales Manager.
Howntrre A Co (Canada) Ltd * Tor
onto. W. II lleatij A Co. Lid. S36
Home Street. Vancouver.
STORE EQUIPMENT 4 SUPPLIES.
Bertram Paper Producl• Co. Ltd.
1290 Homer 81 reel—Norfolk Paper
CO, Ltd. 131 Water Street. Sey. 7Ml
and 7919.
Canadian Toledo Scalee Co. Ltd.--
Windsor. Onl K 8. Chambers. 509
Smythe Street    Sey. 1911
Continental Paper Prodocla. Ltd.
Ottawa. (Hit -Smith. Davidson A
Wright.   Sey. 9646
Geo. McKae. — Waved Paper and
Counter Sales Hooka.   1061 Ham.Hon
Streel.   Sey. SI 13.
International Business Machines
Co. Ltd. Toronto Ural office. Iti
Seymour 81.   Sey. 3S3
J. C. Wilaon. Lid. Lac hate. Que.~
tacal office, lose Homer 8L Soy.
711.   W. T. Rao. Manager.
SPORTING GOODS.
Prosser. T. 11. a Sons Ltd.. London
Eng.—Aaeoclat id Agencies.  Sey. 111. I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^JW^^
THE ONLY BOOK OF ITS
KIND EVER PUBLISHED
Forty-elghl selected sardine meals prepared in the loading kitchens of America
and printed in an attractive sixteen page
book. These tasty yet practical recipes
furnish tempting suggestions for eco-
n imlcal meals.
A new supply of these books is now ready
for distribution. All requisitions will be
tilled in the order received. Write at
onee to the address below, stating bow
many families you serve. One book I'or
each Famll)  will be mailed to you abso-
lll't ly   free,
CONNORS BROS., LIMITED
BLACK'S HARBOUR, N.B.
Largest Sardine Packers in the British
Empire.
Just as popular as Turkey for Xmas Dinner
SWIFT'S
"PREMIUM" Ham
Handy : Delicious : Satisfying
Make Sure of the Brand-Swift's "PREMIUM"
  The Ham that's Different
SWIFT CANADIAN  COMPANY  LIMITED V.

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