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The British Columbia Retailer Jul 31, 1921

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 THIRTEENTH   YEAR
The
CONVENTION NUMBER
British Columbia
JULY,   1921
Dry Goods - Groceries - Hardware - General Merchandise
20c Per Copy; $2.00 Per Year.
Vol: XII, No. 11.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WHEN SELLING YOUR CUSTOMERS
OGILVIE'S
Royal Household Flour
YOU KNOW AND THEY KNOW
That it is not merely a question cf making better bread, but the Best Bread.
There is .1 world of sat ifaction m knowing this, and a steady and high-class
bul ne>8 for you In pushing a Flour which has always been recognized as
CANADA'S BEST
OGILVIE.
■    Ji' I
! OATS;
Ogilvie Oats
Have just  the  right flavor which, coupled  with  an absolute freedom from
hulls, has put them in th" front rank.
Ogilvie Oats are ihu the people's choice.
iwie
THE
OUT  MlIIS
Vancouver, B. C.
o., Lt
o
307-308 Carter-Cotton Bldg.
Phone Sey. 6891 B.C. District Telegraph & Delivery Co., Limited
Operating in Connection with Great North Western Telegraph C v        516 HASTINGS STREET WEST
With which is amalgamated FIRE PATOLS LIMITED
Sevmour 651
ELECTRIC PROTECTION AGAINST BURGLARY       MANUAL FIRE ALARMS
CENTRAL STATION SYSTEM OF NIGHT WATCH SIGNALS
ELECTRIC SUPERVISION OF AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
During the Past Year Our Patrols Reported
and Attended to:
403 DOORS LEFT OPEN.
190 WINDOWS LEFT OPEN or BROKEN
454 LIGHTS Left ON by Accident
87 LIGHTS Left OFF by Accident
17 SAFES Left OPEN by Accident
FIRE PROTECTION ADVISORY DEPT
WATCHMAN'S PATROL.
MERCHANTS' POLICE.
SPECIAL SALVAGE.
LIGHT CONTROL
UNIFORMED MESSENGER SERVICE
We Woik in < o-operatioi  h th the ' it)   Fin   m I  ''
We Answered 207 FIRE CALLS Threatening Our Clienta
i>;
or Wi •    for I
•ri   .' >••
ROYAL CITY BRAND
CANNED FRUITS, VEGETABLES & JAMS
"From the Gardens of lhe Fraser Valley "
WHY
Send  your  money  out Hide  of
P. C
WHEN
Royal (Ity Brand canned
fruits and vegetables are
grown and packed right in B.l .
liny carefully
Bul buy
Keep Ii. 0. s factories buny and
there will be work I'm- all.
B   0   FRUITS    AND    VEGE
TABLES
iivi-i CANADA n-4        Hi
"-mi
W
NO
loi   I  i•.!■ L, tit
BUT
Wi   do park the best ol  I
\      foi  ROYAL CITY brni
PURE jiiniM packed in n !i'»«'
in! iicm lithograph I m
Hooal made iu IV I
" Iv
wikihihiw' ni1*     r — ' "" 921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
363
Give a receipt
and get all your money
The ritfht way to handle a sale
1. Collect the goods at the
wrapping counter beside
the register,
2. Tell the customer the price
and get the money.
3. Register the sale.
4. Wrap the receipt in the
parcel.
5. Give parcel and change to
the customer.
The customer gets quick service.
The clerk gets credit for making the
***      Z>»    'I   Ii   M ilKT
*"_"*        «rm«e        jfgp                fcr
TKS 5 «, ?RE2:Pre* 7*31 ?C*Jit
»:nct««s£.
TB£ UIM4*Matl CH
K» *"3*X
Wrap this receipt ta th* parcel
BiifliS
CASH
DOLLARS   I CTS
Get this receipt inside the register
sale.
The merchant *rets all of his profits.
National
An J get all your money
We make cash registers for every line of business
NATIONAL
CASH  REGISTER  CO.
OF   CANADA  LIMITED
-al 304
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
HIV
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
The End o! e Perfect Day"
fMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which La Imported for the
purpose.
IfPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
2-lb. tins, 24 to a case. 10.1b. tinu, 6 to a case.
54b. tins, 12 to a case. 20 lb. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
tgrnmummgrngmimifiB^ *iI='~^—*— 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
365
Restmore Manufacturing
Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS
OF THE
FAMOUS
RESTMORE MATTRESS
ALSO
WOVEN WIRE and COIL SPRINGS
STEEL BEDS
SANITARY COUCHES
And All Kinds of
FURNITURE   FOR   THE   HOME
Patronize Home Industry
BUY
COLUMBIA BRAND
Writing Tablets
— and —
School Supplies
Made in B.C.
Wrapping Paper, Twine, St. Lawrence
Paper Bags, Toilet Paper, Picnic
Sundries and Stationery
Columbia Paper Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA, B.C.
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
FLOU R
The World's Best
Daily Capacity H200 Bbls.
*
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 16H Store Street
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
Selling Products
Your Customers Know
EDDY'S MATCHES--30tc40different brands of them—are known
to everybody everywhere in Canada.
EDDY'S Indurated Fibreware
utensils are equally well known
and equally popular.
An Eddy display will link you up
with the nation wide demand
.lust show EDDY products in your
store—they sell themselves.
Matlc in Canada, by Canadians,
for Canadians.
THE L B. EDDY CO., LUTED
HULL, CANADA. :;«;<;
tr
rilK BRITISH COLUMBIA KBTAILBK
Bri
rings
Y
ou
Busi
usiness
Do II £ver\) Day
Boost the
MADE.IN-B.C.
Campaign
Ii
Your store bun h\ ot\\ i ,;■ lo thi     h*** o|   * ■   |*   . .•
I',,.; .   ..-. u RO\ \s. M' \\h \iih l»RO!)l (THai   ' •       •
their line.     ' fltl
Royal Standard Flour Wild Ros** Pastry Flour
Royal Standard Whole Wheal ami Graham Flour
Royal Standard Poultry Feed!
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co.. Limited
OFFICES AND MILLS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Branches: Victoria, Nanaimo, New Wtttmtntttr, Mi*-non City
Duncan, Courtcnay, Lanjfley Prairie. CI nerd alp, Lvlner
VANCOUVER
EXHglTlON
*♦>
August 13th to 20th, 1921
Special Attractions For See
Big Days
en
Let Us Help
British Columbia
ENTRIES CLOSE   AUGUST  2nd
H. S. ROLSTON, Secretary.
130 Hastings Street West. VANCOUVER, B. C
it »» Rdmltttd lhal Oaaan Paid Kraft
ind Manilla Pap-n ^r ,.1U4i to Any or ,»,,,
marttl   ind iu|Mr(or to man,
a3 .i mattar of pr.ict.cai home industrial
polloy H .i idvlsabli for daal«n to inafal
upon thrsr p.»per»      Th |  Wrrp, our ot Iffll
busy   and monay elreuiatinft
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturer* and  Wholesale  Paper Dealcn
VANCOUVER ami VICTORIA, B.O, in'»l
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEI
367
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Rltaillk
Published Monthly.
THIRTEENTH YEAR
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS,
HARDWARE,
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION" OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the Interesl of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSi RIPTION HATH. Tun Dollars Per Year, payable in advance.
Advertising Rates on Application.
Kditoi . J. s  MOKKiSON
Publishers: Progress Publishing Co., Ltd.
EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS OFFICES:
LONDON BUILDING, VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Address   "SHIPPING.'' All Codes Used
Telephone; Seymour 3861
Vol   XI!, So. II
l/Y. 11)21
Vancouver, B.C.
IDITOWA
Wl.iKi in normal limes lhe price
luovomeul <»f ever) commodity is
primarily determined by conditions
prevailing in its own aud immediate
|*i related markets, during boom
periods or violent depressions,
prices arc sffected more h,\ general
movement than by individual factors lj does not signify thai been use mnu\ prices have been staoi
lixed thai no further declines will
i \entuatr. The) ma> be looked For
in n number ol litu s aud w bile we
in,i\ feel eonfidenl that 'I'1' vioh nl
general decline in rav materials and
related produets is o\er, this w ill
iii>i prevent s stow bul orderly tie-
i Ii in over n p< nod ol j eai*s Such
,i decline would be no menace lo
sound business i il 's quite praetieal
ti» make business plans to meet slow
priee changes. Thr violent fluctuations and almost lotal absence ol a
market .it nn\ price have been the
distressing factors in business circles,
Prices that Fall gradually over a
period of years would nol materi-
;ill\ afTeet the priee movemeni o\
commodities over such periods ns
are usually ne essarj for manufac
luring and distributing operations.
It must be remembered lbs! rising
pri rs nre nol essential lo prosperity
and to reckless speeulati\ e activities
nlone is n slow t\o\\ n\\ ard movemeni
discouraging,
A   NOVEL  ELEMENT  OF   LOSS
This 1920-21 price collapse and
the universal «•»>11sn11nt*j-s;* strike produced startling changes in assets
throughout business generally. A
large portion of these, while being
absolutely good at face value under
anything like normal conditions,
rapidly depreciated, and in, some
cases disappeared altogether,
through shrinkage of inventories
and the cancellation of orders. In
addition to this, the necessity of
giving more attention to commitments has been realized, whieh in
some cases and under eertain conditions are equal to direct liabilities, A manufacturer, for instance,
may have committed himself to the
purchase of a large volume of raw
material, on the strength of con*
tracts from his customers to take
the  resulting  finished  product.
When the general public, by its
antipathy to purchase goods at any
price stopped the movement of the
finished product, many of the manufacturer's customers cancelled orders. In most cases the manufac-
turer could nol cancel if he would.
and t hese commitments for raw materials contracted For al high prices,
without the offset of his own customers* comicitmciits to 'him. developed into n very definite liability. Thus n novel element of loss
w (is brought into the balance sheet
under n peculiar set of contingencies.
It became evident that the condition of a firm as shown in the balance sheet was not. merely based on
the apparent current condition of a
firm as shown in the balance sheet,
or even in its balance sheet plus a
full knowledge of the concern's contingent liabilities—but full consideration must be given to all possible
changes that may occur in assets in
respect to the commodity values re-
presented there and also in respect
to the firm's orders on its books,
the standing and responsibility of
its customers, and the related contingencies involved in its own commitments.
It is not unusual for a reaction to
be followed by a temporary spurt
of prosperity, or at least a seeming
revival of business that often be-
,'uiles business men into a re->ex*
pansion of their activities beyond
fundamental requirements. Prudence must continue to control business plans until the readjustment of
all phases of industry have been
consumated.
The price drop was particularly
destructive because it began from
unprecedented peaks, established by
an unequalled world-wide advance
in commodity prices. These prices
became so high, gradually bringing
on the great consumers' strike that
swept the entire world, following a
period of apparently unbridled extravagance. Extraordinary as it
may seem, many business men con*
sidered that the same rate of purchasing by the public at these high
price levels would go on indefinitely. Many others apprehended a revulsion, but they placed it at some
indefinite point in the future and
did not prepare for it.
When the reaction came, inventory values melted away aud the
commitmeids of customers became
countless through the wholesale
cancellation of orders that ran to
unheard-of lengths. This resulted
ill many eases to profits heing
proved to be nolhii!g more 'than
normal physical inventories carried
at abnormal prices, and in many
cases the shrinkage of these
prices not only wiped out profits,
but also produced a serious impairment of capital. The cancellation
of orders also converted the physical volume into over-supply, converting an asset into a liability. These
conditions naturally became worse
as goods for which a concern was
committed continued to move into
its inventory, 368
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Educational Ideas for
the Retail Merchant
Executives' Relation to Their Salesforce.
it      is      surprising     how     little     after it a trad of doubt, suspicion,
thought the average person gives to    and a weakening of confidence, is
the simple things in life, and there    not a successful sale.
is a vast amount of satisfaction to       ,> . .- • ,
,    ,        , . ,     .       . hverv activity of a retail store,
be derived from vour sales Force by ■',       , ,      ,
...        , * , *     financial,   advertising,   merchandise
making them think. .    ■   . ., t.
ui!". or management, nnd their ui'r
To arouse thought in a right di- mate expression in those bus) young
rection, even though sometimes BUch people  behind   the   counter.    The
thinking is irrevelant to the subject statement    has    been    made    that
discussed,   tends  to  broaden   and ''salesmen  are   born,   not   made";
strengthen the quality of the human tins is incorrect, as even   normal
mind. mind is a storehouse of aetivities,
and education, ns the very word mi
Example is greater than precept,
and it is quite possible to mould tlie
mind of the average sales hoy or girl
into a splendidly teachable, pliable
and receptive organ when properly
approached, but a training which is
all head and no heart must result in
plies is not a matter of cramming,
but of bringing out the inherent
qualities waiting only to be stirred
in'o activity. Go around one or
t«o  mornings  each   week   among
your sales boys and Kirln and  tail
detrimental t<> any merchant's business.    It is natural to suppose that
Sales folk     will     reflect     the    ex
disc manager, or buyer, will have
''snippy," insolent salespeople in
his store or department- the inevitable result of the law that " like at
tracts like." ,\ dishonest, put it-
over typo of store owner or buyer
should not be surprised t<> find an
excessive amount of stealing going
on. with a very noticeable prceent*
rsmbborn."dull" and resisting unit    about efficiency, about   their  own
interests, their own success, lhe in
creased wages possible through bcl
ler methods, the importance of pf*>
amplesVeY'by those above them,   A    &***< ;,,lli .•••'« w»-- *«■ fr'>m ■h,,in
tyrannical   store  owner,   mer ban-    a reasonable response.    lion speak
to them about 'he grand rewards
fur doing good, for serving and
heipini* others without any thought
of profit or of self, and you will
quickly find the inherent love of
the  idea!   manifest   in  their  rap?   at
tention, From such materia! as
this good salespeople are made
 I    An   educational   s\stein   I   I   H
age of what is called shrinkage at partment store, based on the so
the end of the year. There is surely called laws of efficiency in selling,
no one so short-sighted as to refute however rigid, carefully planned,,
the statement that dishonesty is the and inleiisiveiv applnd it maj be,
most expensive thing 00 earth. !s a trsvest) unless it is founded
whilst honesty, justice, fidelity and upon the premise that anything
similar     qualities     constitute     true     whieh  is not   SS  good  for  the  sales
person as it  is for the store, or an)
thing which is not as good for the
customer as it is for either the store
or    the   sales   person,   is   moral! *<
wrong,
It   sounds  a   far  cry   to   sa\   that
the excessive cost of i|o)iii" business
iii a retail store is largely due to a
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^—^^^^      tailure on the part  of store owners
point o) view; and when people are     .     _,„„,    .,       •     ■,• e     ,
V       •     t1      ,       ,1-1 '"  t-Masp the significance   of   this
economy.
What is a Successful Sale.
_ Then*   is (icrhaps no thought that
rus mankind which is capable
ire varied interpretations than
^thought of human success,   Sn■•-
cess   will    always  be   a   matter   of
idea, Have store owners ever
stopped to realize the terrific cost
of paying wages to an unhappy, dis
Batisfied, disloyal  sales  person,  and
lhe     awful     economic   waste   ()f
"fear"'"
discussing the elements which con
fributed tO a success, they will get
nowhere unless they are both stand
iiiLr at the same point on the horizon.
\o one should think of a successful salesman or woman merely as
one who runs a big book or make!	
a good tally, for a sale that is made     ,)InV(. ,),,, So called ability of a m'or
at the cost of weakening the moral    ial to Seii more goods in a given
fibre  of  a   business,   which    leaves     time, or to sell higher priced goods,
Deal With Our Advertieere:    Th*y Mike This Official  Publication
Education merely tending to i
nt
or   to   make   one   person   bus   mote
than he intended to bu\, or to n ,
another buy something he neithi
wants    or   needs,   i*   «   dangerous
thing, unlest it is tempered b\  a
distinction    between    what    is   , fl
eient  and what  ih right
Most   sabs   people   are   brOUghl
to the average department stori in
some  sneh   way   a*  this    I mal
after standing m hue, poring over
in  their  own   minds  tlie  hopes ami
rears of getting the job, or not  ■ •
tmg  i*.  and  subjected  t" thi   11
bsrraasmcnt of being seen lool •
tot w ork, follow ed bv thi  i nu • i
tional   li*t  of questions   regarding
their houestji. past i sp**ricn
and the other intricacies of lhe ma
I'luii.rv of a store's employment d<
parlineitl,      Ijiej       are      Jhetl
(hrough i short course mi ho*s I
•.e out isles checks, th'    eneli   *
for k'lim chewing, the terribh
of wearing s colon d shirtwstst
then dumped precipitate!) into
parti lent   w ith i book in one h
and   s   bundle   of   fears   and   Ufl    I
lainties in "h,v other.
wioj-e  there t* the right  ipiril
th'   ritfht  loi c for the --tore   sn :  I
•'■ ■ ling <''' '  i fidenee its th*    uti
of the men bsek of the stori   ihcn
yon will find your most in 'cssfitl
•seliuig people. not onlji   ■     '
kind of i  slore sttracli the best
material, but because so-csllcd il n
I lestionsl work thrives no much
more m the fertile mind of i happy,
hopeful  human  being
RETAILERS   WILL   BOOST   BIG
FAIR
I he  Retail   Itcrch&nta    Asso
lion  wdi gi?e s*s support  [o Ihi*
years Exhibition, August l; lo ~".
one   oi   the   features   siread)   ••
i mged  b%   tin- association being r
window   display   competition
local stores, in which the sttenl
Of  the   puhlie   Will   be  directed   (0   '
big gathering at Hastings Park
wt 11  as to the  merchandise b<|!
handled b\  each   competing  store
ihe Vancouver Exhibition A"-1-"'""1
lion   has   donated   1100   toward   "
prises, and  n similar amount  I
been put tip by the K. U, A
I ossihh as a means of cementm
goodwill between England and tl
I nited States, an eminent profess
of the Northwestern tlniversil
Chicago, has produced b red, whil
and blue com I
Poteible at 12.00 a  Year. ' ■'-' THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Fourth Annual
Convention of the
Provincial Board R.M.A.
Ignorant Criticism Not Harmful to Organized Activities.
lave been onlv too eager to lay the
369
\n opportunity to come together
m order to discus-, matters of moment, and to report upon progress
made in connection with the umlti-
ludinous details confronting all organized bodies, is vitally neccsary
if such bodies, or organizations are
tn function with any degree oi efftc-
ienc).
The Retail Merchants' Association oi (.'anada has, in the past, been
subject to much adverse criticism,
chicfl) b\ those who did not trouble
to maki themselves acquainted with
its objects and who went so far as
io rebuke the Association's efforts
and describe then as a bodv who
were "feathering their nests" at the
expense of the retail merchants of
the I dominion.
Thirtj Fve years ago a few jewellers in Montreal originated the
idea ot sell preservation against un-
an      casiiies provided in   the legislation ot that period, and from such
a beginning has grown a formidable
and influential bod) with a Dominion charter, recognised today as a
factor justl) entitled to a very important position in the world ol commerce,
There is still, and probably   ever
will be adverse criticisms levelled
against the k. M.   V.  bul such  a
solid structure is being established
that criticism of a detrimental nature does little dse than enhance the
value of the benefits which the Asso.
eiation is bestowing upon, not only
us members, bur upon the retail
merchant  of every community.
It is tiue of all organized bodies,
.md more especially of an association
functioning for the benefit oi retail
merchants who. as a class, arc possibly the most difficult to organize,
that enormous difficulties will o'er
shadow their endeavors; but provided that measures adopted are always formulated upon a basis ol
5airnC88i not onh to members ot
that Association but also to the activities oi other branches oi industry, so long will they continue to
enjoy public confidence.
Retail merchants throughout this
continent have been accused ot" the
most nefarious acts since the signing oi the Armistice, and the public
against legislation detrimental to
their business, and against encroachment by other branches of trade upon the retail merchants sphere of action. This task is made the more
difficult owing to the fact that anyone is permitted to operate a retail
store without any previous knowledge of merchandising ethics, and
who will consider himself capable of
standing alone, declining to recog-
blamc tor the continued high prices mze the necessity of co-operation.
of almost every commodity handled -be usual result is that after a short
in a retail stoic, upon the retailer period of practices, which only serv-
bimself, and have not realized the ('d to undermine public confidence
problems which confront the retail snd lower the prestige of the retail
merchant and winch are becoming community, the self-styled "-
more complex every day. Indeed,
the public
t"   rive
generally are not inclined
iIn:    retailer    credit for
merchant" fails disastrously. Such problems as these among hundreds of
others have the R. M. A. to contend
with.
When a review is taken of the
recent amendments made in legislation through the efforts of the
Association, legislation which was
considered unfair to the retail merchants, it is obvious that any "nest
feathering" which the executives of
the R. M. A. may have been accused
of was not indulged in at the expense of the retail merchant.
M. A. MACDONALD,
K.C., M.L.A.
Who is addressing the delegates at the
Forthcoming Convention on the Subject
of "Pacific Problems."
straightforward dealing, claiming
that he has not, and is not yet making the necessary sacrifice in reducing the figures of merchandise
bought long since in a rising market.
whereas the manufacturer, they
claim, has made every effort to stimulate business by taking positively]
enormous losses. This attitude of
the public mind seems to reflect upon the K. M. A. who. are certainly
not responsible for the methods retail merchants may adopt in conducting their business. The Association is primarily functioning to
defend members against all such unfavorable, and in the majority of
cases,   provedly   unjust   criticism,
PRINTERS NOT REQUIRED
TO COLLECT SALES TAX
Dominion Secretary E. M. Trowern of the Retail Merchants' Association has written the local office
stating that the association's offer
to appoint an advisory committee
to confer with the customs and
inland revenue department on all
matters relating to tax collections
has been gladly accepted by the
department.
Ottawa officials asked especially
for a committee of the printers and
publishers' section, and Mr. Trowern says that a strong committee
of nationally known houses, embracing general commercial printing, photo-engraving, lithographing, bookbinding, embossing, rubber stamp making, and printing
plates was named.
The Dominion secretary states
that retail businesses are not entitled to pay the sales tax on account of special clause in the Special Revenue Act as follows: "The
excise taxes specified in this section
shall not be payable on the sales of
goods made to the order of each
customer by a business which sells
exclusively by retail." Mr. Trowern adds that many printers are
paying a sales tax when they are
not required to do so. 370
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Successful Convention
of the Saskatchewan
Branch of the R.M.A.
ADJUSTING   DIFFERENCES
<»:.•■    1)1    ihfi    IM.lltl    |trV|C£i    :■•!!!<:
■ •    proi its la]   ottn <•   wn$ in ,»
i< tilem<■!•' . f ;h<> dispute! thai  ■ •■■
tween memoeri and wholeest** ri i
'.i luring firmi    Man) letter* ol %\  ■
ixiiov had been received not onh
in«-r bl   I I   bill   from   th.-   Ittpplj   h
with -rhb b iht r. ■ ttien ma) bait
lo did   ill      -v. . thai fad » ■
The eighth annual convention of    more co-operation on  the pan  ol    nablt featttfi ••   *n parti*!
the Saskatchewan   branch of   the   nwrchants in creating a greater oi        r"r '■'      ,ir'-- ' P* '•:' ■■• m«
Retail      Merchants      Association     ganization, the mott ■   I m   th™
offered  its   members  an    excellent President  Panticld stated that ' '■" -  -    10   -i'    h   r-   -..■..•.
record of accomplishments at  the    retail merchant has a missii n; it is    -u.i-^ were  Um ted   •
three    days'   conference    held    re-     fo  serve the Communitl   bettCI     foi      ;     '   ,   '. ,      ','        '
ccntly in Saskatoon,   Sask. he was the one in actual touch with     ', '      ..  '.,..*,
The official welcome to the dele- the  consumer.    The  largest   nianu*     irhlrti   erai  • ill*   d
gates    was    tendered    by     Mayor facturing concerns passed their pi
Young,  who   mentioned in  his ad- duets   to the   people thr--Ufgh   re,
dress     lhe     disadvantages     under channels    as    the    most econoni
which the  retailers had been labor- am! efficient method ol distribul . »rtatl
ing during the unsettling conditions i u from
following the  war. and hoped  that        TRAFFIC   DEPARTMENT   Thll Kl*Hr
the convention would tend to solve tion vrai geatl) appreciated b) mem
DISTRICT   MEETINGS
• •   • '    i-h..i«n-    i '
,     n%   »;.
-   ,
their many problems. *** It vai Mttaated itet'h ■tew
•    ' . . lettil inetu til ov«>r> hiiri. • « ana        :•
President   Mc.Mickcn.  whilst   of- the extent ol 14.000 i rear vfc  fa wo '*•
fering no forma! address, alluded lo in  all probability bate ?•••■•   oth rwl i
a  recent   meeting   with  the  whole- lost
salers of Saskatoon which, he said,        Thk COLLbBCTfON  I'KIwktmkn r
was m«'st   satisfactory, and  he re- Daring the jrear lomething tiki fl1'1'00    ornoi  arork  ■' •
marked that it was the endeavor of bad been mUfriMl nn<! had Snanciai eon it    hi
the retail   association in the three llOont hew more fatorabh   (***-  tot*)     vcrfcal
i    .      .! would aoootleea nun bwn mu h greet<r*r />«^^r«*1   »««»•*   ^,^/n. rex, < • •<
prairie    provinces   to   work   togeth- ,„ an>  t ,„.  ,,   ,h,jWi,,; {hA>  ,v<t.T ,,.. QROCiRI   meet   WHOLIMLER8
er  with  the  wholesalers,  whom  he couid profltabl)  belong lo Ihe ormi * ' "'
jocularly  remarked   were    "not   so Hon if only  to take idvaaUfi of Ihi '
black as they were painted." wrrict '"•
Provincial    Secretary   !•*   Iv   Kay-        ITBi.P ITY   DEPARTMENT   Mo* between  the two hi
mond characterized the year as one charge o( R   B   Erani Utla lection hai     lrtd«
filled  with   more   notable  achieve !"/"''' Kr";1''P"*™"    N'»' ••*>■'* waa th« the 1
, , ■     ,, v\eaten* R«*t-»H-"r ronald^rablir lronro***d, . ■ •  >    •;»-,,   Man>'<
ment  than  any   other  year  in   the ,„„ , rnn„.an, fJ(i „ (>f , j( ^ u m p. ,  .,   , ,   .,     ,      ..
history   of  the   organization,  and sued to memben In order to keep then       • ' ■ ■■
one in which the value of co-oper* In toncn witta  important matten thai       >     - -
ation had been brought home in a ***** fr,,,n ,l,!"" tn *lm*'
most  forceful   manner. IMIM.KMKNT    AND    aUTOMOBIU |''...'■.'   ,
8El TION- 'f~hiH bii tnadi notahli pr . 1  ,\lr. f. .    .
President  Banfield  Reviews Work grew In tho rear m lei the  lln
of Dominion Board. "  T f*i*x«J     Vpproxlmau         per eer
Inrreaie in memberehip in fhu if ti •.
As   always   .has   been   the   case alone wii proof thai then *«« n<-.-.» ol                       AUTOMOTIVE
when   I.   A.   P.anfield. President of Kl|,,i * icrrlri
the   Dominion    Board  addresses   a ,,  ] u\  PWVincW twrcUp   ''     "
meeting of   merchants he   knows Retail Merehanta   AMociation re
just what he wants to sav, and he OUTcTANni^r   rcATMDrc   ««   T Umu,\     fv,U]     Victoria    reci
'savs.t  without any frills or waste ° rnrMvril^L irh,I? h" ^^ " w,,|! *iU
i  itrnv.   in ins 'address at   the convent.on meeting of the automotli     •
uesday session of the convention, , u'\u>u f" "! "h v" ' ^H" *» i'-"" of Vancouver Island.
President Banfleld stated that  few lM^7f^                                   The secretar? gubmitted a
retailers had anv  idea of the vast -J^Jf    W,Hfl* '" '"h"r ,hin ,h" r" oi l'r"!«"^<l Ifgialation for the |
amount of work"that had   been ac 'r,f(rt,nll, lrr  M P08?    "f    Protecting    the     pul
comoiished hv the r  m   \   d„r ,i «.   ,        'V'"111''   f"'^ tl*** to against mirepreiientaton In
compnsnea ny tnc k. ai. ;\., aur- chain itorei and mail order hou«<-« i •. .    .          .»   Il        i     * •>    . .
ing the past twelve months. certain manofacturen '.HHt",n U1,h "•? BaJe ol     "
Briefly sketching the origin of the ^onrentJon lupporti   Made In Canada*" ,r"m   wh",h   ,!1''   maml,a' hin"
Association and the progress it had Movemeni k'uanintre has  1 n  removett.  '
made   since    that   day, thirty-five , ,:xh",IM'1" ot Weitem made merehar, wh\r ' hiiU' bwn pnvatelv gun;
years afeO    when   the' Association dl" t.,,| bv .m^p.m.iblo dealers,    h;
idea had sprung from a meeting of JSfSS "" 'r;"!'* H""ln,t »w««w« d,*;lft ^a* «*ldor»ed and VV 11 now >
several  jewellers,   until   now   w",e„ '' ,. t 0'1        „    ,. \"^^  ^ ^uP?^     1
there was a head office in every pro- 5 \{                        l!?! ' 00ml,oa A' ;"mt'n,1"n  ^h,< h  will  by  hi
vince and branch offices |n mbst of trie.     8  "            *  ' i,";"l!:"1   lndu '" })U"Tt"" JUly SJj"1? f"   I
the   larger   cities   of   Canada,    the Diitrlct meetlna. to I                i «'"dorsed t bnv, d w ,11 be taken >
i   b     t         i        .ir i-winci meeungi u> be arranged fore the Dominion convention
speaker made an eloquent pica for Election of run-.**--. r«* o u-                    '       ,,
1                           '       ' "'" "r n,,i"ru f,,r die year Winn peg nex  month,
You Have Not Read Thi. Journal, Until You   Have Studied -he Adv.rti.imen
t».
mm 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
371
K. M. A. TAKES EXCEPTION
AT BANKER'S STATEMENT
"Supply and prices are becoming
broadly co-ordinated to demand,
though it must be said that retail
prices are not keeping step with
wholesale in the downward movement."
Such wording appearing in the
annual statement of a well known
banking institution occasioned the
officials of the R. M. A. headquarters at Ottawa to protest vigorously to the general manager of the
bank, on the grounds that such
comments on the trading situation
expressed by officers of an important financial institution were liable
to aggravate the misunderstanding
already existing in the various
communities and prove exceedingly
detrimental to the retailers' business.
In his reply to the Dominion
secretary's correspondence, tin-
bank manager stated that the remarks made in this connection were
of general application and were not
intended to apply to individual retailers, and that while he was not
desirous of entering into an argument on the subject, he was nevertheless open to conviction, and if
figures were obtainable covering a
fairly wide range of the various
lines,   showing  that   retail   prices
have been reduced in the same proportion as the wholesale, the error
in the bank's statement would be
gladly admitted.
Carefully prepared questionnaires
have been forwarded from Ottawa
to the secretaries of the various
provincial boards, seeking reliable
statistics on price reduction in
foodstuffs, etc., obtaining in retail
establishments, and when the desired information is secured a report will be published and presented to the bank in question.
This report will undoubtedly be
awaited with interest, not only by
the banking community, but also
l>v the consumer.
CALIFORNIAN COMING
TO ADDRESS AUTOMOBILE
DEALERS OF PROVINCE
The arrangements were completed for the appearance in Victoria
and Vancouver on August .'» and 4
respectively of Mr. It. W. Mart-
land, secretary of the California
Automobile Trade Association, an
organization, which has the distinction of being the most aggressive in the United States, has been
successful in having its insignia
adopted in eighteen states of the
Union, and it is now being taken
over by New Zealand.
J. T. CROWDER
President. Vancouver Branch B. C.
Board, who is Speakinq at the Provincial Convent on at Duncan July 27.
STORING APPLES IN GAS.
In storing apples there is a very
interesting alternative to cold storage, known as "gas storage." The
apples are placed in an air-tighi
chamber Pilled with the gas produced by the respiration of the
apples themselves. An electrical instrument is used to determine
whether at any time the proportion
of carbon dioxide in this gas heroines excessive, and when that condition occurs air is admitted to
dilute the gas. The air is kept in
slow circulation by its own temperature variations and means arc
taken to remove excess of moisture.
It is stated that this system
doubles the time during which apples can be kept in good condition,
and that the cost of working fis
very much below that of any k'nd
of cold storage. The merits of the
system are heing closely studied by
the  British  Investigation Board.
ANNOUNCEMENT
A. P. Slade and Company, Ltd.,
of 114 Water Street, Vancouver,
who for a number of years have
been engaged in the wholesale fruit
and produce business, are now in a
position to supply all lines of groceries to the retail trade. In addition to the well known "Meadow-
brook" butter, peanut butter, etc.,
it is the intention of the firm to
manufacture jams and jellies of all
descriptions and these products
will also bear the "Meadowbrook"
label.
That the venture will succeed
under the capable management of
Mr. A. P. Slade, there is little reason to doubt, and the firm have
the good wishes of the community
in this undertaking.
Mr. Geo. S. Kellaway, formerly
in the grocery business in Calgary,
Alta., is in charge of that end of
the business of A. P. Slade & Co.,
Ltd., on Water Street.
PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR RETAILERS.
For Attaching Signs.
Use large circular gummed
stickers of colors to fasten cardboard signs or paper announcements—to bulletin hoards, Avails or
exterior of windows.
The contrast in color and design
between the stickers and signs
creates a pleasing effect. This
method is much more satisfactory
than the use of paste or tacks. Suitable gummed stickers are carried in
stock bv stationers.
To attach a note or memorandum to photographs for display
purposes, use rubber cement. After
use the paper ean be removed, and
the cement rubbed off the photograph with an eraser. If good rubber cement is used the photograph
will  not  he  harmed.
Even if the future be shrouded
in mist, as a prominent statesman
has declared, the only mist that
need trouble anyone is the pe si-
niist.
A Novelty—That's All.
Sometime when you are tired of
the monotonous appearance of your
windows, or if you need an idea for
a display, try the following:
Use one window for articles for
use in cooking, another window for
articles oi use in cleaning house.
Label one window with a large sign:
"Of interest to good cooks only."
The other window: "Of interest to
good housekeepers only." Although the arrangement is simple,
it docs not call for unusual skill,
ami will be found effective because
it appeals to the curious interest of
the passersby. 372
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEH
fourth Hnnual Contention
of He B.C. Burl tf Ike Retail Ktrduils' kmutm. af hue, i«.    'I Dikji, B.C.. *itos*i» ui liiru>. lily 27li iri 2811. BJ|
'PROGRAMME
9
30
a.m.
to
12
oo
a. in
12
.00
a rn.
li"
,15
P'i
12.30 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
2.15 p.m.
2.20 p.m
2.30 ji in
3,00 p.m.
3.15 p.m
:: 20 p.m
3 30 p.m
4.00 p m
4 15 p.m
4.30 p.m
4.45 p m
WEDNESDAY. JULY 27th,   1921.
Registration
and
Reception.
Reading of Notice* calling meeting
Address of Welcome, Mayor Tho*  Pitt
Reply to Address   M  J   Phillips, Tie-*   B
Board, R. U  A of Canada
Chairman,   S.   R    Kirkbam,   Pres    Duncan
Branch, R M  A. <>f Canada
-Luncheon at Leyland's Restaurant
Speaker,   Walter  Peterson,   Mur.   Cowicban
Creamery Assoc
Subject, Co-operation between lbs Parmer and
the RetsUer
Afternoon Se»sion.
Convention called to order    Report of Com
mittee on Credentials   The President -Ad! appoint th" following committee*
Finance.
Legislation and constitution
Association Welfare.
Resolutions
Nominations for Executive, 1921-21
—Reading of proceedings of lasl Provin i.il Coo
mention,   Proceed with regular order of busi
ness.
-   1 resident's Report
Secretary'* Report
—Treasurer's Report
—Organizer's Report
-Reports referred to Committees
—Address, J. T Crowder, President Vancouver
Branch B C. Board, R. M a of Canada
Subject Whal should s Grocer Know About
the Grocery Business?
—Questions ami lds< usslon
Address, <;.    I'     UcRobble,    Vice-President*
Dominion Executive Council, R  M  a  oi Can
ada, Ine.
—Questions and Discussion.
Scenic Drive, Courtesy of Member* ><t Dun sn
Branch. B, C. Heard, i! m   v of ■ anada
6.16 p.m    Dinner  «t Leyland'i Resisum.nl
Speaker. M   i  stacDonaid, k<    m i, \
Bobj* c i'a< 18"  Probl* i.
THURSDAY,   JULY    "*•**-.  1921.
9.00 ain I i'.: meeting to order Roil cull ot deli
Repori «( • onwai a coramlm e* !•
w i?. r<- omme** Isi loi   ol nunc
12.16 p.m    Luncheon tt Leyland'i lb isuranl
Speaker Hugh Savage Eiitoi  Cowirl
or  Dun aa  B i
Bubje<"    Ths   ' ■ •'••r>    Kewspapei
Retailer
AftSffie-MI   Jkstiorv
MS pm    Address, Mr  Howard Seaburj   \'\ ■ I■.-.
Sorthwest*-rn Muiusl Pin   Vns'n
8 il •  *   I r* ti ■ irai  .- | || PalJi
I tl p in  ■ Que*i     i si '. i'. i      Ion
1,90 pm    Address snd Demonstration   David Mall
rotary, Vancc-orei Stjrofntfl A»«n
s it «•> ■  Th-- Setting \ ilo* oi Ih*  ■
" K) pn    Question* snd Discussion
I " p m    R< ium| [Ion of Ra its    -       . ■-■   fi<*ttlini
11'   p tn      N'o"*.   Jhietr |
00 p ra    Kk   tion of Ofhr-»rn    i     Hat    f D*
Mtern itlvi i   Domink n  Boer I  in I  Don
* 10   p rn       VppO ' '    POl      '    ludilOl    ind      " 11 •   I |
An 1  pltl fl of  !■<'*.>   m«-« »tfl **
.*. 15 p m    AdJ    ' • i*nl
l.lfi j in    Usocistioo official dtnnet it Li
tauti:'
Rp >skfl     r    \    '•;■:■ ISO    Pfl ||d<*n< ■
I>| Url  I    I •   ■•      r  •        -..'!;.
i   '   Thi   Usnil   >i   t    I        I    i i I
Cf l'     M>>'. •   | •;
B 16 p m    (>r< beslrsl i ol* < rt h%
K
< nurtes) i' rai mber* • ' Ihu
C Board  u  M   \ ol i sn i   i
r «>
,t '■:.
o* I
GOD SAVE THE KiMi
PERSONALS
m
Mr. I. Hainan of (laiiian s Ltd.,
as jnsl returned I'rom an extended
trip during which she visited tin*
leading manufacturing centres of
Rngland and the continent. He
stated thai his was purely a luisi-
ness trip to familiarize and satisfy
himself as to the true market conditions relating to that merehan*
dise in  which  daman's  Ltd..  deal.
He expressed himself as being greatly pleased with the result.
Mr. Hainan states that merehan-
dizing conditions in Europe have
not yet returned to their former
solid basis, He also state*] thai in
England, in particular, there is no
set   standard   of   values   for  Staple
NOTICE
The sessions <>f the R M A Con
v« ation whirl, utkes place ei Dun
can, it C. Jui> II 29 win be held In
the Oddfellow* Hail, whar* dels
gate* ;ir<- requested to rcglsl r
from 9 30 to 12 o'l loi k noon. h,|.
27th
A registration fee ot j\ eu entitle* d< legato* to all ssso* lation
features, Including meals (lunch
eon and dinner on boJJi <l vi ). also
an official badge and programme,
together with tickets of admission
to all events
Delegates travelling via Nanaimo
on Wednesday, July s?th, leave
Vsncouver al 10 o'clock, arriving
Nanaimo al noon The journey will
bo completed by automobile from
Nanaimo   to   Duncan,   this   service
being provided through th urt-
esy of the Nanaimo Branch of lbs
Association
mcrchandisf a^ in pr« uar day*   II
ih of th'- <ipini"Hi  lhai  (hia i* il i<
ihr fact thai Kuglish maiitifai:
trade hith thr • n'tr-.   worhl     <-
result, th- \  arc affi - Ii d by  w i
v. ide conditions, such a** havi  I
I'efuff been expei ieticcd    I 'an i
ii«»ii*i  made  by   foreign  Is it W* is
Hntisli    tuerehandiae    threw
merchnndis*" hack on the hand*
the manufacturer.
M r,   R    I '    Sli.'i'pe,   sales   maii'i'
Of  tin-  |'\ relic  .Manilla turin.' I    '
pan\ of afontreai and Winnipeg, r
eentl)  lefl  fox the Must, after h
nointiuK    Oandall,    Parpcntcr
Read, ol 1052 lloini r *trect, ;*- !
firm s  represent at i\ i»s  t<o- Van "
ver and the  pros in e of I'i il'sh '
Intnhia.
Deal With Our Advertisers:
They Make Th<* Official Publication Possible „t $2.00 a  Year. 1921
m
run
Alter practically all hope of finding him alive had been abandoned,
lhe relatives and friends of Fred
Ilowse were greatly surprised and
relnved when he made his appear
aiiee   at   his   home  after  wandeiing
without food in the wild country
around Princeton, <>n June 21 his
auto plunged over an embankment
and Mr. Ilowse sustained a coneiis-
sioii that is believed to have resulted     in   a   temporary    asphasia,
causing him to wander aimlessly in-
lu the hills. Search parties were organized, hut no trace could he found
nf the missing man. and hope had
hern practically abandoned when he
returned to his home after an aO-
seiiee    of    three    days.      M r.    Fred
HOWHC    is    tile    eldest    s.ill    nf    Mr.    A.
I!, [lowae, well known as a pioneer
no rehant   m   Princeton  and   also  in
NJ t*i la and Merritt, nnd las for
man) years been manager of the
Princeton business.
dames s. Braid wood and .1. M.
Gibson have receutlj been appointed
assistant stores commissioners ol
the Hudson s Bay ('o., w ith In ad*
quarters   in   Winnipeg,   and    will
earn   <<n   the  administration  ol   the
eompany, while the* selection ol h
new  stores commiasiouer >s left  in
ahi\ ain e
Mr. Gibson joined the company
in the year 1915 as manager of the
II.  I'., store at  Nelson, I',. ('., and   u
1918 was appointed merchandise
superintendent. In 1918 he was
made general manager of the Calgary store.   Having only served the
coin pall)   for six   years,  this  is  I lie
quickest promotion made in the service of the Hudson's Hay Co. Mr.
Gibson was educated at Kilmarnock
Aeadetnv, on the west coast ol Scotland
Mr. .1. s. Bratdwood has be n In*
speetiQg officer of the eompany sine
the \ • jir 1905, lie came from Scotland in 1903, where he had gradit-
ah d as , harteivd accountant at the
I in\ersity of Glasgow. (In hia arrival   in   ('anada   he   was   made   a-
sistanl controller at  Winuipeg.   In
1005 he was made inspecting officer,
and since 191(1 he has hecn chief in
specting officer and  practically as
sist.nit commissioner.
Alex.     Macdonald,     millionaite
wholesale grocer, has sold his home
in Winnipeg, Man., and contemplates moving to the Pacific coast.
NEW INCORPORATIONS.
Women's   Apnarel    Importers   of
Canada, Ltd.. 1004 standard Bank
Building, Vancouver: $20,000;
general  mercantile  husiness.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER 373
AMONG THE RETAILERS.
Musicmaster Sales, Ltd, 511
Rogers   Bldg.,   Vancouver;  $25,000;
acting agents for phonograph companies and products of The Music-
master Phonograph Co., Ltd.
Volma Products Ltd., 1022 Standard Hank Building, Vancouver;
$10,000; manufacturing al kinds of
polishes, soaps, grease dissolver, etc.
Perth Trading Co., Ltd., ">06 Lou
The island Supply Co. general
store at Bevan, H. (., is sold out to
George Beattie.
Philip Ohen. grocer, of Central
Park. Vancouver, reported sold out.
The McKay Trading Co., at McKay, B. C, is now known as the
Burnaby Trading Co.
II. Lohnian, grocer, of South Van
don   Building,   Vancouver; $10,000;    eouver, is reported to have sold out
warehousemen,  marruifilcturers and    to S. G, Walters.
merchants.
Dominion Poultry Experts, Ltd.,
Kelowna, B, C; $10,000; dealers in
poultry supplies.
A. J, Peek Co., Ltd., 1227 Standard Bank Building, Vancouver;
$20,000; general grocery, hardware.
supply  husiness.
I). J. Elmer Co., Ltd., 27 Pender
St.     West,     Vancouver;    $100,000;
wholesale and retail tobacconists.
John McAllister & Sons, Ltd.,
2409 Main St., Vancouver; $25,000;
taking over the general hoot, shoe
and gentlemen's outfitting business
now carried on by John McAllister.
T. II. Jones & Co., of Vancouver,
(baby carriages, etc.), have sold out
to W. J. Richards.
Nixon & Co., Ltd., wholesale dry
goods, Vancouver, applying for
change of name to Xixons Ltd.
Gordons Ltd., of Victoria, B. C.
dress goods—change of ownership
effected.
The Pembroke St. Grocery at Victoria, has removed to new location
at Burnside Road.
The English & Scotch Woolen Co.
of Vancouver and Montreal, has assigned.
1). M. Coulter, of Fort Langley,
sustained painful  injuries as a re-
Lister   Trading   &   Supply   Co..    suit of falling from the main floor
Ltd.. (amp  Lister.  I». C.; $10,000;    of   his   store   into    the    basement,
general    merchants,    grocers    and
warehousemen,
Corrie, Matheson Co., Ltd., 1924
l-ii- St., Vancouver; $10,000;
chemists, druggists.
Port llaney Poultry Farms, I/d..
Port llaney.' B. C; $10,000; dairymen, cheese, butter, egg merchants.
NEW PARTNERSHIPS
Veteran Rotary Bread Shop —-
Hilda Victoria Perkin, at Vancouver
Bumab) Trading Co.— G T.
Hughes and Minnie Hughes, at
Bumab). B. C,
Campers Supply and Post Office
Store Frederick C. Phelpand Percy
Cyril flardy, at White Rock, B, C.
Kerrisdale Grocery Co.- John I..
McLcod, at  Kerrisdale.
Victoria Pood Packers-Samuel
II. Robins and John VV, Buckler, at
Victoria.
Electric Store C. M. P. Planta,
at Xanaiino. B, C.
Fair and NHidd—Clifford VV. Pair
and Frederick Geo. Nuclei, at Burnaby, B. C.
Granville Furniture Co. J. Gor-
osh and  I. II. Xarob, at Vancouver,
B. C.
Waters, The R Tire Co. Reginald Waters and E. M. M. Studd, at
Vancouver, B. C.
through a trapdoor which had been
left open.
M. Forrest, milliner, of Lady-
smith, B. C reported to have discontinued husiness.
Grant & Crist have sold their
general store at Matsqui to Moffatt
& Parker.
Fox & Smith are the new proprietors of Milner General Store, Milner,
H. C, formerly operated by MufTord
Bros.
Elliott's Grocery, located at 3282
Main Street, Vancouver, has hecn
sold to Mr. George W. Bell, of Revel-
stoke.
Mr. James Woodman has opened
a new plant at 1067 Richards St.,
Vancouver, under the title of the
Vancouver Art Metal Works.
S. T. Elliott, Ltd., of Kelowna.
B. C, is applying for change of
name to Kerr Ltd.
Gillis Grocery. South Vancouver,
is reported burned out.
A. Tanzman, cloaks and suits, oP
Vancouver, is reported to be offering to compromise 35c. on the $.
Paul Massari, general store, of
Port Clements, H. C„ has assigned,
0. B. Allen, jeweller, of Vancouver. —incorporated.
A new cooperative store has been
opened at Arrowhead. B. C. with
A. Vara, of Trout Lake, in charge.
The stock and fixtures of the Bargain Bazaar, :H)1 Hastings St. VV.,
were recentlv destroyed bv fire. 171
THE BRTPISB COLUMBIA RETAILER
Favorite Dairy
Product
Your trade— your profits—can t*» tocrstS-
ed by sale of the t*NMtfeB| milk product
of the day.
^f^***ms\\Tgmggtmmmm*'
Cteomo
as the Milk Supreme is rapidly b-KOmloj
mor» i»o[»ular. Delicatessen stores, <;r->
eery stores and Bakeries can create a
steady trade hy bringing; this 8j>ioo<li 1
product to the attention of their -nitrons
Fraser Valley Dairies, Ltd.
8th Ave. and Yukon St
Phone Fairmont 1000
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Sixth Ave. and S-xth St.
Telephone 1445
NEW WESTMINSTER. B.C.
MuKK and mOTf people »r* iSkifif for SKKIJ.Y S
4X BRfiAD   ti i* advertised sverywaers, i
door  and  In  th«*  {>uh!|r  ore**     Jest   no*.  w%  are
showing houi^w ive# how  to SSS  BUM'S  Breed     Am!
they'll ;\*k  tOf SHKt.l.Y *8     Hnvt  ll  in  potsr It
SHELLY*8 IX BREAD Is •■ientm.--t.iljr baked sod*
model tonduions    Well rises, *uh  go)!<-«* r< m
crisp crest ium„ finm tenured, tender crumb    Ii
makes   return   *»!*•#   *xu~j-,u*#   u*   lUUKterd   aevef
Witt.
// Makes "Come A jam" Customers
for YOl
Shelly Bros. Ltd.
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
**,*»
Mr. Retailer:—
How're your Figures to-day?
^Pretty slow, eh — {Business much more of a picnic
without 'em—We'll say so.
BUT this little fellow will
keep all your figures in
the pink of condition   every
time and all the
time.
Price only $185
Terms If desired
And You'll Never Get the
"HOURATION BLUES."
Let Us Show You—We'll Be Pleased to Do So.
BURROUGHS
Adding - Bookkeeping - Calculating Machines
E. C. COLEMAN, Manager for B.C.
119 Pender W. VANCOUVER, B.C.
There t| n rtSdy Hale for thr h*»#t BcOtCfa J.'OtlH   'Ihey
are   finer  SBd   fuller   flavoured   than   other   Jam*
BSJCtsr*!   Scotch   l're»ti<r.<'n  are   without   e«jiiitl    your
customer! win be deliffeted with Una
Strawberry Raspberry
Block Currant    Wild Bramble Jelly
In i. 7, 14 and ffl lh   tin*     Write to tin RgtUtl for
lirltlHh Columbia,
Usnofsctored by
NORTHERN JAM WORKS
 pCHABERS, SCOTLAND
Ttlegrafhh and Cable Address,"Jam Fochakrs, Mtrayshtrr.'
Code used   Am <$th EditlntJ,
Agcnii s. e. hiachtntie & Co., Vtmmmr, BA
W. A. BAXTER,
Dsei With Our Advertisers:    They Make This Orflci.l Publication Possible at 12.00 .  Veer. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
;i73
Abernethy & Lougheed, Ltd., of
Pori lliiuey, 15. ('., will in future be
known  as The Slave  Falls  Logging
Co., Ltd.
T   lieunett, grocer, of Port llaney,
luis been succeeded by F. Powell
Simpson <fc Qowans have &uc-
ir.-ilol the Summerland Supply Co.,
Ltd.,  Suuinierland,  H.  ('.
T. «i. Bertram, of 2243 Mam St.,
Vancouver, lias been succeeded by
.1. Tong \ Co,
A. Iv Smith is now running the
grocery store formerly known as
K C. Miller & Smith. 908 43rd
Ave. W.
II. C. Lee, grocer, <>f 1996 2nd
Ave \\\, Vancouver, has moved lo
164 28th Ave. K.
.1 Mummery, formerly of 2200
Arbutus St.. is now located ;it 2300
Granville West, Vancouver,
Curttai tV Qoddard sre now operating the store former!) iun hy C.
II   Knight, 1802 4th Ave. W.
<» I'is.'iilloii. grocer, of ln,,T Odium Drive, Vancouver, has ->"1<I oul
to d. \V. Manson.
T. s, Morton, grocer, formerly of
ITt'i Vmii'isv is now (orated al 4910
Hastings K. Vancouver.
Carver & Steeves grocers, of 2615
Hastings St. K. Vancouver, have
been succeeded by Hobson «.*»: Hob-
ion.
Perns Grocery, of Drake and
Homer Streets, Vancouver, las been
bought b>  Mrs  Brown,
.1. Wilson i*» operating b commercial    meat    busiiMss   at    Horseshoe
Bay, B. C.
.1. W. Graham, of Pender St. W.,
Vancouver, lias sold out to ii. \\.
Devlin.
T, C, lee, general store. Alexis
Creek,  reported extension granted,
VV. s, loilier, grocer, of Keating,
B.  <'..   has stilil  tuit   his  business to
Sam I 'ablwell.
Robt, P> per. general bI irekecper,
of llaineville. Ii. c, creditors'
meeting held.
•Ino. Berg, of Palling, B. C,
general store, reported discontinued.
It is reported thai exteu<iona
have been granted to P. Garrigan
& F. ('.  Parks, who are conducting
general stores in Pavilion, B. C,
The  death  of  ''has.  Greer,  auto
dealer, <>f Princeton, occurred recently,
It is reported thai the Princeton
Co-operative     Association     Ins    ;is-
Bigned to u,. K, Winters.
II. Anno Co., clothiers, of Steves-
ton, B. <*., ate reported to have compromised nt 50c. on the $,
The General Fancy Goods Ltd.,
Vancouver, B. C.,—reported financially embarrassed.
The Pacific Coast Importing Co.
Ltd., of Vancouver, have assigned
to  A.  P.   Foster.
Pacific Sea Products Association,
I tit-..    Vancouver,    have    ceased    to
carry on business in B. C.
Western Dry Goods. Co., of
Canada. Ltd., in liquidation.—--Saul
A. Robinson appointed liquidator.
flrofpBBirmal
Business
Opportunities
Here Is .1 Grocery Business that
la in a very desirable mMKhlwrhootl
st(«k an 1 fixtores amount to
$2,600, about $2."on in .Mock at cur-
renl Invoice price, if desired. Receipts are $1,700 ;> month; net profit $250, 1 inly reason for selling i.s
that owners business is Public Accounting and not used to this line.
Price $1 $00.
w ,* hate $0 other grocery and
confectionery businesses to choose
from.    I-rices from  $600 to $10,000.
C. S. MORRIS
Sales & Service Co.
ruiwfwiirs lowtD • umu nouiM
mcotfotaiMHis fewto
510   HASTINGS  STREET  WEST
VANCOUVER,    B.   C.
"TRIUMPH"
PR0DUQS
including
FLAVORING EXTRACTS,
TEAS, COFFEE, COCOA,
AND SPICES. ALSO
CIGARS AND PUNCH
BOWL BEVEREGES.
Enquiries Solicited
KEELEY & McNERNY
134 Standard Bank Bldg.
Seymour 1257
VANCOUVER, B. 0
Telephones: Office, Seymour 8951
Residence,  Seymour 195SR
C.BaBljuiaoiVIflnFB
BARRISTER  AND  SOLICITOR
Solicitor for
The Retail Merchants' Association
of Canada,  Incorporated
British Columbia Board
309 Rogers Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
L. W. Taylor
& Company
PUBLIC   ACCOUNTANTS
Auditors, Cost Analysts
Board of Trade Building
Seymour 365.      Vancouver, B.C.
Toledo Computing Scales
(No Springs)
Special Charts for Grocers,
Butchers and Confectioners.
Hobart Electric Coffee Mills,
Meat Choppers and Bone Grinders, Berkel Improved Bacon
Slicer. Sold on Terms or Discount for Cash.
Sales Agent for B.C.
E. S. CHAMBERS
424 Cordo?a St. W.      VaacMTcr, B.C.
Great West TEA
PACKETS ONLY
No Premiums   No Deals
No Price Cutting
QUALITY  ONLY
Western Grocers Limited
VANCOUVfl. NtlSON. OURII00K, I.C.
U    AA    A   Mfr
TfttiOftkO BY WHICHMfiNTLESAIIE JUBGl
6F\S and 6/1 SPLINE MflNTUS
FOR  FaU   STYL'-ES OF   LIGHTS
.1SK   rOR    SAMPLED .^d QUOTATIONS
RTtfloor-e. Is C°.U°. ^nC°uVJrc.
fAC\f\C CCMSTM4NTU FACTORY. 371
in
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The grocer who works from the neck
up—never labors from the neck down.
As Andrew Carnegie did more thinking,
the less physical labor he indulged in.
The time for the grocer to do his best
thinking is when he buys.
That it takes ten times the labor and
eftort to move certain unknown or poorly
advertised goods is a fact well known to
every grocer.
The reason for the national popularity
of Postum, Grape-Nuts and Post Toasties is
not accidental.
Advertising with the Postum Cereal
Company is not a fad. Its a clean business
policy.
That's why the sale of Postum,
Grape-Nuts and Post Toasties
is guaranteed—insuring to the
grocer positive and  profitable turnover on a line of
leading,wholesome foods unequalled in quality.
(a
.JUS*1*"***1   *'«»
I<>*Mie-»
■■;r-
•*»
$
\mmjB w
S Ntn-a
I ,S
'
9
t
X*i w—
.
Canadian Postum Cereal Co., Ltd.
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
■mmm» 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
:577
There is a strengthening tendency
in man) lines ol foodstuffs with confidence re-ereatcd by glowing reports ui crop conditions throughoul
tiu- Weal Sugar prices have declined steadily, three drops having
been reported in one week l»\ the
l»>cal  refinery.   Some  retail  stores
Canned Fish.— Cheaper grades
being quoted at prices varying
from 7.50 to 16.00 for flats. Sock-
eye firm with demand fair. No
quotations to hand for new season
pack.
Currants.—Advance   looked   for*.
MH  itl I  i    llllii   |    i   ■ t'UIIM »ll«lli 91UI VO   ---.— . ^ - ,    .
are  advertising   sugar  al   10c  per   Demand good at 21 cent quotation,
per pound, m sharp contrast to the
price for this cowwodit) prcvaiKn
at this tune last year, which reached
24 and _'<• cents    Nol for four ><i
Nuts. — Shelled walnuts show
scarcity, with little future buying;
demand quiet. Shelled almonds
have  declined,  showing attractive!
five years have housevvives had such    |)UV*ng quotations; prices   will ad-
attractivc conditions foi preserving    vancc
inut as this year
Another announcetuenl ofathirh jams.
ecu! reduction has been made in the -flie Dominion Canners have just
price ol flour, bringing the carload |ssue(j  ,|1(MI. price |*sts to whole-
basis on 98's jute to $10.25 a barrel. saicrs  on    ,iie new season's  fruit
Kggs have had another boost and pack.     Opening quotations on all
an  now retailing around 45 cents, lines of jams and   jellies show a
]',  U   Cheese   is up to 22-VJ cents, substantial  decrease from those of
with   Ontario   solid*   bringing   23 last year and a slight decrease over
cents, being an advance ol 1 ccnl on the prices prevailing for the past
previous '{notations.   Lard is   firm couple ol months.
with   puces  expected   to  advance. Strawberry,  raspberry. loganber-
I'here  is  ,»   reported   shortage   oi rics and black currant jams, the four
canned goods in the States, which Des* sellers, are quoted at SI0.50 a
caused   wholesale prices to stiffen dozen, as compared with $18.50, the
'onsiderauly, llt<-  producers  there opening quotation last  season, ami
Having apparent!) made no arrangements to suppl) the demand.
and the canncrs operating on a
future basis agree I some tunc since
upon  a  drastic  curtailment.
Sugar.   The market i$ less cratic
with Canadian refiners quoting oc
with $10.75.   the  price during  th.'
past few months.
( )ther less popular lines such as
apricot, red currant, gooseberry,
blackberry and assorted jams are
quoted at $9.50, while plum, greengage,  and  prune  are  priced  at  S().
casional   reductions, presumably in    fellies  arc  quoted  at   $10.50  and
order  to  compote  with   \mcrican   $9.75,
sugars    Further declines yet   ma)
he   looked   )ot\
Coffee.—Somewhat  firmer.   Ilraz-
According to officials oi the
canneries, the pack this year will he
\en conservative, owing to the fact
l^m",!pm^atiy,n's,|^iler'7han New that business has not^ opj*ne£up
"^ ork market. Local trade steady,
Tea.—Se.u» it\ repotted oi Inch
grade teas, especially Ceylon, In*
dias are moving freely, with lower
grades strengthening.
Rice. Puce unchanged, \ctivc
export iii Kurope tn low grades.
South American markets dull,
Canned Fruits.—Although there
are   quotations    for    new    season s
sufficiently to warrant extensive
canning operations, The reduced
quotations are a natural consequence of conditions prevailing in
all husiness, the cost of production
being much less this year because ot
reduced juices on sugar and lower
wages costs.
i.i ,,  As a  latest   exploit,  the domestic
strawberry pack, prices do not seem    hen has uddod to her much adver-
to attract,  being   considered   souk
what high by those interested,
Dried Fruits. — Vei \   little   d
maud   with    prices   ruling   Steady,
tised achievements by laying an egg
on the fly. One of the birds in a
crate ol' poultry being shipped from
Belgium to London, Eng., by aero-
lll.lll'l >>   1 t  I I Ml   IV  IS lllllll^ -MV    ,1    l>- ■ -O"" ,
Apples are quoted at $0.13;   Figs,    plane,   laid   an   egg   during   the
SO. 12
voyage.
You Have Not Read This Journal, Until You   Have Studied the Advertisements.
Ottawa, June 7th, 1921.
The Editor,
B. C. Retailer,
London Building,
Vancouver, B. C,
Dear Sir:
I have just been reading your
June copy of the B. C. Retailer, and
I would desire to draw your attention to the article on the Food &
Drugs Act, page 331. Under para.
3, there is a statement regarding
the use of the word "Honey" which
might be misleading to some of
your readers.
The matter in question is not
covered by the Food and Drugs
Act, but by the Honey Act, (Chap.
28) copy enclosed.
Section 3 (1) of this Act, forbids
the use of the word "Honey" on
any article of food unless the
same is pure honey, made by bees.
Yours truly,
THOS. L. LECKIE,
Senior Food Inspector.
The Act mentioned herein reads
as follows:—
AN ACT RESPECTING HONEY.
1. This Act may be cited as The Honey Act, 1920.
2. Feeding bees with sugar, except
for the purpose of being consumed by
them as food, or with glucose or any
sweet substance other than such as bees
gather from natural sources, with the intent that the same shall be used by the
bees in the making of honey, or, excepting as a foresaid, the exposing of any such
substance with such intent, shall be
deemed a wilful adulteration of honey
within the meaning of this Act.
3. (1) The word "honey" shall not be
used either alone or in combination with
any other word or words on the label or
other mark, illustration or device on any
package containing any article of food
which is or whieh resembles honey and
which is not pure honey made by bees,
and no package containing any article
of food which is not pure honey shall be
labelled or marked in svieh a manner as
is likely to make persons believe it is
pure honey, and any article of food!
labelled or marked in violation of this
section shall be deemed to be adulterated within the meaning of The Food and
Drugs Act. 1920.
(2) The provisions of th's section
shall not apply to any syrup or compound manufactured and sold for medical purposes only.
4. Every one who is ruilty of wilful
adulteration of h-ny mder section or
who violates ay prevision of section
and liable upon summuy conviction to
the penalities providrd by section sixteen of The Food and Drugs Act, 1920.
■ 378
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•
f GILLETTS LYE
| fcw        EATS DIRT
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise. A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on* your
shelves. until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
Mill
E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED
TORONTO.  CANADA
*   NHlPCG
MONTRIAL
i
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
is SOU) BY
KKTAM. QR0CKR8
THE  WISE GROCER   WILL
UNDERSTAND what ill AT
FACT  IISANS TO  HIM
Phone  Fairmont
VANCOUVER,  BC.
^i—        —.■—
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal line* of leading wholesale firma    Pratt quoted »r% mctiur ly
•ubje:t  to  market  fluctuations.
RAMSAY BROS. A CO.. LTD.
Family soda*, packages, per doz            f 3 M
Cream   soda*,   Is,   linn.   ta\  h 60
1"<   Cream  Sodas. packages, doz. . H
15c (Yearn  Kodaa.   package*,  doz 1 46
kk- Aaeortod Sweet Biscuits, packages,
per doz  '..(J
15c Assorted Sweet  BftCttitS)  fancy <ai-
lon,   per doz. . . LM
Chocolate Bars, assorted kind*. I doz
to a box.  per box .. 90
p.
E.  W.  GILLETT CO.,  LTD.
Rcyal Yeast—
3 doz. pkgs in ease
Perfumed  Lye—
4 doz. in case
ii cases .
1(1 cases Of more
per case,
2 3.1
per ew«
$ 7 1"
7 OO
.   1.96
Magic Baking Powder—
4  oz.,   4doz\
H OS.i  4 do/..
h oz., 4 doz
tl oz.. I doz.
12  oz..   2  doa,
1 lb., 4 doz.
1   lb..  2  doz.
2'* lb.. 1 doz.
.1 lb ,  '<i doz
per Case
* E SS
7.60
'.i on
IMS
6.J0
16.45
7 <ir.
:< Mi
H i,i
Special dlHcount of 5 per cent allowed on
Five Cases or more of Magic linking
Powder.
Caustic  Soda   (Granulated? -
2."> lb   wMiden polls
60 H'   wooden  palls
60 lb   wooden <•.!»•«
'. id  isantstafs (100 h»«   In case)
10 1*3   Canisttf   (100  Ib.    In '.(»<■)
100 lbs   Iron (bum.
i> 0 lbs ,  barrels
Cream   Tartar—
% Hi   pa pet pKic   < i dos
'«, lb   pa pei pkK»   11 doi
pat ih
fl 16*4
UH
11I,
II
14*6
12
t it L.
per d'Hi
i.... i      t: iv.
pen «*a*#
4   dot    *4   Ib    ptpaf   pkRi.   2   dot     s
Ib    pope)   I'kK" .   assorted IS IS
per d<>8
ty lb cn«« with ecrsw covers '4 dot
in case I Of
r> iii square canisters (H dos In caae) 7;*,
in lb   wooden • sees m'^
2fi Hi   W ...Ii ii palls MS
100 ib  lined Ui-tin I ■'',
Magic Soda—Case No. 1 —
I nine (10 i ii> packages)
'i cases of more
Bl-Carbonate   of   Soda  -
iu* ib. kfijc-t. per keg
100 ii» barrels pot barrel
KELLY,  OOUGLA8  A  CO.
Nabob   Products
Alum,   Vis.  dos	
Borax, '*". dos
Tartaric  Acid.   >*h,  (jot
Baking Powder, tn 12 «>z. dos
Hnklng 1'owder,   4X   16 oz ,  doz
LTD.
7 IS
7 Oi
.". to
7*
ri
2.U0
:ti
S7&
Baking Powdtr,  11
Peking Powder, *
• Vlery   Sjttl     gBtOS
''off**, ia, i», ib
Cotft>m     ie     ||«
:V   di
i«. to*
lot
<»«    dot
i»«nrr Hods, *•"> ia esss
I skii g  lod i   M fta   floi
Custard   Powdot   dot
gukk   Taptoos,  dot
Cfeocotau   Podding,   doi
\ '•{.    r    \..   3    tin*   <)"»
Chill   Powder,   email,   doa
Cinnamon  I <>t  Una <*«■•
('•irenne  P-rpptr,  1  tin*.   <b>l
i'io vsa, small   •!•■•
Dinger, sots It dot
Mme,  tmiall   dot
Mutmeg  Mnslt •'•>»
Ptprlks, small llna dot
Black  Peppefi  tins   dot
White  I i,pj«vr.   tlna   >b>»
Pantry Rplet,  1 tin*.  'V>»
i'i kiina Bplce, dot, N«  3
Mark-rain   Mini
Poultry t'rensiDif   Parole*   Bags   *i,,s
nt), Thynta Ttiinerk   tins  doi
furry  t*i*wdrr.  4 m   tlawi.  dot
Rttracts 'i-ii finvi«iir*i, 3 ot. dot
Kttrsrts (aH flsvottrt), 4 o*, d"«
Rttracts (»n f1tv*on**t>,  * <»s. doi
Fp»»om  Hnlla,   %*,  dot
I'rsiit Colors, 2 os . dot
tcinax (Chocolate,  li«>*e  rink, l^rmon,
Vanilla,  White.   Almond,  Onnga)
■b.x
Jolly Powder, <i>>*
(I  <)<> a   fr..,
Mustard.   Ua.   dot
Muatnrd.   'i*.   dot
Mustard,  la d<>«
with   I   Klo«« i
|
■
J*
M
' I
I i
:   i
I
I ."
: (
4
9 "
(0
I
Desl With Our Advertlters:    They Make Thit Official Publication Possible at 12.00 s Ytir.
mimmmit* 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
379
antor "I'.   2  os,  do*
■ttor Oil, 4 os, doz
alt   Pet re,   '>4»i.   doz
iilphur,    '*«.    doz
ca,  Creen   ijibel,   1*.   lb.
,a. Oroen Lobol, '»*». pee Ib
.•i._.  ii,   packages
:, ib   pat UaK<*
i m, de Luxe   Ikftsrnoon, i
,.:i, tin [»uxt, Afternoon, '-.
...iiiiiiiaii.' Powdor, dot.
'inegsr,   do*
i. r ii.
3 25
4 00
1 60
.li
.4*
19
,46
i ■
'.ii
61
1 |U
2 II
THE   W.   H.   MALKIN   CO.,   LTD.
"Mtlkln't Bt«tM  Prodoctt
Biking Powdor, 11-11 »-■. pei doi
IS'tVfcA  vx dot
13-ta.   per   doz
('office,   48-le,   per   lb
.•) Mm of Taitar, is"". j«.i dos
1
tlna.
■ i..z
d<>Z
■ Mir'.
doi
p
t
•i
al!
flrtvora,   «!■>«
p.-r
Custard Powder, II "<
Extracts (nil flavors)
IJH OS . \*>r doi
I ni    pei doi
K ot. pat •!«•*
. ■. ■'*. ptf dot
!•, gallon, ssch
tfation, saob
■ .*.erine,   i» 2 <>t   i
i:i"«   i»-.i(i.-'.   ■,..
Honey, 2t Id <>r  tart
Jl-tJ M    jto~»,   pot
I4>*j • >»   tins, par d
II I ot   tins   per d
Jrllv    PoWdW (*.    *   '•« .
i«•> ,'ti.>>'«' p.iv,dot   I i
Muatard.   U-Ja,   una.
IS*0S,   Una,   per   dot
J4-1*.  tlna,  per OOl
17-S»,  tin».   per  lb
Bpicet and Psstonlpgi!
i 'cleri  Rail   tape* bottlea, doa
Curry l*owdor. tap^r bottles   dot
\llsplce, per dot   Una
cinnamon,    cinaer.    Black    Pepper,
Poultry   Dressing,   Hurv.   ground,
Rage, rubbed, SsTory,  rhyme, Tu-
p< -  dot   llns
Cloves   Mace   '." ■ dot   tin*
Marjoram,   Mint,   Nutmeg,   Pars'ey,
ii»»trv  mixed. Pepper, white, Pep-
i.    i'.. \ enne   pet doi   l i
Paprika,  Cltlll  Powder, Curry  ,''"''-
der.. pf-r  got  tin*
Whole  Sol meg In carb.«n».  per dox
Whole pt'-kiint. it   cartons, «5->z
Tru.   100-la   per   ib
«n.ijn.    per   lb
36 1* :u>! :-■'•!   naeorted, per lb
IJ-Sa,   per   lb
VIOfWNI.   71' HOi      l" I    dol
P    BURNS  A  CO.   LTD
Shamrock   Product*
'.i j.i
i'i
■ :.
'i   IHI
>; oo
:■ •<•<
: -..
fl :-
I        ■/*
1 SS
3 16
7,00
'.' ',.,
I 10
1.40
l ei
4 5*
> 00
eo
u
I  K)
.11
J.N
Matt .i   ...     Ife
Man »   i> tned and rolled
pei le
l    i"
ti
1 >ii(nitii<>ri Kama   1 11.10
i kunlnlon Ra< on  1       pi
i Mminlon "•• on   10-14
I«  per n<
•i !!•
rtoi   1'-
Lew
M
11
iMi-ntntnn  HI tsulder*.  b nr I
~^>
Cooked Hams, Shamrock, per lb,
Ayrshire, rolled shouldeis, per lb,
Lord, Mo  •'. 12 to rase
i..iI'd, No. •'■. 20 to case
Lard, No. I, i artons, IB lbs	
Lard, No   1, cartons, 30 Iba
Compound, Carnation, No. 5, i- cases
Compound, Carnation, No, ,'!, 20 cases
Dripping, beef, i iii. bricks    	
Mincemeat, kit*. 25 lb. net, per Hi	
Meal Loaf, per Ib	
I ork pies, per doi       	
Pork roaal legs with dressing, lb	
Baked Ham, with dressing, pet lb,
Cooking Oil, S Kill   tins, tn lbs., pei n>
Creamer)  Butter, Shamrock, canon
do with »wt cation
Cheese, Canadian   large, per Ib. .
i  h.-isr.    i '.in.nllali.    twin,    III. .   .
Bmoked find, kippers. 2os, per lb	
Smoked fish, kippered salmon, 10s and
tOs   per Ib 	
Bmoked cod, 10s, per lb	
Head I' le, .'■ Ib   tin, each ...
Jellied tongue, ier tin	
Selected i'ow i. per lb. •
S'-'n" ti'ii chicken, i»-r Ib, ...
.54
.30
in.ifi
10.80
,20*4
.2(1
8.65
8.70
.13
.194
.20
.45
.55
,55
H'a
.:<5
.34
.23
.23*4
.10
.IS
.16
.65
2 50
.38
.45
THE   ROYAL   CROWN  SOAPS,   LTD.
Vancouver    Price    List—F.O.B.    Vancouver,
or New Wcstminstsr,
Terms Nett 30 Days.
Royal Crown  ^".tp. 5a box of 180, lea J 6.90
Royal Crown Roup, is, box of b><i
4.95
fiolden WiKt Soap, 6s, bo* of ltd. . 5.90
w hlte Wonder, box of 100  6.25
Linen (unwrapped), box "f li"    4.00
Royal Crown Naptha, )ki\ of 100    . .. . 5,15
Royal Crown  Naptha, new largo slse,
box "f  100   7.00
Klondyke (wrapped), i»>x of 25     7.in
Klondye (unwrapped}, box of 25   6.96
Primrose (wrapped), \»\\ of 25          . . 4.50
llxtr.i Hard (unwrapped), box of 30 .... 2.60
KokIIhIi Blue Mottled, box of 80  6.15
Royal Crown  Powder, !-lb., l»>x o( 24 7.00
Royal Crown  Powder, l-lb, Uix <,f 60 5.75
Golden  West   i-owder, 8-lb., l>ox of 24 7.an
Royal Crtrwn Cleanser, bi>x of 4S       . .. 2,60
Royal Crown Lye, box of 18       ... 5.i»o
Royal Crown Powdered Ammonia, lib.,
box of 36            3.75
Liquid Ammonia, 8 doz. Qts, box of 21 4.50
Liquid Blue, Idoa qts., i>ox of 24   4.5o
" tpex" Sniip Plakea, bulk, 25-lb. txixes 4.75
Crown Oatmeal, 2' Is, box of 144  4.80
Kiem Glycerine, box of 144       o.oo
-r.il Brand Castile, box of SO   4.70
s.mI Brand Castile, N>x of 2.".    5.90
Seal Brand CaatHe, box of 20       5.no
Olive Castile, cakes, box of 200      5.00
Mechanic's Pine T;*i-, box of 100   6.50
Mechanic's Pine Tar. box of 50    2.80
Write for TtOlet and Hotel Soaps.    Special
prices on 5, 10. 96 and 100 boxes.
\\ Mte Swan Snap.  6s, box of 12i* 5.90
Golden Rule Soap, 6a box of 144     . . 5.'.'0
Perfect  (unwrapped), box of 100    ..  . 4.00
*\\' ii it •- Swan Naptha, box of 100  5.15
While  Swan   Naptha,   large  Blie,   box
,,f too "fl<*
CllnittJ   or  Montreal  (wrapped),   box of
  7.10
Red Crown, box of 25   4.50
Golden Par, box of 80   2.50
Hlue Mottled, box of 20   6.15
Blue Mottled, box of 30   5.50
White   Swan   Washing  Powder,   5   lb.,
box  of 24    7.00
Pendray's- Lye, box of 48  5.90
Pendray's Powdered Ammonia,  box of
2d   4.00
Special prices on  5.  10,  25 and  100 boxes
Pendray's  Water  Glass,   Egg   Preserver
Cases. 24x2-lb. tins, per case  $ 5.50
One-gallon  tins,  per  tin     1.60
Four-gallon tins, per tin     5.60
Sundries
Royal Crown Washing Powder in barrels,  per lb 07*4
Royal  Crown   Washing  Powder  in   *£
barrels,  per lb 01%
Royal  Crown  Cleanser  in  barrels,   lb.     .05
Royal Crown Cleanser in % barrels, lb. .05Va
Terr.izz)  Cleanser   in   barrels   _ 07
No. 1 English Soft Soap In barrels, lb.     .12
No. 1 English Soft Soap in pails, lb 14ft
No. 2 Common Soft Soap in barrels  08
Wit h Haze! L-.qnid Soap in bbls., gal.    2.00
Witch Hazel Liquid Snap in 4-gal. tins,
per gal    2.50
"Tetley's
Teas"
Divorse is developing into a habit.
Some people are even beginning to
look upon it as the inevitable corollary of marriage.
The report that clothes are to be
made of banana skins recalls the
story of the dignified but slightly
deaf bishop, who, asked by a lady
if he liked bananas, replied: "I have
never tried them; I always sleep in
a nightgown."
Phosphate
Baking  Powder
—ABSOLUTELY PURE.
—THE EQUAL OF ANY.
—NONE BETTER.
The W. II. Malkin Co., Limited
VANCOUVER    NANAIMO    VICTORIA :;sii
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Impartial Administration
<f >oiir (state in accordance with the termi <>f your Will, in aaattre*] tl a
minimum of expense by the appointment of thia Conpanj aa Executor tad
Trustee.   We .shall be pleased to so Into details ol Trust i omptnj lervtce
with you al an>  time
Consultation or Correspondence   Invited*
THE CANADA PERMANENT TRUST COMPANY
PAID-UP   CAPITAL—""1,000,000.
BRITISH COLUMBIA BRANCH:
GEORGE I LEGATE, Sfansger
Canada Permanent Blda- 43? Richards St. VANCOUVER, BC.
In the Red
and Yellow
Package
w i
71 b&&*Ci*rZZ!&
SPIND
:v.-      >i   ■)   »   i£j
MflCflftOWl
Contains enough for four adult*     Made In the following styles    Marar.■■•
Ready-cut, Spaghetti, Vermicelli.
Packed 16 oz. nett.   Tested Recipes on Package.
Kelly Confection Company, Ltd.
VANCOUVER.  B.C.
| RAMSAY'S CHOCOLATE BARS
BEST
BY
TEST
MILK         !
CREAM
and
NUT
I       ""\sPji3* WinCHOCOlHE     I
■ F^fj IssG lit      1
■ ■*■                  i'
Try Some Toda
RAMSA
__   '           v
y    For Sale By All Leading Confection
iY   BROS. & CC
ANCOUVER   and   VICTORIA, B.
rr* and Grocert.
>., LTD.
C
IMPORTANT
It   is again neccssan io i
warn mi* ;<» members <»i tli« k  \j
.in-! n t .it I * i «i  general!)   throui
tin- Vtq\incc t»» bew.w of coli<
agencies run h\ }>nvatt« invitiuj
i<«r private profit   Che Wso< ial
office I*- m receipt <»i freuui nl
plainta from merchant**   ivhu
haii'lt d «i\ k r at count    in • ■.
,t;;<'li, IC!i     antl     ..;••:.
ii ncinj* consult i able tliiticuHj   i
latnittf*  cithei    i  ittatcmeni
mi ■• cc—... to tin   •
• >!!<■  t onceiii that ban    icti
retail tnefcbantu  '■■■, cm   la
•tim. !'.•.■ nf * >" niul i-veil ind
ft ho ruti"* !hi
,.  I
■ '
.■'.:•     :■.■■■■. t!) ■-
..... II      •.   I
If:,'-.-    11)4    havi     riw
\ i>.. ■ i   ; .sr> ii' %    nevei     '      HI••'•
'    ■ •      I .    ■ '
<>" ii   mtg {eatton   would   ; i   lo
him over!
WAPOUON EXTRA VIRGIN
OLIVE OIL
Bold and 0 i u u It tl I
URQUHART a COMPANY LTD.
Hurr*>ssofi to
A MAONANO «fc CO  LTD
0« Powell  St.      Vancouver,  0 C
CONTAINS NO ALUM PURE AND WHOLESOME
NABOB Baking Powder is a purr phosphate baking powder, giving
good results in every baking.
Tell your Customers to save the Certificates for Wear-Ever Aluminum
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO., LTD.
B!|||gi*illMi.!|*aw^ 1021
mm
"IK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
DRUGGISTS,   ATTENTION!
Fort)  in re <i ufs h v«- been decreet!
381
How is it possible for the absence
of length in women's skirts to came
to tortmia. aa a result of an order-ln- anything bul humor when brevity :s
council  Juat   pastel  i»y  the  Provincla
government.
Moat of these irs put under Schedule
ii. which mean tint druggists when sail-
ini; them must n vw label them nn poison
Before thll then were to drugs set down
o«j poisons
Novacalua, s',o\a'n and other cocaine
derivations snd syn iictin substitutes, as
B result Of the <»i«1 r   art- now  placed In
th«* cidst* of Schedu <• a. poisons, which
tan be sold only <n i doctor's order and
the salt of whhh has to ba registered
The drugs hew ••forth to be classed as
poisons under Schedule H an* Uguld preparations of carcoVc a Id and iih homo-
lot-it**** rhromb .«<i«l p ;rl acid, s *•
aniiide, apit i. amyl nitrite, diethyl bar
bit uric add and other alhyt, art or met
aiih derivations i ( barbituric acid,
whether described an leronal, proponal,
medlnal, or any other trade name, sll
poisouotii uretbaii i i n I ureldes, bar-
iuni chloride, barium sulphide, butyl
rhloral hydrate i t'ora'amlde, cotchicuni
■ ; it« tirrparat nns ronlntn snd ii* pre
parations cotton root and ith prepera
lions, chloroform, creosote, copper sui
: .(tc <(h>i chloride, gelsemluin and Us
prep iration - Indian b< m*j a ' l< p •■•
parations, lead ra to ■ e, leal Iodide,
'. oxide, lobelia ml Its preparations,
(pad i'i ' orob'na I n a Ith olei< ai Id
whether sold a Diacb) on or under anv
othei designs11 n, mi hyl ne blue, nitro-
. l< • print < il i' i sr, oil ol pennyroj si,
potassium *»>< hr ra te, stramonium and
Its preparations, i ropha bos and Us
preparations, s'lvrr 'Itrae ulphonal
.•ni tin bomoiogues whether described
ss Trional lotronsl or under anj otht r
designation  sine chloride, sine acetate.
Druggists and chemists In British Columbia must now be qualified at* British
ul lects before they can obtain s phar
mac) diploma, according to amendments
to the Pharmaceutical Association, ap*
proved by lhe jowrnmenl
Another amendment to the bj laws of
■he association approved bj the govern
ment lm reuses the number of examiners
from five to ten This i« because ol the
srowth of the pharmacj business In tho
province and the scattering of population in new centres
ANOTHER     INSTANCE     OF
EFFICIENCY
Keiown >. B C.
Julj v 1921
ihi s>i retarj.
it V  Board,
U inil Merchants1 Association)
122, Pat itic Building,
Vancouver, n. C.
Hear Sir
i wish to take this opportunity of expressing my alone •iatioii of the ex ell
••nt service rendered by your Collection
Department In connection with claims
(lied with you recently.
The promptness of the service both In
getting after the debtor and In remitting
the proceeds is an Indication that vour
management in this respect Is ace high.
the soul   of  Wit.
Yours very truly,
Thoa, N  Worrlat n.
»
ii
CREAM  CHEESE
Spreads Like Butter
Profit to the Dealer
Satisfaction to the Consumer
Urquhart & 0). Ltd.
Distributors.
08 Powell Steet, Vancouverr
Phone Sevmour 4200
l * 11111111 ll 111111111111 fi 1111111111 • i 111111111111111
Made
KCRLESS PRODUCTS
ala>»a
INK
'Place your
SPRING
ORDEH
through
your
'Dealers
LOWEST PRICES K»
ALWAYS RELIABLE
Elmttrii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimmiiiiimimimi
CrowtiBroom
Works Ltd.
Manufacturers of the
Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province,
Ladies' Carpet, Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling Broom, Warehouse Brooms, Whisks of All
Kinds, Glass Washboards
332 FRONT STREET EAST
Phone Fairmont 1148
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The A-l
Health Builder
"Keep fit" is the health slogan
of the present age.
The food that is doing more than
anv nt her to keen people fit—because it is richest in the life-giving
vitamine  is
FLEISCHMANN'S   YEAST.
Let your customers know that
you are ready to supply them with
this health food, They will soon
come to depend on you for everything in the grocery line.
Have your customers place a
standing order.
lhe fleischmann Company
1166  Burrard  Street
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
J. A. Tepoorten
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES
DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL
PREPARATIONS
308 Water St., Vancouver, B.C.
You Have Not Read This Journal, Until You   Have Studied the Advertisements, :;sl»
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
m
Buy From Home-Grown
Trees Only
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO.
limited, have hy careful ami efficient caw
and management built up s large buaineaa during the past ten yearn, until now they are bj tar th»-
largest growers of nursery stock in Wasters Canada
Soil and weather conditions here at Sardia art
idea!   for   producing   trees   sad   plants   with   Sturd)
constitutions  and   vigorous  roots  systems     This
coupled with a thorough  knowledge of the work ol
propagation, cultivation, ami handling, ensures our
customers best value possible to procure
We have a large cumber of fruit trees and plan:"
to dispose of this year, including a fine hit of aprli 01
trees, hut WO would advise ordering >our trees for
next Full or Spring delivery at an early date Many
have already plated large orders with us
We invite correspondence from all parties interested in the planting of trees, shrubs, or RMN I.
and will be pleased to give valuable informal! >n on
suitable varieties for different districts Write today.
Salesmen  wanted   lo   un*"**presented    dbfrsr^
T« nns liberal.
ADDRESS
The British Columbia Nurseries Co., limited
sardis. b. c.
In the Famous Chilliwaek Valley
Department G.      Mention thl-s paper when wntin*.
(£§S^i=3®§5-^^
ALL ABOARD FOR BOWF.N ISLAND
Favoured with brilliant sunshine, over o.ie thou
krocrrs, and their fronds, made flurry at 'he torn
teenth Annual Picnic     (Grocers S'ctiots KM   A
on July 13.
0^S§£^3SSS£ 3S$^^£$&$& fl
Geo. A. Campy & Co.
Tower Building 500 Beatty 8trwt
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MANUFACTURERS
MEN'S
CLOTHING
All Goods Made on the Prenuaea.
Prices baaed on replacing values
Specialists in
GUARANTEED INDIGOS AND
SOLID WORSTEDS
MADE IN B.C.
Our Customers Receive Silent Salesman Gratis
with Every Order of One half Gross
tmi;
j-Rapid -Needle-Threader
****m**L^|I •   ■■*- *—■■  *—- • I
'***Z3afxl
■ t*f*t     mS     tmmSt   .
J
*•»*./   k**m*  -*•*.**•
\
RAPID NEEDLE THREADER 00.
429 Pender Street Vancouver, B.C
W«pil^LllBIMI«llWIIII.II<WB»TOBMMI»»i»., nwwww. 192]
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
38.°,
A distinct Improvement is manifest In local
dry goods business and buying is brisker than for
some time past, although the hand to mouth tendency of purchasing has by no means been lost
sight of. Wholesale houses are well stocked with
most wanted lines at figures that enable the retail
merchants to make profitable selections. Representatives of up country stores visiting the city
have been making suitable purchases of seasonable
lines, and have reported that business conditions
in their several localities are in most cases, exceptionally good.    The influx of holiday visitors is
resulting in Increased sales for the local retailer
with goods passing over the counter in a noticeably increased volume.
Cotton.—With the U. S. cotton crop away
below the average, there is a tendency on the part
of the eastern mills to curtail their output, causing a slight upward tendency in the price of raw
material. Cotton products, however are moving
In good shape with a brisk demand for all seasonable lines.
Wool.—l". S. market is showing considerable
strength, with fabric market remaining steady.
CLOTHING
The o| inion has been expressed locally that
the average man has purchased clothing very
sparingly during the last two or three years.
Domestic stocks in thia respect are said to be
pretty low with the result that there must be an
active demand manifest itself in the near future.
In both value and quality the appeal of the lines
on the market is said to be very great which
would indicate that better trade is impending.
A Four-Button Creation
Gotham has been kind this spring to the four-
button sacque coat, notably so in grey mixtures,
a garment that might well have been designed to
impart a snug, smooth well-groomed appearance.
But the destinies of the four-button sacque, free
of all minor embellishments as universally shown
in the better stores, have been strangely juggled
with by Fickle Fashion.
This somewhat austere model has been quite
generally accepted by the youthful stalwarts of
Knickerbocker town, particularly the college boy,
who carelessly buttons the top button and allows
the garment to swing free. This attitude imparts
a certain nonchalance to the effect that is hardly
to be anticipated from an inspection of the coat
as shown on lay figures, or when held up for
frontal inspection by the salesman.
SHIRTS
The popularity of the white oxford shirts
has shown a constant growth that has now placed
this article among the trade leaders. In the case
of some New York stores, it is reported to exceed
all other types in the amount of sales. In others
it is sharing leadership among the better grade
of garments, with silk shirts, which are maintaining a healthy volume despite their temporary
setback.
Oxfords are offered in two principal styles;
the long pointed collar and the smaller collar
which has come into vogue. The retailers have
found a large quantity of inferior makes on the
market but, as quality regains its proper place,
they anticipate the return of former standards.
FOOTWEAR
Among the novelty touches seen in the newer
shoes for men is one which creates a peculiar
optical illusion. The novelty of this shoe, which
is a low one, lies in the fact that the top edge of
the sole, instead of being cut square as in the
ordinary shoes, is rounded off. This gives the
shoe the effect of being a size or two larger than
it really is, thus carrying out the vogue for broad
effects on the order of brogues and yet giving the
wearer a trim comfortable shoe. As yet it is not
very widely shown, although some of the leading
stores have it.
With a view to having apprentices trained for
the tailoring trade the merchant tailors of Winnipeg have asked the school board to introduce a
part time vocational training system. The decision was reached at the last meeting of the tailer.-.'
section of the Retail Merchants Association. The
matter was discussed to some length, after which
the question was left in the hands of a committee.
The wool clip of western Canada this year
will be in the neighborhood of 5,000,000 pounds,
according to the figures compiled by the Canadian
Pacific Railway. Alberta's wool clip is estimated
at 2,200,000 which is about the same as last year.
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia are
expected to contribute about 3,000,000 pounds
total.
REVIVAL IN SHOE TRADE TRADE
There has been a welcome revival of the shoe
manufacturing industry. Factories which were
closed or on short time are now busy—some
working overtime—and orders having been refused except for latedelivery. Montreal firms report that many rush orders have come to hand,
particularly for jobbers, and that these are mainly
for comparatively small numbers of pairs. Wholesalers have apparently put off buying until a late
hour, and are now anxious to secure shoes within
an early date from the period ordering. They
are also buying cautiously, and prefer to give repeat orders for small quantities rather than to
purchase on a large scale.
The supply houses are naturally more brisk.
The whole tone of the industry is of a far more
optimistic nature. It is significant that the bulk
of the orders for women's goods is for shoes of
a fancy character, staples being largely negelected. |i l
:;m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
.
Special Prices
We havo made ;i -jm «ia! price on nitr Ball Bear
ing and Vacuum Washing Machines.
'I liese   iiii« i >   art*   v,»   ;it?lai t IVt    that   tln\    will
make n splendid lead?!*.
SniiM-l !t»it*." \ nl! I'lUl I Ml Wt oil t" \ mir eitstMint i r,
Write for prices and descriptive literature.
MACPHERSON & TEETZEL
WHOLESALE  HARDWARE   AM)  STOVES
1290 Homer Street
VANCOUVER, BC
The Martin-Senour Co., Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF
High-Grade Paints and Varnishes
British Columbia Factory; 1505 Powell Street, Vancouver
Phone High 422
mmmtwmmwpi>*'mim^w»w>*m a 1
1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
385
o
\ M BI
V
VANCOUVER MARKETS
in suporl ol reeenl contentions
that pre-war prices would shortly
prevail on basic hardware, evidence
is supplied b\ the substantial number
ni price reductions in steel and kindred products This tendeitc) is undoubted!) a reflection of lhe unset
tied conditions "i the steel industr)
.md the faci thai manufacturers arc
holding large stocks oi material, ah
■ ainii i>  ftn mi tin ninj; i iul  the Rn
ed product to sufficient Quantities
lo nieel the demand.
Wire, wire nails, stove pipes, cul
• ails   fence staple s (both v\ ire and
galvanized),  are amongst lines Rg
uring in lhe revision to lower prices,
is to be noted thai  the onlj in
creases  occurring in tin  patnl mar-
... |   ai 6 tin   i < d U ad,   and  raw and
linseed oil. thes* commodities being
. loted ai hi hi i Rgm ■ -
Shovels   Decline — Is are
tlow n   1;  j" s   cent     |<ibbi is  m»w
it ing ' lids and I' ox al SI I M' doz,
and Buins al ^b125 do*
Window Glass Unchanged.    l.oc
aih •..: v ham • is madi in irlass uuo-
mg recent years. Following arc the
new quotations on some of the most
popular sizes:- Cord. 30in. x '{* -.in.
$23 each; Nron-skid, 30 x V-. $17;
C.rd. 33 x 4, $45j Non-Skid, 33 x b,
$2925 each; Curd. 34 x 1V2, -:.':
Nun Skid. 34 x -ji o. $39.50. Tub -s
30 x 3*/if $2.'?":   33 x 4,   $4; 34 \
4>_'. $5.io;
Sporting Goods in Demand. Sonic
lines ol sporting goods arc reported
to !"■ in good demand at this season.
Dealers report ver) favorable activ-
it) in orders for baseball outfits ol
all kinds, and brisk sales are reported in rods and tackle. The demand
for these various lines is said to be
greater than was aparent last year.
American Winchester and [.'. M.
C., decline.
\il   American ammunition drops
III per cent.
Enamelware is Reduced.    Important reductions in the prices of en
amcllcd ware, Japanned tin, gr; n'.'e,
and maiiv similar hues are announced lo  lh<  inanufacturers.    file ex-
To Make Augur Bits, etc., in Canada
A new Canadian firm is now in
the market manufacturing the Richmond brand augur bits, machine
hits, screw drivers, wrenches, pliers,
and cold chisels. The Richmond
Wire and Iron Co.. Ltd., with head
office at Deseronto, Ont., has been
formed and will manufacture the
above lines of tools, who state they
will be able to make delivery with
the exception of pliers within the
next 30 days.
lenl
ie decline vanes hctv. eeu
2U and 2: per cent, on the average
  [ reduction noted ii) the difierent lines
tations, and little change is shown and is generally claimed as one ol
in the demand. Sales are still small, the most comparatively extensive
and madi Hum puces that van and far-reaching price changes that
among the different jobbers and bas been made effective during re-
wholesalers The market is report- cen- months. The following dis-
cd somewhat steadier . counts have taken place: Colonial,
Handled Hammers lower. \\\ less 1" per cent.; Premier, plus 20
handled hammers, including claw per cent.; White, less 12%-10 per
and machinists hammers, sIlOW a cent.; Tinware (plain), less 32%-
reduetion of approximate!)   10  per 10 per cent.; Returned ware, less 30-
•    nt
Crosscut  Saws Revised.   —   The
Simiuoiid's   Canada    Saw    ( 0   liav e
mafic u \ isiun with slighl reductions
on their line of rrosscul saws,  al
;i._. per cent.; Japanned ware, plus
37Mi percent.; [apanncd ware white,
47' •■ per cent; Galvanized ware, plus
45 per cent.
Paramount Tennis Goods.— The
though tins is the ti.st change in new Reach ■Paramount'- tennis ball
prices the jobbers have received from is now on the market, and some
saw manufacturers, il is generall) marked advantages are churned lor
thought thai saws will 1"' slighth it b) the manufacturers, lhe um-
lower for fall bookings this year.        formit) oi the .walls m Paramount
a   .    v-       u   i„-i     Qnhstiintial construction,  and the even   density
Auto Tires Reduced.    NiiM.inuai .   .
l ,i . where the scans,  om are two oi tin
reductions  n prices on automobile wnen mt    •            .i;m;n.„;M„ nt
i .            ii       I..,  mi ma or  points.    1 he elimination  oi
tin's and inner tubes have been ^ '-m.'   i\                ,   ,               ,
,     .,.,                  ,     t   ti,,.  ,1,- the interior plug and   the patented
llOUnced         he   amount   ol    tlie   M> l'"                   i     •«                    '        .
m .   ,..,.,..  ,,   ',) two piece construction are other lea-
crease varies From 10 pei cent, to.."         i                           ..,.      ,
,.fi '       i       .,,.1 lures o    his tennis bail,    tne oo*
pei cent, on the different lines and jure* ui
-         ,...    ,   ,.      ,       , ,,.,,,!, ective in production is to nave tim-
si/es     "he dechnes nave been mao< J*-*-"*      .' .         ...     , ,. ,•),,,.,
• ,   i      i ■                  i         i ,, i formitv oi size, weight and resuence
with the objeel o   stimulating busi iormu> wi             s
I,    I' I    ,1, .    ,■•,,,..,.    Is       t  UOUgllOU t ,   III)   111 III 161    UOW    t 111    IMII
uess  ui  all   hues,  and  the  rang!   's a .     ..,.      «„„,!•..,.  i,'....
,    , I     .1   ... .,,■,!• mav be played.     ne^anaaian i.u-
noted when compared with pre-wai ma) >        . «....„... ■
values on these commodities. Prices tory ol the A.   . Reach C ompati) is
arenou lower than at any time dur- at  Brantford, Ontario.
You Have Not Read Thi. Journal, Until You   Have Studied
A MAIL ORDER DEAL.
The other day, in Oklahoma, a
man went into a hardware store to
buy a saw. He found the kind he
wanted and asked the price. It was
$1.65, the dealer said.
"Good gracious," replied the
shopper, "I ean buy that same saw
exactly from Sears-Sawbuck, the
catalogue house, for $1.35."
"That's less than I paid for it,"
replied the dealer, "but 1 will meet
catalogue competition, so I'll make
you thai saw for $1.35 also."
"All right," said the customer,
"you send it to my house and charge
it to my account."
"Not on your life," replied the
dealer.    " N'o   charge   account   on
this; the mail order house doesn't
trust you. I am simply meeting
their price and terms. Fork over
the cash."
The customer responded,
"Now 2 eents more for the postage   and   5   cents   I'or   the   money
order." said the dealer.
"What."
"Certainly you have to send a
letter and a money order to a mail
order house, you know."
The customer, inwardly raving,
handed over the money.
"Now, 25 eents for express
charges," said the dialer, still holding out his hand.
"Well,   I'll    he   ,"  said    the
customer. But he paid it, saying:
"Now hand me that saw and I'll
take it home myself and he rid of
this  foolery."
"Hand it to you. Where do you
think you are. You're in Oklahoma  ami   I'm  in  Chicago.    You'll
the Advertisements.
|- •;,<(;
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BETAILKK
have  to  wait  two  weeks  Cor that
saw."
Whereupon the dealer hung the
saw upon a peg. and put the ummv
in the cash drawer.
"That makes $1.67," he said. It
has cost YOU - cents more and has
taken two weeks longer to get than
il yon had bough! i! from your 1 H al
hardware store  in  the first   place."
Gulf Coasl Lumberman.
THE RETURN PRIVILEGE.
We have often referred to the
necessity for keeping a check on
the return ami exchange of goods,
and  at   the   present   time  when   th •
greatest need of the merchant is ihe
reduction of costs, very close at*
ten tion should he given this pn b-
leiii.   There are certain costs over
whieh ihe merchant  has no control,
and  for this  reason  he  should  e i.
eein   himself    ail    the    more   with
those that  can he reduced    If il
costs from 20 to .'ill \h\- cent to sell
goods,   ii    costs   this   whether   the)
stay  sold  or  not.       If they  are  re
turned, the   cost   of   making   real
sales   has   hecn    greatly    inerea <d
ami the greater the burden in pio-
portion to the value id' goodi ic-
turned, Some stores are Buffering
heavily from the return evil, th.-
number of returns or exchange) iu
some cases being greater than the
increase in business. This means,
inevitably, an increase in tie enst
of doing busimss al a time when
costs should he decreased.
Since the buying puhlie have
taken on a more cautious attitude,
they now shop around for values,
ami perhaps tiny may find a lower
priced   article   in   place  of  om-   re
cently purchased, The) will then
seek to have the higher priced goods
returned, and u then* has been a re
due tion iu the meantime the ni t
chant who accepts the return ot (hi
gOOds  I*  the  loser.      Ille  great   lllim
her  of special   sales,   too,   WOrKS  oil!
as encouraging the abuse ..f the re
turn privilege, as the customer will
see  advertised,  Sometime*,   a   similar
article to one purchased and  will
demand   the   lower  price.     It   often
happens thai the goods returned
have hecn handle i on Cue narrow*.**!
of selling margins, and the expense
involved   in   this   second   handling
wipes   I?   all   oil!
Duriug the war period, when
costs tiist commenced to shots an
alarming increase, there was i gteai
d( ai  ol   a 'itatiott  to  |op off all  no
ueccssan   expense*,   including   '-'
abuses ol service, wen as m-sis nmr
nate returns ami exchanges «>? g<
purchased      V, ■•   believe    thai    m
Some cases .*. great deal was seeoii
plished 8long this line.    Is an) a
vantage gained then to be lost n i
through an over-eagerness to n
sab's.
Where goods  are   being  cleared
out   at   a  small   inarvMti  Of   pmflt,  •»»'
al cost, the evil of the return habil
is certainly glaring!) apparent. Jusi
now the public does not nnd ani
encouragemeni from the merchants
to make them fickle in regard to
purchases The) will enlarge the
existing abuses of the return privi
lege unless the merehan! adopts \
rigorous policy of self-protection in
regard to it. In eases where (foods
are being cleared < ut  at sacrifice
priee;, at   bast, a  policy of "\t» <-\
el anges and no refunds" should be
adopted.
HIDE MARKET8 ARE
STIFFENING
Within   the   past   feu    u, .>]
skins  have  sold  nn  high   .^   ■
.'I   cents, a   gain  of  a  eo. ■
cents as compared   with   six
month    ago,    u hde    m     I».
< hi- ago quotations w ere  !'..'
eents and  o-n   feu   sabs     I'
hides have been selling in *
from 9 to 12 eenti    The bid*
are  selling   highest    are   \\, m
ouired tot soJu leather    lhe fi
ll ing ui the market toda)  is I
id packer hubs   w ith light    a
knis show Hsu' itrong lend* in
All round the hidf mai I • I
an %d\ an • of 20 per eeni
The leather market has 11   '
any   radical   change   in   th<
month    I'n «"i stdl hold   ,
■   . i ep| in »'•■ can oi I
calf skins, w hi< h tthott
in;.
Tanners report trade is -
good s;sfns of impro\ i*mi nl h
general leiulen»'*i i* tola anl
i" ss claimed b) i miu ii •■
i >■ . - *     si rived from the M>
oil  fields   'I..*'   the  b i ,:-
then    have a music all then
the  i osi   i n mi *   diti i   b<
i  , kuo*s s ho*a drv I am'
\    Western   evangelist
i •"
iei   ol  painting religu
on   m ki anil  fences along
h*a avs     ' lue   r.oi       v, •
'. ■ ii do when  vou * m
advertising man who painted
ll        i si    Imdtn   oil.     '•■'■■
ioiriif
B H
&ssk
ICOIOM1A4. i
Every can hat a tlgned guaranteed formula.
A formula vthlch hat been proved lo bt lhe
ctrreclfomnia for Canada's vigorous climate,
ll is your assurance of qualify.
Tins formula Is known throughout Ihe length and breadth ,!
Canada where H 11 "English I'aint is us.-,i as tin [tain! with tin
record foi* permanence, covering capacity and economy.
The various t<sts to uhi It it  has been put  ll)   practical  pain''' •
all proclaim It II " Rngiiah " ns tin paint which offei - the grentiMi
resistance to Wear and (ear.
A thoroughly reliable  'surface Kaver" tot all purposes,
WRITE OH WIRE
BRANDRAM-HENDERSON
LIMITED
Montreal, Halifax, St. John, Toronto, Winnipeg, Medicine Hat,
Calgary, Edonton, Vancouver. 921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
;{87
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following .ire prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.    Prices quoted are necessarily
subje:t to  market fluctuations.
vii.s   !•.*■•• w rifhl   M ii;«  to 129 Iba
'. . ,.\. ■■ • tl Iba . t%*   Iii
,   V
,•   -It.,., tt   \ \, I ' •_.
> .»!•!.■   I II      KM    un
i\< a   unhandhd   J1
s   Cron   l" M i ■
■
', I 00
i ti
loa
12
I' 6 "•
mlngl
1'
. .' I   i...-.     a n'....
,   r4d<
-    5'
i -    CARRIAGE   •
»                     '    |    i     |ft
i        *              '          * <<            i' f   ll
l *.*
to 1
igea
1   1.
H   MACHINE
n*j ■*•>
nil.
Up   t
• ,:      \rtn    10       ■■"
•
ll '
■
•   s'r. -\ ':   i.. nii
. ii f i
r'ArhH   i     wi. i
\ |    .   • ly. 1
t: * I
5 I
:.    IKS    ■     |»M- »MU>   ■
■■•.•• 5
'MAIN    «   ■ '   H    < •. '        «
100 lb*       ,    J   ■
.    IHI     ; ■ ■   '
1.'"
it;
1
•ii \:\       islni   S-Uxll   .«       i
ji.    .
'   ■. ■      ;.,(..•'                •    '.    ■              \
12 2]
nivci m    Kti       V,      • i 1    '
r '»•■.» '    ' ■ ■■ - ■      **•«
j i    ■
Hon ■■   No   ■'•'   '• 1     r • "   !';-
\,
'llfUNS   llAURKl.t,    No   =    in
•    IHI         S'o   .
So
«
i      i i
"LEVIS   MAI.I.HARLI     Pi
•   ill H  ;.i \ | •   VVIIM     l'<
'   ifl ,17.1
10 ft.,
il'.   i
■ill.  I:      '  ' ' •
I
t*t)Rttt-OATKP   TEK    Pel    ttot<
|     i. ■■ •..     ....     |    . ■■    |    •   I
«      |{
in >Ht»E Slli >i',.<    Ii m     N* ■
.■-   • n i ii.«    h on, Noa   I 11 '•      i
I ■ i
< -
\|<    (•■ .\l \l. iN    I • •    100   ll"*
,i .' ,,\,-.   j ■>.   i       i   • 'i
\t>u v MM  |wx»H    '•;''•
i
< i
18
I
: win iiiiMM v s \. \.- r«w > «•" •
5; 7J pei doa . v per doa . 12 "• H pi i ■ ,v''
8 dot    tl 91   pi I  .I- ?     H   i-    •' ■■     '•'
LANTERNH   Shod   o1   long  *' '"     I ■' ''••
1 ■     f41    lloj 1 lliinllnl      IIS.OO    '!"'
I. vWN \\> iu r.i;s Tro'ai '■ ln< I
'i lm h, is M ID Incli ll •"■ M '■'
1 liuli i M ln< h, 111 TT,, 16 lm h 5 ■'
$i.! i fi Model C, < blade*, 1'
tl j 30 16 hi. i; I1S.O0 IS Inch >'."'"
e..,i mi i blade*, • i m< ii. J' • !8 l« ■" "i
I '. "a   \s\ lm h   tlS.W
\l VTT< K'KH I'i- I.. It I "'' 1" I ''" ' '''"' •
IH.Ofl i loi
S vii.s.   vv IRK   f.<-.    13 ISfo.li   \ "" »U
vor: ' 'ui   bate   II lo f o b   Vancou' 11
NETTING,    l*OULTR\    Per    i"'1   - v '.'-'
I] |*|;     jxJ |      I'  |S      fxSI      R vi.      |xd I,     |D     i
Ixtl   11 90   ix'.'l   5s 10;  iit38, |lI W
Nl-'l'.e.     pt ,     100    |h<l     Mb .ill ''    ov ei    ll«t
Rquo.ro, wiuill loin,  $.■*"'■. -*'!1'"''•   ■ ,s'' '"'"'
•S.06    hoxii-fon,  Minim  loti,  $S.S0i   hexa&on,
. ..v.. |nfn   J'. SO
I'H'K -   i'i,i\. I ; ii."   US     poi 'l ••     .„
PINK T m;    i »• ii    11 SO <'i.-i.. ', k.i i ,*1 '''
i <■   floa    '. ajnl   IS s'> ow doa
i'i. vs ii;k OF PARI 8   13 80 per '"" lbs
RIVETS VND BURRS—Black carriage, Bib,
Knckagea, lem :'^'-..'; ..ff hst, copper rivots,
"o v. |{k p«i |b . assorted copper rivets and
burra, N.. > ". to ii, (3c per lb.; assorted
coppered rivets and burrs, No. 8, % t<> %,
•5c per Ib ■ - ; per burrs, No, 8, 70c per lb.;
■.; pi red b rra   Mo  i, 40c per lb.
ROPE SISAL BASE -British manila, base,
I8"*i . pun  manila, Ims.- 82V4c
RAWS.BUCK Happy Medium, |16.60 per
doa .•■ • e tootb |2S 35 per doss.; Happy
Idea   11    K) pei   doa.;  Princp Rupert, 123."j
. ' .    DOS
-    . VI -    r.   ght flat head, 65-10*^ off list;
-   ' round   head,   60-109'   "ff   'let;   Brass
■ ■     ..ff  list.   brass  round,   15-10/4
off Had
SOREW8,   SET   S6c ..ff list
SCREWS   CAP   :.'..   ..ff list.
8HOVEL8 VN'n SPAD.1S -OM or K"x,
|'i :■    ■ ■ .!..■/.. .ii.ii.-s oi  Bulldog, J16.75 per
11
!'-j Inch, |6. W;
IRON    i.l. VCK   SHEET   -Per   100   lbs.-  10
ffaugi    17.25;   M  gauge,   |7.60;   is-J1  gauge,
;■ m   !8 ga rge, 5^ 8c
IRi »N, a VLV VNIZED 8HBET- Per l"" lbs.
H (rai ge    Vmi i li an or English, |10.16; -1
i.    «.'.'•   'v and SO gauge, ?'.' 16.
>.-. >..!'s   .,,.   doa    M.«.^.'.   No   4.   121.85;
<':_'    \.   8   822.75; No.  10, 123.75.
■ , .■'••'.•   in I lack finish.
,ts>>  !"ts,   30 ,.'    l"i'
Ih
SPIKES, PRESSED   Per 100 lbs.—"4 Inch,
|S        I .16   J ■ '",  ;v inch. $s i"'.
STA1 u>'   Qalvanlaed fence, 18.50 per 100
■   full kega   galvanised poultrj' netting,
pei  '■    iba. In full kegs,
VCK8     ' Carpet, 70c "ff new list,
Ti" ■! S   Harveal   50 5 "ff new list
WIRE   BARBED   Pei roll    I point, rattlu,
>!.i,,:.   15.s5    i •' ".nt. h g. v" rod, |6 36
\\ ire    pj vtN    i;.\l.v VNIZED   Per   ll 0
i»,    \,.   '•   |8 '"   N... 12, 5,; 65,
WIRE   ''   .v   V    Per 100R)    No.  I i, |6 91;
\..   ■     I*        No   12  $7.05,
WRINGERS   Domestic,   $98.40   per   i\nv. :
nitawfl   I  per dos.; Qem, ?>v 20 per doa.
•   | ■ •   $71 M' i" r i\n7.
VVASHINd   MACHINES   Perfection   Ele'-
<•'"!■•.   low   pressure   watei    motor,
(23 2     Vacuum, $22,70;'Canada Elrat, $16.90.
\  -..>    w ARREN   SOLID   BOX      35 lbs,
y j.|    , ,.      '.'i Iba, J!^ 25 each.
PAINTS   AND   OILS
Martin Senour Co.  Ltd.
"\ VMEliS,   AUTOMOMll.E
•  icy  i uloi .-
', gall 'ii
ij gallon
.  '.. Kitllon
i ai 1i1n.1i lien
',,  gallon
1   -. til.hi
:  ;■.   gallon
ENAMELS,   ENGINE
1 irdinai y c i": v
>4   gallon
\   gail 'ii
! id  gallon
Scarlet
', gall m
••v gallon
!  :•'.  gallon
UN \ \l'.;!..  M VRTIN'S WHITE
1 gallon
1.,   gallon
\   «,i!li>n
if   gallon
1 16  gallon
'.a
h.
46
,8 '
.45
05
1
.07
Mi-W.
$1.46
.80
.45
1.07
$7 00
ll bi
1.88
,95
RO
I lecoratlvp Enamel.
1   gallon       5.00
■■:   gallon  2.8;')
■i   gallon   1.83
1-8 gallon      8'i
1-16 gallon   .  39
Enamel, Bath, Untlets, *.4.(,5 per doz.
PAINTS
Martin Senour.
Gallon
Ordinary colors in 1 gaL cans $4.4«i
Martin Senour porch paint    4.20
Ma-tin  Senour  Neutone white   3.90
Martin Senour Neutone co'.or   3.8'i
Martin Senour flour paint   4.20
Sherwln  WHliama,  white    4.75
Sherwln Williams, color   4.40
3herwln   Williams,   porch     4.20
Sherwln Williams, floor   4.20
1TTTV— Per 100 lbs.
Hulk,   barrels 800   th    $6.50
1 Ui Ik.   barrels 100   tl)   7.75
Hulk,   hands L1.".   ]1>   S.30
Tins.  .",  His Per   th H:.
Tlna, l th .Per th ll%c
LINSEED OIL— Gallon
Raw, i to r. barrels  - ...$i.;'">
Boiled, l  to 5 barrets : 1.88
LEAD WHITE IN OIL— Por 100 lbs.
1,000 lbs,  to  l  ton    $lfi.o"i
Less than   100 lbs 18.55
TURPENTINE-—                                    Gallon.
1   barrel Iota  $1.80
V VRNTSHES— Gallon
Elastic, No.  t   $iun
Elastic,  No.  2   8.50
IV   Linoleum       7.50
IV   Marine  Spar      S.OO
IV   Pale  Hard Oil      5.S0
IV   Furniture    4.20
Less 33 1 -8 per cent.
1 .acqueret  6.75, less 45
Wax 50c,lb
THE   NEW   GILLETTE   SAFETY
RAZOR
There is no place in the scheme of
thiRgs for the disagreeable man or
woman except to serve as warning
for others not to become so.
It is surprising how many things
n woman learns at a cooking school
that she never makes use of.
*™*-*.,mmwxw*>mmei&itt$i0. 388
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Job
p
Advertising Baker's Bread
The Fleischmann Company sounds its Message
Monthly in the Street Cars
STREET  CAR  CARDS  ADVERTISING   BREAD   FOR   YOU
APPEARED  THROUGHOUT THE  WHOLE
MONTH  OF  JINK
THESE CARDS APPEARED IN 45.500 CARS IN
OVER 4,000 CITIES OF THE COUNTRY REACH
ING OVER 50 MILLILON RIDERS EVERY
TWENTY FOUR HOURS.
[ii the average community, thi* number ol street-ear riders, per da} cijuals the total
population of the community. This eard was before the even of all these iteople,
continuously, day by day throughout the month, urging the people t<» buj baker'*!
bread.
a
And beginning August first, it \* ill In- replaced by another card repeating just as foi
fullv the same message. And s«> throughout the year.
National advertising like this is to all effects n local campaign, brought up to the ver
doors of your community.
Don't overlook the opportunity tins brings   von to link un vour advertising with
it
The Pleischmanu organization will co-operate with you in planning sales promotion
fitted tu your nei ds.
THE FLEISCHMANN COMPANY
Fleischmann's Yeast
Fleischmann's Service
KM(BllillMIMttl)WM*^^ - 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
389
ATTRIBUTES TO A PERFECT LOAF OF
BREAD
What is the best bread? This was the subject of a paper read at the Pennsylvania Convention at Scranton recently, by Adam Zeigler, which
proved to be the nucleus of an interesting address
which we reproduce In part for the benefit of our
readers. Realizing that it would be difficult to
answer such a question as the above by a single
definition, there being BO vast a difference of ideas
and tastes between various localities, Mr. Zeigler
states:
"We are. nevertheless, able to tell a few
things that a loaf should not be.
"The definition will also be modified by the
l<»int of view. The question arises. 'Are you trying to bake the kind of a loaf the consumer wants'."
or 'Are you trying to baki1 the kind of a loaf you
think the consumer ought to want?'
The accurate judgment of a loaf involves a
careful analysis of all its properties. It is not
enough to look at a loaf and make this analysis
unconsciously; each character must be taken in
turn and studied by itself.
As a Loaf Should He
The first thing in a loaf of bread that strikes
the eye is the shape. It would probably be a
difficult matter to induce the public to buy a loaf
<>f bread having all three dimensions the same,
that is, a cubical loaf.
Ungainly shapes of the loaf are sometimes
caused by material change of weight without a
corresponding change in the pan size. Sometimes
the pan is too large for the dough, and a flat loaf
is the result; at other times the reverse is the
case, and a high loaf bulging over the sides is the
result. A perfect loaf should be regular and symmetrical.
The color of the top crust or bloom should be
attractive. The pale crust of over fermentation
and the foxv color of under fermentation should be
avoided. 'Phe deep reddish brown is the color
preferred, with only a slight gloss; although the
gloss is largely a matter of local preference. The
color of the sides and bottom should not be overlooked.
After a loaf is cut. the character oi the crust
should be examined. A thin, crisp and tender
crust is due to a cool oven and a tough crust often
follows too much steam in the food box. Both ot
these should be avoided.
Blisters show errors of fermentation, but fine
cracks running through the crust are not objec-
tioanble.
The color of the crumb is important. The
public does not demand a loaf that is dead white,
but prefers the richer appearance of a loaf, with
crumb of delicate creamy shade.
Few flours on the market will give a yellow
color, if handled properly, and this may be avoided
altogether by the use of more salt, more yeast,
cooler fermentation and more thorough fermentation. For all these make a finer grain and the
whiteness of a loaf depends on the grain and not
the ingredients. That objectionable gray shade
on a loaf is often the result of too warm a dough.
There is quite a difference of opinion regarding the grain. The home-made loaf is classed as
course, rather than fine, and while too large holes
should be avoided, extreme fineness savors over
much of bakers' machinery. Streaks from the
use of too much dusting flour and a folding in of
the skin are inexcusable.
Oval, rather than round holes, are considered proof of good flour and proper handling.
A good texture, that is, the ability to tear off
the layers of the bread and leave a silky surface,
is evidence of well conducted fermentation, even
though not so recognized by the public.
The feel of the crumb should be elastic, velvety, slightly moist. A dry crumbly loaf will certainly fail in the face of competition, just as
much as an unbaked doughy loaf.
Flavor I take to means the combination of
taste and smell. The characteristic rich bread
flavor is evidence of plenty of salt, plenty of yeast
and well controlled fermentation. With less than
1 per cent, of salt, bread is inclined to be flat and
with 2-..» per cent, is decidedly salty; from 1%
per cent, to 2 per cent, salt according to the grade
of the flour, seems to give the best results.
There is nothing like milk for improving the
flavor of bread. Use as much as you can afford.
You will not only recover the cost in increased
sales, but you will be turning out a loaf of higher
nutrition, that will create a permanent demand
for your goods.
We can taste only things that are sweet, sour
or salty. In all other flavors we unconsciously
utilize the sense of smell. The public will soon
tire of a loaf that is too sweet; and a sour loaf is
due to warm dough and over-fermentation. This
can only be sold in certain very limited localities.
Deal With Our Advertisers:    They Make Thll Official Publication Possible at $2.00 a Year. :}!){i
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RBTAILKR bmm
P
The Bayers' Favorite
GOVERNMENT   BRAND
ream of the West
FLOUR
THE HEDLEY SHAW MILUNG COMPANY, LIMITED
MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA
Phone Seymour 2245 Affiliated with MAPLE LEAF MILLING CO., LIMITED
Vancouver Office: 510 Hastings Street West
AND YOU OPEN THF1R
POCKETBOOKS
Tickle Their Palates
Rich cakes arc the favorites.
The fact, thai Bakers' Cottolene ia 100*3  fat has made it ,« ^rcal help t«
bakers.
Bakers1 Cottolene is all rielim ss   nil nni ural •' ■■
Its richness makes possibh   ihi   uiuu   results .villi  I-
uuiiees of Bakei*s1 Cottolene ns with  IO ounces ol ttii)
other shortening,
If you don't already know Bakers' Cottolene, let
one of our salesmen explain what it can do for you.
DOS EEFAIRBANKSaSfiEl
HADE IN CANADA u***t-»
^^ MONTREAL
^2'COTTOLEN
Packed in Tierces, Half Barrels, Tubs and Pails.
HHMMMWWMBMIM-WMI^^ 921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
391
Regarding the density of the loaf, Its specific
gravity or relation Of weight and size, there is a
wide difference of opinion in different parts of the
country; in some places volume is wanted regardless of weight, and in other sections a rather dense
loaf seems to meet the demand.
Keeping quality of a loaf is less important
now, m these days of rapid delivery, than it was
formerly. This depends largely on the amount of
shortening used.
(heck I p Vour Loaf
It is a good custom, from time to time, to
take one of your loaves at random, place it on the
desk before you. cut it and impartially as possible
estimate its value, Write down the percentage
you will give each quality, add them up and determine the value of your loaf. See where it is lacking and in what  particulars you can improve it.
The quality of a loaf depends almost entirely
on two things its ingredients and its fermentation. The best bread cannot be made from poor
ingredients. No skill in handling will completely
overcome lack of quality in the things that go
into the loaf.
There are many ways of handling flour, but
there is only one best way. and it is impossible to
obtain good results by changing from car to car
- f flour without changing the fermentation, salt,
temperature, yeast, etc, as so many bakers do.
No chemical analysis will give the information tn be obtained from the handling and baking
of a few loaves. A chemical analysis is a help,
Ihe determination of the absorption is of s;>me
assistance, but the final test of the value of a flour
is a study of a finished loaf."
DON'T FOOL WITH QUALITY
These clays, when in numerous sections of the
country there are merry price wars going on
among bakers, when members o*i the trade foolishly not only attempt to cut each other's business throats, but also their prices, the temptation
is always near to lower the quality of one's product
in order to keep up such a costly fight. A baker
who permits himself to be drawn into a price war
is bound to lose, but the baker who is unwise
enough to believe that he can win out by lowering
the quality of his bread and other products will
be doubly the loser. The price for one's goods can
always be regulated, and after the absurd contest
is over in almost every instance prices can be
put back where they belong without much explaining to the public. Whenever a baker, however, during such a conflict with his competitors
tries to fool both himself and the public by making an inferior loaf of bread he will have a very
hard time, indeed, to get back his business. The
people may laugh and enjoy a price war among
bakers for a time, and benefit thereby, but, as a
rule, they are not apt to forget inferiority that
even only temporarily has been palmed off on
them. So don't be tempted. If you are weak
enough to become party to a price war, don't let
yourself be inveigled into lessening the quality of
your goods. On the contrary, make the very best
goods possible, and even if you should lose, as you
are bound to, during a conflict of this kind among
competitors, you will gradually get your money
back, for the people will remember quality when
the price has long been forgotten.
i'
((i
' 11
fo
PROVINCIAL BAKERS TO
MEET
Recommendations from the bak-
ffl of Victoria, calling for a joint
nference of Vancouver and \ ic-
na bakers for the purpose of
rming a Provincial Makers' section of the K. M. A. have been recently endorsed.
Retail bakers and confectioners
acting upon advice from the Dominion Secretary at Ottawa are
refraining from paying a sales tax.
Appro DOS to this fact, an enquiry
was recently received from a baker
at   Merntt,  B. C, for a ruling on
tins much discussed regulation.
The answer given was that where
a baker or confectioner manufactures on his premises, bread, cake,
pastry or confectionery for direct
sale to consuming customers, no
tax is collectable. Should, however, the aforementioned commodities be manufactured lor sale to
another dealer for consumer distribution, the sales tax is collectable.
The provincial secretary advises
that a wire from Ottawa is expected
shortly confirming this ruling.
P. E. Richards of the Cabin Confectionery, Victoria, has recently
been elected chairman of the Victoria baker's section of the R.M.A.
It a customer is willing t;> buy
without hearing the whole of your
story, close up tie' side and h'll the
rot io somebody else.
GANONG'S
BAKER S ASSOCIATION
We lire asked to state thai
the paragraph in fl recent issue
v, Intive to 'the formation of
tlie ii' w Bakery Section of the
Retail Merchants' Association,
while eorrc i so far as it wen;,
apparently gave the impression
tiitU the Bread and Cake Man-
ufacl ur ts' Assoi iation oi R.
(', had ceased to exist, its activities being superseded by
the R. .M. A. Bakers Section.
This is nol correct. The
Manufaeturing Whob sale Bakers ot' the province still maintain their own organization,
the Bread, and Cake Mfrs. Association,
CHOCOLATES
Value of
Telephone
Sprvice
From near neighbor to distant cities
and villages, thousands of Blender
highways made
alive by speech converge within the small compass
of your telephone. The ears of
people are within your call; their
voices are within your bearing.
Telephone service cannot be estimated by usual values. Imagine
how complete a revision of methods of Itving and working would
have to be made if the telephone
ceased to operate: The miracle
ol thf telephone Is realised at uii
Unit's, and its oeaseless service
put* its value almost beyond price.
B.C. Telephone Company m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKK
Init
io PREPARE NEW BREAD PANS FOR USE
In order thai new pans may be thoroughly clean,
removim* all of the oily and acid matter whieh ifl
used in preparing the metal and when manufacturing the pan. bo thai the fi.nl batch of bread will
come oul properly, it is necessary that they be tempered by baking them before being used for bread.
The best way is tO put ihem in a medium hot
OVen for eight or ten minutes until they smoke and
lake on a bluish lint. Uae a coarse eloth, preferably a clean flour sack or jute bag of any kind, aud
rub the pans well inside and OUt Then while they
are still hot, grease them thoroughly on the inside
with pure lard.    Allow   tin-  lard to soak  in  for a
while. Then warm the pans slightly again, and take
a piece of dough and wipe them oul clean with it.
Remember thai this last wiping should be done
with a piece of dough, as sack or .''her cloth often
leaves lint or ravelingH in the pan.
Before using them they should gel the regular
greasing, and it must be observed thai the inside
comers of the pans are properly lubricated. Insure and do not grease the pans before yon burn
them  out     If any   of  the   pans  are  rus'y,   take  a
handful of salt and put it mto these before burning
them. Rubbing the hoi salt in lhe pan after taking
from the oven will remove the  rust.    Tin- first
greasing after burning the pans oul should |><
with pure lard.    After that you ma\  use ui
material you are in the habit of employing f<
purpose,   Good S?ewi for Baken,
dull,
tail", i"-
' In
WHY DELAY'
11" was jus; fto'tnu to help  i iu;«!iboi
nn r   u t.
u'» <!
lie v.. s jus: going t»» p-   *« n.ii   when ii n
I rotes!
He .n»nt t<> insure h*>, hau*e, bul it our:,
i >iv hi  gol Al Mind to il
He \vas juil going lo reduee his debl win
II rditoni  ■ shut ilowi     on him
11>  wan jusl K'nug *" stop tinnkins
hting w loot his |  .        ■   une n r* I ■ I
[fi was .. usl uoing lo introdue* s bell i -
mt«> his btiKluesM when   I  wen! lo smash
He was jusl v'"'':-* to i ' s ■ It sn liilc sn<
a s seal ion whfti ner\   in pi  itmti n    im<
ll, was ju*i going b proi If proj ■■ prol
for Ins wife and famili wl en bin fori u ■ was
a w a \
•
KIRKLAND & ROSE
IMPORTERS  AND   MANUFACTURER'S   AGENTS
Bakers' and Confectioners' Supplies
aosnts ron
MILKSTOCK
- a 1'ure Separated Milk In Powdtr F\>nn
DIAMALT
- A Pure Malt Extract f<>r Baken
CHOCOLATE
—for Confectionery and Cake work.
ESSENCES
---Flavoring*, Harmless Colors, Bssentitl oils, elci
Manufae* tired  b*   CAKADIAN   MH.K  KRQDIHT8  l.Tl>
Toroeio, • Reads
MaAttfact'-red   b*    TUB    \Mi:i:i   \\    tMAMALT   I  I
Cini In mil, <>h!<
Manufactured   b)   THU   COWAN   I «»    i.Tie   Tow
i anada
Manufactured by W J  in sn * ... j,n>. London Em
L
paper goods ' -' Ofoffl* 6ff-nc- 9iftilf!r»"
"%££££?,"*"• °" "'   M,",;',1': *• »*"**" H»i<T.CAm i ......:
linden, i ru:. snd Montreal  * anada
130 Water Street.
VANCOUVER, B C
Almond's Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
IMPORTERS OF
Bakers and Confectioners'
Machinery  and   Supplies
TICKETS ANI>   LABELS
maoe  nv  SPECIALISTS
A   •p*clft!(»!i   |n  B|)y  ,.w||lrif    i,   ,,r,0  MQlBM-]  !"  pre*
euoe realms  pron-pily,   MtlsfaeiorUy   »n<l  toonomlcaJlr
i«»   »?i whr,"' °"r t'lttn' dlfftri lirow tbi svarsfd prin'
,'■  2'"*<    "' « ear ry In ffoek runny  l»nn of Colored  C*' '
ootrflj ror Immedlaia um ai ont operation with our
moctrn ipeclalty maeJtlaery, wt print itckeia In i*°
cojofi on from of ueksi and <>n •>,« beak; number •«"*tl
oessi lot lama or eonsacutively ind perforata •*>••'
r1'" ****'• or w«t ran print y.mr I loll til and «*••* >''
in»o   r-.i,*   to   lull     fMCh   tlrkiti    ntimln<r«.l   OOOSeCUUVl >
•nd run-iv.y    w, rnaka t>rcn,i labela la two <•<>!<"•» f«
int prlru nt pr'ntinr on. «-ol»r, in quantities, »n<l P ■'
u,d!V"„r"u* nf 6ooo w. mnk* th» ilekfia for **-•
o' K Ity by \h* iTilii|on«: for tint North V»n<*"uv»'
fyrriu\ for tii« OoVrrnm».nt Amuiaantnt Tas, slw "P
m rat mniloni   snd «!t kinds of thMtr* tirkota    U*t
*»•'>  n-.t  tra Of itfrvlrn  |q you
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phont   Bayvlaw  381
W«2 2nd   AVENUE   WEST VANCOUVER,   ■    (
Deal With Our Adverti»er»-    Th«v M,t. tki.  ««, .
They  Make Thi. Official  Publication  Po.aibl.  at 12.00 a   Year. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
393
CAKES THAT ARE  SELLING
AROUND TOWN
Tested Recipes from Practical Bakeshops
Best Sultana Cake
2 pounds butter, 2 pounds sugar, 2'-j pounds
fiour, 2'j pounds sultanas. 2 pound peel, a pinch
of powder, 24 egga, lemon flavor. Cream up the
butter and BUgar well together, add the eggs a
few at a time, and finish by making a fairly free
batter, using a little milk if necessary. Fill into
well-papered hoops, scatter blanched split almonds
on the top, and bake in a steady oven.
Fruit Cake
(A Foreign Recipe)
l'o pounds butter, 2 pounds sugar, 18 eggs,
2 pounds flour. I i pound seeded raisins, fa pound
cherries, ■'< v pound citron peel. \ ^ pound angelica, a
pinch of aniseed, a pinch of cloves, a pinch of
nutmeg. Separate the whites from the yolks and
whip up very stiff. Cream up the butter and the
BUgar thoroughly, add the yolks, a couple at a
time, and beat well until all are thoroughly beaten
in, after which add the mixed spices and beat.
Mix the stiff whites very carefully into the batter,
add the flour carefully, and finally fruit. Hake in
large sizes m weil-papered hoops in a moderate
oven.
Common Ginger Cakes
12 pounds flour, 1 pounds golden syrup, Ifa
pounds lard, ifa pounds brown sugar, 4 ounces
ground ginger. 1 ounce ammonia, 1 quart water,
lemon flavoring. Sift the ginger with the flour,
rub in the lard, mix in the sugar, and make a bay.
Powder ami dissolve the ammonia in the water,
stir into the syrup, and turn all into the bay. Add
the flavoring and sufficient color to give a rich tint
to the batch, stir them in. then make all up to a
stiff dough. Mold thoroughly, roll out sheets j g
inch thick, cut out with round cutter, and place
the cakes on well-buttered tins. Wash over with
a water brush, and bake in sharp oven.
Marquise D'Aprieot
Here is a mixture that will be convenient for
quite a variety of small and even large cakes.
Rub up just light three-fourths of a pound of
almond paste, gratings of two lemons, one strong
pinch of cinnamon and trifle ground mace; tdd
six yolks and two whole eggs, one-halt cup 01
cream, one-half teaspoonful powdered ammonia,
one pound powdered sugar, and and three-fourths
pounds butter and, lastly, three pounds tlour.
Keep this dough an hour to stiffen it up a little;
it will roll out more even and easier. After five
to ten dozens of these marquis-shaped cakes have
been cut out to about one-fourth inch thickness,
make a mixture by boiling one pint of milk, one-
half pound of best butter, one ounce sugar, one
pinch mace, then stir in three-fourths pound fiour,
and when partly cooled off add twelve or thirteen
eggs so that it is something like a soft eclair mixture. With one fourth inch star tube form a
border around the cake a trifie away from the
edge, also with a small plain tube about the thickness of the end of a penholder form what is termed a variegated wreath. Bake these, after brushing with egg wash, in a moderate oven; when
done to a nice delicate color, fill between the border with apricot jelly and the centre with pink
rose fondant.
Apricot Sandwiches
ILj pounds flour, lfa pounds pulverized
sugar, "l1 -j pounds butter. 1 pound ground almonds, 1 "ounce baking powder, 8 eggs, fa pint
milk, apricot jam (stoneless). Beat the butter
and sugar into a light cream. Whisk the eggs
to a very light froth, and stir it into the cream.
Sift the baking powder with the flour and work
it lightly in, then stir in sufficient color to give
the batch a rich golden tint. Spread the batch
on two shallow-edged, paper-lined baking tins,
and bake delicately in a moderate oven.
Mangue D'Aprieot
Pound and force through flour sieve one
pound sugar, six ounces blanched almonds pounded or rolled and well dried; add sixteen egg yolks,
the gratings of two lemons, and one tablespoonful
rum. When light and foamy beat fourteen egg
whites very stiff; add one pound flour, and six
ounces of melted butter, turn this into one-half
inch thick sheet and bake in a moderate oven.
Make two sections out of it, and fill with apricot
jam; put this on a papered board; with a soft
macaroon paste form one-half inch bar over it;
let this dry after sprinkling with crushed loaf
sugar and evenly chopped almonds. Bake in a
moderate oven, and when done run a reddish
apricot string between the macaroon lines; cut
into bars one inch broad by three inches long.
Stamboul Cakes
Mix fourteen ounces sugar, six egg yolks and
ten beaten whites, a pinch of salt, a tablespoonful
of orange-flower water, one pound ten ounces of
flour. Work this by hand to a smooth paste, then
beat it well on the board with a rolling stick; let
it stand for twelve or fourteen hours; beat again,
let stand for another hour or two, then roll out
one-fourth inch in thickness, and cut up into
crescent shapes, and prick them well with the
fork; place on dusted cloths, then drop into simmering water in a shallow pan; when they rise,
remove and put them on cloths to dry; when
ready, place them in greased pans and bake in
a moderate oven. :.(M THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
n
p
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is -SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a pos.tion to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
SiJK WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA, B.C.
M SHAMROCK BRAND
>r«i*---*t*s^^ Stands for the Highest Grade Butter
It is our endeavour to maintain the Highest Standard, and you can safely RECOMMEND this brand to your customers.
Reliability goes with SHAMROCK BRAND
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER CALGARY EDMONTON
44
EFFICIENCY Brand Heavy Rubber Footweai
Brown and White
HIP, STORM KING
and KNEE BOOTS
THREE, FOUR and SIX
EYELET LUMBERMEN'S
WE ALSO CAREY A LARGE STOCK OF    MALTESE CROSS" BRAND BOOTS   LUMBERMEN'S
-AND LIGHT RUBBERS. Send Your Rush „,„„, ,„ „,
Gutta  Percha &  Rubber,  Ltd.
526 BEATTY STREET, VANCOUVER. m yATE8 ^^ V,CT0RIA PARAGON
SELECTED HARD SPRING WHEAT
FLOUR
FAMILY PATENT
Victory Flour Mills, Limited
806 BEACH AVENUE VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phones: Seymour 3242-3243-3244
Experienced Buyers
• *
Paper Supplies
\\TMK\ the}  wanl tn lie sure nf getting the
best. Inn the Standard article.   You want
the lies! Pa] er Bai;
t tiit* them, lm\
S. 11  \ nil \\ I
mid he sure of set-
"STANDARD" Paper Bags
Manilla Wrapping-
Kraft Wrapping.
Toilet Paper.
Ice Cream Pails.
Oyster Pails.
Wax Paper.
Grease Proof.
Twines.
Stationery, Etc.
MAXUFACTl'RED BY
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
PAPER MAKERS
ii
Vancouver Otlice and Warehouse, 1068 HOMER ST.
Phone Sey. 781. Brookfi
*'*sr>    ^v-^r-v     ^r
-■*■■. • m '■'■<■ mm*
3j ©Brookfiewa
IfbButter*
WHAT IT MEANS TO YOUR CUSTOMER
B otter sale*.
R egul.u* trade.
0 riginaJ flavor.
0 pen display.
K ecn attraction.
F resh prod tut.
1 mlisputable quality
E conomic package
L e&disg brand.
Dollars in results.
WHAT MORE COULD ANY   DEALER WISH KOR
Swift Canadian Company, Limited
Vancouver       New Westminster       Victoria        Nelson        Calgary        Edmonton
ii
P
SUPPLY YOUR CUSTOMERS
APEX SOAP FLAKES
Guaranteed 100% Pure
Especially Suitable for use in all Types of Washing Machines
SOLD BY THE POUND IN BULK    NO WASTE
Price: $4.75 per case—25 lbs.
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B.C.

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