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BC Historical Books

The Washington historical quarterly. Vol. III Washington University State Historical Society 1912

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   \
aalftngt0tt IftBiflrintl (jPuarterlg
Unarh of Editors
Clarence B. Bagley, Seattle
J. N. Bowman, Berkeley, Cal.
Clinton A. Snowden, Tacotna
Ashmun N. Brown, Seattle
W. J. Trimble, Spokane
W. D. Lyman, Walla Walla
Thomas W. Prosch, Seattle
Ceylon S. Kingston, Cheney
Allen Weir, Olympia
Edward McMahon, Seattle
VOL. Ill   No. 1
T. C. Elliott, Walla Walla.
managing Enttor
EDMOND S. MEANY
ISSUED QUARTERLY
OCTOBER, 1908
(HanttntB
CHARLES W. SMITH   ..     ..     A Contribution Toward a  Bibliography of  Marcus
Whitman      3
T.C.ELLIOTT               Dr. John McLoughlin and His Guests                     .. 63
W. P. WINANS       Fort Colville, 1859-1869       78
DOCUMENTS — Transfer of Alaska to the United States — Instructions from William
H. Seward and Report of General Rousseau        ..        ..        ..       ..        ..        .. 83
BOOK REVIEWS—  92
NEWS DEPARTMENT—     96
THE WASHINGTON  UNIVERSITY
STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
University Station
SEATTLE,  U.  S. A.
Entered at the Postoiiice at Seattle as second-class mail matter.
y  Vol. Ill   No. i
October, igo8
OTagfjtttgtfltt Ifistatai (j|)itartehj
A CONTRIBUTION TOWARD A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF
MARCUS WHITMAN.
The following list of references relating to Marcus Whitman
has been prepared for the Reference Department of the University of Washington Library. It is submitted for publication as
a means of saving cards and space in the library catalogue, and
also with the hope that it may prove useful to students and
neighboring librarians.
As to scope, the list covers the following points:
1. Biographical material.
2. The ''Macedonian cry" of the Indians as a cause of Whitman's connection with the Oregon Mission.
3. Whitman's Waiilatpu station of the Oregon Mission of
the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.
4. Whitman's ride.
5. The Whitman massacre.
6. The controversy over Whitman's political influence. In
connection with this controversy arises the question of the attitude of the United States Government towards Oregon, especially during the years immediately preceding Whitman's visit
to the East in 1842-43. Owing to the large amount of material
relative to this question, it has been excluded from the list with
the exception of some few references to authorities that have
been prominently brought into the controversy.
As to arrangement, the references have been given in three
groups:
1. Manuscripts.
2. Books.
3. References to periodicals and the publications of societies.
(3) 4 Charles W. Smith
In the form of entry used, a departure has been made from
bibliographic custom.. Instead of the usual "see" or "in" analytic entry, in which the name of the book or magazine containing the article and the pages referred to are mentioned last, it
has been thought desirable to bring these facts to the front.
The list exhibits first of all the places where material bearing
upon the subject may be found, after that, facts showing what
such material may be. This arrangement makes it possible for
a student to select with promptness such articles as he may wish
to call for in a library or for the librarian to readily check such
items as the library may contain. Notes have been given as to
the contents of many of the articles, not at all for the purpose of
taking sides in a discussion, but merely to give the student, if
possible, some clue to the contents or trend of the article so that
he may judge as to whether he wishes to see it or not.
Many of the items have been examined only in the form
of clippings and the compiler has been compelled to depend upon
a marginally pencilled statement for the name and date of the
periodical from which the clipping was made. It thus becomes
impossible to vouch for the accuracy of all references here given,
but it is hoped that the number of errors may not be large. Many
clippings have been discarded from the list because not fully labelled. It is unfortunate that oersbns who have shown most
commendable zeal in clipping and preserving scraps of historic
worth, have often failed to properly label their clippings, thus
greatly impairing their value for reference, and making them
bibliographically worthless.
Few, if any, in the list of American heroes, have been more
variously estimated than Marcus Whitman. For twenty years
before Professor Bourne called the attention of Eastern historians to the saved Oregon story, the question of Whitman's
political influence was being debated in Oregon and Washington.
The controversy was bitterly contested, and although it has
mainly subsided since the death of the principal participants, the
results are still in local evidence. No generally accepted conclusions have been reached, and the topic is by many delicately
avoided.
In 1897 a Seattle man suggested the rechristening of Mt.
Rainier in honor of the savior of Oregon.1 In 1905, however, a
Seattle school board was unwilling even that the name of Whitman should be associated with a grade school building under its
charge.2    Again,  in   1908,  in the  same  city,  a  movement  was
1 Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 8, 1897.
2 Seattle Dally Times, September 12, 1905. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman 5
launched towards placing a statue, of Marcus Whitman in the
rotunda of the National Capitol at Washington.8
Nor has there been greater unanimity of opinion in the country at large. In New England the name of Whitman has been
ranked with that of Lincoln." A student from the Middle West
held that he was not above the stature of a third or a fourth rate
man.3 Barrows, in the East, made him the central figure in his
history of "Oregon,"8 while Garrison from the South in an intensive study of "the ten year's of "Westward Extension" covering the period of his greatest influence, had room for but two
sentences relating to Marcus Whitman.7
What are the sources of information in regard to the life
and work of this variously estimated man ? The greatest single
collection of source material is to be found in the correspondence
between Whitman and his associates and the American Board of
Commissioners for Foreign Missions. This correspondence is
now on file in the Archives of the American Board in the Congregational House, 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., where "Persons who come with clear certification as to their character and
motives are allowed to examine these manuscript letters and
documents in the rooms during office hours, from 9 A. M. to 5
P. M., excepting Saturday afternoons."3 Unfortunately this correspondence is quite out of the reach of the average student. It
ought to be published at the earliest moment for the benefit of all
who are interested in the history of the Pacific Northwest.
Another important set of Whitman manuscripts is also located
outside of the State. This is the collection of letters written
from Oregon by Doctor and Mrs. Whitman to friends and relatives in the East, and contained in the Library of the Oregon
State Historical Society, Portland, Oregon. Fortunately these
letters have been published, and are easily accessible in public
and private libraries.9
The most important Whitman collection in the State of
Washington is owned by Mr. C. B. Bagflev, of Seattle.   In addi-
3 Seattle Daily Times, June 21, 1908, Magazine Section, p. 3.
4 J. Wilder Fairbank. in New Haven Evening Register, February 19, 1901.
5 William I. Marshall, in American Historical Association, Annual Report for
1900, v. 1, p. 232.
6 Barrows, William. Oregon, tbe Struggle for Possession. Boston. Houghton,
1884.    (American Statesmen Series.)
7 Garrison, George Pierce. Westward Extension, 1841-1850. N. Y. Harper,
1900.     (Hart, A. B., Ed.    The American Nation), v. 17, p. 38-30.
s Letter to the compiler from Dr. E. E. Strong, Corresponding Secretary, A. B.
C. F. M., under date of October 26, 1908.
9 Transactions of the Oregon Pioneer Association for the years 1891 and 1893
contain copies of most of the Whitman letters owned by the Oregon State Historical
Society. BB
Charles W. Smith
tion to his own collected savings covering many years, he has
recently obtained the William I. Marshall collection. Here are
to be examined Marshall's letter files containing hundreds of
letters written by Whitman's associates and friends, and by the
principal parties to the Whitman controversy covering a period
of over twenty-five years. Here are also typewritten copies of
a great deal of contemporaneous source material. The collection
includes twenty-four notebooks containing Marshall's manuscript notes and memoranda; five of these are filled with copies
of letters from the file of the American Board in Boston. It includes also five scrap-books of mounted newspaper clippings
and many pamphlets and books relating to the early history of
Oregon. In addition to all this, there is a bound manuscript
copy of Marshall's unpublished history of the "Acquisition of
Oregon and the long suppressed evidence about Marcus Whitman." This is a remarkable piece of work covering over 1,300
pages with an exhaustive eighty-eight-page index. ^Fortunately
for students, Mr. Bagley makes his collection available to all
serious workers in the field of history. For those who have
occasion to use his library, he makes generous provision of a
large well lighted study room, affording access to his books and
pamphlets relating to the Pacific Northwest and to bound files
of early newspapers not elsewhere evailable in the State.
Possessing the Marshall collection, Mr. Bagley's library is
naturally strong upon the negative side of the Whitman controversy. Whitman College Library has the best collection upon
the affirmative side. Here is the Myron Eells collection of books,
pamphlets, mounted clippings and manuscript material. One of
the interesting, treasures is a scrap-book of clippings collected
by Mr. H. H. Spalding and containing much of the material
that he used in the compilation of his "Executive Document,
Number 37." Whitman College Library is strong in missionary-
literature.
The University of Washington Library has a good collection
of United States Public Documents, and, barring newspaper accounts, is fairly well supplied with secondary material for the
study of Whitman.
The present list of references is by no means complete, but
it is hoped that the field has been sufficiently covered to make it
of practical use as a bibliographic introduction to the study of
Marcus Whitman. If it should be the means of causing some
few students to suspend judgment until they have had opportunity to carefully examine the sources of information, it will amply Bibliography of Marcus Whitman 7
justify its compilation. There has been so much undignified criticism upon both sides of the controversy and so many misstatements have been made, based upon secondary authorities and
long range reminiscences, that it is refreshing to hope that the
time has come when no one will have the temerity to rush into
print upon this subject without at least some familiarity with
the real sources in the case. CHARLES W. SMITH.
University of Washington Library.
November 12, 1908.
MANUSCRIPTS.
Hutchinson, Arthur Howard.    Growth and development of the
Whitman myth.   20p.
Mr. Hutchison based his essay upon a careful study of
contemporaneous source material, examining the archives of
the A. B. C. F. M. in Boston, the Bowditch Papers in the
Boston Public Library, and other records in the Libraries of
Harvard and Yale Universities. His paper is of particular
interest in connection with the work of Edward Gaylord
Bourne. Professor Bourne acknowledged his indebtedness
to Mr. Hutchinson as follows: "My eyes were first opened
to the intricacies and curious origin of the legend by a very
careful investigation conducted under my supervision by one
of my students, Mr. Arthur Howard Hutchinson. His study
of the question convinced him that there was a larger amount
of collusion and purpose in developing and disseminating the
story than I have thought it best to try to prove in this article." American Historical Review, 6:277, note (January,
1901). Mr. Hutchinson's paper contains a 4-page list of
references.
Contained in the private library of Professor Edmond S.
Meany, of the University of Washington.
Marshall, William I. Acquisition of Oregon and the long suppressed evidence about Marcus Whitman. 2v. in 4. c 1905.
Copyrighted manuscript of over 1,300 pages with an 88-
page index. An exhaustive work based upon 23 years of
study to combat the saved Oregon story. Mr. Marshall completed this shortly before his death in 1906, and was unable
to secure its publication. It is typewritten upon letter size
paper and well bound. On the whole, it is not so polemical
in tone as his published writings which it entirely supersedes.
While written to disprove the saved Oregon story, it contains also much material of general interest in the history
of the Pacific Northwest. It is especially strong in the study
of the attitude and action of the U. S. Government toward
the Oregon Territory.
Contained in the private library of Mr. Clarence B. Bagley,
of Seattle, Washington. 8
Manuscripts
Parker, Samuel J. Open letter to Rev. John L. Maile, dated
Ithaca, February 23, 1897.    24 p.
Contains some excellent biographical material. In regard
to the personal appearance of Doctor and Mrs. Whitman, Dr.
Parker says: "There is to me no good imaginary picture of
them I should recognize the faces of Doctor and Mrs. Whitman if I saw them; but I cannot call their appearance to
mind fully; I do Mrs. Whitman's most. Certainly they are
not the ideal Methodist clergy faces of Dr. Nixon's book
fancies, whatever may be said."
Contained in the Whitman College Library, Walla Walla,
Washington.
Parker, Samuel J. On the Oregon Missions and their consequences with copies of original documents referring especially
to the mission of the A. B. of C. for F. M.   267P. Bound copy.
This manuscript was completed August 1, 1892, and donated to Whitman College Library. Has much material relating to Marcus Whitman. Dr. Parker thinks that Whitman's name has quite overshadowed that of his father, who
established the Oregon mission of the A. B. C. F. M. He
says it should not be called the Whitman Mission, as Whitman was in charge of only one of the. four stations com-
■ posing it.
Contained in the Whitman College Library, Walla Walla,
Washington.
Parmelee, Egbert Nelson. Early missions of old Oregon; a
thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts, University
of Washington, Seattle, 1905.    H2p.
Mission of the A. B. C. F. M. p. 33-72. Takes a middle
ground in regard to Whitman's influence. Says that he did
not save Oregon or any part of it, but'that he did exercise a
very real and potent political influence. Bound typewritten
copy.
Contained in the University of Washington Library, Seattle, Washington.
Pringle, Catherine Sager.    The Whitman massacre.    I09p.
Mrs. Pringle was one of the Sager girls adopted by Doctor
and Mrs. Whitman. She was a grown girl at the time of the
massacre. A few years after the massacre she committed her
recollections of it to paper. She still has the manuscript and
has made it the basis for lectures. It throws much light on
conditions at the station before and during the massacre.
Professor Meany, of the University' of Washington, has procured a typewritten copy of this manuscript which he has
bound and placed in his private library. He had two carbon
copies made at the same time and these he has bound and
presented, the one to Whitman College Library, and the
other to the Iniversitv of AVashingfton Library. *1
Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
9
Walker, J. E. Esther Among the Cayuses; a true tale of
1847.    8p.
This is softened story of the experiences of Esther Lorinda
Bewley, a survivor of the massacre. The manuscript is dated
Forest Grove, Oregon, April 28, 1908. It is based upon personal recollections.
Contained in Whitman College Library, Walla Walla,
Washington.
BOOKS.
American Home Missionary Society. Testimony of the workers
given at the 58th anniversary of the American Home Missionary Society, Saratoga Springs, June 3-=;, 1884. N. Y. A.
H. M. S.   1884'.   P- 1-2.
Address of. Rev. Cushing Eells. Refers to massacre and
the founding of Whitman Seminary as a monument to memory of Marcus Whitman.
Atkinson, Nancy Bates. Biography of Rev. G. H. Atkinson,
D. D. Portland. Baltes. 1893. p. 66, 72, 110-111, 147,
171-176.
Atkinson visited the East in 1848 and attended the meeting of the A. B. C. F. M. at Norwich, Conn. "He there took
the opportunity to try to establish the fact of Dr. Whitman's
going to Washington in midwinter to save Oregon to the
United States. In Oregon at that time, very few admitted
this, but Dr. Atkinson was firm in the belief of the important
fact, and urged Dr. Whitman's associate missionaries to speak
out to  establish  it,  but there was great opposition  to  the
idea." p.   147.    This book contains  reprints  of Atkinson's
"The American Colonist in Oregon," of Lovejoy's letter to
Atkinson, dated February 14, 1876, and of Atkinson's address
before the New York Chamber of Commerce.
Atwood, Rev. A. The Conquerors. Cinn. Jennings & Graham,
c 1907.   p. 222-234.
"Work of the American Board in Oregon." Speaks highly
of Whitman, but says he didn't save Oregon.
Bancroft, Hubert Howe. History of Oregon. 2v. San Francisco.    History Co.    1886.    Use index in v. 2.
A straightforward account based upon early sources. Not
much attention is given to Whitman's Eastern trip. In a
footnote, v. 1, p. 343, the author says, "Gray wickedly asserts
that Whitman went to Washington with a political purpose,
instead of going on the business of the mission." This account was written by Mrs. Victor. (For a valuable discussion
of the origin and authorship of the Bancroft Pacific States
Publications, see paper by Dr. W. A. Morris in the Oregon
Historical Society.    Quarterly, 4:287-364.    Dec.    1903.)
Barrows, William. Oregon, the struggle for possession. Boston.
Houghton.    1884.    Index.
Much space given to Whitman. An uncritical account
containing" many errors. 10
Books
Beeson, John.    A plea for the Indians with facts and features of
the late war in Oregon.    N. Y.    Beeson.    1857.    p. 116-124.
Says Indians were not treacherous, but that the massacre
of Whitman followed directly from his medical practice.
"We shall now see how it was that through the lamentable
error of this practice [medicine], the good Dr. Whitman lost
his life."   p. 118.
Blaisdell, Albert F.    The story of American history.    Boston.
Ginn.   1900.   p. 342-345- ,     TT .     „     1
"How Dr.  Wliitman  saved  Oregon to the   Union.-     A
rather dramatic presentation for children.   Inaccuracies.
Blanchet, Rev. Francis Norbet.    Historical sketches of the Catholic Chruch in Oregon.   Portland,   n. pub. 1878.   p. 133-183.
Defends the Catholics from charges of having incited the
murder of Whitman.
Bliss, Edwin Munsell.    Encyclopedia of missions.    2v.    N. Y.
Funk.   1891.   v. 2, p. 472.
One column.   Says Whitman saved Oregon.
Bourne, Edward Gaylord.   Essays in historical criticism.   N. Y.
Scribner.   1:901.   p. 3-109.
"Legend of Marcus Whitman," enlarged from the American Historical Review, 6:276-300 (Jan. 1901). Rejects most
of features of the saved Oregon story and attempts to trace
its origin and growth.
Bourne, Edward Gaylord and Scott, H. G. The Whitman myth.
n. pub.    1905.    13 p.
Reprints from the Morning Oregonian, of March 29, 1903.
British and American joint commission for the final settlement
of the claims of the Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound agricultural companies. [Papers.] Washington. Gov't printing
office, etc.; Montreal.    Lovell.    1865-1869.    14V.
v 2. Evidence on the part of the Hudson's Bay Co.   Montreal.    Lovell.    1868.    p. 213.
Deposition of Dugald Mctavish bearing upon the
Whitman massacre,
v. 4 Memorial and argument on the part of the Hudson's
Co.    Montreal.    Lovell.    1868   p. 142-149.
Shows services of the H. B. Co. in helping the
American settlers. Analysizes testimony of W. H.
Gray and scores him for his bitter partizanship.
v. 8. Evidence for the United States in the matter of the
claim of the Hudson's Bay Co. Wash. McGill &
Witherow.    1867.    p. 75, 159-191.
Cross examination of Jos. L. Meek and testimony
of W. H. Gray.   Much material relating to the Whitman station.    Gray swears that Whitman when in
Washington interviewed President Fillmore!
Note.    The compiler has been unable to examine a complete set of the above papers.   The University of Washington
Library contains but 8 out of the 14 volumes as shown in the
printed catalog of the Library of Congress. *1
Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
11
Brouillet, Rev. J. B. A. Protestantism in Oregon; account of the
murder of Dr. Whitman and the ungrateful calumnies of H.
H. Spalding, Protestant missionary.   N. Y.   Cozans.   1853.
A Catholic account of the Whitman massacre which appeared later in a U. S. Public Document (U. S. Congress, 35-1,
House Exec. Doc, No. 38).
Brown, J. Henry. Political history of Oregon, Volume 1, Provisional government. Portland. 1892. p. 49-52, 57-58, 79,
87-90, 111-115, 118-122, 148-154, 316-431.
Contains copies of many important Whitman documents
and sources, such as the permit issued by Secretary of War
Cass to Whitman and Spalding to reside in the Indian country
among the Flathead and Nez Perce Indians, dated March 1,
1836, a fac simile of Whitman's signature, Lovejoy's account
of his ride with Wnitman, and Whitman's letter to the Secretary of War enclosing synopsis of a proposed bill.
Burnett, Peter H. Recollections and opinions of an old pioneer.
N. Y.    Appleton.    1880.
Based on a journal of the immigration of 1843 kept from
the rendezvous near Independence, Mo., to Walla Walla. A
high estimate is given of Whitman's services. Spalding's
attack of the Catholics considered unjust. "Mr.'Spalding and
myself agreed to discuss the matter through the columns of
a small monthly newspaper, [Oregon American and Evangelical Unionist], published by Mr. Griffin, and several numbers
were written and published by each of us, but the discovery
of the gold mines in California put a stop to the discussion," p. 305.
Burgess, John Wfilliam]. The middle period. N. Y. Scribner.
1897.    p. ZiS-zrt-
Ride.    Object stated to be political with political results.
Butterworth, Hezekiah. Log school house on the Columbia.
N. Y.   Appleton.   c 1890.   p. 235-236, 244-249.
Whitman said to have secured a delay of treaties at Washington City, thus saving Oregon and Washington to the U. S.
Catlin, George. Manners, customs, and condition of the North
American Indians, 1832-1839. 2v. Lond. Catlin. 1841.
p. 108-109.
Letter No. 48, an oft quoted authority in regard to the
"Macedonian cry." Catlin traveled with the two young Nez
Perce Indians on their return from St. Louis.
Chittenden, Hiram Martin. Amreican fur trade of the far West.
3v.    N. Y.    Harper.    1902.    v. 2., p. 640-649.
A critical account of the St. Louis delegation of 1832 and
of Whitman's return to the East in 1842-43. 12
Book
Chittenden, Hiram Martin, and Richardson, A. T. Life, letters,
.Hid travels of Father Pierre Jean De Smet, S. J. 4v. N. Y.
Harper.   1905.   v. i, p. 27-28, 129, 267; v. 2, p. 486.
Holds that Whitman considered the American occupation
of Oregon his chief mission.
Clark, Joseph B. Leavening of the nation. N. Y. Baker &
Taylor.    1903.   p. 194-200.
Saved Oregon story. In a foot note, p. 199, Mowry and
Eells are cited as "conservative and accurate.
Clark, S A .    Pioneer days of Oregon history.    2v.
Portland.    Gill.    1(W5-
Vol. 2 gives much space to various phases of Whitman s
life and mission. Author rejects inaccuracies of men like Barrows and Spalding, but is inclined to give all possible praise
to \\ hitman.   Quotes much but without carefully citing ref-
Coffin, Charles Carleton. Building of the nation. N. Y.
Harper, c 1882.   p. 371-386.
Dramatic. Macedonian cry. Quart of seed wheat. Walla
Walla dinner.   Deep laid scheme.
Colvocoresses, George M. Four years in the government exploring expedition commanded by Captain Charles Wilkes. Ed.
2.    N. Y.    Young.    1853.    p. 238.
Oregon mission. Remarkable experience of Wfalker and
Eells in teaching the Indians.
Craighead, J[ames] G[eddes].   Story of Marcus Whitman.   Phil.
Presbyterian Board.    Phil.    ci8o5-
"The incentive of this volume was the wish to vindicate
the characters and 'the work of the early Protestant missionaries in Oregon from aspersions which have been cast upon
them.''—Author's preface.
Crawford, Medorem. Journal; an account of his trip across the
plains with the Oregon pioneers of 1842. (Sources of the
history of Oregon, v. 1, no. 1). Eugene.. University of Oregon.    1897.    p. 19-20.
\ isit at the W hitman station. Mention of the threshing
machine and grinding mill.
Creegan, C[harles] C, & Goodnow, Mrs. J. A. B. Great missionaries of the church.    \\ Y.    Crowell.    1895.    p. 341-366. '
Inaccuracies. Webster made to say to Whitman that
George Simpson was at that time (March, 1843) present in
Washington.
Dellenbaugh, Frederick S. Breaking the wilderness. N. Y.
Putnanis.     1905.    P! 287-290.
Speaks guardedly of Whitman's services to Oregon. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
13
Drake, Samuel Adams.    Making   the   great   West,   1512-1883.
N. Y.   Scribners.   1887.   p. 232-233, 239-240.
Says that Whitman went to Washington with news of
the Red River invasion, and that he raised an immigrant
train of 200 wagons for Oregon.
De Saint-Amant.   See Saint-Amant, Pierre Charles dc.
Dunn, Jacob  Piatt, Jr.    Massacres of the   mountains.     Lond.
Low.     (N. Y. Harper).    1886.    p. 37-42, 93-117.
Inaccurate. Says the British prevented wagons from
crossing to Oregon.    Walla Walla dinner story.
Dunning, Albert E.    Congregationalists   in   America.      N.   Y.
Hill.    1894.    p. 442-443-
Massacre. States political reasons as the cause of Whitman's ride.
Dye, Eva Emery.    McLoughlin and old Oregon.     Chic.
Clurg.     1900.
Interweaves much Whitman fact and fiction.
Mc-
Dye, Eva Emery. Stories of Oregon. San Francisco. Whita-
ker.     1900.    p. 91-99.
No extravagant claims for Whitman. A rather guarded
account.
Edwards, Jonathan.    Marcus AVhitman, M. D., the pathfinder of
the Pacific Northwest 48p.    Spokane.    Union Printing Co.
Preface states that the pamphlet was issued in the interests of Whitman College. Based upon lectures. Much
space given to developing the opposition of the H. B. Co. to a
wagon road.
Eells, Myron.    Father Eells a biography of Rev. Cushing Eells,
D. D.    Boston.    Congregational S. S. and Pub. Soc.   c 1894.
Index.
Claims that the single object that Whitman had in view
in making his famous ride was to save Oregon to the. U. S.
Eells, Myron. The hand of God in the history of the Pacific
Coast.     I5p.    n. p.    n. pub.    n. d.
Address at Whitman College, June 1, 1888. Discusses
the missionary as an "entering wedge." Gives the H. B. Co.
credit for caring for the missionaries.
Eells, M[yron]. History of the Congregational Association of
Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Phil. Am. S. S. Union.
C1882.    p. 27-32, 162-175.
Whitman saved Oregon story.
Eells;  Myron.    History  of the  Congregational  Association  of
Oregon   and   Washington   Teritory,   1848-1880.     Portland.
Himes.     1881.    p. 9-12.
Storv of "Whitman's ride. 14
Books
Eells, Myron. Memorial of Mrs. Mary R. Walker. I2p. n. p.
n. pub.     n. d.
Sermon at the funeral of Mrs. Walker, Forest Grove, Dec.
7, 1877.    References to the Whitman station and massacre.
Eells, Myron. Marcus Whitman, M. D.; proofs of his work in
saving Oregon to the U. S. and in promoting the immigration
of 1843.    34p.    Portland.    Himes.     1883.
Eells was one of the ablest defenders of the saved Oregon story. This pamphlet contains copies of many letters
written to> him in corroboration of his views.
Eells, Myron.    Reply  to   Professor   Bourne's   "The   Whitman
legend."     i22p.    Walla Walla.    Statesman Pub. Co.     1902.
Reprint from Whitman College Quarterly, v. 4, no. 3.
Encyclopedia Britannica. 25V. N. Y. Scribners. 1884. v. 17,
P- 825.
Article by G. H. Atkinson. Gives Whitman credit of at
least attempting to save Oregon. Says his ride of 1842-43
was made to remove the bar on immigration.
Evans. Elwood. Washington Territory; address delivered at
the Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia, Sept. 1876. Olympia
(W^ash.).   Bagley.   1877.   p. 12-14.
Whitman massacre attributed to "Indian jealousy, superstition and hate."
Evans, Elwood, editor. History of the Pacific Northwest. 2v.
Portland. North Pacific History Co. 1889. v. I, p. 199-207,
v. 2, p. 629-630, and elsewhere.
Takes a conservative view of Whitman's political influence.
Fagan, David D. History of Benton County, Oregon. Portland.    Walling.     1885.    p. 127-163.
Condemns Gray's "fiction" in regard to Whitman.
Farnham, Charles H. History of the descendants of John Whitman, of Weymouth, Mass.    New Haven.    1889.    p. 237-239.
Perrin B. Whitman's version of the saved Oregon story.
Farnham, Thomas J. Travels in the great western prairies, the
Anahuac and Rocky Mountains. 2v. Lond. Bentley. 1843.
v. 2, p. 131-149.
Farnham arrived at the mission Sept. 23, 1839, an(i remained about one week. He tells about the farm, the mill,
and the mission work. One of the best contemporaneous accounts. Contained also in the Tribune edition of the same
book.    N. Y.    Greeley & McElrath.    1843.    P- 79-83 Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
15
Flohr, Michael. Did Whitman save Oregon? n. p. n. publ.
n. d.
In this unpaged pamphlet issued by St. Patrick's Church,
Walla Walla, Wash., is contained an account of Father
Flohr's lecture in which he discredits the saved Oregon story.
Foster, John  W.    Century  of American  diplomacy.     Boston.
Houghton.    1901.    p. 305-306.
Follows Barrow's Oregon.
Fremont, John C. Report of the exploring expedition to the
Rocky Mountains in the year 1842, and to Oregon and California in the years 1843-44. Ed. 1. Wash. Gales & Seaton.
1845.    P- 182-183.
Fremont was at the Whitman station, Oct. 23, 1843, f°r
about one hour.
Garrison, George Pierce. Westward extension, 1841-1850. N. Y.
Harper.    1906 (Hart, A. B. ed.   The American Nation, v. 17).
P- 38-39-
Two sentences only, as follows: "In 1836 two Presbyterian missions were founded, one at Waiilatpu, on the Walla
Walla River, and one on Lapwai Creek near its confluence
with Clearwater River. The group of mission workers in
this quarter included Rev. Samuel Parker, Rev. H. H. Spalding, a secular assistant named William H. Gray, and a physician, Marcus Whitman, who carried the first wagon over the
divide of the Rockies, and whom a most interesting but wholly
unfounded mvth has credited with saving Oregon from the
English."
Gilbert, Frank T.    Historic sketches of Walla Walla, Whitman,
Columbia and Garfield Counties, Washington Territory, and
Umatilla   County,   Oregon.      Portland.      Walling.       1882.
p. 63-64, 68-70, 85-86, 96-97, 113-131.
Based on Gray.
Gray, Wfilliam] H[enry]. History of Oregon, 1792-1849. Portland.    Harris.    1870.    Use table of contents.
A large part of the book is devoted to the Whitman massacre. Inaccurate. Should be used with extreme caution.
Gray's main purpose seems to have been to throw all possible
censure upon the Catholics and the Hudson Bay Co.
Greenhow, Robert. History of Oregon and California. Lond.
Murray.     1844.     p. 361.
Good material on the Oregon question. Bare mention
of Whitman.    Printing press at the mission noticed.
Griffis, William Elliott. The romance of conquest. Boston.
Wilde.    1899.    p. 171-173.
The saved Oregon story. Some inaccuracies due, perhaps, to careless proof reading, e. g. "Webster-Ashburton
treaty 1846." 16
Books
Grover, La Fayette.    Oregon archives.     Salem.     Bush.     1853.
p. 218-219, 321-325-
Contains copy of a letter from Robert Greenham [Green-
how], dated Washington City, Sept. 2, 1846, sending six copies
of his "History of Oregon and California" with the request
that one copy be presented "to. my friend, Dr. Whitman, of
Walla Walla? Copies are given of several important documents bearing upon the massacre, including one from James
Douglass to George Abernathy, dated Fort Vancouver, Dec.
7, 1847, officially announcing the catastrophe.
Guerber, H             A .    Story of the great republic.     N. Y.
American Book Co. C1899.    p. 113-117.
Macedonian cry. Says nothing as to the real purpose of
Whitman's ride.
Hanna, J[oseph] A.   Dr. Whitman and his ride to save Oregon.
8p.    [Los Angeles?   1903?]
Saved Oregon story with the Walla Walla dinner and the
announcement of the Red River immigration as the inciting
cause of the ride.
Harper and Brothers.    Harper's encyclopedia of United States
history,    iov.    N. Y.    Harper.    C1901.    v. 10, p. 349.
Brief note saying that Whitman "in all probability kept
Oregon from falling into the hands of the British."
Hastings, Langsford W.    New description of Oregon and California.    Cinn.    Rulison.     1857.    C1849.    p. 21, 54, 60.
Hastings stayed at the mission over Sunday, got provisions, etc. Describes the mission and says that the burning
of the mill while W^hitman was in the East was accidental.
Hawthorne, Julian, editor.    History of Washington.    2v.    N. Y.
Am. Hist. Pub. Co.    1893.    v. 1, p. 366-370; v. 2, p. 105-132.
Biography in v. 1. Whitman massacre in v. 2, written by
G. D. Brewerton. Blames Catholics for the massacre. Gives
deposition of Miss Bewley.
Hines, Gustavus.    Oregon, its history, condition and prospects.
Buffalo.     Derby.     1851.    p. 164-185, 421-422.
Hines arrived at the mission May 8, 1843. Received by
Mrs. Whitman and Mrs. Geiger. Wrhitman away on a tour
to the U. S. Gives a full account of the meeting of the
Indians as called by E. White, Indian Agent.
Hines, H. K.    Illustrated history of the State of Washington.
Chic.     Lewis.     1893.    p. 107-112.
Guarded account.
Hines,   H.   K.    Missionary   history  of  the   Pacific   Northwest.
Portland.    Hines.   C1899.   p. 446-486.
American Board Missions. Says the Wilkes report influenced the board to make the destructive order. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
17
Holman,  Frederick V.    Dr.  John  McLoughlin,  the father  of
Oregon.    Cleveland.    Clark.    1907.    p. 53-54, 73-74, 167,280.
"History says Dr. Whitman was the man who saved Oregon to the U. S., but that is not true.   It was Dr. John McLoughlin, of the Hudson's Bay Company," p. 280.
Hoist, Herman Eduard, von. Constitutional and political history of the United States. 8v. Chic. Callaghan. 1881-
1892.    y. 3, p. 51-52.
Whitman's influence with President Tyler is asserted with
some hesitation and with a citation to Gray.
Howe, Henry. Historical recollections of the great West. Cinn.
Howe.    1853.    p. 384.
Speaks highly olf Whitman's hospitality to immigrants.
No mention of political services.
Hudson's Bay Company versus United States, see British and
American Joint Commission.
Johnson, Overton and Winter, William H. Route across the
Rocky Mountains, with a description of Oregon and California.    Lafayette, (Ind.).     Semans.     1846.
Reprinted in Oregon Historical Society. Quarterly. For
brief references to Whitman, see 7:96 (March, 1906) and
7:190 (June, 1906).
Johnson, Sidonia V. Short history of Oregon. Chic. Mc-
Clurg.    1904.    p. 194-212, 234-240, 249-259.
Story of Whitman told in a fair and careful way with attempt to strike the truth.
Johnson, Theodore T. California and Oregon. Phil. Claxton.
1851.     p. 183-184.
Whitman massacre.
Kane, Paul. Wanderings of an artist among the Indians of
North America. Lond. Longmans. 1859. p. 278-284,
317-322.
Kane was at the mission from July 18 to July 22, 1847.
Sent Whitman a warning of danger from the Indians. (See
entry for Sept. 21).     Later hears of the massacre.
Kip, Lawrence. Army life on the Pacific. N. Y. Redfield.
1859.    p. 32-35.
Kip heard reminiscences of Whitman at Walla Walla
from the Cayuse, "Cutmouth John."
Lang H[erbert]  O .    History of the Willamette Valley.
Portland.     Himes and Lang.     1885.     p. 260-273, and elsewhere.
Much on Whitman. Well indexed. Rejects cod fishery
episode and the Walla Walla dinner story. Says the Whitman "romance" was first given to the world in the "History
of Oregon," written by W. H. Gray, a man "incompetent to
form an unprejudiced opinion" (p. 267). Gives Whitman
credit for demonstrating a practical emigrant route to Oregon. 18
Books
Laurie, Thomas. The Ely volume, or contributions of our foreign missions to science and human well being. Bost. A. B.
C. F. M.    ci88i.    p. 11, 13-15.
Some interesting variations to the usual saved Oregon
story.
Laurie, Thomas. The Whitman controversy. 24p. Astoria
(Ore.).     Snyder.     1896.
"Published in the Missionary Herald, Boston, February
and September, 1885."
Lee, D. and Frost, J. H. Ten years in Oregon. N. Y. Collard.
1844.    p. 109-113, 211-215, 257-259.
Mr. Lee says that the "Macedonian cry" account as published in the "Advocate" is "high wrought" and "incorrect."
Says that Dr. Whitman visited the U. S. to obtain further assistance in order to strengthen the efforts that had already
been made. The Geigers and Littlejohns to spend the year
of Whitman's absence with Mrs. Whitman.
Lenox, Edward Henry.    Overland to Oregon in 1843.     Oakland (Cal.).    Dowdle Press.    1904.    p. 8, 17, 33, 49, 54, 60-61.
Recollections of Marcus Whitman.     Says that. Whitman
was hired to accompany the emigration of 1843.
Leonard, Zenas. Adventures of Zenas Leonard, fur trader and
trapper, 1831-36.    Cleveland.    Burrows.    1904.    p. 35.
Mentions incident of Whitman's extracting an arrow from
Capt. Bridger's back.
Lyman, H[orace] Sumner. History of Oregon. 4V. N. Y.
North Pacific Publishing Society. 1903. v. 3, use index;
v. 4, p. 382-392.
Lymart closes the work with an estimate of Whitman,
quoting Bourne together with defenders of the saved Oregon story, but not expressing his own opinion.
Lyman,  H[orace]   Sumner.    Mileposts  in the  development   of
Oregon.     (Bulletin of the University of Oregon, Historical
Series, v. 1, no. 1).    Eugene.    1898.    p. 4-6.
Whitman's political influence discussed.
Lyman, W D .    History of Walla Walla County,
State of Washington,    n. p.     Lever.     1901.    p. 40-55.
Missions of W^alla Walla and the Whitman massacre.
Claims that the last word has been said on the question of
why Whitman went East, and that his aim was political.
Refers to Nixon as authority.
McBeth, Kate C. The Nez Perces since Lewis and Clark. N. Y.
Revell.    C1908.    p. 27-74.
Saved Oregon story based upon Gray.    Considerable at
tention given to the Macedonian
cry. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
19
History of the people of the United
Y.     Appleton.     1892-1906.     v. 6, p.
McMaster, John Bach.
States,     v.  1-6.     N.
449-451-
Establishing of the Waiilatpu mission. The narrative only
comes down to 1841, and hence there is no discussion of the
ride of 1842-1843.
McMaster, John Bach. School history of the United States.
N. Y.    American Book Co.    C1897.    p. 331.
One sentence regarding Whitman. "Still later in the
thirties went Marcus Whitman and his party."
McMaster, John Bach. With the Fathers. N. Y. Appleton.
C1896.    p. 305-310.
Saved Oregon story, including the Walla Walla dinner
and the announcement of the Red River immigration.
Marshall, T[homas], W"[illiam] M. Christian missions. 2v.
Lond.   Longmans.   1863.   v. 2, p. 266-267.
Massacre, Spalding and the Catholics.   Kane quoted.
Marshall, William I.    History vs. the Whitman saved Oregon
story.    Chic.    Blakely.    1904.
Three essays, as follows:
1. Strange treatment of Original sources. A review of
Mowry's "Marcus Whitman" published in the Daily Ore-
gonian, Sept. 3, 1902.    p. 9-43.
2. Why his search? for the truth of history was a failure.
Review of Myron Eells' "Reply to Professor Bourne,"
p. 45-92.
3. Marcus Whitman: a discussion of Professor Bourne's paper. (From the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 1900, v. 1, p. 219-236).
Marshall has done thorough work and calls attention to
many inaccuracies in the extravagant claims that have been
made about Whitman.    His attitude is belligerent.
Marshall, William I. The Hudson's Bay Company's Archives
furnish no support to the Whitman saved Oregon story. 36p.
Chic.     Blakely.     1905.
Controverts statements which have been made in 1904 to
the effect that "The Hudson's Bay Company was Whitman's
bitterest enemy, and sought in every way to forestall his
plans" and that their records "give positive evidence that
Marcus Whitman saved Oregon to the Union."
Miles, Nelson A[ppleton]. Personal recollections. Chic. Werner.   1897;   p. 384-396.
"A chapter out of early history." Saved Oregon story.
Not based on personal recollections.
Mission life among the Indians of Oregon. N. Y. Carlton and
Porter.    C1854.    p. 36-38.
Mention of Whitman and the incident of the adoption of
the Sager children. 20
Books
Montgomery, D. H. Leading facts of American history. Bost.
Ginn.     1902.     p. 263-265.
Credits Whitman' with perhaps saving Oregon. Says he
went East with a double purpose.
Morris, Charles. Primary history of the United States. Phil.
Lippincott.    C1899.    p. 210-215.
The English boast. Whitman in saddle in a day's time.
How Whitman and consequently the. whole Oregon country
was saved to the Union by the instinct of a mule.
Mowry, William A[ugustus].    Marcus Whitman and the early
days of Oregon.    N. Y.     Silver.     1901.
Attempts to retain so far as possible  the  saved  Oregon
story.    Some valuable documents are printed.
Mowry William A[ugustus]. Territorial growth of the United
States.     N. Y.     Silver.     1902.     p. 161.
Brief statement of Whitman's sendees to the U. S.
Mowry, William Afugustus], and Arthur May. American heroes
and heroism.    N. Y.    Silver.    1903.    p. 176-180.
Father Eells and Whitman College.    Massacre, p. 176.
Mowry, William Afugustus], and Afrthur] M[ay]. First steps
in the history of our country. N. Y. Silver. 1900. p. 228-
234-
Mowry, William A[ugUstus], and Blanche S. American pioneers.
N. Y.    Silver.    1905.    p. 201-202.
Story of Lovejoy, his arrival at the Whitman station, and
his return to the East with Whitman on the famous ride.
Nixon, Oliver W^. How Marcus Whitman saved Oregon. Chic.
Star Pub. Co.     C1895.
Dramatic.
Nixon, Oliver W. Whitman's ride through savage lands, n. p.
Winona Pub. Co.     1905.
Saved Oregon story. Much attention to the Macedonian
cry.
Pacific Railway Report, see U. S. Congress 36-1, House Executive Document, no. 56.
Palladino, L. B; Indian and white in the Northwest. Baltimore.     Murphy.     1894.    p. 9-18.
Flathead delegation to St. Louis in 1831. Says the Flat-
heads insisted on having Catholic missionaries. Refers to
Whitman and Spalding.
Parker, Henry W.    How Oregon was saved to the United States,
or facts about Marcus Whitman,    n. pub.    1901.    iop.
Same in Homiletic Review, July, 1901. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
21
Palmer, Joel.    Journal of travels over the Rocky Mountains to
the  mouth  of the  Columbia  River. ,   1845-1846.     Cinn.
James.    1847.    P- 55, 57"58, 123-132, 165-177.
A valuable source. Appendix contains letter of Rev. H.
H. Spalding to Joel Palmer, dated Apr. 7, 1846. This letter
was written at Mr. Palmer's request for use in his book. It
was apparently given to Dr. Whitman for his approval, and
contains four notes signed "M. W." Tells about the Mission
and the Oregon country.
This rare volume has been reprinted in Thwaites, Editor.
Early western travels, v. 30. The Whitman' references are
p. 108, 112-114, 227-242, and 281-291.
Parker, Samuel. Journal of an exploring tour beyond the Rocky
Mountains under the direction of the A. B. C. F. M., 1835-
36-37.     Ithaca.     Published by the author.     1838.
One of the important sources for the founding of the
Oregon Missions of the American Board of Commissioners
for Foreign Missions. Parker finds Whitman at St. Louis
and they travel together to the Green River, where Whitman
turns back to secure associates. Greenhow criticised Parker
for his discursiveness, saying that his narrative "would have
been more valuable had the worthy and intelligent author confined himself to accounts of what he himself experienced, and
not wandered as he has done, into the regions of history,
diplomacy, and cosmogony." (Greenhow, Oregon and California, p. 361).
Parrish, Randall.    The great plains.     Chic.     McClurg.     1907.
Asserts that the object of Whitman's ride was to bear to
Wasington the  news of British encroachment on the  Columbia,   p. 143.
Roberts, William P.    "The wheels of destiny."    n. p.     Beacon
Ethical Union.     C1901.     p. 9-13.
A pro-Whitman pamphlet.
Robertson, James Rood.     Development of civil
Oregon.    Forest Grove (Ore.).    Thompson.
A careful statement of Whitman's political influence.
Same article contained in the Quarterly of the Oregon
Historical Society, v. 1, no. 1 (March, 1900), see p. 41-44.
government in
1800. p. 29-31.
Whitman's ride, by a lady of Brook-
8p.    Prtland.
Baumgardt and Palm-
The saved Ore-
Rollins, Alice Wellington,
lyn (name unknown),
er.    n. d.
In imitation of the ride of Paul Revere,
gon story.
This poem is contained also in Nixon's How Marcus Whitman saved Oregon, p. 180-185, and Craighead's Story of
Marcus Whitman, p. 205-211. It is said to have made its
first appearance in the New York Independent for March
19, 1885. Books
Ross, Ed. C, Eells, M., and Gray, W. H.   The Whitman controversy, in reply to Mrs. F. F. Victor and Elwood Evans, whose
contributions appeared in the Oregonian of Nov. 7 and Dec.
26, 1884.   7op.    Portland.   Himes.    1885.
A defense of the saved Oregon story.
Saint-Amant, [Pierre Charles] de. Voyages en Californie, 1851-
52.   Paris.   Maison.    1854.   p. 226-227.
States that "The Reverend Mr. Whitman, an American
Baptist missionary," had been an active agent of American'
interests.    Says massacre was caused by Indian superstition.
Translated in Marshall, Acquisition of  Oregon,  Mss, v. 2,
p. 441.
Schafer, Joseph. History of the Pacific Northwest. N. Y.
Macm.     1905.     Use Index.
An excellent statement of the main facts of Whitman's
career. Controverted points in regard to his political influence are avoided.
Schurz, Carl. Henry Clay. 2v. Bost. Houghton. 1887. v. 2,
p. 278.
Whitman is credited with giving the government valuable
information, and with leading the emigration of 1843.
Scudder, Rev. Doremus. A national hero. Sermon at first
Congregational Church, Woburn, Mass., Sunday, November
28, 1897.    igp.    n. p.    n. pub.    n. d.
Text: Genesis, 6:4, "There were giants in the earth in
those days."     Follows Mowry.
Scudder, Horace S. History of the United States of America,
1894.    p. 348-35©-
Shea, John Gilmary. History of the Catholic missions among
the Indian tribes of the United States, 1529-1854. X. Y.
Kenedy.     1854.     p. 478.
Mention of the. Whitman massacre.
Shelton, Don O. Heroes of the cross. Cinn. Jennings. 1904.
p. 133-172.
Saved Oregon story. Apparently based on Mowry and
Mrs. Barrett in the Sunday School Times of Jan. 10, 1903.
Simpson, George. Narrative of a jonrney around the world, during the years 1841 and 1842. 2v. Lond. ColbUrn. 1847.
p. 162.
Derogatory remarks of the missionaries to the Indians.
Speaks of the good feeling between the Indians and the Hur-
son's Bay Co., as contrasted with Dr. Whitman and the
Cayuses, and says that Dr. Whitman lacked tact.
Smalley, Eugene V. History of the Northern Pacific Railway.
N. Y.    Putnam's.    1883.    p. 46-50.
Chapter  Y,   "Marcus  Whitman's  heroic ride."      Inaccu- Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
23
Sm'et, P[ierre] J [ean] de.   Oregon missions and travels over the
Rocky Mountains in 1845-46.    N. Y.    Dunigan.   1847.   P- 29.
Refers to the Presbyterian post at Walla Walla.    Catholic
plans for evangelizing Oregon.    DeSmet to go to Europe.
Spalding, Henry Harmon. Executive Document No. 37, see
U. S. Congress 41-3, Senate Executive Document, No. 37,
Serial No. 1,440.
Sparks, Edwin Erie. Expansion of the American people. Chic.
Scott.     1900.     p. 306-307.-
Saved Oregon story, qualified acceptance.
Spokesman-Review,  publ.    A race for empire  and other true
tales of the Northwest.     48p.     Spokesman-Review.     Spokane (Wash.).     1896.     p. 5-9.
Saved Oregon story.
Steel, W[illiam] G .   The mountains of Oregon.   Portland.
David Steel.     1890.     p. 108.
Quotes Barrow's Oregon to the effect that Whitman's ride
was "to prevent our government from abandoning Oregon."
Stevens, Isaac. I. Pacific Railway Report, see U. S. Congress,
36-1, House Execustive Document, No. 56.
Taylor, J M        .    History and government of Washing
ton.    St. Louis.    Becktold.     1898.    p. 37, 77-78.  -
Credits Whitman with a ride "to save Oregon for the
United States."
Thomas, A [lien] C. Elementary history of the United States.
Bost.    Heath.    1901.    p. 290-298.
Saved Oregon story with rather full details. Gives a
note saying that the question is now under discussin.
Thornton, J. Quinn. Oregon and California in 1848. 2v. N. Y.
Harper.     1849.    v. 2, p. 22-23.
Refers to Whitman's station. Says the emigrants (in
contradistinction to the missionaries^ of 1843 were the first
who proceeded west of Fort Hall with wagons.
Note in regard to Whitman with mention of the controversy, but no opinion expressed.
Thwaites, Reuben Gold.    Rocky Mountain exploration.     N. Y.
Appleton.     1905.     p. 225, 228.
Bare mention of Whitman.
Townsend, John K.    Narrative of a journey across the Rocky
Mountains      Phila.     Perkins.     1839.     p. 249.
Brief mention of Whitman.
Lyon Gfardiner].    Letters and times of the Tylers.    3V.
1, Richmond, Va.     Whittet.     1884.
2, Richmond, Va.     Whittet.     1885.
3, Williamsburg, Va.    n. publ.     1896.
v. 2, p. 438-439, 697; v. 3, p. 47.
Speaks of Whitman's eastern visit.     Says that President
Tyler received Whitman more favorably than Webster.
.yler
v
V.
V 24
Books
Turner, Frederick Jackson. Rise of the new West. N. Y.
Harper. 1906. (Hart, A. B. ed. The American Nation,
v. 14).    p. 124.
Brief mention of the coming of Whitman and party in
1836.
U. S. Congress, 21-2, Senate Executive Document, No. 39, Serial
No. 181.    Pilcher's report.
Quoted by Marshall, Acquisition of Oregon, v. 1, p. 80-90,
in regard to Rocky Mountain-Fur Company's first wagons
to the Rocky Mountains.
U. S. Congress, 25-2, Senate Document, No. 24, Serial No. 314.
Slacum's memorial of 31 pages calling attention to the great
value of the Oregon country.
This document was also reprinted in Cushing's report,
U. S. Congress, House Report, No. 101, Serial No. 351.
U.' S. Congress, 25-2, House Executive Document, No. 42, Serial
No.
Messages from President Van Buren transmitting
a letter from John Forsyth, Secretary of State, dated December 23, 1837. '
In regard to the possession of the U. S. Territory on the
Columbia River.    Refers to the joint occupation clause.
U. S. Congress, 25-3, Senate Document, No. 237,,Serial No. 340.
Petition of a number of citizens of Missouri praying a grant
of land in the Oregon Territory, to enable them to form a
settlement in said Territory, dated St. Charles, Mo., Jan.
3i, 1839.
Signed by about 80 people. The settlement was to be
made near the head of navigation of the Columbia.
U. S. Congress, 25-3, Senate Document, No. 266, Serial No. 341.
Petition of a number of citizens of Michigan, praying for a
donation of land to emigrants and settlers in the Oregon Territory, dated Jan. 20, 1839.
Request for a donation of 1,000 acres of land for single
men and 2,000 acres for married men. Suggests that the
settlement of this country would insure it against foreign invasion.
U. S. Congress, 25-3, House Report, No. 101, Serial No. 351.
Cushing's report on the Territory of Oregon. January 4, 1839.
5i-6ip.
Contains much information about Oregon. One of the
most important of the early reports based on Kelley, Wyeth,
Slacum, Jason Lee, and others. Emphasizes the need of
colonization and control of Oregon by the U. S.
U. S. Congress, 26-1, Senate Document, No. 93, Serial No. 356.
Resolution of the Illinois Legislature calling for a speedy settlement of the Oregon boundary and its occupation by the
government, January 16, 1840. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
25
U. S. Congres, 26-1, Senate Document, No. 174, Serial No. 357.
Edition 1 of Greenhow's History of Oregon, Feb. 12, 1840.
p. 194-195-
In regar dto the ease of a wagon road to Oregon. Gives
account of the first expedition to the Rocky Mountains with
wagons in 1829.
U. S. Congress, 27-2, House Executive Document, No. 2, Serial
No. 401. Report of the Secretary of War (Spencer), December, 1841.
"It is indispensable that a chain of posts should be established extending from the Council Bluffs to the mouth of
the Columbia." Commended by President Tyler in his message to Congress for that year, p. 14.
U. S. Congress, 27-3, Senate Document, No. 102, Serial No. 415.
Message of President Tyler dated January 23, 1843, transmitting to the Senate a letter from Daniel Webster in regard to
grants of land in Oregon said to have been made by the
British Government to the Hudson's Bay Co.
The matter had been taken up with the English Government and assurance given that no such grants had been
made.
U. S. Congsess, 27-3, House Executive Document. No. 2, Serial
No. 418.    Reports of Secretary of War for 1842.
Secretary Spencer repeats his request for a chain of military posts from Council Bluffs to the Columbia, p. 186. Calls
for maintaining our right to title, for colonization, etc: Approved by the President in his Message, p. 9.
U. S. Congress, 27-3, House Report, No. 157, Serial No. 427.
Report of select committee to whom various memorials in
regard to the settlement of Oregon had been referred, Feb.
% 1843-
Favors settlement. Considers our title good. Speaks of
the value of the country.
U. S. Congress, 28-1, Senate Executive Document, No. 105, Serial
No. 433. Petition, dated. March 25, 1843, complaining against
Hudson's Bay Co.
Signed by 65 persons headed by Robert Shortess. See
Evans, Elwood. History of the Northwest Coast, v. 1, p.
246-247.
U. S. Congress, 29-1, Senate Executive Document, No. 8, Serial
No. 472. Petition, dated June 28, 1845, asking for territorial
government.
In refutation of the Shortess petition, it is here stated that
the  British have  been  "most friendly,
thropic."
liberal,  and  philan
U. S. Congress, 30-1, House Miscellaneous Report, No. 29, Ser
ial N(
Howison's Report, 1846.    p. 25-26.
Speaks of Mr. Spalding and of the various missions.
■C- 26
Books
U. S. Congress, 30-1, House Miscellaneous Aeport, No. 98, Serial
No. 523. Memorial of the legislative assembly of Oregon
Territory relative to their present situation and wants, dated
January 25, 1848.
This message announcing the Whitman massacre was
borne to Congress by Joseph L. Meek. It is an extremely
important Whitman source. Copies of twelve letters relating to the massacre are here printed, also Ogden's Address
to the Indian Chiefs together with their replies stating causes
of the massacre. Lists are given of those at AVhitman's station at the time of the massacre, of those who were killed,
and of the supplies furnished in ransom of the captives.
U. S. Congress, 32-1, House Executive Document, No. 2, Serial
No. 636. p. 472-481, Report of Anson Dart, Superintendent
of Indian Affairs for Oregon Territory, 1851.
Spalding said to be an incompetent Indian Agent, p. 472.
Visit to the site of Whitman's station, p. 481.
U. S. Congress, 35-1, House Executive Document, No. 38, Serial
No. 955. Brouillet's Protestantism in Oregon. Contained in
the Report of J. Ross Browne -on the subject of the Indian
War in Oregon and Washington Territories, 1858, p. 13-66.
Gives a Catholic version of the causes of the Whitman
massacre. Appeared also in the government documents of
Congress, 35-1, as Senate Executive Document, No. 4.0, Serial
No. 929, but it is usuallv cited as "Executive Document,
No. 38."
U. S. Congress, 36-1, House Executive Document, No. 56, Part
1,  Serial No.  1,054.     Stevens'  Pacific -Railway Report.     p.
Sllll.
A visit to the site of Whitman's station. The mission
house was occupied by Bumford and Brooke. Massacre
said to have been caused by the false reports of a troublesome half-breed.
U. S. Congress, 41-3, Senate Executive Document, No. ^y, Serial
No. 1440. Spalding's compilation entitled, "Early labors of
missionaries in Oregon."    1871.    8ip.   '
Written as an antidote to Brouillet. Compiled from
various sources, especially newspaper accounts, many of
which were written by Mr. Spalding. Clippings of many
of these newspaper articles are in a scrapbook made by Mr.
Spalding and now in possession of Whitman College Library.
Whitman is the central figure in this document, which unfortunately abounds in inaccuracies and misstatements. On
p. 42, it is stated that the victims of the massacre were 20.
instead of 14 of the earlier accounts, also that Mrs. .Spalding
was one of the number, whereas it is known that she was
over a hundred miles distant at the time, and did not die
until 1851, four years after the massacre.
This document was ordered reprinted on January 15, 1903,
but seems not to have been again bound up in the U.S. Depository set of serially numbered volumes. Bibliography of Marcus Whitmat
27
U. S. Congress, 56-2, House Executive Document, No". 548, Serial No. 4199, see American Historical Association. Annual
report for 1900.
U. S. Congressional Globe, 31-2, v. 23, apx. p. 39.     Speech of
S. R. Thurston, Dec. 26, 1850, on land titles in Oregon City.
Says the Hudson's Bay Co. was responsible for the Whitman massacre.
U. S. Congressional Globe, 34-1, v. 38, p. 776 (March 31, 1856).
Joseph Lane's Remarks on the people of Oregon.
Refers to Whitman as a noble missionary who had been
murdered by the Indians, but says nothing of his political
influence.
U. S. Congressional Globe, 42-2, Pt. 1, p. 157, (December 15,
1871). Mr. Mercur presents resolutions and a petition calling for a fair and adequate edition of Spalding's Executive
Document, No. 37.
A clipping of this brief notice is contained in the Spalding
scrapbook.
U. S. Congressional Record, 60-1, v. 42, p. 1760 (February 10,
1908). Speech of Samuel H. Piles on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.
Brief mention of WLitman in connection with immigration
of 1843.     Says Oregon was saved by the pioneers.
U. S.—Education, Bureau of.     Annual Report for 1903.     v. 2,
P- I33i:i332-
Mr. D. K. Pearsons in telling of his benefactions to Whitman College gives the story of. Whitman's ride.
Van Dusen, W. W.   Blazing the way.   Cinn.   Jennings.   [1905.]
P- 32-35-
Avoids controverted points in regard to Whitman.
Van Tramp, John.    Prairie and Rocky Mountain adventures, or
life in the West.     Columbus  (Ohio).     Segner.     1867.     p.
143-145;
Whitman mission. Kindness and aid of the H. B. Co.
Information drawn from Spalding's account in the Missionary Herald for October, 1839.
Victor, Frances Fuller.    All over Oregon and Washington.   San
Francisco.     Carmany.     1872.    p. 107-109.
Speaks of the mission site. Nothing upon controverted
points.
Victor, Frances Fuller.    Early Indian wars of Oregon.     Salem
(Ore.).    Baker.     1894.    See index.
Story of the ride, p. 32-42. Denies that Whitman exercised any great political influence. Mrs. Victor has been
much criticised, especially by Myron Eells, for her statements
in this book. pi
28
Books
Victor, Frances Fuller. River of the West. Hartford. Columbian Book Co.    C1869.    p. 186-188, 201-213, 280, 308-315,
399-427-
In this book Mrs. Victor sanctioned the saved Oregon
story which she afterwards denied. Tells the codfishery incident.     Illustration of the massacre, p. 411.
Von Hoist, see Hoist, Herman Eduard, von.-
Walker, Williston. History of the Congregational churches in
the United States. N. Y. Scribners. 1900. C1894. p.
377-378-
Says Wiiitman saved Oregon.
Walling, A. G. History of southern Oregon. Portland. Walling.     1884.    p. 127-150.
Whitman's ride to save Oregon based on the arrival of
the Red River emigrants.
Wells, Harry L.    Popular history of Oregon.     Steele.     Portland.     1880.    p. 260-275.
Saved Oregon story.
White, Dr. E[lijah]'and Lady. Ten years in Oregon. Compiled
by Miss A. J. Allen. Ithica. Mack, Andruss & Co. 1848.
p. 117-118, 166, 174-212, 215-216.
Considerable information in regard to the mission. Several anecdotes, mention of the printing press, etc.
White, James T. & C°- National cyclopedia of American biography.    N. Y.    White.    1901.    v. 11, p. 112.
Says the story of Whitman's journey as given by Gray,
Barrows, Nixon, and others is fictitious.
Whitman College. Summer announcement for 1895. Walla
Walla.     Walla Walla Union Print.     1895.    p. 22.
Contains a selection from the inaugural address of President Penrose, delivered June 11, 1895, in which he says: "The
nation will never forget, when the stars and stripes are waving before its eyes, that three of the stars of that flag are due
to Marcus Whitman, and the red of that flag may well stand
for the outpoured blood with which he baptized this country,
in the name of God and of the United States."
Whitman's grave and monument, n. p. n. publ. n. d. i6p.
A pamphlet signed by W. Barrows, D. D., Financial Agent,
Reading, Mass., 1887.
Says that Whitman secured Oregon, p. 6.
AVhitson, John H.    A courier of empire; a story of Marcus Whitman's ride to save Oregon.     315P.     Bost.     Wilde.     1904.
A work of fiction based upon  and covering the  entire
period of Whitman's life in Oregon. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
29
Wilkes, Charles. Narrative of the U. S. exploring expedition
during the years 1838-1842. 5V. and atlas. Phila. Lea &
Blanchard.     1845.    v. 4, p. 393, 395"396-
The Wilkes party were at Whitman's station in 1841 and
a short but interesting account of the mission is here given.
It is stated that the Indians learned to irrigate their crops
from Dr. Whitman and that they tried to use his trenches to
save making their own.
Wilkes, George. History of Oregon, geographical and political.
N. Y.    Colyer.    1845.    P- 67, 85, 88-89.
Under date of Oct. 8 [1843], tells of the arrival at the
Whitman station of the emigration of 1843. ln spite of the
fact that Wilkes had travelled in the same party with Whitman, he calls his station a "Methodist mission establishment," and says that it dated back to 1834.
Wilson, James Grant, and Fiske, John. Appleton's cyclopedia
of American biographv. N. Y. Appleton. 1889. v. 6, p.
485.
Follows Barrows. "Had it not been for him [Whitman],
the United States might have given up Oregon to England as
comparatively worthless."
Winsor, Justin. Narrative and critical history of America. 8v.
Boston.   Houghton.    1889.   v. 7, p. 562.
Barrows Oregon is "probably overwrought as to the influence of Whitman."
REFERENCES TO PERIODICALS AND PUBLICATIONS
OF SOCIETIES.
Advance (Chicago).    December 1, 1870.    "An evening with an
old missionary."
Interview with H. H. Spalding. Saved Oregon story.
Clark's refusal of the Bible to the Flatheads. Story of the
quart of seed wheat. Copied in Spalding's Executive Document, No. 37.
March 14, 1895.    Whitman number.
January 17, 1901.
January 24, 1901.     Howard, C. H.     "Is Whitman's ride
a legend?"
Albany (Ore.)  Register.    November 21,  1868.     Resolutions in
regard to "Protestantism in  Oregon."    Clipping in  Spalding's Scrapbook.
Albany (Ore.) States Right Democrat.    November, 1866—September, 1867.    A series of thirty-seven articles by H. H. Spalding recounting at  length  the  story  of  his  missionary experiences among the Oregon Indians.
November 23, 1867.    An editorial saying that the Spalding articles had been dropped because of the opinions of the old
settlers who were tired of them.    Mentions that Spalding is
considered by some to be crazy.
About half of the above articles are contained in Spalding's Scrapbook at Whitman College Library. IN
30
Periodicals
American Antiquarian, 26:326 (September-October, 1904). Review of Marshall's History vs. the Whitman saved Oregon
story.
Says the literature is exhaustive but not convincing on
either side of the controversy.
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. Annual Report.
25th (1834) p. 26-27.    Samuel Parker left Ithaca, N. Y., on May
5 for an exploring tour among the Indians of the  Rocky
Mountains.     At St. Louis he decided to return and obtain
associates for the trip.
26th (1835) p. 99-101.    Journeys of Parker and Whitman to the
Rocky Mountains begun.    Objects of the trip stated.
27th (1836) p. 98-99.    Outlook for missionary work west of the
Rocky Mountains.
28th  (1837)  p.  113-115.    Beginnings   of   the   Oregon   mission.
Kindness of the H. B. Co.
29th (1838) p. 125-127.    Glowing reports.    The request made by
Mr. Gray for 50 additional missionaries and assistants.
30th (1839) p. 143-145.    Arrival of reinforcements.
31st (1840) p. 176-179. Coming of the papists. Setting up of
the first printing press.
32nd (1841) p. 181-185. Full account of the various stations.
Map of the territory.
33rd (1842) p. 192-195. Destructive order of the Prudential Committee of the A. B. C. F. M. "The Committee deemed it
advisable to discontinue the Southern branch of the mission,
embracing the stations at Waiilatpu, near Walla Walla, and
Clear Creek and Kamiah, higher up on the waters of Snake
River."
34th (1843) P- J69-i73.    Action of the Mission in regard to the
"destructive order."    Whitman sent East.    The order rescinded.
35th (1844) p. 212-213. Indians apprehensive and inclined to
fault finding and jealousy.     Outlook unfavorable.
36th (1845) P- 187-189. Mention of the growing numbers of immigrants and the need of preachers for the white population.
37th (1846) p. 193-196. Kindness of Mr. McDonald of the H.
B. Co.
38th (1847) P- 185.    Brief report.
39th  (1848) p. 239-244.    Whitman massacre.     Indian sickness
and superstition assigned as the immediate cause.    Rescue of
the captives.    Map.
40th (1849) P- 201-203.    The lower stations relinquished.
4.1st (1850) p. 182. The remaining Oregon missionaries at work
among the whites. Attempts made through the Indian department at Washington to recover damages for the property
destroyed by the Indians. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
31
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. Maps
and illustrations of the' missions of the A. B. C. F. M. 56p.
n. p.    n. pub.    1843.
Gives a full page may of the Oregon Mission and vicinity.
American Catholic Historical Researches. January, 1899, 16:187-
197.    Beadle, H. M.    Story of Marcus Whitman refuted.
April, 1901.    Bourne's "Legend of Marcus Whitman."
April,   1906.    Notice  of  Marshall's  "The  Hudson's  Bay
Company's archives furnish no support to the Whitman saved
Oregon story."
American Historical Association. Annual Report, 1900. v. 1,
p. 219-236. (Issued as a government document, U. S. Congress, 56-2, House Document, No. 548, v. 125, Serial, No.
4199).
Marshall, Wm. I. Discussion of the paper of Professor
Bourne. Tells of his study of the Whitman question and of
his efforts to keep misstatements in regard to Whitman from
circulation in school histories.
American Historical Review. 6:276-300 (January, 1901).
Bourne, Edward Gaylord.    The legend of Marcus Whitman.
An able discussion based upon contemporaneous source
material. Revised and enlarged in his Essays in Historical
criticism, 1901, p.  1-109.
14:79 (October, 1908). Letters of Sir George Simpson,
1841-1843. Copied by Professor Joseph Schafer from the
Public Record Office at London.
Paragraph 46 of Letter dated November 25, 1841,.refers
to American missionaries. The four stations of the A. B. C.
F. M. are mentioned with a list of the members of each station. W^hitman is not elsewhere noticed. In a letter to the
compiler, under date of October 30, 1908, Professor Schafer
makes the following statement:
"As to the bearing of my recent researches on the Whitman question, the results are purely negative. The letters
and dispatches of the British Minister at Washington during the years 1842 to 1846 make no mention of Whitman;
neither does Dr. McLoughlin in his letters to the Hudson's
Bay Company; neither does Sir George Simpson in his reports to the company, except in his list of Oregon missionaries contained in the letter of November 25, 1841 (See American Hist. Rev. Oct. 1908). This is all negative evidence;
Whitman's agency in influencing the negotiations was not
known to these representatives of Great Britain or it would
probably have been reported by them."
Annales de 1'Association de la propagation de la Foi (Lyons,
France), v. 5, p. 599, 600.
In regard to the Macedonian cry. First mention of the
four Flatheads in a letter dated, St. Louis, Dec. 31, 1831, from
Rt. Rev. Joseph Rosati, Bishop of St. Louis, to the editor of
the Annales. Translated on p. 188-189 of v. 2 of the Records
of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia
in an article by Maj. Edmond Mallet. 32
Periodicals
Astorian (Dailv and Weekly).    February 29, 1880.   Daily.    May
14,1880.    Daily.    January 28, i88r.   Weekly.   March 6,1881.
Articles by Mrs. F. F. Victor, "Did Dr. Whitman save
Oregon?"    Six articles in reply by W. H. Gray, issued as
separates as, "Circular No. 8."
Astoria Marine Gazette.    July and August, 1866.
Said to have contained Gray's account of Whitman's journey a few months after Spalding's.
Atlantic Monthly, 46:534 (October, 1880). Reminiscences of
Washington.
Whitman's arrival at Washington. The codfishery story.
An unsigned article attributed to Ben Perley Poore.
Bay View Magazine (Detroit). 10:258-259 (March, 1903).
Lyman, W. D.     Evolution of the Northwest.
Refers to Whitman and his services, politically. Illustrated.
Biloxi (Miss.) Daily Herald.- February 17, 1905. Account
of Dr. Nixon's lecture, "How Dr. Whitman saved Oregon."
Boston Recorder. May 4, 1843. Quoted by Marshall, Acquisition of Oregon, mss. 2:45o. as giving a snort notice of Whitman's visit in Boston and his departure for the Oregon mission.
Boston Evening Transcript. January 21, 1901. Penrose, Stephen, B. L.    "The Whitman story."
Refers to de Saint-Amant in support of the Whitman
story.
Boston Transcript.     March 23, 1901.
Californian. April 19, 1848. Said to have contained account
of the massacre. 2:19-33 (Juty> 1880). Clarke, S. A. How
Dr. Whitman saved Oregon.
Follows Gray.
2:229-233 (September, 1880). Victor, Mrs. F. F. Did
Dr. Whitman save Oregon?
In refutation of the previous article by S. A. Clarke. Contends that Whitman went East on business of the mission.
Disposes of the Ashburton treaty.
Catholic Magazine, 7:49c. Said to contain material on the Whitman massacre.
Catholic Northwest (Seattle, Wash.). 4, No. 8:5 (August, 1907).
Hylebos, P. F. Address at the breaking of ground for the
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.
States that Whitman did not save Oregon.
Catholic World. February, 1872, p. 665-682. "Several calumnies
refuted."
A criticism of Spalding's Executive document, No. 37.
Cited by Van der Donckt in Ecclesiastical Review, 32:13-14
(January, 1905). Bourne surmises that this article was written by Brouillet, (see his Essays in historical criticism, 1901,
P- 34)- Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
33
Chicago Advance, see Advance.
Chicago Interior, see Interior.
1893.     "Who gave the Pacific
Marcus Whitman's
Chicago Interocean.     August 5,
Northwest to the nation?"
Scores the Spokane Review for having acknowledged a
debt of gratitude to Jefferson. Says Whitman is the man
who should receive first honors.
November 30, 1894.
December 16, 1894. Onderdonk's poem on Whitman's
ride.
January 22, 1895.
May 5, 1895.
October 8, 180c.
November 26,  1895.
June 2, 1896.
June 9, 1896.
August 23, 1896.     Baxter, Geo. M.
ride.     Extravagant praise.
October 14, 1897.
December 21, 1897.
July 14, 1898.
August 21, 1898.
July 3, 1899. Review of Mowry's First steps. In speaking of the Whitman controversy, allusion is made to the
"smaller fry like Marshall, the Chicago school teacher and
crank."
November 20, 1899.
February 12, 1900. Review of Boutell, Geo. S. Crisis of
the republic.
April 2, 1900.
December 30. 1900.
January 9, 190T.
January 11, 1901.
January 15, 1901.
January 21, 1901.
Februarys 6, 1901.
February 9, 1901.
November 25, igoi.
January 19, 1902.
July 12, 1902.
July 12, 1903. Nixon, O. W. The pioneer Whitman, who
followed Lewis and Clark and saved Oregon.
Chicago  Record,  September 25,   1900.     Wtoodburn,  James  A.
• Explorers of the great West.
Saved Oregon story briefly told.
Christian Advocate. March 1, 1833, p. 105. Disosway, G. P.
Letter enclosing letter of William Walker, dated Upper
Sandusky, Ohio, Jan. 19, 1833.
This has been referred to as the origin of the Protestant
version of the Macedonian cry.
3 34
Periodicals
Christian Advocate—Continued.
March 22, 1833.    President Fisk's "ringing editorial."
May 10, 1833. Mr. Lehon's letter dated St. Louis, April
16, 1833.
January 31, 1834.
February 21, 1834.
March 31, 1834.
Typewritten copies of the material in the Christian Advocate relating to the Indian delegations to St. Louis were made
for Win. I. Marshall and are now available in the library of
Mr. C. B. Bagley.
Christian Work. April, 1901, p. 600-602. HoAvard, Gen. C. H.
Was it history or legend?
Church at home and abroad (Phila.). March, 1896, p. 189-204,
210-214. Parker, Prof. H. W. Article on his father, Samuel
Parker.
Says that the pamphlet issued by Whitman in the interests
of the emigration of 1843 was scattered widely, even to Texas.
August, 1897, p. 129-134. An article on Air. and Mrs.
Spalding with some references to Whitman.
Churchman (Chicago). 94:507-511 (October 6, 1906). Kirk-
bride, William Howard. The martyrdom of a pioneer missionary,     il.
Typographical errors, eg. "Rev. P. P. Spalding who went
to Oregon in 1866."
Cleveland Herald. April 6, 1843. Said to have copied Greeley's
description of Whitman which appeared in the New York
Tribune for March 30, 1843.
Colfax (Wash.) Commoner, 1893. Cited by Lyman, History of
Walla Walla county, p. 47, as containing Mrs. Catherine
Pringle's "Storyr of the Christmas dinner of 1847."
Commonwealth (Seattle, Wash.). March 4, 1905. Webb, J. G.
Discovery of Puget Sound.
Beginning of material relating to Whitman. Macedonian Cry.
March 11, 1905.    AVhitman continued.
March 18, 1905.    AVhitman continued.
March 25, 1905.    Whitman continued.
April 1, 1905.    Whitman continued.
Continued in later issues which the compiler has not examined.    Based upon Barrows.
Congregational Association of Oregon and Washington. Minutes.
34th Session, 1882, p. 17-18. Resolutions touching Whitman, the Indians and the Catholics.
37th Session, 1885, p. 37-59. Apx. A. Eells, C. "Early
workers." Anecdotes of AVhitman. Apx. B. Eells, M.
Work accomplished during fifty years, 1835-1885. Contains
references to AVhitman. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
35
Congregationalist. October 5, 1866. An early version of the
Whitman story cited by Bourne, Essays in historical criticism, p. 8, note.
November 18, 1897. Mowry, W. A. Dr. Marais Whitman, the hero of Oregon.
Says that Whitman was not "snubbed" by the Board
when he returned to Boston in 1843.
January 19, 1901.
January 4, 1902.
Congregationalist and Christian World.     September 20,  1902.'
Griffis, AV. E.    The Marcus AVhitman Centennial in Ithaca.
Dial, 32:40-43 (January 16, 1902). Hodder, F. H. .The Marcus
Whitman legend. Reviewing Bourne, Essays in historical
criticisms and Mowry, Marcus AVhitman and the early days
of Oregon.
Mr. Hodder states clearly and forcibly his views agreeing
with Bourne rather than with Mowry.
Ecclesiastical Review. 32:13-14 (January, 1905). Van der
Donckt, Cyril. The founders of the church in Idaho. Refers
to the Catholic Sentinel, No. 12 and No. 13, as containing material against Spalding's charge that the Catholics instigated
the Whitman massacre.
Eclectic Magazine. 148:400 (May, 1907). Tyler, Lyon G. John
Tyler and his presidency.
Mr. Tyler states that "The story told by Mr. Barrows, that
the government was indifferent to Oregon and was only
prevented from surrendering it to the British by the timely
interference of Dr. AVhitman, is totally without foundation."
Refers to Alarshall.
Fitchburg (Mass.) Sentinel. February 12, 1901. Fairbank, J.
Wilder.    Reply to Bourne's attack on Whitman.
Forest Grove Times.    August 14, 1902.
Dr. Whitman went East.
Walker, L. C.    Why
Four Track News.    5:135-137 (September, 1903).    Kane, Mary
L.    How Oregon was saved.
Great Round World,     p.  359-361   (1901).     Brown,  Arthur J.
Marcus AVhitman's ride.
A popular rendering of Barrow's saved Oregon story.
Hampshire Gazette (Northampton, Mass.).    July 22, 1884.    In
regard to Whitman's boyhood and schooling.     Quoted by
C. Eells in Minutes of the Congregational Association of Oregon and Washington, 37th session (1885), p. 41.
Harper's Magazine.     85:839 (November, 1892).     Wyeth, John
A.    Nathaniel J. Wyeth and the struggle for Oregon.
Quotes Barrows in regard to Whitman's connection with
the emigration of 1843. 36 Periodicals
Home Missionary. December, 1890. Article by J. E. Roy.
78:280-281 (December, 1904). Address of Dr. Newell Dwight
Hillis at Des Moines in which he claims new evidence from
the H. B. Co's. archives. Referring to E. G. Bourne and his
work, Dr. Hillis says: "That is the Bourne to which no
scholar will ever return."
Idaho Signal. June 7, 1873. Resolutions in regard to Exec.
Doc. No. 37.
August 8, 1874.   Death of a pioneer (Spalding).
Independent. March 19, 1885. Said to have contained the poem
by Alice Wellington Rollins on "Whitman's Ride."
49:1528 (November 25, 1897). Whitman, Mary L. Whitman's ancestry^-.
54:2712-2713 (November 13, 1902. Review of Myron
Eells' reply to Professor Bourne's "The Whitman legend."
Favorable to Eells.    Refers to de Saint-Amant's book.
Interior  (Chicago).     January 17,  1901.     Whitman of Oregon.
February 14, 1901.    Saved Oregon material.
Ithaca (N. Y.)  Daily Journal.     July 8, 1893.     In regard to a
proposed tablet in the new Presbyterian Church.     Caption
of article,  "A  dozen rich  states
mission."
gained through an  Ithacs
January 24,  1901.     Alowry,
is the  story history  or tradi-
Jourhal of Education (Boston)
W. A. "Marcus AVhitman,
tion?"
Attacks Bourne.
60:491-492 (May 4, 1905). A plea for a just estimate of
Whitman. Says questions regarding motives for his ride and
causes of the massacre will probably never be settled. ■
Ladies Home Journal. 14, No. 12, p. 9-10 (November, 1897.
Weed, George Ludington. When Dr. Whitman added three
stars to our flag; how Oregon was saved to the Union.
Gives map showing Whitman's route. Drawing to illustrate the Fourth of July celebration in 1836.
Ladies Repository, September, 1868, p. 174-180. Hines, H. K.
(of Fort A^ancouver).     "Waiiletpu."-
Walla Walla dinner, arrival of the Red River colony, deep
laid scheme. Says that the Ashburton treaty had not yet
been executed in March, 1843.
Lewiston' (Me.) Journal.     Aiarch 5-10, 1904.     AVhitman, C. F.
A two page illustrated article in the Magazine Section.
Saved Oregon story with many details.
Literary World. 32:119 (August 1, 1901). Review of Mowry's
Marcus Whitman and the early days of Oregon.
Reviewer states that Dr. Mowry's book is a "decisive contribution' and "ought to settle finally" the question of Whitman's political influence. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
37
Littell's Living Age. 19:66-67 (October 14, 1848). Osborn,
Josiah.    The massacre in Oregon.
Letters from Ohio, dated Oregon, April 7, 1848, from the
Oquawka (111.) Spectator. A valuable contemporaneous account by a survivor.
Magazine of American History. 10:526 (December, 1883). A
favorable review of Barrow's Oregon.
11:168-170 (February, 1884). Tyler, Lyon Gardiner. A
letter relating to the policy of President Tyler's administration in regard to the Oregon question.
"At no time did the President [Tyler] contemplate abandoning any portion of that country without a proper equivalent—to any nation on the face of the earth."
12:193-210 (September, 1884). Lamb, Martha J. A
glimpse of the valley of many waters.
Saved Oregon story based on Barrows.     Illustrated.
Midland Monthly. October, 1896, p. 342-349. Phelps, William
W.   How Oregon was saved to the Union.
Ride story. Quotes Spalding's Exec. Doc. No. 37. Gives
illustration of Whitman pleading for Oregon before Tyler
and Webstre.
Missionary Herald (Boston). 32:26, 35-36 (January, 1836). Account of Parker and AVhitman from letters received from
them.    Speaks of AVhitman's return to St. Louis.
32:70-72 (February, 1836). Letter from Mr. Parker dated
on Green River, August 17, 1835.
Prospects of the mission. Dr. AVhitman's return to obtain associates. "I do hope that Dr. Whitman with others
will be sent back by the next caravan,- an dthus a year or
more be saved in bringing a knowledge of the Savior to these
people."    p. 71.
32:162 (April, 1836). Departure of Whitman and Spalding about March 1 for their field of labors.
32:268 (July, 1836). Note saying that Mr. Parker had
found a desirable opening for missionary stations.
32:317 (August, 1836). Notice regarding Dr. Whitman
and Messrs. Spalding and Gray en route for Oregon.
32:445 (November, 1836). Report based on a letter received from Mr. Parker. Claims a good field for missions.
Mentions kindness of H. B. Co.
33:122-124 (March, 1837). Letter from Mr. Spalding
dated July 8, 1836, written from the Green River rendezvous.
Tells of an Indian delegation come to meet them and go
back with them to the Walla Walla country.
Letter from Mr. Parker from the Sandwich Islands, dated
September 24, 1836. This very interesting letter tells of the
country in the region of Spokane and Colville. . Kindness
of H. B. Co. Says that they and the U. S. traders had borne
practically all of" his expenses so that he had paid out less
than two dollars in money from the time he left Council 38
Periodicals
Missionary Herald—Continued.
Bluffs on the Missouri until he reached the Sandwich Islands,
p. 124.
33:24 (January, 1837). The movements of Messrs.
Parker and AVhitman and the prospects for missionary work
among the Indians.
33:317 (July, 1837).    Return of Samuel Parker.
33:348-349 (August, 1837). Announces the arrival of
Whitman/Spalding and Gray at Fort Walla Walla on September 3, 1836. On October 3, they had selected their stations.
33:369-371 (September, 1837). Extracts from the journal
of Mr. Parker.    The Oregon Indians.
33:421-428 (October, 1837). Letter from Mr. Spalding
dated at Fort Vancouver, September 20, 1836. Much valuable
information in regard to the founding of the mission.
33:497-501 (December, 1837). Letter from Mr. Spalding
in regard to the prospects for the mission.
34:92-95 (March, 1838). Ex-tracts from a letter from Mr.
Gray who asks for more missionaries.
34:237 (June, 1838). Sending of reinforcements to the
Oregon mission.
34:386-388 (October, 1838). Letter from Mr. Spalding
dated September 4, 1837, written from Fort Colville where he
had proceeded to obtain supplies for his station. Nearly a
full page letter from Dr. AAliitman dated March 12, 1838, telling about the Indians and the mission. All their books used
in teaching had been furnished by the Methodist mission at
Willamette.
35:14 (January, 1839).' Abstract of the Annual Report
of the A. B. C. F. M., with brief statement covering the Oregon mission.
35:44 (January, 1839). Receipt of letters from Messrs.
Eells, Smith, Walker and Gray, dated at Fort Hall, July 30,
on their way to recruit Whitman and Spalding.
35:269 (July, 1839). Arrival of Eells, Smith, Walker and
Gray at Walla Walla on August 29, 1838.
35:446 (November, 1839). Arrival of Mr. Hall at AValla
Walla with printing press, type and paper.
35:472-475 (December, 1839). Letters from Messrs.
Walker and Spalding. Among other interesting things, is
told how the Indians help dig the mill race for Dr. Whitman.
35:484-485 (December, 1839). Death of Alice Whitman.
Mr. Hall at work printing an elementary text-book in the Nez
Perces language.
36:15, 33-34 (Januarv, 1840). Abstract of the Annual
Report of A. B. C. F. M. Gives brief biographical data in regard to the various missionaries of the Oregon mission.
36:230-231 (June, 1840). Letter from Mr. Spalding dated
October 2, 1839. Drought and failure of crops. Commencement of printing. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
3<
Missionary Herald—Continued.
36:326-329 (August, 1840). "Letter from Mr. Smith,
dated at Kameah, Aug. 27th, 1839."
Valuable information regarding the missions. Says they
cannot become self-supporting. Tells of the Indian superstition regarding medicine men.    The coming of the Papists.
News from a letter from Doct. Whitman, dated Waiilatpu,
Oct. 22, 1839.
Says the Indians like books in their own language.
36:437-441 (November, 1840). Letters from the various
stations.
Eells, Feb. 25, 1840. Interesting letter with much information about the Indians and the methods used at the mission, p. 437-439-
AA'hitman, March 27, 1840. Letter telling of the handicap
to mission work caused by the migratory habits of the Indians.    Publication of a 52-page book,. 800 copies, p. 439.
Spalding, March 16, 1840. Letter regarding his work
with the Nez Perces.
37:14-15 (January, 1841). Abstract of the Report of the
A. B. C. F. M., annual meeting September, 1840. Mentions
members of each station.   Brief progress report.
37:405 (September, 1841). "Letters have been received
from the missionaries dated as late as 23rd March. At some
of the stations the usual labors were going on prosperously,
while at others there was opposition, and the prospects were
disheartening."
37:436 (October, 1841). Letter from Doct. Whitman,
March 28, 1841.    Speaks of the work of the mission.
38:9-11 (January, 1842). Abstract of the Annual Report.
Mention of the printing of the second book in the Nez Perces
language.
39:14-15 (January, 1843). Abstract of the Annual Report.
Gives the "destructive order" of the A. B. C. F. M. Mentions
the coming of a papal priest for missionary work.
39:14 (January, 1843). Destructive order of the A. B. C.
F. M.   Cited by Bancroft, Oregon, v. 1, p. 341.
39:81-82 (February, 1843). Letter from Mr. Eells, March
1, 1841.
Gives information in regard to the missions.
39:356-359 (September, 1843). "Report of Doct. AATiit-
man."
Introductory remarks. States the destructive order and
that Whitman had gone East at the instance of the mission
to consult the Prudential Committee in regard to it and that
they had decided to continue operations without change. "Another object of Doct. Whitman in making the above mentioned visit, was to procure additional laborers." Nothing
. said of a political purpose. Whitman's report on the mission
covers over two pages and is most interesting.
39:398 (October, 184.3). "Doct. AVhitman was one hundred miles west of Laramie's Fork, Black Hills, on the 20th IN
If
40
Periodicals
Missionary Herald— Continued.
of July. The Indians at his station were very anxious for
his return. One of them said to Mrs. Whitman, 'O, that I
could eat the word of God to the full!"
40:12 (January, 1844). Annual survey of the Mission.
Encouraging progress reported at Waiilatpu and Clearwater.
Arrival of the 1843 immigration. Printing press. Papists"
planning to occupy the country.
40:105 (March, 1844). Brief reference to Oregon mission.
"Some fears of hostile movements had disturbed their quiet
at one time.
40:175  (Mays'1844.).     Letter from AVhitman, November,
1843-
Account of his return trip and arrival at the mission.
Urges need of a minister for Waiilatpu, one who could meet
the Romanists. Need of a good class of immigrants. "This
country must be occupied by Americans or foreigners; if it
is by the latter, they will be mostly papists."
40:384-385 (November, 1844). Letter from Mr. Eells,
March 23, 1844. Has much to say in regard to Indian character.
40:385-386 (November, 1844). Letter from Dr. Whitman, April 13, 1844.    In regard to Indian disturbances.
41:11 (January, 1845). Annual survey of the missions
of the Board. "Jealousy of the white people seems to be
awakened among the Indians, which may affect the mission
unfavorably."
41:56-57 (February, 1845). Letter from Mr. Spalding,
April 8, 1841.    AVork and sickness.
41:284 (August, 1845). Quotes from a letter from Whitman in regard to examination of candidates for admission to
the church.
42:13 (January, 1846). Annual survey. Reports that the
natives are rapidly advancing in the knowledge of agriculture
and the means of living comfortably.
43:12 (January, 1847). Annual survey. "While there is
an increase of religious knowledge, there is also more of
cavilling and opposition One of the gospels has been translated and printed."
44:11 (January, 1848).    Annual survey.
44:104 (March, 1848).     Brief report making mention of
strong reinforcements to the Catholic mission.
44:237-241  (July, 1848).     Letter from Mr. Spalding, dated
January 8, 1848.
Gives brief biography of AAHiitman. Spalding tells of
the massacre, of his escape and. of the ransom of the captives.
"Too much praise cannot be awarded to the Hudson's Bay
Company, especially to Mr. Ogden, for their timely, prompt,
judicious and Christian efforts. AA^e owe it, under a kind
Providence, to the efforts of Messrs. Ogden and Douglass
that we are alive at this place today." Gives map of Oregon
Territory.
■tit Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
41
Missionary Herald—Continued.
44:370 (October, 1848). Gloomy outlook reported for the
mission.
45:12 (January, 1849). Annual survey. Taking over of
the Methodist station at the Dalles.    Kindness of H. B. Co.
45:68 (February, 1849).    Rescue of Walker and Eells.
45:405 (November, 1849). "The efforts of the Board in
behalf of these Indians may be considered as at an end."
46:13 (January, 1850). Annual survey. Formal statement of the close of the Oregon mission.
December, 1866. A six page article by Cushing Eells
claiming political influence for Whitman. Cited by Bancroft,
Oregon, v. 1, 341.
March, 1869, p. 76. Story that General Clark refused the
Flatheads the "Bible.' Says that Clark was a Catholic. Cited
by Marshall, Acquisition of Oregon, Mss. v. 2, p. 21.
65:314-316 (October, 1869). Condemning Browne's Report, Exec. Doc. No. 38 (Brouillet) and the wrong done by
Congress.     Blames Catholics.
February and September, 1885. Articles by Rev. Thomas
Laurie.
Replies to Victor and Evans. Same reprinted as a 24p.
pamphlet.     Astoria.     Snyder.     1866.
Missionary review of the world. July and August, 1888. Cited
by M. Eells in his list of Whitman references (Seattle Daily
Times, April 12, 1903) as containing 11 pages of material by
J. W. Bashford.
25:641-653 (September, 1902). Brain, Belle M. The
true story of Marcus Whitman.
Illustrations.    Map.    Mowry cited as good authority.
Nation. 76:109 (February 5, 1903). Crandall, F. A. "Contentious public 'documents.' "
On the occasion of a reprint of Spalding's Executive Document, No. 37. Government should keep out of missionary
squabbles.    Same article in N. Y. Post, Feb. 7, 1903.
76:169-170 (February 26, 1903). Wilson, J. R. "Whitman and Oregon." Letter to the effect that people in Oregon
have not accepted Bourne's conclusions in regard to Whitman.    De Saint-Amant's testimony discussed.
New Haven Evening Register, February 19, 1901. Long article
by J. Wilder Fairbank in which the name of AVhitman is
linked with that of Lincoln.
New York Christian Advocate, see Christian Advocate.
New York Evening Post, February 7, 1903. Crandall's "Contentious public 'documents' " as in the Nation of February
28, 1903.
AA ilson's reply to Crandall.
1^ 42
Periodicals
New York Observer. October 25, 1866. Treat, S. B. A missionary patriot.
Speech at the meeting of the American Board. Eulogizes
the missionaries. Says that AVhitman got specimens of gold
ore to prove the value of the country.
December 22, 1870. The Oregon mission-and the U. S.
Govt.
Calls for printing Spalding's antidote.
December 7, 188-2.
December 21, 1882.
January 4, 1883.
January 11, 1883.
January 18, 1883.
January 25, 1883.
February 1, 1883.
The above seven articles written by Rev. William Barrows glorify Whitman as the Savior of Oregon. They were
later thrown together as his "Oregon, the struggle for possession."
New York Sun.   January 17, 1885 (?).
March 3, 1901. "A good statement of the legend and its
summary execution at the hands of Prof. Bourne of Yale."
February 11, 1903. "The Marcus Whitman legend—
demolished by Prof. Bourne of Yale and revived in a government document.".
Deplores the reprint by the government of Spalding's
Executive Document, No. 37.
March 15, 1908. Said to have contained ^4 column interview, in London, with Prof. Joseph Schafer of the University of Oregon. For results of Prof. Schafer's researches
in the British Archives, see statement under American Historical Review, 14:79 (October, 1908).
New York Times Saturday Review of Books. March 12, 1904.
Dodd's review of Johnson's Century of Expansion.
March 19, 1904. AA^. F. Johnson replies stating that
Everett had credited Whitman with saving Oregon.
March 26, 1904.    Prof. Bourne calls for the proof.
New York Tribune, March 29, 1843.     Said to have contained
.an editorial by Greeley on Whitman's visit to New York.
Copied in Quarterly of the Oregon Historical Society,
4:168-169 (June, 1903).
New York Voice,
upon Nixon.
January 13, 1898.    Saved Oregon story based
Niles Register. A careful search through the entire file covering
the period of Whitman's life in Oregon, barring an occasional
missing number, failed to reveal any mention of Whitman.
There is much relating to Oregon, especially Congressional
action, speeches, etc. Bibliography of Marcus .Whitman
43
North British Review, September, 1844.
The writer calls attention of the English to the necessity
of colonizing Oregon. Quoted by John Minto in Transactions of the Oregon Pioneer Association for 1876, p. 36.
North Pacific Coast (New Tacoma, AVash).
1:85-87, 91 (March 1, 1880).     Massacre.
1:101-103 (March 15, 1880).    Massacre.
1:123-125 (April 1, 1880).    Ride.
Three articles by Elwood Evans in regard to the life and
services of Dr. Whitman. A critical examination of the
saved Oregon story, written 20 years before Professor Bourne
published "The legend of Marcus Whitman."
Northwest Magazine (St. Paul, Minn. ?). August, 1895, P- 22-
Contains favorable review of Nixon's How Alarcus Whitman
saved Oregon.
Occident. June 4, 1874. Whitman material in the form of
resolutions.   Clipping in the Spalding Scrapbook.
Ontario (N. Y.) County Times. November 26, 1902. Smith,
Charles James. The Principal of the Rushville High School
writes a long saved Oregon article but adds nothing new to
the controversy.
Oquawka (111.) Spectator. Cited by Littell's Living Age as containing the letter of Josiah Osborn, dated April 7, 1848, in regard to the massacre. See Littell's Living Age, 19:66-67
(October 14, 1848).
Oregon American and Evangelical Unionist.
1, No. 1:12-15 (undated). Spalding, H. H. Letter dated
Feb. 18, 1848, to the Editor of the Oregon Spectator.
In this letter Spalding explains why shortly after the massacre, he wrote favorably of McBean and the H. B. Co., his
object being to secure good treatment for himself and the
refugees. Now he is ready to tell the truth about the Catholics.
1, No. 2:23-27 (June 21, 1848). Letter from Alanson
Hinman asking two pertinent questions in regard to Mr. Mc-
Bean's conduct at the time of the massacre.
Spalding, H. H.    History of the Waiilatpu massacre.
The first article in the Burnett series. Gives names of
those present at the time of the massacre. States that many
were there against Whitman's wishes.
1, No. 3:35-37 (July 5, 1848). Osborn, Josiah. Affidavit
in regard to escape from massacre.
Throws blame upon Mr. McBean of the H. B. Co. for
not showing greater hospitality.
1, No. 3:37 (July 5, 1848). "True American." Dr. Whitman's death foretold.
States that Mr. McBean had tried to buy Whitman's station shortly before the massacre and on Dr. Whitman's refusing to sell, he had said that the Indians would kill him if he
staid. 44
Periodicals
Oregon American and Evangelical Unionist—Continued.
i, No. 3:38-40 (July 5. 1848). Correspondence between
. Spalding and Burnett in regard to their discussion of the
Whitman massacre.
1, No. 4:49-54 (July 19, 1848). Spalding, H. H. History
of the Waiilatpu massacre, continued.
Details of the massacre. Much in regard to the Catholic
ladder.
1, No. 5:65-68 (August 2, 1848). Spalding, H. H. History of the Waiilatpu massacre, continued.
Note.    In the file examined, pages 69-82 are missing.
1, No. 6:83-87 (?). Burnett, Peter H. Reply to Spalding.
Claims that Spalding has been unfair and underhanded.
1, No. 6:87-93 (?) "Review of Mr. Douglas' letter [continued]"
Anti-Catholic.
1, No. 7:106-108 (March 1, 1849). Spalding, H. H. History of the Waiilatpu massacre, continued.
Especially^ in regard to the escape of Messrs. Canfield and
Kimble.
1, No. 7:108-109 (March 1, 1849). Anti-Catholic depositions in regard to threat to have Whitman killed.
1, No. 8:113-128 (May 23, 1849). Editorial note in regard to Burnett's running off with Charley, the printer. This
is the end of the magazine. Entire number devoted to Anti-
Catholic material.
Note. Copies of this magazine are exceedingly rare.
With the exception of parts of No. 5 and No. 6, Mr. Bagley,
.of Seattle, has the complete file of 8 numbers. Whitman
College Library has several numbers. The Oregon Historical Society has the complete file.
Oregon Historical Society.     Quarterly.
1:41-45 (March, 1900). Robertson, James R. The genesis of political authority in Oregon.
Holds that Whitman was influential but not vital to the
Oregon cause.
1:60-65 (March, 1900). Condon, Thomas. The process
of selection in Oregon pioneer settlement.
"Doctor Wliitman seems to have had a mild monomania
on the subject of ox teams drawing plain Missouri wagons
from Fort Independence to the Columbia at Wallula."
1:84-85 (March, 1900). Matthieu, F. X. Reminiscences
collected by H. S. Lyman.
"In person he recalls Whitman as not very tall, rather
slender in build, and of strongly Yankee style." Hair dark.
Mention of McLoughlin's kindness to Whitman.
1:241-242 (Sept., 1900). AA^ilson, Joseph R. The Oregon
question.
Credits Whitman with large political influence. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
45
Oregon Historical Society—Continued.
1:351 (December, 1900). Young, F. G. The Oregon,
trail.
Speaking of Whitman, says, "He did go to AVashington
and he urged the importance of American interests in Oregon
upon Pres. Tyder and some members of his cabinet."
1:379_8i (December, 1900). Applegate, Jesse. AA^ith the
cow column in 1843.
Reprinted from the Transactions of the Oregon Pioneer
Association for 1876.
2:268-83 (September, 1901). Hinman, Alanson. Reminiscences collected by James B. Robertson.
Hinman, at 79 years of age, discusses Whitman's aid to
pioneers, relations with Catholics and the massacre. He was
with Whitman at AVaiilatpu in 1844-45. AVas at the Dalles
at the time of the massacre. Thinks Bourne was incorrect
in his statements.
3:220 (Sept., 1902). - Minto, John. Sheep husbandry in
Oregon.
Sheep at the Waiilatpu Mission in 1841. AVhitman taught
the Indians spinning and weaving.
3:28i (Sept., 1902). .Tory, James. Reminiscences collected by H. S. Lyman.
Brief mention of A\rhitman.
3:292 (Sept., 1902). Brown, Mrs. Tabitha. Reminiscences collected by Jane Kinney Smith.
Whitman's suggestion that Christian families could make
provisions for schools by acquiring contiguous donation
claims and giving up part of the land for this purpose.
3:329-335 (December, 1902). Himes, George H. History
of the press of Oregon.
An interesting account of the arrival and use of- the printing press at Lapwai.
4:78-79 (March, 1903). McCarver, M. M. Letter to
Hon. A. C. Dodge of Iowa immediately after the arrival of
the immigration of 1843. (Reprinted from the Ohio Statesman, Sept. 11, 1844, taken from the Iowa Gazette where it
was originally printed).
Estimates Whitman's services in accompanying the party'
out.     "His knowledge of the route was considerable."
4:84-85 (March, 1903). AAtood, Tallmadge, B. Letter to
Isaac Nash, dated Oregon City, December 23, 1847.
Attributes the massacre to the measles. "It was in consequence of this that Dr. AAHiitman was killed as they held a
malice against the whites for bringing the disorder into the
country."
4:168-169 (June, 1903). Editorial from the New York
Daily Tribune of March 29, 1843.
Whitman visited the Tribune office while in New York.
Mention is here made of his personal appearance and of his
II 46
Periodicals
Oregon Historical Society—Continued.
missionary zeal but nothing is said of a political significance
to his appearance in the East nor of his interest in securing
emigrants for Oregon. This editorial is said to have been
copied in full in the Boston Advertiser of March 31, 1843.
4:169-170 (June, 1903).    "Civis."    Cruising on the Sound.
A communication published in the New York Spectator
of April 5, 1843. Speaks of Whitman's rough appearance as
he was seen on the boat between New York and Boston.
No mention is made of the object of his trip.
4:177 (June, 1903). Copy of a letter in Iowa Gazette, July
8, 1843, copied into the New York Tribune (weekly), August
5, !843-
This letter dated Kansas River, June 3, 1843, has some
bearing upon AA^hitman's connection with the emigration of
1843-
4:253-254 (Sept., 1903)'. Cone, Anson Sterling. Reminiscences secured by H. S. Lyman.
"Whitman was a good man, he had a heart like an ox."
4:259-260 (Sept., 1903). Hopkins, Mrs. Rebeka. Reminiscences secured by H. S. Lyman.
Mrs. Hopkins, the daughter of Peter D. Hall, was at the
Whitman station during the massacre -as a giri of five years.
Remembers the appearance of the room.
5:43-44 (March, 1904). . Minto, John. Antecedents of
the Oregon pioneers and the light they throw on their motives.
Unimportant.
5:67, 76-77 (March, 1904). Burnett, Peter H. Recollections and opinions of an old pioneer.
5:303-305 (Sept., 1904). Burnett, Peter H. Recollections
and opinions of an old pioneer.
Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Burnett's Recollections are reprinted in the Quarterly, the paging above given show the
places where Whitman is mentioned,
7:96 (March, 1906). Johnson, Overton and Winter Wm.
H.   Route across the Rocky Mountains.    (Reprinted.)
Brief mention of their arrival at Whitman's station.
7:190 (June. 1906). Johnson, Overton and Winter Wm.
H.    Route across the Rocky Mountains.     (Reprinted).
Corn growing at the Wrhitman mission.
', 8:403-405 (December, 1907).    Munger, Asahel and Eliza.
Diary of Asahel Munger and wife.
Conditions at the Station, September 2-3, 1843. A "valuable side light.
9:107, 114-118, 125 (June, 1908). Elliott, T. C. "'Doctor'
Robert Newell: pioneer."
Newell pioneered the way for wagons from Fort Hall to
Walla AA^alla. He named one of his sons "Marcus Whitman." Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
47
Oregon Native Son.
1:9 (May, 1899).
Mentions Alice AVhitman as the first
white child born west of the Rockies.
1:27-29 (May, 1899). Letter dated Waiilatpu, July 7,
1842, from Narcissa Whitman to Maria Pambrun.
Said not to have been previously published. Adds nothing to the Whitman controversy.
1:62 (June, 1899). Portraits of survivors of the Whitman
massacre.
1:63-65 (June, 1899). Denny, Mrs. Owen N. An interview with a survivor of the Whitman massacre.
Mrs. Denny was a child at the mission and remembers the
massacre.
1:126-129 (July, 1899). Hampton, F. AVho saved Oregon?
"To acclaim the Doctor [Whitman] 'the Savior of Oregon'
is to claim more than the facts will warrant." His mission
to Washington may have been to secure aid from a "secret
service fund."
1:311-314 (October, 1899). Frederick, S. H. A pioneer
patriot.
An uncritical account of AA^hitman's career containing
many errors of fact.
1:47i-472 (February, 1900). Eells, Myron. Concerning
Dr. Marcus W^hitman.
In a letter to the editor of the Native Son contributing
extracts from two letters written by Whitman, Mr. Eells
maintains that AA^hitman claimed credit for the Americanization of Oregon.
1:573 (April, 1900). Hines, H. K. Some historical inaccuracies.
Statement in regard government of the Oregon Mission
of the A. B. C. F. M.       Whitman was not superintendent.
2:6o (June, 1900).    Portraits of survivors of the massacre.
2:120-124 (July-August, 1900).    Indian war history errors.
Myron Eells points out mistakes of Mrs. Victor. Somewhat bitter criticism of Mrs. A^ictor's "pretended history."
2:126-128 (July-August, 1900). Riddell, H. H. The
Dalles, Oregon, 1858.
In regard to the transfer of the Dalles Mission in 1847
from the Methodists to Dr. AAliitman.
2:145-149 (July-August, 1900). AValker, Cyrus H. Address before the Oregon Pioneer Association.
Mr. Walker, son of Rev. Elkanah Walker, was born at
the mission, Dec. 7, 1838. His address has no bearing on
controverted points.
2:273-275 (November, 1900). Bode, Minnie M. The
Whitman massacre, November, 1847; to the survivors, June,
i897-
A poem.    Illustrations of the scene of the massacre. 48
Periodicals
Oregon Pioneer Association.    Transactions.
1874, p. 68, 81. Thornton, J. Quinn. History of the
provisional government of Oregon.
Says AVhitman saved Oregon, p. 68. Speaks of Whit
man's influence in persuading Thornton to go to Washington
to procure the passage of a law organizing- territorial government for Oregon, p. 81.
1875, p. 28.     Deady, Matthew P.    Annual address.
Mentions the Congregational missions.     Speaks of AVhitman's return to the East but does not state its object.
p. 45, 47-48.     Nesmith, J. AV.     Occasional address.
Mentions Whitman's visit to AVashington "to intercede
in behalf of the American interests on this coast," p. 45.
Whitman as guide in 1843, p. 47-48.
1876, p. 63-64. Applegate, Jesse. A day with the cow
column of 1843.
Speaks of AVhitman "that good angel" of the emigrants.
1877, p. 22-23, 35-36.     Evans, Elwood.     Annual address.
Statements of Robert Newell in regard to the bringing of
the first wagon to Walla Walla, in 1840. At the arrival at
the mission, Whitman congratulates Newell on "having
broken the ice." The Indians crowd around the wagons
which they call "horse canoes."
Evans speaks in high terms of AArhitman as a friend alike
of Indian and emigrant.
p. 69-70.    Atkinson, G H.    Rev. Elkinah AValker.
Brief references to the mission and the massacre.
1878, p.  15-16.     Thornton, J.  Quinn.     Annual  address.
Indian superstition is given as the cause of the Whitman
massacre.
1880, p. 22-23.    Nesmith, J. AV.    Annual address.
Whitman's personality.     Massacre not instigated by the
Catholics. Missionaries in general have been given undue
credit for self-sacrifice.
p. 52-54. McLoughlin, John. Copy of a document written in McLoughlin's handwriting.    Found among his papers.
McLoughlin warned Whitman before the massacre of
Indian ill-feeling. Speaks of overhearing an Indian say, "It
is good for us to kill these Bostons," which sentiment McLoughlin rebuked and which incident he reported to Whitman.
1881, p. 14-17.   Crawford, Medorum.    Occasional address.
A pioneer of 1842.    Tells of his arrival at Dr. Whitman's
as he was preparing to leave for the East. Gives Dr. W.
direct credit fois the immigration of 1843, which he says
"practically settled the question of occupation by American
citizens of this then disputed territory."
1882, p. 10-11, 22-23.     Kelly, James K.    Annual address.
Says Whitman was influential in saving Oregon to the
Union.     Mentions the. massacre.
P- 74-75- Whitman quoted as authority for the statement
that Oregon was a good wheat country. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
49
Oregon Pioneer Association.    Transactions—Continued.
1883, p. 18.   Hill, W. Lair.   Annual address.
Refers to AVhitman and Benton as the prophets of Oregon.
1884, p. 32-35. Tolmie, AAr. Fraser. Letter to the Oregon
Pioneer Association.
Written to correct misrepresentations of Gray and Barrows. Accounts for the massacre on grounds of Indian superstition. Some details of the watermelon incident when
Spalding placed tartar emetic in watermelons to prevent the
Indians from stealing them. Holds Catholic, priests were
blameless.
1888, p. 20-24.    Condon, Thomas.    Annual address.
Gives AVhitman credit for demonstrating the possibility
of a wagon road to Oregon.
p. 41, 48-50, 56. An unsigned sketch of Dr. John McLoughlin in which AVhitman is given incidental eulogistic
mention.
p. 71-     Driver, I. D.    Annual address before the Inc"
War veterans.
Brief- mention of the Whitman massacre.
p. 114-116.   Parrish, Edward Evans
in 1844 (Diary).
Parrish worked for Dr. AA^hitman.
from October 23 to November 2, 1844.
1889, p. 31-32.     Kelley, James  K.
Whitman mission and massacre,
p.  79-80,  87-88a.     Eells,  Myra F.
passing through the United States and over the Rocky Mountains in the Spring and Summer of 1838.
Mentions kindness of the H. B. Co. Arrives at the mission August 29. Description of Dr. Whitman's house. Some
account of the -missionary' plans.
p. 91-93. McKay, AV. C. Additional light on the Whitman matter.
Letter dated Pendleton, Oregon, Jan. 30, 1885, in which
McKay says that he received a letter from Whitman dated
at Washington, D. C, in 1843, which fact settles the discussion as to whether Whitman went to Washington.
p. 94-97. Lang, Herbert. The pioneer printing press of
the Pacific Coast.
Story of the printing press brought from Honolulu to
Spalding's station at Lapwai in 1839. This was the first
printing press in the Pacific Northwest.
1890, p. 71. Mrs. Nancy Morrison, the Oregon pioneer
woman.
An unsigned article. Mentions the incident of the Whitmans adopting the Sager children.
1891, p. 40-68. AVhitman, Mrs. Marcus. A journey across
the plains in 1836.
Covers June 27 to October 18, 1836. An extremely valuable source. Manuscript secured by Myron Eells from
eastern relatives.    Not published in full.
in
e.
Crossing the plains
Was at the mission
Occasional address.
Journal  kept while 50
Periodicals
Oregon Pioneer Association.    Transactions—Continued.
1891, p. 68-78. Whitman, Marcus. Letter to the Secretary of War, James M. Porter, written in 1843, enclosing
synopsis of a proposed bill prepared by him, entitled "A bill
to promote safe intercourse with the territory of Oregon, to
suppress violent acts of aggression on the part of certain
Indian tribes west of the Indian territory, Neocho, better
protect the revenue, for the transportation of the mail, and for
other purposes."
These are copies from the original documents on file in
the office of the Secretary of War and are extremely important
in their bearing upon Whitman's political activity.
p.79-176. Whitman, Mrs. Marcus. Letters written by
Mrs. AVhitman from Oreg'on to her relatives in New York.
Thes letters are full of interesting details in regard to
every phase of the .mission work. They are of first importance in the light they throw upon Whitman's acts and
motives. They bear the following dates: For the year
1836, March 15, 28, 29, 30, 31, April 2, 4, 7, December 5, 8, 26;
for the year 1837, March 30, May 2 and 3; for the year 1838,
March 14, 28, April 11, May 10, Sept. 18, 25, 28, Oct. 3, 6; for
thes year 1839, Sept. 30 and Oct. 9; for the year 1840, April
30 and May 2; for the year 1841, Oct. 1, 6, 18, 19; for the
year 1842, Feb. 2, 4, March 23, May 17, October 4, 5, 7, 8, 9,
12, 14, 17, 22; and for the year 1843, February 7, March 6,
May 27 and 28.
p. 177-179. Whitman, Marcus. Letters dated Shawnee
Mission School, May 27, 1843, an<^ May 28, 1843.
The second of these letters written to "Dear Brother
Galusha" throws important light upon Whitman's connection
with the emigration of 1843.
1893, p. 53-219. AVhitman, Mrs.- Marcus. Additional letters.
A total of sixty-seven letters written by Mrs. Whitman to
Eastern relatives under dates ranging from January 1, 1840,
to Oct. 12, 1847.
p. 64-65, 68-70, T09-110, 198-203. Whitman, Marcus. Letters.
Five letters under the following dates: May 16, 1844,
April 8, 1844, June 4, 1836, May 15, 1846. and November 5,
1846. These letters throw light upon the estimate which
Whitman placed upon his own work.
p. 83-86. Rogers, Andrew, Jr. Letters to Miss Jane A.
Prentiss dated, Tshamakin, April 22, 1846.
Side light upon the Wfiitmans.
p. 93-103. Spalding, H. H. Letters dated Oregon City,
April 6, 1848, "To Stephen Prentiss, Esq., and Mrs. Prentiss,
the Father and Mother of the late Mrs. AVhitman of the
Oregon Mission."
Spalding's contemporaneous account of the massacre.
Praises Mr. Ogden of the H. B. Co. for deliverance and ransom of the captives. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
51
Oregon Pioneer Association.    Transactions—Continued'.
1895, p. 73-74- Barlow, Miss M. S. Reminiscences of
Oregon pioneers.
Follows Gray and Barrows with the Indian delegation to
St. Louis in 1832, H. B. Co's. hostility to a wagon road and
Whitman's interview with AVebster and Tyler.
1896, p. 101. Shortess, Robert. First emigrants to Oregon.
Arrival of the 1839 immigration at the' Whitman mission.
States that AVhitman's labors Avere thwarted by "Jesuitical
and Popish intolerances."
p. 113-119. Young, J. Q. A. The Whitman massacre related by one of the survivors.
p. 120-128. AVilson, Mrs. E. M. The last day at Waii-
latpue.
Memories of Mrs. Elizabeth Sager Helm who was in the
massacre, aged eleven years.
p. 129-130. Himes, Geo. H. List of all present at Waii-
latpue at the time of the massacre.
From a list made by Peter Skeen Ogden of the Hudson's
Bay Company.     Gives ages and some other information.
1897, p. 61-62,     Barnett, John.     Occasional address.
Eulogium upon Dr. Whitman.     Implies that Whitman
went East in 1842-43 to influence the government to secure
Oregon to the United States.
p. 106-120. Eells, Myron. Rev. H. H. Spalding, Mrs.
E. H. Spalding and Mrs. R. J. Spalding.
Covers various points in the history of the AVhitman mission.
p. 130-140.   Eells, Myron.   Mrs. Mary Richardson Walker.
Some information in regard to the Whitman station.
1900, p. 35-48.     AAralker, Cyrus H.     Occasional address.
Walker was born at the station, December 7, 1838. Quotes
from his mother's diary. Has some memories of the time of
the. massacre.
1902, p. 100-103.    McBride, T. A.    Annual address.
Asserts that Oregon was safe long before Whitman's ride,
that in fact it was never in danger.
1903, p. 189-195. Kimball, Nathan. Recollections of the
Whitman massacre.
The story of a survivor. Gives harrowing details but adds
little information upon controverted points.
Oregon Spectator. December 10, 1847. Letter from Hinman
to Abernathy in regard to the massacre, see Bancroft, Or§.
1 '.667, note.
January 20, 1848. Contains Gov. Abernathy's letter of
thanks to Peter Skeen Ogden for rescuing the captives of the
Whitman massacre. List is given of those massacred. Cited
by Bancroft, Oregon, v. 1, p. 647-648.
TCli'
iff.
!■
■
'!&
m 52
Periodicals
Oregon Statesman (Salem).
August ii.
185:
Has been cited
as containing
insane.
statement to the effect that Spalding was
Oregonian (Portland). November 6-7, 1884. Mrs. Victor on
Marcus Whitman. Important article with ample footnote
references.     AA^hitman's political influence questioned.
December 9, 1884.     Reply by E. C. Ross.
December 26, 1884. Elwood Evans states that Whitman's journey had no political influence.
January 11, 1885. M. Eells' reply to Mrs. Victor and Elwood Evans.
February 1, 1885. AV. H. Gray to the rescue. This article was reprinted as a pamphlet.    Portland.    1885.
February 8, 1885.     Eells replies to Evans.
February 15, 1885.     E. C. Ross.
March 15, 1885.    Evans replies to Ross.    Long article.
March 20 ,1885.    Evans again.
May 21, 1885.    M. Eells replies to Evans.
October 27, 1895. Hines, H. K. "An extended review
of the Whitman romance."
Copied from the Pacific Christian Advocate of October 24,
1895.    Claims that Whitman did not save Oregon.
November 21, 1895. Himes, George H. Reply to H. K.
Hines' criticism of Nixon et al.
An able defense of pro-AArhitman statements.
February 17, 1897. Regarding AVhitman monument with
an Ogden document about the massacre.
January 30, 1898. Regarding the reinterment on January
29 of the bones of the victims of the massacre.
September 1, 1901.    M. Eells replies to Bourne.
March 26, ? . Bourne's article from the Sunday School
Ttimes.
September 3, 1902. Marshall's review of Mowry's "Marcus Whitman." Long article entitled "Evisceration of Dr.
W. A. Mowry's book on the Whitman myth."
October 26, 1902.    Mowry's reply to Marshall.
January 18, 1903.    M. Eells replies to Marshall.
February 2, 1903. Prof. Schafer on the status of the
Whitman question. In the same number C. Johnson in an
article "Examining the myth" stands by Marshall.
February 8, 1903.    Marshall defends his review of Mowry.
March 29, 1903.    Professor Schafer replies to Marshall.
May 31, 1903.    M. Eells reviews Bourne.
September 13, 1903] Marshall on the authorship and
September 20, 1903}-   value of the account of the migra-
September 27, 1903 J tion of 1843 to Oregon, which was
published as Part 2, of Wilkes, Geo. "History of Oregon."
N. Y. 1845. Says Burnett kept the journal. States that
Burnett's Old Pioneer was written immediately after he had
heard and been influenced by the Whitman saved Oregon
story. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
53
Oregonian (Portland)—Continued.
November i, 1903.    Professor Schafer discusses the value
of Wilkes' Oregon as a Whitman source.
Seven ' pure   fictions  of  the  Whit-
manites.
Seven mistakes of Marshall.
August^o^oU. ) I Marshall's Hudson's Bay Co's.
August 27 1905 > Archives furnish no support to the
September'3, 1905.) Whitman saved Oregon story.
August 13, 1905. 1
August 20, 1905. y
August 27, 1905 J
September 10,1905.
December 10, 1905.
December 17, 1905.   J
July 8, 1906. \ Marshall's reply entitled, "Rev. Myron
July 15, 1906. j  Eells finds a mare's nest."
August 5, 1906. Eells, M. Long article in regard to the
Whitman monument debt.
March 10, 1907. I Echoes of the controversy by C. T.
May 5, 1907.       ) Johnson.
Outburst (Spokane, AArash.). February 8, 1896. "How Durham saved Whitman."
Mr. Durham, editor of the Spokesman-Review, has evidently taken part in the AA^hitman controversy, but the compiler has not examined the files of this newspaper.
Outlook, 57 5879-880 (December 4, 1897). Dr. Marcus Whitman.
Notice of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the massacre.   Credits the saved Oregon story.
89:199 (May 23, 1908). Bruce H. Addington. Thomas
Hart Benton and the occupation of Oregon.
Alludes to theAArhitman "legend." States that Whitman
went East to save his mission, not Oregon. In reply to the
emphasis here placed upon Benton's services, see letter of
T. C. Elliott of AValla Walla, AVash., in Outlook, 89:869-870
(August 15, 1908).
Overland Monthly, o. s. 1:127-133 (August, 1868). Apple-
gate, Jesse.    A day with the cow column.
Reminiscences of Whitman and the migration of 1843.
Often quoted.
o. s. 3:148-159 (August, 1869). Victor, Mrs. F. F. Manifest destiny of the West.
In this article, Mrs. A^ictor sanctions the Walla Walla
dinner story with the announcement of the Red River Immigration as a basis for Whitman's ride.
o. s. 6:297-306 (April, 1871). St. Mathew, John H. The
Northwest boundary.
Whitman's ride. Condemns the H. B. Co. Says Whitman's devotion to his country was probably the cause of the
massacre. 54
Periodicals
Pacific.
May 25, 1865.
June 1, 1865.
June 8, 1865.
June 15, 1865.
June 22, 1865.
June 29, 1865.
July 6, 1865.
Spalding,  H.  H,     History of  Indian
affairs among the Nez Perces.
September 14, 1865. Early missionary labors among the
Indians of Oregon.
September 28, 1865. Two missionary ladies saved this
Coast to the United States of America. Dr. Whitman's
services to the emigrant route.
October 19, 1865.    Dr. Whitman's winter journey.
November 9, 1865. Dr. Whitman's successful mission at
Washington.    The codfishery story.
Spalding's original version of the Saved Oregon story.
Has been often cited as the first printed account of the
"Whitman legend."
Note. Seven out of these eleven articles are scrapped in
the Whitman College Library. A^erbatim copies are given in
Marshall's Acquisition of Oregon, Mss. v. 2, p. 108-118. Typewritten copies are also in the Marshall Collection owned.by
Mr. C. B. Bagley of Seattle.
60:17-18 (September 7, 1905). Himes, George H. Oregon letter.
Refers to the Historical Congress in Portland at which
both Bourne and Marshall were present. Expresses the hope
that all of the Oregon correspondence of the American Board
may soon be published.
58:10-11 (July 30, 1908). Himes, George H. Letter in
regard to the death of Alanson Hinman, July 20, 1908. Gives
some account of his connection with the Oregon Mission and
estimates the value of his recollections.
Pacific Advance (Seattle, AVash.), 1, No. 10 (December, 1895).
Eells, Myron.    Who saved Oregon?
Long article scoring H. K. Hines and defending his own
position in regard to Whitman.
Pacific Christian Advocate.    December 13, 1883.
Cited by Mrs. Eringle in- the Willamette Farmer of February 1, 1884, as containing a review of Barrow's Oregon by
Mr. Hines in which the services of the Methodist missionaries are overestimated while the Congregationalists do not
get their share of credit.
October 24, 1895. Hines, H. K. An extended review
of the Whitman romance.
Copied in the Oregonian of October 27, 1895. Criticised
by Geo. H. Himes in the Oregonian of November 21. 1895. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
Pacific Monthly and Official Gazette (Portland, Ore.), No. 2,
p. 8-10 (December, 1879).    Scraps of Oregon history.
Mr. William T. Newby, a pioneer of 1843, says the impelling cause of that immigration was the introduction in
Congress the previous year of Senator Linn's Donation bill.
States that Senator Linn had widely distributed the Lewis
and Clark Journals. Whitman, tho a good man, Mr. Newby
considers has been overestimated.
No. 3, p. 97-100 (January, 1880). Story of the adventures
of 16 pioneers sent by Governor Abernathy in January, 1848,
to California to secure aid to fight the Indians—as a result
of the Whitman massacre which is here mentioned.
Pacific Wave (Published by the Students of the University of
Wash.) May 19, 1905. AVhitworth, George F. Lecture to
the students of the University of Washington on the Early
history of Oregon territory.
Purpose of the ride was to save Oregon.
Pearson's Magazine.    9:523.    Raine, William Macleod.     Story
of the states:   Oregon.
Avoids the controversy.
Pioneer and Historical Society of Oregon.    Proceedings.
1875, P- I3-I5- Gray, W. H. Report on the AVhitman
monument fund. States the attempt of Elwood Evans to
have the territory of Washington erect a monument to Whitman.
p. 21-24. ■   Atkinson's address on Whitman.
Gives Walla Walla dinner story.
1876, p. 5-12. Atkinson's "American Colonist in Oregon,"
address at Astoria, February 22, 1876.
Saved Oregon.    Walla Walla dinner.
p. 13-15. Lovejoy, A. Lawrence. Narrative of the winter
trip of Dr. Marcus Whitman, across the Rocky Mountains,
1842. (Letter to Dr. Atkinson, dated Oregon City, February 14, 1876.
An important Whitman source which has been often
copied.
1877, p. 5-12.     Gray, W. H.    President's address.
Much about Whitman.     Attacks the Catholics.     States
that Whitman's ride to Washington was the  cause of his
death later on.
Portland Oregonian, see Oregonian.
Portland Weekly News. May 17, 1883. Hill, Almoran. Estimate of Whitman cited by Marshall, Acquisition of Oregon,
Mss. v. 2, p. 468-470.
Prattsburg (New York) Advertiser. March 26, 1869. Story
of Whitman's interview with Webster in which he says that
Simpson is then at Washington and that they are planning
to trade Oregon for a codfishery.
Clipping of this article is in the Spalding Scrapbook at
Whitman College Library.
ittf
v.
-£ 56
Periodicals
Puyallup (AVash.) \7alley Tribune. February 20, 1904, to January. 7, 1905. Montgomery, Robert. History of the Puyallup.
Contains much material relating to Whitman, upon the
negative side.     Complete file has not been examined.
Recorder (Boston). May 4, 1843. Cited by Marshall, Acquisition of Oregon, Mas. v. 2, p. 450, as containing a short
statement to the effect that Dr. AVhitman of the Oregon
Alission had lately been in Boston and had returned to the
field of his labors.
538.     Cited by
79, as showing
14, 1901.     Review of Mowry.
Nixon replies to Mrs. Victor's criti-
"Clai:
mng too
Revue  des  Deux  Mondes.     Mai   15,  1843,  p.
Bourne.     Essays in historical  criticism, p.
that even the French writers realized the importance which
the United States placed upon the Oregon territory.
Sacramento Union. November 16, 1864. Cited by Marshall,
Acquisition of Oregon, Mss. v. 2, p. 106, as containing the
third printed version of the saved Oregon story, written by
S. A. Clarke.
July 10, 1869. In regard to "Protestantism in Oregon."
In the Spalding scrapbook.
Salem (Ore.) Statesman. August 18, 1895. Victor, Mrs. F. F.
"Revival of the Whitman Romance."
San Francisco Call.     July
September 1, 1895.
cism of his book.
September 8, 1895.     Mrs. Victor replies.
San  Francisco   Chronicle.      August  30,   1896.
much."       A review of Mowry.
July 14, 1901.     A review of Nixon.
San Francisco Daily Herald. June 1, 1850. Cited by Bancroft,
Oregon, v. 1, p. 667, in regard to the AVhitman massacre.
Sandwich Island News. 2 04-55. Said to have contained an
account of the massacre.
Seattle Daily Times.    January 4, 1901.
April 12, 1903. )        Bagley, C. B.    Beginning and growth
April 19, 1903. ( of organized government in the Northwest. Contains a list of references prepared by Myron Eells.
Mr. Bagley has high praise for AVhitman, the missionary, but
does not credit him with having political aspirations.
September 12, 1905. An account of the naming of the
Seward School in Seattle. This school had been unofficially
called the 'Whitman School," but objection was made to the
name on account of the AVhitman controversy^.
June 21, 1908, Magazine section, p. 3. A full page article
with lurid illustrations of the mission and the massacre. Announces a movement towards placing statues of Whitman
and Stevens in the Rotunda of the Capitol Building in Washington. Bibliography of Marcus Whitman
57
Seattle Post-Intelligencer. April 14, 1882. Letter from M. Eells
in regard to Whitman's familv.
February 26, 1885 (AVeekly).    Article by M. Eells.
October 22, 1897. Account of the disinterment of bones
on Oct. 21 from the grave of the victims of the Whitman
massacre.     Gold in the tooth of Whitman's skull.
November 21, 1897. Article by Professor Edmond S.
Meany on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Whitman massacre. AA^ritten to arouse interest in the Whitman
monument fund.
December 8, 1897. "Did Whitman save Oregon?" Report of Father Flohr's lecture at Walla AValla in which he
took a negative view.
December 12, 1897. Twyman O. Abbott suggests that
Mt. Rainier be rechristened in honor of Dr. Marcus Whitman. Submits an act for presentation to Congress providing
for such change.
February 10, 1898. Eells, M. "Justice to the memory
of the worty dead." Says Spalding was so busy fighting the
Catholics that he couldn't get the AVhitman story published
until 1863. States that the Oregon newspapers would not
admit it to their columns.
March 29, 1899. Sherwood, Laveine. "The ride that
saved Oregon."    A poem.
December 29, 1899. Cox, H. R. Address on the history
of Washington.
Saved Oregon story.
March 19, 1905.    Diary of Mrs. H. H. Spalding.
November 28, 1907. Account of the 60th anniversary of
the Whitman massacre.
August 27, 1908, Section 1, p. 8. Turner, George. Address before the American Bar Association in Seattle, August
26, 1908, on "The acquisition of the Pacific Northwest."
Saved Oregon Story. Walla AA^alla dinner with the start
for Washington next day. States that Whitman met Webster, Tyler, Calhoun and Benton at the National Capitol.
Seattle Public Library Bulletin. 5:67-68 (September, 1905).
Banks, Mary.     Reading list on "Dr. Marcus Whitman."
Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Wash.). November 26, 1905.
"John A.Stoughton of Cheney, Wash., declares Whitman told
•him facts."
Mr. Stoughton was an emigrant of 1843. At the age of
75, he tells the saved Oregon story with some variations to
Barrows. States that Whitman saw Webster and President
Polk! and got a delay of the treaty then pending with England.
August 2, 1902.     Controversy opened.
Griffis, W. E.     "Marcus Whitman and
Sunday School Times.
August 9, 1902.
his wagon wheel."
August 23, 1902.
Whitman."
Weed, G. L.    "My memories of Marcus 58
Periodicals
Sunday School Times—Continued.
"Three W's—Whitman, woman, wagon—helped to save
Oregon. - That wagon may be compared without irreverance
to the ark—Need fancy be restrained if Women's Missionary
Boards find in the two cherubim of the ark symbols of the
two women in the wagon—Mrs. Whitman and Mrs. Spald-
ing."
September 27, 1902. Professor Lamberton questions
whether Whitman really went East to save Oregon. The
editor of the Times calls for evidence.
November 1, 1902. Bourne's article based largely on the
records of the A. B. C. F. M.
November 15, 1902.   Mowry and Jonathan Edwards take
part.
November 22, 1902.
November 29, 1902.
December 13, 1902.
December 29, 1902.
January 10, 1903.
Letter from Eells.
Controversy continued.
Controversy continued.
Controversy continued.
Controversy continued.
January 24, 1903.    Cntroversy continued.
Tacoma Ledger.    November 12, 1899.    Mrs. Prentiss Whitman.
Union Central Advocate (Cincinnati, Ohio). June-July, 1905.
Saved Oregon story.
Upto the Times (Walla Walla, Wash.). 1:199-202 (February,
1907).    "The great day of '43."    Saved Oregon story.
AValla Walla Statesman. February 9, 1866. Spalding, H. H.
In this number begins a series of articles about the.Oregon
mission. They are interesting but must be read with caution.
February 16, 1866.    Spalding, continued.
February 23, 1866.     Spalding, continued.
March 2, 1866.    Spalding, continued.
March 9, 1866.    Spalding, continued.    Massacre.
March 16, 1866. Wm. McBean under date of March 12,
1866, writes