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Manual 1907-8 of the British Columbia (formerly Kootenay) Curling Association in affiliation with the… Nelson, W. J. 1908

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            u
SEMPER FUOBEAT   MAJNTT^JL
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(jTORMHJRXiY  KOOTENAY)
cijRLijNra association
IN  Aj70?TtiIATION   WITH
THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN CURLING CLUB
A' ye that lo'e auld Scotia's name
A' ye that lo'e auld Scotia's fame
A' ye that lo'e auld Scotia's game
Here's health and wealth to thee, boys.
Here's three times three for curlin' scene:
Here's three times three for curlin' freem
Here's three times three for beef and gre,
And the roarin' rink and thee, boys. r~
C*\l SAS HIS HONOUR, JUDGE P. E. WILSON
PRESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATION
I907 v OFFICE-BEARERS
ROYAL CALEDONIAN CURLING CLUB
/906--/907
PATRON
His Majesty The King.
PRESIDENT
The Right Honourable The Earl of Haddington.
PRESIDENT-ELECT
The Right Honourable The Earl of Northesk.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
Sir Kenneth Mackenzie, Bart., of Gairloch (Caberfeidh).
Sir Henry Ballantyne (Peebles).
COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.
The Vice-Presidents. Rev. John Kerr, Dirleton.
John M'Kellar, Hillhead. Robert Husband, Broomhall.
W. Henderson, Kinnochtry.    J. Young, Upper Annandale.
Colin C. Moffat, Merchiston. D. R. Gordon, Bathgate.
Ebenezer Dawson, Dalkeith. D. Murray, Kelvindock.
CHAPLAIN
The Rev. John Kerr, M. A., F. R. S. M F. S. A. Scot.,
Dirleton, Drem.
SECRETARY AND TREASURER
A. Davidson Smith, C. A., 4a York Place, Edinburgh
(Whittingehame Club). BRITISH COLUMBIA
PREFACE.
The Association during the current season, 1907-8,
celebrates the tenth anniversary of its founding. This epoch
in its history, alone suggests the publication of an Annual
in which its records and history—otherwise liable to be forgotten—may be preserved.
But beyond this, the late assumption by the Association of a Provincial title, its affiliation with the Royal Cale-'
donian Curling Club of Scotland, and the changes recently
made in its Constitution and Rules of the game, render the
iss.uance of a revised manual almost a necessity.
With the first mentioned thought in mind, and for the
reasons referred to, this volume is now issued with the.
authority of the Association.
The Constitution and Rules revised to date have been
reprinted, with new diagrams showing "The rinks" with
six-foot rings, instead of seven, as formerly, incorporated
therein.
The volume will also be found to contain, it is hoped,
useful information and much general literature of interest
to curlers.
Canada, which is a Scotland in physical features, and
in area a Scotland multiplied many times, is already eminent
for her love of the "Grand Auld Game," and is destined to
be pre-eminently a Curling Nation.
As do the Scots, so should we^endeavor to keep alive
the literature which belongs to and-is inseparable from this
favorite sport. A humble effort, directed to this end, is
made, in the issuance of this volume.
The Association hopes to be able to publish in the
future at regular intervals, volumes, of which the present
one is the beginning, similar in scope to those issued by the
Manitoba Branch, through the medium of which the names
of our curlers and their achievements will be preserved for
all time to come.
The Association is indebted to W. J. Nelson, Esq of
Rossland, for the general design of the present volume and. CURLING ASSOCIATION
the literary and much of the other work incidental to its
compilation. ' The article by this gentleman on "The Game
of Curling, its Origin and its Rise and Growth on the
American Continent," will be found to be a valuable contribution to the curling literature of Canada.
The Association is also indebted to Mr. Nelson for the
design of a coat-of arms, a cut of which appears in\ the
volume; also for the "Hints to Secretaries," the draft
"Constitution and Rules" for affiliated clubs, and other like
useful matter scattered throughout the pages of the Annual.
Indebtedness is also acknowledged to Mr. G. O. Buchanan, of Kaslo, for the "History of Curling in British
Columbia," which is incorporated with Mr. Nelson's article
above mentioned; also for the collection of part of the material concerning B. C. clubs, which has been utilized in the
preparation of the volume.
The Association is also indebted to Dr. Gomm, of San-
don, for the short but interesting history of the well-known
Cordwood trophy.
The task of collecting the material for the volume,
especially such as appertains to matters connected with
this Association and its affiliated clubs, has been great. The
information in respect to some matters, considering the
short time given for the compilation of the volume, is conceded to be meagre and fragmentary, but rather than delay
longer, in an effort to obtain more complete information, it
was deemed expedient to go to press, with the hope that in
future editions, the groundwork herein laid may be made
to sustain a more perfect edifice.
Much of the difficulty in procuring information would
be obviated in the future by the election of a permanent
secretary to the Association, agreeable to the practice of
the Ontario and Manitoba Branches of the Royal Club.
In conclusion, to borrow the words of Lord Byron,
"What is writ is writ;—
Would that it were worthier."
If any errors have crept into the volume, let it ever be
remembered that "Nothing is so difficult as a beginning." BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE-BEARERS
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
CURLING   ASSOCIATION
FOR  YEAR /907
PATRON
A. B. MacKenzie, Rossland.
PRESIDENT
His Honor P. E. Wilson, Cranbrook.
VICE-PRESIDENT
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
SECOND VICE-PRESIDEN1
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT
A. T. Walley, Nelson.
CHAPLAIN
John Cholditch, Cranbrook.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
A. C. Nelson, Cranbrook.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
J. F. M. Pinkham, Cranbrook. W. G. McMynn, Greenwood.
R. E. Beattie, Cranbrook.        A. E. Kincaid, Revelstoke.
Louis Pratt, Sandon. j    Geo. B. Nicol, Phoenix.
V A. B. MACKENZIE
4 POPULAR AND ENTHUSIAST   KOOTENAY   CURLER •v CURLING ASSOCIATION
PAST   OFFICE-BEARERS
BRITI SH   COLU M BIA
CURLING   ASSOCIATION
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to min'
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
An' the days o' auld lang syne?
1898
PRESIDENT
J. B. McArthur, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon.
F. W. Peters, Nelson.
HON. SECRETARY-TREASURER
A. W. Strickland, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
jjas. Waugh, Kaslo. W. H. Grant, Nelson.
G. Main, Sandon. C. A. Warren, Golden.
D. H. Rae, Golden. BRITISH COLUMBIA
.1899
PATRON
Hon. C. H. Mackintosh.
PRESIDENT
F. W. Peters, Nelson.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
H. W. C. Jackson, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon. W. A. Carlyle, Rossland.
James Waugh, Kaslo. R. Dalby Morkill, Rossland.
His Honor J. A. Forin, Rossland. N. T. McLeod, Nelson.
1900
PATRON
Hon. H. C. Mackintosh.
PRESIDENT
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon..
Judge Forin, Nelson.
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. D. McG Gandier, Rossland.     '
SECRETARY-TREASURER.
Thos. S. Gilmour, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
F. W. Peters, Nelson. P. A. Tamblyn, Nelson
James Waugh, Kaslo. W. M. Lawrence, Revelstoke.
R. D. Morkill, Jr., Rossland.    J. G. Main, Sandon ' CURLING ASSOCIATION
1901
PATRONS
Lt. Gov. Sir Henri Joli de Lotbiniere.
Hon. C. H. Mackintosh.
PRESIDENT
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
N. T. MacLeod, Nelson.
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. C. W. Hedley, Rossland.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Thos. S. Gilmour, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
A. R. B. Hearn, Revelstoke.    His Honor J. A. Forin, Nelson
J. B. McArthur, Rossland.       James Waugh, Kaslo.
Alex. Crawford, Sandon. D. E. Kerr, L. D. S., Rossland
1902
PATRON
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
PRESIDENT
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
G. S. McCarter, Revelstoke.
A. B. MacKenzie, Rossland.
John Rae, Nelson.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. A. M. Sanford, Rossland.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
A. E. Hall, Sandon.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Wm. Hood, Sandon. N. J. Cavanaugh, Sandon.
A. S. Phipps, Revelstoke. T. Gray, Rossland. f
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1903
'PATRON
His Honor John A. Forin, Nelson.
PRESIDENT
J. S. H Fraser, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
G. S. McCarter, Revelstoke.
A. B. Morris, Kaslo.
Dr. R. B. Boucher, Phoenix.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. A. M. Sanford, Rossland.
HON. SECRETARY-TREASURER
Charles V. Jenkins, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
R. W. Grigor, Rossland. S. Brown, Revelstoke.
A. B. MacKenzie, Rossland.    G. C. Hodge, Nelson.
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon.        j. H. Wallace, Nelson.
1904
PATRON
His Honor John A. Forin, Nelson.
PRESIDENT
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
M. L. Grimmett, Sandon.
P. E. Wilson, Nelson.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. C. A. Procunier, Revelstoke.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
F. B. Lewis, Revelstoke.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE |
R. W. Grigor, Rossland. Geo. L. Sinclair, Golden.
Dr. R. B. Boucher, Phoenix.    G. S. McCarter, Revelstoke.
J. A. Russell, Greenwood.        D. M. Rae, Revelstoke. CURLING ASSOCIATION
1905
PATRON
J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland.
PRESIDENT
His Honor Judge P. E. Wilson, Nelson.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
Thomas McCosh. Ashcroft.
Dr. R. B. Boucher, Phoenix.
CHAPLAIN
The Rt. Rev. Archdeacon W. W. Baer, Nelson.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
A. T. Walley, Nelson.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
A. B. MacKenzie, Rossland.    C. D. Blackwood, Nelson.
John A. Turner, Nelson. G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo.
L. Grimmett, Sandon. Alex. Crawford, Trout Lake.
1906
PATRON
His Honor P. E. Wilson, Nelson.
PRESIDENT
A. B. MacKenzie, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
Wm. G. McMynn, Greenwood.
N. J. Cavanaugh, Sandon.
L. B. de Veber, Nelson.
CHAPLAIN
The Rev. H. R. Grant, Rossland.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
H. P. McCraney, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
|L. A. Campbell. Rossland.       William McQueen, Rossland.
■Dudley Blackwood, Nelson.     H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.
fc. H. Parsons, Golden. I. Crawford, Phoenix. f
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST Of CLUBS
THAT   HAVE   BEEN   OR   ARE   IN   AFFILIATION
WITH THE B. C. CURLING ASSOCIATION
KASLO CURLING CLUB.
(One of the Charter Clubs.)
Organized Januar
5t, 1896.
1896 to 1901.—President, G. O. Buchanan; Secretary,
Horace W. Burke.
1902 to 1905.—President, G 0. Buchanan; Secretary,
Harry E. Douglas.
1906.—President, G. O. Buchanan; Secretary, James
Anderson.
SANDON CURLING CLUB.
(A Charter Club.)
Organized Winter 1896-7.
Present Secretary, E. M. Sandilands. CURLING ASSOCIATION
GOLDEN CURLING CLUB.
I 4th December, 1903.
Office Bearers 1906-7.—President, J. N. Taylor, M. D. ;
Vice-President, James Henderson; Second Vice-President,
George Sanborn; Chaplain, Rev. C. F. Yates; Secretary-
Treasurer, Thomas King.
This club has a present membership of 40. It affiliated with the Manitoba Branch of the Royal Caledonian
Curling Club, but on the formation of the Alberta Curling
Association, it withdrew from the Manitoba Branch and
became affiliated with the nearer Association.
ROSSLAND CURLING CLUB.
(A Charter Club.)
Organized November, 18
1898-9.—President, W. A. Carlyle; Secretary, J. S. Patterson. (Resigned 14th June, T. S. Gilmour succeeding him.)
1899 to 1902.—President, J. S. C. Fraser; Secretary, T.
S. Gilmour.
1903.—President, Dr. D. Campbell; Secretary, H. R.
j Townsend.
1904 to 1905.—President, A. H. MacNeill, K. C. ; Secretary, H. R. Townsend.
1906.—President, A. B. MacKenzie; Secretary, H. R.
Townsend.
1907.—President, His Honor Judge Wilson; Secretary, H. R. Townsend. mr
BRITISH COLUMBIA
NELSON CURLING CLUB.
(A charter Club.)
Organized 5th December, 1898.
1898-9.—President, His Honor John A. Forin; Secretary, Thos. Little.
1899-1900.—President,   A.   H.   Buchanan;   Secretary,
Thos. Little.
1900-1.—President. Norman McLeod; Secretary, C. D.
J. Christie. :
1901-2.—President, F. A. Tamblyn; Secretary, S.  G.
Campbell.
1902-3.—President, J.  H.  Wallace;  Secretary,  A.  T.
1903-4.—President, His Honor P. E. Wilson; Secretary, E. G. Smyth.
1904-5.—President.  J.   A.   Turner;   Secretary,   E.   G.
Smyth.
1905-6.—President,  J.   A.   Turner;   Secretary,   G.   A.
Hunter.
1906-7.—President,  A.  T.   Walley;   Secretary,   G.  A.
Hunter.
"A social brotherhood are we,
And after we^are deid and gane,
We'll live in literature and lair
In Annals o' the Channelstane." HIS HONOUR JUDGE FORIN  CURLING ASSOCIATION
REVELSTOKE CURLING CLUB.
Organized 30th November, 1900.
1900-1.—President, H. A. Brown; Secretary, H. R.
|Heam.
1901-2.
1902-3.
ICarruthers.
1903-4.
|Lewis.
1904-
JLewis.
1905-6.
[Jackson,
President, Geo. S. McCarter; Secretary, A.
President, H. A. Brown; Secretary, Dr. J. F.
,—President,   C.   B.   Hume;   Secretary,   F.   B.
President, W. M. Lawrence; Secretary, F. B.
,—President, A. E. Kincaid; Secretary, John H.
PHOENIX CURLING CLUB.
: Organized November, 1901. Affiliated 24th February, 1902.
1901-2.—President, G. W. Rumberger; Secretary, I.
jCrawford.
1902-3.—President, J. A. Morrin; Secretary, Ed.
[Birnie.
1903-4.—President, Thos. Hardy; Secretary, O. B.
Smith, Jr.
■1904-5.—President, Dr. R. B. Boucher; Secretary, I.
Crawford.
1905-6.—President, Geo. L. McNicol; Secretary, A. B.
Hood.
1906-7.—President, C. H. Reeves; Secretary, W. D.
Lawson.
_J ff"
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GREENWOOD CURLING CLUB.
Organized :
January,  1902,
1902-3.—President, J. A. Russell; Secretary, J. Ml
Humphrey.
1903-4.—President, H. C. Shaw; Secretary, H. W. Falconer.
1904-5.—President, J. S. Birnie; Secretary, H. W. Fal-
190.'
- 6.—President, Ë. G Wan
; Secretan
Wr
Al-
1906-7.—President, Wm. G. McMynn; Secretary, Wm.|
THE NELSON LACROSSE, HOCKEY AND CURL-'
ING CLUB.
Organized 1904.   Affiliated 12th December, 1904.
This club has since been merged in the Nelson Curling
b.    It took part in the Bonspiel held at Nelson in 1905.Ï
THE LARDEAU THISTLE CLUB OF TROUT LAKE-l
This club was organized by the Crawford family, who
had temporarily taken up their residence at Trout Lake, in ^
1904.   It entered a rink at the Revelstoke Bonspiel in that ;
year; also at the Nelson Bonspiel in 1905.   It has not since I
been heard from, but as no club fathered by a Crawford caffi I
possibly die, we will no doubt hear from it again.   Fred C.
Elliott was the last known President, and E. Saunders the
last known Secretary.
"Better lo
Will ve n
ye couldna be ;
cam' back again?" CURLING ASSOCIATION
ASHCROFT CURLING CLUB.
Organized 1903.    Affiliated Dec. 4th, 1903.
This club was organized in 1903. It competed in the
[Revelstoke Bonspiel in 1905. Since that date it has not
I been heard from. Rumor has it that it has been, or is about
[to be, re-organized, and Avili ask for re-affiliation with the
j Association. We would be glad to again receive it into
the fold.
CRANBROOK CURLING CLUB.
Organized Oct. 15th, 1906.    Affiliated Dec. 5th, 1906.
1906-7.—President, His Honor Judge P. E. Wilson;
[Vice-President, J. G. McCallum; Secretary, A, C. Nelson;
Treasurer, Jas. A. Arnold; Executive Committee, R. E.
JBeattie, George Hoggarth, and G. T. Rogers.
OTHER B. C. CURLING  CLUBS
ATLIN.
Jas. L. Stavers, President.
Atlin has a curling club, and it is hoped that it wil
[the coming year apply for affiliation.
"There draw a shot; there lay a guard;
And here beside him lie, man.
Now let him feel a gamester's hand ;
Now in this bosom die, man.
There fill the port, and block the ice—
We sit upon the tee, man!"
—The Ettrick Shepherd.
L I
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL REMARKS.
In 1905-6 there were ni
Association, with a total mem
twelve, made up as follows:    Revelstot
clubs  affiliated with  the
ship of four hundred and
: Golden, 32;
Phoenix, 28; Greenwood, 60: Sandon, 30; Kaslo, 18; Trout
Lake, 10; Nelson, 130; and Rossland, 80;—in all, 412.
In 1904, at the Revelstoke Bonspiel, 24 rinks entered,
namelv: Trout Lake, 1; Phoenix, 1; Sandon, 3; Rossland,
2; Nelson, 2; Calgary, 1; Greenwood, 1 ; Ashcroft, 1: Golden, 2; and Revelstoke, 10.
In   1905,  at  the   Xelson  Bonspiel,  25  rinks  entered,
namely:    Nelson Lacrosse, Hockey and Curling Club, 3;
Phoenix, 2 ; Greenwood, 2 ; Sandon, 2 ; Kaslo, 1 ; Rossland, j
5; and the Nelson Curling Club, 10.
These, in point of rink entries, were the largest Bon-
spiels held under the auspices of the Association.
In 1903, at the Rossland Bonspiel. 22 rinks were entered, by six clubs. ;#w
J. S. C. FRASER,   OF ROSSLAND
An Ex-Patron and Ex-President of the Association
ran Curler and an Earnest Devotee of the Grand Auld Gar fî CURLIN
)CIATIC
)\T
PAST
BONSPIELS
HELD   UNO
ER THE AUSPICES
OF THE
ASSOCIATION
WITH
PL
AOES AND
DATES
OP   HOLDING   SAME
1899—Jariu
Fourte
«j
rinks entei
i 12.   I
ed, as f
îonspiel
ollows :
held at Ro
ssland.
Nelson
derson.
4
Skips: <
>ant, '
ramblyn,
Peters ar
d An-
Kaslo,
ê
Skip: Wa
Sandon
Skips: C
rrimmet
t and H
jod.
Revelst
ok
H   Skip:
Brown
Rosslai
ish, Carlyle
d,
I Smith.
Fraser,
Morkill,
Cranston,
Beam-
1900—Febr
land.
Eleven
tar
ks entered
inclusiv
as foil
ows:
piel held at
Ross-
Nelson
2
Skips: F
. A. Ta
mblyn ar
d John Rae.
Sandon
Crawford.
3
Skips : Vv
r. Wilso
n, M. L.
Grimmett
and A.
Rosslar
H. Smith, /
d,
1. Cranston
D. B. 1
. C. J.
Bogle, T.
loss and
M. Beam
D. E. Ker
sh, H.
T.
1901—Febr
land.
iar
y 12 to 16
inclusiv
e.   Bons,
Diel held at
Ross-
Rinks-
land.   Num
official reco
-N
rd
kept.
on, Re\
r names
relstoke,
of skips
Kaslo and
not know
Ross-
n.   No
22 rr
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1902—February   17   to   22.   inclusive.     Bonspiel   held   at
Sandon.
Rinks entered—Sandon, Phoenix,  Kaslo.  Revelstoke,
Nelson and Rossland.   No official record kept.
1903—January 20 to 24 inclusive.    Bonspiel held at Rossland.
Twenty-two rinks entered, as follows:
Greenwood, 2 ; Nelson, 3 ; Phoenix, 1 ; Revelstoke, 2 ;
Sandon, 3; and Rossland, 11.
1904—January 25 to 29 inclusive.    Bonspiel held at Revelstoke.
Twenty-four rinks entered, as follows :
Lardeau Thistle Club of Trout Lake, 1 ; Phoenix, 1 ;
Sandon, 3 ; Rossland, 2 ; Nelson, 2 ; Calgary, 1 ; Greenwood,
1; Ashcroft, 1; Golden, 2; Revelstoke, 10.
1905—January 23 to 28 inclusive.   Bonspiel held at Nelson.
Twenty-five rinks entered, as follows:
Nelson Lacrosse, Hockey and Curling Club, 3; Phoenix, 2 ; Greenwood, 2 ; Sandon, 2 ; Kaslo, 1 ; Rossland, 5 ;
and Nelson, 10.
1906—January 22 to 27 inclusive.    Bonspiel held in Rossland.
Eighteen rinks entered, as follows:
Nelson, 4; Sandon, 3; Kaslo, 1; Greenwood, 1; and
Rossland, 9.
J ING ASSOCIATION
1907—January 21 to 26 inclusive.    Bonspiel held in Cranbrook.
hat fuller particulars canard to the winning rinks
nsertion of such informa-
ch to the value of this
ning the different trophies
would also have been given, but the compiler has been
unable to obtain this information. A permanent secretary,
keeping full and complete records, would in future permit
of such information being readily obtained.
N. B.—It is to be regretted
not at present be obtained in re
at the different Bonspiels, as the
tion would undoubtedly add m
Manual. The names and skips wi:
Will ye no'
ne back again
At tail en
d 0
the year, John;
Mak' snell v
v-ind
s blaw, wi' frost and snaw,
Gi'e ice b
aitl
keen and clear, John?
"Leal-hearted, loyal to the core,
Your praises aye we'll sing, John.
Wi' stones and kowes we'll mak' a throne
An' crown ye 'Curlers' King', John." BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST OF THE ASSOCIATION TROPHIES FOR
COMPETITION AT  THE ANNUAL
BONSPIELS
i.—THE GRAND CHALLENGE CUP.
Open to all rinks entered at the Bonspiel and affiliated
with the British Columbia or any other Curling Association.
Presented by
Messrs. Harvey McNair Co.,
12 Great Tower St., London. Eng.
This trophy remains the property of the Association,
and is held by the winning club for one year.
2.—THE B. C. CURLING ASSOCIATION TROPHY.
Open to all rinks entered at the Bonspiel and affiliated
with the Association.
3.—THE OLIVER CUP.
Open to all rinks entered at the Bonspiel and affiliated
with this or any other Curling Association.
Presented by
m T. Oliver, Esq.,
Banker, of New York City, formerly of the Bank of B. N.
A, Rossland.
4.—WALKERVILLE COMPETITION.
Open to all rinks entered at the Bonspiel and affiliated
with this or any other Curling Association.
Four trophies presented annually by
Hiram Walker & Sons, Ltd.,  .
Walkerville, Ont.
The trophies become the absolute property of the members of the winning rink in each year. THE GRAND CHALLENGE CUP
. C. CURLING ASSOCIATION TROPHY  CURLING ASSOCIATION
5.—THE HUDSON BAY CUP.
Open to one rink from each club affiliated with the
Association.
Presented by
The Hudson Bay Company.
Four individual trophies are also presented annually
by the Company.
The individual trophies become the absolute property
of the members of the winning rink, each year. The cup
remains the property of the Association, and is held by the
winning club for one year.
6.—THE TUCKETT DISTRICT TROPHY.
Open to one rink from each club affiliated with the
Association.
Presented by
Geo. E. Tuckett & Sons Co., Ltd.,
Hamilton, Ont.
Four individual trophies are also presented annually
by the Company, which become the absolute property of
the members of the winning rink.
The cup remains the property of the Association, and
is held by the winning club for one year.
7.—THE FIT-REFORM CUP.
Open to all comers.
Presented by
The Fit-Reform Clothing Co.,
of Montreal.
Four individual trophies are also annually presented by
the Company, which become the absolute property of the
members of the winning rink.
The cup remains the property of the Association, and
is held by the winning club for one year. !
BRITISH COLUMBIA
8.—THE SPRING CUP
For Grand Points Competition.
Open to all curlers entered at the Bonspiel.
Presented by
J. W. Spring, Esq.,
late of Rossland, Jeweller.
The trophy remains the property of the Association,
but is held by the winning club for one year.
9.—THE P. BURNS CUP.
(Consolation.)
Open to "all rinks competing in the Bonspiel that have
not won a prize in the B. C. C. A., Grand Challenge, Oliver
or Walkerville competitions..
The firm annually presents four individual trophies,
which become the absolute property of the members of the
winning rink.
THE MACKINTOSH CUP, THE NEW YORK LIFE
CHALLENGE CUP AND THE CORD-
WOOD TROPHY.
The first named cup, presented to the Association by
Hon. Charles H. Mackintosh in 1899, and the second cup,
presented by the New York Life Insurance Company, once I
important cups of the Association, were withdrawn by the
executive on the 27th December, 1904, from competition
under their old names, through the omission of the donors
to supplement them from time to time with individual
prizes. The last named is now competed for, and is known
as the "B. C. Curling Association Trophy." The first named
will no doubt be in active competition in the not far distant
future.
The  Cordwood trophy has  also been an interesting
trophy at many a past Bonspiel, even though it received no
27 CURLING ASSOCIATION
tive official recognition by the Association.    Its history
has been well related by Dr. Gomm in another column.
In connection with all, or nearly all, of the nine cups
or trophies of the Association in active competition, other
prizes are added, the gifts of the different donors or of the
Association or its friends, at each annual Bonspiel. These,
in every instance, became the absolute property of the
members of the winning rinks.
N, B.—In case of a second edition of this Manual, an
effort should be made to give a history of each trophy, including the composition of the teams winning same, from
year to year. The compiler has not space this year for such
interesting particulars, even were the same available.
'Ae day, ere long, we may hae rinks
Laid doon in polished granite,
And then we'll hae the roarin' game,
In kilts and tasselled bannet."
m  INAUGURAL  MEETING:
 OB1	
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
CUHBHSTO ASSOCIATION
NOW IN .AjTjTTLIA.TION WITH THE ROYAL
CALEDONIAN CURLING CLUB
Minutes of a meeting held at the Hotel Allan in the
City of Rossland, B. C, on the 12th day of February, 1898,
of the representative curlers of the Kootenays :
Moved by F. W. Peters, of Nelson, seconded by W. H.
Grant, of Nelson: "That this meeting of representative
curlers of Sandon, Kaslo, Nelson and Rossland, agree to
form an Association, called the 'Kootenay Curling Association' ; that the officers of the Association be President, three
Vice-Presidents, Secretary-Treasurer, and that an Executive Committee of six members be appointed."    Carried.
Moved by F. W. Peters, of Nelson, seconded by H. H.
Smith, of Rossland:    That the following be the officers:
President—J. B. McArthur, Rossland.
Vice-Presidents—G. O. Buchanan, Kaslo; M. L. Grimmett, Sandon; F. W. Peters, Nelson.
Secretary-Treasurer—A. W. Strickland, Rossland. ff
Executive Committee—Jas. Waugh, Kaslo ; J. G. Main,
Sandon; W. H. Grant, Nelson; J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland;
C. A. Warren, Golden; D. M. Rae, Golden.
Moved by F. W. Peters, of Nelson, seconded by G. O.
Buchanan, of Kaslo: "That the President of any club
affiliated with this Association shall be ex-officio a member .
of this committee, provided that such club is not already
represented thereon."
Moved and seconded: "That the President and Mr.
F. W. Peters be a committee on the Constitution."
M CONSTITUTION
OP  THE
BRITISH COLUMBIA CURLING ASSOCIATION
IN AFFILIATION WITH
THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN CURLING CLUB
CHAP. I.—THE CONSTITUTION.
i. The Association shall be called the British Columbia
Curling Association.
2. Its object shall be to promote the game of Curling,
particularly in the Province of British Columbia; to unite
all the Curling Clubs therein into one organization; and to
hold fraternal intercourse with other Curling Associations.
3. Its membership shall consist of the members, Regular and Honorary, of all Curling Clubs which may be received into the Association, and conform to the rules
thereof, as adopted.
4. The affairs of the Association shall be managed by
a Representative Committee, composed of two representatives appointed by each affiliated club, as hereinafter provided, which shall have power to elect the office-bearers of
the Association and to appoint committees for the business
thereof.
5. An Annual General Meeting of the members of the
Representative Committee shall be held on the first Wed-
m
w I
CONSTITUTION
V_
nesday in December in each year, to receive the Annual j
Report of the Executive Council of the Association, and
take action upon the same; and to transact such other
business as may be necessary.
6. No new law shall be enacted, and no existing law
shall be altered or repealed, until approved of by at least
two-thirds of the members present at the Annual General
Meeting of the Association, and unless notice of such alteration or addition shall have been previously given at the
preceding Annual or Semi-Annual Meeting.
CHAP. II.—CLUBS.
i. Any Curling Club shall be eligible to be received
into the Association which has a membership of not fewer
than eight persons; and which has a constitution and staff
of office-bearers, including President, Vice-President, Treas- j
urer and Secretary and two Representative Members.
2. Clubs may be received into the Association at any
meeting of the Representative Committee, and at any meeting of the Executive Council, if given power to do so at
any regular meeting of the Representative Committee.
3. Every club desiring admission into the Association :
shall furnish a list of its office-bearers and members, and
name of club; and shall agree to be governed by the Rules
of the Association, and must be proposed by one member
of the Representative Committee and seconded by another,
and two-thirds majority of votes of those present shall decide the question.
4. Every club shall elect annually, and not later than
the first Wednesday in November, before the date of the
Annual Meeting, two persons as its delegates on the Representative Committee; and no person shall, at any meeting
of the Representative Committee, represent more than one
club. In the event of any Representative being unable to
be present at any meeting of the Association, a proxy may CONSTITUTION
be appointed by the executive of the club he represents, or
by the President thereof.
5. It shall not be lawful for any curler to play in any
one season for or on behalf of more than one club for prizes
allocated by the Association, or given under its auspices.
Any club playing an Association Prize Match with one or
more curlers in its ranks not properly qualified as members,
shall forfeit all right to the prize if it shall have been successful in the contest.
6. Clubs must classify their members, as Honorary and
Regular.    Entrance Fee and Annual Dues shall be payable
• each regular member returned as belonging to the club,
and only regular members shall be entitled to take part in
the Association games, and be eligible to the Representative Committee as delegates.
CHAP. III.—THE REPRESENTATIVE COMMITTEE.
1. The Representative Committee, composed of two
Representatives from each affiliated club, shall hold one
regular meeting each year, as provided in Sec. 5, Chap. I,
of the Constitution, which shall be known as the Annual
General Meeting of the Members of the Association. The
Semi-Annual Meeting shall be held on the Saturday previous to the date of the opening of the Annual Bonspiel.
Special meetings may be called by the proper office-bearers.
At all such meetings, five shall be the quorum.
2. At said Annual Meeting the Representative Committee shall elect for the year ensuing, the office-bearers
of the Association, who shall come into office immediately
upon their election, and continue until their successors are
appointed. They shall consist of a Patron, a President,
three Vice-Presidents, a Chaplain, and a Secretary-Treasurer. At the same meeting there shall also be selected
six members, who with the office-bearers, shall be the Executive Council and manage the affairs of the Association.
The Presidents.of all affiliated local clubs, not otherwise
111 if
CONSTITUTION
represented on this Council,  shall be ex-officio members
thereof.
(a) The duties of the President shall be to preside and
maintain order at all meetings of the Association, of the
Representative Committee, and of the Executive Council;
and he shall sign the minutes of such meeting, after they
have been confirmed, and all official documents. The chairman at all meetings shall have a casting vote in case of a
tie, as well as a deliberate vote.
(b) The First Vice-President shall take the place and
discharge the duties of the President when he is absent;
and the Second Vice President shall have the same authority in the absence of the President and First Vice-President ;
and should all of them be absent from any regular or special
meeting, it shall be competent for the meeting assembled
to elect a chairman, who shall have, pro tern, all the rights
and powers of the President.
(c) The Secretary-Treasurer shall keep full and correct
minutes of all the meetings of the Association and of the
Executive Council, and shall conduct all correspondence
arising out of the same, and generally carry out the work
of the Association. He shall levy and collect all dues and
fees, and pay all accounts, and shall keep regular and correct accounts of all moneys collected and bills paid. His
books and accounts shall at all times be open to the inspection of the office-bearers, and shall be audited at the close
of each fiscal year.
(d) The Executive, consisting of the officers and six
members, shall have full management of the affairs of the
Association.
(e) Auditors shall examine and certify the Treasurer's
accounts from year to year.
3. No complaint or appeal will be received unless sent
in to the Secretary of the Association in writing, withikr' CONSTITUTION
one week from the date on which occurred the matter of
the said complaint or appeal; and no complaint or appeal
shall be decided until all parties thereto shall have been
given an opportunity to state their case; and any party
failing or neglecting to show cause within one week after
being notified to do so by the Council, shall thereby be
held to have departed from his claim, and to forfeit all
rights to any further hearing.
4. At the Annual Meetings of the Representative Committee, the order of business shall be as follows :
1. Calling Meeting to Order.
2. Report on Credentials of Delegates.
3. Reading Minutes of Previous Annual and Spe
cial Meetings.
4. Admission of New Clubs.
5. Communications.
6. Accounts.
7. Annual Reports of Clubs.
8. Reports of Standing Committees.
9. Reports of Special Committees.
10. Semi-Annual Report on Clubs.
11. Unfinished Business.
12. Reports of District Umpires.
13. Fixing Place of Bonspiel.
14. Election of Office-bearers.
15. New Business.
16. Alteration of the Constitution.
17. Miscellaneous Business.
5. At special meetings no business shall be transacted
other than that for which the meeting was convened, and
which has been clearly set forth in the circular calling the
meeting. The President, the Secretary, and any three members of the Executive Council, may. convene a special meeting of the Representative Committee at any time.
36 CONSTITUTION
CHAP. IV.—ENTRANCE AND ANNUAL FEES.
i. The fees payable by clubs shall be an entrance fee,
club fee, and annual dues.
2. The entrance fee for any club shall be $5, which
must accompany application, together with annual club fee I
and other dues.
3. The annual dues shall be paid in advance, as follows :
' A club fee of Two Dollars each year from each club, and
an additional sum of Fifty Cents in respect of each regular |
member of the club.    Members can be registered up to
the 31st day of December in each year, and new clubs admitted up to the same date.
4. From these sources shall be formed a common fund
to be under the control of the Executive Council, and from
which shall be defrayed the printing, advertising and incidental expenses of the Association, including necessary
running expenses of the Bonspiel.
5. No club in arrears shall be entitled to compete in
the District Matches or for any prize of the Association)
at the Annual Bonspiel.
6. If any club shall fall two years in arrears in the payment of its annual dues, it shall be struck off the list of the I
Association, and shall not be re-instated except as a new •.
club, unless the Association shall decide to the contrary by
1 two-thirds vote.
CHAP. V.—THE GAME.
1. The standard length of the rink for play shall be
42 yards from hack to tee. No important match shall be
commenced if the ice be not in a condition fairly to test
the curling skill of the competing players; and it shall be
stopped and declared "off," if, after it has been begun, the
condition of the ice, by reason of thaw setting in or snow .-
37 id
X.
H, Diagram to be draw m
 M
ON THE /CE PREVIOUS
TO PLAYING I  CONSTITUTION	
falling, becomes such as not to afford a fair test of the
curling skill of the competing players; or darkness comes
on sufficient to prevent the stones at the tee from being
distinctly seen from the further hack; and in all cases of
stopped matches, the postponed game shall be commenced
de novo. The umpire's decision, regarding the condition
of the ice and atmosphere, shall be final in all cases.
2. The tees to be 38 yards apart, and around each,
as a centre, shall be described a circle of six feet radius,
which shall be called the "Home," or "Ring." To facilitate measurements, intermediate circles may also be described around the tee. Every stone within, or resting
upon the outer ring, shall be entitled to be counted in the
game; no stone shall be considered without a circle, unless
it is entirely clear of that circle, nor shall a stone be considered over a line unless it has crossed and entirely cleared
it. In every case this is to be decided by a square placed
upon the ice.
3. From, and in exact alignment with both tees, a
line, called the centre line, shall be drawn to a point four
yards behind each tee; at this point a line shall be drawn,
at a right angle to the centre line, on which the hack
shall be cut. The hack shall not exceed six inches in
length, nor shall the inner edge thereof be more than
three inches from the centre line, so that all stones shall
be delivered with their centre upon the centre line.
4. Other lines, called the Middle Score, the Hog
Score, the Sweeping Score and Back Score, shall also be
drawn on the ice at right angles to the centre line. The
Middle Score shall be drawn at midway between the two
tees, to point out the place at which sweeping may ordinarily be commenced. The Hog Score shall be drawn
at a distance from each tee of one-sixth of the length
from hack to further tee; and shall indicate the point,
which if a played stone fails to pass, it shall be counted CONSTITUTION
a hog, and removed from the ice unless it has been prevented from passing by striking another played stone rest-
ing inside said hog score. The Sweeping Score shall be?
drawn across the tees, for the guidance of the skips in I
sweeping. The Back Score shall be drawn just outside and I
behind the 12-foot circle around the tee (the home); all ;
stones having passed this score must be removed from I
the ice.
N.  B.—For method of laying out rink, see diagram.
5. All matches to be the majority of shots won, after
playing a certain number of ends, or definite period of time, I
to be agreed upon by the competing clubs before begin-?;
ning to play. In the event of both parties being equal at I
the conclusion of the match, play shall be continued, under |
the direction of the umpire, by all the rinks engaged, forfl
another end, or for such additional number of ends as I
may be necessary to decide the match.
6. Every rink to be composed of four players a side,
each using two stones and playing one stone alternately
with his opponent, and the rotation of players observed
in the first end shall not be changed during the match.
7. The two skips opposing each other shall settle bv
lot, or in any other way they may agree upon, which party
may lead in the first end, after which the winning party,
shall lead.
8. The skips shall have the exclusive management and
direction of the game for their respective parties, and may
play last or in any part of the game they please ; but are
not entitled to change their places when once fixed. When
their turn to play comes, they shall each appoint one of
their players to act in their places as skips of the game,
and must take the position of ordinary players until they
have played and returned to the tee-head as skips.
9. Players during the course of each end, shall be ar- CONSTITUTION
ranged along the sides, but well off the rink, as their skips
may direct; and no party, except when sweeping according
to rule, shall go upon the middle of the rink. Skips alone
to stand within the 12-foot circle, or home; the skip of
the party playing to have the choice of place, and must
not be obstructed by the other in front of the tee, while
behind it. The privileges of both, as regards sweeping,
shall be equal.
10. Every player to be ready to play when his turn
comes, and shall not take more than a reasonable time to
play. Should he play a stone belonging to another player,
any of the players may stop it while running; but if not
stopped till at rest, the stone which should have been played
shall be put in its place to the satisfaction of the opposing
skip.
11. If a player should play out of turn, the stone so
played may be stopped in its course and returned to the
player; should the mistake not be discovered till the stone
be at rest, or has struck another stone, the opposing skip
shall add one to his score, and have the option of allowing
the game to proceed or declaring the end null and void.
But if another stone be played before the mistake has been
noticed, the end must be finished, as if it had been played
properly from the beginning.
12. If any player, engaged or belonging to either of
the competing clubs, shall speak to, taunt, or otherwise
interrupt any other player not of his own party while preparing to play his stone, and so as to disconcert him, one
shot shall be added to the score of the party so interrupted
for each interruption, and the play proceed.
13. If, in sweeping or otherwise, a running stone be
marred by any of the party to which it belongs, it shall be
put off the ice, and the opposing skip shall have the option
to add one to his score and allow the game to proceed, or if
t CONSTITUTION :
to call the end null and void; but if marred by any of thef
adverse party, it shall be placed wherever the skip of the
party to which it belongs may direct.    If marred by any
other means the player shall replay the stone.   Should any
played stone be displaced by any of the players before the
end is reckoned, ifshall be placed as near as possible where I
it lay, to the satisfaction of, or by the skip opposed to the I
party displacing it.    If displaced by any neutral party, both I
skips  to  agree  upon  the  position  to  which  it  is  to  be
returned, and if they fail to agree the umpire shall decide.
14. The sweeping shall be under the direction and
control of the skips. Upon all occasions a stone may be I
£wept from the Hog Score nearest the point from which
the stone is delivered, and may be swept by the party to
whose side it belongs until it comes to the Sweeping Score ;
but all stones when they have passed the Sweeping Score
may be swept by either skip only. Skips will have liberty*
to sweep behind the tee at all times, except when a player
is receiving directions to play from his skip. All sweeping
shall be across the rink, and the sweeper must be in front
of the stone being swept, and at one side thereof ; and no.
sweepings shall either be moved forward or left in front
of a running stone, or of a stone "at rest." It shall not
be allowable for the party to whom a running stone belongs
.to place their brooms before it or behind it to screen it;
from the wind, unless with consent of both skips; and the."
use of a broom or any other instrument as a fan, either to;
promote or retard the running of a stone, is strictly forbidden, and shall be dealt with as a "running stone" marred
by the party to \
vhich 1
t belong
3.    (See
Sec. 13
* H
15. All stone
s shall
be of
rr
circular
shape.
No stone,
including handle,
shall
be of
a
greater
weight
than fifty
pounds, or of a gi
eater
;ircum
:erence than thirty-
six inches,     1
or of a less heigh
t than
one-e
ghth part
of its greatest cir-
cumference.
■ T"**? R. W. GRIGOR
X Curling  Enthusiast and a Familiar i
at all  Bonspiels
"He filays for the love of if."
am  CONSTITUTION
16. No stone or side of a stone shall be changed after
a match has been begun, unless with the consent of the
opposing skip. Should a stone happen to be broken during
a game, the largest fragment shall be considered in the
game for that end, and the player shall be entitled to use
another stone, or another pair, during the remainder of
the game.
17. Should a played stone roll over, or stop oin its edge
or top, it shall be put off the ice. Should the handle quit
the stone in delivery, the player will not be entitled to
replay the stone unless he retains his hold of the handle.
18. No measuring of shots allowable previous to the
termination of the end. Disputed shots to be determined
by the vice-skips; or, if they disagree, by the umpire; or,
if there is no umpire, by some neutral person chosen by
the skips. All measurements to be taken from centre of
tee to nearest point of stone, after removing stones intervening.
19. If any of the competing rinks are not ready to
begin play at the hour named for a match, one end shall
be counted as played for every ten minutes' delay; and the
opposing rink, if ready to play, shall count one point in the
game for each such period of time it is kept waiting.
20. No rink shall be eligible to enter for any competition or match under the jurisdiction of the Association,
unless in the first game they have four bona fide active
players. If, however, after starting in any event, any member, through sickness or other unforeseen circumstances, is
unable to play, then the following rules apply:
(a) If the skip be absent, then the third man becomes
skip, and the second man plays his own and the third pair
of stones.
(b) If third player be absent, the second man shall
play second and third place. \L
CONSTITUTION
(c) If the second player be absent, then the lead plays I
first as well as second place.
(d) If the lead be absent, the second player shall play |
his own as well as the lead stones.
(e) A sweeper will be allowed for the absentee, but no I
rink shall continue play with less than three men.
CHAP. VI.—ICE RINKS.
i. All District matches, as well as those played at the I
Annual Bonspiel, and general competitions at the Points'
Game, must be played on new or virgin ice, or upon neu- |
tral ice.
Ice for curling shall be deemed new or virgin ice :
(a) When it has not previously been played on.
(b) When, since last played on, it shall have been I
flooded so completely as that the water shall have come I
to its natural level, over the entire ice surface, before 1
freezing.
(c) If, after being last used for curling, the ice shall j
have been re-faced by sprinkling with water, and the tees |
changed, either at least two feet sideways or ten feet length-1
ways, so as to get rid of grooves or channels formed in the 1
course of play.
(d) Shaving of nodules or protuberances from the I
surface of the ice, or the application of any other mechanical I
operations having for their object the bringing of the ice I
to a true and correct level, shall not be held as degrading j
ice, otherwise entitled to be called new or virgin ice; but j
such operations must be carried out under the direction of j
the umpire, and in no case shall any special preparation of I
the ice be made, intended, or calculated, or having for its |
object to facilitate the making of any particular shot, or to I
otherwise pervert the ice surface from the true and correct I
level. CONSTITUTION	
(e) It is desirable that artificial single rinks should be
constructed not less than 18 feet in width by 152 in length,
so as to admit of changing the tees both sideways and
lengthways.
CHAP. VIL—THE POINTS' GAME.
1. Rinks shall be laid off in accordance with the enclosed diagram. Within the 12-foot circle, a circle 8 feet in
diameter shall be drawn around the tee, and a centre line
or score, from the hack to the hog score; and the length
of the rink, from hack to tee, shall be 42 yards.
2. Lots shall be drawn for the order of playing; each
competitor shall change position one place each point, thus :
The first player, at any of the points, to be the last in playing at next point ; and the second player, at any point, to be
the first at the next, and so on. Each competitor shall
use two stones, and play them, the one immediately after
the other, and shall not during the competition change the
side of a stone, or the stone itself, unless it happens to be
broken.
3. Every competitor to play four shots at each of the
nine following Points of the game, viz : Striking, Inwicking,
Drawing, Guarding, Chap and Lie, Wick and Curl In, Raising, Drawing through a Port, and Chipping the Winner,
according to the following definitions, and each successful
shot shall count as hereinafter provided:
(a) Striking.—A stone placed on the sweeping score,
and with its inner edge two feet from the tee; if struck,
to count 1 ; if struck out of the 12 feet circle, to count 2.
(b) Inwicking.—One stone being placed on the tee and
another with its inner edge 2 feet 6 inches from the tee
and its fore-edge on a line drawn from the tee at an angle
of 45 degrees with the central line; if the played stone strike
the latter on the inside, to count 1 ; if it perceptibly move
both stones, to count 2.
44
m ffffi
CONSTITUTION
(c) Drawing.—If the stone played lies within or on the
12 feet circle, to count i; if within or on the 8 feet circle,
to count 2.
(d) Guarding.—A stone to be guarded, placed with its
fore-edge  on the  tee.     If the  stone  played rests within I
6 inches of the central line, to count I ; if on the line, to
count 2.    It shall be over the hog, but not touch the stone
to be guarded.
(e) Chap and Lie.—If the stone placed on the sweeping score, with its inner edge one foot from the tee, be
struck out of the 12 feet circle, and the played stone rest •
within or on the same circle, to count i ; if struck out of the
12 feet circle and the played stone rest within or on the
8 feet circle, to count 2.
(f) Wick and Curl In.—A stone being placed with its
inner edge 6 feet distant from the tee and its fore-edge I
on a line making an angle of 45 degrees with the central I
line; if the stone is struck and the played stone curls on or
within the 12 feet circle, to count 1 ; if struck and the played
stone rests on or within the 8 feet circle, to count 2.
(g) Raising.—A stone placed with its centre on the
central line and its inner edge 8 feet distant from the tee;
if struck within or on the 12 feet circle, to count 1 ; if struck
within or on the 8 feet circle, to count 2.
(h) Drawing through a Port.—One stone to be placed
with its inner edge on the central line 10 feet in front of the.-"ï
tee, and another stone placed parallel thereto and with its
inner edge 2 feet from the central line; if the played stone
passes between these two stones, without touching either,
and rests within or on the 12 feet circle, to count 1 ; if within
or on the 8 feet circle, to count 2.
(i) Chipping the Winner.—A stone being placed on
the tee, and another 10 feet distant and with its inner edge .
just touching the central line, and half guarding the one ;
VL on the tee, and a third stone being placed 4 feet behind
[ the tee, with its inner edge touching the central line, but
on the opposite side from that on which the guard is placed ;
1 the played stone strikes the stone placed behind the tee,
t j count 1 ; if it strikes the stone on the tee, to count 2.
(j) Outwicking.—In the event of two or more competitors gaining the same number of shots, they shall play
I 4 shots at Outwicking ; that is, a stone being placed with its
nner edge 6 feet distant from the tee, and its centre on a
! line making an angle of 45 degrees with the central line;
i struck within or on the 12 feet circle, to count 1 ; if struck
vithin or on the 8 feet circle, to count 2.
4. If the competition cannot be decided by these shots,
I the umpire shall order one or more points to be played
again by the competitors who are equal.
5. In the Points' Game the rinks may be swept as often
j as required during the intervals between the playing of
stones.   A player may sweep his own stone, and may direct
j where a broom shall be held to guide him in playing.
Note.—It will save much time if, in playing for local
prizes, two rinks be prepared lying parallel to each other,
the tee of one being at the reverse end of the other rink;
every competitor plays both stones up the one rink, and
immediately afterwards down the other; finishing thus at
one round all his chances at that point.
It will also save time if a code of signals be arranged
between the marker and the players, such as: The marker
to raise one hand when 1 is scored, and both hands when
2 is scored; in case of a miss, both hands to be kept down. ïï~
Far frae the busy haunts o men
We revel in the grand auld game,
And never fash, tho' far frae home,
Away up in the mountains.
II THE   GAME   OF   CURLING
ITS  ORIGIN,  AND  ITS  RISE  AND  GROWTH   ON
THE  AMERICAN  CONTINENT
"There's music in the curling stone,
And singing on the rink,
And sweeter echoes know I none
Than stones that meet and clink."
The influence of climate on sports is as little understood as that of climate on character. The notion that
people in the latitudes of extreme frost have invented
vigorous amusements merely to keep warm is a southern
one. If this idea had been the ruling one in our northern
country, would the Pilgrim Fathers have been so set against
dancing? If exercise is a mere matter of climate, would
it be true that "when the sun goes down all Africa dances" ?
If ever there was a climatic excuse for dancing pretty much
all the year round, surely New England and Scotland offer
it And yet we know that the inhabitants of these countries
preferred amusements less graceful than dancing, even when
they had to be enlivened with rum. and usquebaugh. We
can only say in a general way that the successful colonizing
48
JP BRITISH COLUMBIA
races who are accustomed to an aggressive and defensive
warfare against frost, take naturally to rough sports. We
never hear of the students of El Azhar, in Cairo, playing <
at foot-ball, or taking a degree in rowing. Base-ball, football, cricket, golf, skating, curling, and the like vigorous
athletics, have never been popular in tropic or semi-tropic
countries.
The Northerner wants a sport that brings out the
muscle and taxes all his powers, and makes him hungry
and thirsty.
A game peculiarly adapted to do all these is the Scottish national game of Curling, which is a passion with all
classes in Scotland, and has now taken deep root in England, Canada, and in some of the northern States of the
Union. The idea that the game was invented to keep
Scotchmen from freezing to death is conveyed in a poem
written in the last century, beginning:
"Auld Daddy Scotland sat ae day
Bare-legged on a snawy brae;
His brawny arms wi' cauld were blae,
The wind was snelly blawing.
As icicles froze at his snout,
He rowed his plaid his head about,
Sin raised to Heaven a roupet shout,
Auld Albyn's Jove misca'ing.
CHORUS.
"Oh for a cheery, heartsome game,
.    To send through a' the soul a flame,
Pit birr and smedden in the frame,
And set the bluid a-dingling!"
That may have been the reason of its ancient origin—
for it is a very old game—but we infer from a large and
very entertaining volume on Curling, by James Taylor,
D. D. (William Paterson, Edinburgh, 1884), that it has
been sustained by hunger as well as by cold. In this twentieth century, we presume there are few
who are not to some extent acquainted with the game,
h is no longer confined to Scotland, but now finds patrons
in all parts of the world where the needed climatic conditions exist. It is everywhere pursued with supreme enthusiasm, zest and glee. As one writer pithily remarks : "It
xeates the keenest excitement and competition; it eschews
castes—in other words, excludes social distinction; promotes extreme sociability, and is productive of a superabundance of hilarity and humor."
It is called the "roarin' game," not on account of the
noise made by the players, but on account of the roaring
ound made by the stones as they speed along the ice. This
roaring may not at all times be in evidence in a game played
in a curling rink, except it may be during a February thaw
(when there is both a rush and a roar), but it can certainly
be heard at quite a distance on an open pond or lock, or
where the ice is made on a raised floor. Though the game
is now generally known, the following slight reference to it
may not be uninteresting, even to curlers :
The centre of the ring is called the "Tee." The stone
may be delivered with an "in turn" or an "out turn"; that
is, bringing the elbow in towards the body, which gives an
"English" to the right or left, and which makes the stone
"curl" in or out, and hence comes the name of the game—
"Curling."
Four men on each side make a game, and the captain
is called the "skip."
There is no limit to the variety of the shots played,
and in this it is very different from quoits and is more like
billiards. Sometimes the player must "draw" a quiet shot
to place the stone on the tee ; sometimes he is called on to
"guard" or "lay" a stone in front to protect a winning
stone; again, he may be asked to play a "running" shot
to break off the guards or for other purposes, or to run a
narrow port, and then he may have to inwick or outwick
(carom) off a s£one on the side, and "curl" in upon the tee ft
BRITISH COLUMBIA
or chip a winner. The game can hardly be made intelligible
by a printed description, so our advice is, learn it.
To an uninitiated onlooker, the game appears uninteresting, even stupid; but to the players it is the very
opposite, and gives opportunities of exercising skill, nerve
and judgment in various ways. Many, who as onlookers
condemn it, become its most ardent devotees after their
initiation into its secrets.
The game was played in the Land of Cakes away back
in the fifteenth century. Scotchmen contend that it had
- its origin in Scotia, but it is asserted with equal confidence
by some writers who have spent much time in research
that the game was introduced into Scotland from Flanders.
Other writers, with greater positiveness, assert that there
is no authentic evidence to be found that it ever existed on
the continent of Europe. Be that as it may, and it matters
little, there is no doubt that the game as a national game
was cradled, nurtured and brought forth into healthy
"gamehood" in the land of the brawny Scots.
"Way back in the airly days," as James Whitcomb
Riley would say, the knights of the "besom an' the stane"
used stones of various sorts, shapes and sizes, each curler
probably possessing a set of stones especially devised for
special shots, instead of the two polished kettle-shaped ones
of beautiful finish that are generally in use today.
In olden times, too, the brooms were made out of
brush, instead of the corn brooms that are in general use
today. ,
In those ancient times, kings, lords and commoners
joined in the healthy outdoor sport. It was a sport common
to all. There is a tradition that James IV., who fell at
Flodden, was a keen curler, and that Darnley, the husband
of Mary, Queen of Scots, in the winter of 1,565 enjoyed
many a game at Peebles. In any event, it is certain that
the game has been practiced in Scotland for at least four
centuries, for a curling stone bearing the date "1531" was
found early in the nineteenth century in a pond which was
drained near Dunblane.    It was not dressed, but was just CURLING ASSOCIATION
as it was taken from the bed of the river, and has two
holes in it where the handle has been. Another stone, with
date "1611," was found near the village of Torpichen,
i and a third was found at the bottom of Shed's Loch, with
j the date "1613" distinctly cut into it.    Several stones of
great age were dug out of a pond on the estate of Mr.
Drummond Moray, near Ardoch, which are of very primi-
I tive appearance and have handles like those which appear
in the cuts accompanying this article.
As Bridie says in his Centenary Ode:
"In early days the implements were coarse;
Rude, heavy boulders did the duty then.
And each one had its title, as 'The Horse' ;
And one was 'Cockit-hat,' and one 'The Hen,'
The 'Egg,' the 'Saddle,' 'President' and 'Soo,'
The 'Bannock,' 'Baron,' 'Fluke' and 'Robbie Dow'."
The stone shown in Fig. 2 is dated "1700" and is lettered "W. H. M." It was one of the number found, and
was used in matches over two centuries ago. It is unique
in its way, "having a three-legged handle inserted in it, the
one handle having been used probably for the in-turn and
the other for the out-turn.
Curling is the only game which has an extensive and
varied literature of its own. Poets and historians in their
writings have in very early times referred to it.
"Allan," in his epistle to Robert Yarde of Devonshire,
makes this interesting reference:
"Frae northern mountains clad with snaw,
Where whistling winds incessant blaw,
In time now when the Curlin' stane
Slides murmuring o'er the icy plain."
[continued on page 55] \L
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fig. 2-"W. H. M
Fig-. 4—"The Egg"
Fig. 5—«'The Fluke'
Fig  6—"Robbie Dc CURLING ASSOCIATION
EXPLANATORY NOTES
Stone rests 'gainst stone, and wanting the foundation
All would be wanting, so in curling
The "Home" is only made secure, by like construction.
Figures i, 3, 4, 5 and 6 represent some of the most
ancient curling stones. They are now in the possession
of the Delvine Club of Scotland. They are some of the
stones referred to in the metrical account found in Mr.
Bridie's Centenary Ode to the Blairgowie Club.
Fig. 1.—"The Soo," weighs 79 pounds, and measures
16x11 inches.
Fig. 2.—From Ardoch, Scotland.
Several stones were dug out of a pond on the estate
of Mr. Drummond Moray some years ago. The one shown
in this figure is dated 1700 and is lettered "W .H. M." It
was used in matches over two centuries ago, and is unique
in its way, having a three-legged handle inserted in it.
Fig. 3.—"The Baron," weighs 88 pounds, and measures
14x14 inches.
Fig. 4.—"The Egg," weighs 115 pounds and measures
17x12 inches.
Fig. 5.—"The Fluke," weighs 52 pounds and measures
12x11 inches.
Fig. 6.—"Robbie Dow," weighs 34 pounds and measures 17x12 inches.
JU BRITISH COLUMBIA
Pennecuik, in his "Description" (published in 1715) of
the customs of Peebleshire, says of curling:
"To curl on the ice doth greatly please,
Being a manly Scottish exercise.
It clears the brains, stirs up the heat,
And gives a gallant appetite for meat" ;
and James Grahame, in his poem, "The Sabbath," gives a
most excellent description of the game.    The above lines
quoted in "Description" were penned many years ago by
Doctor Ruthven, a Scottish practitioner, and a most enthusiastic curler.    It exemplifies the praise of curling in a
nutshell.   "Curl," says the doctor, "and throw physic to the|;
dogs," and Canadians as a people, are following the doctor's injunction, and Canada is rapidly becoming a curling
nation, and the New England and Northwestern States are
following in its train.    In truth, the brotherhood of curlers^
is day after day receiving new augmentations to its fold—
Russia, Switzerland and New Zealand being the latest ad-
tions.    The Royal Caledonian Curling Club is becoming
mighty organization, with its seven hundred and twenty-
ght affiliated Associations scattered over the world, and
irlers may indeed year by year become prouder of their
otherhood.   The following lines will appeal to the curlers
to-day even more strongly than they appealed to the
:ouple of centuries ago, when written by J.
Usher, ;
"It boots not whence the curler hails
If curler keen and staunch he be.
Frae Scotland, England, Ireland, Wales,
Or colonies ayont the sea;
A social brotherhood are we."
A visit to any Kootenay Bonspiel will convince the
onlooker more forcibly than words, that the curlers form in
truth a great social brotherhood! The observer will also
readily discern how truly democratic a game it is.    The
55 CURLING ASSOCIATION
village parson (the Sky Pilot of the West), the lawyer, the
doctor, the miner, the banker, the humblest laborer, honest
men of all ranks of life, may be found curling together in
happy fellowship, for as the above poet has truly said, "It
boots not whence the curler hails, if curler keen and staunch
he be." Men of wit, men of wealth, men of brawn, men of
muscle—every rank and condition of life (for a man's a man
for a' that), congregate each year at such events, to compete in the various matches for the beautiful cups, trophies
and prizes that are annually offered by the Association for
competition.
In these struggles for supremacy, none are more active,
none keener, than the clergy.
It is ah old tradition in Scotland,
"Frae John o' Groat's to Maiden Head
Na' curler's like the clergy";
and the same thought has been voiced in Ontario in these
lines :
"From Chatham town to Parry Sound
The Church in every club is found."
If this Association had a bard at its command, we might
call upon him to improvise a couplet in regard to the clerical
curlers of Yale and Kootenay, but failing the assistance of
a curling poet-laureate, we make use of the following words
roughly put together :
"Sky-pilots curl, in every camp
From Revelstoke to Fern-ay;
Aye, truth to tell, they curl durn well
In either Yale or Koot'nay."
The mingling of the pastor with his flock is a great
feature of the game in our Association. In some local
clubs the roaring game is such a favorite with the pillars
of the church that the clergy, regardless of belief or denomination, foregather at the rink, and there throw their
56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
stones and sweep them with a zeal that is not surpassed
by their parishioners. In one of our Kootenay. towns, we
have seen upon the same ice the Roman Catholic priest, the
Methodist parson, the Anglican clergyman, and the Presbyterian minister. "Their liberal souls with every sect
agreed." Need we mention such names as the Rev. Mr.
Sanford, the Rev. Hugh R. Grant, the Rev. Mr. Hedley,
the Rev. Father McCullough,—of each and every one of
whom it may be said :
"A truer, nobler, trustier heart,
More loving, or more noble, never beat
Within a human breast."
There is probably no cleaner or more manly game in
the world, and woe to him who, in the game, is detected
acting in the least bit shady. Honor and honorable conduct
are inseparable from the game, and among its devotees, no
matter how humble the player may be in the ranks of life,
if he possesses such qualifications he stands on an equalityï
be what he really is—
put him on the curling
places on the same level,
"The tenant \
The pastor \
vhich better
good, bad c
; rink, where
shows up the man to
■ indifferent—than to
all classes take their
i' his jolly 1
i' his flock,
When the curling season is on, the dulness of the winter evenings is forgotten and the happy feasts of good
fellowship that follow them, coupled with the pleasant
memories of closely contested matches, make winter in this
country lose much of its bitterness.
Long life to the noble game ! W. G. MOMYNN, OF GREENWOOD
PRESIDENT GREENWOOD CLUB
An Ex-President of the Association
A Curling Devotee. m CURLING ASSOCIATION
CURLING CLUBS IN SCOTLAND
When winter stern and cold, with clouds and storms
Subdues the world, and chilling tempests roll ;
In flowing beard, with hoary frost bedecked,
Jack Frost arrives, and cheers the curler's soul.
The oldest Curling Club in existence is the Dudings-
ton Curling Society of Edinburgh, . instituted January
17th, 1795.
The Royal Caledonian Curling Club of Scotland, however, is the mother of all curling clubs. It is "the fountain
head" (fons et origo) of the modern game. Established
in 1838, it codified the rules of the game, and harmonizing
many widely diversified practices, it is everywhere looked
up to as the honored parent of curling, to whom the game
is indebted for its laws and its high standing, if not also
for its very existence.
Under its auspices, matches of the most exciting interest take place in Scotland annually, if there is ice, not
only between parishes, but between counties, and sometimes
the North and South of Scotland play against each other
for the curling championship, the Forth being the dividing
line. The last grand match was held at Carsbreck last year.
There were four hundred and eleven rinks entered for the
North, and three hundred and thirty-five for the South,
making a total of three hundred and forty-six rinks, or two
thousand nine hundred and eighty-four players.
In the international match between England and Scotland, held at Lochmaben, England entered fifty-two rinks,
and Scotland one hundred and forty-three.
There are seven hundred and twenty-eight clubs now ff
I
BRITISH COLUMBIA
associated or affiliated with this grand old curling organization. Our own B. C. Curling Association, under its old
name of "Kootenay," was admitted into affiliation by the
Royal Club last year, and its name and office bearers appear ;
in the Annual for 1906-7.
The Royal Club this year passed the following motion,
which must be regarded as a compliment to Canada and"
its Curling Associations :
"On motion of the Chaplain, Rev. J. Kerr, Dirleton,
seconded by Bailie Husband, Dumfermline, the Committee
agreed to nominate as next President-elect the Right Hon. I
Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal."
Lord Strathcona, among his many valued services rendered to the Dominion and his home country, Scotland, has I
ever done all in his power to advance  the interests  of
CURLING CLUBS IN QUEBEC.
The history of curling in Canada dates back to the year
1807, when the game was first played on the St. Lawrence I
River at Montreal, under the auspices of a Curling Association which has since been known as the Montreal Club, and
which last year celebrated its centenary.
During the succeeding years the game was played to
some extent every winter between local clubs formed in
the city at the foot of Mount Royal, the matches being
played on the river. In 1821 a number of sons of the
"brown heath and shaggy wood" residing in Quebec City
formed a curling club and in due time issued a challenge
to the club in Montreal to play them a match. The first
match played between those two clubs of which any data
was kept was in 1835, the contest taking place at Three
Rivers:
From  that  match a  friendly rivalry  resulted,  which CURLING ASSOCIATION
gave a great impetus to the game and brought it prominently before the Canadian people as a game that furnished
popular winter pastime.
Last year, as we have said, the Montréal Club celebrated its one hundredth birthday, beginning on January
22d. The celebration, as was natural, consisted, of a grand
Bonspiel and a centenary banquet. Curlers from all parts
of Canada attended. There were also clubs from the United
States Associations. It was a grand success. The event
is perpetuated by the establishment of a trophy to be competed for during the anniversary week each year by the
clubs affiliated with the Canadian or Quebec Branch of
the Royal Caledonian Curling Club. During the Bonspiel
the annual international contest between Canada and the
United States also took place, Canada being again victorious. Canada was represented by rinks from the St.
Lawrence Club and the Thistle Club, and the United States
by the Utica Club and St. Andrews Club of New York.
The game was hotly contested, the score being 35—31.
In the match in the prior year, held on February 3d,
Canada was also victorious, the score being 35—33. The
previous year, 1905, the score was 34 to 32, also in favor
of Canada, showing how evenly matched were the com-
neting teams.
CURLING CLUBS IN ONTARIO.
After the game had been popularized in Canada,
through the formation of many clubs in the Province of
Quebec, curling spread through the sister province of Ontario. A curling club was formed in Kingston in 1859,
Ottawa in 1862, Belleville in 1867, and in Arnprior and
Toronto in 1868. The Ontario Curling Association is
now one of the most successful curling organizations on
the continent. Some ninety-one clubs are affiliated with
it, and its annual Bonspiel is an event eagerly looked forward to by all the curling clubs of the banner province.
60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1
The Ontario Silver Tankard competed for at each Bonspiel
and held by the winning club for a year, is the great trophy,
and is keenly fought for by representative rinks from all
the affiliated clubs.
Last year it was won by the Gait Club. In this contest seventy-five clubs entered, and fifty-three clubs actually
engaged in the competition. At the head of this organization is the Rev. R. M. Burns, B. A., D. D., of Brampton, one
of the most eminent divines of the Methodist church, and
a most enthusiastic curler. It was the first time in the
history of. the Association that it bestowed its highest office
upon a reverend gentleman. The writer and "Bobbie
Burns," as he was familiarly called in his youth, were students together at the High School in Brampton for a
number of years, and eyen in his youth the reverend gentleman exhibited a great liking for legitimate sport. He now
presides over an Association whose membership exceeds
four thousand.
CURLING CLUBS IN MANITOBA.
In the exodus of young and old to Manitoba and the
Northwest in the early 8o's, was included some of the best
curlers of old Ontario. During the hustle and bustle inci- |
dent to pioneer life on the prairies, these settlers were
forced for a time to neglect their old favorite pastime. The
strenuous life attendant on the settling of the new country
absorbed all their time. It was not till 1888 that a convention of curlers was called at Winnipeg, at which it was
decided to form a branch of the Royal Caledonian Curling
Club in Manitoba. Many of those who attended that meeting are still active curlers. Among them, we notice the
name of the late Mr. H. H. Smith, formerly known to tbj I
members of this Association as "Harry," and referred to by
Dr. Gomm in his short history of the "Cordwood" trophy.
Harry, during his sojourn at the Hub of the Golden Kootenay, was one of the most popular curlers, and great was
the regret when he left  Rossland to again take up his ; J. P. ROBERTSON, ESQ..
OF WINNIPEG
Branch of the Royal Cal. C. C.
" THE FATHER OF CURLING IN THE WEST." pr CURLING ASSOCIATION
residence at "the Peg," and greater the regret when we
learned of his death, a few days ago. Also the name of Mr.
J. P. Robertson, the Provincial Librarian and the popular
Secretary of the Manitoba Branch of the R. C. C. C, who
is justly entitled to the pseudonym of "The Father of
Curling in the West." The game has no greater or more
enthusiastic devotee than this fine old Scottish gentleman.
In the succeeding years curling clubs were formed in
various parts of the province, until now nearly every hamlet
has its local curling club, with members old and young.
The Association has now ninety clubs on the roll, with a
membership of 2885. The game is increasing in popularity year after year. About one hundred clubs are in
existence in the province at the present time.
The annual Bonspiel in Winnipeg is one of the big
events of the year, and clubs from Port Arthur to the
Yukon take advantage of the opportunity of comparing
their skill with that of other rinks at the Hub of the Golden
Prairies.
Last year's event was a most successful one, if not the
most successful in the history of the Association. The
entry list passed all previous records, except for the memorable winter when the Scotch curlers visited the Hub.
The Secretary, Mr. J. P. Robertson, was more than kept
busy. He received a total of 150 entries. The four City
clubs made 35 entries, so that about 115 of the entries
were from out-of-town points, ranging from Lindsay to
Klondyke, and including seven rinks from the United
States.
-two from Chatham,
i Collingwood, Owen
t arrived in a special
Eastern Ontario had seven rinks-
two from Lindsay, and one each fror
Sound, Toronto ana Waterloo. The
coach on the trans-continental.
There were eleven rinks in all from Ontario, counting
two rinks from Kenora and one from Fort William. Among
ifc BRITISH COLUMBIA
them were such crack skips as Flavelle of Lindsay and 1
Rennie of Toronto. The redoubtable Dunbar skipped a 1
rink from St. Paul, and Skip Myron had a quartette from j
Duluth. The feature of the Bonspiel was the presence o
a rink from Dawson City, ably handled by Skip Strickland 1
The weather was propitious, the ice in good condition, and
as a result, some fine curling.
The programme and prizes were exceptionally good,
and evoked the keenest rivalry in the several competitions :
The record made by Braden, the Winnipeg Thistle skip
was undoubtedly the  great feature  of  the  meeting.     He I
captured the Dingwall, Royal Caledonian and Tetley Tea
cups and the gold medal for the Grand Aggregate, involv- ]
ing the championship of the Spiel.   He played twenty-seven
games and only lost two.    This record is unique from the
I fact that it was attained despite the'fact that over a score 1
of the best skips in America were pitted against h
Flavelle captured the International, Matheson of Russell I
the Empire, and Carson and Youhill of Winnipeg- Thistles
won the Tuckett. The Whyte cup went to Black of the j
Winnipeg Assiniboines. The Blue Ribbon went to Ver
of the Winnipeg Granites. The McMillan cup was won by j
Young of Saskatoon, and this being the final year for this
cup, five clubs had to compete in a special competition for
the absolute ownership. The clubs competing were: The
Winnipeg Granites, Gladstone, Cypress River, Saskatoon
and Hamiota. William Ferguson of the last named club
won the cup.
It was a grand gathering, and marked Winnipeg as i
the great curling centre of this continent. The visitors
received the kindliest welcome from their brothers at theij
Hub, who are noted for their cordial hospitality.
CURLING IN THE NEW PROVINCES OF
SASKATCHEWAN AND ALBERTA.
. It was natural that the Northwest, particularly those
districts now included in the above provinces, should catch CURLING
ASSOCIATION
I the eu
-ling
fe
ver from the
adjoining Province of
f especia
lly v
en  the sever
ty of the winters pr
1 for the
pc
ses of the ga
me, for five months c
of the
best
q
uality.    A fe
v years after the ga
popula
r in
i
Manitoba,     cu
rling clubs were est
Régine
. Mc
se Jaw, India
n Head, and half a d
places
in tr
e
old District
of Assiniboia, now th
of Sas
katel
ei
van.    Curling
r clubs now exist in
towns,
and
tl
îe Assiniboia
Curling Association
j   of the
Roy
al
Scottish Clul
With the advent of curling into Assiniboia, the game
spread to the District (now the Province) of Alberta.
Though the climatic conditions in this province are not
at all times favorable to the making of ice, yet there are
six clubs affiliated with the Alberta Branch of the Royal
Caledonian Club, one of which is the Golden Club in British Columbia, once affiliated with the B. C. Association.
The other clubs are the Calgary. Banff, Lacombe, Preddis
and Bankhead Curling Clubs.
YUKON CURLING CLUBS.
Curling has even spread as far as the distant District
of Yukon. The old Eastern curling devotees who had
settled in Dawson City were not slow to form a club, in
order that they might enjoy themselves at their old favorite
pastime. The result is that in Dawson City there are two
clubs, and clubs also exist in other parts of the district,
though the exact location of the same are unknown to the
writer. Dawson City sent two rinks to the last Winnipeg
Bonspiel, which was a striking evidence of their curling
enthusiasm, and they carried back with them to their distant home in the Northwest a fair quota of Bonspiel trophies, including the Brandon Bonspiel, which they also
attended; and this is all the more to their credit when we
remember that in the Bonspiel all of the best rinks in Manitoba and some of the best rinks in Ontario were partici-
64
i pants, and when we further remember that the best clubs
from the Northwestern Curling Association of the United
States also entered at the Bonspiel.
CURLING ASSOCIATIONS IN THE UNITED
STATES.
In the year 1866, twelve of the curling clubs of the
United States organized the "Grand National Curling Club
of the United States," of which G. B. Allen of Utica, N. Y.,
is President, and Geo. W. Peene of Yonkers, N. Y., is
Secretary. The game so steadily increased in popularity
that it was not long until some forty clubs, some in the
State of New York, became affiliated with it. So many
of these affiliated clubs were in the Northwest, in the State
of Minnesota and adjoining states, that it was deemed
advisable in 1892 to organize a Northwestern Association
covering all the territory Northwest of Ohio. An Association was accordingly formed and called the Northwestern
Curling Association, U. S. A., of which Mr. A. H. Smith
of Duluth is the President, and S. H. Jones of the same
place is the Secretary-Treasurer. It is now a most thriving Association, and annually sends rinks to Winnipeg and
Montreal to compete in the Bonspiels.
The history of curling in the United States, in so far
as its extension westward is concerned, is similar to that
of Canada. The game spread westward from Minnesota
to the State of Montana. The city of Butte has now, and
has had for some time, a good healthy curling club, with a
fair membership. True, it is somewhat isolated from the
curling world, and no doubt finds difficulty in entering any
of its rinks in ^he Manitoba or Minnesota Bonspiels ; yet
the members of the club, we are informed, get every enjoyment out of inter-club matches. It would be no more than
an international courtesy if the B. C. Association would
arrange a series "of matches with our Montana brethren.
There is no doubt that the curlers of Butte would extend
a right royal welcome to any visiting team or teams from
\ CURLING ASSOCIATION	
British Columbia, and it goes without saying that if the
Butte Club sent a team or two to this Province the welcome
would be more than reciprocated.
Again, as in Canada, the grand auld game crept still
further westward, and has at length reached the Pacific
coast, a club having been recently organized in the city
of Spokane, in the Pacific State of Washington. While it
may be difficult to get ice in Spokane for lengthy periods
during the winter, yet there are times when the degrees of
frost are sufficient to provide very good ice for a week
or so. We believe, however, that the club is endeavoring
to combine art and nature in the formation of sheets of ice
for curling, and we trust it may. be successful in its efforts.
The B. C. Association should not be slow to invite
their Spokane brethren to affiliate their club with the B. C.
Association. The presence of one or two Spokane or Butte
rinks at the Bonspiels would do much towards rendering
the Bonspiels more enjoyable, if not more successful. No
international boundary line exists as between curlers. We
are brithers a', and our Montana and Washington brethren
know, or should be made to feel, this. An invitation should
be extended to them at once, to send rinks to our next
Bonspiel.
Yes, let us haste these bonds to knit,
And in the task be handy,
So we can blend "God Save the King"
With "Yankee Doodle Dandy."
CURLING IN NOVA SCOTIA.
As might naturally be expected, the hardy and progressive Scotch race which settled in Nova or New Scotia
were not long in organizing curling clubs in that Province
and providing rinks wherewith to pursue their old and
favorite pastime. Scarcely had the settlers gained a footing in the Maritime Provinces ere many curling clubs were
formed.   We are not able to say positively whether curling BRITISH COLUMBIA
in the Arcadian Provinces had been in vogue prior to the
historical game played at Three Rivers, in the Province of
Quebec, in January, 1807. It was, however, played at a
very early date, Halifax, being the pivotal point. Many
years ago the Maritime Province Branch was in affiliation
with the Royal Caledonian Curling Club. Some years ago
it ceased to maintain its standing in the Royal Club, but
nevertheless,- good live curling clubs continued to exist in
different parts of the Provinces of New Brunswick and
Nova Scotia, not the least of which was the Halifax Curling Club and the St. John's Thistle Club. Last year the
Nova Scotia Branch was affiliated with the Royal Club, on
motion of the Rev. John Kerr, the Chaplain of the Royal
Club and the Author of a very excellent work on Curling.
In proposing the Toast, the reverend gentleman expressed
the great pleasure it afforded him in moving that the Nova
Scotia Branch, with headquarters at Halifax, and with a
membership of ten clubs, be admitted on the roll of the
Royal Club. "As a matter of fact," continued the reverend
gentleman," it is not entirely new, because the Maritime
Province Branch, covering part of the same jurisdiction,
had in years past been affiliated with the Royal Club."
The Thistle Club of the City of St. John, of the Province of New Brunswick, is now one of the largest and most
active clubs in that Province, having among its members
many of the most prominent and. successful citizens of that
prosperous maritime city.
CURLING CLUBS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
It will thus be seen that curling, beginning in the old
Province of Quebec in the year 1807, has gradually spread
over the whole of Canada, and#he northern and northwestern portions of the adjoining Republic. Nor was this
western province slow in introducing the roarin' game, for
in the early part of January, 1896, the first club was organized at the City of Kaslo. It was in that year that Mr.
67 CURLING ASSOCIATION
Hamilton Byers of Kaslo sent to the Hingston-Smith Arms
Company of Winnipeg for stones. Upon their arrival, the
Kaslo Curling Club, with sixteen charter members, was
formed, and curling, under the tutelage of Mr. Waugh, began in a temporary structure erected in the old river bed
at Kaslo.
The new club soon afterwards affiliated itself with the
Manitoba Branch of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club.
This  body  immediately  constituted  the  "District  of
Kootenay," and sent a medal for competition, with the
proviso  that  until the  organization  of  another  club,  the
medal might be annually awarded to the individual member
. of the Kaslo Club making the highest score at points.
James Waugh was named District Umpire. The match,
at points, was held in February, 1896, on Mirror Lake, two
miles from Kaslo, and the medal was won by Horace W.
Burke, with a score of 19. The match was finished by the
light of bonfires built an the ice.
Mr. Waugh, now a resident of Winnipeg, and who still
interests himself in curling, has many pleasant recollections
of this first British Columbia game on the "lock."  .
"I have a fairly good photograph in my imagination
of that first competition for the district medal, played on
Mirror Lake on a glorious afternoon. How we cleaned,
as well as possible, the surface of the ice, and after trying
a few shots the Umpire (the writer) concluded that the
condition of the ice required a shorter lead, and accordingly the rings were scratched at much shorter distance
than ordinary; and even then, Horace Burke's "winning"
score was less than a "score." Although forced to be an
onlooker and officiate as score-keeper, I enjoyed the game
immensely, and while Mr. Buchanan played, my-memory
ran back to school-days and curling scenes at the foot of
the Eildons, within sight of Sir Walter Scott's home, where
I saw the Earl of Dalkeith playing lead and his coachman
31
L ff
BRITISH COLUMBIA
skipping the game. What a jolly crowd they were ! Shopkeepers, 'keen on the siller,' had left their shops to their
wives. The dominée had 'skaled' the school. The blacksmith and the painter, the laird of the neighboring farm,
the parish minister, Dr. Hendman (an uncle of Dr. Hend- .
man of Calgary), frozen out masons and plasterers,—the
whole town, to the cry of 'The ice holds,' had left their respective businesses, and with a clothes-basket full of bread
and cheese, a few bottles of ale and some coffee, had wended
their way to the pond.
"The latter was formed in a clump of trees, on a clay
bottom, where a few inches of water, protected by hills and
trees from the sun, rapidly froze with a few degrees of frost.
"I wish you could have seen the curios in the shape
of stones,—lumps of whinstone, roughly shaped by some
village mason, with a handle like a gate crook, run, with'
lead, into the stone. Curling-stone makers could not have*
been very many in those days, or rather, every man must
have been his own stone maker, as almost all who curled
had home-made stones.
"Brooms were readily improvised, because the hillside was covered with heather, and a round pole served for
a handle.
"To be sure, a few players had stones just as fine as;
the stones of to-day, yet many a head was filled with what
made an odd-looking cairn.
"The game was not played as scientifically as the game
of to-day. Besides this, it was easier for a skip to draw
into a head which was depressed in the centre with the
weight of stones within the ring, and it was easier to get
on the tee if you had weight, than to get off it. Yet the
game of to-day does not develop such enthusiasm in the
players, as I can recollect in connection with the games
thirty years ago."
During the same season, the Kaslo Club sent all the
69 G. O. BUCHANAN  CURLING ASSOCIATION
stones and two rinks of players to Nelson for a game. The
old skating rink below Vernon Street afforded two sheets
of ice about 199 feet in length. Four or five veteran curlers
and plenty of non-members were available to make up the
Nelson rinks. It was a delightful day's sport, and the play
was not wholly in favor of the visitors.
In the winter of 1896-7 the Sandon and Golden Clubs
were organized.
The Sandon Club afterwards won the district medal
from Kaslo. Also the first trophy, a cup, awarded by Wm.
Bostock, Esq., M. P. The medal and trophy are still in the
possession of the Sandonites.
OTHER RINKS.
The Kaslo Skating and Curling Rink building of
74x150 feet floor space was built in 1896.
In February, 1898, a Bonspiel was held in Rossland, in
its commodious curling and skating rink, the largest and
best west of Winnipeg. Rinks from Kaslo, Sandon, Nelson
and Rossland were present and took part in the game.
During this gathering, at a luncheon at the Hotel
Allan, the Kootenay Curling Association was formed. Mr.
J. B. MacArthur, since deceased, was elected first President.
In 1899, largely through the efforts of the Rossland
Club, a splendid programme of events, with a magnificent
array of trophies, was provided, and the first of the regular
Bonspiels was held. The commodious new Rossland rink
building, with six or seven sheets of ice, was used. It has
since been enlarged, and now, with the smaller rings, can
easily provide eight rinks.
Eighteen rinks, representing Rossland, Nelson, Sandon, Kaslo and Revelstoke, competed, and the honors were
fairly distributed. A feature was the achievement of H. A.
Brown of Revelstoke, who, with two curlers and two boys
70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
from the hockey team, and with borrowed stones, captured
the Hudson Bay Company's cup.
The annual Bonspiel of this Association is now an
event of great interest, eagerly looked forward to by the
members of all the affiliated clubs.
The last Bonspiel was held at Cranbrook, and was a
success. The President of the Association, His Honor
Judge Wilson, and Dr. King and other resident curlers of
the city were untiring in their efforts to provide for the
entertainment and comfort of the visiting rinks. His Honor
was the soul of the Bonspiel, and much of its success is to
be attributed to him.
Since the formation of the Association, there have been
in all mine Bonspiels. Five have been held in Rossland, and
one in each of the following cities and towns : Sandon,
Revelstoke, Nelson and Cranbrook. Fuller particulars regarding same appear elsewhere in this Manual.
Year after year, however, the conviction is being
forced upon many curlers that the best results will be secured in connection with this annual event by holding it,
as is done in the Provinces of Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba, at a fixed central point, with a permanent Secretary
in connection therewith. Rossland has been suggested as
the permanent place for the holding of the same. lt|M
centrally located and easy of approach from all points.
'Beyond this, it has a most spacious curling rink, capable of
accommodating eight rinks at one time. And, in additio^B
of all places in the interior it has the best ice. The truth
of the assertion will be doubted by none, although the ice
has been unfortunately bad at the time chosen for the holding of some of the Rossland Bonspiels.
All that is required, however, to rectify this grievance,
is to hold the Bonspiel at a more favorable time of the
year—a time which past experience will suggest to every
keen observer of weather conditions in Rossland. CURLING ASSOCIATION
At the annual meeting of the Association held in Rossland on the 5 th of December, 1906, it was decided to change
the name of the Association to that of the "British Columbia Curling Association."
At the same meeting two officers were authorized to
apply for affiliation with the Royal Caledonian Club. The
affiliation was duly accepted by the parent body, and the
organization appears, under its former name of the "Kootenay Curling Association," in the Annual of the Royal Club
for 1906-7.
At the same annual meeting some amendments to the
Constitution were made. The most important were : First,
the increase in membership dues payable to the B. C. C.
Association by the affiliated clubs, the fees being raised
from 15 to 50 cents per capita; second, the diminution in
the size of the rings from 14 to 12 feet.
In making this last change, the Association followed
the example of the Manitoba Branch of the R. C. C. Club.
The argument, among others, in favor of the change
was the economy effected in the size of the building required
to cover a certain number of sheets of curling ice.
The increase in dues was made with the object of providing a fund to assist in defraying the expenses of the
annual Bonspiels. All of such expenses have heretofore
been borne by the curlers of the town in which the Bonspiel
was held, and it was often a heavy burden upon them.
It is hoped that in future the assessments w'll provide
ample funds for carrying on the Bonspiels.
Should Fortune smile anither year
An' we are blessed wi' routh o' gear
Tae distant Butte a team we'll steer
To hae a game o' curlin'. BRITISH COLUMBIA
\H
THE  ORIGIN  OF THE  "CORDWOOD"
TROFHY
When the Sandon Bonspiel of 1898 had ended, with
the throwing of the last stone in the finals for the Bostock
Cup, the devotees of the sport were still unsatisfied. Grimmett was there ; good old Sanford, the Sky Pilot ; and Wilson and Mairn; and the only "Harry Smith," and others-
all equally insatiable. One and all longed for just another
trial of skill—"anither end or twa, afore partin'."
Enthusiasm acquired a semi-religious aspect, and I
sudden idea, emanating from the fertile brain of the genia
Harry, brought about, to the satisfaction of all, a "final of
finals"—in connection with which the furnishing of
"ready-to-burn" cord of wood to the local parsonage was
at stake.
The. losers in the contest were to purchase the wood,
the winners to cut and split it.
A trophy of unique design, minus silver and gold, was
then and there designed and constructed. It was to be
awarded to the winning rink. So originated the "Cord-
wood" Trophy.
A description of it would be superfluous ; it speaks for
itself.    It must be seen to be appreciated.
Inscribed on one of its faces, we can read the words:
"His first, was narrow;
His second, went through;
With third, to the right;
What could poor Harry do?: CURLING ASSOCIATION
This verse refers to the difficulty which confronted Skip
Harry, with the score even, and his last stone yet to be
played. He saw two adverse stones counting, and seemingly
well guarded. Nothing daunted, the redoubtable Harry
studied, consulted, studied again, then backed up to the
hack. A grip of the handle, a pose of the broom and body,
a swing of the stone, and down the perfect ice sheet scudded
the "Ailsa Craigh."
How the trick was turned only Harry Smith knows;
suffice it may be  to say, the opposing rink bought the
wood.    The early morning train carried Harry, the conquering hero, with his non-metallic trophy, far, far away
from the saw-buck, towards his home at the Hub of the
Golden Kootenay.   As we bade him good-bye,
We sang his praises loud and lang,
We ca'd him "freen an' brither";
We nick-named him the "Cordwood King,"
An' since, he's had nae ither.
Two years later, in 1900, the trophy was turned over
to the K. C. A; and is now one of its most interesting and
valued trophies.
A rink, composed of uproarious Sandonites, shortly
afterwards challenged the ever-ready-to-play Harry. He
accepted, but, sad to say, in the battle he was defeated,
horse, foot and artillery; youth and brawn prevailed over
superior science.
Later Frank Tamblyn won it from the Sandonites.
Recent rumor has it that some Boundaryites have obtained
possession of it surreptitiously. Be this as it may, the
"Cordwood Trophy" will ever remain one of the most coveted trophies of the Association, and one which has produced more innocent merriment than all other trophies
combined.
"When I on former winters think,
How on the ice- we met wi' glee,
And cheerfu' swat, to clear the rink,
It gars me sigh, right heavylie." ' .    . CURLIANA  SONCS AND LITERATURE
11
THE CUNNING AULD CURLER.
Tradition tells us of an old curler who was anxious
to have his grave adorned with the broom kowe, but he
was afraid that his wife would hinder his desire. They never
could agree. Jean "aye contradickit" him, and knowing
she would do it until and beyond death, he gave her this
dying charge :
"When I am dead and gane, Jean,
A stane put ow'r my grave.
And dinna let a blade, Jean,
O' grass upon it wave.
Ye mauna let a flower, Jean,
E'er shed on it its bloom ;
And oh, jist mind, 'boon a', Jean,
The ne'er a bit o' broom.
"Ye ken I never liked them, Jean,
Nor where the wild flowers dwell,
But loved the whins and briars, Jean,
(They're thrawn things like yersel),
Sae let them ow'r me twine, Jean,
As in the winds they grew;
And when I'm lying cauld, Jean,
They'll mind me aye o' you."
The old curler judged rightly.   Jean did as she was not
told.    But in death, he did what he could not do in life—
he got the better o' his wife.
"And weel he judged, for ow'r his grave
Is mony a flower in bloom ;   r
And what he liked the best o' a'—
A bonnie buss o' broom." CURLING ASSOCIATION
"LIFE IS A GREAT BONSPIEL."
A Curler's Reflection.
Companions in the roarin' game.
Dear Brithers o' the broom,
This life is but a long Bonspiel,
Frae cradle to the tomb.
The slippery rink we a' maun tread,
Wi' prudent, tentie care,
Or we may find, ere weel begun,
Our lowest level there;
And on the "prickles" in our turn
We each maun tak' our stand,
And try to "draw straught up the lead"
Wi' firm and steady hand:
For wae betide us, if we swerve
Owre far to either side,
Or lag ahint "the hoggin' score,"
Or "owre the ice" should glide.
The cautious e'e, the prudent head,—
Gude faith, we sairly need it!
And nane the less, the friendly "scope,"
And neibor's "cowe" that gi'ed it.
And should we get a worthy shot
Within the sma' ring planted,
O, then, for "guard and angle-guard,"
For baith, we'll find, are wanted
To "close up ilka port" through which
Our foe, perchance, may rin,
Or, by some wily, crooked shot,
May "wick-an-curl" within.
Thus warily in Life's great match,
Aye "keepin' what we hae,"
Let's ever play the slipp'ry game
Wi' all the skill we may,
And when our "score" is totted up, BRITISH COLUMBIA
The handle o' the broom
May show a "nick or twa" for us
Against the day o' doom.
What matter, then, the cruel "rubs"
That scarce could be withstood, Sir
If but the Master Skip can say:
"Ye've done the best ye could, Sir."
—R. Burns B
THE CURLER'S APPEAL TO JOHNNIE FROST.
Air—"The Lassies o' the Kerry."
Och hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind 's ye should hae been;
Winter's come and winter's gane,
An' scarce a day was clear an' keen.
We waited lang to feel your grip;
The ice was hardly worth a preen :
Och, hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been.
We airted to the broomy kowe,
An' waled oor cows wi' mickle care;
We dreamed o' birlin' up the howe,
And fandly thocht to meet ye there;
But aye the rain kept dribblin' on,
The air was saft, an' Yule was green ;
Och, hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been.
Noo this is winter number three
Ye've hardly looked the road we're on,
An' though ye've fairly ta'en the gee,
An' pruived sae camsheugh an' sae thrawn
We lo'e ye still ; oor hearts are leal ;
We look for you wi' wistfu' een :
Och, hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been. CURLING ASSOCIATION
An' noo, it is the month o' Mairch,
The plewin' matches maist are by,
The verdant tassels o' the lairch
Will sune be wavin' i' the sky;
At last ye've ta'en a thocht and come,
And made a bonnie winter scene :
Och hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been.
Oor pond by this is nearly toom,
We thocht the season fanrly done;
There's hardly room for deuks to soom,
An' play at keek-bo wi' the sun.
We ettled at a game the day,—
We gaed through a' ice to the green:
Och hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been.
But we mauin seek some ither way
To court a lad that is so blate.
We'll try the aishphalt an' the spray
An' for oor Ailsas mak' a gait.
Till then, wi' brave an' patient mind,
We'll tak' the tallow wi' the lean :
Och hey, Johnnie Frost,
Ye're no sae kind's, ye should hae been.
—The Rev. A. Gordon Mitchell, D. D.
THE NOBLE GAME OF CURLING.
Air—"Castles in the Air."
The King is on his throne, wi' his sceptre an' his croon,
The elements o' cauld are the courtiers stannin' roun' ;
He lifts his icy haun', and he speaks wi' awe profound,
He chills the balmy air, and he binds the yielding ground;
He calms the raging winds when they moan and loudly rave,
78 1
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The hedges
an'
the trees a
An' the rinl
The wee bir
dsi
re glancing
n the blast
The sheep a
re
yin  close 1
The farmer
lea
ves the pi
loom,
Auld age g
oes
totterin'
He stops the runnin' stream, and he stills the dancin' wave;
He calls the Curlers on, to the fields of hope and fame,
An' the spreading lake resounds wi' the Noble Curliœ
ig the heaps of shinin'
blin' wi' the cauld,
^-guarded fauld;
:he weaver leaves the
| youth in manhood's
frae hame,
he Brave Old Curling
e crimson tide to flow,
i and ruddy glow;- I
charms o' wealth and
the bright triumphant
i the unco guid may
lin' stanes and broom.
5 love to name,—
the Rare Old Curling
bdue the manly form:
>' mist and storm, I
i wide extended sway,
It gars the
The rich f
When the
hour.
At the happ)
The melody
Ah! there's
The warm and glowin' clime will subdue
The Curler's happy hame is the land o' m
Where the dreary winter reigns, wi' a wi>
An' the healthy moors are clad in a robe
Till the gentle breath of spring blaws the icy fields awa'',
To woo the springin' flowers, and to melt the frozen snaw
When the curlin' days are o'er, a' the days o' life are tame,-
There's naething warms the heart like the Noble Curba)
Game.
79 CURLING ASSOCIATION
Ye may bounce ower yer billiards, grow great ower yer
gowf,
Or craw crouse ower yer cribbage in some cosy howf ;
Ye may whimper for whist an' for loo ye may grane,
But for me let me curl wi' the auld channel stane.
There the whirr o* the stane, an' the whisk o' the cowe,
An' the jokes an' the shouts, set my heart in a lowe;
It's a potion, a tonic, a cure for a' ills ;
Auld John Frost, believe me, supplies the best pills.
Hear the skip shouting winningly, "Lay me ane there.
Noo just be ower the collie, I'm wantin' nae mair;
Noo watch her, noo nurse her, noo help her awee.
Weel play'd,  sir! weel play'd, sir!    Oh,  she's ower,—let
her dee."
What words half sae cheering :   "It's a perfect pat-lid,"
Or, "Man, you're a player, but losh ! it's ower guid" ;
"A great shot, sir! Great shot, sir!" rings ower the pond.
"You play like a book, sir!" the echoes resound.
"Tak' an inwick on that, or an outwick on this;
Now mak' sure o' yer stane—I don't want ye to miss."
An' to do it,—ah man, sir! a kingdom is won
When, "Hoora !" shouts the skip, "ye've played it, my son."
Yes, gae bounce ower yer billiards, grow great ower yer
gowf,
Or craw crouse ower yer cribbage in some cosy howf;
Ye may whimper for whist, an' for loo ye may grane,
But let me to the ice, wi' the auld channel stane. BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIS AWFU' WEATHER.
(A Curler's Wail.)
Hi-
At nicht we think him freezing well,
Syné when next morning up we get
We find the roofs an' street are wet.
Last week we started snell an' keen,
An' ice on ilka loch was seen;
Bue wae's me ! ere the week was gane
Plumb doon cam' the perpetual rain.
A fickle
I've see
hs through;
Nae doot the winter's young as yet;
It's but December—we may get
A freezin' month or two for this,
An* curlers syne will be in bliss.
For where is there beneath the sky
A game that wi' oor ain can vie ?
Oh, for the humming of the stanes,
The ringing cheers that wake the plains f
The rapture in ilke e'e that's seen,
The excitement where the match runs keen ;
Oh, come, John Frost, an' end this thaw.
Oh, come an' let's see Hogganfiel'
A bonnie stretch o' burnished steel;
My flask is primed, I've a' thing richt;
Come on, Come John, this very nicht.
—The Baillie.
ML CURLING ASSOCIATION
CURLING SONG. .
By Alexander Maclagan.
Hurrah for Scotland's worth and fame,
A health to a' that love the name;
Hurrah for Scotland's darling game,—
The pastime o' the free, boys.
While heid an' heart an' arm are Strang,
We'll a' join in a patriot sang,
And sing its praises loud and lang,—
The roarin' rink for me, boys!
Hurrah, hurrah, for Scotland's fame,
A health to a' that love the name;
Hurrah for Scotland's darling game,—
The roarin' rink for me, boys!
Gie hunter chaps their break-neck hours;
Their slaughtering guns amang the muirs ;
Let wily fisher prove his powers
At the flinging o' the flee, boys.
But let us pledge ilk hardy chiel,
Wha's hand is sure, wha's heart is leal,
Wha glories in a brave bonspiel,—
The roarin' rink for me, boys.
Hurrah, Hurrah, etc.
In ancient days, time tells the fact
That Scotland's heroes werena slack
The heids o' stubborn foes to crack,
An' mak' the feckless flee, boys.
Wi' brave hearts, beating true and warm,
They aften tried the curlin' charm
To cheer the heart and nerve are arm—
The roarin' rink for me, boys.
Hurrah, Hurrah, etc.   .
JjP IRITISH COLUMBIA
May love
and friendshi
p crown o
nr cheer
We hae t
We ay
his nicht som
î are blythe t<
ere
May Fick
Aye keep
le Fortune, s
their ice bait
is:
[dean-
three for beef and bean
Hurrah, Hurrah, etc.
May health an' strength their toils reward,
And should misfortune's gales blow hard,
Our task will be to plant a guard,
Or guide them to the tee, boys.
Here's three times three for curlin' scenes,
Here's three times three for curlin' freens,
Here's thre«
Hurrah, Hurrah, etc.
A' ye that love Auld Scotland's name
A' ye that love Auld Scotland's fame
V ye that love Auld Scotland's game
A glorious sight to see, boys.
Up, brothers, up, drive care awa';
Up, brothers ,up, ne'er think o' thaw
Hurrah, H
SONG OF THE CURLER.
Wi:
The hoar frost lies on the bush and shrub.
Pray that the tack may last;
For what is fame to the roaring game,
When the stones are hurling fast? CURLING ASSOCIATION
Then drop all cares of business,
And take the handles down;
Take up the broom and hurry off
To leave the foggy town.
Who'd take a throne for a curling stone,
Or barter it for a crown?
The day is bright and frosty,
The ice is fast and good,
Then toss the stones and play the game
When Nature's in her mood.
We'll raise a shout e'er the day is out
That will startle the frost-bound wood..
The game is o'er and done with,
The sun is setting low;
We take our stones and make for home,
And o'er the white fields go.
Though the trees are bare, we forget our care,
As we trample through the snow.
—Cunningham Cuthbertson.
THE KING O' GAMES IS CURLING.
By John McMaster, Wheeling, W. Va.
The stars are oot, the nicht is clear,
The frost is biting keen.
The loch is near, oor skip is here—
Mine what we did yestreen.
Noo, brave men, steady,
Brooms all ready—
It's victory we mean.
The joy o' every curler's heart
Is winnin' near the tee; BRITISH COLUMBIA
Each man will surely do his part
To get up near the tee.
The kindly strife dies curlers good—
It lightens many a gloomy mood,
An' every man gangs hame richt prood
For lyin' near the tee.
lii
"Just haud yer stane wi' steady grup,
And aim straucht for the tee.
Noo men, stan' by tae soop it up,
An' bring it to the tee.
Just draw in canny by this stane—
You've duen't before—just try't again —
I'll pit ye against ony ane
For getting near the tee."
But there's a time for every side
To rest upon the tee.
It wudna do for ane to bide
Ower long upon the tee.
"Noo lift this pat-lid—canny there !
Soop hard, my lads, he's got it fair'
It's coming richt.    He'll pass the gair!
Aha! he's on the tee!
So is it in life's busy strife—
All striving for the tee;
Some giving health, and wealth, and life
To win up near the tee.
But some get hoggit at the score;
A guaird keeps ithers oot the door;
Some through the port come wi' a roar
An' drive richt past the tee.
The warl' is better for the moil
O' fechting for the tee;
It lightens many a care and toil- CURLING ASSOCIATION
This wrastle for the tee.
But when we're there, it's noble gran'
To gie a freen a liftin' haun'—
The sooper is a better man
For helpin' to the tee.
MY BONNY BROOMY KOWE.
In summers past I've seen the bloom
On mossy bank and knowe;
I've revelled 'mid thy sweet perfume,
My bonny broomy kowe.
I've garlanded thy yellow flowers,
I've lain beneath thy bough;
111 ne'er forget thy youthful prime,
My bonny broomy kowe.
You've been my frien' at ilka spiel,
You've polished up the howe,
You've mony a stane brocht owre the hog,
My bonny broomy kowe.
As memory noo recalls the past
My heart is set alowe;
Wi' moistened een I gaze on thee,
My bonny broomy kowe.
Time tells on a' ; your pith has gane,
And wrinkled is my brow;
We're no sae fresh as we hae been,
My bonny broomy kowe.
You're wizzened sair, and maist as thin
As hairs upon my pow;
I doubt our days are nearly dune,
My bonny broomy kowe.
When death comes o'er me let my grave
Be sacred frae the plough;
I
i BRITISH COLUMBIA
For cypress, plant a golden broom
That yet may be a "kowe."
Nor rest or peace shall e'er be yours-
A' curlers hear my vow—
Unless there grow abune my head
A bonny broomy kowe.
BEEF AND  GREENS
The Scottish Curler's Delight.
The doughty game of curling is nothing, unless it is
followed by a huge supper of "beef and greens" and whiskey :
toddy. These are essentials of the game, and the praise of
beef and greens and whiskey is dwelt on with an enthusiasm
that is given to nothing else in literature except the Homeric fodder of ambrosia and nectar. We can understand
that in order to enjoy beef and greens and whiskey it may
be necessary to bring one's self to the famine point by
curling, but it passes belief that anywhere else than in the
land of Scott and haggis could such viands be an inducement to sport. The game is a passion with the Scotch,
as we have said elsewhere,—a passion for which the minister will shirk Ins preparation for the pulpit, the judge
desert the bench, the lawyer neglect his client, the blacksmith quit his forge, the navvy drop his spade, and the
laborer let the cupboard-of his wife and children go empty.
The game is a passion, but the supper only is worthy of
the paean of the poet: "The table is all alive with hot
animal food. A stream of rich distilled perfume reaches the
roof, at the lowest measurement of seven feet high. A
savory vapor! The feast takes all its name and most of
its nature from beef and greens ; the one corned, the other CURLING ASSOCIATION
crisp ; the two combined the glory of Martinmas. The beef
'^pnsists almost entirely of lean fat rather than of fat lean,
and the same may be said of the bacon. See ! how the beef
cuts longwise with the bone, if it be not, indeed, a sort of
sappy gristle. Along the edges of each plate, as it falls over
from the knife-edge among the gravy-greens, your mouth
waters at the fringe of fat, and you look for the mustard. Of
such beef and greens there are four trenchers, each like a
tea-tray, and yet you hope that there is a 'corps de reserve'
in the kitchen. And then the whiskey! Oh, Saint John!
From such a feast even the clergyman curler found it difficult to tear himself away, though it might be late Saturday
night. Dr. Wotherspoon, minister of Beith in the last century, was supping with his fellow-curlers at Shand's Inn
one Saturday night as late as eleven o'clock. The innkeeper's wife, a douce and pious matron, afraid that the
minister's good name might be evil spoken of, patted his
shoulder and whispered in his ear a hint about his public
duty, the next day being the Lord's day. He replied aloud,
"A minister who could not shake a sermon out of his coat-
sleeve is a silly cuif." The late Dr. Adamson, of Cupar-
Fife, colleague to Dr. Campbell, father of the Lord Chancellor, at a similar late Saturday night supper, was about
to depart, alleging that he must prepare for the Sunday
service. For two previous Sundays he had been holding
forth on Judas Iscariot, and a member of his congregation
who sat at the table detained him with, "Sit down, doctor,
sit down; there's nae need for ye to gang awa'; just gie
Judas another wallop in the tow."
We think it well to add that it is not now universally
true that Scotsmen are so fond of whiskey as is generally
asserted. There are plenty of curlers who are tee-totallers.
There is a great decrease of drinking in Auld Scotia in
recent years. In Canada, too, there is far less drinking,
at or after the game, than there was twenty years ago.
Our statements, however, in this regard might seem untrue when the undermentioned menu is perused. BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Glasgow Cronies' Club, at a dinner lately given
by it, has done its level best to maintain the traditions of
the whiskey-loving Scotch. This is what faced the members at their annual dinner recently:
MENU.
(A wee drappie before dinner clears the road fine.)
Kail.
Fush: Caller herrin'.    (To eat herrin' without Whusky is
sheer temptation o' Providence.
Second   Coorse:   Minced   Collops   and   Champit   Tatties.
(Whusky gangs better wi' Collops than ony
freevolous drink.)
Third Coorse: Haggis.    (A drap o' Auld Kirk here is a
releegious duty.)
Fourth Coorse : Bubbly Jock and Sassingers.    (He's but a
fusionless body who leaves Whusky out
o' this coorse.)
Kebbuck and Bannocks.
(After this maist folk begin tae drink Whusky.)
WHERE CURLING STONES COME FROM.
Curling stones come mostly from Ailsa Craig, Ayrshire. Of attributed volcanic origin, the lonely crag is
famous the world over for the excellence of the stones
that are taken from its quarry, which is the property of the
Earl of Ailsa. Something like a thousand pairs are produced annually, and dispatched to those quarters of the
globe where the "roarin' game" holds favor. Curling
stones are, by reason of the place that begets them, frequently called "Ailsa Craighs." They are so called by Dr.
Gomm, in his short history of the "Cordwood Trophy."
89
\y THE  OLIVER  CUP
W.  G.   McMynn's Rink, of Gree
Revelstoke  Bonspiel 1904
m §r
I
\a CURLING ASSOCIATION
THE ORIGIN OF ARTIFICIAL ICE RINKS.
The chaplain of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club is
in possession of an interesting and valuable autograph
letter written by the poet, Allan Cunningham, to Sir Richard Broun of Coulstoan. Sir Richard had evidently sent
the poet a copy of his "Memofibilia Curliana Mabenensia."
It was a work (since well known to all who take an interest
in the game) mainly concerned with the doughty deeds of
renowned curling clubs in Dumfriesshire, such as Loch-
maben, Sanquhar, Wanlockhead, etc. The publication would
thus be of great interest to "Honest Allan," who was himself a Dumfriesian, born in the parish of Keir, December 7,
1784. The love of the game to which he refers would be
an inheritance from his father, who had many a merry
game on the loch, on which the first steamboat is said to
have been launched. Allan was in his early years apprenticed to a stonemason, who, no doubt, like most of his
class, would be a keen curler. It will be remembered that
as a boy of twelve Allan was at the funeral of Robert Burns,
whose farm of Ellisland adjoined Cunningham's home at
Dalswinton, and that he afterwards wrote the poet's life.
The following is the letter addressed to Sir Richard, which
we publish with the knowledge that it will be read with
interest by the curlers of British Columbia:
Belgrave Place, 26 March, 1832.
Sir:—Your little clever work on Curling has many
charms for me; it is the production of a land I love; it
is written in a very graphic manner, and moreover it treats
of a game of which I am passionately fond. I have played
from morning till midnight and sometimes by the light of
candles, often by the light of the moon; and I once had
the supreme satisfaction of, I may say, leading a rink of
tradesmen who for a period of eighty years had been always
beat and sometimes soutered by the Farmers, but who were
on that day victorious. You must not, however, think from
this that I esteem myself worthy of ranking with the ac-
90
W BRITISH COLUMBIA
complished Skips of Closeburn or Lachmaben; in truth,
though I sometimes play miraculous shots, I was anything
but a siccar hand. When I go again into Scotland, I shall
make it winter, and wind my way to Lochmaben, of which
borough my father was a burgess, for he lived long at
Ramerscales, and seek admission among the worthies of
Queen Marjory.
Artificial rinks owe their existence to the wisdom of a
citizen "of "the Friars Vennel, Dumfries—I say what I know
to be true. That ingenious person, I forget his name, having a bonspiel to play in 1794, selected and swept and made
his rink on the Nith the evening before; but to his confusion he found it occupied in the morning by a cloud of
Souters who refused to leave it. Upon which he swore he
would have a rink of his own. This he made by laying
clay all along the wall line of his garden' and continuing
through two frosty days to pour in water drawn by Jimmy
Connel the Burn drawer. He made a capital rink, I was
told by one who saw and played on it.
With regard to the quality of the stone, we reckoned
the Sanquhar the best, and with respect to the shape something approaching the Closeburn, because the friction was
little and the stone could be played on any ice. A broad
sole is not easily laid fair on, is apt to follow the bias of the
ice, and when the rink is drug or moist, is the mischief to
put over the hog score. I once played a game with nine
men on a side and for three ends running my stone alone
passed the hog.    I soled it fair and delivered it freely.
For the names of old curling stones which belonged
to the lochs, and were no one's property, let me add that
of "Lockerby Hill," played by Alexander Johnstone of
Lockerby, alias Pavior Sawney. It was some 90 lbs, weight,
and once caused blows on Halleath Loch. Some one,
when Lockerby Hill was running dead to the mark, threw
shot lead in before it and stopt it in mid rink. On Dalswin-
ton Loch we had the "Cocket Hat," a brown stone and CURLING ASSOCIATION
keen. "Sleeping Maggie," a gray stone and dour, some
70 lbs. weight, and the "Gray Goose," so called from the
color and from the handle being curved like the goose's
neck. We had another, a lobshaped or sugar-loaf-shaped
stone, being high and narrow, and capital at running posts.
—I remain, my dear Sir, yours very truly,
ALLAN CUNNINGHAM.
CURLING AS A WINTER SPORT, AND SOME OF.
ITS LESSONS.
By James Wallace, of Lindsay, Ont.
"One moment now may give us more
Than years of toiling reason;
Our minds shall drink at every pore
The spirit of the season."
That man needs recreation, if his work is not merely
to be done, but to be done with zest and pleasure, is now
an undisputed fact. The axiom that where there is an
expenditure of energy, provision must be made for what
is expended, else speedy decay follows, has come to be
recognized as a universal law. The Joseph Chamberlains
who can work from morning to night without recreation,
are few and far between, and even in their case, if the collapse is long delayed, it is inevitable; for if the debit side
is constantly increasing without a corresponding increase
on the credit side, there can be only one result. We need
recreation, not only that we may not become dead men,
but to guard against becoming half dead men, who may do
their work, but whose work lacks the element of rounded
out completeness, and gives no pleasure to the worker
while performing it. We hear of certain productions that
"smell of the lamp"; if the author or manufacturer had M
il
BRITISH COLUMBIA
come out into the open air, that disagreeable odor would
have been absent.
Some people, sad to say, find themselves' so situated
that they cannot give recreation its rightful place in their
program, but
"Our life is turned
Out of her course, wherever man is made
An offering, or a sacrifice, a tool
Or implement, a passive thing employed
As a brute mean."
x\nd for those who have the opportunity, loyalty to themselves and to their work demands that they duly apportion
their time and give recreation its own place. "How do
you grow old so gracefully?" asked a lady of Alexander
Dumas. "Madam," replied that brilliant writer, "I give
all my time to it." This witty reply suggests no lop-sided
development, but a proper adjustment directed toward the
greatest of arts, the art of living. Recreation contributes
its share toward the element of gracefulness in the art of
living, and no season of the year presents greater opportunities for recreation than winter, with her "frosty breath
that pierces garments thick and thin." So we welcome her
because we are likely not only to have more time for recreation during the winter season, but because of the manlaa
sports she brings in her train, and as sturdy men an™f
women we hail her with the Canadian poet, John Reade,
whc
"Oh winter! if thy anger
Affrights the poor of heart.
Best humored and most cheery
Of play-fellows thou art,
"E'en summer cannot rival
Thy many-sided glee;
For young and old, for maid and boy
Thou hast a store of healthy joy
To bind our hearts to thee." CURLING ASSOCIATION
And with her advent winter brings no sport more de-
ghtful than curling. Without disparaging any of the other
flinter sports in which Canada abounds, there is none stands
on a higher plane than the game of curling. There is no
sport better suited for old and young, more democratic,
more delightful, or more health-giving; and none so free
from the undesirable adjuncts that are found, not only in
many of our professional, but also in many of our amateur
sports.   True, at one time the curler's ideal was:
"Wad Fortun' grant me what I want
I'd pray for health o' body,
A healthy mind to sang inclined,
An' nae distaste for toddy!"
The toddy, to "wat your whustle," was one of the indispensables at the game, and some of us can remember
seeing old curlers go up to their opponents, when the latter
were playing exceptionally well, and as they extracted a
cork, saying, "here's a wee drap to steady your haun'."
The "wee drap" is now seldom either seen or tasted at
matches, and though to some "auld Scotsmen" this may
seem to mark a general decline and deterioration in the
modern exponents of the "roarin' game," curlers generally
regard the change in a different light. We are glad to
know that most clubs not only discountenance "its consumption on the premises," but also have taken steps to
prohibit profanity in their clubs, even though this may be
a very great inconvenience to some of "the brethren" when
they miss an easy shot.
Curling is not too violent an exercise to prevent anyone from indulging in it, yet it affords all the exercise
anyone needs, if he will only follow the stones from end to
end and be ready to
"Sweep distemper from the busy day,
Run o'er with gladness."
And make the chalice of the.big round year
1 BRITISH COLUMBIA
But, if we are to get all out of the game that it has for us
we must aim to become artists at it. A recent writer says
that "to turn work into play is the highest achievement of
active life." If so, then play when properly played must
be a real art, for as the writer continues, "a full nature,
putting itself forth with ease and power, and expressing
that which is distinctive and individual in it, in the work of
mind and hand,—this is what the worker becomes when he
is transformed into the artist." So we ought to aim to
play the game with ease and freedom, that through it a
delicacy of touch and grace might be added to our wholef
life, and thus get from the game all that it has for us. It
has been well said that a man may get to his journey's end?
by the light of a lantern, bût he is less secure than the man;'
who travels by daylight, and he loses the landscape ; so in
like manner there are many fine features of the game that
we may miss, if we go into it half-heartedly or with our
eyes shut or even half shut.
The game has much to teach us about the art of living,
the great game of life. We are taught, for example, thatrf
we must face the problems of life calmly and soberly with a
clear eye and steady hand ; that only where there is coolness,
combined with definiteness of aim and directness of application, need we hope for satisfactory results. It reminds
us that we must learn the lesson of adaptability and be ever
able to adjust ourselves to new and varying conditions;
that we must develop the qualities of generalship, be quick*;
to size up a situation and to take advantage of an oppor-j;
tunity. If you are a skip you must learn to estimate cor-..
rectly the. ability of yourselves and of others. When a
possible shot presents itself, in balancing up playing ability >
as over against the difficulties of the situation, you will
learn to know whether it is better to attempt the brilliant^
but difficult thing, or something easier that might bring
surer results.
Curling affords us splendid opportunities for cultivât-
1 self-control, not only in refraining from unseemly ex-?;
95 CURLING ASSOCIATION
plosions when our side plays badly, but in denying ourselves
an undue manifestation of delight when our opponents are
playing for us rather than for themselves. The curler
learns, too. that to play well he must play unselfishly—each
must play for all and all for each; and he must sweep his
fellow-player's stone as if it it were his own; in short, the
curler must learn to "look not only on his own things, but
also on the things of another" ; and he who has fully learned
this truth will never go very far wrong in any of the relationships of life.
Let us, however, remember that "no deep, great productive quality or power," to quote from the same writer
again, "comes to a man by accident, for while the capacity
for developing such a quality or power must be inborn, its
unfolding depends not only on skill, but also upon character," and we must show our character in our play; in other
words, we must play fairly. Any injustice or unfairness on
the rink shows a moral defect that will undoubtedly make
trouble in other social relationships.
"Him only pleasure leads and peace attends,
Him, only him, the shield of Jove defends,
Whose means are fair and spotless as his end."
Let it never be forgotten that it is the enjoyment we
have and the training we receive in playing the game, not
in winning, that constitutes its real worth.    As the Rev.
R. W. Burns, the President of the Ontario Curling Association, aptly says, "Let us play up and play the game.   Play
for the jolly sport of it ; for the strengthening of muscle and
nerve; for the genuine good fellowship there is in it.    Let
us play to win, and if we do, let us be fair and chivalrous
victors.    If defeat is our lot, let .us be gentlemanly and
thoughtful losers."
Let us meet at all times as brothers, and may
"All ills that flesh is heir to
Be banished from our train;
And may the pleasure of the scene
Keep in each heart its memory green
Until we meet again."
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
A FEW ANECDOTES AND STORIES ANE NT
CURLERS AND CURLING
Let me play the fool;
With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come ;
And let my liver rather heat with wine,
Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
Why should a man whose blood is warm within,
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?
Sleep when he wakes ? arid creep into the jaundice
By being peevish?
-—Mer. of Venice.
In the course of centuries a great many anecdotes,
stories and sayings have gathered about the game illustrative of its fascination, its development of the virtues,
and its superior attraction over everything else in life, except, it may be, "Beef, greens and whusky."
We   have   gathered   together  a  few   of  them—most
probably not the best, but yet the best at our command—
and trust they may amuse a few of our readers during an ;
idle moment.
"GANG WHAR THERE'LL BE NAE ICE."
The presence of the 'meenister" on the ice generally
restrains—if restraint is necessary—anything approaching j
profanity. Even with the minister present, one old curler
could not .entirely control his indignation at the play of
a stupid "lead," but did not like to tell him to go to
"Hades." He, however, got over the difficulty by exclaiming:    "Mon, there'll be nae ice whar ye're gaun."
97 CURLING ASSOCIATION
"FOR G 'S SAKE, SWEEP."
A doughty skip of the Fraser clan had been restrained
from the free gift of speech for several seasons, through the
presence of a "sky pilot" on his rink. The third year he
had upon his rink an Anglican clergyman
"Of manners gentle, of affections mild !
In wit a man, simplicity a child."
The poor parson had the heart to sweep when occasion
required it, but not the physical strength to perform the
. duty long. A stone had been thrown, at the skip's request,
for the purpose of guarding a port. Much depended upon
guarding this entrance from the enemy. The stone in its
course was a little slow. The excited skip shouted to the
parson, "Sweep! Sweep! Sweep her up!" The poor clerical
did as he was bid with a zeal and energy that deserved
praise, yet he did not sweep in a manner that satisfied the
skip. The latter, exasperated beyond silent endurance,
at length shouted in despair, "Sweep, Parson, Sweep i For
G—d's sake, sweep!"
EVEN DEATH MUST BE POSTPONED TO
CURLING.
An enthusiastic curler absorbed in the game from day
to day during favorable weather, expressed the earnest
hope that his wife, who was ill and at death's door,
"wouldna' dee till there came a thaw, else he would no' be
able to attend the funeral."
WOULD DENY HIM THE SACRAMENT.
A couple of servants saw the minister going to the
curling pond.    One of them criticised him, and said that
instead of curling every day he ought to be making sermons
and visiting the folk.    But the other defended him, and
98
3 I
 BRITISH COLUMBIA	
thought he should take every chance he could get at curl-,
ing the stone. "If I were a minister," said he, "and there
was ony man in the parish who wouldna' tak' at least one
day's guid curling every winter, I can tell you what it is,
I would deny him the sacrament."
THE MEENISTER'S SCRUPLES O' CONSCIENCE,^
The Rev. Adam Walderstone, minister at Bathgate,
was an excellent man and curler, who died in 1768. Late||
one Saturday night one of his elders received a challenge^
from, the people of Shotts to the curlers of Bathgate to"
meet them early Monday morning; and after tossing about
half the night at a loss how to convey the pleasing news tô">
the minister, he determined to tell him before he enteredll
the pulpit.
When Mr. Walderstone came into the session house,
the elder said to him in a low tone, "Sir, I've something?
to tell ye: there's to be a parish play with the Shotts folk;
the morn, at "
"Whist, man, whist!" was the rejoinder. "Oh, fie
shame, John ! fie shame ! Speaking to-day about warldly;
recreation !"
But the ruling passion proved too strong for the
worthy clergyman's scruples of conscience, for just as he;,
was about to enter the inner door of the church he sud-;v.
denly wheeled round and returned to the elder, who was^
now standing at the plate in the lobby, and whispered in
his ear, "But whan's the hour, John? I'll be sure and be^
there."
The Reverend gentleman then mounted the pulpit, and
with thoughts of curling predominant, he absentmindedlyf '
exclaimed, "Let us all join heartily in singing:
I' ' 'Tis music dear to a curler's ear—
Enjoyed by him alone—
The merry clink of the curling rink
And the boom of the roarin' stone.' "
99
1 CURLING ASSOCIATION
WOULD GIVE UP THE MEENISTRY.
A Kootenay "sky-pilot" became so absorbed in the
game that, it was alleged, he neglected his sermon-making
and folk-visiting. On Saturday night he would curl till
twelve o'clock; in-fact, he often broke the Sabbath by a
minute or two, in order to conclude an end.
A portion of his flock objected to his preference for
the roarin' game, to the alleged neglect of his Kirk duties.
Nothing daunted, the curling enthusiast never lost an opportunity of indulging in his favorite pastime.
The breach on this account grew wider between the
parson and a part of his flock, until he at length resigned.
Writing back from F , his new charge, to friend Grigor,
of his old congregation, he said : "You will observe that I
was at the last Bonspiel at Cranbrook. You see, I still continue a curler, and take no good lesson from past experience. I will curl as lang as I can wiggle, and if it came
to a question of my giving up the meenistry or curlin', I
think I'd give up the meenistry."
NEITHER A CURLER IN THIS WORLD NOR
THE NEXT.
A story very much on a par with the story first told,
occurred at a curling match in a rural district in Scotland.
The minister, an enthusiastic but poor curler, chanced
to be on the side skipped by the local mason. At a critical
period of the game, the minister put in a very bad shot,
whereupon the mason exclaimed, in angry tones:
"Ay, I tell ye, sir, ye'll never mak' a curler in this world,
and I am dootin' if there'll be ony ice in the neist ane ye BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE   AULD   CURLER   ACCOUNTS   FOR   WEEL-
LUM'S GUID PLAY.
A young minister (who was known to use his prede
cessor's sermons) was skipping a rink in which Tammas  J
the   old  grave-digger,   and  Weellum,   the  beadle   of  the j
church, were playing.   Tammas had taught Weellum much J
about curling—in fact, all he knew.
Weellum had just delivered his stane when the min
ister shouted:   "Soop her up, Tammas, soop her up!"
Poor old Tammas, whose days at curling were drawing J
to an end, plied his broom as vigorously as his age and I
rheumatism would allow him, and puffing and blowing with I
the greatest effort, brought Weelum's stane to the desired spot.
"Well played,  Weellum,  vera well played!"  shouted
the minister.
"Aye," said Tammas, who, with his advancing age, was j
jealous of the beadle's playing; "it was weel played, but it j
mightna' hae been, had he no' gotten his knowledge frae
ane that gaed afore, like some young meenisters I ken."
THE KIRK AND THE MEENISTER.
On the day of a match at R , it was found that the
two opposing rinks were each a man short. It was finally
; agreed that the Rev. Mr. Blank should fill the vacancy on
one side, while Surveyor Kirk took the absent man's place
on the other. The rink which took on the reverend gentleman was admittedly the best rink, and had won in many
a prior contest. The minister, however, was an indifferent
player, and undoubtedly weakened it. Surveyor Kirk, on
the other hand, was a first-class player, and added much
strength to the rink he joined. At any rate, the side which i
took on the surveyor won in the contest; whereupon the
victorious rink,  rejoicing in its unexpected victory, ban- CURLING ASSOCIATION
tered their defeated opponents, one of them ejaculating:
"Oh ay! ye were very guid to gie us the meenister, but ye
took guid care to tak' the 'Kirk'."
DISESTABLISHED THE KIRK.
During the Yule holidays some years ago. two rinks in
a local curling club were holding a match. The last man
to play was the leading Liberal in the district. When he
threw his stone, it struck the minister's and sent it spinning; then, rebounding, it knocked the laird's stone, which
.was the "shot," out of its place, and lay "shot" itself.
One of the rink thereupon exclaimed :
"Grand, mon, grand! Ye've dune't noo, ye've dun't
noo. Ye've disestablished the Kirk, turned out the Laird,
and ta'en his place yoursel'."
"Aye," replied the leading Liberal, who had made the
erratic shot, "aye ; but I'm dootful if ye'll pay me the rents."
A FORTUNE IN COPPERS.
The curlers had finished a game, and were carrying
their curling stones to the club house. One very rich and
proud gentleman requested an old worthy, called Dauvit,
to carry his stone, at the same time handing him a tip.
A friend of Dauvit's, desiring to know how much he got,
slipped up to him and began by adroitly asking him if he
knew the gentleman.
"No, I dinna ken wha he is ava. Ken ye?" returned
Dauvit.
"Well," said his friend, "they tell me the mon is worth
thousands." " .
"Eh mon!" ejaculated Dauvit, "he must keep it a in
coppers." BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CURLING TANGS.
During the severe spell of frost almost all outdoor
work suspended, Jeems Dorbie, the mason, resolved one
morning to have a day's sport at the curling pond. On
leaving, he informed his wife that he was going to start
curling. She made no reply, as she did not know exactly
what was meant. However, when ;he had gone, she burst
into her neighbor's house, with the exclamation:
"Weel, Mrs. MacCaltter, what d'ye think Jeems has
ta'en in his heid noo?"
"Na, what ava?"
aun oot at the door the day, 'I'm
:, I pity ye, for thae twa lassies!
three times a day; I've been per-
hae curlint tangs came into the;
îa licht in't, whanever he comes
Jorbie ; "I'll burn them."
GOOD AS HIS MAISTER."
ngton was a keen curler, as was alsojs
his head gardener. On one occasion when they were both
playing in an important match, the gardener was skip of
the rink, in which the Earl was third player. It was the
Earl's turn to throw his stone, and a good deal depended on
his shot to put the "house" on the right side, and the skip
was greatly excited over the probable result.
"Jist lay on for that," said he, placing his "kowe," or
broom, near the edge of the opponent's stone that he wished
removed, "an' I'll gie ye the shot."
But the Earl was not very sure of the gardener's directions.
"Don't you think," he suggested, "I should play "
"Jist ye play as I tell ye," cried the skip, forgetting
whom he was addressing, "or else gang off the ice."
103
"He sa
ys, says he
gc
in' to sta
rt curlin'.'
"Weel,
Mrs.  Do
fe
he
mine are
:tly he'rtl
"Eh, b
at it, twa
jroken  sin
ut I'll pu
ha
me," exel
aimed Mrs
JOC
EC'S AS G
The Ea
rl of Eglii CURLING ASSOCIATION
LET THE WATER SIPE DOWN.
A few curlers one day arrived at a pond, to find the
| ice covered with water.
"No curlin' to-day!" they ejaculated, in dismay.
"Toots, what are ye haiverin' about?" cried an ingenious rustic near by.    "Can ye no' bore holes i' the ice
let the water sipe doon?"
WOULDNA CURL IN SEED-TIME NOR HAIRST.
At a Bonspiel once, an old farmer appeared on the
ice for the first time to witness the game. He was much
delighted with the sport, and a neighbor said to him:
"Man, Andra, you should join our Club, and become
curler."
"Weel," said Andra, "I've nae objection to joining your
Club and paying onything that is to be paid in connection
wi' it, but ye maunna expect me to come here an' curl either
I the hurry 9' the seed-time or o' the hairst. It's vera guid
i' the noo, when there's naething can be dune at hame."
THE DUKE AND THE DEUKS.
While playing one day, the Duke of X had the misfortune to send one of his curling stones some distance beyond the tee, and into a marshy part of the loch. He was
a very wealthy duke.
"Come, Jamie, get that stone for me, and I'll give
you a penny," said the Duke, addressing a well-known
half-wit, who was watching the game.
"Na, na," answered Jamie; "jist soom in for't yersel.
Deuks aye like to babble wi' water. I'll keep my feet dry
and save ye the penny." BRITISH COLUMBIA
M
LYIN' TWA.
Two worthies were returning home from a curling
match, more elevated with Scotch than with their success
at the game. They had not proceeded far on the way when
they both fell headlong on the slippery road, one on top of
the other.
" 'Od," said Tammas, who was the first to find his
voice, "that drink's nae to be meddl'd wi', for it aye proves
a doonfa'."
'Well, maybe it does," replied the other, "but we've
made mair success wi't than we had wi' the curlin'. It's
the best score we've made the day, for we lie twa this
A DEEVIL OF A SLIDE.
Another old worthy who had spent the day at the
curling pond and the evening over "the beef and greens"
that are so much relished by all lovers of the roaring game,
at length set out for home, "setting his staff wi' a' his ski|E
to keep him siccar."
When he reached a steep incline leading to Glenhowe
Mill, which was from top to bottom a sheet of ice, Andra
lost his balance when half way up and went straight
to the bottom without a halt. On rising, he was accosted
by a stranger, who asked, "Is this the road to Glenhowe?"
"Nae," replied Andra, "there's nae road to Glenhowe,
but there's a deevil of a slide."
FROZEN HARD.
Like the worthy Andra of the foregoing, Dàuvit Anderson had indulged too freely after the curling match,
where he had won the medal.
During his absence from hame, at the curling game,
Mrs. Anderson had cleaned the kitchen, and stained the CURLING ASSOCIATION
jambs and mantelpiece with patent black varnish. Dauvit
arrived home, and, leaning against the mantelpiece, viewed
his trophy with much pride and pleasure, and, at the same
time, lit his pipe.
"Come awa' t' yer bed, Dauvit," cried his better half;
"It's baith cauld and late."
"Aye, aye, Janet, my woman," responded Dauvit,
roused from his revery, "but losh! this is an awfu' nicht;
I never saw the ice sae keen, arid here I'm frozen to the
very jamb—frozen hard, Janet, my woman, frozen hard."
A RAINY CURLING SEASON.
It haint no use, as I can see,
For mortals such as us to be
A-faultin' nature's wise intents,
Or lockin' horns with Providence.
It haint no use to grumble and complain ;
It's just as cheap and easy to rejoice.
When God sorts out the weather
And sends rain, then rain's my choice.
—Riley.
There are mony I could name
Can handle besom, handle stane
Wi' ony son o' Scotland's ain,
At the gran' auld game o' curlin
As mem'ry green recalls the past,
My heart is set alowe;
Wi' moistened een I gaze on thee,
My bonny broomy kowe.
106 Il
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE  BEARERS
OF
ASSOCIATIONS   IN   CANADA   AND   THE  UNITED
STATES, AFFILIATED WITH THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN CURLING CLUB  OF SCOTLAND
i.—ONTARIO  CURLING ASSOCIATION  BRANCH.
PATRON
His Excellency Earl Grey,
Governor-General of Canada, etc., etc.
HONORARY PRESIDENT
The Hon. The Lieutenant-Governor, W. Mortimer Clark.
PRESIDENT
Rev. R. N. Burns, B. A., D. D., Brampton Club.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
ist—W. T. Toner, Collingwood Club.
2nd—W. J. Crossen, Cobourg Club.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. W. G. Wallace, M. A., D. D., Toronto Club.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
J. A. MacFadden, 24 King St. West, Toronto.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
C. W. Cartwright, Hamilton Club.
J. W. Corcoran, Toronto Queen City Club.
D. Carlyle, Prospect Park Club, Toronto.
W. C. Matthews, Toronto Granite Club.
W. D. Mcintosh, Toronto Caledonian Club.
Geo. Duthie, Jr., Parkdale, Toronto.
Number of Affiliated Clubs, 91. CURLING ASSOCIATION
2.—QUEBEC BRANCH
(or Canadian Branch.)
PRESIDENT
R. W. Tyre, Montreal Club.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
ist—G. H. Cornell, Heather Club.
2nd—Archibald Hood, Ârnprior Club.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. Dr. Barclay, Thistle Club.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Wm. D. Aird, Thistle Club.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Lt.-Col. Stevenson, Caledonian Club.
David Guthrie, St. Lawrence Club.
Number of Affiliated Clubs, 32.
3.—MANITOBA BRANCH.
PATRON
A. F. D. MacGachen.
PRESIDENT
W. A. Carson.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
ist—Wm. Robertson, Kenora.
2nd—John Angus, Emerson.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
J. P. Robertson, Winnipeg.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. G. B. Wilson, Ph. D., Winnipeg. If"
■I
1
BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXECUTIVE
W. L. Parish, Winnipeg. W. F. Payne, Winnipeg.
E. J. Rochon, Winnipeg. F. O. Fowler, Winnipeg.
I. Pitblado, Winnipeg. J. Fred Palmer, Winnipeg.
R. H. Smith, Winnipeg. C. W. Huffman, Winnipeg.
R. A. C. Manning, Winnipeg.
BARD
Thomas Todd, Russell.
Number of Affiliated Clubs, 94.
4.—SASKATCHEWAN BRANCH.
PATRON
Hon. A. E. Forget, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province
of Saskatchewan.
HONORARY PRESIDENT
Hon. Walter Scott, Premier of the Province of
Saskatchewan.
PRESIDENT
Dr. W. Henderson, of Qu'Appelle.
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT
E. M. Saunders, of Moose Jaw.
SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT
C. J. Rosborough, of Grenfell.
THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT
Horace Pain, of Milestone.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. E. A. Henry, of Regina.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
R. B. Ferguson, of Regina.
109 CURLING ASSOCIATION
J. A. MacCaul, Indian Head.
L. Rankin, Regina.
L. T. McDonald, Regina.
D. S. McCannell, Regina.
W. G. Vicars, Qu'Appelle.
J. L. Thompson, Areola.
EXECUTIVE.
P. Cooper, Regina.
W. Williamson, Regina.
H. Acaster, Regina.
A. Blair, Lumsden.
Horace Pain, Milestone.
G. Hill, Sintaluta.
Number of Affiliated Clubs,
5.—KOOTENAY BRANCH.
(Now B. C.)
Year 1906.
PATRON
His Honor Judge Wilson.
PRESIDENT
A. B. Mackenzie, Rossland.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
1st—W. G. McMynn, Greenwood.
2nd—N. Çavanaugh, Sandon.
3rd—L. B. DeVeber, Nelson.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. H. R. Grant, Rossland.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
H. P. McCraney, Rossland.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
L. A. Campbell, Rossland.       Dudley Blackwood, Nelson.
C. H. Parsons, Golden. Wm. McQueen, Rossland.
H. A. Brown, Revelstoke.      J. Crawford, Phoenix.
Number of Affiliated Clubs, 12. BRITISH COLUMBIA
6.—NOVA SCOTIA BRANCH.
HONORARY PRESIDENT .
Hon. W. Ross, Halifax.
PRESIDENT
W. P. Cunningham, Antigonish.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
J. Fisher Grant, New Glasgow.
D. Murray, Truro.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. Dr. M'Millan, Halifax.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Walter C. Murray, Halifax.
Number of Affiliated Clubs, 10.
7.—ALBERTA BRANCH.
PATRON
J. H. Morris, Edmonton.
PRESIDENT
H. S. McLeod, Calgary.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
1st—M. C. MaeLean, McLeod.
2nd—Jas. Aird, Millarville.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
J. R. Miquelon, Calgary.
CHAPLAIN
Rev. R. A. Pearson, Banff.
EXECUTIVE
O. C. Smith. J. A. Simpson, M. P. P.
Jas. Smart. C. S. Pringle. "*iîÉ
CURLING ASSOCIATION
8.—UNITED STATES.
ST. ANDREWS (NEW YORK).
PRESIDENT
John A. Rennie.
VICE-PRESIDENT
Wm. A. Milligan.
REPRESENTATIVE MEMBER G. N. C. C.
OF UNITED STATES
John McMillan.
REPRESENTATIVE MEMBER R. C. C. C.
Forest Macnee.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Francis Dykes, 1112 Garden Street, Hoboken, N. J.
PRESIDENT
George C. Reid.
VICE-PRESIDENT
Thomas McVicar.
REPRESENTATIVE MEMBERS.
George Grieve.
John H. Ferguson.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Geo. W. Peene.
The compiler concludes that these two affiliated organizations are local clubs under the jurisdiction of one
or other of the two great American Associations below
mentioned, neither of which are as yet affiliated with the
Royal Caledonian Curling Club. BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE BEARERS GRAND NATIONAL CURLING
CLUB OF THE UNITED STATES.
PRESIDENT
G. B. Allen, Utica, N. Y.
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT
Forrest Macriee, New York.
SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
S. Thornton, Newark, N. J.
CHAPLAIN
S. R. Rossiter, D. D., New York.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
George W. Peene, Yonkers, N. Y.
OFFICE BEARERS N. W. CURLING ASSOCIATION,
U. S. A.
PRESIDENT
A. H. Smith, Duluth, Minnesota.
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT
fj. McCutcheon, Minneapolis, Minn.
SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT
Louis Hanitchi, Superior, Wisconsin.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
Stephen H. Jones, Duluth, Minnesota.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
A. B. Vanbergen, St. Paul, Minnesota.
C. T. Fairbairn, Duluth, Minnesota.
Geo. F. Mackenzie, Duluth, Minnesota.
James C. Myron, Duluth, Minnesota.
L. A. Barnes, Duluth, Minnesota. THE   TUCKETT   TROPHY
Von by J. S.  C.   Fraser's  Rink, of Rosslani
Sandon Bonspiel 1902 I CURLING ASSOCIATION
BAGNÀLL-WYLD SYSTEM OF DRAWING.
One object of the Bagnall-Wyld system of drawing is
to avoid byes after the first round. The advantage of a
bye is less in value to the club drawing it at this early stage,
than it is later in the competition. If the number of entries
be a power of 2, such as 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, etc., there
will be no byes. If, however, the total entries are not
one of these numbers, then a preliminary or extra series
must be played between part of the clubs, so that in the
next round all the surviving competitors may be reduced
to the next lowest of these powers of 2. A simple method
of ascertaining the number of byes is to deduct the number
.of entries from the power of 2 next above, while the number of preliminary games is found by deducting the power
of 2 next below from the number of entries.
For example, if the entries are 9, subtract 9 from 16,
and we find that 7 draw byes; and taking 8 from 9, we
find that 1 preliminary game must be played.
If the entries are 7, taking 7 from 8 gives 1 bye only,
while 4 from 7 gives 3, the number of preliminary games.
Another object of this system is to make one draw
suffice for the whole competition, and this is done by making the pairs follow some simple rule. One of the simplest
methods is to make 1 play 2, 3 play 4, 5 play 6, and 7
play 8, and then in the next round the survivor of 1 and 2
to play the survivor of 3 and 4, and the survivor of 5 and 6
play the survivor of 7 and 8, leaving two to play off in
the finals.
To take a complete example, where there are 7 entries
there will be, as indicated above, 3 preliminary games and
1 bye. Let the umpire take seven pieces of paper and
number them as follows: Two with the figure 1 on them,
two with 2 on them, and two with 3 on them, and one
with 4 on it. These when shaken in a hat the skips can
draw, after which the two i's will play together, so the two I. H
BRITISH COLUMBIA
2's and so the two 3's, while four will have the bye.   In the
second round, the surviving 1 will play the surviving 2,
and the surviving 3 will play 4, and so on.
Number of Number of
Entries Ballots
■  '1 .1
:} -  t
5       3l
6     Il -j  I
7     4      Bye... 4^
Again, in the case of 9 entries, it will work out 1 preliminary game and 7 byes:
Number of     Number of
Entries Ballots
::::::::.:::} -■
Bye .... 2 J \ ]
■I ' I
.... 71
.... 8( *
AN AULD CURLER'S SONG.
Tune—"Scotland Yet."
Gae fetch tae me my old grey plaid,
My cowe and channel stane ;
For I maun hirple tae the loch,
And try my haun' again.
Wi' gaird, and wick, and draw,
We'll lilt a sang tae Scotland's fame,
And hills clad o'er wi' snaw—
A rousin' theme tae Scotland's gante,
Her cowes, her cramps and a'. CURLING ASSOCIATION
HINTS   BY THE B. C.   CURLINC   ASSOCIATION TO  SECRETARIES OF
AFFILIATED CLUBS.
The orderly and successful carrying out of the work
of the Association depends so much upon the Secretaries
of the affiliated clubs, that we take the liberty of inviting
their hearty co-operation towards keeping their respective
dubs in closer touch with the Association.
First.—If your club has not a code of by-laws for its
government, see that one is adopted without delay, similar
to the form next hereinafter given.
Second.—Hold your yearly meeting for the election
of officers, etc., not later than the third Wednesday in
October. Elect your representatives to this Association,
and instruct them fully and place before them all questions
and matters which you desire to be brought before the
annual meeting of this Association, which is held on the
first Wednesday in December in each year. Lastly, elect
your club skips, so that pending the arrival of Jack Frost,
they may make up their rinks. This done, everything will
be ready for the first ice.
Third.—See that your returns of office bearers and
Bpmbers are sent to the Secretary of this Association immediately after the annual club meeting in October; also
your club's annual and membership fees. Should further
members join after your first return, it is easy to make a
supplementary list.
Fourth.—Preserve a record of all matches played by
your club with other clubs, as well as those played within
the club for prizes, and at the end of the season, after the
Bfei-annual meeting,  send a record of the same to the
Secretary of this Association, with a view to publication in
I the next Annual. BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fifth.—In all matches in the points' game, scoring
cards should be used, and the score of each one of the four
stones played at each point should be carefully registered;
when this is done both the club and the individual players
will discover where they are weak, and where strong, and
can thus know how to make themselves strong all around.
Sixth.—See that your "Rinks" for ordinary games as
well as for set matches, are laid out in perfect accordance
with the diagrams in this Manual, and when you have to
play on the ice of other clubs, see that all the Rink Lines
are properly marked. Remember that the circle in rinks
has now a radius of 6 feet, instead of 7, as formerly.
Seventh.—Abide strictly by the Rules of the game in
all matches, and insist that your opponents do the same.
Eighth.—Be sure and collect your club fees in advance.
This benefits your club beyond estimation. It benefits this
Association, in that it enables you to make prompt returns
to this Association of the annual dues and membership fees.
Read Chapter IV. of the Constitution carefully.
It is an excellent plan to have a general club match
at the very commencement of the season, to which no one
shall be admitted unless his fees have been paid; another
good rule is to allow no one to vote whose fees are unpaid.
Ninth.—A word to Presidents: Let the President of
every club direct and assist the Secretary in all his work,
encouraging him when despondent, stimulating him when
dilatory, and aiding him when overburdened, and both
officers will feel amply rewarded when they see their club
flourishing under their guidance.
Tenth.—Work for the work's sake!
Who works for honor misses oft the goal;
Who works for money coins his very soul.
Work for the work's sake then, and it may be
Honor and wealth shall be given unto thee. CURLING ASSOCIATION
CONSTITUTION AND RULES
FOR CLUBS IN AFFILIATION WITH THE BRITISH
COLUMBIA CURLING ASSOCIATION
The underwritten Constitution and Rules for the government of all clubs affiliated with the B. C. Association,
are printed with the approval of the Association for the
guidance of such clubs. By filling in the blanks and formally ratifying the same, each affiliated club can have a
Constitution and By-Laws without the expense of printing
the same. The chief object, however, in printing them, is
to create harmony and uniformity in the management of
the different affiliated clubs; the holding of meetings at
the same fixed dates, etc., etc., so that the affairs of the
parent organization may be the more easily directed, and
the labor of the Secretary lessened. Clubs already having
Constitutions and By-Laws are requested to alter or amend
the same so as to conform to the following:
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS.
NAME.
Article i.—This Club shall be known as the	
Curling Club, of and the curling rules of
the Club shall be those hereunder given and approved by
the British,Columbia Curling Association.
Article 2.—The object of the Club shall be to promote
the game of curling, to inculcate fraternal intercourse
among its members and with other Clubs in the Association
to which it is affiliated. Il
BRITISH COLUMBIA
.   MEMBERS.
Article 3.—The members of the Club shall consist of
two classes—regular and honorary—who shall be duly proT
posed and elected, upon condition of complying with the!
Constitution and By-Laws provided for the government-
of the Club.
OFFICE BEARERS.
Article 4.—The office bearers shall consist of a Patron,
President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary, Treasurer (the
two latter may be filled by one person), Chaplain, and an
Executive of five regular members. The President, Vice-
Presidents, Secretary and Executive shall be a Board of
Managers to attend to the business of the Club, and five
members shall constitute a quorum.
REPRESENTATIVES.
Article 5.—The Club shall elect annually, at its Annual General Meeting, when electing the other officers,
two persons as its representative delegates to the B. C.
Association. They must be regular members of the Club,
or of some other Club in good standing in the Association.
Should any member so chosen be unable to attend a
meeting of the B. C. Association, then the President or
Executive may name a proxy.
MEETINGS.
Article 6.—The Annual General Meeting of the Club
shall be held on the third Wednesday of October for the
election of officers, payment of annual fees, election of
skips, and making necessary preparations for the curling
season, A report of this meeting, with list of officers and
members finally revised, and fees due the Association, must
be forwarded to the Secretary of the Association not later
than the third week in November in each year. CURLING ASSOCIATION
The Semi-Annual General Meeting of the Club shall
be held on the first Wednesday of April, for the reception
of financial and other reports of the previous curling year,
and for general business. Seven members shall form a
quorum, at all regular and special meetings of the Club.
The Secretary must forward to the Secretary of the B. C.
Association, not later than the first day of May in each
year, a synopsis report of this meeting.
Special meetings of the Club may be called at any
time, after due notice, by the President, upon the request
in writing of five regular members of the Club; but this
request shall state the object of the meeting, and the Secretary, in notifying members of such meeting, shall set
forth the business to be transacted at such special meeting.
SKIPS.
Article 7.—Every Club, at the Annual Meeting in
in October, shall elect one skip for every seven members
upon the revised roll, who shall be called club skips, and
they shall form their rinks on the voluntary principle, or
in such other way as may be decided by a majority of the
members in attendance at such meeting.
DUTIES OF OFFICERS.
Article 8.—The President shall preside at all meetings
and shall have a casting vote, in the event of a tie, in all
equal divisions of the vote of the club. He shall have
power to convene meetings as provided in the Constitution.
He shall take charge, when elected, of all medals and other
trophies of the Club, and shall be responsible for their safe
keeping.
The Vice-Presidents, in the absence of the President,
shall, according to their order of seniority, be vested with
the powers and duties of the President.
The Secretary shall keep correct minutes of all meet- BRITISH COLUMBIA
ings, a register of members and a record of all Club matches
and medal competitions, it being obligatory upon skips to
furnish him details of such matches, and shall submit same
at the Semi-Annual General Meeting of the Club in April.
He shall conduct all correspondence, notify new members
of their election, and attend to such other duties as shall
pertain to the office.
The Treasurer shall, from a certified roll by the Secretary, collect all subscription fees due by members, and other
monies payable to the club. A roll once prepared must have
no names taken therefrom, except by death, removal from
the locality, and resignation, in writing, and this must be
done at the semi-annual meeting of the Club in April,
called, among other things, for the final revision of the roll.
The fiscal year of all Clubs begins on the first day of April
and terminates on the 31st day of March of the succeeding
year. He shall make all necessary disbursements on account of the Club, on the order of the President. He shall
keep an account in detail of the receipts and expenditure,
and submit the same at the Annual General Meeting of the
Club in April, when provision can be made for auditing the
same.
The Board of Managers shall have the superintendence
of the affairs of the Club, and may appoint sub-committees
from their number. They shall have full control of the rink
and preparation of the ice, and may make regulations for
the management of games and competitions of the Club,
not already provided for under the Constitution. They shall
arrange the dates and places at which matches with outside
Clubs are played, and notify skips of same, and may appoint
umpires when requisite. They shall report the result of
their work at the annual and semi-annual meetings of the
Club. They shall meet at least once a week during the
curling season, but only once a month the rest of the year.
FEES AND PENALTIES.
Article 9.—The prompt payment of fees is the essential CURLING ASSOCIATION
requisite. The fees of every member of the Club are
expected to be paid in advance on the day of the annual
meeting. The subscription fee shall be such as may be
determined at any annual meeting of the Club.
Any member whose fees are not paid by the third Wednesday in November in each year, shall be debarred from
playing in any Club matches, and shall not be allowed to
take part in any proceedings of the Club, or to vote on any
subject connected therewith, or be eligible for election as
an officer or skip, until such dues are paid. It shall be the
duty of the Executive to take cognizance of any default
herein, and enforce the rule.
FOREIGN MATCHES.
Article 10.—In all outside or foreign matches with
other Clubs for trophies, medals or other consideration (not
monetary), the President shall summon a meeting of skips
for the selection of the skips to play in any of said competitions. The mode of election shall be by ballot from among
themselves, when those having the plurality of votes shall
be chosen, and the rinks built up to the best possible advantage with the assistance of the Board of Managers.
RULES OF CURLING.
Article n.—The play in all matches or competitions
shall be governed by the existing rules of the British Columbia Curling Association, as published from time to
time in the Annual.
Article 12.—The former Constitution of amendments
shall be made to this Constitution except by a two-thirds
vote at an Annual Meeting of the Club, and thereafter must
have the sanction of the B. C. C. A. before being finally
adopted. Notice of any change must be given not later than
the Semi-Annual Meeting in October. IF
VI
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CURLERS' SIGNAL CODE.
For In-turn.—Righ arm to be held close to body.
For Out-turn.—Arm to he extended horizontally.
For Striking.—Broom to be held vertically, and passed
rapidly backwards over stone to be struck.
For Inwicking.—Broom to be waved "off and on" the
inside of the stone to be inwicked off, showing the place
on which the strike should be made.
For Drawing.—Broom to be held vertically at the place
where it is desired the stone should come to "at rest."
For Guarding.—Broom to be held transversely on the
ice, at the place where the stone should rest.
For Chap and Lie.—Broom to be held vertically, and
moved up and down over the stone to te struck.
For Wick and Curl-in.—Show place as in Drawing
where it is desired that the stone should rest, then as in
Inwicking.
For Raising.—Broom to be held vertically and slowly
passed over the stone crosswise of the rink, and the length
of the raising to be indicated by the space between the two
hands holding the broom horizontally.
For Drawing Through a Port.—As in Drawing.
For Chipping the Winner.—As in Inwicking.
For Outwicking.—As in Inwicking, only indicating the
outside of stone to be struck.
After indicating, as above directed, the character of
the shot to be made, the corn end of the broom should be
held on the ice to show the point at which the player should
take aim in order to reach the desired position, and the
hand on handle of broom should be placed as near as possible to the point which the played stone is. expected to
reach; the space between is called, in curling phraseology,
"the borrow."
123 CURLING ASSOCIATION
QUOTATIONS, ANENT CURLERS AND CURLING.
Suitable for Menu or Toast Mottoes.
"The Devil can cite scripture for his purpose."—Shak.
(Selected by W. J. Nelson.)
THE GAME.
"When winter binds in frosty chains,
the fallow and the flood,"
The curler's heart rejoiceth still,
and owns his Maker good.
"Pleasure and action make the hours seem short."
—Othello.
"The labor we delight in physics pain."—Macbeth.
"These meetings make December, June."—Tennyson.
(The Winners.)
Who wins the trophy in life's little game,
The envy gains, of them unknown to fame.
—Nelson.
"He who surpasses or subdues mankind,
Must look down on the hate of those below.
-—Byron.
(The Losers.)
"A poor player who struts and frets."—Shak.
"He that is valiant and dares fight,
Though drubbed, can lose no honor by't."
—Butler.
m
m BRITISH COLUMBIA
"Still bear up, and steer right onward."—Milton.
"Wise men ne'er sit and wail their loss,
But cheerily seek how to redress their harm."
—Shak.
THE ICE.
"In thrilling regions of thick ribbed ice."—Shak.
"The sweetest ice that ever froze."—Byron.
"To smooth the ice, is wasteful and ridiculous excess."
—Shak.
THE STONES.
"Like stones of worth, they thinly placed are."—Shak.
"Finds   *****  sermons in stones,
And good in everything."—Shak.
(Hogged Stones.)
"Their every parting was to die."—Tennyson.
"Oh say, 'tis tardy in its flight."—Eliza Cook.
"He dies, and alas how soon he dies."—Dr. Johnson.
(A Through Stone.)
"I have shot mine arrow through the house."—Shak.
"Found no end, in wandering mazes lost."—Milton.
"No reckoning made, but sent to my account
With all my imperfections on my head."—Hamlet.
(A Draw.)
"By vig'rous effort and an honest aim,
At once he draws."—Young.
(Lucky Shots.)
"O many a shot at random sent
Finds mark the player little meant."—Scott. THE GRAND CHALLENGE AND OLIVER CUPS  CURLING ASSOCIATION
(Bad Shots.)
"Errors upon the surface flow."—Dryden.
(Guard Stones.)
"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more."
—Shak.
(Chap and Lie.)
"When I remember something which I had,
But which is gone, I sigh to think on't."
—Jean Ingelow.
"Each changing place, with that which goes before."
—Shak.
"A lie ; upon my soul, a lie ; a wicked lie."—Shak.
"These lies are like the father that begets them,
Open palpable lies."—Shak.
"I didn't do it, did I?"—Grigor.
(In-turn or Out-turn Stones.)
" 'Tis good in every case, you know,
To have two strings unto your bow."—Churchill.
"They run in separate channels."—Dryden.
"Follow 'their' envious courses."—Shak.
"On the smooth expanse of crystal lakes,
The 'gliding' stone at first a circle makes."—Pope.
(A Running Shot, and the Result.)
"Look round, the wrecks of play behold."—Gay.
"Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels all scattered."
—Shak.
(Raising.)
"To raise the dead to life."—Longfellow. BRITISH COLUMBIA
(The Lead Stones.)
"Nothing's so difficult as a beginning,.
Unless perhaps the end."—Byron.
"Amid the encircling gloom,
Lead thou me on."—Newman.
"Would I were safe at home."—Gray.
THE END.
"This is the true beginning of our 'end'."—Shak.
"There is a divinity that shapes our 'ends,'
Rough hew them how we will."—Hamlet.
"Attempt the 'end,' and never stand to doubt."
—Herrick.
"The 'end' crowns all."—Shak.
"Our last great 'end'."—Churchill.
"What I will, I will, and there an 'end'."—Shak.
THE SKIP.
"There's a method in his wickedness,
It grows up by degrees."—Beaumont and Fletcher.
"Behold the great image of authority."—King Lear.
"A stoney adversary."—Shak.
"Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part."—As You Like It.
"In form and moving, how express and admirable."
—Hamlet.
"Within that circle, none durst walk but he."—Dryden.
"He builded better than he knew;—
The conscious stones to beauty grew."—Emerson. CURLING ASSOCIATION
His "deeds are known,
In words that kindle glory from the stone."—Schiller.
THE VICE-SKIP.
"Ah, Vice, how soft are thy voluptuous ways."—Byron.
"A good old gentlemanly Vice."—Byron.
"Dressed in a little brief authority."—Shak.
"The post of honor now is thine."—Gray's Fables.
"Our pleasant 'Vices' made instruments to plague us."
—King Lear.
"Vice, sometimes, is by action dignified."
—Rom. and Jul.
"There is no 'Vice' so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts."
—Mer of Venice.
"Content thyself to be obscurely good
When 'Vice' prevails, and impious men bear sway."
—'Addison.
THE SWEEPERS.
The task of one who goes before to find
The way for such as follow.swift behind,
Is thine, sweet Sweep.—W. J. N.
"Sufferance is the badge of all our tribe."—Shak.
"Sweep on, ye fat and greasy citizens."
—As You Like It.
"His feet have wings."—George Elliot.
"They also serve, who only stand and wait."
"Hev day, what a 'Sweep' of vanity comes this way."
—Shak.
"Heralds high before him run."-
J BRITISH COLUMBIA
"The first great law is—to obey."—Schiller.
"Our little life is rounded with a 'sweep'."
—Shak. (E.O.E.)
"Sweep, Sweep, don't hesitate!    He who hesitates is
lost."—Nelson.
"Sweep, Sweep, for G 's sake, Sweep."—Fraser.
"And as he knew not what to say, he swore."—Byron.
THE HOUSE.
"When we mean to build,
We first survey the plot, then draw the model;
And when we see the figure of the house,
Then must we next 'protect our proud' erection."
—Shak.
"We figure to ourselves the thing we like,
And then we build it up."—Taylor.
A man. who builds a house oft provides
A home for his adversary.—Nelson.
"You take my house, when you do take the prop
That doth sustain my house."—Shak.
THE POINTS' GAME.
"Here I lay, and there I bear my point:
Three knaves in buckram let drive at me."—Falstaff.
THE AULD CURLER.
"My age is as a lusty winter—
' Frosty, but kindly."—Shak.
The gay old grandsire, skilled in curling art,
Still loves the gallant sport, and plays his part.
—W. J.  N.
129 ï
CURLING ASSOCIATION
"Age that melts with unperceived decay,"
And all unconscious, plays its favorite play.
-*W. J. N.
"Then why should those who pick and choose
The best of all, the best compose,
And join it by mosaic art,
In graceful order, part to part,
To make the whole in beauty suit,
Not merit as complete repute
As those who, with less art and pains,
Can do it with their native brains."—Butler.
N. B.—In making the above selections (save the few
which are original, or part original) we have avoided borrowing from the Scotch poets, Burns, Thomson, Hogg or
Scott (save one from the latter), in whose writings many
more appropriate expressions may be found directly applicable to the game, its play and players.
I BRITISH COLUMBIA.
IN MEMORIAM
THE LATE J. B. McARTHUR.
The members of the Association will recall with profound regret the untimely demise of Mr. McArthur at
his home in Toronto, some years since.
He was one of the pioneers of Kootenay, and in the
early nineties practiced law in Kaslo, and subsequently in
Rossland.
He was the promoter of many of the mining companies
operating properties on Red Mountain, as also of the West
Kootenay Power and Light Co.
He was one of the best known residents of the District,
and was held in high esteem,
As one of the founders of the Association and its first
President, he will ever be held in affectionate remembrance
by every curler of "ye olden time."
We deeply regret our inability—though every effort
was made—to secure a photo of the ex-President, so that an
engraving from the same might have found a place irivthis
Annual.
As Mem'ry green recalls the past,
Our hearts are truly sair.
'Tis vain to greet, yet sad to think
We ne'er may see ye mair. THE LATE "HARRY" SMITH
AN OLD TIME CURLER  il
CURLING ASSOCIATION
THE LATE H. H. SMITH
We feel assured that every curler in the Kootenay will
learn with the deepest regret of the death of "Harry," as
he was familiarly called by his intimate friends. His face
was familiar at every Bonspiel from 1898 till he left Rossland in May, 1905, to again take up his residence in Winnipeg.
"Harry" curled for the love of it. The thought of
winning a prize scarce entered his mind. Win or lose,
mattered little to "Harry." Yet in curling he was a careful
player, ever acting on the principle that whatever is worth
doing is worth doing well. No one better obeyed, in the
playing of the game, the scriptural injunction, "Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might."
Harry was present at the formation of the Manitoba
Branch of the Royal Club in 1888, at Winnipeg, and at the
meeting in 1898, at Rossland, which brought into existence
the Kootenay (now B. C.) Curling Association.
-Our deceased brother, while curling last year at the
Hub, fell on the ice and injured himself. Complications
afterwards set in, which resulted in his death on the 4th
day of September, 1907.
Of a social, genial and kindly disposition, he acquired
numerous friends by whom he was much beloved. In his
death an interesting link, which bound us to the past, has
disappeared.    May he rest in peace.
Death is but a little space,
For dreamless sleep, to mortals given.
The grave is but a resting place
On the road from earth to heaven.
—W. J. N. EXCERFTS FROM  THE ANNUALS  OF THE
MANITOBA BRANCH OF THE R. C. C. C-
OF INTEREST TO B. C. CURLERS
[ Through the courtesy off. P. Robertson, Esc., the Secretary of the Branch\
From the Annual of 1897-8, Vol. 9, page 162, we borrow the following item, which will be of especial interest to
the curlers of British Columbia:
"THE EARLIEST RECORD OF CURLING IN THE
WEST.
"The first game of curling was played in the Northwest Territories in November, 1839, on the east side of the
Rocky Mountains, at Boak Encampment, about a mile
above the junction of the Clark and Lewis rivers. The
curlers were the members of the Hudson's Bay brigade,
waiting for the overland transport from Vancouver. The
skips were Dugald McTavish, brother of the late Governor
McTavish, and Alexander Simpson, brother of Thomais
Simpson of Arctic fame. James Steele, Roderick Finlay- •
son, Wm. Spencer and Edward Spencer were the other
players.    Flat stories were used in the match."
FIRST CURLING CLUBS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The first curling club established in British Columbia
was at Golden, B. C. It was organized in 1894, with the
following officers:
Patron—Lt. Gov. Dewdney.
President—Capt. F. P. Armstrong.
Vice-President—Capt. G. F. Parson.
Secretary-Treasurer—D. M. Rae.
Chaplain—Rev. W. R. Ross. CURLING ASSOCIATION
It af
Caledonis
as Distric
In the Manitoba Annual for 1895-6, Vol. 7, the following report appears:
"There is as yet only one club in this District-, the
Golden Curling Club. An effort is, however, being made
to get another organized at Donald, B. C. The club played
for the Royal District Medal at points, and the ten highest
scores were as follows: P. J. Russell 18, D. McRae 17,
J. Lake 15, C. A. Warner 13, W. R. Hamilton 10, M.
Dainard 10, W. Dainard 10, J. Rae 9, P. R. White 9, J.
Henderson 8, and G. H. Brock 8. The medal was awarded
P. J. Russell.
"This club for its first year has done exceedingly well,
and a number of keen local competitions for handsome
prizes took place.
WM. McNElSH, Umpire."
In the Annual for 1896-7, Vol. 8, this report appears:
"DISTRICT No. 17—COLUMBIA.
"The club at Donald having failed to materialize as
yet, we are without rivals to contest with us for the District
Medal and Bonspiel primaries.
"The Royal District Medal was, however, competed for
at points, and resulted as follows: J. Rae 19, D. M. Rae
15, T. Todd 14, C. Pearce 13, G. Brock 13, O. P. Thompson
12, M. Dainard 11, G. Woodley 11, W. L. Hamilton 10.
"The ice was in poor condition, and, in consequence,
the scores are low. J. Rae captured a medal with a score
of 19 points. The winner at other times has scored as
high as 30 points.
H. G. PARSON, Umpire.
"Golden, B. C, 13th January, 1896."
J BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the Annual for 1897-8, Vol. 9, this report appears:
"DISTRICT" No.  17—COLUMBIA.-
"The District Medal match for this District took place
at Golden, B. C, on the 19th January, 1897, and was won
by Wm. McNeish, with a score of 18 points.
"The low score is attributable to the fact of the ice
being in very bad condition, a cold snap having heaved it
in various directions. Much higher scores have been made
before at ordinary practice.
"The ten highest scores were:   Wm. McNeish 18, H.
G. Parson 16, A. C. Warren 15, D. McDonald 14, G. Brock
14, J. Lamontague 14, James Henderson 13, H. Woodley -
12, P. R. White 12, and W. Houston 11.
"The Gait and other club primaries were played in the
usual way.
H. G. PARSON, Umpire.
"Golden, B.  C, 29th January,  1897."
KASLO CLUB.
The Kaslo Club, organized in 1895 (erroneously stated
on page 15 to have been organized in 1896), was the second
club organized in British Columbia. It affiliated with the
Manitoba Branch in the year of its formation. The following were the officers of that year:
Patron—Lt.  Gov. Dewdney, B.  C.
President—G. O. Buchanan.
Vice-President—James Waugh.
Secretary-Treasurer—Hamilton   Byers.
In the Annual of the Manitoba Branch it was known
as District No. 18—Kootenay. In Vol. 8, 1896-7, of said
Branch, this report appears: .
"Kaslo as yet is the only club in this locality, but one
is under way at Nelson, and may be a rival next year..
Living as we do, in a semi-tropical position, ice does not
always hold in this banana belt.    Twice during the season CURLING ASSOCIATION
Bid the opportunity offer for play.    A cold snap struck us
I about the first of March, and i't was decided to play points
for the District Medal.   We took a steamer out about three
•miles till.we got a sheltered nook on Mirror Lake, where
I we got lots of ice, but rough and crooked.    The ice was
laid out and hacks, cut.   A fire was lit to prepare hot water
for pebbling.    It was -not so bad, but the wind blew such a
terrible gale that lots* of borrow had to be taken.    It reminded me of auld Scotia, and right lustily we souted, and
the echoes resounded from hill to hill.    The Wind went
down with the sun, and we built a huge bonfire, and curling
was kept up by this light, resembling very much one of
the scenes in Faust.   It looked more like a dance of demons
than  a  curling match.    The  medal  was  won by Horace
Burke, but not until the last stone was thrown was it decided who was the winner.    Later we had a game with
Nelson,   one  rink  a  side,  loaning them half  our stones.
Having left our stones there, a return match was played,
when they beat Kaslo, having been at practice day and
I night with our stones.
JAMES WAUGH, Umpire.
"Kaslo, 20th March, 1896."
In the Annual of the next year, Vol. 9, 1897-8, this
report appears:
"DISTRICT No. 22—KOOTENAY.
"Having failed to get weather fit to make ice, the preliminary District stage of the Tuckett Trophy competition
failed to come off until last Thursday, the 18th of February,
: when Sandon won by one point.    The scores aggregated
respectively 27 and 28.    Kaslo curlers are, however, proud
of themselves, even in the midst of defeat.    Only two of
their eight men could play an out-turn, while the Sandon
; callants had many who graduated in Manitoba, even figuring
in the great Bonspiel. .
"At a joint meeting of the two clubs held m the even-
I BRITISH COLUMBIA 	
ing, I awarded the medal, as umpire of the District, which,
by the way, is the most westerly protege of the Branch.
At a spread given it was freely ventured that one rink
would represent Kootenay at the Bonspiel of 1898, if not
two, one from each club.
"Since that match, the rinks in both clubs turned out
well, and we are looking forward to another year with great
hope. Curlers whose old proclivities prevent them losing
sight of the game, and new men who begin to see something
in it, will be out in greater numbers another season. We
will also try and get Nelson to join, where Frank Peters,
Billy Grant and W. A. Macdonald, late of Brandon, all
veterans, would form the nucleus of a good club.
JAMES WAUGH, Umpire.
"Kaslo, B. C, 22nd of February, 1897."
In the Annual of the next year, Vol. 10, 1898-9. the
following report appears:
"DISTRICT  No.  22—KOOTENAY.
"The  primary  matches were  played  concurrently  at
Sandon, on Friday, the 21st day of January, between Kaslo
and Sandon, two rinks from each club.    The score was as
follows :
SANDON. KASLO.
A. R. Hall, skip    16        Jas. Waugh, skip    13
Wm. Hood, skip    14        D. W. Moore, skip    14
30 27
Points in favor of Sandon, 3.
"The game was well  contested,  the ice in Splendid
condition, and the players on each side full of determination
"to win.    It was a thoroughly enjoyable game.
JAMES WAUGH, Umpire.
"Kaslo, 26th January, 1898."
*37 0
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m  CURLING ASSOCIATION
SANDON CLUB.
The Sandon Club was the third club organized in British Columbia, and the third to affiliate with the Manitoba
Branch. It was organized in 1896, as we have said elsewhere, and was one of the charter clubs of the Kootenay
(now B. C.) Curling Association.    Its first officers were:
Patron—Hewitt Bostock, M. P.
President—M. L. Grimmett.
Vice-President—E. R. Atherton.
Secretary-Treasurer—W. W. Fallows.
We had not received the necessary information from
that club to insert the names of the Presidents and Secretaries of the club since its formation in 1896 under the
proper heading at page 15 of the Manual.
We have since obtained the names of the present
officers, who are as follows:
President—William  Bennett.
Vice-President—Geo.   Bruder.
Secretary—W. T. McClurg.
Committee of Management—L. Pratt, W. T. McClurg, E. R. Atherton, N. Tattrie, and Mr. Ward.
From the same Annual for 1898-9, Vol. 10, we make
the following extract:
"KOOTENAY CURLING ASSOCIATION.
"A new Branch has been organized during the past
year, to be known as the 'Kootenay Curling Association.'
It has affected the Manitoba Branch to the extent of
taking away two clubs, Kaslo and Sandon. Nelson had
not affiliated, neither had Rossland, and consequently did
not materially affect this Association. Golden did not
leave us. They were just as well in the old as in the new
Association. Representatives of the Nelson, Rossland, Sandon and Kaslo Curling Clubs have organized the Kootenay
Curling Association. J. B. McArthur was elected temporary President, A. W. Strickland temporary Secretary,
I
P BRITISH COLUMBIA
and Messrs. Peters, Grimmett and Buchanan Vice-Presi- .
dents. An Executive Committee was appointed, consisting of J. E. Bain, James Warcastle, Sandon; W. H. Grant,
Nelson ; J. S. C. Fraser, Rossland ; and Messrs. Warren and
Rae of Golden. Messrs. McArthur and Peters were appointed as a committee to draft the constitution of the
Association."
N B.—It will be observed that the names of the Executive here given differ materially from those appearing
in the minutes of the inaugural meeting, appearing elsewhere in this Manual.    (See page 31.)
In the report of the Executive Committee of the Manitoba Branch of the R. C. C. C. for the year 1899-1900,
Vol. 11, these words appear:
"Seventy clubs were in affiliation with the Association
during the past year, of which sixty^six were in good
standing and active operation. This number would have
been larger, but for the fact that Nelson, Kaslo, Rossland,
Sandon and Revelstoke 'withdrew' to form a ne^ association in British Columbia."
This clause in the Annual suggests to the mind that
the Nelson, Revelstoke and Rossland Clubs had actually
been affiliated with the Manitoba Branch. We can not,
however, after a careful perusal of the Annuals of 1896-7,
1897-8, and 1899-1900, find any other evidence corroborating the inference that might be conveyed by the above
clause.
On enquiry from old members of the Rossland Club,
nothing could be learned that would establish the fact that
any one of these three clubs had actually affiliated with
the Manitoba Branch, though the year prior to, or the year
of the formation of the Kootenay Curling Association,
these clubs may have had some correspondence with the
Branch looking towards affiliation. Upon the formation of
the Kootenay Association in 1898, as a matter of course,
all desire for affiliation would end.
'39 CURLING ASSOCIATION
ORIGIN OF THE  ROYAL CALEDONIAN
CURLING CLUB OF SCOTLAND
This organization, with which the B. C. Association is
affiliated, was first called the Grand Caledonian Curling
Club of Scotland. A mystery hangs over one part of îts
origin, which will probably never be unveiled: The name
of its founder, like that of the projectors of other great undertakings ,is doomed to remain forever in obscurity.
This much is known: A number of curlers assembled
for the first time in the Waterloo Hotel, Edinburgh, pursuant to an advertisement in the North British Advertiser,
dated 16th May, 1838, on the 26th of the same month. At
. this gathering a grand court was formed, to which all Provincial ones were subject, and a grand President and other
Office-bearers were elected.
An adjourned meeting was held in the same hotel on
Wednesday, the 20th of June, 1838, at which one John
Cairnie, Esq., of Curling Hall, Largs, was in the chair.
Deputations from various clubs were present, and approved
a resolution to prepare a code of regulations applicable to
the whole of Scotland.
A further adjournment to the 25th of July, 1838, took
place to permit of a fuller representation of the different
clubs throughout Scotland. This meeting was largely attended, and from it really dates the organization of the
Royal Caledonian Curling Club.
The Club has made steady progress ever since. Its
prosperity may be best judged from the present strength
of the organization. In all 728 clubs are directly or indirectly associated with it, and these are scattered over England, Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, Russia, New
Zealand, Newfoundland, Canada and the United States.
140
II tff
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADDITIONAL CURLIANA SONCS AND
LITERATURE
IF YOU WANT TO BE A FIRST-CLASS CURLER.
By Fred J. Boswell, Banff, N.W.T.
Tune—Dae yae ken John Peel.
My freens, I'm gaun tae tell you how, if you would curl
quite right:
You must learn to sup on parritch an' drink hot Scotch at
night.
Ye may tak' a dram i' the morriin' too, but you never maun
get tight,
If you want to be a really first-class curler.
Chorus.—For the skip may shout elbu' in or elbu' out,
Sandy gie us a gaird here, or knock that deil out ;
But if you chance to make a hog, oh how they'll
roar and shout;
Then hurrah ! for the roarin' game o' curlin'.
You must handle yere besom quick and well, if ye'd hae
ony gains,
And just keep one eye on the skip, the ither on the stanes;
But the most important thing of all, is tae play wi' hert
and brains,
If you want to be a really first-class curler.
Chorus—
You must learn to be obedient to what the skip shall say,
For he's the man's responsible how good or bad ye play,
But dinna shove your stane too hard, or it'll go beyant
the tee,
If you want to be a really first-class curler.
Chorus— CURLING ASSOCIATION
The skip he is the maister, awhiles he's on the rink
And you should do whate'er he wants, whene'er he tips
the wink,
And if you chance to win an end, you may go and tak' a
drink,
If you want to be a really first-class curler.
Chorus—
When you meet a curler out, why just tip him the sign,
And tak' him doun to the nearest tap and gie him a sup
o' wine,
You should always look on curlers as good cronies of thine
If you want to be a really first-class curler.
Chorus—
SCOTLAND'S BONNIE BROOM.
By Doctor Sidey.
Air—"Bonnie Bessie Lee."
Oh, mony, mony fairy sichts in other climes I've seen,
And  mony  a  bonnie  flower  I've  pu'd  wi'  a'  its rich
perfume ;
But naething yet has cheered my heart, in a' the lands I've
been,
Like the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
On Scotland's bonnie broom,
Auld Scotland's bonnie broom,
Like the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
I mind fu' yell in days gane by, when callants wild we ran,
An' pu'd the bonnie gowan, and the scented hawthorn's
bloom, BRITISH COLUMBIA
How aft was hush'd our merry laugh, to list the lintie's sang,
Mang the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
On Scotland's bonnie broom,
Auld Scotland's bonnie broom,
Mang the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
But a' my kith and kin, and my friends o' former days,
Like withered leaves hae passed away and sleep within
the tomb,
And tho' I'm left my lane, yet I dearly love to gaze
On the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
On Scotland's bonnie broom,
Auld Scotland's bonnie broom,
On the bonnie draps o' yellow gowd on Scotland's bonnie broom.
CURLER'S RITUAL AND PASSWORD.
Whatever may be the practice among modern curling
clubs, the fraternities in the days long gone by had a kind '
of ritual, with secret signs and a password. Regarding the
Sanquhar Curling Club, Dr. Taylor informs us that a dispute had arisen among the members as to which was the
true curler's word and grip, and the society found it necessary to issue an authoritative declaration on the subject in
the following terms: In order to prevent all disputes concerning the curler's "word and grip," 'the master, who is
always present during his office,, and the rest of the scoiety
have agreed that the following shall be held and reputed
the curler's word and grip of this society for the future:
"Gripping hands in the common manner of shaking
hands is gripping the hand of the curling stone. The thumb
of the person examined or instructed thrust in between the
thumb and forefinger of the examiner or instructor, signi- CURLING ASSOCIATION
fies 'Running a port.'    The little finger of the person examined or instructed linked with the little finger of the
, examiner or instructor, means an 'inning-'."
THE CURLER'S GRIP.
By Doctor Sidey.
Air—"Auld Lang Syne."
Losh man! I'm glad to see yoursel',
I'm glad to meet a frien',
But, man, the pleasure's greater still
When he's a curler keen.
Chorus.—Sae gie's the curler's grip, my frien';
Sae gie's the curler's grip.
Losh man! I'm gral to see yoursel';
Sae gie's the curler's grip.
We've played thegither many a time
Around the curlin' tee;
I've sooped ye aften up the ice.
You've dune the same to me.
Chorus—
Man ! when I feel a grip like that
I'm unca sweir'd to pairt;
The blood rins dim'lin up my airm,
An' warms my very heart.
Chorus—
But as the nicht is gye weel thro',
Let's hae anither "nip,"
An' drink success to ilka ane
That kens the curler's grip.
Chorus—
144
i BRITISH COLUMBIA
"WICK AN' CURL IN."
By J. R. Foulden.
Air—There's noe Guid Luck aboot the House.''
When luck's again' ye, an* the hoose
Is blockit up wi' stanes,
An' yer opponents, awfu' crouse,
Are countin' up their gains;
There's aye a shot, a bonnie shot,
A shot that's sure to win—
To draw up till an orra stane,
An' wick an' curl in.
An' sae ye'll find it a' thro' life,
When failure nips yer pride,
An' disappointment's cruikit form
Comes hirplin' where ye bide;
There's aye a way to fortune's smiles,
An' takin't is nae sin,
A bonny shot for mense an' skill—
To wick an' curl in.
Yon judge that wags his curly pow
Sae sagely ower a plea,
Yin better stocked wi' law an' lair
Ye'd think there could'na be;
But losh ! he's just been wide awake
When ither folks were blin',
An' never let a chance gang by
To wick an' curl in.
Then, brithers, let us bide oor time,
An' cautious let us play
Each ticklish shot in life's big game—
That's hoo to win the day.
"45 CURLING ASSOCIATION
Dame fortune irate shows here claws
To drivers down the rin,
But smiles on him wha gently draws
A wick an' curl in.
MY CHANNEL STANES.
Air—"Jock o' Hazeldean."
Gae bring to me my channel stanes,
The stanes that were my pride,
Anld justly feared by every man
That curled upon the Clyde;
I'll gie them just one other look,
Before I'm taen awa
To land where "soopit's" never heard,
Or curlers fear a thaw.
Ah, mony a happy hour I've spent,
When it was freezin' keen,
- And we had met upon the loch
To play some weel kent frien',
The cunnin' way that you could gaird,
Or inwick to the tee,
Made me the proudest man on earth,
The saddest one my fae.
Nae doubt our Meg would often say
My heart was a' your ain,
That o' my thought you got far mair
Than her or our wee wean ;
That empty creel or poorith bairn,
Or cheerless ingleside,
Were a' forgotten when wi' you
I played upon the Clyde.
146 BRITISH COLUMBIA
But though she gloomed and grudged the time
I spent to keep ye braw,
And sometimes when I sang your praise
Would let the tear doun fa',
When frae the loch I had returned
Wi' shouts o' victory,
She seemed a prouder being far
Than either you or me.
O, waes me, but it's hard to think
I hae to lay ye by,
And ne'er again on pond or loch
A pat lid see ye lie,
Or watch wi' pride ye firmly ride
The winner to the snaw.
While victor ye were heralded
Amid a wild huzza.
Ah, me! but life's a little thing,
Sometimes as thrawn's the ice,
And though I haena played it weel,
Been, hoggit once or twice,
I hope that through Death's narrow port
I'll cuddle quietly ben,
' And rest within the bosom o'
The Man that died for men.
A CURLER'S SONG.
By T. S. A., of Waverly, Scotland.
Ance mair the bitin' norlan' wind
Comes blawin' doun the glen,
Ance mair we feel a joy is near
That only curlers ken.
147 CURLING ASSOCIATION
Nae langer is our bonny loch
Wi' wavelets dimpled o'er,
Nae langer do ye hear them break
Wi' music on the shore.
Her bosom noo is frozen hard,
-   The hills are clad wi' snaw;
The trees aroun' have shed their leaves,
And stillness reigns o'er a'.
But soon the hills resound wi' cheers,
And wi' the bonnie soun'
O' channel stanes, which on the howe
Gang roarin' swiftly doun.
And see the men ranged doun the rink
A' watchin' for the cry,
"Come, bring him, lads, soop a' your mi
Haud up! noo let him die."
The cautious draw, the bonnie gaird,
The skillfu' wick an' curl in;
The strikin' shot or chap and lie,
That sets the winner birlin'.
Oh, keen the roarin' game is played,
And wi' untirin' zest,
Until the settin' sun proclaims
The time has come for rest.
But be it days or be it weeks
That John Frost holds levee,
At early morn a' curlers keen
Are found around the tee.
O may we play life's game as weel !
And happier will we be
Each time we sweep wi' friendly hand
A neebor to the tee.
i
I BRITISH COLUMBIA	
AN AULD CURLER'S SANG.
Tune—"Scotland Yet."
Gae fetch tae me my auld gray plaid,
My cowe and channel stane:
For I maun hirple tae the loch
And try my haun' again.
And when the roarin' game begins,
Wi' gaird, and wick, and draw,
We'll lilt a sang tae Scotland's fame,
And hills clad o'er wi' snaw—
A rousing theme tae Scotland's game,
Her cowes, her cramps and a'.
The day is breaking in the lift,—
The sun keeks o'er the brae,—
The air is snell, the frost grips hard;
We'll hae some famous play!
And when we buckle tae our work,
Wi' strike, and raise, and draw,
We'll lilt a sang tae Scotland's fame,
And glens deep wreathed in snaw—
A rousing theme tae Scotland's game,
Her cowes, her cramps and a'.
The cranreuch deeds the woods in whit
Ilk lea and broomy knowe;
The rink is true, the ice is keen,
My heart's a' in a lowe.
For as the game gangs roarin' on,
Wi' soop-up, hauns, and draw,
We'll lilt a sang tae Scotland's fame,
And burns choked up wi' snaw—
A rousin' theme tae Scotland's fame,
Her cowes, her cramps and a'.
149 THE GRAND CHALLENGE CUP
f Nelson.    Nelson Bonspiel, 1905  CURLING ASSOCIATION
ANOTHER "KING O' GAMES IS CURLIN'.
By John McMaster, Wheeling, W. Va.
The joy o' every curler's heart
Is winnin' near the tee;
Each man will surely do his part
To get up near the tee.
The kindly strife does curlers good—
It lightens many a gloomy mood,
An' every man gangs hame richt prood
For lyin' near the tee.
"Just haud yer stane wi' steady grup,
And aim straucht for the tee.
Noo men, stan' by tae soop it up,
An' bring it to the tee.
Just draw in canny by this stane—
You've done't before—just try't again—
I'll pit ye against ony ane
For getting near the tee."
But there's a time for every side
To rest upon the tee.
It wudna do for ane to bide
Ower long upon the tee.
"Noo lift this pat-lid—canny there !
Soop hard, my lads, he's got it fair'
He's coming richt.    He'll pass the gair!
Aha! he's on the tee!
So is it in life's busy strife—
All striving for the tee;
Some giving health, and wealth, and life
To win up near the tee.
But some get hoggit at the score;
A guaird keeps ithers oot the door;
Some through the port come wi' a roar
An' drive richt past the tee.
150 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The warl' is better for the moil
O' fechtin' for the tee;
It lightens many a care and toil—
This wrastle for the tee.
But when we're there, it's noble g
To gie a freen a liftin' haun'—
The sooper is a better man
For helpin' to the tee.
THE GRAN' AULD ROARIN' GAME.
O' a' the wintry sports and plays,
That gar ane lo'e the holidays,—
An' put ane in a merry frame,
Gie me the gran' auld roarin' game.
I mount the skates wi' unco dreed,
Lest I may fa' an' split my heid,
But oh ! I'm fearless an' at hame
Playin' the gran' auld roarin' game.
Billiards am' skeetles lead to vice,
But no saloons infest the ice;
We gang as sober as we came,
To play the gran' auld roarin' game.
Lassies an' bairns may play in-doors,
An' dames feel fine on carpet floors;
A' parlor joys are puir an' tame
Beside the gran' auld roarin' game.
Na game sae forges friendship's link,
"We're brithers a' " upon the rink ;
Tory or Grit, 'tis a' the same,
Playin' the gran' auld roarin' game. CURLING ASSOCIATION
Nae bad surroundin's near it lurk:
The guid o* every creed an' kirk,
The clergy without thocht o' blame,
Join in the gran' auld roarin' game.
Come ane an' a' wi' stane an' broom,
Awa wi' anxious care an' gloom;
Forget ambition, wealth an' fame,
An' play the gran' auld roarin' game.
THE GATHERING OF THE CURLING CLANS.
By the Late Rev. A. Grierson.
Tune—"And are Ye sure the news is True?"
And are ye sure the ice is true?
An' is it strong and keen?
Is this a time to think o' wark?
Mak' haste and mak' me clean !
Is this a time to think o' wark,
When Johnny's at the door?
Rax me my plaid, I'll to the loch,
As in the days o' yore.
For there's nae luck about the toun,
There's nae luck ava;
There's little sport in winter days,
When Johnny Frost's awa'.
Gae warn the curlers, young and auld.
To meet the morn at ten;
That nane o' a' our social band
May say they "didna ken" ;
To yark their besom snod and tight,
Mak' gleg their curlin' stanes,
I BRITISH COLUMBIA
And see their cramps be sharpit right.
For fear o' broken banes.
For there's nae luck about the toun,
There's nae luck ava,
When men creep round the ingle cheek
To girn at frost and snaw.
Let poets sing o' May and June,
When starlight there is nane;
Cauld January's the month for me,
When clinks the channel-stane !
Firm i' the north the win' is stell't,
The lift is calm- and blue ;
Sae spades may tak' the play a while,
As wed's the canny plew.
For there's nae luck about the toun,
There's nae luck ava,
When folks abuse the gude hard frost,
And lang for blashy thaw.
CURLING SONG.
By Doctor Sidey.
Air—"John Grumlie."
John Tamson was a souter gude,
As ever waxed an end,
And folk frae a' the countryside
Brought him their shoon to mend,
For John he was a canty carle,
That worked frae break o' day,
And liked fu' weel to hae a crack
Syne bored and chap't away.
Singing, fal de ral, etc.
1.53 —i
CURLING ASSOCIATION
Ae day the curling keen began,
He thocht he'd like to gang;
"Gude wife," quoth John, "rax me my broom,
I'll no be very lang."
But John he wasna hame till nicht,
Sae keen was he on play.
"Gude wife," quo' John, "it's awfu' fine,
I'll gang the morn tae."
Singing, fal de ral, etc.
Now John next morning kept his word,
The first time in his life,
And soon forgot his trysted wark,
His bairnies and his wife;
And aye he played the better played,
Ilk day for mony a week,
And a' the while ne'er crapt a nail,
Nor yet put in a steek.
Singing, fal de ral, etc.
Ae day he rose up early,
And played from morning licht,
And neither bite nor sup he took
Till he came hame at nicht;
Sae John he lookit in the pat,
For a hungry man was he ;
"What kind o' kale are these?" quo' John,
"They're unco thin o' the bree."
Singing, etc, (a melancholy chorus.)
"Nae doubt," quo' Jean, "the kale are thin,
There's neither beef nor banes,
And ye may sup as best ye can
On broo frae curling stanes;
And ye may learn that while ye play,
Your bread ye dinna win;
For tho' there's plenty gaein' out, BRITISH COLUMBIA
There's naething comin' in."
Singing, fal de ral, etc.
John stood amazed, syne loudly swore,
For an angry man was he;
"Gude wife," quo' John, "as sure as death,
This day you'll dearly dree."
But better thochts cam ill his head,
As supperless he lay;
Sae he rose up and took his wark,
And bored and chap't away.
Singing, fal de ral, etc.
CURLER'S SONG.
By Norman MacLeod, LL. D.
A' nicht it was freezin', a' nicht I was sneezin',
"Take care," quo' the wife, "gude man, o' yer cough."
A fig for the sneezin' ! hurrah j for the freezin' !
This day we're to play the bonspiel on the loch.
Then get up, my auld Ieddy,   the breakfast get ready,
For the sun on the snawdrift's beginnin' to blink ;
Gie me bannocks or brochan, I am off for the lochan,
To mak' the stanes flee to the tee o' the rink.
Chorus.—Then hurrah for the curlin', frae Girvin to Stirlin' !
Hurrah for the lads o' the besom and stane !
"Ready noo !" "Soop it up !" "Clap a gaird !"
"Steady noo!"
O ! curlin' abune every game Stan's alane.    i
The ice it is splendid, it canna be mended—
Like a glass ye can glower on't and shave off yer beard.
And. see how they gether, comin' o'er the brown heather, CURLING ASSOCIATION
The servant and maister, the tenant and laird;
There's brave Jamie Fairlie, he's there late and early,
Better curlers than he or Tarn Conn canna be,
Wi' the lads frae Kilwinnin, they'll send the stanes spinnin',
Wi' whirr an' a curr till they sit roun' the tee.
Chorus—
It's an unco like store, that both Whig and Tory
Maun ape collyshaugh like dogs ower a bane;
And a' denominations are wantin' in patience,
For nae kirk will thole to let ithers alane;
But in the frosty weather, let a' meet thegither,
Wi' a broom in their haun' and a stane by the tee ;
And then, by my certes, ye'll see how a' parties,
Like brithers will love, and like brithers agree.
Chorus—
ANOTHER SONG.
By Henry Shanks, of Bathgate, Scotland.
Air—"A Man's a Man for a' That."
Old England may her cricket boast,
Her wickets, bats, and a' that ;
And proudly her eleven toast,
Wi' right good will and a' that.
For a' that, and a' that,
It's but bairns' play for a' that;
The channel stane on icy plain
Is king o' games for a' that.
And Erin's sons, at wake and fair,
Wi' roar and yell, and a' that,
May toss shillelahs in the air,
And crack their croons, and a' that;
156 BRITISH COLUMBIA
For a' that, and a' that,
And better far than a' that,
Our roarin' game aye keeps the flame
O' friendship bright for a' that.
When biting Boreas, keen and snell,
Wi' icy breath, and a' that,
Lays on the lochs his magic spell,
And stills the streams, and a' that;
For a' that, and a' that,
Cauld winter's snaw, and a' that,
Around the tee, wi' mirth and glee,
The curlers meet for a' that.
But see yon cauldrife Southron coof,
Wi' chitterin' teeth, and a' that,
In muffler, coat, and glove on 's loof,
Wi' draps at 's nose for a' that;
For a' that, and a' that,
As warm's a pie and a' that,
The hardy Scot will cast his coat
And play his game for a' that.
By Thos. Tod, of Russell, Man.
When ye first start in life,
An' join in its strife,
Where ilk ane is climbin' an' speerlin',
What e'er your lot be,
Gang straught to the tee,
Just the same as they dae at the curlin'.
An' ye'll find every day,
As life's game ye play,
Ye'll no' help it by snappin' an' snarlin',
*57 T!
h
H. A. BROWN, OF REVELSTOKE
One of the Oldest Off loers of the Association
and for five years Vioe-President  CURLING ASSOCIATION
But help every man
As much as ye can,
"Soop him up" as ye dae at the curlin'.
If ye dae get a fa',
As maun happen tae a',
Dinna gang aboot growlin' and gurlin',
But pick up yere stane,
An' at it again;
That's the way that they dae at the curlir
Keep yere mouth an' yere think,
As clean as yere rink,
Nor gauge everything by the pund sterlin',
Or that time's thrown awa',
Gin ye dae tak 'a day
Wi' yere freen's on the ice at the curlin'.
When life's voyage is o'er,
An' ye're nearin' the shore,
Grim death a' yere top sails a' furlin',
The Skip up above
Will withhold not His love,
'Cause ye hae been addicted tae curlin'.
AN "END" AT A CURLING MATCH.
Dauvitt,
(Leading Stone).
George Brown,
(Second Stone).
Dr. M'Queen,
(Third Stone).
Simon Loudon,
(Skip).
The Schoolmaster,
(Leading Stone).
Sandy,
(Second Stone).
Rev. Mr. Duthie,
(Third Stone).
Carberry,
(Skip).
"57 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Simon (lighting his pipe)—Dauvit, ye ken the road.—
Nev-er a [puff, puff] kowe!—Verra guid stane, Dauvit.
Carberry (his besom at the tee)—Noo, schulemaister,
doon the soo's back, and mind it's gleg ice.—Huts! man!
you're owre hard! you're owre hard!—Dinna touch'm.
Let'm alane.—You're through a', Schulemaister! [Aside]
Him a curler!
Simon.—Same as last, Dauvit, same as last.—You're
like it ! Cannie ! up hands !—Up—hands !—Weel, weel,
you're in the parish yet, Dauvit !
Carberry.—See an' keep your haund in this time,
Schulemaister. Leave something to the besom. Stand by
to soop, Sandy.—He's coming brawly.—Soop! soop!—So!
Pat-lid—Wha said you couldna' curl, Schulemaister!
The Rink.—Pat-lid ! Weel played, sir! Pat-lid!
Simon.—George Broun, d'ye see that! It's a pat-lid!
Aff wi't! Plenty o' pouther!—Weel laid doon, sir, weel
laid doon!
The Rink.—Will we bring that ane on? He's on't—
He's aff't!—He's on't!
Simon.—He's on't!—Na! He's aff't! He's aff't! Up
haunds !    E—h !    Missed it !—Man, that's a peety !
Carberry.—Oh! for a gaird, Sandy! Oh! for a gaird!
Creep doon centre ice ; we'll soop ye ! Brawly ! Brawly !
It's a hog? Oh! see'd owre!—Soop! Soop! See'd owre?
See'd owre ! ! See'd owre ! ! ! See'd owre ! ! ! ! Is't owre ? Ay ?
Let'm dee, then !   There !—It's no a gaird after a'—H'm !
Simon.—Hoo muckle d'ye still see o' this pat-lid,
George Broun? The hale o't? Tak' your wull o't, then!
Plenty o' pith, an' awa' wi't this time. I dinna want to see'd
again !—I like ye, George, I like ye. Gie'm lugs. He's
comin' straucht for it !—Soop ! Soop ! Chap an' lie ! [Bump]
—That's—the curl, Geordie.    You for a medal player.
Carberry.—Noo, Sandy, follow George Broun.—Huts,
man ! You're awa' sooth, you're awa' sooth ! Let'm gaun !
Man! man! Sandy! Sandy!— CURLING ASSOCIATION
Sandy (on his stomach in front of the brander).—See
that ane up, lauds ! See that ane up !
Carberry.—Soop ! He'll get a wick aff that ither stane !
Soop!—up kowes! He's far eneuch! [Bump] [Bump]—
the winner!
The Rink.—Weel played, Sandy!
Carberry.—The shot? You for a curler, Sandy! Tee
high and deid gairded. Shake haunds wi' your luck, Sandy,
man!
Simon.—D'ye see onything o' this stane, Doctor?—
No; weel, we lie second. This is owre ain stane. A canny
draw doon to here for a gaird. So!—I like this ane—it's
comin' fine, man! Let'm dee! Thank ye, sir! A braw
gaird!    Thank ye!
Carberry.—Noo, Maister Duthie, I want ye tae gaird
this port to the tee. Come awa' tae my besom, an' ye'll fa'
tae't !—Oh ! man ! you've a fine deleevery !—See'm owre
the hog an' he's plenty!—Canny, Schulemaister! Up
kowes!—It's no' the bairns you're licking! Up kowes!—
That's better, noo!   Weel played, Maister Duthie.
Simon.—Doctor! ye maun redd the ice!—What-—Na!
Na! It's owre narrow a port.—Break up their gaird.
There's breeks for ye! But dinna throw awa' your stane.
Play for my besom !—Watch this ane, George Broun. I'm
no sure o' ye, Doctor.—Dinna middle'm, Dauvit! He's
hard eneuch.
The Rink.—He's got them baith.
Simon.—No, he's no'! He's through the port! Let'm
dee ! Let'm dee !—Never mind, Doctor, we'll pu' their teeth
the next time.
Carberry.—That's better! —Noo, Maister Duthie;
you're accustomed comin' in whaur the doctor's failed !—
Fill up !—A tee-high wecht. If ye promote this ither stane
a yaird it doesna' matter. Come quietly doon for a draw—
ane o' yer insinuatin' kind that gets at the hairt.—Dag on't,
vou're like it, man!—Bring him owre the hog!—Leave'm
to me !   Up kowes !—Capital, Maister Duthie, cap-ital ! BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mr Duthie (jubilant)—You're not in great form today,
M'Queen.
Dr. M'Queen.—Come, sir! Come, sir! Who lost the
last.end?   Tell me that, sir!   Tell me that!
Simon.—It's not looking verra braw, Doctor. I'll hae
tae break up their gaird. Eh? An inwick aff that stane?
Weel, I'll see what I see o't !
Dr. M'Queen.—What d'ye see o't, then? Half o't?
Will ye try the inwick ? All right !—Keep oot ahin' the tee,
Mr. Duthie, an' let the man see what he's playin' on—I'll
gie ye my besom to play to, Simon.—Weel laid down ! That
should find her!—Kittle 'm up, lauds.
Simon.—Soop, lauds, soop!
Dr. M'Queen.—Up wi' 'm! Up wi' 'm!—That'll do!—
Let'm dee. [Bump]—Verra bonny stane, sir!—Just missed
being shot.
Mr. Duthie.—Noo, Carberry, we're a' playin' on ane
side.—D'ye see this stane? Crack an egg on't, then, and
you'll lie another.—What? Well, it's dangerous; but take
your own shot.
Carberry.—Put doon your besom on the stane. Stand
by to soop, Sandy!
Mr. Duthie.—He's got it!—Never a kowe! Never a
kowe !   Oh, man, I like ye !   Oh, man, I like ye !—Fine, man,
fine!—[Bump.    Bump.]—There's   my   hand   tae   ye,   sir; "
there's my hand!—Better gie Simon safety, Doctor.
Dr. M'Queen.—What d'ye mean, sir?
Simon.—Whaur there's life there's hope, Doctor.
Which is the shot?
Dr. M'Queen.—My besom's on't. It's against ye. Can
ye come doon on the back o't?   You'll lie shot.
Simon.—I'll try't.
Dr.   M'Queen  and  the  Rink.—Fine  laid  doon !—It's
ragin':—Na!  Na!    It's  a  dull  stane.    See'd up!—Soop!
Soop!—That's a' the curl!—Come on wi' ye!    Come on
wi' ye!—It's fair on't!—Shot! Shot!! Shot!!!   You're sing-
160 CURLING ASSOCIATION
in' sma' now, Mr. Duthie.—Gie me a shake o' your hand,
Simon.
Mr. Duthie.—Now, Carberry, there's nothing for't but
to lift this stane a foot.   Take plenty time.—So !
The Rink.—Hoo d'ye like that ane.    Is he on't?
Mr. Duthie.—Soop! Soop! Gie'm every inch o't!—
Oh! he's on't!   No, he's on the gaird!   No, he's all right!
The Rink.—He's on't! He's on't! [Bump] Got'm!
Soop! Soop!—Awa' wi' that ither ane.—Soop!—That's the
twist!—You for a curler, Carberry!—I'll gie ye a snuff for
that ane, laud !   Shot ! Shot ! !
Mr. Duthie.—One for Carberry.
What is writ is writ.
Would it were worthier.
—Byron.
Hk7-
«I    1
ADDENDA AND CORRIGENDA.
Page 15—Re Kaslo Curling Club: "Jany. 1st, 1906,"
should be struck out and "the winter of 1905" substituted.
The name "Horace W. Burke" should be struck out and
that of Hamilton Byers substituted.
Page 16—Re Rossland Curling Club: "1906" should
read "1906-7," and the last two lines should be struck out.
Page 29—For "stone" read "stane."
Fronting page 37—The diagram of "The Rink": "21"
feet, appearing on the top of the right centre line, should
read "^6" feet.
Page 47—For "home" read "hame."
Page 67—The words "in the early part of January,
1896, the first club was organized at the City of Kaslo"
should be struck out, and these words substituted: "in the
winter of 1894 the first club was organized at Golden, B. C,
and a second club was organized at Kaslo, B. C, in 1895."
Page 70—For "other rinks" read "other notes."
Page 7^.—For "Mairn" read "Main."
Page 94—The second to the last line should be the
last line. i ""'     *■  1
INDEX TO ENGRAVINGS.
Coat-of-Arms of Association Fronti
spiece
FRONTING
His Honor Judge P. E. Wilson, President .of the
Association, 1907	
PACE
A. B. Mackenzie, Patron of the Association, 1907
9
His Honor Judge Jno. A. Forin, an ex-Patron of
25
J. S. C. Fraser, of Rossland, an ex-President of the
T. S. Gilmour's Rink, Rossland Bonspiel, 1906...
R .W. Grigor, an old-time curler	
4i
W. G. McMynn, of Greenwood, an ex-President of
57
61
J. P. Robertson, Secy. Manitoba Branch R.C.C.C.
G O. Buchanan, of Kaslo, Vice-President of the
Association, 1907  69
W. G. McMynn's Rink, Revelstoke Bonspiel, 1904 89
J. S. C. Fraser's Rink, Sandon Bonspiel, 1902.... 113
Dr. R. B. Boucher's Rink, of Phoenix, Rossland
Bonspiel,  1903     125
The late Harry Smith  131
A. T. Walley's Rink, of Nelson,  Rossland Bonspiel, 1906  137
J. A. Turner's Rink, of Nelson, Nelson Bonspiel,
1905     149
H. A. Brown, of Revelstoke, an ex-President of
the Association  157
Finis : "Life's Poor Play is O'er" 163 INDEX TO CONTENTS.
PAGE
Title  2
Office bearers Royal Caledonian Curling Club.... 6
Preface     7-8
Office-bearers, B. C. Curling Association, 1907. .. 9
Past office bearers of the Kootenay (now B. C.)
Curling Association  10-14
Clubs in affiliation with the B. C. Curling Association :—
Kaslo Club  15
Sandon Club 15 and 136
Golden Club    16
Rossland Club  16
Nelson Club    17
Revelstoke Club  18
Phoenix Club    18
Greenwood Club     19
Nelson L. H. & C. Club  19
Lardeau Thistle Club of Trout Lake  19
Ashcroft Club  20
Cranbrook Club  20
Atlin Club   20
References to past Bonspiels  21-24
Association Bonspiel cups and trophies  25-28
Minutes  of the  Kootenay (now B.  C.)  Curling
Association : Inaugural meeting  30-31
Constitution of the B. C. Curling Association:—
Chap. I  32
Clubs (Chap. II)    33
Representative Committee (Chap. Ill).. 34
Officers     34-35
Order of business at annual meetings. .. 36
Entrance and Annual fees (Chap. IV)... 37
The Game (Chap. V)  37-42
Diagram of "Rink"  37
Diagram re "Points' Game"  38 —
INDEX TO CONTENTS.
Diagram, "In-Turn and Out-Turn"  38
Ice Rinks (Chap. VI)  43
The Points' Game (Chap. VII)  44-46
THE GAME OF CURLING AND ITS ORIGIN 48-57
Ancient Curling Stones  53
Explanatory Notes re same  54
Curling Clubs in Scotland  58
Curling Clubs in Quebec  59
Curling Clubs in Ontario  60
Cunilrg Clubs in Manitoba  61-62
Curling Clubs in Saskatchewan  63
Curling Clubs in Alberta  64
Curling Clubs in Yukon  64
Curling Clubs in Nova Scotia  66
Curling Clubs in British Columbia  67-62
Curling Clubs in the United States  65
THE CORDWOOD TROPHY—THE ORIGIN
OF    73-74
CURLING SONGS   75-86
"The Cunning Auld Curler"  75
"Life is a Great Bonspiel"  76
"Curler's Appeal to John Frost"  y y
"The Noble Game of Curling"  78-79
"Curling"      80
"This Awfu' Weather"  81
"Curling Song," by Alexander Maclagan  82-83
"Song of the Curler"  83
"The King o' Games is Curling" 84-85
"My Bonny Broomy Kowe"  86
"If You Want to be a First Class Curler"  141
"Scotland's Bonny Broom"  142
"The Curler's Grip"  I43-H4
"Wick an' Curl In"  H5
"My Channel Stanes"  M6
"A Curler's Song"  147-148
"An Auld Curler's Sang"  x49
"King o' Games is Curlin' "  I5° INDEX TO CONTENTS.
"The Gran' Auld Roarin' Game"	
"The Gathering of the Curling Clans"	
"A Curling Song," by Dr. Sidey 	
"A' Nicht it was Freezin' "	
"A Curling Song," by Dr. MacLeod	
"Old England May Her Cricket Boast"	
"Curling," by Thomas Todd	
CURLIANA LITERATURE:—
The Game of Curling : Its Rise and Growth in
Canada and the United States        4^-57
Beef and Greens—the Curler's delight        87-88
A Curler's Menu  89
Ailsa Craigh, where curling stones come from 89
Ancient Curling Stones  53
Origin of artificial rinks         90-91
Curling as a winter sport        92-96
Anecdotes and stories      97-106
Quotations re curlers and curling     124-130
Origin of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club 140
Sketch:—"An End at a Curling Match"     157-161
OFFICE BEARERS OF ASSOCIATIONS IN
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES.
AFFILIATED WITH THE R. C. C. C. OF
SCOTLAND :—
Canada—
Ontario Branch  ..-  107
Quebec or Canadian Branch  108
Manitoba Branch  108
Saskatchewan Branch    109
Kootenay (now B. C.) Branch, 1906  no
Nova Scotia Branch  in
Alberta Branch     in
United States—
St. Andrew's (New York).. ..'  112
Yonkers    112
Office bearers of non-affiliated United States Associations :— INDEX TO CONTENTS.
PAGE
Grand National Curling Club, U. S. A.. 113
N. W. Curling Association, U. S. A  113
GENERAL INFORMATION:—
Curler's signal code 123
Bagnall-Wyld's system of-drawing     114-115
Hints to Secretaries of affiliatel clubs     116-117
Draft   Constitution   and   Rules   for  affiliated
clubs         118-122
IN MEMORIAM :—
The late J. B. McArthur  131
The late Harry Smith  132
EXCERPTS FROM MANITOBA ANNUALS:—
First record of curling in the West  133
First curling clubs in British Columbia—
The Golden Curling Club  133-135
The Kaslo Curling Club  i35-T36
The Sandon Curling Club  138
The Kootenay Curling Association  I38"I39 L *J±àËL If
i. KEEP YOUR FEET
WARM WHEN CURLING
The George A. Slater Shoe is
just right for the ice. I also
carry an exceptionally fine
line of German Socks, Rubbers
and Overshoes.
w. f. McNeill,
ROSSLAND, B. C,
CURLERS    ATTENTION !
When you have sprains, bruises, swellings,
rheumatism, or backache from curling too hard
or your legs become stiff or your feet sore from
standing too long on the ice, try a bottle of
STOUTS EMBROCATION. This remedy
cannot be excelled as a liniment.
PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED.
THOMAS STOUT,
THE DRUGGIST
ROSSLAND,"B. C. ï
OHALLONER
THE BEST VALUES IN PRIZE
CURS, TROPHIES
AND SHIELDS FOR CURLERS
ARE TO BE HAD ATT. C. CHALLONER'S
MEDALS MADE TO ORDER ON
SHORT NOTICE IN OUR
ROSSLAND STORE
ROSSLAND, B. C.
I_ 1Real Estate & TTnsurance
timber limits
pole anb Œie timber
IRancb, (Barben anb
jfruit Hanbs
Hôent melson anb fort
Sbepparb IRailwaç Crown
(Branteb Xanbs
on wbicb tbere are
large quantities of
merchantable ttmber
in ans si3e tracts.
yrancis )£. Ermstrong
1Ro80lanb; B. 8 CURLERS' SWEATERS,
SHOES AND RUBBERS
at A THEY & SMITH'S
GENTS' FURNISHING
GOODS STORE
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Sole agents for the famous   Twentieth   Century Made to Order Clothing
Our aims are to please our patrons and to
make moderate profits.
Patronize us and you will be certain of the
best possible treatment " THERE IS A DESTINY SHAPES
OUR ENDS "
ACCIDENT
LIRE AND RIRE
INSURANCE
LIBERAL F O LI CI ES | LOW RATES !
ABSOLUTE PROTECTION !
A. S. GOODEVE
INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE
XLhc Bank of British
IRortb Hmerica
CAPITAL AND REST,
Total Assets Over,
$7,105,333.33
$50,000,000
Does Every Kind of Legitimate Banking Business
Interest  Credited  on   Deposits  of   $1.00   and   Up
Every Three Months
56 Branches in Canada.    Correspondents AU Over the World
Rossland Branch
H. H. ROWLEY, Manager ^\\t Hume
NELSON, B. C.
GEO. P. WELLS
B. TOMKINS
You always feel at home at The' Hume.    Ask THE  ROSSLAND
Winter Carnival
THE  GREAT ANNUAL  WINTER
EVENT OR BRITISH COLUMBIA
Jfive Bacs of ibibernal Sports, Commencing
tbe Œbtrb Œuesbaç in 3anuan> Eacb iPear
HOCKEY, SNOWSHOEINC,
SKI-RUNNING AND JUMPING
{CHAMPIONSHIP OF CANADA)
SKATING   EXERCISES,    SLED   AND  CUTTER
RACES, GRAND MASQUERADE CARNIVALAND CURLING BONSPIEL
TLbe Xargest IRinfe anb tbe ffiest ïce in Brttisb
Columbia BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817
CAPITAL (all paid up)
REST,        -
UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
$14,400,000.00
11,000,000.00
-     422,689.98
HEAD OFFICE,   MONTREAL
BRANCHES:
IN CANADA
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO
NORTHWEST PROVINCES
PROVINCE OF
	
continued
Alton», Man.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Lethbridge, AlUu.
Colhngwood
Man.
allaceburg
Raymond, Alta.
Rossland
Goderich
PROVINCE OF NEW
Winnipeg, Man.
Victoria
Guelph
BRUNSWICK
PROV. OF NOVA SCOTIA
PROVINCE OF QUEBEC
UnSlT
Millbrook
London
Perth
Picton
Sawyerville
IN NEWFOUNDLAND
IN GREAT BRITAIN
IN THE UNITED STATES
I. Y. Hebden, W. A. Bog, J. T. Molineux.
IN MEXICO-- UNDER  NEW MANAGEMENT
Ghe Central Ibotel
ONE OF THE OLDEST AND MOST
COMMODIOUS HOTELS IN
ROSSLAND. B. C.
EDWARD SHEARER, PROPRIETOR
Steam Heated Throughout.     Baths Free
for Commercial Men.
ONE DOLLAR A DAY AND UPWARDS
CURLERS WILL FIND IT A HOUSE OF COMFORT AND JOY
The Best Dining Room in the City.    The Best of Wines,
' è/Àe tJSpjMwman'
xe&
rUUM',
a
v.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN   	
HAY, GRAIN AND CEREAL
PRODUCTS
B <& K ROLLED OATS
ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED FOR CURLERS
ROSSLAND, B. C. 1
Œbe IRosslanb Seating anb
Curling IRink, Xto.
Œbe IRosslanb IRinn is one of tbe Xargest anb
Best Hrrangeb IRinfes IClest of, Winnipeg
THE SKATING ICE IS 170X80 FEET
THREE SHEETS OF CURLING ICE, 165X16 FT.
THE MOST COMMODIOUS RINK
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
COZY WAITING ROOMS. LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S
HOCKEY ROOMS.
SKATERS' ROOMS WITH PRIVATE LOCKERS.
EVERY CONVENIENCE FOR BOT^SKATERS AND CURLERS
SKATES TO RENT FOR A NOMINAL SUM.
BRASS BAND IN ATTENDANCE
TWO TELEPHONES IN. THE BUILDING.     .        -    .-
ICE FOR FOUR AND A HALF MONTHS IN THE YEAR.
SEASON TICKETS AT THE CHEAPEST RATES IN  WESTERN CANADA
9IO.OO PER FAMILY •■••.„
S6.00 FOR GENTLEMEN S3.OO FOB LADIES
This rink is the honte of the great Hockey 'Tournament in connection
•with the great Rossland Winter Carnival, the great-winter event of
British Columbia. Here the great B. C. Curling Association Bonspiels
are held. The Races for the Skating Championship of British Columbia
take place in this, commodious Rink. It is the home of the Canadian
hibernal sports for British Columbia.
J. S. C. FRASER,
W. J. NELSON. THE CITY OF ROSSLAND
THE CITY OP SEVEN HILLS
THE HUB OP THE GOLDEN KOOTENAY
AN INCORPORATED  CITY, WITH BOOO HAPPY CITIZENS
'ell  kn<
Bear,
vn gold-cop-
War Eagle,
i and
The
: paid.
Within the corporate limits
per mines—the Le Roi, jo:
Idaho, Spitzee, White Bear,
Le Roi, and others.
It has the finest climate in the world.    The winter is
and   the  varying  seasons of spring,   summer,  autumi
winter, render it the most delightful place of residen.
the continent.     The abundance and  purity ot the  wa
unsurpassed.     The   best  schools   (high   and public) i
Province.     Miles   of sidewalks  and excellent drives,
best fire brigade in  the  Province.    The scenery aroun
city rivals that of the Alps or the Appenines.    It is  an
place of residence.     The  highest rates of w
The common laborer gets $3,50 per day.    The cost of li
is   moderate.       Two   great   transcontinental   railways—the
. Great Northern and C. P. R.—have branch lines into the city.
In Rossland and its vicinity are some of the finest fruit
- lands in the Province. The finest apples, plums, peaches,
pears and prunes are grown on the fertile hills and in the
valleys in and about the city. The exhibit of Rossland fruit,
this year in London, England, has astonished the world.
Vast tracts of fruit lands for sale at reasonable prices.
All who desire to enjoy life. All who desire to prolong
life. All who desire to amass wealth from the products of
the soil. All who wish a white man's wage for eight hours
per day labor. All who wish wealth, health and happiness:
To all we extend the glad hand of fellowship.
J f
FRUIT LANDS TIMBER LIMITS REAL ESTATE
McMORRIS & HORSTEAD
CUSTOMS BROKERS
NOES AND FORWARDING PROM
P. O. BOX 93
403 BAKER ST.
NELSON, B. C.
t ATTENDED TO
PHONE 209
TLbe IRelson Cafe
FURNISHED ROOMS
OPEN  DAY AND NIGHT LARGE CLUB ROOM
509 Baker St. NELSON, B. C.
\
FRUIT LANDS
THE BEST THE CHEAPEST
S. M. BRYDCES
IMPERIAL
BANK BLOCK NELSON,   B.   C.
BRYDCES,    BLAKEMORE   et   CAMERON,    LIMITED.
A-GKNEW   «fe   CO.
We car
y a full line
of Grocert
es, Provisions, Crockery and
Classic
re. Also Men
's Underwe
ar, Overalls, Top Shirts, âfc.
ROSSLAND, B. C. RBURNS&Cb.
"wholesale anl retail
dealers in"
MEATS
FISH
GAME
OYSTERS
Our tender steaks, chops, roasts, etc., will
add to your strength, build up your nerves
and aid you in winning at Curling
RBUBNS&Co.
GEORGE W. CJRQUHART
MANAGER
ROSSLAND BRANCH E. A. EWERT
JEWELER
Silverware
Canadian
Souvenirs
Etc., Etc.
CURLING  TROPHIES
A   SPECIALTY
ROSSLAND, B. C. &va*ieJ' &e#A. ont/ 0£cu*i€/a*y &aM. f   ■
1
CURLING
IRON HEATERS
il.
ELECTRIC SAD IRONS
HEATING PADS
STOVES
IMMERSION COILS
[I r.
TRANSFORMERS
WIRING DEVICES AND SUPPLIES
also STEAM PUMPS
Carried in stock by the
<
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC
1
CO., LTD.
ROSSLAND AND VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE:   TORONTO
1
Manufacturers of                                                                    Dealers in
EXPLOSIVES FOR MINING                                        FUSE, DETONATORS
il
STUMPING AND RAILROAD                               AND ELECTRIC BLAST.
1
1
WORK                                                                                          ING APPARATUS
THE GIANT POWDER CO., CON.
H. P. DICKINSON, Interior General Agent
1   ■
Factories                                                                    COLUMBIA AVENUE
TELEGRAPH BAY, Vancouver Island                                       Phone 117
GIANT, California                                                                              P. O. Box 05
si ■ •
CLIPPER GAP, California                                                    ROSSLAND, B. C.
1
1 THE JENGKES MACHINE CO., Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
BOILERS,  ELECTRICAL  AND   STEAM
HOISTS
CRUSHERS AND  STAMP MILLS
LOGGING ENGINES
Offices:     ROSSLAND  AND  VANCOUVER.
THE   CANADIAN
RAND CO., Ltd.
COMPRESSED AIR
SPECIALISTS
OUR LONG   AND SUCCESSFUL  EXPERIENCE  INSURES
BEST RESULTS FOR OUR CUSTOMERS
ROCK DRILLS
ELECTRICAL AND STEAM DRIVEN
AIR COMPRESSORS
COMPRESSED AIR HAULAGE, ETC.
OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES :
ROSSLAND AND VANCOUVER W. R. BRADEN
THE GROCER
We turn, our stock over frequently and
hence it is always fresh and palatable.
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. We carry a particularly fine
line of Teas and Coffees. Goods delivered to all parts of the city.
)0LUMmAAVE. ROSSLAND, B. C,
W. J. LOUGHEED & CO.
PASHIONABLE   TAILORS
The patronage of curlers is particularly requested. We
make clothing that fits properly, is stylish, and at the
same time will keep you warm.
AGENTS FOR THE BROADWAY BRAND
OF CORRECT TAILORED CLOTHING
The coat oft proclaims the man, and we give particular
attention to making coats as they should be made.  We
take like pains with trousers and vests.
ROSSLAND, B. C. Ghe Queen's Dotel
MRS. E. C. CLARKE, Prop.
RATES   S2.00 RER   DAY
FIRST-CLASS DINING ROOM.
LARGE AND COMFORTABLE BEDROOMS.       NELSON,  B.  C.
STARKEY & CO.
WHOLESALE
PROVISIONS, PRODUCE, FRUIT
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NELSON, B. C. r
AFTER DROP INTO  THE
r^i IK9W  wiur+ HOPPMAN   HOUSE
CUfxLlnlG     RESTAURANT et   CAPE
where the finest viands are on hand at all times,
and they will be properly cooked and carefully
served by the staff of the old and  reliable HofTman
We can fix you with the proper sort of imported
refreshments while curling.
GREEN A SMITH, Proprietors
WASHINGTON ST. ROSSLAND,   B.   C.
SMITH & HUNDEN
PLUMBERS AND TINNERS
I
HOT AIR AND HOT WATER HEATING
are among our specialties. Bath rooms
fitted up in the highest style of the plumber's art. vWe always strive to please our
customers.
i
SMITH & HUNDEN,
Rossland, B. C. Ube Ibotel Bilan
ROSSLAND, B. C.
ONE OF THE OLDEST AND MOST POPULAR
INNS IN THE KOOTENAY
THE HOME OF CURLING
FRATERNITY
IT   WAS   IN   THIS   ANCIENT    EDIFICE   THAT
THE   KOOTENAY   (NOW   B.   C.J   CURLING
ASSOCIATION HAD ITS BIRTH ON THE
12TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1898
Mc
Whoe'er has traveled life's duU roun,
Where'er his stages may have bet
igh to think he still has found, it
i
P. BURNS S CO., Ltd.
THE PIONEER MEAT MERCHANTS
OF YALE AND KOOTENAY
FRESH AND CURED MEATS
FISH AND POULTRY
GREENWOOD,       -      -      -       B. C,
AND ALL INLAND CITIES
HENDERSON BROTHERS
LIVERY  STABLE
Special A ttention Given to Haulage and Delivery
Best Turnouts in the City for Driving
Office: Royal Barber Shop. Phone iS7. Residence Phone B-Z44
ROSSLAND,        ------        B. C. SEND YOUR ORDERS TO US POR
ALL HINDS OP
SHEET   METAL   WORK
PLANING   MILL   EXHAUST  SYSTEMS
SCIENTIFICALLY ENGINEERED.
THIS IS OUR SPECIALTY. WE ARE EXPERTS.
WE HANDLE THE FAMOUS  "SUNSHINE" FURNACE
"KOOTENAY" RANGE AND McCLARY'S
"CANADA" ENAMEL WARE
GASOLINE ENGINES
F AT M ORE BROTHERS
PLUMBING, HEATING AND VENTILATING ENGINEERS
CRANBROOK, B. C.
BLUE & DESCHAMPS
MANUFACTURERS OF
AND DEALERS IN
LUMBER, PILING, CEDAR POLES
AND MINING TIMBER
ROUND OR SAWED
ROSSLAND,   -   -   BRITISH COLUMBIA PAULSON BROS.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES
PROVISIONS
FRUITS ....
TBL- ,S3      ROSSLAND, B. C.
NOTICE TO  CURLERS!
ALL GOOD CURLERS SHOULD
NOT FAIL TO SMOKE
JOE WRIGHT'S
"ïïltix ôc 3£i*oca/*
"^mivUUa"
All made from the best Havana Tobacco, and all
UNION  MADE
MANUFACTORY:       -      ROSSLAND, B. C.
Goods kept by all good tobacconists in Yale and Kootenay Œbe ©rwell Ibotel
CORNER   OF WASHINGTON   STREET
.    .    .    AND  SECOND   AVENUE    .    .    .
ROSSLAND, BRITISH   COLUMBIA
KENNETH  MARTIN
PROPRIETOR
ONE DOLLAR A DAY AND UPWARDS
Fifty Elegantly Furnished Rooms
With All Modern Conveniences
And All   Home  Comforts    .    .    .
THE   BEST   OF   WINES   AND   LIQUORS
THE   BEST   MEALS
THE   BEST  ACCOMMODATION
THE   BEST   SERVICE
THE   BEST   OF   EVERYTHING
Curlers attending the Bonspeil will receive especial attentio
at The Orwell. We will make them feel at home and giv
them  "a richt guid welcome."
How fond your home,  ne'er mind the partin'
Hither fly and live with  Martin,
Feast for body,  feast   for mind,
Best of welcome, taste refined,
Ken.  does nothing here by halves,
Other landlords are but calves. The Beaver  Bar
THATCHER & SCOTT, Proprietors
COLUMBIA   AVENUE, WEST,   ROSSLAND,   B. C.
(3 Doors West of the Royal Bank)
The Choicest Wines, Liquors and Glgars
Curlers who want "a wee drappie o' auld Scotch whusky,"
hot or cold, can get it at this ancient inn.
Cam' ben the house and we'll gie ye a richt guid welcome.
Hunt & Wert
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Wholesale    and    Retail
^Tobacconists
Direct Importers of Havana
and Manila Cigars
All Icinds of Smokers' Supplies
Curlers attending the annual Bonspiel will please give i
call. We'll give you a smoke better than you have i
enjoyed before.    Fresh Cigars daily.
Goodeve   Brother»
The Old  Reliable	
Druggists & Stationers
Office   Supplies   and    Specialties
Curlers desiring anything in our lines
will profit by giving us a visit.  ...      .- ',' "I;
IT PAYS TO DEAL WITH GOODEVE BROTHERS
L_ T.   R.  MORROW
ROSSLAND,  B. C.
The Oldest Apothecary & Druggist
"The Hub of the Oolden Kootenay"
P. 0. Box 323       12 Columbia Ave. (East)       Phone 3
THE CENTRE STAR HOTEL
JAMES   DYER,  Proprietor
Rossland, B. C.
ONLY   THE  BEST LIQUORS  KEPT
CHERRINGTON
The Old-Established
CONFECTIONER
Cigar & Tobacco Man
Pipes .'. Souvenirs, 1. etc.
XTbe TRossIanft /BMner
$3 perçear
ail tbe flftininq mewg ot Sotitbern B. C. r
J.W. CAMPION SCO.
High-Class  Dry Goods
and Ladies' Furnishings
CURLERS, WHEN ATTENDING THE
ANNUAL BONSPIEL, WILL FIND OUR
STOCK   OF   DRY   GOODS    COMPLETE
Styles Right!  Prices Right The Clarendon Bar
ROSSLAND, B. C.
We Keep only the Choicest
WINES AND SPIRITS
"There's a Spirit above and a Spirit below
A Spirit of joy and a Spirit of woe.
The Spirit above is the Spirit divine,
The Spirit below is the Spirit of wine
AND WE KEEP IT BOTTLED OR ON DRA UGHT IN ITS
PUREST STATE
Cam  ben the hoose and an hae a wee drappie
m
m
THE
Strathcona
Hotel
NELSON,   B.   C.
The best Tourists arrive daily
The best  Kooms are provided daily
The best  Meals are served daily.
The. best service is guaranteed daily
All Travellers requiring'home comforts, visit the hotel dail.
Curlers will receive special attention The Nelson Brewing Co., Ltd.
NELSON, B. G.
Brewers and Bottlers of the Purest,
most Wholesome and Health-Giving
Lager Beer and Porter
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soft Drinks.   Our "Red
Ribbon Beer" for quality cannot be surpassed
Curlers try it, you'll never drink Scotch "Wnsky" again
Owen's Family Liquor Store
™  WASHINGTON STREET  I
The Great Wine and Liquor Emporiun
Choicest Wines & Liquors Sold
WHISKEYS
Dewar's Scotch - $1.25 per Bottle
Seagram's "83" - $1.25 per Bottle
Gooderham & Worts' Special - $1.25 per Bottle
Imported Beers, by the bottle or dozen, at wholesale
prices.
The best Spanish, Californian and Native Wines, by
the bottle, gallon or barrel.
Goods Delivered  Free to any Part of the City A. B. MacKenzie & Co.
S9tines
Stocks
Bcal estate
Slfc      ~ '
Insurance
	
loans
timber stands
^rntt Ratios
Coal auô Coke
RC
)SSLAND,  British Colum
bia
ALBERT Mf STUDIO
Curlers desiring  Individual or Group
Photos will do well to give us a call
We Excel in our work.     Satisfaction Guaranteed
To mate some good, others to exceed"-SHAK.
Si
-r.=-   \
■H. PRES1
The Old Reliable Barber
\   =
If you want a Shave  we'll Shave you
If vou want Shaving Utensils, Razors, Cosmétiques,
Pomades,   Hair Oils or Hair Restorets, we'll sell
them to you cheap.
If you want a Smoke we'll  give you one. f
J. M. JORDAN
 TMEOLD RELIABLE	
House  Kurnislier
-Wholesale and Retail
FURNITURE all   KINDS
GARPETS,  RUGS,  ETC.
FOR CASH OR ON CREDIT
Curlers Visiting the Bonspiels and desiring to take
home some useful Souvenir can not do better than call
upon me.   1 HAVE THE GOODS.
Columbia Bottling Works
dAMES HARPER, Proprietor
Manufacturer of every known Variety of Aerated
Waters, Sodas, Etc.. Plain or Flavored
ies.   Ask for my Soda, it is kept by all good Inn Keepers.
Zbe flMoneer Barber Sbop
3 Ghaif s    llkè^ an-d Most A»* **°i    3 Ghalfs
Baths
Plain      Shower
Steam
Baths
NG MASSAGE
WALTER G. ROBINSON, Prop. Hunter Bros.
WHOLESALE AND . . .
RETAIL  MERCHANTS
Dry Goods, Gents* Furnishings, Boots
and Shoes» Groceries, Hardware, China
and Crookery Wares, etc», etc	
Curlers visiting the Bonspiel will
profit by a visit to the "Big Store."
Columbia Avenue ROSSLAND, B. C.
The LE ROI BREWING Co.
PHONE   79    .    ROSSLAND,    B. C.
The "Le Roi"  Beer for quality, wholesomeness and
health-giving properties cannot be excelled.
"It cheers the sad, revives the old,
Inspires the young, makes weariness forget his toil,
And fear her danger :   Opens a new world
When this, the present, palls."—(Byron.)
Brewed with all the care and attention that art and experience
can suggest, from the purest barley-malt and hops ; aged just
to the proper degree of ripeness ; possessing a body, a richness, a zest and flavor it appeals to the taste and appetite
of all who partake of the nutritious beverage.
Curlers attending the Bonspiel should try our famous beer
and avoid the injurious consequences of " Scotch Whiskey"
The ale will give you the necessary strength and zeal to win,
without a sore head "the morrow morn."
Try it and see how much it excells Scotch. Murray, Henderson & Hutchinson
WOOD MERCHANTS-
AND DRAYMEN. . . .
ROSSLAND,    B.C.
OFFICE  PHONE  I
RESIDENCE   PHONE  AI33
Two Years' Seasoned  Tamarac and   Fir.
The  Best Wood  at Current Prices.
EXPRESS and GENERAL
TRANSFER    WORK
Leave orders at P. R. McDonald's Store, Columbia Ave.
McDONELL&COSTELLO
GENTS'   FURNISHINGS
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, Clothing.
The largest, most commodious and best
arranged Store in Rossland
Curlers visiting the Bonspell should give us a call. We
keep only the best grades of all goods and the cheapest.
Just "wick-in" and we will "wick" you "out" with profit to yourselves and to us. The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company
of Canada, Limited
Offices of the Smelting and Refining Department :
Trail, British Columbia
Smelters and Refiners
Purchasers of all classes of Ores»
Producers of Fine Gold and Silver, Base
Bullion, Copper Matte, Pig Lead, Lead
Pipe, Antimony and Bluestone.  Hbe "Koçal Bank of Canada
INCORPORATED
1869
Banking Business in all it's Branches
PROGRESS OF SIX YEARS
1901        $3,700,000       $12,700,000       $18,800,000
1907        $8,290,000       $35,000,000       $48,000,000
ROYAL BANK BUILDING
W. A. W. WARD,
Local Manac
H. S. WALLACE
Stationery, Office Supplies,
Wall Paper, Fancy Goods,
GhinaWare, Glassware, Etc.
Columbia F\Ve.
ROSSLAND, B. G.
The  Old   Reliable
KOOTENAY:: CAFE
Miss YANNA   HELGASON,  Proprietress.
Regular Full  Course  Dinner, 25c.
Short Orders Day or Night
The Choicest Wines f
Halcyon Hot Springs Sanitarium
HARRY   MclNTQSW,   Proprie
This commodious and well-equk>ped Sanitarium is
beautifully situated on the batiks of the Arrow Lakes,
enlargements of the great Columbia' River, between
Robson and Revelstoke. The surrounding scenery is
magnificent.
Fine Walks and Drives. . . Good Boating and Fishing
The C. P. R. Steamers call twice a day.
A first-class Gasoline Launch, in charge of a competent
engineer, is ever at the disposal of guest's.
Post, Telegraph & Money Order Offices in the Hotel.
The tables are provided with the best the markets supply. The service is most efficient. The rooms
and cottages are furnished with every regard to home
comforts and conveniences.
The health, happiness and comfort of our guests is
our constant aim and motto.
The curative powers and health-giving properties
of the Hot Springs are now generally acknowledged.
The marvelous cures effected are their best testimonial.
le
HALCYON LITHIA WATER -:- -:-
-:--:- THE GREAT TABLE WATER
This unrivalled mineral water, and every variety
oft drinks, are manufactured at the Springs.    Cur-
will  find  Lithia  Water preferable  to  any  other
\merican  water,   for  mixing  with   Scotch  or  other
vhiskeys.    Our Waters, Sodas and other Soft Drinks
ire found in all first class bars.    All are bottled, siph-
jned and aerated by skilled and experienced workmen.
For sale by the barrel or by the dozens in syphons or
)Ottles.    Shipped to all points by rail or steamer.
He
In  I L 

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