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BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Educational institutions of Vancouver: Their progress from incorporation up to the present time Vancouver School Board 1910

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VANCOUVER'S GREATEST DAILY
NEWSPAPER
1/
fJThe only newspaper published in Vancouver
which carries features to suit all—giving you
news when it is news—Articles on every recreation by experts—Articles for the children—in
a sentence, "The Home Paper for the Home.
tJThe only paper that carries all the large department store news.
^[[Delivered to your home for 1 0 cents per week.
tJWe guarantee our delivery service.
XLhc Vancouver HDnily Wlorlo Revelstoke in 1896. He was in the service of the
C. P. R. there, when, seeing the larger possibilities
of Vancouver, he came here, taking up The World,
of which he is the principal owner at the present
time.   He was elected to the mayoralty this year  .
Came to Vancouver on' August 5th, 1895, and
opened a shoe business where Colvin & McRobie
are at the present time. He was elected to the
School Board in January, 1908 and was appointe*
Chairman of the Finance Committee in 1909. He
was elected as General Chairman of the School
Board in 1910, which position he now occupies.
J f "m-1
4^-    4g-
.¥0 ¥0i ALVENSLEBEN
LIMITED
Real Estate
Investments
Mines
Farm Lands
TIMBER
405   HASTINGS   STREET,  WEST
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
-*}*■       -^ J8P
=DQ=
, and though
the
s have been
f position he will occupy is
school trustee. Mr. Clubb is a member of the
old and well established firm of Clubb & Stewart,
Hastings street.
—nf—
HwxtanmtB
i       g>rlj00l0
Those who are cc
present magnificent
should not be?) am
hardly  realize  that  .
chool   buildin
and   modern
system is the growth of less than four decades.
All will be interested in reading a brief history.
(It is with pardonable pride the writer recounts
On February 12th, 1873, a school was opened
under the name "Granville," after the name of the
town itself. The constituency was largely the Hastings Mill Company and their employees. To their
credit, this company, at their own expense, built a
schoolhouse and asked the Government to provide
a teacher. The pupils numbered 20, as against
our almost 10,000 today. The first trustees were
no less worthy and prominent citizens than
Messrs. R. H. Alexander and Jonathan Miller,
who are yet among our most respected citizens.
The first teacher was Mrs. Cordiner, who was at
once painstaking, sympathetic and successful. It
is pleasing to hear her pupils, some of them sea
captains, and otherwise ennobling life, speak in
gratitude of their first teacher. Following came
Miss Sweeney, the daughter of the mill foreman,
and next in succession, Mrs. Richards (later Mrs.
R. Springer). Both these ladies adorned the
profession. For quite 13 years the school continued in the building placed in close proximity
to the Hastings mill. One room and one teacher
is the history of Granville school from Feb. 12,
1873, to Nov. 4th, 1886.
The Government archives at the latter date
read: "Boundaries altered and redefined and name
changed from Granville to Vancouver," and adds:
"The boundaries to be the same as those defined
on the official map of the City of Vancouver."
Now began our
flrst Vancouver schoo
but not
till after the C. P
R. passed along the
shores of
the inlet did the i
eal change begin.    Le
te in '86
a   four-roomed   building  tin   Oppenheim
sr   street
(now Cordova) an
d just east of Jackso
i avenue,
took the place of
he "Granville" school
with an
enrollment of 93.
In six months the e
arollment
became 285.    This
required a principal
md three
assistants.    There
Messrs. Pottmeyer a
nd J. W.
Robinson   by   shoi
t   turns   filled  the   tl
îen   most
difficult position.
The assistants were Miss Hart-
ney (now Mrs. Bir
d), Miss Alice Christ!
3 (who is
still   devoting   he
skill   and   energy
o   school
work), and Miss IV
lurchie (now Mrs. Dr.
Mills).
So great was tt
e city's growth that
all pupils
who applied could
not find admission.   The West
End first and then False Creek (now Mount
Pleasant) quickly became settled and for accommodation two schools of four and two rooms
respectively were built. The West End school
stood on Burrard street where recently has been
erected the Aberdeen school. The False Creek
building    (some   years   afterwards   rechristened w. s. Mcdonald
Res.   Phone    2564
H. WILSON
Res. Phone 3526
1
Mcdonald & wilson
General Contractors
P.O.  Box 1166
Tel. 2598
Office :   No. 101 Carter Cotton Block
Works : Westminster Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. WILLIAM PIRRITTE ARGUE.—Born in Newmarket, Ontario; came to Manitoba in 1881; educated in Winnipeg; graduated from Manitoba University, 1888, with honors; taught in rural schools
from 1884 to 1889; took normal training in Winnipeg, 1888-1889; principal of Neepawa Public
Schools, 1889-1891; principal of Brandon Public
School; teacher in Brandon High School; superintendent Brandon Public School Department,
1891-1893; principal Central School, Winnipeg,
1893 to 1895; principal Collegiate Institute and
superintendent of public schools, Portage la
Prairie, 1895-1901; chief clerk Department of Education, Province of Manitoba, 1901-1903; city
superintendent, Vancouver, B. C, 1903.
period of time
Fredericton, N.
the University
tained his B. A.
took  special   cou
burgh, Scotland.
The   doctor
3., graduating t
E New Brunswi
looking of the
y for a long
educated   in
the  old-i
jrld
1 S. O. of Edin-
Mount Pleasant) was divided and is still in evidence, one part lending ao the janitor's residence,
the other constituting the Manual Training school
for "The Hill." These two schools were in charge
of lady principals, Misses A. J. Macdougal and M.
Hartriey. Towards the end of '87 the staff numbered seven.
Further data may be given here. In the school
year '86 and '87 the city's ccntribution to education was $1172.01, which, by the way, did not
include the cost of the Government-erected building. The salary schedule was: Principal $70; each
of the two assistants, $50, and the Monitor, $25.
The first (Vancouver) Board consisted of Dr. D.
L. Beckingsale (Sec.) and Messrs. D. B. Charleston and J. B. Henderson. The building, now some
years replaced by handsome residences was built
and equipped at a cost of only $3,500. It consisted of two stories, 67x37.
It is of interest to read the Board's recommenda-
> tion at the end of '87:—"The large increase in
the number of teachers" (only six of an increase
for the year) "fails to meet the present urgent demands. Two additional assistants should be added at earliest possible date: It is further recommended that a building should be erected on
a site eligible for a 'Central School.'"
In 1888 this Central School was built, of boards.
This wooden building served for some time, and,
after the completion of the new Central, did service for the first High School and Board Offices.
Though old and unfit, and never a thing of beauty,
it is still used for the various School Offices and
Board Meetings. Surely the builder did not know
what varied and lengthy service this building
would fulfil.
By June 30th, 1888, 642 pupils were enrolled.
The official report reads "with two graded Schools
in operation, it is to be expected that the city
will, at no distant date, be in a position to make
application for the establishment of a High School
within its limits."
At midsummer, '88, the first two pupils passed
their entrance—to the credit of the East School.
For some time this school had an attendance
about equal to the combined enrollment of the
other sections, showing that the weight of population remained in the East End. The unprecedented increase of attendance was not in advance, it
is pleasing to notice, of the advance in the attainment of the pupils. Attest is had in the entrance results for December '88, six pupils (East
School again) and in June '89 (the same school),
ten pupils and the West School two. Besides,
three obtained Teacher's certificates.
The beginning of 1890 saw the completion of
the first brick school, the new Central, erected in
our City, the present 8-roomed School, now under
Principal Gourley, but then under the able princi-
palship of Alex. Robinson, B. A.—who had, with
the writer, just received appointment.
Our first High School began its career in January, 1890, under Mr. Robt. Law, B.A., B.Sc. who
had already served as Principal of the East School
and of the Central. The initial enrolment was 32,
many of whom were older than those since attending. Gold medals were the order of the day.
Three young ladies carried "First Honors," Miss
Cassie A. Barnes (Since June '91 a successful
member of the Strathcona Staff) passed head of
the school; Miss Mclntyre was dux in mathematics, and Miss Johnson most proficient in English
Subjects. These medals were presented by Mayor
Oppenheimer, Rev. Mr. Fay, and by old Victoria 1051 Seaton St.
John R. Tacey
HEATING AND VENTILATING
ENGINEER
The Tacey Corrugated Garbage Can
 ALL KINDS OF	
Galvanized Sheet Metal
Copper Work, Roofing, Etc.
The Fan System of Hot Air Heating
and Ventilating
Dust Separators and Blow Pipe
Work for Planing Mills
a Specialty
Vancouver
B.C.
Proper Office Equipment
■mms essential to successful businessman^
|   A Well Arranged
I   MACEY
Cabinet
is a time and
labor saver.
We have a
splendid
assortment
of FILING
CABINETS
Office Desks
Tables and
Chairs.
The Visible Underwood Typewriter
THE
WEBSTER-HANNA CO,
LTD.
Complete Office Outfitters
426-430 Cordova St., W. VANCOUVER, B. C.
THE DOMINION STOCK AND
BOND CORPORATION, Lm
WINCH  BUILDING
Vancouver, B.C. Ground Floor
General Trust, Financial and Real
Estate Business Conducted
Administrators, Executors, Investors
Mining,   Stocks,   Bonds  and   Debenture
Money Loaned at Current Rates.
Agreements of Sale Purchased.
Notaries, Conveyancers, General Brokers
/e are fully equipped to handle your bus:
ness affairs.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
Clubb $c g>Uvantt
Héé^ê
— 309 to 315 m
HASTINGS ST., W.
mm
Are the leading boys' outfitters in British Columbia. Everything for the boy from hat to
hose in the best of quality.
We are sole agents for
"20th Century Brand"
Garments for Men
Fine Furnishings   for   men,    including
Shirts, Underwear, Hosiery, and Gloves.
Hats and Caps
in all the new   shapes  and best qualities. Bduc. Kingston    Gra
ina   Kerr
Ex-Chai
al Agent Con-
ince 1891. f. Robert
I. b. Kingston, Ont.
School, m. to Rose
Vancouver     School
Board and Chairman Management Committee,
ten years trustee, municipal councillor and Reeve
in Ontario. Military first-class certificate, Kingston military school. Recreation, Yachting. Member of Masonic Order. Residence, 1032 Barclay
St., Vancouver, B.C. Business address, 451 Pender
Street
J. J. DOUGAN— Wa
s born i
n Sydney, Australia
Oct. 20, 1864, and ha
been
issociated with edu-
cational matters ever
since h
s arrival in Vancou-
ver, both as teacher
and as
school trustee.    He
High School pupils. Incidentally the Mainland
Teachers' Institute met In the Central School be-
for the building was completed and were banquet-
ted in the room since long occupied by Principal
D. M. Robinson, B.A.    The attendance at this in-
In general, perhaps, 1890 marks as important an
epoch as any in our school history, four Schools
doing duty. Not only was the High School organl
ized, but the School Playground made its appearance. In the desire to get School Buildings there
had been little regard to providing for physical
exercise. The Oppenheimer Street School was for
the most part surrounded by a narrow margin of
ground, protected by a high board fence. There
was room for no games except "Knife," "Alleys;"
even "Hopscotch" and "Leapfrog" had to await a
better day. So pupils did not learn to play fair,
and often complaints met the teacher's ear.
While teaching in this School, it was customary
for the pupils (and teachers, too) to follow the
cattle, or old logging trails south-easterly through
a varied woods to False Creek. "Skid roads"
largely served to carry through the then partly
dismantled forest. This range of play ground
made up for the lack at school of such. The more
stately trees had been drawn off for lumber, yet
there remained some large cedars and firs—some
fully five feet in diameter. The underbrush was
thick, largely made up of sadal and blackberry,
interspersed with alder, crabapple, and salmon-
berry. The present 8-roomed brick building facing
Princess Street, took the place of the Oppenheimer Street School in March '91. This splendid
building and level grounds gave no idea, either
of the block when unslashed, or after the timbers
were thrown down and lay in confusion higher
than our heads amidst great stumps and boulders.
Mr. J. B. Ganton, undergraduate of Toronto University,  was  the  first  Principal,   and   with  him
ated   five
-the
ones being Miss B. Johnston and Miss M. G. Mac-
kay. Both of these ladies, together with Miss
Barnes are still giving excellent service. These
were times of the troublesome big boy. One instance will give some idea of the difficulties in
discipline. One morning a great robust fellow was
placed in one of the middle seats. He lost no
time in making good his purpose of defying the
teacher. The request that he take "a better seat"
was disdainfully treated. His conduct was so insolent that action had to be taken without delay.
Proceeding towards him he decided on a change
of tactics, and leaping over two rows of desks
descended the stairs, many steps at a leap, and
passed out the front door never since to be heard
It was about the close of 1891 that the Government amended the School Act, placing the cities
under the burden of paying the teachers' salaries
and giving them a per capita grant.
The High School had grown rapidly. Mr. Alex.
Robinson, B.A., succeeded Mr. Law as head of that
Institution. The first Assistant was Mr. Secord,
who, shortly afterwards, died in Mexico.
The School Year '92 to "93 saw the completion
of three more brick Schools, each of eight rooms
and costing, with grounds, a total of $150,000.
These were the Mount Pleasant, the present Sir
William Dawson and the old High School (now
the south building of the Central School.) For
the year 51 passed their "entrance." The Government grant on per capita began and for the first
year amounted to $15,000.   The next school to fol- Each Man to His Profession
I Have made a Life Study of Treating
and  Looking After
PLUMBING and HEATING
I Keep the Best Workmen Available and
Guarantee Satisfaction.
A TRIAL   WILL CONVINCE YOU.
Sam A. Rose,  The Plumber
505 Pender Street, W.
Phone Up 4137
and I will Call t   accompli
born in Cornwall
i educated at  St. Austell,
>wed in the footsteps of his father
d in Vancouver over 20 years and
eriod has taken an active part in
îe civic affairs of the city. He is
.  and   for  many  yes
! the Vi
tory of
retary of the Trinity Col-
e of Music, of London, for four years. He has
sn a conductor, teacher and composer, and his
npositions lately have attracted wide attention.
3e takes a deep interest in sports and for three
1rs was secretary of the Vancouver Kennel
lb. He is vice-president of the Devon, Corail and Somerset Club (he was the club's first
;sident, 1908-9); is president of Ward V. Bast
d Electors' Association, and for three years was
ector of the Terminal City Club. Mr. Dyke is
3 of Vancouver's successful real estate brokers,
d is associated with the Mercantile Trust Corn-
low was the 4 roomed Fairview at a cost of some
$3,000. This year bode ill to the teachers, for,
through alleged "hard times" we all got notice
of "a cut" which, we were assured would be made
were good, probably, but as far as the teachers
were concerned, for many years the times did not
get better, and so the old schedule was not restored. By this reduction the City saved $7,000 in a
twelvemonth, though the Government grant was
a thousand dollars more than the year previous.
In 1895 the Board adopted the pupil teacher idea.
This meant to such teachers a two month's course
as assistants in our City Schools. The reason
given for adopting this was to give the many
pupils from the High School, holding Teachers'
Certificates an opportunity, despite the lack of
Normal training, to take charge of a class. This
year, too, saw the movement originated to affiliate with McGill. Principal Robinson notes that
negotations are looking to an early consumation
of this advance step. The year following 8
roomed brick additions to the East, West and
Mt. Pleasant Schools were made.
At Easter 1899 Mr. Alex. Robinson, B.A., resigned from the Vancouver College principalship to
accept the position of Chief Superintendent of
Education for the Province. In 1900 the "Admiral
Seymour" and "Lord ' Roberts," each modern in
style and fully equiped, were opened. Both were
soon overcrowded.
We may record what the Provincial Inspector,
D. Wilson, B.A., says:—"The Vancouver College"
(which the High School had become)
nucleus of the future University of B. C.
the
: this t
\ Dra
ring, Physical Culture and
the range of teaching and
vas this first special instruct-
The School Year ending June 1900, saw an
attendance of 4000 and a teaching staff of 68,
with 47 passes to the High School. The expenditure for salaries was about $47,000 and for other
expenses $12,000. The Provincial Normal School
was opened in 1900 under Principal Wm. Burns,
B.A., and Messrs. J. D. Buchanan and D. Blair
(who still efficiently prepare our students for
teaching.)
Two Manual Training Centres were established
through the generosity of Sir Wm. MacDonald.
This was an enlargement of our system. At first
it was thought they would detract from the regular work and so prove ill-advised. Many teachers did not favor their introduction. It was not
; and its advantage was soon
3 safe to say this was a big
step towards making the school work practical
and efficient. The year was to the Board a vexatious one. The City Council insisted in lopping
off $10,000 from the estimates. Despite this the
Board made good progress.
From the year 1900 onwards it will be impossible to do any measure of justice. Various
features of advancement were made, and the administration generally became that of an up-to-
date city. About this time P. S. Insp. F. M. Cow-
perthwaite was appointed City Supt, which position he retained for some years.
Mr. Geo. S. B. Perry for a time not only very acceptably filled the position of Secretary, but set
himself the task to gather all the information possible of the development of our Schools. (For
many items in this account I tender him grateful
J 7
7
JORDAN-WELLS
RAILWAY SUPPLY CO.
VANCOUVER
British  Columbia
*~Lm*Lr^*«L
ggS
In selecting this invention for this space we have
desired to illustrate the new method of heating school
buildings especially, thus doing away with the unsightly
piles of slabs, the dust, soot, ashes, etc., etc.
The cut fully illustrates the operation of converting
the liquid fuel into vapor gas and it is a revolution in
oil burners. It can be operated with steam or compressed air and when properly installed is guaranteed to
save from 10 to 25 per cent, in oil consumption over any
oil burner now on the market. It can be turned down
low, does not go out, is clean ii
requires very little attention am
It can be used under all kino soot or ashes, cinders or cli
source of so many destructive fi
The use of this Burner me
the beauty alike, of the architec
Jordan-Wells  Railway Supply  Co.,   Ltd.
its operation, practically sm
is absolutely free from all dg
is and sizes of boilers, cookii
kers, no  offensive  odors ar
okeless,  easily regulated,
lg ranges,  furnaces, etc.;
id no  foul chimneys, the
is a cleaner, healthier city a
ire of the city, its homes, pub
nd will aid in preserving . LEECH.—Born in the town of Win-
burg, Orange River Colony, South Africa. Son of
J. R. Leech, Esq., M.D., CM., for many years Government surgeon to the late Orange Free State
Government. Studied at King's College, University of London, Eng. Took the courses of Architecture and Engineering concurrently. Was
awarded the gold medal i
final year, besides two sil
bronze medals. Also n
gained first-class certificate i:
passing first on the list. Pai
ination of the Society of à
Architecture
medals  and three
certificates.    Also
Civil Engineering,
assed the final exam-
chitects in
l special certificate. Worked \
well-known architects in England, such as John
Belcher, R.A.; Prof. R. Elsey Smith, Messrs. Bam-
ster, Fletcher & Sons, etc., etc. Was chief lecturer in architecture at the Technical Institute,
Norwich, England, and held similar positions at
the Johannesburg (S. Africa" *
ticed for four years in Joham
numerous buildings. Before
of School Architect, was fo
couver manager for Mr. Thos. Hooper, architect,
and designed some fine Provincial buildings. Is
a member of the Council of the B ~
of Architects. Expert in design, fireproofing, s
construction and reinforced concrete. Mr. Le
is the school trustee architect with offices in
Central School Building.
Institute.
mesburg and put up
king the position
by Board in February, 1910.
1910.    Employed
thanks.) Resigning to engage in more lucrative
lines, Mr. C. W. Murray the present Secretary
took up the duties of office. Mr. Murray brought
much experience into service as he had filled
varied important posts in the city and for a number of years was a member of the School Board.
In addition, Mr. Murray is Building Inspector.
Early
3 the I
a Fair-
view between Laurel and Oak Streets, one of the
best sites in the city, and erected a handsome
and commodious school which later became the
Vancouver College. At this time the Board reports the necessity of erecting yearly one 8-
roomed building. (Today 4 or 5 such are scarcely
adequate.) The organization of the Cadet Corps
belongs to this year as also the Children's Memorial Fund to commemorate the life of our late
Queen Victoria. In a small way something was
done looking towards Medical School Inspection—
at least teachers were given instructions as to
testing pupils' eyesight.
Late in 1903 Mr. W. P. Argue, B.A., Deputy
Minister of Education for Manitoba, among many
competitors, received the appointment of City
Supt., that office again being restored. Mr. Geo.
R. Gordon who was then Chairman of the Management Committee says.in his Annual Report:
"Mr. Argue is eminently qualified for the position.
He is a practical teacher, one capable of dealing
with all matters pertaining to his office, and discharging them in a manner which cannot fail to
benefit those over whom he is placed. As our staff
has nearly reached the century mark his office
is no sinecure."
Dr. W. D. Brydon-Jack, the Chairman of the
Building and Grounds Committee that year makes
valuable suggestions, among them "That the
grounds at Grandview and Victoria Drive be graded and arrangements made at an early date for
School Buijdings. He also suggested a new building in West Fairview, and that in future, trees be
planted outside the school grounds along the
boulevards. The three Schools were soon erected
and are today the Grandview, McDonald and
Kitsilano. Mr. Banfield as Chairman of the Board,
writes of consideration of the Night School and
Free Text Book ideas.
Vancouver is pre-eminently an educational city.
Well may the. Senior Prov. Inspector write : "The
System of Education maintained in the City of
Vancouver may be properly described as one of
a most comprehensive character; it teaches from
the primary school to the university. For a city to
maintain such a complete system is a matter of
surprise as well as of congratulation."
Thus a child on being received at school may
count on continuing till he has at least secured
his Arts Degree. The relationship of the public
school to the Collegiate Institute and again the
relationship of the College to the University have
been determined. Already the Manual training
has been spoken of and as much may be said in
favor of Domestic Science. These mean the training of hand and heart and a practical preparation
for the duties of life. Physical Drill, Drawing and
Music have their fair share of attention. Their
supervision is carefully carried on. All who
know of the results are agreed that our pupils are
reaping manifold returns for the amount invested.
Night Schools are being conducted in various
parts of the city, and for two hours or more for
several nights weekly, those who are engaged
during the day may jQptain free the rudiments of
a general education. Some 25 teachers conduct
these schools.
Trustees and j principals quite often meet to
consider school questions. By the way, it will not
be amiss here to refer to the arduous work of the
J £>.v^.-aar-1*.
Wells Construction  Company
(REGISTERED)
SIMON METTLAR, President G. E. VERGOWE
JOE WELLS,   Secretary-Treasurer.
VANCOUVER,       -       B.C.
84-86 Exchange BIdg.
A. H. Cederberg, Manager
TACOMA Wash.
301 -302 Kentucky Bldg.
Joe. Wells, Manager
Steel Buildings-Mill Buildings
Reinforced Concrete Buildings
Concrete Bridges — Concrete Standpipes
ï
I
We prepare, if requested, our own framir
or   reinforced   concrete   and incorporai
We have the biggest equipment of any construction Company in British Colui
the State of Washington.
Consulting Engineers
on    Reinforced    Concrete
We solicit correspondence from owners and architects contemplating hig
fireproof structures of every description.
Estimate© Cheerfully Given
Wells  Construction  Company Board   1
school   ;
work.    He • has
for  assistant  a thoroughlj
well
qualified  nurse.
With  the  special  teache
s  the
City has now a
[most  230  instructors,  and
as  a
devoted,  sympathetic,  skillful  body  of  me
a  and
women it would
be difficult to find any mo
e effi-
cent.   Just here
a moment to speak of som
e who
fell at their post
of duty.   Alex. Gilchrist, Pn
ncipal
for many years
of Fairview School, suddenly laid
down his pen and bade adieu to scholar and school.
Mr. Gilchrist, gi
eat in many ways and ce
tainly
"a   man among
men."   Mr. James C. Shaw
B.A.,
for  scholarship,
ability  and  skill  had  few
corn-
petitors.    For m
any years his constructive
genius
presided over ai
d guided the destiny of the Van-
couver College.
After long illness during
which
he toiled    inces
w   peacefully   reposes   und«
lg his
greensward on t
he border of the busy city
where
he long and lov
ngly taught.   Fully a dozen
other
teachers  have
?one  from  the  school  rooi
n  and
happy hours to their peaceful rest in the sile
at city
where teachers
and taught at last must j
Very much m
ore might be traced and 'v
ratten
regarding our schools but it must suffice here to
visit i
didly i
d inspect our splen-
-  perfect system of
uipped buildings,
fire alarms and fire escapes, and not least, the
work of our devoted and efficient te achers. Shortly we hope to have as beautiful school grounds as
to be more than anything else the attraction of
our city. Vancouver has always prided itself on
its schools, and its motto is "Progress and Advancement."
J. J. DOTJGAN
WE 1
IDancouver
JBueineee Unetitute
=  Xtmiteb   ===
336 Hastings Street, West
The NEW NAME of
the FAMOUS
Sprott-Shaw
Western Canada's
Greatest Business and
Technical School
A  CORNER OF ONE OF OUR TYPEWRITING DEPARTMENTS.
Commercial       Shorthand       Typewriting
Telegraphy Engineering
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone 1810.
J. R. CUNNINGHAM,
Sec-Treas. A DRAWING LESSON
By Mr. J. Kyle, Superviser of Drawing
"Education is the harmonious development
of all our faculties."
—Lubbock.
You ask me to write about Drawing in the pub
ic schools; to speak of its place in the curriculum
ind its connection with the manual arts.
Let me tell you that our great aim and ideal ir
:his work is to prepare the ground and lay s
strong foundation in order to make men good work
> to r
Skill in execution. In making working drawings
the student must visualize the idea before he is
able to put anything on paper.    This faculty of
The industrial pursuits of our city already includes furniture manufacturing, stained and decorative glass works, decorative iron works, brick
works, architecture, stone and wood carving, printing and book publishing, painters and decorators,
dressmaking and millinery and many other trades,
all depending to a great extent on the artistic skill
of the workman, and it rests with the teachers in
our schools to see that the faculties of the children are not neglected along this direction.
When these students leave school and go to
work we have night classes where designs may
be studied more completely and with all the limita-
u
o be deplored—
all educational bodies to see that this
ives proper attention in the elemen-
»n  of workshop  practice and  sti
rry  forward   the  future   industrie
By a
which 1
i the
made, may be fashioned i
artistic vase or a piece of architectural dec-
worth fifty times as much money, and in
other line the art displayed by the workman
the value of the raw material to an almost
ditable degree.
etter man.   Man needs knowledge
not merely as
means of livelihood, but as a meat
s of life.
Putting aside the material side of
the question,
lis study cultivates a sense of delight in the fine
rts, and a spirit of refinement follows.   There is
great difference  between the  w
rid  of vision
njoyed by the trained and that se
en by the un-
rained person.   The trained person
sees not only
îe works of man bnt also the wo
rks of nature
rtth increased delight and profit. I
i
JBlue IRibbon Zca
«tin
j IJ  :j| g g
The Award of Merit for Quality
The Grand Prize
at the Alaska-Yukon-Exposition
SEATTLE,   1909
WAS GIVEN TO-
BLUE  RIBBON  TEA
iH G. F. & J. G ALT,
WINNIPEG   -   MAN.
VANCOUVER, - B. C. The old Central school and Strathcona school
to this day remain in a state of preservation that
redounds to the credit of the architect who supervised it. In this and other schools in the Province
the Government, working under the Municipal Act,
placed entire dependence in Mr. Hooper.
In Victoria monuments to his ability will be
seen in the buildings erected for Pither & Leiser,
Adelphi block, the Geo. Jay school, St. Joseph's
hospital, St. Ann's convent, the Royal Bank of
Canada, the Metropolitan Methodist church and
Congregational church.
In Vancouver the Winch building, Geo. B. Bower
building, David Spencer, Limited, B. C. Permanent,
0L0 Gee Wing building, Mount Pleasant Methodist church, Irving Hotel and the Oddfellow's Hall,
are familiar features to all.
Mr. Hooper's present suite of offices are at 526
Winch building.
i
»
J%Ht.
ém^
!ii__AlBTTT5r A
Standard Furniture Co., Ltd.
' 1 ' H E furnishing of a home is the event of a
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Standard Furniture Co., Ltd.
507-513 Hastings St., W.         Vancouver, B. C.
DOUGAN & STUBBS
Phone 6835
Sty?
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and Loans
849 PENDER ST., Wes
VANCOUVER,
THE HODGSON
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Plumbing and Heating
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643 Seymour St.
Phone 2412      VANCOUVER. B.C.
Hanrmtwr
JrTtttattrtal (tepnra-
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Agreement of Sales Purchased
Money to Loan
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
C. R. DRAYTON     -     Manager
E. G. BAYNES, 1200 Broadway W.
Telephone 1005.
W. M. HORIE, 2396 York Street
Telephone R-1778
BAYNES & HORIE
Builders and Contractors
Office:
Room 57, Davis Chambers
Vancouver, B. C. MEDICAL INSPECTION
OF SCHOOLS
' 100 have bad heari
las skin trouble of a
place them in school at a
cram their brains to their
is  a close  relation  betwi
Jst capacity. There
the health of our
odies and our mental capabilities. "A sound
lind and a healthy body" is a well known quota
tion, and certainly the healthie
the greater is our power of concentration
ability to remember. We must, therefor
our children healthy and bright, so that th
benefit to the utmost by their facilities 1
cation and grow up into men and women
physically as well as mentally. The chil
today will be the nation of tomorrow, I
their physical and mental strength depei
honour of our nation.
The governments of England, Germany,
Austria, Norway,  Switzerland, Argentine,
The discovery of these defects is the most important part of school inspection for 99% of them
can be easily remedied, and the children cured
beccme brighter and progress ' more rapidly, for
these defects have a dulling influence on the mind.
Medical inspection will reveal these defects early,
so that by having them attended to at once a
parent will save himself a great deal of money
and a loss of valuable time at a future date and
will save his child from discomfort, perhaps a
permanent weakness or even a fatal disease.
We have here in Vancouver a school population of nearly 10,000. On account of the magnitude of the work and the multiplicity of duties it
was found necessary to appoint a nurse to assist
the medical inspector in examining the pupils.
Besides this duty, the nurse visits the homes of
those children who have any physical defects and
' and the United States of America, recognizing the
importance of the health of the school children,
have passed state legislation to institute medical
inspection of schools, so that the children may
work in the schools under the best conditions of
seating, heating, lighting, ventilation and sanitation, so that the spread of infectious or contagious
diseases, such as diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, whooping cough and tuberculosis, might be
limited, so that children suffering from eye trouble, ear trouble, adenoids, tonsils, and defective
teeth,, could be notified and have their defects
remedied. Children having weak hearts could be
told how to live good, useful lives, instead of overstraining themselves and dying early.
15 in every 100 Vancouver school children are
adenoids   and
>uble
tended t
rsuades the parent of the necessity for attention and warns him of any evil
consequences of neglect. Any advice or aid she
can give to make the home life of the school child
more hygienic will be her pleasure. She is to
create a strong bond of union—through the children—between   the   parent   and   the   educational
In Seattle there are about 30,000 school children.
In charge of the medical inspection there are ten
school doctors and three school nurses. Tacoma
with a school population of 10,000 has one school
doctor and two school nurses. Winnipeg, Man.,
has two school doctors and two or more school
nurses. Hamiltorrf^Ont., has a school doctor and a
school nurse. Toronto, Montreal and Victoria also
have medical inspection of schools.
F. W. BRYDON-JACK, M.D., CM.
School Medical Officer. The Store whose Chief Study is    >
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Women and Children
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Members of Pacific Coast Stock Exchange
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957 Granville Street
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- / • •°"
h .     ^—|
===== * 'T'-f
Languages, Eng-
After his graduation he started out to extend
his education and with that end in view, spent
one year in Prance among the best French universities, pursuing their regular courses of study.
Coming back to Canada, the first year was spent
at the Ontario Normal College, where he obtained
marked distinction as a teacher. In Ontario he
* taught for varying periods at the Mitchell High
School, Oshawa Collegiate Institute and Hamilton
Collegiate Institute. His ability was recognized
by the faculty of St. John's College, Winnipeg,
one of the colleges of Manitoba University, and
s ther
in t
ro years as lecturer in
term in the University
was appointed Senior
f Romance Languages
Reali
ng the
e out to Va
ded the Spr<
ilities of the vast west, he
r, B. C, in 1904, where he
w Business School, a schol-
institution which at the present time enjoys
i than a provincial reputation. It is only
add that with the thorough training
Mr. Sprott has had from a commercial, business
and educational standpoint, the guarantee of a
thorough education to his pupils is no mere asser-
FROM A BUSINESS STANDPOINT.
. J. SPROTT, B.A.)
education which are not so generally favored by
the educated state of public opinion, and among
these is that department generally known as business education.
Generally speaking, the average parent looks
upon the training received in the ordinary public
school, and the lower high school as very necessary to success in life, but it does not occur to
him th.at probably a good wage-earning education
is of immeasurably greater real value than any
other type of school training.
Our system of public school education is so
arranged that it lays a broad solid foundation for
almost any type of educational superstructure.
The boy who has spent one or two years in high
school is equally prepared to enter the church,
law, medicine or the teaching profession. Now,
all these professions require preparatory training
of a somewhat similar nature up to this point and
in so far our educational system follows what
appears to be a very wise course. But it must
be very evident to any careful observer that the
percentage of persons entering these professions
is exceedingly small whn compared with the great
army who make their living in other walks of
life.
In fact, it has been estimated that scarcely 15
per cent, of the youth of the nation go beyond
the first year in high school aja that about 80
per cent, never go beyond the entrance to the
high school.
Of course, to the favored 15 per cent., the cultured subjects, upon which the majority of the
time in the high school is put, are valuable, but
to the others it is just that much time wasted.
To my mind, our public school system doesn't
make a sufficiently definite effort to give courses
of instruction which are of definite practical value,
but which are covered by a business college such
as the Sprott-Shaw Business Institute.
Up  to  th<
able that this condition will
a number of years to come.
to the
•If s
the
Df the time
grades, and
ering of French, German, Latin, Greek
and Ancient History in the earlier high school
courses, and which is of no value whatsoever to
that vast army of 85 per cent.; if the time spent
on these and probably other so-called cultured
subjects were devoted to English Literature, Composition, Arithmetic, Algebra, Euclid, Accounting
in all its branches, Commercial Law, Shorthand
and Typewriting, not only would the praises rise
of  the   privE
utions
who   i
fortunately have to fill up this Gap in the education of the boy—or girl—but any school boards
inaugurating such a change might reasonably expect a life tenure of office.
Such a reform as this would not be easy to
introduce, but the Vancouver School Board deserves great praise for the step it has already
taken in that direction in the establishment of
night schools, giving instruction in some of the
subjects just mentioned.
The school should be the world in miniature
and I think I am not open to serious contradiction when I say a good practical commercial
training in a first-lass school is more likely to
acquaint the youth with the problems he will
have to face in after life than any other course
of training.
Those who study bookkeeping need not necessarily become professional s
«w 1
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PHONE  674
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Edgewood Design These subjects have a much wider range
usefulness. Moreover, when we use the ti
business education we mean bookkeeping, c
mercial arithmetic, commercial law, commer
correspondence, penmanship, shorthand and t:
writing.
Now, the vital bearing which every one of th
subjects has on the success in after life of
f young men and young wot
eceiving  greater   :
the hands of the fra
great majority e
warrants their
consideration at
school courses.
Mr. Yoimgman
best of himself
is properly equipped to make the
md his opportunities, unless he
has some knowledge of bookkeeping. Commercial
arithmetical computations, more or less intricate,
enter into the lives of all. A knowledge of the
laws governing commercial transaction will save
many a. dollar and many an hour's worry. The
ability to write a "decent hand" is of equal value
with knowing how to read. A working knowledge
of shorthand is a wonderful power in the hands
of any business man or woman, and the ability
to operate a typewriting machine saves many
dollars' worth of time and eyesight. In short, it
appears to me that no one, whether business man,
lawyer, doctor, clergyman or farmer, is properly
equipped, without at least a fair working knowledge of a number of the subjects mentioned.
Why are the city and private night schools filled
to overflowing during the winter season? Simply
because aU and sundry of the attendants realize
the handicap under which they suffer when placed
side by side with a fellow wage-earner who has
been fore diligent, more far-sighted, or more fortunate than they.
If I might be permitted to offer a very disinterested advice, it would be for the School Board to
enlarge upon its present and very laudable policy
of doing its best to give, not only in its night
classes, but also in its day classes, as thorough
instruction as possible, not only in those subjects which lie at the foundation of a business
education, but also to a commercial training where
possible,.
R. J.  SPROTT.
GEO. P. HICKS.—Born in Cornwall, England,
Jan. 14, 1850. Commenced musical studies at
six years of age under Wm. Hicks, Esq., his father,
who was at that time a performer on the flute and
a choirmaster at Luckett, Cornwall. Mr. Hicks,
at the age of 19, undertook charge of a choir, and
has been leading choirs ever since. In 1905 he
accepted a position with the Board of School
Trustees of Vancouver, and occupies the position
of Musical Supervisor at the present time. He
was two years a student with F. T. Lohr in Plymouth, England, in vocal training. "The Messiah,"
in Wesley church (2) in Mount Pleasant Methodist
church and "The Creation," "The Twelfth Mass,"
Sullivan's "Prodigal Son," and kindred works have
been produced by Mr. Hicks.
DRILL AND DISCD7LINE
By Lieut. A. C. Bundy.
The real value of Drill and Discipline in our
schools need not be enlarged uponhere, suffice it
to say that as at present used in the Vancouver
City Public Schools the movements are not taught
from a strictly military point of view. The instructor has endeavoured for nearly a period of 10
years to observe what would be of the greatest
benefit for school purposes, and has arranged the
work acordingly.
Preliminary Movements of Military Drill are
used such as standing at ease, marking time,
marching, side stepping, turning, etc., forming
fours and File Formations.
The  pupils,   of  which  there   are  now  about
10,000,   are   all  fairly  well  acquainted   with  the
above.     The   system   as   uow   used   is   uniform
throughout, and is appreciated very much by the
teachers.
The system briefly is as follows:—On assembling for school^ pupils "fall in" standing at-ease,
caned to attention and marched into school. Each
pupil places his or her own belongings and moves
to desks. All movements in the school are conducted by command of the teacher until dismissed..
A SHORT SKETCH OF LIEUT.
A. C. BUNDY
The Supervisor of "Drills" (both Military and
Physical) of the Vancouver public schools' staff
is appreciated in this publication, as he is a mar
of most varied experience, both naval and military
While still in appearance a very young man
he was born in Bromley, Kent, England, in 1868.
On May 5th, 1887, he joined the Royal Marine Ar
tillery.
Eastney, Souths
sisting
ing and dismounting ordnance, army signals and
naval semaphore, at all of which he obtained the
highest qualifications, which entitled him to the
rank of corporal. The course in naval gunnery is
indeed a hard one, and was completed in August,
1888. He again repeated the course in 1891, with
a repetition of qualification. His first step in promotion was in September, 1889, when he received
the rank of bombadier, corporal in February,
1903, lance sergeant in 1897, and sergeant in November, 1898.
He also has a splendid record of naval service,
being transferred to H. M. S. Neptune, 1889. Again
returning to headquarters for further study at the
end of 1890, after which he served on the following ships of war: H. M. S. Medusa, H. M. S. Nelson, H. M. S. Impérieuse.
1 A   GOOD   INVESTMENT
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We will give prompt answers.
We court inquiry	
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P. H. ALLMAN, Manager.
Phone 6363
134 fastings St, W. In March, 1894, he was transferred to Esqui-
. malt, where he remained until 1899, assisting to
mount the guns in the fortifications. After the
mounting he remained as gunnery instructor until
completion of service. During his period of service at Esquimalt he was detailed as instructor to
the- Fifth Regiment, Victoria, on special schools of
instruction; also to the Vancouver regiment in
^896, and New Westminster in 1897.
In 1890 he received the appointment of sergeant-
major and instructor to the Sixth Regiment, the
Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles, in which regiment he did his duty most faithfully until 1898,
when he resigned his position. He received His
Majesty's commission of lieutenant-cadet instructor to the Vancouver public schools in February,
1898, using his best efforts on .behalf of the Board
of Trustees, teachers and children.
He is a strict disciplinarian, and yet tempers
his work with kindness. His system of work, as
used in our schools, is entirely his own, and is
very much appreciated as being of great assistance in maintaining the very best of discipline.
Lieut. Bundy has n
PHYSICAL TRAINING
his credit and is ii
3 than fourteen naval a
his ability while ashore
very good, indeed).
and afloat was
The
i object of Physical
Vancouver public schools,
the strengthening and re
pupils' muscles. The exei
taught by the instructor, ;
teacher.    There  are  exen
not for display, but
ering supple of the
ses are arranged and
er which the lessons
daily by the class
for  bending
stretching the limbs and body muscles, such as:
Arms, bending and stretching; body, bending and
stretching;    shoulder movements;    arm and leg
The system is somewhat different to others,
owing to the "commands" used being uniform
with other movements used for school purposes.
The exe
rcises are mostly taught
and exec
uted
with life a
nd animation, each
teach
er seeing
that
certain rules and regulations
re ca
rried out \
vhile
engaged a
t drill.    However,
,trict
discipline
pre-
All movements used have so far been chosen a
being suitable for school children, and are ca
ried out without the use of apparatus.
FIRE DRILL
A system of fire drill is also arranged to enable
the individual teachers to practice their own class
whether the alarm is sounded or not. This is also
uniform in all the schools. The system has been
studied by the instructor, who claims that, providing the teacher remains calm, control of the
class is obtained on the alarm sounding. The
main points considered in the system are:
1. Control by the teacher.
2. Fewest commands possible.
3. Shortest amount of time.
No attempt is made at assembling (as for dismissing) or providing any belongings. No hard
and fast rules are laid down for any movements
after leaving the class-rooms, so that the system
only applies from the desks to the class-room
doors, after which each individual teacher (who
leads the class) is instructed to use their own
good judgment and march the class the best route
to safety, according to the conditions that may
exist. As an instance of the capable way in which
the children are taught fire drill, it is only necessary to say that Mount Pleasant school, the largest
in the city, can be entirely emptied in 1% min-
Music knows no
limitations, which,
Music speaks to all men o:
of all nationalities.
The Painter's Art is a
the artist's pictures cann(
Music is accessible to
and the cottage and the
privileges.
You have not to cc
will absorb all your i
Y people:    No gift c
i not subject to
seset languages.
s, of all tongues,
i poorest of mankind,
s of a
Music is of the people, and music at its
ought to be the greatest of popular arts. It is
cational, instructive and sympathetic; a balr
the weary; a comfort to the aged;
the
afflicted, and a source of delight to the young.
It cheers the toiler and invigorates the invalid;
helps to dispel gloom of thought or of mind, and
whether in joy or sorrow nothing appeals to any
people, or nothing conveys the depth of feeling, I
I
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Companies Represented :
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Agencies in all Towns in British Columbia and
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When you are inquiring about
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Watson & Bowen
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341   Homer  Street
(JONES   BLOCK)
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA the intensity of the soul, more than "the swee
sounds of music" and from the time of the Psalm
1st to the present day, it has been a joy to the Us
GEORGE  J.   DYKE.
By Geo. P.  Hicks, Supervisor of Music
Its Purpose and  Place in the Public Ssh
So much has been said on this subject tha
t one
feels that there is little left unsaid.   We are t
ware
of the fact that there are some persons living yet
who  look  upon   music  teaching  in  the   1
•ublic
Schools  as  a  fad  and  time  waster; fortunately,
they are  becoming  fewer every year.    But the
vast majority of leading educationalists not
only
look upon it with favor, but openly advoca
e its
claims.   That music is in the schools to st
y no
one now doubts.    Its intrinsic worth is so
great
that it must be a subject of school studies.
Any
comprehensive definition of education will In
elude
music as one    of    the    necessary    subjects
for
Shakespeare said:—
The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with    concord of sweet
sounds,
Is fit for treason, stratagems, and spoils;
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus,
Let no such man be trusted.
The state believes she should have more men
who can be trusted, and so she is attempting to
study the songs and hymns of home, affectio:
country and religion.
Among other mighty considerations is the fa<
that the relation between Music and Literatur
two of the great arts of expression, is intimât
The rhythmical elements which enter into musi
enter also into literature, both prose and vers
The sweep and variety of verse structure illu
trated by poets like Burns, Tennyson and Miltoi
arise from a correct knowledge of this principl
On the other hand, the disregard of literary valu*
sometimes shown by musicians, springs froi
scant literary training. Whenever music an
literature fail in harmonious co-operation, tl
social use of the two great arts of expression :
impaired. It is evident that literary an3 music!
training should be more accessable, and their frj
quent separation is a social loss.
An effort to better musical education is fa
reaching. When it aims at the body of societ
It is not only beneficial to the musical element i
society, but also a wise public policy. The in
provement  of musical  educat
ed,
mblic
roll i
those engaged in music study and instruction.
The life and prosperity of the state depends
upon the character of its citizens. Music in
schools has, therefore, a broad meaning-for us.
It is more than mere material for school room
possession, the value of which
i be known. Few educational activities
directly for the higher social life
if it be carried over into the doings
practise.
f
of h
:hildre
3 among the
ïreat school studies is believed to be broad as
;hat of other leading subjects. This study trains
md developes the intellectual faculties; Observation, Precision, Concentration and Construc-
jowers. Music also has its physical side, and
contributes towards the correlation of mind and
jody which  is  one of  the  aims  of  harmonious
Her
in its bearing
breathing   on
serious and frequent
highest standing tell
l value, especially to vocal music,
health, because it strengthens the
s,   which,   if   impaired,   produce
.   Physicians of the
is no more healthy
of after-school life. Music sh(
only in the public school, but i
in continuation classes and en
in the home. Even then thei
number who are only
music yields enjoyment thro
hearing of it, quite as much
mance; and whereas sight re
as an accomplishment, and as
discipline. The school course
fail if it trains up
and discriminating ï
tic teaching of musi.
igh   the  intelligent
as through perfor-
reading is invaluable
ation of appreciative
If then the systema-
for discipline
the
ititled to its rightful place i:
EO. P. HICKS, Supervisor. BRITISH    COLUMBIA
FARM LANDS
NOT   ONLY  Fort Geor£e' in Cariboo district, but other large tracts of
  farm lands are included in our land department ! !
WE ARE land specialists and control over 100,000 acres of land in CENTRAL,
or INTERIOR BRITISH COLUMBIA ! !
PRICES $7.50, $10.00 and $12.00 per acre.
For MAPS, particulars, description of sections, etc., apply to
The Mercantile Trust Co.. Limited
103 Winch Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MAHON, McFARLAND & PROCTER
Real Estate and Insurance Brokers
ESTATES MANAGED
Money   Advanced    on    Mortgage
Corner Seymour and Pender Sts. VANCOUVER, B.C. JE :—
~-_
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General Securities Company, Limited
VANCOUVER,  CANADA
Capital Authorized       -       -       -       $300,000.00
INVESTMENTS
and comprehensive knowledge of this Banking House in all
ment in Western Canada guarantees the safeguarding of
funds invested through this Department.
STOCKS and  BONDS
Dealers in Municipal, Industrial and Corporation Bonds.
Members of the Pacific Coast Stock Exchange.
Reference:   The Imperial Bank of Canada, Vancouver, B.C.
Archibald York, President
V. C. James, Managing Director B. Geo. Hansuld, Sec.-Treas
S. M. Read, Manager Real Estate Department mm i '
™
WÊÊlm*-'
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^^P1 ,viila -HI     •« The "New Ball-Bearing" School Furniture
iversal Exposition
It Stands To-Day Above Criticism, the Standard of the World
THE LITTLE BALLS DO THE WORK
The Steel Bicycle Balls inside the "Ball-Bearing" Hinge Increases the life of
the latter many years and make it absolutely
and permanently noiseless.
= THE SHIELD =
' |HILE our desk is the strongest made, and needs no bracing, we decided to add strength
phere we knew it was required. The shield protects the seat in front from being marred
r rubbed by the occupant of desk in rear- Boys cannot place a pin in their shoes and
'electrify" the studious pupil in front and neither can they fold the seat down when once
p. Our New "Ball-Bearing" Desks combine grace and beauty with the highest form of
durability and rigidity. They embody every requirement—durability, simplicity, comfort, beauty of
outline, superb finish, accuracy of fittings and an absolutely, permanent, noiseless and automatic folding seat.
FLUSH TOP INK WELLS (Nickel Plated) supplied with all our Desks
E. G. PARNELL
AGENT FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
513 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
The Canadian Office & School Furniture Co.
PRESTON, Ontario.
Catalogue Sent of Application.
Phone 6571
M. (JDrttantrntal ton
& 3tenrr (En., ftth.
NUFACTUEÏERS OF
Wire and Iron Fencing and Gates
Fire Escapes and Window Guards
Railway Gates a Specialty
Cor. Westminster and Front St.
VANCOUVER,    -    British Columbia
JOHN CARVER
IRWIN, CARVER & COMPANY
(fcttmtl (totrartnra
319 Pender Street, West
Telephone 5837
Plans, Specifications and
Estimates furnished for
all kinds of Buildings ...
Office Buildings, Theafc
and Warehouse Const™
VANCOUVER, B.C. = r
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J. MENZIES, President D. McLEOD, Vice-PresidenI
C. H. CARNWATH, Secretary
FALSE CREEK
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Manufacturers of
PACIFIC  COAST   FIR,
CEDAR AND SPRUCE
LUMBER
==3T^
Telephone 1900
Cor. Oak Street and Sixth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
An Education
Dur City Schools is absolutely im-
•ativr. ' It broadens and fits the
id so as to fight the battle of life
in an intellectual standpoint.
Another Education
is    !
iry.     That  is
to  buy the
nec
essitie
s of life at the
lowest price
con
mens
irâfe with go<
d living.
We Profess to Educate
all an<l price the commodities of
DUKE'S GROCERY
Orange Block
Cor. Gore Ave. and Hastings St.       Phone 2845
Vancouver, B. C.
Canada, Home and Country
The Dominion of Canada is our
Country.     That is here for us,
but I supply the
1
, HOMES .
Architectually Perfect, at a minimum of cost. Any person can
get further particulars and illustrations of my successes by
consulting me.
E. Y. GRASETT
Architectural Builder
Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
P.O.Box 1215
437 Seymour Street
HARRY T. DEVINE
(Late City Assessment Commissioner)
H.T. Devine Co., Ltd.
Real Estate
Loans and
Insurance
Furnish Promptly any Enquiries in regard
to Realty in Vancouver and the
Surrounding Suburbs
Remember the Address:
437 Seymour St. Vancouver, B. C.  î
!
S¥S
mm- shoes
SOME DAY
that baby of yours will grow to be a boy or a girl. Now,
girls are hard on shoes—and boys are worse.     Our
Come in and Let Us Demonstrate
W. J. ORR
Phone 2440      420 Westminster Ave.
Talk
Graft
I MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
GRANDVIEW DISTRICT
Homes for Sale
on Easy Terms
CHARLES CRAFT
REAL  ESTATE  BROKER
1517 Park Drive Phone 5266
Street Car
DON'TS
for
SCHOOL CHILDREN and OTHERS
DON'T play on the car track.
DON'T hang on behind the car.
DON'T stand on the car steps.
DON'T put your head or arms out of
the car window.
DON'T dart across the  track  of an
approaching car.
DON'T run into a car on the other
track- STOP !
DON'T get on or off while the car is
is motion—LOOK !
DON'T take any chances—LISTEN !
British Columbia
Electric Railway Company
Wabbs Bros.
H5boto0rapbers Jï
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InWPff J*
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QUEBEC, Que.
VANCOUVER, h.x,.
FOREIGN CONNECTIONS
LONDON, Eng. HAMBURG
JOHANNESBURG, S.A. PARIS
SYDNEY, N. S. W. AUCKLAND, N. Z.
NEW YORK
The Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd.
Head Office and Factories:   Guelph, Ontario.
VANCOUVER BRANCH: 340 PENDER ST., West
J. W. TAYLOR, Manager.
Hf F
m-
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)
'ESIGNED AT NIGHT SCHOOL
m.
1 Sovereign in Name and Quality
THAT IS WHY THE SCHOOL BOARD PICKED THE
"Sovereign" Hot Water Boiler
above all others
to heat their new School Board Offices—they looked for comfort—they will have
attained it. <J SOVEREIGN Boilers for hot water and steam are recognized the
world over as the best.
Our name on every boiler
is a guarantee of quality
BRANCHES IN CANADA:
TORONTO, Ontario
MONTREAL, Que.
QUEBEC, Que.
ST. JOHN, N.B. s;%&\
WINNIPEG, Man.
VANCOUVER, B. G
FOREIGN CONNECTIONS
LONDON, Eng. HAMBURG
JOHANNESBURG, S.A. PARIS
SYDNEY, N. S. W. AUCKLAND,  N. Z.
NEW YORK
The Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd.
Head Office and Factories:   Guelph, Ontario.
VANCOUVER BRANCH: 340 PENDER ST., West
J. W. TAYLOR, Manager. pu
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