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BC Historical Books

Public Archives Canada annual report 1982/1983 Public Archives of Canada 1984

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 Special Collections Serial
1+
annual
report  1+
annual
report
1982/1983 Canada
of Supply and Services Canada 1984
Cat. No.: SA1-1983
ISBN: 0-662-52690-2 Contents
Introduction
1
Internal Audit
5
Departmental EDP Advisor and Coordinator
6
Planning and Program Evaluation
7
Policy Development
8
Records Management Branch
9
Records Management Services Division
10
Federal Records Centres Division
12
National Personnel Records Centre                                                                 17
Archives Branch
21
Manuscript Division
22
London Office
46
Paris Office
47
Federal Archives Division
48
National Map Collection
59
Picture Division
69
National Photography Collection
.    80
Public Archives Library
88
National Film, Television and Sound Archives
92
Machine Readable Archives Division
101
Assistance to the Archival Community
105
Departmental Administration
111
Departmental Administration Secretariat
Office of Micrographie Standards and Reprographic Development
Financial Services
Personnel Services
Technical Services
General Services
123
Exhibition Services
125
Communication Services
128  Introduction
Most of the matters that were of chief concern to the Public Archives during the last fiscal
year have been referred to in earlier reports, but during the year there were significant
developments in or fruition of several major projects.
(I) Legislation and Regulations — Two chapters of the Administrative Policy Manual
that are of vital importance to the Public Archives were approved by Treasury Board. Chapter
460 comprises a comprehensive policy on records management in the federal government. It
includes the responsibilities of Treasury Board, departments and the Public Archives. It is
much more extensive than the Public Records Order of 1966 that it replaces in part. It confirms
the existing responsibilities of the Public Archives and in some respects extends them,
particularly in regard to the audit or review of the effectiveness of records management
performance by departments. A report to the Treasury Board on the general state of records
management in federal government departments has been completed. The Advisory Council on
Public Records was replaced by a new Council on Government Records whose members are
appointed by the Dominion Archivist.
Chapter 445 consists of a policy on micrographics. While it includes elements of the
Public Records Order it, too, is more extensive in regard to responsibilities. While it confirms
the responsibilities of the Public Archives in regard to the Central Microfilm Operations and
Advisory Services, it includes some changes in the relationships of the Public Archives with
government departments.
A third chapter of the Administrative Policy Manual on EDP Records, which is of great
to the Public Archives, will become effective in the near future.
The Access to Information and Privacy Act, which was passed by Parliament in 1982, will
come into effect in July 1983. The Public Archives has had extensive consultation with
Treasury Board and several staff members were seconded to the Treasury Board Task Force on
Access to Information and Privacy to assist in the development of guidelines and directives for
the implementation of the Act. Implementation will have a significant impact on the Federal
Archives Division tHat anticipates an increased workload as the Division will now have to
decide if access should be granted or not to departmental records under its control, a task
performed in the past by the department of origin. Staff members were assigned to the
preparation of internal policies and procedures.
Work on the proposed National Archives and Records Act was delayed for much.of the
year since the Minister wished to wait for the report of the Federal Cultural Policy Review
Committee (Applebaum-Hébert) before seeking Cabinet approval for new legislation. The
Committee recommended that the Public Archives Act be revised to reflect the needs of
archives throughout Canada. A draft discussion paper has been prepared and final stages of
consultation and presentation to Parliament are expected during the next fiscal year.
(2) Accommodation — The need for adequate accommodation to house the holdings of
die Public Archives has become increasingly urgent during the last 15 years and has been a
constant preoccupation of the management of both the Public Archives and the National
Library that share accommodations and the adverse effects of inadequate space. The Department of Public Works has provided the Archives with interim space in many buildings
throughout the National Capital Region, much of which, unfortunately, is ill-suited to the
preservation of historical documents. The Accommodation Committee, chaired by the Assistant Dominion Archivist, will focus attention on the medium- and long-term accommodation
needs. For the medium-term, a new satellite building with a capacity superior to that occupied
by the Public Archives in its headquarters building on Wellington Street is required. Plans to
adapt space in an office building in Hull (Place du Portage, Phase IV) have been dropped
because of the high cost involved. Present plans call for a specially-constructed building in Hull
that would accommodate, in good environmental conditions, several divisions of the Archives
Branch and the Conservation and Technical Services Branch. Unfortunately, the inconvenience caused to Archives staff and particularly to researchers by the separation of 2 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
archival operations and services will be considerable. It has been apparent for many years that
the only satisfactory solution to the accommodation problems of the Public Archives as well as
those of the National Library is a new headquarters building for the Archives, preferably
situated in close proximity to the present site. It is sincerely hoped that tentative plans for such a
headquarters building in the mid-1990s will reach fruition.
One aspect of accommodation for the Public Archives is particularly gratifying. During
1983, it is expected that new regional records centres will be constructed in Vancouver and
Halifax and that there will be major extensions to the centres in Montreal and Winnipeg.
(3) Organization — The retirement of Albert C. Taylor, who for 25 years developed and
directed both administrative and technical services for the Public Archives and the National
Library as Executive Director of Departmental Administration, provided an opportunity to
reassess and rationalize the organization of these functions. While it had been an advantage to
have all the joint services for the Archives and the Library under one person who reported
directly to both the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian, it was recognized that the
span of control was unusually large and that it would be difficult to find another person who was
equally competent in administration and technical services. In addition, certain elements of the
former Administration and Technical Services Branch could more appropriately be assigned to
other parts of the Archives. During the winter of 1982-1983, a reorganization plan was
developed, approved by the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian and implemented
under the direction of an implementation team headed by George Saltan, Director of Personnel
Services. The chief elements in the reorganization were: 1) the concentration of all services to
government departments in the Records Management Branch by transferring to that branch the
Central Microfilm Operations, Micrographie Advisory Services and the Office of Micrographie Standards and Reprographic Development; 2) the creation of a new Conservation and
Technical Services Branch, headed by Ken Foster as Director General and consisting of the
Picture and Records Conservation Divisions, Reprography Services, Computer Systems Services, Videodisc Systems and the EDP Coordinator and Advisor; 3) the transfer to the Office of
the Dominion Archivist of the Planning and Evaluation Unit and the Departmental Secretariat
including Policy Development and Public Relations. The new Administration Branch as well
as the Internal Audit will continue to report to both the Dominion Archivist and the National
Librarian; the new Conservation and Technical Services Branch will report jointly to the
Associate National Librarian and the Assistant Dominion Archivist. The latter, who continues
to be responsible for the Archives and Records Management Branches, will also assume
responsibility for the Publications Division and Exhibition Services.
(4) New Technology — Of continuing concern for the Public Archives is the advent of
new technology. There are two aspects to the archival interest in computers. More and more
documents are created by the computer and are only machine readable. They are marvellously
compact, millions of precis of information being stored on a single tape. But the life of the tapes
is short and their preservation presents problems; so does the transmission of the total
documentation necessary to have access to the files. The electronic data processing community
is different from the records management staff we have largely dealt with in the past. The
criteria of selection of files for permanent retention are necessarily different, as the files are all
the more useful when the data can be manipulated with ease. The quality of the information
must be tested. Our present staff is far too limited in numbers to suffice for the task. If no new
resources are received, it is inevitable that the Public Archives will be able to acquire only the
files that have the most obvious interest and are most accessible, while much material
containing information assembled at great cost and potentially of great value to searchers will
disappear, unless we obtain the best possible cooperation from the departments.
But the computer is also an indispensible instrument to control, locate and retrieve the
description of the millions of items constituting our holdings. Progress is being registered in the
control of our textual federal government records that occupy more than 27 kilometres on the
shelves. A study to cover control over all of our historical holdings will be conducted shortly.
Systems for records centres material are also in operation to control the tapes stored temporarily
for the several departments and for the civilian and military personnel files numbering over five
million and subject to the access and privacy legislation. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT l1
In addition, automated systems are used in the administration area for keeping our
financial and personnel records.
(5) National — A most important event of the year was the proclamation of the new
Canadian Constitution.
The assistance of the Prime Minister was sought to ensure that all the documents
concerning it. originating in the several departments and agencies of the federal government,
whether dealing with drafting, consultations, discussions or approval, be identified as archival,
for permanent preservation. The Public Archives was entrusted with the proclamations signed
by the Queen on July 1, 1982, and with the facsimiles of important constitutional documents
that were presented, in September, by the British Government. The Public Archives, under the
authority of the Speakers of the House and Senate, organized an exhibition including those
records and others related to symbols of sovereignty in the Hall of Honour of Parliament in
April 1983.
Of concern during the year was the continuation of discussions concerning the role of the
Public Archives in relation to the national archival community. There were several significant
developments. In May 1982 at a meeting in Regina, the federal and provincial ministers of
culture and recreation requested the Dominion, Provincial and Territorial Archivists (an
informal group that has met annually since 1970) "to study the needs of archives in Canada and
to make recommendations to meet those needs. " At the regular meeting of the DPT in Ottawa in
June, the several elements in the "mandate" were assigned to members of the group for the
drafting of recommendations and at a meeting in Winnipeg in August these recommendations
were approved unanimously by the group and forwarded to the ministers. Approval by both
federal and provincial ministers would go a long way toward the establishment of a national
archival system based on provincial networks with a significant federal role in coordination and
support. Other events that were related to the subject were a national archival congress at
Queen's University in June and the report of the Federal Cultural Property Review Committee
in November. If the Public Archives is to play the significant leadership role that is anticipated,
it will require appropriate provision in the proposed National Archives and Records Act and
additional financial and human resources. The existing activities of the Public Archives in
assistance to the archival community are extensive enough to warrant a special section in the
report of the Archives Branch that follows. It will therefore be unnecessary here to refer to
national projects, courses, seminars and conferences or to other professional activities of staff
members.
Periodic meetings were held with the Archives Committee of the Canadian Historical
Association during the year. In addition to discussions on research conditions and facilities at
the Public Archives, one major concern was the impact on research of the Access to Information Privacy Act.
(6) International — Information on a wide range of activities of an international nature is
included in the special report of the Archives Branch. Several additional items might, however,
be noted.
In February, the Dominion Archivist participated in an archives congress in Pakistan and
was consulted by the Pakistan government concerning legislation and the development of
records management.
Accepting an invitation from the government of the People's Republic of China, the
Dominion Archivist visited that country in May 1982 to sign an agreement for the exchange of
microfilm copies of papers relating to Dr. Norman Bethune. Dr. Bethune's reputation as a hero
to whom Mao Tse Tung paid a special tribute for his devotion to the Chinese cause in the
struggle against Japanese invasion in the late 1930s is undiminished. The Norman Bethune
International Peace Hospital and Museum and archives in several cities were visited. In
September there was a return visit to Canada by the Director of the State Archives Bureau and
the Director of the Bethune Museum.
Following a visit at the Public Archives of the Administrator of the General Services
Administration of the United States, the Dominion Archivist and the Director of Policy PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Development were invited to participate in discussions in Washington concerning the organization, status and functions of the National Archives and Records Services.
Several members of the staff were involved in UNESCO activities. In June, the Dominion
Archivist was Chairman of an expert consultation to review UNESCO's Records and Archives
Management Program (RAMP) and in February, the Assistant Dominion Archivist undertook a
UNESCO mission to advise the government of Burma on the development of its national
archives.
Participation in the International Council on Archives continued. The Dominion Archivist
was elected Secretary General, the Assistant Dominion Archivist continued the duties of Editor
of CAD Information (the journal of the Commission on Archival Development), and other staff
members were active in the work of ICA committees.
The Public Archives was host to a number of international conferences including an
International Symposium on the Stability and Preservation of Photographic Images with 235
participants from 14 countries, a Computer-Assisted Retrieval Seminar sponsored by the
Micrographie Advisory Section and attended by over 1,200 persons, and the International
Standards Organization's Technical Committee on Micrographics attended by 60 delegates
from 11 countries.
(7) Personnel — As mentioned earlier, the retirement of A.C. Taylor in November 1982,
after 25 years of distinguished service to the Public Archives and National Library, was a
significant event. When Mr. Taylor was appointed as Administrative Officer for the Public
Archives and National Library in 1956, the administrative and technical stfcff numbered less
than 15 and the budget less than $100,000. When he retired as Executive Director, the staff of
Departmental Administration was 286 and its budget was $13,182,000. Among the developments with which Mr. Taylor was involved were the transfer to the Public Archives of the
Central Microfilm Unit; the creation of the Microfilm Advisory Section, the Office of
Micrographie Development and a Picture Conservation Service; and extensive development of
the Records Conservation Service, the Exhibitions and Public Relations functions, Internal
Audit, Planning and Evaluation, and many other aspects of administration. On his retirement,
A.C. Taylor can reflect with satisfaction on his important contributions to two national
institutions, the Public Archives and the National Library, during a period of rapid development.
Another retirement during the year that should be noted is that of Bill Galloway. Although
his service with the Public Archives was relatively short, from 1969 to 1982, his secondment
from the National Film Board marked the origin of the National Film, Television and Sound
Archives. He was unexcelled in locating and acquiring vintage film, often from obscure places
in any part of the North American continent. His efforts gave the Public Archives the nucleus of
a valuable collection as well as a credibility in the film community that was extremely
important at the time.
(8) Acknowledgements — Again, we would like to express our thanks to all those who
contributed to the work and achievements of the Public Archives during the year. We wish,
particularly, to express our appreciation to the donors of material of enduring value that will
serve this and many generations of researchers and ultimately the Canadian public. Our
gratitude goes to members of advisory boards and committees, to officials and records
managers of many departments for their assistance throughout the year, and finally to the staff
of the Public Archives, for their devotion to their work and to the service to the public that is a
trade mark of this institution.
31 March 1983 Wilfred I. Smith
Dominion Archivist Internal Audit
Internal Audit is part of the Office of the Dominion Archivist and the director reports
directly to both the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian. The directorate provides a
systematic and objective appraisal of the adequacy and appropriateness of the framework of
controls (including managerial processes and controls) applicable to all departmental operations. These include the operations of administrative, financial and personnel services. The
degree to which operations are in compliance with the terms of the control framework, and the
effectiveness, economy and efficiency of operations are also assessed. Areas requiring improvement are identified, recommendations as to how improvements can be made are formulated and the directorate reports all such matters to the Dominion Archivist, the National
Librarian and their respective managements.
During the year, 21 audits were in process, 14 of which were completed by the year's end.
Nine reports, including five from the previous year, were tabled before the Audit Committees
(chaired by the Deputy Heads). The 1983-1988 draft audit plans were in the process of being
finalized by the end of the year.
Internal Audit was the subject of a Performance Assurance Review, conducted by the
Office of the Comptroller General. Their November 1982 Final Report indicated that they were
generally satisfied with the progress achieved by the din Departmental EDP Advisor and
Coordinator
The Departmental EDP Advisor and Coordinator reports to the Assistant Dominion
Archivist and serves as secretary to the Departmental EDP Committee. He has been involved inure management and coordination of different EDP activities and projects within the department.
The most important EDP activities in the Public Archives during the year are now
summarized. A Document Control system to support the Federal Archives Division's operations was accepted. A Facilities Management contract providing for the use of a Hewlett-
Packard Computer 3000/44 to satisfy departmental computer-processing requirements was
negotiated. An experimental office automation project was implemented in the National
Photography Collection using SEENA MPC-1 hardware. This project should indicate whether
significant increase in productivity can be achieved by a direct interaction of professional
employees with computer technology. The Machine Readable Catalogue (MARC) format and
the University of Toronto Automated Library system were selected for the cataloguing of
maps. Further developments in the Personnel Administrative and Reporting System were
achieved in the area of staff leave with a saving in excess of one person-year. Work has been
initiated on the definition of requirements for a Records Management computer system tfjat
would satisfy the Public Archives' Records Services needs and serve as a reference to the
Records Management applications within other departments. A bibliographic computer system
project supporting Picture Conservation requirements was initiated. This computer system will
use the M1NISIS software package and the Facilities Management arrangements noted above.
The development of a computer system to support the Tape Library Operations of the Records
Management Branch continued. The in-house Data General C-150 minicomputer supports this
application. The initiation of a study in the Machine Readable Archives Division to review the
existing system and procedures and make pertinent recommendation was approved. Various
papers concerning the review of the departmental EDP policy and procedures were prepared.
Numerous discussions on this topic were held throughout the department at different levels of
responsibility. Planning and Program Evaluation
This directorate coordinates departmental planning for the Public Archives; provides for
the cyclical and independent review and assessment of departmental programs for both the
Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian; and develops and monitors the implementation
of performance measurement systems in both the Public Archives and the National Library.
Planning and Program Evaluation operates under the general direction of the Dominion
Archivist antl the director is a member of the departmental Senior Management Committee.
During the year, planning activities included coordination of the Senior Management
Strategic Planning Session and the related Strategic Approaches of the Public Archives,
1983-1988 document; involvement in Branch planning sessions; coordination of the departmental Operational Plan Framework submission, of the first departmental Expenditure
Plan narrative (Part III of the Estimates) and of the departmental Multi-Year Operational Plan
narratives; participation, with Program Evaluation, in a Statistics Canada project team examining the Museums and Related Institutions Survey; and extensive committee work and liaison
with central agency officials.
In the course of the year, the Program Evaluation Unit completed the evaluation study of
the Public Archives' Government Records Storage and Reference Services which was
approved by the Dominion Archivist in February 1983. An evaluation assessment of the Public
Archives' Conservation component was started in December 1982. The National Library's
Legal Deposit evaluation study was completed and presented to the Program Evaluation
Committee for approval in March 1983. Work on the National Library's Awareness component
was undertaken. The Program Evaluation Unit was also asked to assist in the evaluation of the
National Library's iNet project and, in February 1983, assumed responsibility as the scientific
authority for contracted evaluation work.
In 1982-1983, a departmental policy, a definition of roles and responsibilities, and a
proposed schedule for developing and implementing performance measurement systems in the
department were approved by the Public Archives Senior Management and a booklet outlining
these decisions and providing information was produced. Pilot Performance Measurement
systems were implemented in the Public Services Branch of the National Library and in
Technical Services of the Public Archives. Initial discussions commenced with the Cataloguing Branch of the National Library and assistance was provided to various areas within
Departmental Administration setting up criteria for system development and implementation in
1983-1984. Policy Development
The director of Policy Development reports to the Dominion Archivist and serves as a
member of the Senior Management Committee. The directorate is responsible for relations
with central policy agencies, other federal cultural institutions, provincial governments and
nongovernment organizations. It develops proposals related to archives, records, and access to
information and privacy legislation and regulations. Policy proposals from other institutions on
issues related to culture and government information are analysed to formulate a Public
Archives response.
Most work on new archives legislation was suspended during the year while awaiting the
recommendations of the Federal Cultural Policy Review Committee. The committee did
recommend that the Public Archives Act should be revised, following consultations with
provincial and private sector archivists, to reflect national needs of archival institutions
throughout Canada. The directorate prepared draft revisions to federal access to information
and privacy regulations and directives, and coordinated implementation plans for this legislation within the Public Archives. The Public Archives' position on issues such as copyright,
records management, micrographics and exhibitions were developed and discussed with other
departments. The director represented the Public Archives at the Canadian Conference on
Historical Resources. Records Management Branch
The Records Management Branch continued its work in 1982-1983 in developing management systems, with emphasis on improving its senior level teamwork. The branch is
managed under a "management by objectives" philosophy, through establishment of priorities,
goals and action plans. The initiative to develop a corporate strategic model had to be
postponed, due to a pending reorganization within me department that will result in significant
new activities being added to the branch in 1983-1984.
The Records Management Services Division began implementing,the new records management policy (Chapter 460 of the Administrative Policy Manual) issued by Treasury Board
on March 22, 1983. In particular, the division completed its first full-scale evaluation of the
records management function in a government institution, as well as its first report on the
general state of records management in the federal government. The latter report will be sent to
Treasury Board early in 1983-1984. The division continued its work on improving the quality
of records management training offered to government employees and began the task of
revising all the publications in the Records Management Series, using an interdepartmental
advisory committee. Plans call for the issuance of a revised manual on "Records Organization
and Operations" in 1983-1984 and on "General Records Disposal Schedules" in 1984-1985.
The division also made good progress in the development of automated records management
systems.
The Federal Records Centres Division continued to deal with its accommodation problem.
Progress was made towards alleviating the pressure on existing facilities through acquisition of
additional space in several centres. As of March 31, 1983, the records centres were storing
384,091 metres of paper records, 160,242 magnetic tapes and 318,764 reels of microfilm. The
reference function (returning files to client departments on request) experienced an increase of
16.6 per cent, from 1,200,590 records in 1981-1982 to 1,399,725 in 1982-1983. Disposals
increased 53 per cent, from 44,032 to 67,426 metres. In large measure this increase was due to
the success of the projects employing handicapped people to sort, shred and bale classified
records. The division expects to expand this project in 1983-1984 to the point where 50 people
will be employed in the centres across the country. Another significant development during the
year was the January opening of the Ottawa Tape Library. The library utilizes the National
Personnel Records Centre's minicomputer. 10 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
The National Personnel Records Centre received delivery of a minicomputer to administer
the PERSFILES automated system, providing administrative and bibliographic control over
the five million files in the division. By year's end the transition to the new hardware and
software was complete. The division handled 33,220 informal and general requests from the
public for information from its holdings — a volume increase of 24 per cent compared to last
year. The centre also processed 1,419 formal requests under Part IV of the Canadian Human
Rights Act, responding to 99.51 per cent of them in under 30 days, and the remaining .49 per
cent in under 60 days.
Records Management Services Division
The Records Management Services Division has a broad responsibility for "ensuring the
proper implementation of the federal records management program throughout the federal
government"; and "compliance with the records management policies developed by the
Treasury Board." To focus its activities around this commitment, the division has had approved
the following objective: "Optimum records management functions throughout government
institutions." To achieve this, the divisional management team has developed goals and
priorities that are kept under constant review, and has centred the strength of its operations on
an integrated approach to assignments and services with a nucleous of well-trained and
experienced staff. More specifically, the division is responsible for advising and assisting!
government institutions in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of their records management programs; in reviewing and monitoring the state of records management in government;
and in carrying through research projects for the improvement of current records systems and
procedures. As well, the division provides assistance to federal institutions in developing
records schedules; coordinates the assessment and documents recommendations on records
retention submissions; and is obligated to publish standards and guides on records management. Training courses in records management are provided to public servants throughout
Canada and systematic evaluations are conducted on records management practices and
procedures. The provision of the Secretariat for the Advisory Council on Public Records is a
continuing responsibility.
Consultative Services — The Public Records Order assigns to the Public Archives the
responsibility for ensuring that federal institutions properly document their programs and
policies. Assistance provided to government institutions included conducting departmental or
branch-wide record surveys or studies, developing or revising file classification systems,
developing procedural manuals, conducting mail management surveys and giving advice and
assistance in records office activities.
Departments and agencies given technical assistance during the past year included:
External Affairs, House of Commons, Metric Commission, Ministry of State for Economic
Development, Northwest Territorial Government, Public Archives of Canada, Public Service
Commission, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Statistics Canada, Science Council of Canada,
Transport Canada, Veterans Affairs Canada and Cape Breton Development Corporation.
Furthermore, 32 departments and agencies received informal advice and assistance on various
aspects of records management.
Policies, Guidelines and Directives — The division continued to assist the Treasury Board
Task Force on Access to Information and Privacy in developing and issuing guidelines for
federal institutions to follow in reporting personal information bank descriptions (under the
Privacy Act) to the Public Archives. This procedure should ensure that all descriptions reflect
approved retention periods.
Chapter 460 of the Treasury Board Administrative Policy Manual is expected to have final
approval by the spring of 1983. This directive will be a central source of records management
policy and will increase the awareness of the responsibilities for records management in the
federal government. This document will have considerable impact on the division. n behalf of the Treasury Board, i
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Evaluations — Part of the mandate of the Public Archive-,.„..
to conduct evaluations of the records management programs of departments or assessments of
the degree in which institutions comply with policies. To this end, the division is developing
working procedures and an evaluation checklist. A comprehensive evaluation was completed
m the Department of Communications and a report was prepared. In addition, evaluations have
commenced in Public Works Canada and in the Solicitor General's Office.
The evaluation study in the Department of Communications marks a milestone in the
activity of the division as it is the first time a government institution has been subjected to an
all-embracing scrutiny of the effectiveness of their records management program.
Publications — An interdepartmental committee was established to assist the division with the
revision of the Records Management Series handbook Records Organization and Operations.
A draft revision incorporating recommended additions and changes is being prepared. The
publication should be reissued during 1983-1984.
During the year, the revised version of Guide de classification idéologique became
available to the public.
Assisted by a departmental Records Management Working Group, the division has begun
the necessary planification for a comprehensive revision of the publication General Records
Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada. Six years have passed since the last issue
and many changes have occured in records scheduling requirements. This publication is
expected to be reissued sometime late in the 1983-1984 fiscal year.
Training — During the year, the division conducted three four-week Records Management
Courses, two in English and one in French. The courses contained some revisions and
improvements to course content developed this year to strengthen the formal instruction in
records management principles and techniques provided to participants. A total of 59 students
attended the English courses and 29 students attended the course in French. The participants
represented federal government institutions from both headquarters and field offices.
In addition, nine regional Records Management Courses were held throughout Canada.
They took place in Quebec City, Saskatoon, Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Montreal,
Toronto, Halifax and St. John's. Over 200 students received instructions on records management techniques during these sessions.
Lectures also were presented at the Association of Records Managers and Administrators
in Atlanta, Ottawa and Toronto. Besides this, the division contributed resource people to
lecture on records management topics to courses sponsored by other bodies, including: the
Canadian International Development Agency, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health and
Welfare Canada, the Public Service Commission, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the
Public Archives of Canada, the Records Management Institute, the Association des archivistes
du Québec, the City of Ottawa and the Government of Alberta.
Records Scheduling and Microfilming Submissions — Table I indicates the number of
departmental submissions (records schedules, records destruction proposals and microfilm
submissions) handled from 1961 to March 1983.
Number of Records Number of
Schedules or Disposal       Microfilm Cumulativ
Period Proposals Submitted       Submissions     Total Total
1961-1966 (March) ..                     194                           58*               252 252
1966-1971 (March) ..                   373                          52                425 677
1971-1976 (March) ..                   208                        207                415 1,092
1976-1982 (March) ..                   322                        190                512 1,604
1982-1983 (March) .. 86 20 106 1,710
Total 22 years U83 527             1,710 1,710
* Includes proposals for microfilm equipment from 1961 to 1966 inclusive. 12 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
The Records Retention and Disposal Authority (form ARC-170) and the Microfilm
Submission (form ARC-197) have been under review and are being redesigned. Staff of the
division continued to assist departments in the development of personal information and
disposal schedules in preparation for the eventual passage of Bill C-43.
Council and Committee Meetings — The division provides the Secretariat for the Advisory
Council on Public Records (ACPR) and also contributes members for such committees as the
ACPR Subcommittee on Automated Records Management Systems, the Interdepartmental
Committee on Records Retention for Business Records and the Interdepartmental Committee
on Records Management Series Handbooks.
Work with Professional Associations — Divisional staff continued their active participation
as members of the Records Management Institute (RMI) Executive, the Federal Micrographics
Council and the Association of Records Managers and Administrators Program Committee.
Visitors and Visits Made — Among visitors received by the division were officials from
Norway, the Philippines, Peru, Great Britain, a delegation from the Peoples' Republic of China
and officials from Ottawa and Kanata. Discussions centred on areas of mutual concern and
interest in records management.
Other Significant Events — The event that will have the most positive impact on divisional
activities will be the merger, effective April 1,1983, of Micrographie Advisory Services with
the Records Management Services Division. The amalgamation of these operations will have
great potential and far-reaching benefits to the records management community in government.
A special study on the State of Records Management started during the year will be
submitted to Treasury Board in June 1983. The data collected and analysed will continue to be
updated to form a base of information on the state of records management in the government.
Research continued into the automation of records management systems. In cooperation with
the Subcommittee on Automated Records Management Systems of the Advisory Council on
Public Records, the division studied automated records management systems and prepared a
status report. As part of the project, much emphasis was placed on liaising and cooperating with
the private computer sector in order to encourage the development of software packages
suitable to the records management community. A proposal was made to the Departmental
EDP Committee for the funding of a prototype computerized system to be implemented late in
1983 within records management operations at the Public Archives.
The division organized four information sessions for Records Managers in which matters
of mutual concern were discussed in detail. Minutes of these meetings are being prepared and
will be distributed to the 58 participants.
Finally, the director of the Records Management Services Division, John Dumont, was
presented with an outstanding achievement award by die Ottawa Chapter of the Association des
archivistes du Québec in recognition for his efforts in promoting sound records management
principles and techniques.
Federal Records Centres Division
The aim or objective of the Federal Records Centres Division is efficient, effective and
economical storage and management of general subject records on behalf of all federal
government institutions across Canada. Storage and management includes accessioning the
records into the records centre, providing a reference service, application of records disposal
schedules, secure destruction of classified records, a microfilm inspection service, a magnetic
tape library service and, in cooperation with the Records Management Services Division,
training and advisory services in regions outside of the National Capital Region. Records
centres are located in Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-
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Employee reviewing files in the Ottawa Records Centre building. (C 111354)
The records centres are presently providing storage and management for 384,091 metres
of records for 83 federal government institutions. This represented a saving to the federal
government of eleven million dollars in 1982-1983. However, a client survey that was
completed early in the fiscal year indicated that while users of the records centres were fully
satisfied with the level of service received, a total of almost 700,000 metres of dormant records
are still being retained in various federal government office buildings across Canada. This
represents potential savings to the government of an additional twenty million dollars if these
records were stored in economical records centre facilities.
Complete listings of all potential users in each region were completed during the year and
many of these were visited to promote use of the records centres. As a result, 34 new client
offices began using the division's services. This increased promotional activity also accounted
in part for the 533 visitors to the centres for information and tours. Last year's total was 443
As part of the division's proactive move to promote the use of records centres, coordination among management was stressed. A system of semiannual meetings of all records centre
chiefs was adopted and as a result some important steps towards increased efficiency were
taken. These included complete standardization of forms used by the centres and standardization of job descriptions. Work methods were also standardized wherever possible. Reporting
systems and types of statistical information were reviewed and standardized particularly as they
affected liaison with users. Finally, a commitment was made by each records centre chief to
adopt the bay locator system and shelf listing procedure as the standard in the division. 14 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 ,
Accommodation — Lack of accommodation was a serious problem throughout 1982-1983.
Plans for more accommodation that were to have been implemented during the year were put
off to 1983-1984 by Public Works Canada because of funding problems. This meant that by the
end of the year, the Vancouver Records Centre had only 800 vacant spaces remaining with the
largest single being 40 consecutive spaces. By the end of the year accessions were being placed
on the floor. Staff in all centres are to be commended for the fine way they are coping with this
situation.
The records centres in Halifax, Winnipeg and Montreal were forced to curtail their
accessioning to some users. Montreal received accommodation for an additional 50,000 PARC
boxes during April, but by June this space was full. The only good news to report is that space
for 14,000 PARC boxes was received at the Essential Records Site during the year, which is
adequate for 10 years of operation.
To help avoid this problem in the future, work began on a 10-year accommodation plan
using information gathered from the client listings and visits. In addition, a proposal went
forward to establish a new records centre in Quebec City to ease the growth pressure on the
centre at Montreal. This would divert an initial 50,000 PARC boxes from Montreal to the new
centre and annually 22,000 boxes.
Accessions — Despite being forced to hold back expansion because of accommodation^
problems, the division has increased the overall volume of records accessioned by 12 per cent.
Total volume accessioned in 1982-1983 was 72,983 metres compared to 65,701 metres in
1981 -1982. The number of client offices has increased from 942 to 976. This steady increase is
attributable to the emphasis on organized and methodical visits made to potential clients.
The Edmonton Records Centre, which has 12,000 metres of vacant shelf space, is a good
example of what has been done to attract more clients. This centre increased volume of records
accessioned by 81 per cent from 2,123 metres to 4,727 metres. Holdings were increased by 19
per cent from 12,767 metres to 15,313 metres. Twelve new clients began using the Edmonton
Centre during 1982-1983 for a total of 101 offices served.
The division now has a total of 384,091 metres of paper records compared to 358,264
metres last year. The total number of magnetic tapes is 160,242 compared to 150,357 last year.
Microfilm holdings stand at 318,764 reels compared to 286,849 in the previous year.
Reference — The reference service in the division also experienced a dramatic increase in
workload, particularly in Ottawa and Vancouver. There was a 33 per cent reference increase at
the Vancouver Centre. This meant that reference requests jumped from an average of 18,000
per month in 1981 -1982 to 27,000 per month in 1982-1983. Some of this can be attributed to a
substantial increase in accessions, but most can be traced to heavy Revenue Canada-Taxation
(RC-T) increases.
There is a typical example in the Ottawa Records Centre that is applicable to every centre
except Edmonton, which does not service Taxation records. Table II shows the huge 87,360
request disparity between RC-T, the heaviest records centre user, and the next largest user.
 Requests
Revenue Canada-Taxation       101,195
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation        13,835
Health and Welfare Canada         12,801
Consumer and Corporate Affairs           9,705
Indian and Northern Affairs           7,084 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 15
Table III shows the huge year by year increases in records requested by RC-T. In the three
years since 1979-1980, reference service to this department has increased by 282 per cent.
1979-1980
1980-1981
1981-1982
1982-1983
ixation   26,569
60,014
125.9
89,127
48.5
101,195
13.5
Revenue Canada-Taxat
Percentage Increase
However, because of the cooperative staffing arrangement with RC-T and hard work
within each records centre, the 24-hour service standard was met throughout the year with few
exceptions. No backlogs accumulated in any reference activity.
Disposal — During the fiscal year, the Edmonton project employing six handicapped people
destroyed 13,190 PARC boxes of records (140 tonnes of paper). This dropped the five-year
disposal backlog from 23,698 PARC boxes to 11,621.
The disposal project in Vancouver employed 11 handicapped people and shredded and
baled 15,129 PARC boxes of classified records during nine months of operation. Seventeen
departments took advantage of the facility to destroy 1,581 PARC boxes of nonaccessioned
security classified records.
Comments from the chiefs of the records centres are that without the systematic disposals
made possible by these projects it would not have been possible to continue accepting more
records for storage given the severe accommodation constraint.
This year, for the first time, nonaccessioned disposals with 27 departments using the
classified records disposal facility actually outstripped the regular accessioned disposals in
Ottawa. Out of a total of 330 tonnes (33,000 PARC boxes) destroyed, 226 tonnes were
nonaccessioned records compared to 104 tonnes of accessioned records. This work, including
sorting, shredding and baling the paper, was done by 13 handicapped employees.
New equipment was installed for the Ottawa project during the last quarter of the fiscal
year. This installation consists of two industrial shredders feeding into one huge fully-
automatic baler. Based on figures for the last week of March production will go up to 150
tonnes from the average 27 tonnes per month. In addition, arrangements were made to increase
the number of handicapped employees from 13 to 30 people.
The Winnipeg disposal project was discontinued at the end of December because a wage
agreement between the Archives and the local association for the handicapped could not be
reached. Other arrangements still employing the handicapped were made with the Public
Service Commission. The project will go ahead early in the new year.
Tape Library — The Ottawa Federal Records Centre's Active Tape Library opened its doors
on January 15,1983. The 16,749 magnetic tapes, which were in storage under the old system,
were converted over to the computerized locator system. Since opening, five new clients began
using the facility and this generated 17,090 tape registrations and 8,034 deregistrations.
Progress has been slow largely because of reluctance to bring unscheduled records of any
type into the records centre. Scheduling of information on magnetic tapes is a relatively new
endeavour and this tended to impede the transfer of tapes into the library. A compromise was
made so that unscheduled tapes are accepted for storage if the owner department makes a firm
commitment to participate in the scheduling process. This will enable many depart
take immediate advantage of economical records centre tape library storage.
The volume of magnetic tape storage in vaults in the other records centres hardly ir
during the year. Visits and surveys carried out during the year revealed very little inte
very few magnetic tapes. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
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i 1 j 1 f i J Microfilm Inspection — There was a 46 per cent decrease in the total number of microfilm
reels inspected for redox blemishes this year. Only 10,040 reels were inspected compared to
18,599 reels the year before. At the end of the second complete inspection cycle of site film aie
inspection unit diverted its attention to overhaul some special problem film groups.
One example of this was the 11,560 reels of Communications microfilm. With permission
from the Department of Communications, these films were cut down or spliced to a standard
size. They ranged in length from 120 metres to 30 metres of film. The end result was 25,494
reels of film.
Nothing startling or unexpected was discovered in the inspection program this year. Out of
10,040 reels inspected 3,401 reels were found to have blemishes and none were considered
Training and Advisory — In cooperation with the Records Management Services Division
staff, the records centres were fully involved in giving training and advice in records management. The chief of each centre lectured and gave tours and assisted with the administration of
the courses .This enabled the branch to provide records management training to more personnel
in the regions than was formerly possible because of resource limitations. It was decided that
this arrangement was well-worth pursuing and expanding in the coming year.
National Personnel Records Centre
The primary functions of the National Personnel Records Centre (NPRC) are: (1) to
provide storage and reference services to federal departments and agencies and the general
public on personnel and personnel-related records of former civilian and mUitary federal
employees and former members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; and (2) to assume, on
behalf of the Dominion Archivist, the responsibilities defined in current privacy legislation for
all noncurrent personnel records under NPRC control.
The National Personnel Records Centn 18 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 £
The period from April 1, 1982 to March 31, 1983 was one of great significance to the
National Personnel Records Centre. A major event was the purchase and acquisition of an
ECLIPSE Model C/150 minicomputer and data system from Data General (Canada) Inc., of I
Mississauga, Ontario.
The ECLIPSE C/150 has a memory capacity of 1,024 kilobytes and provides the power
and versatility for multi-processing operation. In addition to the minicomputer and comprising
the C/150 data system are two disc storage subsystems with storage capacities of 96 megabytes
each, a magnetic tape drive with dual mode of 800/1,600 bits per inch, a data channel printer ~
which provides fast, hard copy reports at 300 lines per minute, a hard copy console, two I
30-characters per second printers and 13 terminals.
This period also saw the development and production of a seven-minute slide show,
complete with narration and background music, which details the various activities of the
NPRC. This audio-visual presentation has been invaluable in explaining the centre's roles and
responsibilities to various visitors, visiting groups and the public as a whole.
Also of significance has been the dramatic increase in the use of the centre's Research
Rooms by qualified historians and researchers. At least one and sometimes two research rooms
are in use on a daily basis.
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT SECTION — This section directs the Automated Systems I
Processing and Maintenance area as well as the Documentation area and develops new systems
for additional records groups or for other administrative needs. The acquisition of the ECLIPSE
C/150 minicomputer and associated equipment had, of course, a great impact on the Systems
Development Section. The C/150 data system will be used for two major projects within the
Records Management Branch. One project is to front-end PERSFILE, the automated index
system that provides access to more than four million of the personnel records stored within the
centre. The other major project is to provide facilities for the Ottawa Federal Records Centre
Tape Library. The minicomputer is used to provide an active tape service to all participating
government agencies and institutions in the National Capital Region. The Tape Library
database stores information pertaining to clients and their tape files and has a capacity of over
80,000 records. Client reports are produced on a monthly basis or more frequently, if needed.
Again this year considerable progress was made in the reduction of the backlogs of
material that had built up over years of manual operation. These backlogs were reduced to
about 35 per cent of their size of a year ago. Finally, new coding and checking procedures for
processing interfiles were developed and implemented within the Systems Development area.
These new procedures resulted in a 50 per cent saving in the human resource requirement for
processing interfiles.
COMMUNICATIONS SECTION — This section provides all communication services,
both internal and external, and prepares the responses to requests for information from various
governments and the general public, ensuring compliance with existing privacy legislation.
The Correspondence group of the section replies to informal and general requests for
information. During the fiscal year, the group actioned 33,220 requests, which represents a
24 per cent increase in activity over 1981-1982. The types of inquiries that have noticeably
increased over the previous year are letters by 28 per cent and Telex by 92 per cent. Telephone
and counter requests decreased by about 4 per cent. Following is the percentage breakdown for
all types of inquiries received: letters — 71.9 per cent; telephone — 17.8 per cent; Telex —
9.1 per cent; and personal visits — 1.2 per cent. Additional statistics related to the services
provided by the Correspondence group are shown in Table V. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 19
TABLE V
Activities of the Communications Section
Inquiries Processed (Total)      33,220
Personal Visits           402
Telex       3,033
Telephone       5,912
Letters  23,873
Response Time (%)
Under 30 31 to 60 Over
Letter Inquiry Type Days Days 60 Days
Routine*     19,702 90.56                    8.33                   1.11
Complex     5,481 53.20                  28.97                 17.83
Sensitive     848 84.91                   10.26                  4.83
Genealogical    875 24.00 23.09 52.91
Total Number of Photocopies
Provided  17,454	
* Includes all Telex requests.
The Review and Restructuring group is responsible for replying to formal information
requests received from the public through the Record Access Request Form. During the year,
the group responded to 1,419 formal requests, which represents a 122 per cent increase over the
637 requests processed the previous year.
The response time to these formal requests was excellent as over 99.5 per cent of them
were processed within 30 days and the remainder within 60 days. Statistics concerning the
handling of formal and informal requests under Part IV of the Canadian Human Rights Act are
shown in Table VI.
TABLE VI
Activities of NPRC under Part IV of the Canadian Human Rights Act
Number of Formal
Requests Processed      1,419
Number of Photocopies
Provided    49,991
Number of Informal
Requests Processed    27,969
Number of Photocopies
Provided    17,354
Total Number
of Requests Processed
(Formal and Informal) .. 29,388
Total Number of Photocopies
Provided    67,345
Respor
sel
'ime (%
Under 30
31 tc
60
Over
Days
Da
ys
60 Day 20 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Due to the increase in the use of Telex, steps have been taken to replace our paper
tape-operated Telex equipment with an automated Telex terminal. In addition, following a
message traffic survey conducted by the Government Telecommunication Agency, a
recommendation was made to convert the Telex operations to the Government Data Network
Service (GDNS). This should result in a significant improvement in the operational effectiveness of the section's telecommunication system.
REFERENCE SERVICES SECTION — This section receives and integrates personnel
records from other government departments and agencies on a national basis and controls
access to these records by government institutions. Reference requests satisfied during the
period under review showed an increase of 18 per cent over last year, resulting in a response Ï
rate of 8,035 requests per month. In spite of this very healthy increase, the Reference Services
Section was able to maintain next day service in almost every instance. In addition, the
Reference Services unit refiled over 183,000 interfiles, jacketed over 177,000 files and
accessioned 1,935 metres of records.
Two major events that were completed by the Reference Services Section during the past
year were the World War I Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) project and the Interfile
project. The CEF project involved the complete reboxing and renumbering of this holding of
620,000 records and was completed well before the target date. The Interfile project required
the pulling of 65,000 files, writing new locator numbers on each file and then refiling the
documents. This project not only placed the interfiles in their correct jacket but released 65J000
jackets to be used again. Archives Branch
The past year saw the Archives Branch stretched to the limit in its various areas
endeavour. Details of the activities and accomplishments of the year are to be found in i
divisional reports which follow. This overview is intended only to highlight matters of
interest. A-report on notable branch activities in the area of assistance to the archival commi
V flity follows on page 105.
The most serious challenge now facing the Archives Branch is the implementation of the
Access to Information and Privacy legislation. Within the branch, the Federal Archives
Division has assumed overall responsibility for this task. During 1982-1983, three staff
members were assigned to work in this area. In anticipation of a heavy workload following
promulgation of the legislation, a submission for additional resources was prepared and
forwarded.
In terms of the difficulties experienced during the year, the accommodation situation of
the branch proved one of the most vexing. It is hoped that the availability of a new storage
facility early in the new fiscal year will ease the present overcrowding.
Major acquisitions in 1982-1983 included the papers of Frank Scott, a group of more than
200 stereograms by William Notman of Canadian cities and landscapes and a large collection of
the Toronto-based landscape architect, J. Austin Floyd. Our appreciation is extended to the
Cultural Property Review Board for enabling the purchase of an album of 90 watercolours by
Capt. Francis George Coleridge, and for assisting in the acquisition of two plans by John Marr
for a citadel at Quebec.
Archives Branch Statistics
Activities 1980-1981    1981-1982    1982-1983
Acquisition
Archival Records* Acquired     2,781,012    1,114,211       676,729
Control
Archival Records Brought Under
Control       2,307,311    3,813,756    3,367,988
Conservation
Archival Records Conserved        304,969        97,547        174,044
Public Service
Inquiries Processed       101,797        117,556 97,729
Reproductions Supplied**         526,895       439,220       329,864
Records Circulated (in-house)     1,380,268    2,525,843       781,783
Records Loaned (originals)           22,176 24,286 783
Researchers Registered (in-house)  4,971 5,339 6,664
Researcher Attendance        43.167 42,442 37,483
Visitors Toured  1.770 1,736 2,241
Archival Training Given (seat-days)  213 157 500
Archival Advisory Services (contacts)    239 204 223	
* An archival record, for statistical purposes, is defined as one photograph; one map; one machine
readable data file; one painting, drawing or print; one poster; one book, periodical or pamphlet; ten
minutes of recorded sound, video or film; or one file folder of textual material (1 metre = 100 file
folders; 1 microfilm reel = 25 file folders; 1 microfiche = 1 file folder).
** These figures do not include the numerous complimentary copies that are provided to researchers. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Also in the area of acquisition, work was begun on a pilot project to investigate appropriate ways of identifying, scheduling and acquiring photographic records of the Government of
Canada. R.S. Gordon was assigned the task of developing an acquisition policy document for
the branch and a selection standards document covering all media.
Work continued throughout the branch on the long-term project of developing suitable
EDP systems to improve physical and intellectual control over record holdings. The
FEDDOCS record control system of the Federal Archives Division is now operational.
In response to a request from the Senior Management Committee, the branch began the
process of identifying its conservation requirements, in preparation for the development of a
fully-coordinated departmental conservation program. The branch disaster contingency plan
proved to be of considerable practical assistance during the year. A roof failure in a storage
building resulted in the evacuation of 1,618 volumes of federal government textual records. As
very little information in these records was lost, the recovery operation must be judged a
success.
In the area of public service, the branch has been studying ways of reducing delays in
responding to inquiries.
In keeping with the government's accountability emphasis the Archives Branch made a
concerted effort in 1982-1983 to refine its management reporting practices, its planning
activities and the monitoring of progress made toward the achievement of specific goals.
Manuscript Division
The year 1982-1983 saw little change from the several previous years in the distribution of
staff among the major archival functions of acquisitions, control, conservation, public service
and administration.
The control function includes the selection, arrangement, description and appraisal of
archival resources. Over the year, the division placed a high priority on this function and as a
result spent a significant portion of its time accessioning backlog and current year acquisitions.
The division was also greatly assisted by two new student programs initiated in 1982. Three
students from the first class of the University of British Columbia Masters in Archival Science
program spent 12 weeks in the division as part of their practicum. A further 12 senior
undergraduate students in the Career Oriented Summer Employment Programme (COSEP)
spent 16 weeks in the division. Their presence was a boon to the division and resulted in more
work being processed than was anticipated. The division anticipates assistance from these
programs in the future years. The time and effort required for in-house and National Archival
Appraisal Board (NAAB) appraisals and the coordination of the appraisal office once again
increased and continued to place a strain on resources.
The division continues to employ a number of methods to protect the holdings from
damage. The staff is in a better position to care for the rich resources as a result of the continuing
restoration and conservation of valuable original documents, through protective microfilming
and the withdrawal of original documents from circulation, the development of a division
contingency plan and closer monitoring of the use of originals.
The Manuscript Division continues to play a very active part in the community. A number
of staff members served in executive positions for archival, historical and other professional
associations, and others contributed to scholarly journals. The staff provided professional
advice to other archives and museums, historical and genealogical societies and general
research clientele through lectures, courses, visits, tours, publications and attendance at
various conferences. Exhibitions are an important part of the outreach activities and throughout
the year the division's staff was involved in a number of major and minor displays. Oral and
written inquiries provide primary contact with the ever-widening research community which PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
«now utilizes archives. Over the year genealogical and general inquiries declined somewhat
while historical inquiries increased, but clearly the trend over the past several years is towards a
levelling off in inquiries.
The divisions management team established a number of task forces to study specific
divisional concerns including the Reference Room, access policy and the divisional information system. During the year the Procedure Manual Committee produced the first series of
titles — a^useful addition to the training program.
Volume of Accessions from April 1, 1974 to March 31, 1983
Microfilm Copies
Number of
Year
Accessions
1974-1975   	
396
1975
1976   	
409
1976
1977   	
556
1977
1978   	
545
1978
1979   	
568
1979
1980   	
430
1Q80
1981   	
436
1981
1982   	
503
1982
1983   	
             426
Number of
Accessions
Number of
Reels
Volume of Inquiries from April 1, 1974 to March 31, 1983
Year
Historical
Genealogical
Acquisitions
General
Oral
Total
1974-1975 .
2,455
1,543
1,772
79
_
5,849*
1975
1976 .
2.795
1,533
2,189
930
,.,-■• r*-;rL
7,447*
1976
1977 .
3,138
1,861
1,818
4,934
15,934
27,685
1977
1978 .
2,076
3,210
1,482
5,455
18.513
30,736
1978
1979 .
3.160
2,947
2,012
4,502
28,003
40,624
1979
1980 .
2,663
3,145
2,014
6,057
35,495
49,374
1980
1981 .
2,585
2,714
2,013
7.118
52,075
66.505
1981
1982 .
2,152
2,669
1.908
6,424
60.640
73,793
1982
1983 .
2,327
2,493
1,738
4,887
46,606
58,051
* No record kept of oral inquiries.
FRENCH ARCHIVES — The French Archives section is responsible for documentation
concerning the presence of the first Europeans in North America and the period of New France,
as well as the seigneurial system and the history of the Catholic Church in Canada. It acquires
and conserves original manuscripts and copies of documents kept in various European,
American and Canadian archival repositories.
Acquisitions — Included in the documents acquired during the year were original papers
concerning René-Nicolas Levasseur. Among these items were a commission and warrants
relating to his duties in New France as Chief of Construction of the Royal Fleet and Inspector of
Woodlands and Forests in Canada. From the archives of Revillon Frères in France, the section
received microfilm of documents relating to Canada. Revillon Frères was a company that was
active in the fur trade in Canada during the first half of the twentieth century. In addition,
microfilms were acquired from various archival repositories: the Archives de la Marine and des PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
jLlljOUtd MIL pwu«ca»uï «..( J««_,.,*-»..a.«..i.- l..,.t.
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n permitting René-Nicolas Levasseur to build ships for the King in
Canada, signed by "Louis," April 1. 1743. (C 119822)
Colonies in the Archives nationales; the Archives départementales de la Gironde; the Archives
départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques; the Archives du ministère des Affaires étrangères;
and the Archives maritimes du port de Cherbourg. Below is the list of acquisitions:
Baudry, René, C.S.C. (1910-1972), archivist (MG 31, D 136). Handwritten and printed
documents and maps from various archival repositories in France, Canada and the United
States. (743 microfiche, n.d., 1510-1933)
France .Archives de la Marine, SérieG, Mémoires et documents divers (MG 2). Excerpts from
volumes 69 to 242. Several volumes have been microfilmed in their entirety. (microfilms,
n.d., 1556-1819, 21 reels, F-1496 to F-1516)
France: Archives de laMarine, Service hydrographique, Série4JJ, Journaux de bord(MG2).
Logbook of the Embuscade, 1689 (by La Caffinière). Voyage to Canada (Bundle 7,
No. 3). (microfilm, 1689, 1 reel, F-1462)
France: Archives départementales de la Gironde (Bordeaux) (MG 6, A 17). Série III E 2425:
Records of notary Raoul Brigot for 1571. This bundle contains mostly Newfoundland
fishing contracts. Série 6B, Amirauté de Guyenne: Excerpts from volumes 66 to 115,213
to 280, 338 to 402. This series comprises clearance papers and bills of lading for ships
sailing to Canada from the Port of Bordeaux, (microfilms, 1571, 1640-1791, 8 reels,
F-1554, F-1565, F-1566, F-1568, F-1569, F-1576, F-1577 and F-1592)
France: Archives départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques (Pau) (MG 6, A 18). Excerpts
from the records of Biarritz notaries: Bertrand Planthion, 1754-1765 and Jean-Baptiste
Commamalle, 1786-1787. Excerpts from the records of Ascain notaries: Pierre Hiribar-
ren, 1662-1699. Excerpts from the records ofBidart notaries: Michel Garrin, 1750-1774.
Excerpts from the records of Ciboure notaries: Pierre Chourio, 1697-1716, Georges
Chazelles, 1639-1656, Michel Chazélles, 1656-1665, Jean Bereau, 1666-1691, Etche- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 25
goyen, 1731-1733 and Jean Dhiriart, 1749-1764. Excerpts from the records of Bourg
Saint-Esprit notaries: Jean Cassolet, 1712-1738 and Pierre Cassolet, 1746-1761. Excerpts
from the records of Saint-Jean-de-Luz notaries: Valcarcel, 1711-1739. Records of Saint-
Jean-de-Luz notary Jean Diharce (ail holdings of the office were microfilmed), 1606-
1644. (microfilms, 1606-1787, 14 reels, F-1557 to F-1564 and F-1570 to F-1575)
France: Archives des Colonies, Série tfC, Troupes des colonies (MG 1). Excerpts from
volumes 1 to'18 and 50 to 56. (microfilms, n.d., 1672-1809, 15 reels, F-1467 to F-1479,
F-1485 and F-1486)
France: Archives des Colonies, Série G', Registres de l'état civil, recensements et documents
divers (MG 1). Volume 461, Recensements du Canada, 1685-1750. (microfilm, 1685-
1750, 1 reel, F-1555)
France: Archives du ministère des Affaires étrangères, Mémoires et documents: France
(MG 5,B3). Two letters bearing the signature of the Duc de Saint-Simon, from volumes
1235 and 1519, dated 1719. (microfilm, 1719, 1 reel, F-1579)
France: Archives du ministère des Affaires étrangères, Traités (MG 5, E). Treaty of Utrecht.
Part concerning France and England. No number. Kept in the Salle des Traités, (microfilm, 1713, 1 reel, F-1578)
France: Archives maritimes, Port de Cherbourg (MG 6, C3). Série 12P4. Articles concerning
the fitting out and laying up of ships in the Granville and Regneville districts, bundles 1 to
4. (microfilm, 1722-1725, 1 reel, F-1567)
Lev'asseur, René-Nicolas (1707-1784), Chief of Construction of the Royal Fleet (MG 18,
H 58). Commissions and warrants relating to bis duties in New France, (originals,
1743-1779, 12 pp.)
Maison des étudiants canadiens à Paris (founded in 1925). Documents of the board of
directors, 1925-1950, and documents relating to the financial affairs of the organization,
1926-1929. (microfilm, 1925-1950, 1 reel, F-1591)
Nouvelle-France: Conseil supérieur, Insinuations (MG 8, A4). Royal decree for carrying out
the edict of 1667. Regulations by the Intendant and the Conseil souverain de Québec for
carrying out the edict of 1667. These transcripts were received by the Library of Parliament, Ottawa. The originals are in the Archives nationales du Québec, Quebec City,
(transcripts, 1678-1679, 19 pp.)
Revillon Frères. Documents concerning the company's activities in Canada at the Edmonton,
Prince Rupert, Charlottetown, Montreal, Hudson Bay and other trading posts. The
company specialized in the fur trade. The originals are kept in the archives of Revillon
Frères in Paris, (nncrofilms, 1902-1969, 11 reels, F-1580 to F-1590)
Spain: Archivo General de Simancas (MG 10, F 7). Excerpts from the Secciôn de Estado,
Nos.7644 and 6969. Excerpts from the Secciôn de Estado, Libro 172, legajos6909, 7644.
Excerpts from Legajos 392 and 426 of the Direcciôn General de Rentas, 2nd" Remesa.
These documents relate to fishing in Newfoundland, (microfilms, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 2 reels, K-140 and K-141)
Control — A number of finding aids were prepared or updated in order to make documents
more accessible to researchers. Particular mention should be made of the analytical inventories
prepared for the following holdings:
France: Archives des Colonies, Série C"A, Correspondance générale, Canada (MG 1).
Analytical inventory of volumes 1 to 5.
France: Archives des Colonies, Série G , Registres de l'état civil, recensements et documents
divers (MG 1).
France: Archives départementales de la Seine et ville de Paris (10), du Calvados (15), de la
Gironde (17) and des Pyrénées-Atlantiques (18) (MG 6, A). 26 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
France: Archives et bibliothèques municipales de: Dieppe (1), Honfleur (2), Tours (5), Rouen
(6), Blois (7), Bourges (8), Orléans (9), Carpentras (10), Rochefort (11), Troyes (12),
Hiers-Brouage (13), Loches (14), Dijon (15), Musée basque de Bayonne (19), Marseille
(21) (MG 6, B).
France: Archives maritimes, Port de Cherbourg (MG 6, C 3).
Nouvelle-France: Correspondance officielle (MG 8, A 1, three series). Chronological inventory.
Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, Montréal (MG 17, A 7-2, 2nd series). Chronological inventory.
Hôtel-Dieu de Québec (MG 17, A ÏO).
Vatican: Archives of the Sacred Congregation of the "Propaganda Fide" (MG 17, A 25).
Calendar of documents relating to Canada prior to 1800, in the series "Congregazioni
particolari" and "Lettere."
Ramezay Family (MG 18, H 54).
Baudry, René, C.S.C. (MG 31, D 136).
A calendar of printed documentation sources was begun and has produced more than
10,000 descriptions.
Lastly, an inventory of seals is under way, in cooperation with a researcher.
Conservation — A number of documents in the MG 8 and 18 holdings have been restored. The
remainder will be systematically restored in the coming years.
Public Service — A considerable amount of time was devoted to answering the numerous
written and oral inquiries from the public. Victorin Chabot and André Desrosiers worked on the
publication Dreams of Empire and Guide des sources de l'histoire du Canada conservées en
France, as well as on preparations for the Dreams of Empire exhibition, which will travel
across the country and abroad during the next few years. Research was conducted in preparation for the second phase of the exhibition, which will cover the period from 1700 to 1760.
BRITISH ARCHIVES — The British Archives section is responsible for records and
manuscripts from British sources that relate to Canada, including material copied from the
Public Record Office and the British Library. Records of the British military and naval forces in
Canada, the pre-Confederation records of the Govenor General's Office, and papers relating to
the fur trade are also the responsibility of this section.
Acquisitions
Constitutional Documents. Presentation copies of six documents relating to Canadian constitutional development, presented by the Government of the United Kingdom to the
Government of Canada in October 1982, were accessioned. The documents are: the Royal
Proclamation of 1763, the Quebec Act of 1774, the Constitutional Act of 1791, the Act of
Union of 1840, the British North America Act of 1867 and the Canada Act of 1982.
Great Britain, Admiralty Hydrographie Department. A report on astronomical observations
undertaken to determine the true St. Croix River, ca. 1831, was transferred from the
National Map Collection. (12 pp.)
Great Britain, Air Ministry Collection. Copies of documents from Air Ministry files, mainly
Air 1 and Air 8, obtained by the Canadian Directorate of History, Department of National
Defence, for use in the writing of the history of the RCAF, were transferred to the PAC.
(10 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Constitutional documents presented by the Government of the United Kingdor
Government of Canada in commemoration of the "patriation" of the Canadia:
i. (C 104126)
Great Britain, General Post Office. Several series, copied recently from originals in the
General Post Office Archives, London, England, were accessioned:
Post 1, Financial Letterbooks (38 reels)
Post 29, Packet Minutes (74 reels)
Post 34, Packet Minutes (6 reels)
Post 41, Packet Reports (3 reels)
Post 44, Instructions to Post Masters (4 reels)
Hessian Troops. A microfilm copy of some records of Hessian troops who served in British
North America during the American Revolution was acquired through J.-P. Wilhelmy of
Montreal. (2 reels)
Hudson's Bay Company. The microfilming of Section A, Headquarters Papers, of Series II
( 1870-1904) has now been completed (400 reels), and authorized researchers may consult
these reels at the PAC. The Hudson's Bay Company Archives in Winnipeg has prepared a
new statement of rules and regulations; this has been translated and is available for
reference purposes.
Lyngfeld, Surrey, England, Collection. Documents relating to the sale of land in the parish of
Lyngfeld, Surrey, England, ca. 1448-ca. 1719, were received from J. Edward Whittaker
of Saint John, N.B. (16 pp.)
Simpson, Sir George. Probate and double probate of Sir George Simpson's will were received
through the Canadian Centre for Folk Culture Studies, National Museum of Man. (6 pp.) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
Williams, Sir William Fenwick. A small collection of papers of Fenwick Williams, relating to
the defence of British North America during the American Civil War, was received from
Peter Alward of Nepean, Ont. (2.5 cm)
Control
Canada, Governor General's Office. Good progress was made on the revision of this inventory. Revisions and shelf-lists were prepared, typed and proofread. Of the series
within the responsibility of the Manuscript Division, only G 19 (Records of the Governor
General's Military Secretary) remains to be revised. Plans have been made to republish
this inventory as a joint project of the Manuscript and Federal Archives Divisions.
Great Britain, Air Ministry Collection. This collection was refiled and reboxed, and a
comprehensive shelf-list was completed.
Great Britain, Colonial Office 188, New Brunswick "A". The calendar published in the PAC
Report for 1895 was annotated to indicate current references. Many uncalendared items
were discovered and a finding aid for these was prepared.
Great Britain, Colonial Office, CO 532. This heterogeneous class, consisting of original
correspondence of the Dominions Department of the Colonial Office, 1907-1925, was
acquired several years ago, but had no finding aid. Because of the size of the collection
(283 reels) and its complexity, the preparation of a finding aid was a long task, but this has
now been completed and the collection is now accessible to researchers.
Great Britain, General Post Office. An index to personal names appearing in the finding aid
was prepared, as well as a shelf-list for the new material.
Haldimand Papers. Material relating to prisoners-of-war was indexed.
Manuscript Group 21. An index to this inventory was prepared for inclusion in the General
Index.
Thompson, David. A list of titles of the notebooks, 1789-1850, recording the journeys, surveys
and observations of David Thompson, which make up Volumes 1-38 of the Thompson
papers, was prepared.
Whaling Logs Collection. The finding aid was completed.
Public Service — The section replied to 1,539 oral inquiries and 480 written inquiries this
Outreach — Grace Hyam was responsible for organizing an exhibition of constitutional
documents and symbols of sovereignty, to open in the Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings
in April 1983, to mark the first anniversary of the signing of the Proclamation of the Canada Act
by the Queen. Stephen Salmon organized the copying of material on Dr. Norman Bethune,
which Dr. Smith presented to representatives of the People's Republic of China during his visit I
there.
PRE-CONFEDERATION ARCHIVES — The year has been marked by a clarification of
goals and priorities, causing some shifts in the emphasis placed on certain functions. Efforts
have been made to maintain a healthy balance amongst acquisition, control, processing,
conservation and public service/reference functions. Having a full establishment throughout
the year and some additional help from students under the Career Oriented Summer Employment Programme made a significant contribution to the control of incoming material and a
slight reduction in the accessioning backlog.
Work on the divisional Procedure Manual was brought to a degree of fruition in November, with the distribution of the first instalment of procedure papers. Half have now been
written, translated, printed and distributed. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 29
Acquisitions — The development of selection criteria and their application in the acquisition
fonction has reduced the number of collections acquired, although the number of contacts with
donors and dealers has increased somewhat over previous years. Items more appropriate to the
jurisdiction of provincial, municipal or denominational archives, to museums, or to historical
societies have been referred to the relevant institution.
Collecting policies in the field of religious archives was further clarified. Discussions
continued with both denominational archives and the London Office regarding the copying of
records from missionary society archives and the acquisition of records from interdenominational or ecumenical organizations.
Of some 100 units accessioned during the year, roughly 10 per cent were protective
microfilm copies of existing holdings and 30 per cent were items cleared from the backlog.
Greater selectivity in acquisition should gradually eliminate the backlog of unaccessioned
material.
The preparation of evaluation reports on donations for income tax purposes, both in-house
and for the NAAB, continues to add to the costs of acquisition and processing. The number of
small donations requiring in-house appraisals rose markedly in 1982.
Control—The links between arrangement and description remain strong. The reintegration of
files in the Provincial Secretary's Numbered Correspondence for Canada East (RG 4, C 1 ) and
Canada West ( RG 5, C 1 ) will eliminate the need to provide detailed description, since the main
series are provided with contemporary, indexed registers. Microfilming of the series under the
Diffusion Program had to be halted, since the absence of files was causing considerable
frustration to researchers. Four series were reintegrated and priorities established for those "B"
series in RGs 4 and 5 that have been identified for reintegration into C 1.
Reintegration of files and restoration of the original order was completed in four series of
Executive Council Office records of 1841 to 1867:RG 1,E 4, Despatches Referred to Council;
E 6, Board of Railway Commissioners; E 7, Submissions; and E 8, Orders-in-Council. The
first two were prepared and sent for protective microfilming.
Substantial efforts of arrangement were undertaken for new material in the papers of Evan
John Price and family (MG 24, D104—70 cm); the records of Fitzroy Township, Ont. (MG 9,
D 8-73 — 9.3 m); and additional records of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church of Ottawa (MG
9, d 7-35 — now 14.6 m). The records of the Canadian Council of Churches (MG 28,1327 —
about 50 m) were surveyed and the subseries identified. Records of the Religion-Labour
Council (MG 28,1 328 — 3.6 m) were organized separately, but will not be fully listed until
potential strays have been identified within the records. Incorporation of new material necessitated a complete reorganization of the Ontario Cemetery Recordings (MG 9, D 7-40—2 m and
23 reels of microfilm), as well as revision of Finding Aid 961.
The original order of several manuscript collections was restored to facilitate access and
improve the use of existing finding aids. Notable in this regard are the British Headquarters
Papers (MG 23, B 1 — Finding Aid 784) and the papers of Sir Charles Bagot (MG 24, A 13 —
Finding Aid 234).
The advantages of providing introductory notes for older finding aids have manifested
themselves in considerable time savings on both oral and written reference work. Efforts were
continued to provide technical notes of explanation for the most heavily used finding aids
whose awkward structure and uneven levels of description caused frustrations and inefficiencies. Particular emphasis was placed on collections scheduled for protective microfilming or
designated for withdrawal from circulation for conservation purposes. These include the
following:
FA 41 Claus family MG 19, F1
FA 119 Neilson collection MG 24, B 1
FA 292 Papineau family MG24.B2
FA 214 Baring Brothers & Company MG 24, D 21
FA 1014 Brome County Historical Society MG 8, F 14 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT !<
Thematic guides were prepared in areas of strong research demand:
TG 1204
Native peoples (Indians and In
xit)
TG 1206
Parish registers (supplemental
j to the Checklist)
TG 1208
Religious and Masonic Manusc
ripts
Coverage of other guides was expanded, n
otably:
TG 1072
Immigration and settlement
FA 300
Census returns and related rec
ords
Finding
aids were provided for both recen
acquisitions
and some older hoi
FA 842
Upper Canada — Petitions and addresses t
■> the
Lieutenant Governor
RG 5, B 3
FA 883
R. Maclsaac MacDonald famil
MG25.G 356
FA 1346
James Leslie and family
MG 24, D 102
FA 1348
William Stewart and family
MG 24, D 101
FA 1350
Louis de Watteville
MG 24, F 96
FA 1351
Thomas Dyneley
MG 24, F 97
FA 1368
Clarence Kipling collection
MG 25, G 62
FA 1377
Evan John Price and family
MG 24, D 104
FA 1387
Fabien Index (microfilm)
MG 25, G 231
FA 1416
Richard, first baron Airey
MG 24, F 104
FA 1417
Benjamin and Danford Mott
MG 24, B 171
L
A survey of finding aids was carried out to determine both the adequacy of description a"nd
the physical state of all finding aids for collections under the care of the section. The survey has
greatly facilitated development of minimum standards of description for collections being
microfilmed as a protective conservation measure (where the originals will be withdrawn from I
circulation) and under the Diffusion Program. It will also serve in identifying items for
inclusion in the Finding Aids on Microfiche Diffusion Program.
Conservation — Plans for a conservation survey of the section's holdings were outlined and a
reporting form was devised. Methods of recording conservation treatment were systematized.
A backlog survey for RGs 1, 4, 5 and 14 identified a severe conservation problem. A pilot
survey indicating records and manuscripts that should be withdrawn from circulation for both
conservation and security reasons produced a revised list of currently withdrawn records series.
A procedure for withdrawals is being formalized.
Several large manuscript collections were reviewed and the most fragile items sent for
conservation treatment. Where the collections were to be microfilmed, treatment was confined
to repairs of tears, mold and like damage; strengthening through lamination was reserved for
items likely to be used in exhibition or to remain accessible for general research. The two
versions of the United Empire Loyalist List are being conserved for potential exhibition use, as
is the logbook of HMS Pegasus.
Public Service — Oral reference demand did not increase significantly, but the written
reference load rose by 50 per cent during the second half of the year when some inquiries were
diverted from the Genealogical Unit. Resources being limited, these inquiries were given brief
but prompt responses.
Tours were provided to special groups approximately every other month. The demand for
talks increased as the year progressed, reaching a peak in March. Speakers were requested for
conferences and workshops of genealogical societies and local historical associations. Limitations of both human and budgetary resources forced a negative response to approximately half
the requests.
Consultant services were provided by letter, by telephone and by personal visit to
colleagues in museums, historical associations, archives and other cultural institutions PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
throughout the year. Assistance took the form of advice on tax certificate appraisals and
conservation methods, processing methods and reference systems, training programs and
administration of archives. Statistics on time spent in this function are incomplete but suggest
that it is a significant demand on the time and expertise of senior archivists.
The text ofTracing Your Ancestors in Canada was revised by Patricia Kennedy and Janine
Roy. A revised French text of Guide des sources généalogiques au Canada is also in
preparation.
Participation in exhibition preparation has been limited. Documents were loaned to the
Newfoundland Museum and negotiations were conducted with other institutions. A small
exhibition on the Loyalists is being prepared for mounting adjacent to the Reference Room in
PRIME MINISTERS ARCHIVES — The responsibility for the acquisition, description and
servicing of prime ministerial papers lies with this section. Acquisition is dependent to a large
degree upon donations by prime ministers or those in possession of prime ministerial documents. In order to encourage donations and to provide a service to incumbent prime ministers
the section promotes an "on deposit" system that provides for the safe storage of dormant
papers of the prime minister. Both Mr. Clark and Mr. Trudeau have availed themselves of this
The arrangement and description of prime ministerial papers continues to account for most
of the staff time. As in previous years the focus for 1982-1983 was on the W.L.M. King and
J .G. Diefenbaker collections. Work on the King papers has been going on for over 30 years and
it is expected that it will take another five to ten years to complete. The Diefenbaker papers will
require less time due to the involvement of the University of Saskatchewan in providing
manpower. This collection should be organized, described and microfilmed by 1990.
Research interest in the St. Laurent and Pearson papers remains high. During the year, a
number of books and articles appeared that were based upon these collections. Their authors
noted their appreciation for the help they received from staff of the Prime Ministers Archives.
Members of the section were also involved in conducting tours of Laurier House for
students visiting the Terry Fox Youth Centre, coordinating the activities of the Archival
Appraisal Office, assisting other sections, advising the Diefenbaker Centre at the University of
Saskatchewan, editing the division's procedure manual and serving on a variety of committees.
Diefenbaker, J.G. (MG 26, M). The 1940-1956 series was microfilmed and the originals and
two microfilm copies were shipped to the Diefenbaker Centre at the University of
Saskatchewan. All of the material that has been microfilmed to date is open to researchers
at the Archives. With the assistance of a COSEP student and a Diefenbaker Centre
summer student, it was possible to paginate 446 volumes of the 604 volumes in the Prime
Minister's Office Numbered series.
The question of access to the PMO material was discussed with Sharon Mitchell, Director
of the Diefenbaker Centre and it was decided that the advice of federal government
departments would be sought where material relating to any department was involved. As
prime ministerial papers are not considered public records, the ultimate decision on access
will rest with the University of Saskatchewan.
King, W.L.M. (MG 26, J). The indexing of the J 1 series was completed to the end of 1940 and
the computer-produced finding aid for 1933 was made available to researchers.
Matthew Arnold material, some unpublished, sent to King by Arnold's sister was
organized and described. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
The pamphlets and clippings series (J 6) was partially reorganized with the help of a
Career Oriented Summer Employment Program student. It is hoped to complete this series
next summer with the help of another COSEP student.
Macdonald, Sir J.A. (MG 26, A). An important document relating to the National Policy, the
resolutions of the 1878 Liberal Conservative Convention in Toronto, was acquired and
added to the collection.
A survey of conservation needs was conducted and restoration of 115 volumes of
documents commenced.
Pearson, L.B. (MG 26, N). The Post-1968 (N 5) series was opened to research in January 1983
as were the Pre-1958 (N 1) series files ending in the year 1952 and the Leader of the
Opposition Correspondence series (N 2).
Trudeau, P.E. (MG 35, A 7). A number of requests for retrieval from this "on deposit" material
were received and an additional 47 metres of papers were transferred to the Archives.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS ARCHTVES — The Public Affairs Archives has as its mandate the
acquisition, description, conservation and public service responsibilities for private papers in
the following post-Confederation subject areas: cabinet ministers and members of parliament,
political parties and related political papers; governors general; and military, judiciary, diplomatic and public service collections of national significance.
The year witnessed a greater emphasis on the arrangement and description functions due
to the deliberate slowdown in active acquisitions, loss of two senior archivists, pressure placed
on the section by a large number of tax appraisals, and the availability of several summer
students for processing collections. As a result, much of the backlog in the military area has
been reduced and significant progress made in the political sphere.
In total, time devoted to inquiries declined slightly due in part to the absence of senior
archivists.
Major Acquisitions
Brutinel, Raymond (MG 30, E 414). Report and memoranda on the military campaigns and
victories of the Canadian Corps in the final year of World War I, 1918-1919. Presented by
William Ross Henry of Montreal West, Quebec, (originals, 5 cm)
Burns, Eedson L.M. (MG 31, G 6). Additional files relating to disarmament, 1958-1968.
Donated by Gen. E.L.M. Bums, Manotick, Ontario, (originals, 60 cm)
Cadieux, Marcel (MG 31, E 31). Additional documents comprising correspondence and
memoranda relating to disarmament, legal affairs, the United Nations, the Law of the Sea
andbilingualism, 1948-1980. Presented by Anita Cadieux of Ottawa, Ontario, (originals,
90 cm)
Casgrain, Thérèse (MG 32, C 25). Unfinished manuscript "Les raisons pour lesquelles le
Québec a dit non au CCF." (originals, 5 cm)
Chisholm, Elspeth (MG 31, E 50); public servant and broadcaster. Further transcripts and other
research materials were received.
Goldenberg, Senator Carl (MG 32, C55). The first instalment of Senator Goldenberg' s papers
was received from his Senate office upon his retirement. There remains an extensive
collection of labour material in his Montreal home which will be transferred later. (3 m)
Hays, Senator Harry W. (MG 32, B 2). Correspondence and memoranda in subject and
nominal files, n.d., 1966-1982, from Senator Hays' office. Donated by Mrs. H.W. Hays,
(originals, 1.8 m, additional) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1
Leggatt, Stuart M. (MG 32.C41). This material was donated by Mr. Leggatt when he left
federal politics for B.C. provincial politics. Presented by NDP Whip's Office, House of
Commons, (originals, 3.6 m)
Liberal Party of Canada (MG 28, IV 3). Additional papers were received documenting
conventions, constituency matters, elections and a policy workshop. Presented by the
Liberal Party of Canada. (2.4 m)
McGregor, Gordon Roy (MG 30, E 283). This material completes the transfer of papers from
this former president of Air Canada. Donated by Elizabeth Buchanan, Air Canada
Historical Division, Montreal, (originals, 3 m, additional)
Progressive Conservative Party Research Office (MG 28, IV 2). The additional material
consists of material prepared for PC members of the House of Commons and Senate on
various subjects. Donated by the PC Party Research Office, (originals, 3.3 m)
Reid, Escott (MG 31, E 46). Additional documents consist of a manuscript of his book,
Farewell to Nehru. Presented by Escott Reid of Ste-Cécile-de-Masham, Quebec, (originals, 8 cm)
Robertson, Norman (MG 30, E 163). Additional documents consist of correspondence and
memoranda relating to the Prime Minister's Office and the Privy Council Office, 1941-
1964. Presented by Mrs. Norman Robertson, Toronto, (originals, 15 cm)
Smith, Russell (MG 30, E409). Correspondence, diaries, notes and many photographs relating
to Group Captain Smith's World War II air force career were received via the Directorate
of History, Department of National Defence. (40 cm)
Thorson, Joseph T. (MG 31, E 38). Additional documents consist of Icelandic books and the
invitation book, 1930-1963. Presented by Judge Donald Thorson, Toronto, (originals,
50 cm)
Political Papers on Deposit — The section continues to accept political papers on deposil
pending final decisions on their disposition. Included this year in over 35 such transfers were
the papers of 16 ministers and former ministers and nine members of parliament.
Boucher, Jean (MG 31, E49). Letters, press clippings and texts from lectures given before
learned, cultural, university and charitable groups, 1949, 1959-1977. Presented by Mrs.
Jean Boucher, Ottawa, Ontario, (originals, 5 cm)
Cadieux, Marcel (MG 31, E 31). The arrangement of this addition to the Cadieux collection
was completed, (originals, 50 cm)
Chevrier, Lionel (MG 32, B 16). The arrangement of the collection was completed and the
finding aid prepared, (originals, 33.3 m)
David, Laurent-Olivier (MG 27, HE 8). The arrangement of the collection and the selection of
documents for microfilming were completed, (originals, 1 cm; microfilm, 1 reel)
Douglas, Thomas Clement (MG 32, C 28). The arrangement and description of the Douglas
papers as well as the preparation of the finding aid were completed. (31 m)
Hays, Senator Harry W. (MG 32, B 2). The correspondence and subject files were arranged and
the finding aid prepared. (1.6 m)
Howard, Frank (MG 32, C 20). Correspondence and reference files relating to Howard's
career as a member of parliament, 1957-1974 were arranged and a finding aid prepared.
(15.5 m)
Monteith, J.W. The papers, consisting of nominal and subject files, speeches and clippings
relating to Monteith's parliamentary career as a member of parliament and Minister of
Health and Welfare in the Diefenbaker government, have been arranged and described. 34 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 ]
Morrison, Hugh Whitney (MG 30, E 408). Material relating to Morrison's CBC career was
received and arranged. (5 cm)
Nicholson, G.W.L. (MG 31, G 19). The arrangement of the collection and preparation of the
finding aid were completed. The papers document Colonel Nicholson's career as a
military historian, (originals, 1.3 m)
Penhale, Matthew Howard Somers (MG 31, G 21). The arrangement of this collection has been
completed. The papers consist of correspondence, personal and military files and Civil
Defence material relating to Penhale's long military and public service career, (originals,
6 m)
Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (MG 28, IV 2). The arrangement and description of
this significant collection has been completed for files dating to 1966. (originals,
108.3 m)
Reed, Hayter (MG 29, E106); public servant. This collection has been sorted and arranged. It
consists of correspondence and letterbooks, 1885-1921, relating to Reed's career as
Indian Agent and Superintendant of Indian Affairs.
Smith, Arnold (MG 31, E 47). This collection documents Smith's years as secretary-general of
the Commonwealth Secretariat, 1965-1975. It has now been arranged and described,
(about 4 m)
Ussher, John Frederick Holmes (MG 30, E 376). Papers relating to Ussher' s South African and
World War I experiences are arranged, (originals, 43 pp.; photocopies, 14 pp.)
Vockeroth, Heidi (MG 32, F 7). The correspondence, 1954-1973, from Dorise Nielsen, formeY
member of parliament, was received and arranged.
Wong, Christine (MG 32, G 11). Additional material includes correspondence from Dorise
Nielsen to her daughter, Christine Wong, documenting Mrs. Nielsen's life in China,
(originals, 6 cm)
SOCIAL/CULTURAL ARCHIVES — The section has acquisition, custodial and reference
responsibilities for all post-Confederation private papers in the social and cultural fields. The
acquisition program of social archives is, at the present time, mainly concentrated in the areas
of education, the Arctic and Canadian North, and social sciences on the one hand and women,
sports and recreation, children and youth on the other. The cultural archives program specializes in the acquisition and preservation of papers reflecting our literary heritage, artr theatre,
music, dance, film and broadcasting.
A decrease in both acquisition and control work was experienced in the social archives
program as one archivist position remained vacant for virtually the whole year.
Major Acquisitions
SOCIAL ARCHIVES I (Education, the Arctic and North, Social Sciences)
Boyd, William H. (MG31, D 139). Dr. Boyd (M.D.), a professor of anatomy at the University
of Guelph, donated his papers concerning his legal dispute with the University of Guelph.
He won a landmark case in the Supreme Court of Ontario that required the University to
make public their criteria for the promotion of a lecturer to professor. The papers consist of
minutes of meetings, correspondence, memoranda, legal documents, court proceedings
and scrapbooks for the period 1969 to 1976. He was represented by Andrew Brewin,
a noted Toronto lawyer and NDP member of parliament. (7 m)
Canairelief (MG 28, I 371). Correspondence, memoranda, receipts, clippings, leaflets and
invoices, 1968-1971, concerning the raising of funds and the shipping and distribution of
relief supplies to Biafra during the Biafran war when Biafra attempted to secede from
Nigeria. Donated by Dr. E. MacKay, former president, in 1982. (6 m, additional) >UBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
'.alth Press Union (MG 28, I 355). Correspondence, memoranda, minutes of
meetings, clippings and addresses concerning press freedom in the Empire and, later, in
the Commonwealth, 1917-1982, were presented by I. Norman Smith of Ottawa. (20 cm)
Jenness, Diamond (MG 30, B 89). Chapters 8 to 16 of the manuscript of Jenness' book Eskimo
Administration: Canada were presented by the Department of Health and Welfare,
Program Aids and Resources, through Candace Bell. (1.5 cm)
Kenney, James Francis (MG 30, C 176). Correspondence, memoranda, drafts and articles,
photostats of archival documents and publications largely concerning Irish and Celtic
history, n.d., 1908-1946. Presented by the Archives of the Jesuit Fathers of Upper Canada
through Rev. E.J. Dowling. (1 m, additional)
League of Nations Society in Canada (MG 28, 120). Minutes of meetings of the National
Council, financial statements, reports, proceedings of annual conferences and clippings
collected by Constance Wrenshall, Toronto. (10 cm, additional)
McKenzie, Ruth Isabel (MG 31, D 135). Correspondence, memoranda, clippings, notes and
manuscripts of McKenzie ' s books Laura Secord, The Legend and the Lady and Leeds and
Grenville: Their First Two Hundred Years and a copy of her thesis "A Survey of the
Proletarian Movement in Canadian Literature," 1938. Presented by Ruth I. McKenzie,
Ottawa. (60 cm)
Penlington, Norman (MG 31, D 82). Correspondence, memoranda and notes for interviews
relating to his book Canada and Imperialism (1965) and constitutional history. A notable
portion of the papers relate to interviews conducted with Henri Bourassa, Sir Robert
Borden and Sir William Mulock. Presented by Norman Penlington, Michigan, U.S.A.
(1 cm, additional)
Sim, Alex (MG 30, D 260). Correspondence, memoranda and reports concerning adult
education, the Ontario Older Boys Parliament, Rochdale, the United Church of Canada,
the Canadian Citizenship Branch, the CBC, his doctoral thesis "The Agronome" and a
variety of other subjects, 1929-1975. Presented by Robert Alexander Sim, North Gower,
Ontario. (2.1 m, additional)
SOCIAL ARCHIVES II (Women, Sports and Recreation, Children and Youth)
Canadian Amateur Football Association (MG 28, I 180). Minutes of board of directors'
meetings and annual general meetings, 1973-1982. (20 cm, additional)
Canadian Federation of University Women (MG 28,1196). Minutes, reports, correspondence
and newsletters concerning conferences and committees as well as correspondence and
circulars from the International Federation of University Women and correspondence and
reports from local clubs, 1961-1982. (1.2 m)
Canadian Figure Skating Association (MG 28,1209). Minutes of annual meetings and related
documentation, 1970-1977 and 1934-1957. (60 cm, additional)
Canadian Home Economics Association (MG28,1359). Correspondence, memoranda, briefs
to governments and royal commissions, financial statements, account books, cookbooks,
texts on home economics, 1939-1975. Many of the books and pamphlets date to the turn of
the century. Received through the executive director, Diana M. Smith, in 1982. (10 m)
Girl Guides of Canada (MG 28,1367). The first acquisition of Girl Guides of Canada records
was received and consisted of annual reports and published magazines.
Montreal Caledonia Curling Club (MG 28,1365). Minute books, match results, minutes of
annual and semiannual meetings and management committee meetings, minutes of
directors' and shareholders' meetings, letter book and financial data, 1850-1971, of what
is believed to be the second oldest curling club in Canada were acquired from Anne Fisher,
Baie-d'Urfé, Quebec. (1.1 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Royce, Marion (MG 30, C 206). Subject files, research notes, correspondence, memoranda
and pamphlets concerning Canadian Girls in Training, the World YWCA, women's
education and public health were presented by Marion Royce, Toronto. (1.05 m)
World Organization for Early Childhood Education (MG 28,1303). Minutes, printed reports,
correspondence, clippings and subject files relating to the activities of the WOECE were
received with the assistance of Margaret Kee, Ottawa. (80 cm, additional)
CULTURAL ARCHIVES
Bernardi, Mario (MG 31, D 134). The papers of Canadian conductor Mario Bernardi,
1939-1982, including correspondence, memorabilia, programs, clippings, reference
files, sheet music, libretti, music serials and miscellaneous publications, were presented
by Mario Bernardi, Ottawa. (3.65 m)
Canadian Artists' Representation (MG 28, I 213). Records, 1970-1981, consisting of
alphabetically-arranged subject files were presented by the organization's national office,
Ottawa. (2.5 m, additional)
Canadian Broadcasting League (MG 28, I 372). Administrative records, subject files and
library materials, 1930s, 1956-1983, were presented by the organization through Graham
Spry, Ottawa. (24.9 m)
Carmichael, Franklin (MG 30, D 293). The papers of Franklin Carmichael, Canadian artist I
and member of the Group of Seven, were presented by his daughter, Mary Mastin,
Toronto. They include material, n.d., 1912-1981, relating to his commercial art, teaching, exhibitions, the Ontario Society of Artists, an unpublished manuscript on the history
of signs, and other material. (46 cm)
Colville, Alex (MG 30, D 292). A notebook, a diary and typewritten reports relating to
Canadian artist Alex Colville's career as a war artist, 1944-1945, were presented by Alex
Colville, Wolfville, N.S. (2.5 cm)
Graham Spry (right) with Archives Branch Director General Michael Swift at the
ceremony marking the acquisition of Mr. Spry's papers relating to broadcasting and
politics. (C 102312) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Dance in Canada Association (MG 28, I 355). Administrative, financial and conference
records, 1972-1982, were presented by the association. (7.4 m)
Davidson, Margaret (MG 30, D 295). The papers, 1933-1939, 1969-1982, of singer and
dancer Margaret Davidson, relating to vaudville in the western provinces, Ontario and
Quebec, were presented by Margaret Russell, Dorval. (7.5 cm)
Glassco, John (MG 30, D163). Papers of Canadian author, poet and translator John Glassco,
including correspondence and manuscripts, 1956-1981, were acquired. (1.15 m. additional)
Moodie, Susanna (MG 29, D 100). Five original letters, four letter transcripts and two letter
fragments written by early settler and author Susanna Moodie to her daughter Kate
Vickers and her family, 1869-1876, were presented by Hope Vickers, Toronto. (5 cm,
additional)
Motion Picture Institute of Canada (MG 28,1358). Records relating to this nonprofit trade
organization were transferred by the Academy of Canadian Cinema. Dating from 1977 to
1980, they relate to the institute's membership drives and library. (20 cm)
Scott, Francis Reginald (MG 30, D 211). Subject files containing correspondence, memoranda, reports, manuscripts, notes, clippings and pamphlets, n.d., 1939-1980, relating to
Canadian poet, lawyer and professor F.R. Scott were acquired. (7.6 m, additional)
Shorey, Kenneth (MG 31, D 133). Correspondence and related documents, 1959-1977,
exchanged between Canadian artist William Kurelek and Shorey were acquired. (7.5 cm)
!0, relating to the Society for
icanada, formerly Canadian
Society for Art Publications (MG 28,1357). Records, 1943-1
Art Publications, publisher of the Canadian art review a
Art, were acquired. (35 m)
Spry, Graham (MG 30, D 297). The papers of public broadcasting advocate Graham Spry,
n.d., 1918-1970s, including material on the Canadian Radio League, Canadian
Broadcasting League, League for Social Reconstruction and the CCF were acquired.
(48 m)
Toronto Camera Club (MG 28, I 181). Minutes, correspondence, financial material and
publications, 1892-1978, were transferred to the PAC. (80cm, additional)
ECONOMIC/SCIENTIFIC ARCHIVES — The section has acquisition, custodial and
reference responsibilities for post-Confederation private manuscripts in the economic and
scientific fields. Programs have been established for Business, Labour and Science and
Technology.
Acquisition activity was limited by the loss during the year of both the business and labour
archivists. Nevertheless, approximately 170 metres of material was added to the section's
holdings representing acquisitions from some 62 individuals and organizations. It is interesting
to note that over 50 per cent of these acquisitions were additions to already existing collections,
a statistic that clearly points out the nondiscretionary aspect of acquisitions work.
The following is a summary of some of the major acquisitions and other activities of the
section over the past year.
Major Acquisitions and Other Activities
BUSINESS
Baker, Francis Russell. Correspondence, subject files, financial material, publications and
clippings, 1936-1974, concerning Russ Baker and Pacific Western Airlines. The collection was arranged and a finding aid prepared. (90 cm) 38 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Canada Starch Company. The Canada Starch Company was established in 1858 in Edwards-
burg (Cardinal), Ontario by W.T. Benson. Originally known as the Canada Starch Works
and later the Edwardsburg Starch Company, it was reorganized under its present name in
1906. The collection, which covers the period 1847-1962, consists of minutes, various
ledgers, advertising literature, deeds, agreements, leases and other legal documents.
Presented by the Canada Starch Company. (5 m)
Jones, Stanley Neville. Papers of Stanley N. Jones (1893-1981), former president of the
Winnipeg Commodity Exchange, were accessioned. They span the period 1925-1961 and
consist of correspondence, speeches, clippings and memorabilia concerning the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, Mr. Jones's activities as president and the grain industry in
general.
Toronto Board of Trade. Council minutes, 1974-1977; reports to council, 1974-1977. Presented by the board. (54 cm, additional)
Toronto Stock Exchange. Board minutes, 1956-1969; minutes of members' meetings, 1949-
1956; member firm correspondence, 1956-1974; delisting files, 1974-1981. Presented by
the Toronto Stock Exchange. Work also continued on the original transfer. A guide to the
delisting files, listing statements, members' correspondence and general correspondence
in the first 385 volumes was completed. (24.4 m, additional)
Winnipeg Commodity Exchange. The arrangement of the records has now been completed and
a detailed finding aid has been prepared. Over the next year it is planned to microfilm
certain key series of the collection for provincial archives in the West.
Wright Family. This collection consists of the papers of three descendants of Philemon Wright:
Hannah Wright, her brother Edward Van Cortland Wright and Edward's daughter Frances
Adelia Wright. A detailed finding aid to these papers is now available.
Bruce, John. The desk diaries, 1911-1962, of John Bruce, relating to his daily activities as
general organizer for the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry were donated by Donald Montgomery, secretary-
treasurer of the Canadian Labour Congress.
Canadian Labour Congress. An additional 21 metres of original records were transferred over
the past year. Included are general administrative files, 1943-1970; Ontario Regional
Office records, 1968-1980; Jean Beaudry's files, 1962-1975, as executive vice-president;
convention material, 1956-1963; tapes of Executive Council and committee meetings,
1977 and the 1974 convention; financial data, 1953-1973; and miscellaneous files which
include correspondence and related documents of the TLC-CCL Unity Committee and
articles, transcripts and other documents relating to the Toronto Trades Assembly and the
TLC in the nineteenth century.
Forsey, Eugene. Personal and official correspondence, handwritten notes and printed material,
1943-1982. Subjects include Forsey's appointment to the Senate in 1971 and his resignation from the Liberal Party in 1982. Also received from Senator Forsey was the copy-
edited manuscript of his Trade Unions in Canada 1812-1902. (32 cm, additional)
Laidlaw, Dr. Alexander F. A rich source of documentation on the history of the cooperative
movement in Canada after World War II; these papers have now been arranged and a
finding aid prepared. (6.12 m)
Sufrin, Eileen. Correspondence, leaflets, pamphlets, radio scripts, rninutes, press clippings
and photographs, 1942-1982, documenting her campaign to organize workers at Eaton's.
Donated by Eileen Sufrin. (40 cm, additional) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 39
Labour Unions. Additional transfers of records were received from the following unions and
labour organizations:
Association of Canadian Television & Radio Artists
Canadian Actors' Equity
Canadian Union of Public Employees
International Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers
Ontario Federation of Labour
United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America
United Steelworkers of America
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Anglin Norcross. This construction company was formed in 1920 and dissolved in 1967. It did
some residential construction, but was primarily involved in commercial, institutional and
industrial projects. Its major projects included the Royal York Hotel, Toronto; the
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto; the Canada Life Budding, Toronto; the T. Eaton
Company Building, Montreal; and the Château Frontenac, Quebec City. The papers were
presented by Philip Norcross Gross of Ottawa, and consist primarily of notebooks giving
actual costs and cost breakdowns for various projects, annual reports and advertising
catalogues. (20 cm)
Barnett, John Davis Engineering Collection. Work on this rich collection of manuscripts,
catalogues, promotional literature, engineering drawings and maps, photographs and
broadsides progressed significantly over the year. With the exception of the engineering
drawings and maps, arrangement and description of all material was completed. It is
hoped that the entire collection will be fully arranged and a detailed multi-media rinding
aid available sometime in 1984.
Bethune, Norman. Copies of documents exchanged between Canada and the People's Republic
of China on the occasion of the Dominion Archivist's visit to China in May 1982. Included
are some Bethune correspondence, reprints of his articles on the treatment of tuberculosis,
his instructions to the Chinese on the proper organization of field military hospitals and
various magazine and newspaper accounts of his activities in Spain and China. Also
included are three issues of the Chinese newspaper Renmin Ribao with coverage of Dr.
Smith's visit as well as a calligraphic scroll honoring the occasion. (95 pp., additional)
Canadian Council on Urban and Regional Research. The Canadian Council on Urban and
Regional Research was founded in 1962 to further the understanding of the problems and
needs of urban development in Canada and to foster the development of innovative and
constructive approaches to the improvement of the quality of urban life. The collection,
1962-1982, consists primarily of various committee minutes and related correspondence,
research project files and reports, successful and unsuccessful grant applications and
various publications. Presented in 1982 by the CCURR. (23.4 m)
Canadian Lung Association. Files on persons associated with the history of tuberculosis
control in Canada, 1914-1973. Three scrapbooks containing advertisements and publicity
material for annual Christmas Seal campaigns, 1936-1937. Broadsides and circulars
printed in various languages. Presented by the Canadian Lung Association. (40 cm,
additional)
Canadian Micrographie Society. Correspondence, convention and committee files, chapter
files, minutes and financial records, 1967-1980, were presented by the society. (40 cm)
Electrochemical Society of Canada. Minutes, correspondence, briefs, newsletters and subject
files, 1954-1980, of the society's Ontario-Quebec Section were presented. (40 cm) 40 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
ETHNIC ARCHIVES — The National Ethnie Archives program continues to represent not£ {
only the interests of the Manuscript Division, but also of the other media divisions in its
acquisition activities. At the beginning of the year the staff spent a day to review the progress of
the first decade and to plan for the future.
While much has been accomplished with public support, much material remains to be
discovered if the holdings of the Public Archives are truly to portray the diversity of the
Canadian experience.
Canadian society, and the ethnocultural communities it encompasses, can only be correctly understood in their relationship to the rest of the world. It is not only those of British ancestry I
who have an interest in "the empire" or those of east European background who are concerned
about cultural developments in the U. S. S. R., or Jews and Arabs who worry about the Middle
East. The Canadian Council for International Cooperation is one nongovernmental organization that demonstrates Canadian involvement in international affairs. Therefore, the section has
accepted responsibility for the records of this and similar organizations that seek to promote
intercultural, international cooperation and understanding.
Similarly, Canadians are dependent on other archives to understand fully their history.
Therefore, the effort to identify and copy records in Germany relating to emigration to Canada
was continued. The section is grateful to Dr. F. Genzel for again offering his services to assist
in this.
There is continued public interest in the history of all ethnocultural communities. The shift
of interest from general history to family history is also continuing and is particularly evident in
the numerous requests for searches in the LI-RA-MA collection (the papers of former Russian
consular officials). Because the arrangement and identification of this collection is almost
complete and a card index to nearly all of the case files is available, it is now possible to permit
public reference to this collection. To relieve the time needed to respond to written requests
with respect to genealogical inquiries, a paper on "Sources for the Study of Ukrainian Family
History at the PAC" was drafted. A first draft of the "Guide to Ukrainian Archival Sources at
the PAC" was completed and this will be published during the coming year.
The section reviewed its standards of arrangement and description with a view to
establishing better control over the materials in its custody that have not yet been fully
processed. The standards that were drafted will be part of the divisional discussion to obtain
broad agreement on standards of control and description. Similarly, the need to provide
standardized minimal description of publications that exist in manuscript collections was
answered with a new set of standards. It is expected that with the implementation of these new
measures, the finding aids that are published in microfiche form will be more useful to
researchers who use them outside the Public Archives.
Major Acquisitions
Bader, Michael (MG 31, H 122). Memoirs of Michael Bader relating to his work with the
Deutsche Arbeiter und Farmer Verband. Donated by Michael Bader, White Rock, British
Columbia, (originals, n.d., 1970-1972, 1.5 cm)
Balinsky, Clara (MG 31, H127). The papers collected by Clara Balinsky during her activity as
a leader in Jewish organizations, (originals, 1968-1982, 3.8 m)
Biberovich, Ladislas (MG 30, D 158). Correspondence, memoirs, photographs, articles,
essays, press clippings, periodicals and publications relating to the career and interests of
L. Biberovich, a Ukrainian community leader and newspaper editor. Also included are
some records of family and friends. Donated by the University of Toronto Library through
the courtesy of Mary Stevens, (originals, additional, 1.45 m)
Buchar, Frank (MG31, D132). Correspondence, certificates, documents, periodicals, photographs, videotapes, cassette tapes, slides, artwork and other material relating to the career
and cultural interests of Frank Buchar. Donated by Frank Buchar, Hanover, Ontario,
(originals, 1.07 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 41
Burman, Fred(MG31,H25). Memoirs of a Swedish immigrant. Donated through the courtesy
of Sven Svensk, Surrey, British Columbia, (photocopies, 1963, 10 cm)
Byelorussian National Association (MG28, V130). Correspondence, newspaper clippings and
other material relating to the activities of the Byelorussian National Association in
Canada. Donated by J. Babrowski, North Bay, Ontario, (originals, additional, 24 cm)
Chauhan, Jay (MG 31, D 6). Correspondence, case files, articles and records of the East
African Cultural Association, (originals, 1967-1977, 6 cm)
Corporate Direction International (MG 28, III 93). The Drache family (Winnipeg and Ottawa)
transferred ownership of 10.8 metres of manuscript records and 9 metres of publications.
The records concern the business activities of this organization, particularly in the potash
industry, urban development in Winnipeg and business financing, as well as personal
papers focusing chiefly on the Jewish communal activities of Samuel Drache. The
publications focus chiefly on the Jewish community, (originals, 1928-1980)
Dontsov, Dmytro (MG31, D130). Additional material, includes correspondence, notes, drafts
of articles and periodicals and publications. Donated by Natalie Roussow, Rawdon,
Quebec, through the courtesy of George Salsky, Aylmer, Quebec, (originals, 40 cm)
Fackenheim, Emil(MG31, D 74). Additional papers concerning his last years of teaching were
received and accessioned, (originals, additional, 1978-1981, 60 cm)
Finnish Society of Montreal (MG 28, V 68). Four minute books, (originals, additional,
1927-1977, 15 cm)
Folkloric Performing Arts Research Project (MG 28, V 138). Correspondence, reports,
questionnaires, computer tape and other material relating to the research project on
ethnocultural folk art groups and individuals. Donated by Steven Levy, Toronto, Ontario,
(originals, 2.6 m)
Germany: Hamburg, Staatsarchiv (MG 10, D 3). Microfilms of documents in the Hamburg
Staatsarchiv relating to German emigration to Canada, 1831-1927. Purchased from the
Hamburg Staatsarchiv through the cooperation of Dr. Genzel. (microfilm, 1831-1927,
reels K-141 to K-144)
Hadawi, Sami (MG 31, D 141). Correspondence, pamphlets and articles on the Arab community and the Arab-Israeli conflict, (originals, ca. 1977-1982, 15 cm)
Haltrecht, Arnold (MG 30, C 204). Diaries of Arnold Haltrecht, 1915-1920, his personal
correspondence, n.d., 1922-1928, 1942, as well as correspondence, n.d., 1939,circu-
lars, n.d., and clippings, n.d., 1937-1940, relating to the German Canadian League, an
organization established in 1937 to counter Nazi propaganda in Canada. Presented by
Sylvia Haltrecht, Ottawa, Ontario, (originals, n.d., 1922-1942, 27 cm)
Kossar, Wladymyr (MG 30, D277). Memoirs, biographical notes, reports, correspondence,
photographs, scrapbooks, newspaper clippings. Donated by Alma Bilak, Oakville,
Ontario, (originals, additional, 72 cm)
Lithuanian Canadian Community (MG 28, V 124). Correspondence, financial reports, clippings, photographs and other records relating to individual Lithuanians and/or Lithuanian
community life in Ontario and Quebec. Received from the Lithuanian Canadian Community through the courtesy of J.V. Danys, Ottawa, Ontario, (originals, n.d., 1940-1979,
1.68 m)
Miska, James (MG 31, D 88). Manuscripts and correspondence of Miska, a Hungarian
Canadian writer, (originals, 1934-1977, 52 cm)
Nanton, Herbert Colborne (MG 30, E441). Transcripts of letters by Herbert Colborne Nanton
from France to members of his family in Winnipeg and of a diary kept by Nanton at the
front in France during World War I, 1914-1915, 1917. Also included are transcripts of
notes made by Augustus Meredith Nanton during a trip in 1901 to Russia to explore the 42 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
possibilities of developing trade links between Canada and Russia. Presented by Elisabeth
Newton, Guelph, Ontario, (transcripts, 1981-1982, 1 cm)
Panchuk, Gordon R. (MG 31, D118). Radio scripts in Russian and Ukrainian, broadcast over
Radio Free Europe, from about 1950 to the mid-1970s, (originals, additional, 7 m)
Peters, James (MG 30, D 201). Incomplete run of Arab Dawn and a copy of Arabic
Contributions to the English Language, by J. Peters and Habeeb Salloum. (originals,
additional, 1969-1982, 5 cm)
Plast-Ukrainian Youth Association (MG 28, V107). Correspondence, minutes of meetings,
reports, brochures, publications and other material relating to the activities of Plast in
Canada. Donated by Plast National Headquarters, Toronto, Ontario, (originals, additional, 6.8 m)
Qaadri, Mohammad S. (MG 31, D 140). Various publications and annotated submissions to
the Ontario Legislature Standing Administration of Justice Committee on the Arab
Boycott, (originals, ca. 1978, 8 cm)
RoussowFamily (MG31, D128). Additional material includes draft manuscripts, translations,
university lecture notes, newspaper clippings and related documentation. Donated by
Natalie Roussow, Rawdon, Quebec, through the courtesy of George Salsky, Aylmer,
Quebec, (originals, 2.4 m)
Sadouski, John (MG 31, D 124). Correspondence, notes, reference and bibliographic cards,
draft manuscripts, thesis, articles, reports of meetings, teaching notes, publications and
periodicals relating to the career and academic interest of Prof. John Sadouski, one of the
few scholars who studied the history of the Byelorussian Community in Canada. Donated
shortly after his death by Mary Sadouski, Kingston, Ontario. Most of Prof. Sadouski's
library, also deposited (MG 35, B 44), will be transferred to the University of Toronto
Library, (originals, 1.6 m)
Schaefer, Christian Moritz (MG 24,136). Mainly letters received by Christian Moritz Schaefer
of Saint John, New Brunswick, from friends and relatives in other areas of British North
America, in Germany and in the United States, 1854-1881. Presented by Mary Lillian
ClarkeofKirk'sFerry,Quebec, (originals, n.d., 1854-1881,2.5 cm;photocopies, 1854,
1858, 1862, 1873, 1876, 23 pp.)
Shteppa, Paul (MG 31, H 117). Correspondence with various Ukrainian organizations and
individuals in both Canada and abroad. Donated by Stefan Horlatch and Stanley Frolick,
Toronto, Ontario, (originals, 20 cm)
Slonim, Reuben (MG 31. F 7). Correspondence, manuscripts and other papers pertaining to his
work as a notable Toronto journalist and as the controversial rabbi of a Jewish synagogue,
(originals, additional, 1958-1982, 1.5 m)
Szathmary de Kovend, Charles (MG 31, G 24). Correspondence, radio scripts, clippings and
other records documenting the lives, activities and Weltanschauung of members of the
Royal Hungarian Gendarmerie. Received from Charles Szathmary de Kovend, Toronto,
Ontario, (originals, n.d., 1931-1978, 6.83 m)
Szekely-Molnar, lmre (MG 31, H123). Notes, articles and clippings of newspaper articles by
Imre Szekely-Molnar, a Canadian Hungarian writer and journalist. Donated by Mrs. Imre
Szekely-Molnar, Toronto, Ontario, (originals, 1962-1976, 11 cm)
Ukrainian Canadian Committee, Montreal (MG 28, V 9). Minutes of the Ukrainian Sick
Benefit Society of Montreal, bulletins of the jubilee publications concerning Ukrainian
organizations and churches in Montreal, donated by Joseph Diachyshyn, Lachine,
Quebec. Correspondence, minutes, agendas, financial records, periodicals and publications and other material relating to the organization and activities of the Montreal UCC
and the Montreal Ukrainian community were donated by the Ukrainian Canadian Com- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 43
mittee (Montreal) through the courtesy of M. Kulba, president, Montreal, (originals,
3.55 m)
Ukrainian National Government in Exile (MG 28, V 123). Correspondence, minutes of
meetings, information bulletins, reports and other items relating to the activities of the
UNGE. Donated by the UNGE Archival Committee, (originals, additional, 8.5 m)
Ukrainian Professional and Business Federation (Ottawa Branch) (MG 28, V 35). Correspondence, minutes, notes, conference proceedings, publications and other material
regarding the activities of the Ottawa Branch, Ukrainian Professional and Business
Federation. Donated by Orest Nowakiwsky, Ottawa, Ontario, (originals, 80 cm)
Urge, Jonas (MG 31, H 124). Documents recording Urge's experiences in refugee camps in
Austria after his flight from Hungary towards the end of the 1956 revolution. Presented by
Jonas Urge, Rimouski, Quebec, (originals, 1956-1972, 1 cm)
Walkowski, Col. Tadeusz (MG 31, G 22). Additional correspondence, documents, articles,
notes, periodicals and publications, newspaper clippings and other related material
concerning the Polish-Bolshevik War, Polish effort in World War II and the Polish
community in Canada. Donated by Col. T. Walkowski, Edmonton, Alberta, (originals,
80 cm)
Wertyporoch, Evhen (MG 31, D 131). Correspondence, notes, newspaper clippings, drafts,
articles and other related material concerning Evhen Wertyporoch's career and writings in
Europe and in Canada. Donated by Oleh Ivanusiw, Islington, Ontario, (originals,
17.85 m)
Winterwerb, Anton (MG 31, H126). Taped interview with Winterwerb discussing his life in
Germany during World War II, his experiences as a prisoner-of-war in Russia and his
family's* beginning in Canada. Also included are correspondence, an "Ahnenpass" and
other personal papers, (originals, n.d., 1942, 1946-1949, 1954, 1983, 3 cm)
Wornell, Edmund John (MG 30, E 418). Photocopy of diary of Wornell recording his activities
as magistrate for villages along the Labrador coast, 1919, 1926, as well as copies of
Womell's record of trials for which he served as magistrate, 1919, 1925-1926. Received
from Barbara Lewis of St. John's. Newfoundland, (photocopies, 1919,1925-1926,2 cm)
Zmuidzinas, Jonas (MG 30, E407). Correspondence, passports, certificates and other documents relating to the Lithuanian community in Canada. Presented by Jonas Zmuidzinas,
Toronto, Ontario, (originals, n.d., 1924-1960, 2.61 m)
REFERENCE ROOM — The Reference Room is responsible for all reference tools entering
the Reference Room with special emphasis on finding aids and card indexes. The responsibility
includes the coordination of research services in the Reference Room and the registration of
researchers. Staff of the Reference Room process, file and update reference tools and provide a
reference service. The Reference Room cooperates with other parts of the Manuscript Division
to produce finding aids on microfiche and to ensure the availability of inventory entries of
Manuscript and Record Groups of the division, as well as thematic guides.
Finding Aids—This year, 163 finding aids were processed including 64 new ones, 96 revised
or corrected ones and three preliminary ones.
Inventory Entries and the Main Entry Catalogue — In 1982-1983, 470 new, revised or
provisional inventory entries were filed into the various inventories and copies of these
inventory entries were selected and filed into appropriate thematic guides. Main entry catalogue cards were added or revised accordingly.
General Index — This year, 9,500 cards were added to the General Index, consisting mainly
of nominal and subject cross-references to finding aids. 44 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Registration of Researchers — Researchers using the holdings of the division are required to
register and obtain a research pass. For the fiscal year 1982-1983, there were 4,012 new or
renewed registrations; 4,284 oral inquiries at the reference desk; and 3,192 oral inquiries at the
registration desk.
CURATORIAL SERVICE — The Curatorial Service has control over divisional stacks,
accession procedure, registry and acquisitions and general administration.
The number of accessions registered during this fiscal year was 493, totalling 492.90
metres of manuscript material, 716 reels of microfilm and 741 microfiche.
During this fiscal year, 224 new groups of papers were created.
Moving of material from one building to another is an important function of this section.
Many collections were relocated within buildings to facilitate retrievals and to assist research-
The remainder of the division's negative films were sent to the Federal Records Centres
Division to be filed with the Security Storage of Microfilm Master Negatives.
The Manuscript Division was utilizing 17,678 metres of shelf space at the end of this fiscal
RESEARCH AND INQUIRIES SERVICE — The Research and Inquiries Service coordinates in a central office all research activities undertaken by professional and clerical staff in the
Manuscript and Federal Archives Divisions, in response to written inquiries for information.
The Genealogical unit also provides an oral reference service for genealogists. The Secretarial
subsection handles the typing of virtually all the correspondence of the two divisions, as well as
a large proportion of the miscellaneous typing.
The total number of items processed in the section (inquiries, letters and miscellaneous
typing) amounted to more than 11,000. The Secretarial subsection has also been actively
involved in the processing of several texts for publication and exhibitions.
Answering oral requests from the public is an important function of this section. In the
Genealogical unit alone it takes one person-year to perform this duty. In 1982-1983, Research
and Inquiries Service replied to close to 10,000 oral inquiries, most of them originating from
people interested in genealogy. Other functions have been performed, such as preparing
indexes for microfilming, giving interviews for the media, guiding tours, and providing advice
for specialized publications.
OUTREACH AND TECHNICAL SERVICES — The service has responsibility for compiling, editing and publishing the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, a
catalogue of unpublished manuscript material and government records available to the public in
archival institutions in Canada. The third supplement, that for 1979-80, was distributed to
participating repositories. Work on the 1981 -82 supplement was advanced considerably during
the year. With the aid of two COSEP students, the more than 7,000 entries from French
language institutions were transcribed, edited and verified. About 1,000 returns from English
language institutions were also edited. Thus the preinput phase was almost completed.
The planned consultation and recruitment work with repositories was begun with a visit to
more than 30 British Columbia institutions. Although more than 200 archives participate in the
Union List system, nearly 150 others hold documents, but do not report their collections. A
concerted effort will be made over the next year to bring as many of these repositories as PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
possible into the system. At the same time, staff are canvassing opinion as to the directions the
project should take, in view of changing technologies in the field of information processing and
distribution. This information from users will help in long-term planning.
Well over 300 microfilm reels of manuscript collections and government records were
supplied to provincial archives under the Diffusion Program. Some material additional to the
1891 Census was microfilmed for British Columbia. The Ontario portion of the 1881 Census
was sent to Saskatchewan. For Manitoba the section microfilmed the index of the Kipling
collection, a genealogical source relating to the Red River Colony. For Ontario two series of
pre-Confederation documents were arranged and filmed: Despatches Referred to the Executive
Council (RG 1, E 4) and records of the Board of Railway Commissioners (RG 1, E 6). Most of
the remainder of the Neilson papers were prepared and microfilmed for the province of Quebec.
For New Brunswick, the papers of Sir John Harvey were arranged and filmed. For Newfoundland, a microfilm copy of three entry books of Adm. Sir John Duckworth were added to the
papers, which had previously been organized and microfilmed by the division.
Nearly 40,000 pages of documents were identified and sent for conservation treatment.
The major collections, from which at least 1,000 pages were treated, were the papers of Sir
Charles Bagot, Grey of Howick, Joseph Howe, Sir John A. Macdonald, Simon McGillivray,
L.-J. Papineau, the Ramezay family, and the records of the Sorel and other seigneuries. The
division microfilmed more than 40 metres of documents. The divisional portion of the branch
contingency plan was completed and its implementation begun through the microfilming of
some essential records, such as the 200,000-card General Index.
ARCHIVAL APPRAISAL SERVICE—The Public Archives provides donors with receipts
for tax credit purposes that indicate information required by Revenue Canada Taxation
including the fair market value of the donation. Where the donation is worth less than $ 1,000,
an in-house appraisal by qualified staff members is acceptable to Revenue Canada Taxation. If
the value exceeds $1,000, an outside appraisal by expert examiners is usually required.
Revenue Canada does accept in-house appraisals for more than $ 1,000 "in unusual circumstances, if ft is difficult to find a competent appraiser or if it would involve unwarranted
expense" (Gifts in Kind , Revenue Canada Taxation pamphlet, 1983). Where an outside
appraisal is in order, the Public Archives uses the services of independent appraisers or the
Appraisal Reports, 1982-1983
Prepared for Prepared by	
National Archival        Other
Staff* Appraisal Board      Appraisers      Total
Manuscript Division           34 56** 2 92
National Photography
Collection         12 7 19
National Film, Television
and Sound Archives     1 17 18
National Map Collection ... 2 4
Picture Division         15 2 3*** 20
Library   7 1 §__
Total         71 83 7 161
*        Appraisals by staff are done by two archivists, usually of the same division, in consultation
other divisions if necessary.
**      This includes appraisals of some collections that are predominantly manuscript material, bt
include other media.
***     This includes the appraisals of medal collections. 46 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
National Archival Appraisal Board (NAAB). The latter is an independent nonprofit organization that is national in scope and provides expert appraisal service to any archival institution.
Since the National Archival Appraisal Board is a nonprofit organization, the cost of its
appraisals is usually less than the cost of independent appraisals. It should also be kept in mind
that where a donation is valued at more than $5,000, the Canadian Cultural Property Export
Review Board (CCPERB) requires two independent appraisals or a NAAB appraisal.
In order to avoid having donors pay the capital gains tax that might normally apply to the
donation, the Public Archives applies to the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board
for a Cultural Property Income Tax Certificate. Possession of the document will permit the
donor to claim an exemption from this tax. Thus, by furnishing the donor with a receipt, and
where applicable a CCPERB certificate, the Archives enables the donor to claim a deduction
from taxable income for the tax year in which the donation was made; where the amount of the
donation exceeds the taxable income in the year of donation, the excess may be carried forward
and deducted the following five years. This provision of the Income Tax Act has resulted in
increased donations to the Public Archives and other archival repositories.
London Office
The nature of the work of the London Office has changed substantially in the last year with
the major emphasis shifting to inventorying of material relevant to Canada in British repositories, resulting in a de-emphasis on in-house microfilming. In light of this, the office camera
operator has been replaced with a second archivist. Stress has also been placed upon broadening the range of acquisitions in Great Britain and the office has participated more fully in
acquisitions for the Picture Division, the National Map Collection and the Manuscript Division. The acquisition of microfilm already available from institutions has also been stressed.
Within London, 50 institutions have been surveyed and their collections relevant to
Canada listed in detail. The work has included most of the larger London repositories. Work on
a continuing basis goes on at the Public Record Office, the British Library and the National
Register of Archives. Outside of London, 27 repositories in the main county record offices,
university archives or larger libraries have been visited. Twice that number of repositories have
been researched and contacted by letter. These consist of smaller archives, public libraries and
private collections. With work done previous to this year, inventorying has been virtually
completed in Scotland, Wales, the South East, the North East and the South West, with some
work completed in the North and Midlands. Much work has also been invested into the card
index for this survey.
Within the London Office, 64 reels of microfilm have been made, consisting mainly of
General Post Office files and Barnardo records along with Canada Club papers and a few -
private collections. Both General Post Office and Barnardo filming in London are near
completion.
In acquisitions, the office has sent a circular letter to 50 major dealers in London and the
provinces outlining the general areas of interest. The office subscriptions to catalogues has
been greatly expanded.
For the Manuscript Division, the office has acquired the log of the man who was the
Commander-in-Chief of the Newfoundland Station shortly after theWarofl812;theJohnMott
papers (Mort was a rebel of 1837 who was expelled to Australia): an illustrated diary of an
anonymous merchant living in Quebec City, 1811-1812; the journal of a member of an 1864
defence committee examining in detail the potential for improving defences along the St.
Lawrence and the Great Lakes; a journal of a 1760 militia man outlining the mopping-up
operations after the Siege of Quebec; and the papers of a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1918. On microfilm, the office has purchased 500 reels of Dominion Office
35, the twentieth century equivalent of the Colonial Office Original Correspondence Classes. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983 47
From the Public Record Office, approximately 250 reels have been purchased, including 125
reels of War Office 25, selected material of Canadian relevance in Customs 4,6,8, lOand 12,
along with smaller portions of Admiralty, Board of Trade, Cabinet Office, High Court of
Admiralty, Treasury and War Office. Ten reels of microfilm have been purchased from the
British Library and orders have been placed with the National Library of Wales for substantial
filming of the papers of Maj.-Gen. John Bradstreet and Owen family papers relating to
Campobello Island, New Brunswick. Several reels of microfilm representing the Canadian
holdings of the National Army Museum were made and microfilm was purchased from the
Royal Society of Arts and the Royal Artillery Institution. Microfiche of the Wesleyan Missionary Society Records was also purchased.
For the Picture Division, portraits of Charles Ogle and William IV were purchased, as
well as three John Pedder sketches of the Canadian West, a view of Sault Ste. Marie, three
sketches of Nova Scotia and Quebec by CM. Shipley, an album of 30 views of "Canada and
the Rocky Mountains" and an album of satirical sketches of military life in Canada in the 1870s.
Four further watercolours and four miniatures were acquired as well as a medal. Seven vie ws of
I the Arctic were forwarded to Canada for assessment.
For the National Map Collection, six atlases, architectural plans for two Ottawa office
buildings, a twentieth-century map of Alberta, and plans of stained glass windows for a church
in Granby, Quebec and of proposed fortifications for Cape Diamond were purchased.
Paris Office
Research on Canadian history sources in France continued in Paris, Cherbourg, Bordeaux
and Rouen, resulting in the acquisition of originals and microfilms. At the same time, the usual
activities of answering research requests and participating in events of an historical nature
relating to Canada's presence in France went on.
Research and Acquisitions — Again this year, most research was conducted in outlying
regions. In the Archives départementales de la Gironde, in Bordeaux, a contract employee
finished going through the "Attributions administratives" of the Amirauté de Guyenne and
made up a card index for each voyage to Canada in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Eight reels of microfilm were obtained, which represents only part of the documentation
selected. Scanning of the "Attributions judiciaires" of the Amirauté de Guyenne is now also
under way.
At the Archives départementales de la Seine-Maritime, in Rouen, one contract employee
is working scanning the archives of the admiralties of the various ports in the department. The
records of Le Havre, currently being analysed, provide evidence of intense trade with Canada
in the eighteenth century.
At the Archives départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, the reproduction of documents previously selected from the records of notaries in the French Basque region is continuing; eleven reels have been obtained so far.
At the Archives de la lère région maritime, in Cherbourg, recent cooperative efforts in
microfilming produced an initial reel based on the "Inscription maritime du port de Granville"
for the eighteenth century.
In Paris, at the Archives du ministère des Affaires étrangères, we acquired a copy of the
Treaty of Utrecht on microfilm (one reel).
Private archives were also explored. Those of Revillon Frères, on the fur trade in Canada
at the beginning of the twentieth century, yielded eleven reels of microfilm, and the Maison des
étudiants canadiens à Paris, on the interwar years, resulted in one reel. We were also able to
reproduce some portraits of the Louis Hémon family of Quimper. L
48 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
The original, nineteenth-century Baldwin-Ross archives, belonging to a family member ;
living in France, were donated to the Public Archives of Canada as part of a reciprocity
agreement.
Original manuscripts of the eighteenth-century shipbuilder Nicolas-René Levasseur were
acquired from a dealer.
Some rare printed material was also obtained: Voyage autour du monde by La Pérouse and
Recueil des déclarations, édits, lettres patentes et arrêts du Conseil d'État du Roi enregistrés
au Parlement de Dijon. 1689-1786 (eighteen volumes).
In addition, the head of the Paris Office answered 300 research requests, presented a paper
at the conference of the Association française d ' études canadiennes at the University of Nantes,
and organized the PAC s contribution to a Canadian Cultural Centre exhibition on currently
available Canadian books and magazines.
Federal Archives Division
The Federal Archives Division preserves permanently those textual records of the federal
government of long-term value. The holdings of the division form the collective memory of the
national government and are essential to its continued, effective operation as well as to
historical research. The functions of the division are to select, preserve and make available to
the public these historically significant records in accordance with the appropriate legislation.
Departments and agencies of the federal government are encouraged to transfer their records to
the Public Archives at the earliest possible date in order to ensure the preservation of their
contents. Records are identified for permanent retention and transferred to the Federal Archives
Division even if they are not immediately available for public research.
Lack of storage space continued to hamper seriously the fulfilment of divisional objectives. The divisional management committee was required to consider separately each request
for the transfer of over four metres of records from government departments and many were
refused because adequate stack space could not be found. By the end of the year, close to 500
metres of records of archival significance were backed up in departments awaiting transfer
while an additional 5,000 metres were still being held for the division by the Ottawa Records
Centre. Of particular concern was the desire to have all outstanding accessions transferred and
brought under control before the proclamation of the Access to Information and Privacy
legislation. Stack space to be acquired at the Journal Towers early in the new fiscal year should
alleviate for the short-term the division's space problem.
The implementation of the Access to Information and Privacy legislation (ATIP) was a
divisional priority. The Archives Branch approved an implementation plan that centralized the
ATIP function in the Federal Archives Division. Several staff were given part-time assignments to gather information and draft procedures for the handling of requests for access to
archival records and release of personal information found in such documents. A Treasury
Board submission seeking the resources to handle these new responsibilities was prepared. By
the end of the year, three archivists had been assigned on a full-time basis to staff the embryonic
"Access Section." In addition to this formal work for ATIP implementation, archivists
throughout the division experienced a major increase in the records scheduling function as
many departments tried to schedule personal information prior to implementation of the
legislation.
Substantial changes were made in the public service area. Recommendations from a
management consultant regarding the photoduplication and interlibrary loan systems will be
implemented in the new year to further improve these services. A facilities design consultant
studied the Microfilm Research Room and recommended several major modifications, which
when instituted in the new year will improve markedly the comfort and efficiency of this area PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT V
49
for researchers. Public service turnaround times were maintained for most of the year at the
levels demanded by senior management. Several changes were made to the public research
areas to improve the security of the archival collections being consulted there.
Work to be undertaken by the Public Archives in connection with the implementation of
Chapter 460 (Records Management) of the Treasury Board Administrative Policy Manual
remained a concern. Proposals developed by the division, relating primarily to the scheduling
of records, were discussed at several meetings with the Machine Readable Archives and
Records Management Services Divisions. Late in the year, the division participated in a series
of meetings held with records managers from 65 departments.
The division prepared a proposal on regional records for discussion at the senior management planning session. In addition, plans were developed to have several archivists visit
government departments in British Columbia in conjunction with attendance at the annual I
conference of the Association of Canadian Archivist in Vancouver in June 1983. Information
gathered during these field trips on the departments' holdings of records of archival value will
be used in the further development of a regional records policy.
Records Acquisition and Disposal — During the year, the Federal Archives Division
received 921.3 metres of records as well as 4,244 reels of microfilm and 12,128 microfiches
bringing the total shelf space occupied by divisional holdings to more than 27 kilometres. This
represents an annual rate of growth in divisional holdings of a mere three per cent. More
material could have been acquired if the division had had adequate storage space. A comprehensive list of divisional accessions may be found in the publication Accessions 1982183. A
comparative statistical review of the holdings of the division is found in the table "Custodial
I Statistics."
General view of Expo '67, Montreal, 1967. (C 18536; 50 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
The Federal Archives Division reported to the Dominion Archivist on the archival :
considerations of records disposal proposals involving 83 records schedules and 16 microfilm
submissions submitted by federal departments and agencies. This review of records in situ
ensures that historical government records are identified for eventual transfer to the Federal
Archives Division. Much of the unusually high scheduling activity in the past year may be
attributed to the desire of departments to schedule information as required under the provisions
of the forthcoming Privacy Act. In addition, agencies such as the Law Reform Commission,
the International Development Research Centre, the Public Service Commission, the Foreign
Investment Review Agency and the Office of the Comptroller General submitted their first
schedules. The first phase in the preparation of a retention and disposal schedule for records of
the Security Service was accomplished with a two-month review by PAC staff of records at
RCMP Headquarters.
The review of accessions already received in the division resulted in the submission to the
Dominion Archivist of 20 recommendations to destroy 473.5 metres of nonarchival material.
For the fiscal year ending March 31,1983, the division disposed of 324.4 metres of nonarchival
records.
Various important negotiations concerning the transfer of records were carried out in the
course of the year. An agreement concluded with the Canada Post Corporation established that ;
the records of Canada Post would be scheduled and that the Public Archives would be the
official repository for the archival material. Discussions with the Secretary to the CBC Board of
Directors resulted in the transfer of Board of Governors' and Board of Directors' records,
1936-1972. A review with the CN archivist of 41 accessions totalling 2,884 metres of records
in the Winnipeg Records Centre resulted in the identification of 360 metres for potential
transfer to the PAC Arrangements were concluded with Industry, Trade and Commerce for the
transfer of records of Expo '67 from the Montreal Record Centre. Discussions with port
authorities at Churchill, Manitoba resulted in the transfer of 23 metres of National Harbours
Board records to the Winnipeg Records Centres.
Custodial Statistics (in metres)
 1980-1981         1981-1982 1982-1983
Total Holdings         25,565              26,782 27,096
Organization/Selection Backlog           4.816                 4,803 4,333
Boxing/Listing Backlog                 211                    199 506
♦Under Control          20,538              21,780 22,322
Percentage Under Control     80 81 82
* Extent under preliminary control and identified for permanent retention.
Divisional Finding Aids Program — Because of the extensive volume of federal government
records held by the division. concerted efforts are being made to produce finding aids that make
these records more readily accessible to researchers. While manual indexes are still prepared,
in recent years increasing use has been made of the computer and the resultant computer-
assisted finding aids. A description of the finding aid projects upon which substantial progress
has been made during the fiscal year follows.
Several manual finding aids of note were prepared. A "Guide to Federal Land Records"
was completed for holdings of the Department of the Interior (RG 15) relating to script,
affidavits and letters patent, 1873-1936. A detailed finding aid for the records of the Adjutant
General and Deputy Minister, Department of Militia and Defence (RG 9) was prepared.
Finding aids were also produced for Staff College records and RCAF Station and Squadron
Diaries found in the holdings of the Department of National Defence (RG 24).
The input into FEDDOCS (Federal Archives Division Document Control System) of file
numbers for Privy Council Office central registry files, 1939-1952 (RG 2) and Governor
General's Office registry files, 1859-1966 (RG 7, G 26) was completed; file number sorts will PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
be produced. Work was started on the input of file numbers for similar finding aids for the
extradition records, Department of Justice, 1859-1934 (RG 13) and the central registry series,
Department of Finance, 1900-1973 (RG 19). Service file titles for the 1870s to 1970s, Royal
Canadian Mounted Police (RG 18) were entered prior to the production of an alphabetical
finding aid.
Considerable time was spent on the production of four large keyword-out-of-context
(KWOC) indexes: Divisional Inspectors' reports, 1875-1902, Post Office (RG 3); Indian
Affairs central registry files, 1872-1964 (RG 10) relating to such subjects as surveys and
surrenders, band membership, housing and social welfare programs; Dominion Lands Branch
I records from the Department of the Interior (RG 15), 1873-1936 relating to most aspects of
western settlement; and central registry files for the Board of Railway Commissioners,
1899-1969, Canadian Transport Commission (RG 46).
Divisional Microfilming Program — For several years the Federal Archives Division has
been involved in an active program of producing microfilm copies of its holdings. The reasons
for this program are twofold: to ensure the security and protection of important and often fragile
records of the federal government and to make research material more readily available
throughout the country by means of the Interlibrary Loan System or purchase of microfilm
copies.
Protective microfilming of letterpress letterbooks continued with camera time allocated
for the copying of letterbooks from the following series: Divisional Inspectors, 1851-1902,
Post Office (RG 3); Chief Architect, 1873-1905, Department of Public Works (RG 11); Office
of the Deputy Minister, 1840-1931, Department of Finance (RG 19); Office of the Superintendent Engineer, Rideau Canal, 1861-1936, Department of Railways and Canals (RG 43); and
Executive Council and Minister of Finance, Auditor-General (RG 58). Filming of the numbered files series from the Governor General's Office, 1818-1941 (RG 7, G 21) started in 1980
was completed as was the copying of the records of the Under-Secretary of State for External
Affairs, 1908-1952 (RG 25, D 1), registered correspondence of the Department of Public
Works, 1827-1859 (RG 11), Divisional Inspectors' reports, 1875-1902, from the Post Office
(RG 3), and Cabinet conclusions, 1944-1951, transferred from the Privy Council Office
(RG 2). Two new projects, registry files, 1883-1915, from the Department of Fisheries
(RG 23) and strike and lock-out files, 1900-1974, from the Department of Labour (RG 27),
were started. In all, a total of 92 metres of government records were microfilmed during
the year.
Divisional Publications Program — The Federal Archives Division produces two series of
publications as well as a number of miscellaneous titles. The "General Inventory Series" is
published to publicize divisional holdings; each inventory describes one or more record groups
with an administrative history of the relevant federal department or agency and a detailed listing
of the division's holdings. The annual listing of all accessions received by the division and
thematic booklets frequently prepared for conferences and describing specific divisional
holdings are printed in the "Special Publications Series." In addition, from time to time, the
division publishes more elaborate volumes describing its functions and collections. An extensive mailing list permits the wide distribution of these publications to educational institutions
and groups specifically interested in federal government archival holdings.
During the year, one "Special Publication" was produced: Accessions 1981182 compiled
by Glenn T. Wright. Terry Cook and Glenn T. Wright completed their work on the manuscript
"General Guide Series: Federal Archives Division." This volume will be printed early in
1983-1984 and will be the first in a new Archives Branch series entitled "General Guide
Divisional Exhibition Program — Divisional staff participated in the concept, development
and selection of documents for two major exhibitions: From War to Winterlude—150 Years on
the Rideau Canal, which opened in May and The Widening Sphere: Women in Canada,
1870-1940, which opened in September. In addition, the division provided space and captions
for a travelling exhibition from the Yukon Archives, which was mounted in three sections from PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
m
TS.
g S
1 Q PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
53
December 1982 to May 1983. Entitled Opening Yukon, this exhibition documents discovery,
exploration and early settlement, the gold rash, and the modem age in the Territory. Three
immigration posters were loaned to the Glenbow-Alberta Institute for display in its exhibition
commemorating the centennial of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Three particularly prestigious
documents, the Proclamation of the Constitution Act, 1982, the Proclamation of the National
Anthem, 1980, and the Exemplification of the Proclamation granting Armorial Ensigns to the
Dominion of Canada, 1921, were loaned to The Sergeant-at-Arms, House of Commons for an
exhibition depicting Canadian constitutional evolution, which is to open in the Centre Block on
Parliament Hill in April 1983.
Divisional Conservation Program—Conservation in the Federal Archives Division involves
the protection of archival records through actual physical restoration and microfilming programs. As well, care is taken to ensure that both staff and researchers are guided in proper
handling techniques. Special cabinets are available for the storing of oversized records.
Acid-free folders and specially-designed storage boxes are used.
Comparatively little restoration work was accomplished during the year with only 35
items sent to the conservation labs for physical repair. Most emphasis in the division was placed
on aspects of preventive conservation, particularly proper storage and handling of records, as
well as protective microfilming that permits the removal of fragile originals from circulation.
However, a serious roof failure in an auxiliary storage building after two days of record rainfall
in early February resulted in the evacuation of 1,618 volumes of archival records. The
subsequent recovery operation lasting until early May involved the temporary location of 974
volumes, the manual air-drying of 431 damp volumes, and the freezing, then drying in the
warm air chamber of Records Conservation's Wei T'o Mass Deacidification System of a final
213 wet volumes or 159,984 pages. Very little information in these records was lost although
there were many examples of ink smearing.
Sorting records for temporary reboxing and air-drying after roof failure in the Larivii
Building. (C 103438) 54 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
NATURAL RESOURCES RECORDS SECTION — This section is responsible for the
records created by those agencies concerned with the development and regulation of Canada's
natural resources, including Dominion Lands and federal land patents. Of particular note are
the records of the Departments of the Interior; Indian Affairs and Northern Development;
Agriculture; Energy, Mines and Resources; and Environment as well as those of the National
Energy Board, the National Capital Commission and the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry.
Major Accessions
(RG 21) Energy, Mines and Resources. The section accessioned 1.8 metres of records created
by Dr. D.G. Crosby, Director General, Resources Management Branch, relating to
Canadian involvement in the Law of the Sea Conference and offshore mineral rights,
1957-1982.
(RG 88) Surveys and Mapping Branch. Records from the Legal Surveys Division consisting of
.2 metres of survey notebooks for British Columbia and Alberta reserves, census notebooks for B.C. Indian tribes, and a correspondence portfolio regarding the establishment
of Indian reserves in Nova Scotia, 1874-1900, were accessioned.
(RG 90) National Battlefields Commission. A valuable collection was completed with the
accessioning of .3 metres of copies of minutes of proceedings of the commission,
1962-1982.
(RG 108) Environment Canada. Fifteen metres of records from the Minister's Office, particularly during Jack Davis' term, were accessioned. These records, dating from 1965-1976,
deal with such subjects as Canada-Japan ministerial meetings, the International Conference on Marine Pollution, the Law of the Sea Conference, the Technical Conference on
Fisheries Management and Development, and federal-provincial conferences.
Major Custodial Projects — Work commenced on the selection, boxing and listing of
52.5 metres of records from the Health of Animals Directorate, Agriculture Canada (RG 17)
with 13.4 metres processed. A major revision and consolidation of all relevant entries in
the inventory was also undertaken. The selection, boxing and listing of 21.9 metres of records
from the Minister's Office, Fisheries and Oceans, was completed; these records related to such
subjects as legislation and conservation of fish stocks, 1973-1980.
TRADE AND COMMUNICATIONS RECORDS SECTION—This section is responsible
for the records of those government departments and agencies concerned with the promotion
and regulation of trade, commerce and communications throughout Canada. Such record
groups as Public Works, Post Office, Marine, Railways and Canals, Statistics Canada (Census). Canadian National Railways, Transport, and Industry, Trade and Commerce have
particularly high reference rates.
Major Accessions
(RG 30) Canadian National Railways. The first major transfer of CNR material in several years
was received when 20 metres of records of the Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railway,
1850-1950, were transferred from Portland, Maine through the cooperation of the CN
archivist.
(RG 41) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Fifteen metres of records of the Office of the
Secretary of the Board of Directors were accessioned. These records included minutes,
agenda and working papers of the Board of Governors and the Board of Directors,
1936-1958.
(RG 97) Communications. Several accessions of records totalling 43.8 metres and relating to
national telecommunications development, broadcasting and publishing policy, and
space research, 1968-1982, were accessioned. Included in this material were 16.2 metres
of briefs, agenda books, minutes of meetings and related records of the Federal Cultural
Policy Review Committee (Applebaum-Hébert), 1980-1982. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-
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:. Lawrence Rail-Road Company, October 9, 1855.
(C 105981)
Major Custodial Projects—The organization, selecting, boxing and listing of approximately
200 metres of postmastership files for all provinces, 1924-1954, and 100 metres of central
registry files relating to postal rates, classification, public affairs and administration, 1900-
1970, were completed (RG 3, Post Office). Work continued on the administrative outline and
description of postal records in the inventory that is to be published. Considerable reboxing and
refiling of records were accomplished as part of a review of the holdings of the Canadian
Transport Commission (RG 46), a review performed in conjunction with the updating of all
major finding aids. Board of Railway Commissioners central registry files were key worded.
The finding aid for CBC Historical Archives records, 1923-1979, was completed and prepared
for input.
MANPOWER AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT RECORDS SECTION—This section is
responsible for the records of those departments and agencies concerned primarily with
Canadian citizens. Of particular interest are the records of the Indian Affairs Program, the
Immigration Branch, the Departments of Labour and National Health and Welfare, the Habitat
Secretariat and the Unemployment Insurance Commission.
Major Accessions
(RG 27) Labour. A particularly interesting accession was received with the transfer of a
scrapbook of newspaper clippings relating to the Winnipeg General Strike, 1919; this
scrapbook, the last of a series of 24 already transferred, had been lost for over 50 years.
Also transferred during the year were 1.6 metres of strike and lockout files, 1976 and
7.8 metres of collective agreements records, 1910-1979. 56 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
(RG 29) National Health and Welfare. An accession of 9.3 metres of records from the Policy,
Planning and Information Branch relating to policy committees, conferences, and national and international associations, 1970-1975, was transferred as were 4.2 metres of
records from the Radiation Protection Branch, 1959-1979, which document committees,
working groups, and relations with federal, provincial and foreign governments. Some
early material dealing with leprosy in Canada was received with the transfer of .07 metres
of records including ledgers for the Tracadie Lazaretto, 1900-1908, and memoranda and
miscellaneous records relating to the Quarantine Service and the International Sanitary
Conventions, 1912 and 1926.
(RG 57) Emergency Planning Canada. An accession of 3.6 metres of records relating to
emergency government facilities, international liaison, survival and exercise planning,
peace-time disaster planning, NATO, and the Financial Assistance Program, 1951-1976,
was received.
Major Custodial Projects — Some large accessions of Indian Affairs (RG 10) records from
the Sault Ste. Marie and James Bay Districts were selected, boxed and listed as were several
smaller transfers; a total of 68.2 metres and 15,000 microfiches of records for the period
1890-1975 were processed. Policy and general files from Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation (RG 56) were selected, boxed and listed, and inventory entries prepared; these
records, totalling 7.5 metres, document Canadian housing and urban growth between 1935 and
1970. The first large-scale sampling project in the Federal Archives Division was completed
for 277 metres of benefit claims files from the Unemployment Insurance Commission (RG 50).
After statistically valid sampling, the dozens of accessions involved were reduced to 8.6 metres
of case records for permanent retention.
liTe ONE BIG UNION is
Bolshevism Pure and Simple
NOTE THE STRIKING PARALLEL
Winnipeg Citizen fly sheet regarding the Winnipeg General Strike, June 1919.
(C 37320) : ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
QLiZABGcb cba soaoNT
n of die Constitution Act, April 17, 1982.
STATE AND MILITARY RECORDS SECTION — This section is responsible for the
records of those government departments and agencies concerned with central government
administration or with external relations, defence and the military, judicial, legislative,
culture, and related matters. Major areas of responsibility in the section are the Privy Council
Office, the Treasury Board, the Departments of External Affairs, Justice, Finance, National
Defence and the Secretary of State, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and more than 150
federal royal commissions and defunct boards, offices and commissions.
Major Accessions
(RG 2) Privy Council Office. During the year, .3 metres of Cabinet Conclusions for 1952 were
received. In addition, 6.9 metres of Orders in Council, records and dormants, 1977, and
one reel of Orders in Council and annexes for December 1981 were transferred.
(RG 55) Treasury Board. Several accessions were received including 53.1 metres and 10,360
microfiches of minutes, 1976-1980, and 19.2 metres of records from the Program Branch,
1960-1980, relating to general government management policy, budget and coordination
as well as the program activities of such departments as External Affairs, Finance, Justice,
Post Office, Science and Technology, and Transport.
(RG 68) Registrar General. An exceptionally noteworthy record was received with the transfer
of the Proclamation of the Constitution Act, 1982, the document signed by Her Majesty
Queen Elizabeth II on Parliament Hill. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1982-1983
Major Custodial Projects — During the year, 23.5 metres of central registry files from the
Privy Council Office, 1914-1951 (RG 2), 6.6 metres of records from the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police (RG 18) including the letterbooks of G.A. French, the first Commissioner, and
daily diaries of northern detachments, and 30 metres of records of the Royal Canadian Mint
(RG 120) were selected. Several accessions totalling 53.2 metres of central registry files from
the Department of Finance (RG 19) relating to the Economic Division, the Tax Structure
Committee and GATT were selected, boxed and listed as were 33.8 metres of records from the
Public Service Commission (RG 32) documenting die activities of the National Joint Committee on Equal Opportunities for Women, the history of the Public Service Commission, and
its Management Committee for the years 1908 to 1978.
ACCESS SECTION —The Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act were adopted by
the House of Commons in June 1982; proclamation of this legislation is expected early in
1983-1984. The access and privacy legislation imposes new and unique demands upon the
Public Archives, in general, and the Federal Archives Division, in particular. Consequently,
much time has been devoted in the division during the past year to the development of
mechanisms and procedures to ensure smooth implementation. Three staff members were
assigned on a full-time basis to formulate these procedures before actually reviewing files in
response to access requests. Several other staff members gathered information and produced
discussion papers on specific subjects relating to access to archival government records,
re