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BC Historical Books

Public Archives Canada annual report 1983/1984 Public Archives of Canada 1985

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Array TP
i+
annual
report
1983/1984
CanadS  1+
annual
report
1983/1984 ® Minister of Supply and Services Canada 1
Cat. No.: SA1-1984
ISBN: 0-662-53333-X Contents
Introduction
1
Internai Audit
7
Executive Secretariat
8
Planning and Program Evaluation
9
Exhibition Services
10
Publications Division
12
Records Management Branch
15
Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division
16
Federal Records Centres Division
21
National Personnel Records Centre
26
Central Microfilm Operations
30
Archives Branch
33
Manuscript Division
35
London Office
45
Paris Office
46
Federal Archives Division
47
National Map Collection
58
Picture Division
67
National Photography Collection
74
Public Archives Library
82
National Film, Television and Sound Archives
85
Machine Readable Archives Division
92
Assistance to the Archival Community
98
Conservation and Technical Services Branch
101
Optical Disc Systems
101
Picture Conservation Division
102
Records Conservation Derision
105
Photography Services Division
107
Computer Systems Division
108 Departmental Administration
Financial Services	
Personnel Services	
Administrative Services Introduction
The activities of the Public Archives of Canada in recent years must be seen in the
context of increases in responsibilities and workload without corresponding increases
of the resources to carry out those responsibilities.
Our response to the challenge of increased workload is two fold: on the one hand
managerial improvements which are designed to ensure that maximum value is obtained
from all resources, and on the other hand effective use of technology in order to improve
productivity.
In the last few years there has been an increasing emphasis on managerial techniques: the effective use of the Senior Management Committee and of Branch management committees, the annual planning sessions resulting in five-year plans and the
establishment of priorities, a monitoring mechanism, a management forum for periodic
discussions of major issues by the management "team," the introduction of Internal
Audit, of a Planning and Evaluation Unit including performance measurement, a revised
departmental secretariat including policy development, a major reorganization to better rationalize functions and responsibilities. In the last fiscal year, following a reorganization of departmental administration, a functional review was undertaken to ensure that
the most effective use was made of all resources and to attempt to carry out all functions with fewer resources. The first evaluation reports were completed and have proved
to be beneficial. During the year, a comprehensive audit was undertaken by the Auditor
General, the report indicating a satisfactory performance by the Public Archives.
Technology is used more and more extensively. Pilot studies in the development
of automated systems for control and retrieval of holdings are to be extended to all divisions of the Archives Branch. Improvement in the automation of administrative functions in Personnel and Finance are underway and the PERSFILE system for control
of several million personnel files by the Records Management Branch has been functional for some time.
The reports of the branches and divisions which follow indicate that despite all the
problems which have been encountered the results of efforts in the wide range of activities of the Public Archives of Canada have been extensive and gratifying. Of special
interest is the launching of the first three titles of a new General Guide Series 1983, which
when completed in a few months, will present to the researchers and the general reader
an overview of the functions and holdings of each of the eight divisions of the Archives
Branch.
There are several subjects of a recurring nature which should be mentioned here.
(1) Legislation and Regulations — The quest for a new National Archives and
Records Act, which has been mentioned in annual reports for the last fifteen years, has
not been attained. During the last fiscal year, a great deal of attention was given by
the Public Archives and by the Department of Communications on behalf of our Minister
to the refinement of a discussion paper for consultation with other government agencies
and other stages in the preparation of legislation for Parliament. Cabinet approval was
barely missed before Parliament was adjourned.
The Access to Information and Privacy Act came into effect in July 1983 and a
great deal of attention was given to implementation of the act by the Public Archives.
The effect on research was explained to the research community and a special unit was
established to review the requirements of the legislation in regard to requests for access
to government records in the Public Archives. Additional person-years were granted to
permit the Archives to surmount the increased workload imposed by the legislation.
The new Treasury Board policies on records management, micrographics and EDP
records required a major effort by staff of the Public Archives in regard to implementa- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
tion during the year. In this respect, the advice and assistance of the new Advisory Council
on Records was greatly appreciated. The first audits of records management systems
of government departments were undertaken and the first report of the Dominion
Archivist on the state of records management in the Government of Canada was submitted to the Treasury Board. Significant advances were made in the development of
standard features or specifications for automated records management systems. Pilot
projects were undertaken in an attempt to bring cartographic and photographic records
of government departments into the records management/archives system with approved
schedules.
(2) Accommodation — Another subject which has been of perennial concern for
the last fifteen years, accommodation, has become increasingly critical. Short- and
medium-term plans have been prepared. Short-term requirements involve an almost constant search for space which has resulted in the occupation of premises, often unsuitable,
in many parts of the National Capital Region. The medium-term requirement has been
for a large, environmentally-controlled satellite building which could house elements
of the Public Archives for a few years until a new headquarters building is completed.
Office accommodation in Hull, with a similar purpose, has been occupied by the National
Library for several years, but delays and several changes in proposed locations have
prevented the Public Archives from obtaining suitable space. The construction of a new
headquarters building for the Public Archives would permit the National Library to use
the space presently occupied by the Public Archives and is the only satisfactory solution
to the critical accommodation needs of both the National Library and the Public Archives.
I hope a very high priority in the construction plans of the Government of Canada will
be given to a new headquarters for the Public Archives.
One aspect of accommodation which has been most gratifying is in regard to regional
records centres. In the last year nearly every centre has received a new building or a
significant addition to an existing building.
(3) National — Discussions concerning the relationship of the Public Archives of
Canada with the archival community and the development of archival networks have
continued and have included resolutions by professional archival associations, approval
of recommendations by the Dominion, Provincial and Territorial Archivists (DPT) Conference, by provincial ministers of culture and a study sponsored by the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council. Significant elements in the eventual solution will be
the provisions of a new National Archives and Records Act and possibly a national
heritage policy. In the meantime a wide range of activities in support of the archival
community continues and is reported by the Archives Branch. Similarly the many activities of members of the staff of the Public Archives in regard to the many associations
which relate to aspects of the work of the Public Archives is reported by the Archives
Branch.
(4) International — In addition to the activities reported by the Archives Branch,
it may be of interest to mention a few other matters. The activities of the Dominion
Archivist as Secretary General of the International Council on Archives and the Assistant Dominion Archivist as editor of CAD Information and Chairman of the Archives
Committee of the Pan American Institute on Geography and History, respectively, have
continued. A significant development of interest was the agreement of CIDA to provide
grants for archival assistance to developing countries in the Pacific, South East Asia,
East Africa and the Caribbean regions. Missions abroad undertaken for UNESCO
included those to Burma by the Assistant Dominion Archivist and to West Africa by
the Director of Picture Conservation. Cultural agreements with several countries including
China were renewed. Among the many visitors from other countries to the Public Archives
were those from Australia, Burma, France, New Zealand and Sweden. Several members
of the staff were involved in a presentation to the visiting King and Queen of Spain
by the Governor General. Sixteenth-century documents of Spanish kings relating to
America were acquired through the Manuscript Division by the Governor General and PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1'
Dr. W.I. Smith, Dominion Archivist (far left), looks on while Patricia Kennedy
explains a detail to His Majesty, don Juan Carlos of Spain, seen here examining
the Cédulas reaies (royal decrees) presented by His Excellency, Governor
General Edward Schreyer, March 13, 1984.
an appropriate portfolio was prepared by PAC services. Those who were involved in
the work participated in the presentation at Government House.
(5) Personnel — Among the staff members who retired during the year were several
who were on the staff of PAC before the transfer to the Wellington Street building in
1967: John Howard, Rita Gamble, Lloyd Chisamore and Donna Lawrence. John Howard
was the Head of Reprography Services for many years, and with his experience as an
officer in the St. John's Ambulance gave first aid courses to staff members enrolled
in civil defence teams. Rita Gamble was one of the few staff members who transferred
with the Central Microfilm Unit from the Printing Bureau in 1956. She was a most
valuable supervisor for many years. Lloyd Chisamore, after service in the Records
Management Branch, served with the Manuscript Division and Federal Archives Division as the authority on railway records. Donna Lawrence served in several capacities
in the Manuscript Division before her retirement.
A Personal Note — I would like to conclude on a personal note by observing that this
is my fifteenth and last report since I shall retire from the Public Service of Canada
in October 1984. With the exception of the first report, which was for an eleven-year
period, 1959-1969, these have been annual reports relating to the period from 1970 to
the present. It has been a most remarkable period in the history of the Public Archives
of Canada, and I am grateful for having had the opportunity to be involved as the fifth
Dominion Archivist.
The period, 1969-1984, particularly the first part of it, was one of rapid development, as can be seen by the increase in staff and budget — from a staff of 263 in 1969
to 807 in 1984, and a budget of $2,267,000 in 1969 to $39,437,000 in 1984. More significant, however, was the activities for which the increased resources were required and
they included all aspects of the operation of the Public Archives. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
There were significant changes in management with the introduction of a Senior
Management Committee and Branch Management Committees, as well as planning, performance measurement, and internal audit functions. Committees have been formed
for such subjects as administrative policy, human resources, conservation, accommodation and EDP.
The Records Management functions have developed in content and stature as well
as extent by the expansion of regional records centres from coast to coast, the introduction of automated systems for personnel files and the creation of a magnetic tape library.
The Archives was also called upon to implement new Treasury Board policies for records
management, micrographics and EDP records, new responsibilities for leadership in
regard to automated records systems and the requirement to audit records management
performance by government departments.
The Archives Branch has doubled its divisions from four to eight, including the
addition of new archival media such as the Machine Readable Archives Division, and
the National Film, Television and Sound Archives. Acquisitions have increased in volume
and variety to approximately 25,000 cubic feet each year. The systematic acquisitions
policy has ensured a comprehensive record of all aspects of Canadian history and tax
credits for donors have provided an important incentive for the donation of material
of major national significance; while their purchase was greatly assisted through the
Cultural Property Fund of the Department of Communications. A most significant movement has been the development of automated systems for control of the documents in
various media. Improvements in public service when workloads have exceeded resources
and involvement in implementation of Access to Information and Privacy legislation
has been a challenge. Exciting developments have taken place in regard to conservation,
deacidification and the optical disc. A diffusion program has developed the concept of
taking the archives to the people in microfilm, slides, popular publications and travelling exhibitions.
The Public Archives has evolved a leadership role in regard to the archival community including meetings such as the annual meeting of Dominion, Provincial and Territorial Archivists, the continuing archives course and national cooperative projects such
as the Union List of Manuscripts, the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives, and
seminars, advice and assistance. A striking development has been visible on the international scene with the involvement of many members of the staff in executive positions
in many international organizations, participation in activities of committees, in conducting missions to advise foreign countries, entering into international cultural
agreements, and the reception of visitors from abroad in formal courses or informational visits. It can be said that the reputation of the Public Archives of Canada as a
modern, progressive and efficient national archives is unsurpassed in the world.
In considering the exciting developments and achievements during the last sixteen
years, I am very conscious of the fact that it has been a team effort, the result of dedicated
work by literally hundreds of people at all levels, specialists in a wide range of fields,
indeed all members of our staff. It has been a privilege for me to lead such a team and
to have shared the sense of making an important contribution to our national heritage.
There is a price to pay for growth: the increase in staff which has enabled us to
do so many more things has reduced the camaraderie and even communication among
the staff. I regret that I have not been able to become acquainted with many members
of the Archives.
All our efforts have not been successful. I regret the circumstances that have
prevented the enactment of a new national archives and records act and the construction of a new headquarters building for the Public Archives on Wellington Street. Both
have been high priorities for the last fifteen years. In addition to legislation and accommodation, my successor will share with the staff several significant problems: that of
conservation of archival materials, that of developing and obtaining resources for PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
automated control and retrieval systems, indeed the problem of automation of many
functions, the problem of clarification of the role of the Public Archives in the archival
community and the problem of creating a greater public awareness and appreciation
of the work of the Public Archives on behalf of present and future generations of
Canadians.
1 would like to express my thanks to all members of the staff for their initiative
and dedication, to all the colleagues in the records management field and the archives
community in Canada and abroad, to the many donors of archival material who contribute to our Canadian heritage, to the ministers to whom I have reported and to the
officials in cultural and other government agencies whose cooperation will become increasingly important.
I shall treasure the memories of my 34 years at the Public Archives and I extend *
sincere wishes for the future success of this notable national institution.
31 March 1984 Wilfred I. Smith
Dominion Archivist  Internal Audit
The mandate of the directorate is to provide an independent internal audit function, which involves sytematic reviews and appraisals of all operations, for the purposes
of advising both the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian and managers as
to the effectiveness, efficiency and economy of internal management policies, practices
and controls, and the degree of compliance to Central Agency Directives for both the
Public Archives and the National Library.
For administrative purposes, the Public Archives, through the Office of the Dominion Archivist, is responsible for funding both human and financial resources of the
directorate.
The directorate has an establishment of four person-years, which includes a director, manager, senior internal auditor and an administrative assistant. In addition, the
directorate hires on contract auditors and management consultants, equivalent to an
additional four person-years.
During the fiscal year 1983-1984, 18 audits were undertaken in the Public Archives
and National Library. The Long-Term Audit Plan (1984/1985 to 1988/1989) has received
approval in principle from both Deputy Heads. Executive Secretariat
The Executive Secretariat is responsible for relations with central policy agencies,
other federal cultural institutions, provincial governments, nongovernment organizations and the media. The secretariat develops policy proposals related to archives and
coordinates implementation of access to information legislation. The director reports
to the Dominion Archivist and serves as a member of the Senior Management Committee.
Proposals for revision of the Public Archives Act were developed, discussed with
interested institutions, and forwarded to the Minister in December 1983. Implementation of the new Access to Information Act and the revised Privacy Act went into effect
in July 1983.
Public Relations — During the year, the Public Relations section issued 21 press releases,
coordinated 91 interviews with the media, printed four posters and organized 14 receptions. Exhibitions and acquisitions provided the subjects for most public relations activity. Advertisements were placed featuring publications such as Dreams of Empire, Guide
des sources de l'histoire du Canada conservées en France, and various inventories and
catalogues. The staff organized 79 visits for 1,146 visitors to the Public Archives from
Canada and a number of other countries.
During the course of the year, the Public Archives attracted anticipated as well as
unexpected national television coverage. The announcement that the Flaherty Brothers
collection of films had been restored by the National Film, Television and Sound Archives
reached a national audience. A series of film clips from the collection was used extensively by the various television networks. As for the unexpected one of the two copies
of the Canadian Constitutional Proclamation was damaged when red paint was poured
on its surface by a registered researcher. The incident immediately became an item in
television newscasts and newspapers throughout the country.
The exhibition Private Realms of Light: Canadian Amateur Photography, 1839-1940
received extremely good reviews in the press at the national level. The accompanying
publicity campaign included the design and production of a poster that was reproduced
for advertisements. The announcement that the Public Archives had acquired the Marshall McLuhan papers also focussed cross-Canada attention on the Archives.
A week-long series of interviews, anecdotes, sound clips and relevant commentary
dealt exclusively with the Public Archives on the national Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio program "Morningside." The series included interviews with staff
members and long-forgotten sound clips featuring political speeches, musical interludes
and broadcasts from war correspondents.
Posters, flyers, post cards and advertisements were produced and used by the Public
Relations office to promote events, publications, services and facilities. Feature articles
concerning the mass deacidification process used to preserve books at the Public Archives
appeared in Du Pont Magazine and American Airlines' inflight magazine. Public Relations made extensive use of its slide presentation, which was sent to Pennsylvania and
New Zealand for archival training purposes. Planning and Program Evaluation
This directorate coordinates departmental planning for the Public Archives; provides for the cyclical and independent review and assessment of departmental programs
for both the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian; and develops and monitors
the implementation of performance measurement systems in both the Public Archives
and the National Library. Planning and Program Evaluation operates under the general
direction of the Dominion Archivist and the director is a member of the departmental
Senior Management Committee.
During the year, planning activities included coordination of the Senior Management Strategic Planning Session and the related Strategic Approaches of the Public
Archives of Canada, 1984-1989 document; involvement in Branch planning sessions;
coordination of the departmental Expenditure Plan narrative (Part HI of the Estimates)
and of the Multi-Year Operational Plan narratives; participation with Program Evaluation, in a Statistics Canada project team examining the Heritage Institutions Survey and
in the preparation of an archives supplement; and extensive committee work and liaison
with central agency officials.
Program evaluation projects reflected the current concerns of both the National
Library and the Public Archives. For the National Library, an evaluation study of its
Awareness Program was completed, presented and approved by the National Librarian
in September 1983. An evaluation study of the National Library's iNet Pilot Project
was also completed. For the Public Archives, an evaluation study of the Conservation
component commenced following the completion of the assessment and terms of reference
reports. Evaluation work also began on the Public Archives' Researcher and Public Service Component, with the completion of the assessment and terms of reference reports.
Performance measurement work was undertaken for both departments. For the
Public Archives' Conservation and Technical Services Branch, the performance measurement process was implemented in the Photography Services Division and developmental work was completed for the Computer Systems, Records Conservation, and Picture
Conservation Divisions. Performance measurement work elsewhere in the Public Archives
included system implementation in Forms Management and technical advice and support for Exhibition Services, Official Languages and Internal Audit. For the National
Library, a departmental performance measurement policy was developed and approved
by the Executive Committee. Trial data collection commenced in the Cataloguing Branch.
The Public Services Branch system continued to evolve towards automation in 1984-1985.
The Library Systems Centre developed its initial system and has proceeded towards a
fully-automated system. The Performance Measurement Coordinators Committee was
established in the National Library during this past year. Exhibition Services
The division provides exhibition, audio-visual, auditorium and boardroom reservation services to both the Public Archives and the National Library. The circulation
of exhibitions and the management of Laurier House are carried out for the Public
Archives.
Twelve exhibitions sponsored by the Public Archives, National Library, embassies
and non-profit organizations took place in the foyer of the auditorium.
Within the division training was provided to
ith the educational programs at Laurier Housi
1 students, and 31 volunteers assisted
One major exhibition was produced foi
Viva te Realms of Light: Canadian A,
Design and Preparation of Exhibitions -
Public Archives during the past year —
Photography, 1839-1940.
Two exhibitions were received on loan: The Garrison Years: London, Canada West,
1793-1853 from the London Regional Art Gallery, and Discovery 1778 prepared by the
Vancouver Museum.
Fifteen minor exhibitions were prepared including Constitutional Documents and
Symbols of Sovereignty shown on Parliament Hill; The Loyalists; Human Rights;
1931-Painters of Canada Series; and Quebec City: Bastion of Old Europe.
Circulation of Exhibitions — Two sets of the major exhibition Dreams of Empire continued to circulate throughout Canada. One set was presented at four institutions in
western Canada, while the second set finished its tour of eastern Canada and travelled
View of the exhibition Private Realms of Light: Canadian Amateur
Photography, 1839-1940. (C 104781) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
to France in September for exhibition in La Rochelle, Paris and Mulhouse. Over 130,000
people visited the exhibition in its several locations in Canada.
A second major show, The Widening Sphere, began a cross-country tour in Toronto,
Waterloo, Longueuil and Moncton. Approximately 6,550 people viewed the exhibition
at these venues. It was accompanied by the videotape Towards Equality, a history of
women in Canada.
Laurier House — An Open House was held in May to celebrate International Museums
Day and was attended by 425 visitors. Activities included music by the Apex Jazz Band.
A new program for young people was inaugurated in the fall. Designed to acquaint
children with the lives of prime ministers, and Laurier and King in particular, the program was staffed entirely by volunteers. The seventh annual Christmas program for
children was held, once again involving a session on archives. New features this year
were a creative drama session, an Artifact Scavenger Hunt and a birthday party for King
on December 17. Special tours with such organizations as the Terry Fox Canadian Youth
Centre continued, along with tours for approximately 160 Archives staff members.
An important acquisition was a set of onyx and diamond shirt studs and cufflinks
formerly belonging to Sir Wilfrid Laurier, donated by George Rosengarten of Montreal.
Two hundred and fifty inquiries were processed and 26,500 people toured the House.
Audio-Visual Services — The auditorium and the boardrooms continued to be used at
near capacity. Due to a significant increase in departmental use of the facilities, it became
more difficult to accommodate external, non-profit organizations. During the year, 58
receptions were held, 146 films were checked and shown, and 448 requests for services
were satisfied.
ÎM ?yÉ
7#,4p
syj
Students from grades three and four participating in an education w
The Life and Times of Mackenzie King. (C 121314) Publications Division
The director of the Publications Division reports to the Assistant Dominion Archivist
and is a member of the Archives Branch Publications Committee. The division is responsible for publishing and distributing publications that will inform researchers and the
general public of the holdings and services of the Public Archives.
The fiscal year 1983-1984 was an active period for the division. A new publication
project, entitled the General Guide Series - 1983, was initiated to better inform the public
of the resources and services of the various divisions of the Archives Branch. Three guides
in this series were produced: Federal Archives Division, Public Archives Library and
National Film, Television and Sound Archives. The remaining guides will be printed
during the coming year.
The Inventory of the Collections of the National Film, Television and Sound Archives
is a major new finding aid. It provides, for the first time, a list of all the collections
of the division in alphabetical order. Hundreds of radio and television programs are
entered under the CBC, and 73 films or series appear under the National Film Board.
During the year, the division was proud to announce the release of the W. H. Cover-
dale Collection of Canadiana. This textual and visual inventory of 500 paintings, water-
colours and drawings is a valuable reference work for those interested in Canada's pictorial history.
The success of the Antique Map Calendar copu Wishing venture was again realized
with the production of the 1984 calendar. This third edition contained outstanding colour
reproductions of 14 original maps from the National Map Collection.
The bimonthly magazine The Archivist continued to be well-received by the general
public. One of the highlights was the special issue (January-February 1984) prepared
to commemorate the 450th anniversary of Jacques Carrier's first voyage to Canada.
During the year, several exhibition publications were printed to accompany displays
presented by the department. Two colour folders for the National Photography Collection's Aperçu series were circulated: Structural Visions and Quebec City: Bastion of Old
Europe. The colour brochure 1931-Painters of Canada Series was produced to complement an exhibition of Coutts Christmas cards. An attractive booklet was designed for
the exhibition The Garrison Years: London, Canada West 1793-1853. A small folder
for the Human Rights display was made available to the public. Also, an exhibition
brochure was offset for the Professional Photographers of Canada's National Print Show
1983.
In order to assist those who wish to cite archival sources, the Public Archives has
published the helpful guide Archival Citations. Another useful booklet for researchers
is the recently revised edition of Tracing Your Ancestors in Canada.
An eye-catching bulletin was designed for the Machine Readable Archives Division.
The first four issues were published and the response from that division's public has
been encouraging.
The Records Management Bulletin remains an effective communication tool for
the records management community with Nos. 18 to 23 being issued. Another publication that is now available to assist records managers is the Federal Records Centres Users
Guide.
Other titles produced during the year included the following: FIAF 1982; Fédérai
Archives Division Accessions 1982/83; Record Group 46-Records of the Canadian
Transport Commission; A Guide to Sources for the Study of Ukrainian Canadians;
National Map Collection brochure; and five reprints. LCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
In the distribution of publications, 1,789 publications were sold to individuals or
Supply and Services Canada; 58,347 free publications (guides and other types of informational brochures) were circulated in response to inquiries; and 46,438 publications
(The Archivist, bulletins, annual report, some inventories, etc.) were distributed through
established mailing lists.  Records Management Branch
Two developments had a significant impact on the Records Management Branch
during 1983-1984. A reorganization of the Public Archives resulted in the transfer to
the branch of Micrographie Advisory Services (MASPAC), Micrographie Standards,
and the Central Microfilm Operations. The result was a consolidation of responsibility
for all information management services provided to outside institutions, with a view
to improving their coordination and the quality of the services they perform. The second
major thrust was the attention paid to the implementation of Treasury Board's two new
policies: Chapters 460 and 445 of the Administrative Policy Manual, defining responsibilities regarding records management and the management of the micrographics function. More details regarding these two developments and other important records management activities are presented in the divisional reports that follow.
MICROGRAPHIC STANDARDS AND DEVELOPMENT — As stated in the "Introduction" of the last annual report of the Public Archives, this office was transferred
to the Records Management Branch as part of the departmental reorganization implemented at the beginning of this year.
In Une with the policy of restraint, the position of Micrographie Development Officer
was terminated on the retirement of Mr. E. Dupuis in June. This contributed to a change
of emphasis in the functions of the office. Involvement of the director in international
non-governmental organizations was reduced and the administration of micrographie
standards activities increased. The loss of the Micrographie Development Officer will
be partially compensated for by increased assistance in standards development by the
director and staff of the Research and Development section of the Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division.
Standards — The Public Archives sponsors the development of micrographie standards
for the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB), with this office the designated
secretariat. Under the chairmanship of the director, the CGSB Coordinating Committee on Micrographie Standards, which is comprised mainly of persons from the private
sector, oversees five standards-writing committees. Some 75 persons across Canada are
Canadian delegation to the meeting of Technical Committee 171 Micrographie
International Standards Organization, Zurich, Switzerland, October 12-16,
1983. Seated, left to right: William Wheeler and Michael Andrews, PAC,
and Donald Wilson, Bank of Canada. Standing: Donald Donoahue,
Medrey, Inc. and John O'Neill, 3M Canada. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT V
involved in the preparation of micrographie standards and contribute their time and
untarUy.
The Coordinating Committee held two meetings ir Toronto, one in May and the
other in November. During the year, two COM standards were published as National
Standards of Canada as well as one CGSB Provisional Standard. In addition, standards
committee work has been completed on two other standards that are at the publishing
stage. The program of work decided upon for the next year will consist mainly of converting three ISO (International Standards Organization) draft standards nearing completion to National Standards of Canada, and reviewing four issued National Standards
for ammendments or revisions. Proposals for three additional new micrographie standards will be studied before deciding whether or not to proceed with their preparation.
The director was the head of the Canadian delegation to the meeting of ISO Technical
Committee 171 Micrographics, which was held in Zurich in October. The seven Working Groups were attended by some 60 persons from 12 countries.
International and National Non-governmental Organizations — The director attended
the annual meeting of the Committee on Archival Reprography of the International Council on Archives held in Toledo, Spain, in September. He also represented the Canadian
Micrographie Society on the ARMA Program Committee for the ARMA/CMS 1984
conference. As chairman of the CMS Advisory Council of Past Presidents, he coordinated the commencement of an examination of the impact of the new technologies
on the society.
Records Management and Micrographie
Systems Division
During this past year, significant changes and events occurred that had a considerable
impact on the role and responsibilities of the division. Organizational changes, approval
and passage of legislation and related policies concerning records management and
micrographics, and the need to shift emphasis on operational priorities, combined to
make the past fiscal year a demanding one.
In order to meet the challenge of providing a stronger and more coordinated service to government institutions, the Micrographie Advisory Services was amalgamated
with the Records Management Services Division. The merging of these two functions
combines traditional records management with micrographics technical expertise to provide a consolidation of proven methodologies and techniques. It is a positive step forward and represents an integration of complementary skills and capabilities. Realizing
this, divisional management reviewed the organizational structure and concluded that
to maximize the efficient use of resources and to better carry out its responsibilities,
four major sections were needed. They are: Research and Development; Evaluations;
Advice, Projects and Training; and Scheduling. The annual divisional operational planning session refined and strengthened managerial direction by developing revised goals
and action plans. Long range planning continues to be the cornerstone of divisional
Throughout the year, the division actively participated in implementing Treasury Board
policies reflected in Chapters 445, Micrographics, and 460, Records Management, and
concerned itself with responsibilities assigned pursuant to the Access to Information and
Privacy Acts and the Treasury Board's Interim Policy Guide: Access to Information
and Privacy Acts. The latter, as a direct concern, provides a legal and regulatory requirement for government institutions to schedule, retain and dispose of records containing
personal information in accordance with established principles. The result of many years PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
of consultation between the Public Archives, Treasury Board and other government
departments, the new policies emphasize the need for a strong records management and
micrographics function in the federal government.
Committee and Professional Association Activities — The division provides the secretariat
for the Advisory Council on Records and contributes members to such organizations
as the Federal Micrographics Council, the Association of Image and Information Management, and the Interdepartmental Committee on Records Retention for Business Records.
In addition, divisional staff continued their active participation on the executive and
committees of the Records Management Institute, the Association of Records Managers
and Administrators, the Canadian Micrographie Society and the Association des archivistes du Québec.
Visitors and Visits — Among visitors received were officials from New Zealand, the
World Council of Churches, Senegal, the National Archives of Sweden, the Northwest
Territories Housing Corporation, the Quebec Provincial Government, the City of Saskatoon, the University of British Columbia and the Archives of Burma.
The chief of the Research and Development section attended the International Standards Organization meeting in Zurich, Switzerland as a Canadian delegate. He also
attended a meeting of the Advisory Council of Past Presidents of the Canadian
Micrographics Society in Toronto. The director visited with officials of the National
Archives and Records Services in Washington, D.C.
Other Significant Events — Several projects were undertaken during the year that were
directly or indirectly connected with the division's overall responsibilities for improving
the records management and micrographics operations in government.
Divisional staff participated in organizing the ceremonies surrounding the observance of the thirtieth anniversary of the Records Management Institute. Over the years
a close relationship has existed between the RMI and the Public Archives and divisional
staff have always been closely involved in the activities of the institute through participation in the executive and committees. The highlight of the RMI annual meeting was the
presentation of the 1983 Cardillo Award to the director of the division, J.G. Dumont,
for his many achievements in the field of records management.
John Dumont (right) receiving the 1983 Cardillo Award from Mr. Joe Cardillo.
(C 104496) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
The need for an up-to-date Information Resource Centre for branch staff and others
interested in pursuing studies in records management and micrographics was recognized.
The library capability will be expanded later by the acquisition of a computerized information retrieval service.
The Micrographie Advisory Services staff worked closely with the Federal
Micrographics Council to arrange and present a training seminar. The seminar covered
a wide variety of relevant subject matter and several members of the branch were invited
to participate as guest lecturers.
The Micrographie Advisory Services section coordinated the French translation and
provided the technical advice for the Micrographie Technician Level 1 Certification
Assessment Package. The MAS supports the program through consultative advice and
by providing qualified assessors for the assessment procedures and tests. At a special
ceremony marking this event, Dr. W.I. Smith presented the translated version to Mr. D.R.
Yeomans, Commissioner, Correctional Services Canada, who provided the initial contract as part of an industrial training program at the Bath Correctional Institute.
The activities of the division were audited by the Auditor General. The observations and recommendations were addressed by management and where necessary, adjustments are being made in the operations and services provided to government departments.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT — The Research and Development section has
been heavily involved in micrographie evaluations, field trials and investigations for utilizing automated technologies for records systems, and information research studies leading
to revised standards and guides in records management and micrographics — all with
a view to ensuring that records management and micrographics support the operational
and administrative programs of the federal government.
The past year has been a period of adjustment for the Micrographie Advisory Services unit in which responsibilities for implementing Chapter 445, the micrographics policy
issued by the Treasury Board, coincided with the integration of activities with the Records
Management Services function. Even so, during the period under review, systems studies
and investigations, procedural reviews, and technical assessments were provided to 23
government institutions. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1'
As part of its regular work, the unit investigated and reported on 25 microfilming
submissions. As well, in order to place more emphasis on current technology and develop
new test material, the contents of the Microrecording Technology Course were modified
prior to being presented in November 1983. Twenty-five participants representing 19
departments attended. An optical disc presentation was given at the November conference
of the Canadian Micrographie Society and earlier the unit organized and coordinated
a two-day Microfilm Technology - Quality Control and Storage Seminar attended by
46 government employees.
Liaison with the micrographics industry enabled the unit to stay abreast of new
developments and rapidly changing technologies in micrographics. Of equal importance
is the time devoted to the development and application of micrographie standards and
the direct involvement with National and International Standards Organizations.
In response to the growing need in government for advice and assistance in
automating the various functions of records management, the Automation unit participated in projects and field trials with other departments. Foremost among these studies
are those involving the Department of Communications and the Public Archives. In Communications, the working group of the Office Communication Systems completed the
fifth field, developing and evaluating proposals concerning the application of archival
and records management principles and techniques to information created, used and
disposed of within an automated office environment. The experience being gained by
participating in these automated field trial studies enable the division to develop and
introduce standards and guidelines, and to offer greater assistance to departments. The
division also participated in a study to determine how the quality and efficiency of records
services in the Public Archives can be improved through the use of automated technology.
As a result of the issuance of the new records management policy by Treasury Board
in March 1983, the division continued with the major task of revising the Records
Organization and Operations handbook. The preparatory work on the revisions to the
General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada (GRDS) also continued. Suggestions and recommendations were sought from informed sources involved
in the administrative and regulatory processes of government to assist in developing a
records management disposal guide satisfying current needs.
Information circulars #RMB-83A, Scheduling of Personal Information and
RMB-84A, Scheduling Records in Government Institutions, were issued as a result of
the scheduling requirements stated in the Treasury Board's records management and
micrographics policies and the Interim Policy Guides: Access to Information and Privacy
Acts. These circulars are interim measures, until the handbook Records Scheduling and
Disposal has been revised.
EVALUATIONS — Contained within the new policies on records management and
micrographics is the delegation to the Public Archives by Treasury Board of the authority
and responsibility to conduct on-going evaluations of the records management and
micrographics function in each government institution on a five-year cycle.
As a result, the division, assisted by a consultant from the Audit Services Bureau,
coordinated the development of a broad strategy to implement this policy requirement
in cooperation with the Administrative Policy Branch of Treasury Board and the Office
of the Comptroller General. This implementation will be supported by the Internal Audit
operations in government institutions linked to the resources and expertise in records
management of the Evaluations section to ensure policy objectives are met.
The recent policy on records management also requires the compilation of an annual
report on the state of records management in the federal government. The first report
under this policy was submitted by the Dominion Archivist to the Treasury Board in
August 1983. It contained the results of a survey conducted within 62 government depart- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
ments during 1982. Future reports will contain many of the observations noted from
internal audit evaluations in government operations backed up by information collected
and analysed by the section. The 1983 report will be submitted to the Treasury Board
early in 1984-1985.
ADVICE, PROJECTS AND TRAINING — The policies governing records management and micrographics in government stipulate that the Public Archives is responsible
for ensuring that government institutions document their policies and programs. This
delegation requires that assistance be provided, on request, in all aspects of records
management functions — traditional as well as micrographics — extending to such areas
as surveys and studies on records organization and systems operations, file classification systems, records scheduling and disposal, and related studies on micrographics
systems.
Anticipating the need to assign resources to other priority areas, a management decision taken this year is to limit consulting assignments within defined time and study constraints, emphasizing that departments have the primary responsibility for ensuring the
existence of effective records management practices. In addition, the section is developing internal procedures for conducting surveys and providing advice and assistance, to
assist departments in undertaking activities in these areas. Some 50 institutions were provided with technical assistance this past year.
Technical training in records management principles and techniques was provided
through two four-week English and one four-week French-language senior records
management courses. Eighty-two participants representing both headquarters and field
operations attended. Eight regional introductory courses each of four days duration were
given in Toronto, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa (2), Edmonton, Vancouver and Winnipeg.
Altogether 280 students attended these introductory sessions. The division also presented
two week-long courses in the fundamentals of micrographics. During the year the content of the courses was updated to reflect the new legislative and policy changes and
to introduce the participants to automated technology.
The division also assisted several departments in establishing in-house records training
programs, as well as providing speakers at various seminars and conferences and as guest
lecturers on courses sponsored by other government institutions.
SCHEDULING — The Scheduling section's primary purpose is to advise and assist
government institutions with the development and application of records retention and
disposal schedules and to function as the coordinating secretariat in the records scheduling
approval process. Recent changes have been made to records scheduling requirements
resulting from the Privacy Legislation and subsequent implementation regulations and
the policy directives on scheduling records contained in Chapter 460 — Records Manage-
Number of Records
Schedules and Disposal
Proposals Submitted
Number of
Microfilm Cumulative
Submissions   Total Total
1961-1966 (March) ..
194
58*
252
252
1966-1971 (March) ..
373
52
425
677
1971-1976 (March) ..
208
207
415
1,092
1976-1982 (March) ..
322
190
512
1,604
1982-1984 (March) ..
159
45
204
1,808
Total 23 years	
1,256
552
1,808
1,808 ILIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
ment. As a result, the branch developed and issued two procedural documents Scheduling Records in Government Institutions and Scheduling of Personal Information. These
information circulars outlined procedures designed to assist government institutions in
meeting the legislative requirements to schedule, retain and dispose of personal infor-
mation as required by law and also to assist them in complying with the scheduling regulations embodied in the new records management policy. Another significant proportion
of the work involved the review and assessment of 98 scheduling submissions and the
revision of internal procedures for processing submissions.
Table I indicates the number of departmental submissions (records schedules, records
retention proposals and microfilming submissions) handled from 1961 to March 1984.
Federal Records Centres Division
The objective of the Federal Records Centres Division is the efficient, effective and
economical storage and management of general subject records on behalf of all qualified
federal government institutions across Canada. To meet this objective records centres
have been established in Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton
and Vancouver. Activities include accessioning records into the centre, providing a
reference service, applying disposal authorities, secure destruction of classified records,
a microfilm.inspection service, a magnetic tape library service, and in cooperation with
the Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division, provides training and advisory services in regions outside of the National Capital Region.
The records centres have storage capacities ranging from 25,000 metres of records
in Edmonton to 153,000 metres in Ottawa. Holdings vary (same regions) from 12,500
metres to 119,000 metres of records. Comparing the average cost of shelving and accommodation only between records centres and departmental records storage areas, the
records centres saved seven million dollars last year. Surveys conducted during the year
indicate that there is still much work to be done and therefore more money to be saved.
Many thousands of metres of records are still being stored in expensive office space.
The challenge in the coming year will be to bring these records into economical records
centre storage consistent with planned growth in facilities.
Accommodation — There was tremendous growth and action in this area during the
year as plans for additional accommodation all came together.
1. The Winnipeg Federal Records Centre received an addition in July that doubled its
capacity.
2. The Vancouver Federal Records Centre moved into a ne
December that doubled its capacity.
3. The Montreal Federal Records Centre, already operating from two buildings, acquired
a third building in February. This increased the capacity by 40,000 PARC boxes.
4. The Ottawa Federal Records Centre also acquired a third building giving it an additional 110,000 PARC boxes.
5. A new building for the Halifax Federal Records Centre was completed at the end
of March. This will double the capacity of this facility.
The acquisition of all this accommodation resulted in massive movements of records.
The Winnipeg Centre, which had operated out of two interim locations, moved 25,000
boxes into the new addition. The Vancouver Centre had to move its entire holdings of
117,000 boxes. The Ottawa and Montreal Centres, because of overcrowded conditions,
shifted 80,000 and 12,500 boxes respectively for the sake of future efficiency. Full
reference service was maintained throughout the period of these moves by a hardworking
and dedicated staff. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
New Vancouver Federal Records Centre. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Except for the Montreal Centre, accommodation should not be a problem for five
years. Proposed plans for a centre in Quebec City within the next two years will relieve
the accommodation pressure in Montreal.
Planning for additional accommodation in the Toronto Centre is well under way
and for the Edmonton Centre planning will begin in 1984-1985.
Client Survey Work — A review of federal government organizations revealed that there
are 3,104 potential records centre users. The division serves 1,025 of these. During the
year managers of the records centres visited 893 of the potential users to promote use
of the service. As a result, 49 new offices began to use the records centres. Further efforts
will be made during the new year to actively promote records centres by visiting the
remainder of the potential users.
Tape Library — The Ottawa Federal Records Centre's Tape Library, which became operational January 15, 1983, has completed its first full year of operation. With capacity
for storing 100,000 tapes, the library now holds 36,376 tapes from 36 government institutions compared to 18,156 tapes from 19 clients in April 1983.
Growth of this library can be seen when comparing the April 1983 V
1984 workload in Table II.
the March
April 1983
Tape Registration ...
Tape Deregistration .
3,467
1,257
6,775
6,641
The library processed a
d of 101,629 registrations and deregistrations during the
Promotion and survey work carried out during the year has resulted in dra
increases in tape activity in each records centre (see Table III).
1982-1983
1983-1984
Difference
Division Tape Holdings ...
Number of Users	
Number of Actions	
145,666
19
34,456
171,894
36
128,513
+ 26,228
+        17
+ 94,057
These increases in activity indicate that serious consideration of computerization
of the controls on these records must be given in 1984-1985.
Microfilm Inspection — Good progress has been made in this area. The third inspection
cycle for essential records microfilm has been inspected and the third cycle for microfilm
held in the General Records Centre building is well underway. In addition, all microfilms
held in the regional records centres have been inspected and reboxed. Inspection data
is now so voluminous and complex that only a computer could make full use of this
important data.
TABLE IV
1982-1983
1983-1984
Difference
10,040
20,410
19,119
5,388
+ 10,370
Reboxing	
Blemished Reels	
66,068
3,401
- 46,949
+   1,987 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
One dark note concerning this project is that the tape that was used to seal the 200,000
microfilm containers was found to be chemically active despite written assurances from
the supplier that the tape met the division's specifications. As a result new tape will have
to be purchased and installed.
Table IV demonstrates the year's activity in this area.
Essential Records — Chapter 460 of the Information Management Manual has given
new impetus to this program. Many government institutions have inquired about bringing their records in this area up-to-date. At present only 14 departments are actually
active in this program. To cope with this renewed interest the Advisory Committee on
Essential Records was created. Membership includes the director of Emergency Operations Co-ordination of Emergency Planning Canada and the chief of the Ottawa Federal
Records Centre.
The aim of this committee is to rewrite the manuals and guidelines covering essential records, to ensure that government institutions participate and that facilities for storing
these records are up to standard.
Finally, requests have been received from regional Emergency Planning Canada
depots, that the federal records centres assume administration and responsibility for
storage sites outside the National Capital Region. This issue will be dealt with in the
coming year.
Accessions — The level of accessions remained about the same this year, but the total
holdings in the division decreased. There are two reasons for this: (1) the new policy
restricting services only to those institutions appearing on the schedule to the Privacy
Act excluded some large crown corporations; (2) the decrease in overall holdings is an
indication of the increased efficiency in disposal operations (in 1982-1983, 48,444 metres
were disposed of compared to 53,509 metres in 1983-1984).
It was decided that all records centres would be converted to the bay locator system.
This will eliminate much of the paperwork associated with accessioning while improving the usefulness of the records descriptions through more thorough descriptions. The
Edmonton, Winnipeg and Toronto Federal Records Centres have already converted.
The others will do so in the new year.
Reference Service — Revenue Canada - Taxation (RC-T) provided almost 50 per cent
of the work in this area. Unfortunately, negative records searches still accounts for 50
per cent of the work done on behalf of this department. Some 25 per cent of divisional
reference resources are expended in this work. In Edmonton, where RC-T records are
no longer accessioned, negative searches dropped from 12,160 in 1982-1983 to 4,335
in 1983-1984. Two years earlier, negative searches accounted for 69 per cent of the RC-T
workload so a 19 per cent improvement can be seen. RC-T and the centres are continuing to work to bring negative searches down still further. RC-T has also transferred some
resources to the division to help cope with the workload.
Disposals — It is expected that changes to the retention scheduling criterion, because
of new legislation, will cause a slowdown in physical disposals next year. This year,
however, physical disposals were up substantially. In 1982, 844 tonnes of paper were
destroyed compared to 2,357 tonnes in 1983 — an almost three fold increase. In 1983,
the disposal operation employed 55 handicapped people and destroyed 228,541 PARC
boxes of useless records at a cost of ten cents per box — which is eight cents per box
cheaper than in 1982. In addition to supporting government goals for providing employment opportunities for the handicapped, this program also supports recycling goals
because over 99 per cent of this waste paper went to paper mills.
Significant Events — Inclement weather and a leaky roof caused water damage to 777
boxes of records in the Edmonton Centre. Quick action by the staff with heat fans saved
these records from any permanent damage. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
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PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
The division had numerous visitors who did research and toured the records centres. Mr. B. Spiers, Assistant Provincial Archivist for Alberta, Mr. J. Harding from
the Government of the Northwest Territories, Mr. J. Frenière and Mr. P. Grimard from
the Government of Quebec, Ms. H. Ford from the British Archives, Mr. F. Strachon
from the Government of New Zealand and Dr. Y. Tut and Mr. M. Kyaing from Burma
were some of the noteworthy visitors.
There were some staff changes during the year. William Shea, chief of the Halifax
Centre resigned and Albert Cyr transferred into this position from the Edmonton Centre. Harris Christian was appointed chief of the Edmonton Centre.
The division held the first of a series of records centre training courses in the Ottawa
Federal Records Centre. This course is designed to train all records centre staff in all
aspects of records centre management and operations. It will be held in other centres
in the coming year.
The Winnipeg Records Centre reached the stage in its growth where reorganization
became necessary. The organization will be similar to the Montreal and Toronto Records
Centres.
Accommodation in the records centres formerly held by the National Film, Television and Sound Archives and by the Central Microfilm Operations has been turned over
to this division.
Two important in-house studies on computerizing the records centres were completed this year by the Toronto and Ottawa Centres. Expansion of tape library services,
increasingly more accommodation and the huge microfilm redox blemish information
bank especially, but also the growth in all other areas within the division, dictate that
full implementation of computer technology take place in the near future.
National Personnel Records Centre
The National Personnel Records Centre (NPRC) provides storage and reference
services to federal agencies and the general public on personnel and personnel-related
records of former civilian and military federal employees and former members of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police. In addition, the centre assumes, on behalf of the Dominion Archivist, the responsibilities defined in current privacy legislation for all non-current
personnel records under NPRC control. The NPRC currently administers about 5,500,000
personnel records, which are stored on some 112.7 kilometres (70 miles) of shelving within
the centre. The NPRC also administers several hundreds of thousands of personnel-related
documents that might be utilized by individuals who are in pursuit of pensions, allowances,
claims and other benefits.
General — The proclamation on July 1, 1983 of the Access to Information and Privacy
legislation resulted in an increase of over 91 per cent in the number of formal requests
for personal information. While the number of informal requests processed during the
year remained at slightly over 33,000 (the same as last year), the provision of photocopies
of information to requestors rose by over two and a half times to 241,216 pages.
This year saw the completion of the project to eliminate the large backlog of holdings
that had accumulated over years of manual operation. The remaining 90,400 civilian
records were processed during the year to completely eliminate this long-standing problem.
Eight additional computer terminals were purchased during the year and installed
throughout the office areas of the NPRC. These new terminals have decentralized access
to the PERSFILE index into areas where some of the work originates. In addition, they
have facilitated input of some ancillary records that will be integrated into the personnel records now on the system. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Personnel Records Centre Building in Ottawa. (C 113055)
Computer terminals in the Systems Development section. (C 103464) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
Activities of the NPRC
Informal and General Requests for Information
In uiries Processed (Total)
33,101
Personal Visits
338
Telex
4,458
5,821
Letters	
.     22,484
Letter Inquiry Type
Response Time (%)
Under 30            31 to 60
Days                  Days
Over
60 Days
Routine*  17,597               94.15                     4.91                    0.94
Complex  3,788               72.99                   18.56                    8.45
Sensitive  275               90.18                     4.36                    5.46
Genealogical   824               42.72                   23.66                  33.62
Total    22,484 88.65 7,89 3.46
Total Number of Photocopies Provided 50,879
* Includes all Telex requests.
Activities of the NPRC under the
Access to Information and Privacy Act
L
Part IV of Canadian
Human Rights Act
(April 1-June 30)
Under 30
Days
Response Time (%)
31 to 60
Days
Over
60 Days
Number of Formal
Requests Processed....
Number of Photocopies
Provided	
574
26,174
99.48
0.52
Privacy Act
(July 1-March 31)
Number of Formal
Requests Processed....
Number of Photocopies
Provided	
2,107
163,355
95.70
3.48
0.82
Access to Information Act
(July 1-March 31)
Number of Formal
Requests Processed	
Number of Photocopies
Provided	
38
808
89.47
10.53
Total Number of Formal
Requests Processed	
Total Number of
Photocopies Provided ..
2,719
190,337
96.49
2.89
0.62 [VES REPORT 1983-1
A year-long research project to study the radiation effects on persons witnessing
nuclear explosions was undertaken by the University of Ottawa on behalf of the Department of Veterans Affairs. The Reference Services section provided in excess of 4,000
files on a continuing basis to satisfy the researchers requirements.
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT — This section directs the Automated Systems Processing and Maintenance areas as well as the Documentation area, and in addition, develops
new systems for additional record groups or for other administrative needs.
During the period under review, a software package called HASP was purchased
and installed. This program provides electronic transmission of data between the NPRC
and our PERSFILE database in the Canada Pension Plan computer in Vanier, Ontario.
The NPRC is now receiving daily updated reports from the computer.
Much handwritten information had been annotated onto the key-punch cards when
the indexing system was operated in a manual fashion. A project to capture this data
was completed during the past year and this additional information has now been entered
to PERSFILE via the minicomputer.
This reporting period also saw the development and implementation of an on-line
statistics package. PERSFILE now compiles information on the activities of the Enquiry
Sub-System. Data concerning the different search patterns, search results, search time,
system connect time, etc., is gathered and is available to the NPRC through locally-
prepared programs in "Natural" language.
COMMUNICATIONS — This section provides all communication services, both inter-
jial and external, and prepares the responses to requests for information from various
governments and the general public, ensuring compliance with existing privacy legislation.
The Communications section relies heavily on word processing equipment and by
utilizing a very complete glossary is able to respond to requests within a reasonable time
frame. To this end, the Wang Model 5 word processors were replaced during this period
by Wang OIS-115-2 equipment with its additional memory capacity and more rapid
response time.
The number of inquiries that were responded to by Telex increased by more than
46 per cent over the previous year. Procurement action to update the paper-Telex equipment was undertaken and the centre now employs an Extel ComMaster terminal.
During the period under review, the Correspondence unit actioned 33,101 informal
and general requests for information with a percentage breakdown as follows: letters
— 67.9 per cent; telephone — 17.6 per cent; Telex — 13.5 per cent; personal visits —
1 per cent. The Review and Restructuring unit actioned 2,719 formal requests for information, which is a 91.6 per cent increase over the same period last year.
The statistics in Tables VI and VII show some of the activities of the Communications section for 1983-1984.
REFERENCE SERVICES — This section receives and integrates personnel records from
other government departments and agencies on a national basis, and controls access to
these records by government institutions.
Reference requests satisfied during the period under review averaged about 7,840
per month. Despite this large number of requests, slightly over 94,000 during the year,
the Reference Services section was able to provide next-day service in almost every
instance.
Researchers and historians made large demands on the Reference Services section
during the past year. As well as the previously mentioned University of Ottawa project, PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
the section provided active support to the University of Dalhousie in a large study of
federal employees. In addition, several government departments were also provided with
reference assistance during this period.
Reference Services Statistics, 1983-1984
Type of Request              Number of Requests
Military
Veterans Affairs  24,539
National Defence  13,387
Civilian   16,760
RCMP  5,014
Internal  32,236
X-Rays  1,298
Ancillary  814
Total  94,048
Central Microfilm Operations
The major development for the Central Microfilm Operations (CMO) for 1983-1984
was its transfer to the Records Management Branch. In addition, the manager of
Camera/Microforms, Rita Gamble, retired after many years of service. She was replaced
by Gerry Donoghue, a micrographics analyst with Micrographie Advisory Services. The
Toronto branch operation ceased activity as of March 31, 1984, with the resources
transferred to Ottawa. Existing clients were offered services out of Ottawa.
The division was audited by representatives of the Office of the Auditor General,
and by the department's own audit service during 1983-1984. The findings of both audits
were virtually identical; the reports were generally positive. The installation of sprinklers
and smoke detectors in the Computer Output Microfilm (COM) area addressed previously
stated health and safety concerns. In addition, the department installed computerized
communication devices and a special telephone line for hearing impaired staff. The CMO
provided training to visitors from Bermuda and Burma during the year.
The operations of the CMO are divided among four areas: Source Document Filming, Silver Halide Processing, Roll and Fiche Duplication, and Computer Output
Microfilm. These are all supplemented by a Quality Control function. Two new monitoring and evaluation programs were instituted in the division's continuing efforts to improve
productivity, reduce reruns, minimize losses and improve the general quality of its product. The CMO also completed installation of automated systems to improve maintenance
services, produce monthly statistics and process control evaluations.
As Table IX indicates, the number of camera exposures produced in 1983-1984 was
double that of the previous year. The volume of film processing and duplication also
was up from 1982-1983. The Camera section acquired two state-of-the-art microfilm
cameras capable of producing microfilm for use in computer assisted retrieval applications. Acquisition of the processor formerly used by the Toronto office will enable the
CMO to respond more rapidly to requests for evaluation and verification tests. This
service will reduce down-time and loss of technician's time, be more economical, and
not tie up the high volume production equipment. The Computer Output Microfilm unit
had a good year. Major clients included National Defence, the National Library and
Canada Post. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
TABLE IX
Central Microfilm Operations
Activity 1982-1983
Camera Exposures  4,339,216
COM Frames — Exposures  16,625,583
Film Processing (metres)  752,677
Roll Duplication (metres)  942,967
Fiche Duplication  3,996,689
1983-1984
8,758,725
19,452,107
789,997
1,028,015
5,046,263
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In the year just ended, the Archives Branch undertook a number of major new projects and carried on a large number of continuing projects. Details of the activities and
accomplishments of the year are to be found in the divisional reports that follow. A
report on major branch activities in the area of assistance to the archival community
follows on page 98.
In the area of acquisition, the most sustained new initiatives related to government
records. The National Photography Collection continued its pilot project on the identification, scheduling and acquisition of photographic government records. The Machine
Readable Archives Division and National Map Collection began similar projects in
1983-1984.
The Federal Archives Division experienced an extremely heavy influx of textual
government records arising out of the availability of a new storage facility, the promulgation on July 1, 1983 of Access to Information and Privacy legislation and the issuance
of a new Treasury Board records management policy. A working group of senior
managers from the Records Management Branch and Archives Branch met regularly
in an attempt to clarify the respective roles of the two branches in the acquisition of
government records.
The past year saw the acquisition of two outstanding collections of records. The
Crawley Film collection documents the work of the most important Canadian film production organization in the private sector. The Marshall McLuhan collection consists
principally of textual records reflecting the life and work of this scholar and thinker.
The Archives greatly appreciates the Minister and officials of the Department of Communications for their assistance in arranging for these acquisitions.
Work continued throughout the branch on the long-term project of developing
suitable EDP systems to improve physical and intellectual control over record holdings.
A feasibility study was undertaken and divisional situation reviews and requirements
analyses were completed.
As part of the overall effort to develop a fully-coordinated departmental conservation program, divisions carried out a detailed collections survey. This project involved
many months of staff activity.
In many ways, 1983-1984 was a year of coordination and rationalization. Considerable progress was made on the development of an acquisition policy for the Public
Archives. The difficult exercise of preparing and reviewing divisional mandates and scopes
of activity documents neared completion. Efforts continued to improve the coordination of assistance activities within the branch, and to refine planning for exhibitions
and publications. Finally, the branch continued earlier initiatives to refine its management reporting practices, its planning activities and the monitoring of progress made
toward the achievement of specific goals.
Table X consists of output statistics that have been selected for presentation as being
meaningful. They account for a substantial percentage of time spent by staff of the
branch. Those outputs that are not presented here are in some cases quite difficult to
quantify. Recent annual reports have included tables with outputs reported differently,
usually in branch-wide terms. It is hoped that this new method of presentation will be
more useful to readers. Please note that acquisition statistics for textual records do not
include microform accessions, that control statistics exclude outputs for subsequent control processes, and that no reference is made here to conservation outputs of the Conservation and Technical Services Branch. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
Selected Output Statistics
Activities 1982-1983 1983-1984
Acquisition
Metres of Government Textual Records  921 9,105
Metres of Private Textual Records  493 1,170
Photographic Records   205,266 141,726
Film, Television and Sound Records
(10-minute segments)  118,912 87,688
Cartographic Records  52,947 70,858
Machine Readable Data Files  131 124
Iconographie Records  6,936 4,312
Published Items  14,979 28,541
Control (records brought under minimal control)
Metres of Government Textual Records  1,913 1,383
Metres of Private Textual Records   529 848
Photographic Records   205,266 141,726
Film, Television and Sound Records
(10-minute segments)  215,878 57,673
Cartographic Records  43,720 61,880
Machine Readable Data Files  113 59
Iconographie Records  26,274 2,702
Published Items  8,917 6,141
Conservation
Items Conserved or Transferred to Other Formats
by Branch Staff
Magnetic Tapes Rewound  1,490 939
Film, Television and Sound Records Processed  123,827 38,751
Cartographic Records Microfilmed  9,557 33,961
Items Transferred to Other Formats by Service Bureaux
Metres of Government Textual Records Microfilmed .. 92 142
Metres of Private Textual Records Microfilmed  39 44.5
Service to the Public
Researchers Registered  6,664 6,853
Researcher Attendance  28,250 28,273
Inquiries Responded to   97,729 96,603
Photocopies Supplied  278,841 335,132
Photographs Circulated  607,564 954,156
Textual Containers Circulated
(government and private records)  83,225 80,074
Microfilm Reels Supplied on Interlibrary Loan
(copies of textual records)  18,626 17,238
Pages Reviewed for Access and Privacy  — 210,000 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1'
Manuscript Division
The Manuscript Division has custody of nationally significant and historically
valuable private papers of individuals and records of corporate bodies as well as pre-
Confederation public records and copies of records in foreign repositories relating to
Canada's historical development. It is responsible for acquiring, selecting, organizing,
describing, preserving and storing these documents and for making them available to
researchers.
There were a number of staff changes in the Manuscript Division throughout the
year as a result of the secondment of the director, Robert S. Gordon, to the office of
the director general, Archives Branch. Mr. Gordon's special assignment was the preparation of an acquisitions policy statement for the Archives Branch, an assignment that
will continue until the middle of 1984-1985. His position was filled on a rotational basis
by four of the division's section chiefs, Carman Carroll, Grace Hyam, Charles MacKinnon
and Peter Yurkiw, who formed an executive committee to assist in divisional management. As a result of this arrangement and several special projects within the division
such as the preparation of the Manuscript Division's General Guide, a number of acting
positions and rotations were put into place.
The Manuscript Division Task Force on Information (MISTAFO) Systems gave
way to a larger study of EDP requirements in the division, undertaken by the Bureau
of Management Consulting. The resulting report, which documented the existing systems
and offered a range of options, was formally accepted by the division in January 1984.
This study was a major step in the development of a more automated information management system for the division. While much work remains to be done in defining needs
and standardizing certain processes, it has been agreed that the Manuscript Division will
commit resources to these tasks in order to operate more efficiently and effectively.
Several other major studies were carried out in the Manuscript Division through
the auspices of the Bureau of Management Consulting, which is coordinating these
branch-supported activities. The results of the study on indexing were deemed to be useful,
but not practical for immediate implementation given the division's lack of descriptive
standards in some critical areas. The conservation survey was completed, but the data
analysis still remains to be done. It promises to provide the Manuscript Division with
a clearer picture of the physical state of its holdings. This information will be helpful
in forecasting future resource requirements and in refining restoration and microfilm
priorities.
The Manuscript Division Procedure Manual has 60 per cent of its papers in circulation and another 30 per cent is expected shortly. A regular updating procedure is being
put into place. The inability of the division to continue its inventory publication program is a serious problem and alternate means of publication are being explored. A recommendation that will allow regular dissemination of all of the inventories, without an
undue drain on human and financial resources, is a major goal for 1984-1985.
The Manuscript Division benefited from several training programs that resulted in
additional resources for the summer period. For the second consecutive year, 12 Summer Canada Career Access students spent 18 weeks in the division. In addition, three
Masters in Archival Science students from the University of British Columbia spent 15
weeks in the division. The division also maintained a number of archival and clerical
term positions that partially offset the long delays in some staffing actions. The assistance
of students and volunteers from the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions in identifying printed items in our pre-Confederation manuscripts and records provides the division with valuable information on the physical condition of the material
and the contents of these collections. Several short-term programs with high schools
and junior colleges provided assistance to both the division and the institutions involved. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Manuscript Division
Statistical Summary
April 1983-March 1984
Activity Person-Days
Acquisitions      1,486.75
Control      5,051.25
Conservation         946.25
Public Service     4,213
Administration      1,857.75
Career
Development         879.75
Leave      2,490.25
Total    16,925
170.35 metres
462.33
metres
deposit
576
reels
50
fiches
140.79
metres
959
reels
16
fiches
178
finding
aids
27,260 documents conserved
44.54 metres filmed
4,844 written inquiries
46,319 oral inquiries
TABLE XII
Volume of Accessions from April 1, 1979 to March 31, 1984
Original Material
Microfilm Copies
Year
Number of
Accessions
Extent in
Metres
Number of
Accessions
N
amber of
Reels
1979-
1980-
1981-
1982-
1983-
980.
981 .
982.
983.
984.
          430
          436
          504
          426
          441
743
824
868
493
1,170
108
68
73
67
60
747
654
464
716
576
Volume of Inquiries
from April 1, 1979 to March 31, 1984
Year
Historica
Genealogical
Oral
Total
1979-
1980-
1981-
1982-
1983-
980.
981 .
982.
983.
984.
            2,663
             2,585
             2,152
             2,327
             2,217
3,145
2,714
2,669
2,493
2,627
35,495
52,075
60,640
46,606
46,319
41,303
57,374
65,461
51,426
51,163 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
r. Lou Ronson, signing agreement between Bnai B'rith Canada and the Public
Archives for the preservation of Bnai B'rith records, his arm resting on a
volume of the organization's earliest minutes. Looking on are Mr. M. Swift,
the Honourable F. Fox, Mr. W. Neutel, the Honourable H. Gray,
Mr. S. Jubas and Mr. F. Dimant. (C  105656)
Acquisitions — Acquisitions activities continued to be generally non-discretionary in
response to senior management's Strategic Approaches document. There were however
several significant purchases and donations that have enriched the division's holdings
over the year. While discretionary acquisitions time was limited, there were new efforts
in the field of human rights and renewed efforts to document several of the under-
represented areas in ethnic archives, in particular the Arab and Black communities.
The following sample is but a small reflection of the 1,170.35 metres and 576 reels
of microfilm acquired, not to mention the 462.33 metres of deposit collections received.
Bnai B'rith Canada (MG 28, V). Bnai B'rith Canada is the largest Jewish membership
organization in the country and has been active in such issues as the struggle to
end legal and social discrimination against Jews. The agreement for the preservation of the organization's records was signed at a ceremony attended by many of
its leading members and two cabinet ministers. (15 m)
Canadian Institute of Mining & Metallurgy (MG 28, I 394). Council minutes of the
General Mining Association of the Province of Quebec, 1891-1895; Ontario Mining
Institute, 1894-1896; Canadian Mining Institute, 1898-1920; Canadian Institute of
Mining & Metallurgy, 1920-1970. Also, Executive Minutes, 1922-1971, and minutes
of Bulletin, Finance and Library committees, 1929-1980. (2.7 m)
Field, Martha & Simpson, Frances (MG 24, K 48). Diaries, cookbooks, family correspondence and other papers relating to domestic activities and financial concerns
in the mid-nineteenth century, (additional, originals, 26.5 cm) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Great Britain, Dominions Office 35. A microfilm copy of this series, especially important for documentation of the history of Newfoundland from 1925 to 1949, was
obtained from the National Library of Australia, through our London Office and
the Australian High Commission in London. The originals are held by the Public
Record Office. (590 reels)
Great Britain, General Post Office. A microfilm copy of the letterbooks of the Secretary
of the Post Office relating to the organization of overseas mail, 1849-1920 (Post
48 - 82 reels); service contracts for conveyance of mail by sea, 1755-1932 (Post
51-2 reels); Catalogues (3 reels) and Parliamentary Papers (1 reel) were received
from the General Post Office through our London Office. (88 reels)
McLuhan, Herbert Marshall (MG 31, D156). Manuscript copies of books, unpublished
works, articles, correspondence, resource material, speeches and scholarly papers,
films, video and sound cassettes relating to the life and work of Marshall McLuhan
were purchased from Mrs. Corinne McLuhan of Toronto. A reception and press
conference attended by the Honourable Francis Fox were held to mark the acquisition of these papers. (51.6 m)
"Mémoire sur les moyens d'augmenter la culture des terres en Canada ..." (MG 18,
H 62). Anonymous manuscript on farming, 1753. (original, 38 pp.)
Military Acquisitions. Several interesting collections were received through our agreement with Professors Morton and Granatstein who are collecting military papers
for several publications. The Ian Sinclair and Donald and Hector McKinnon papers
provide additional sources for First World War studies.
The Honourable F. Fox (right) examines documents at the ceremony marking
the acquisition of the Herbert Marshall McLuhan papers. Looking on are Dr.
W.I. Smith and Mrs. Matie Molinaro (representative of the McLuhan family).
(C 120890) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Miller, W.J. (MG 28, 1264). W.J. Miller (d.1983) was the Eastern Ontario Representative of the International Union of Electrical Radio and Machine Workers (IUE).
His papers, 1935-1980, document his involvement with the IUE and the labour movement in general at the local, regional and national levels. (15.5 m)
Montreal Ladies Benevolent Society (MG 28,1387). Minutes and minute books, financial statements, admission books, matrons and superintendants' journals of the
MLBS and the Montreal Protestant Orphan's Asylum, 1831-1948, were presented
by the Youth Horizons Foundation of Montreal. (2.5 m)
Churchill Falls, Labrador, before the construction of the Churchill Falls power
project, ca. 1962. From Churchill Falls (Labrador) Corporation Limited
papers, MG 28,111 73. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Page, Patricia Kathleen (MG 30, D311). Correspondence, subject, personal and art files,
and memorabilia were acquired from poet and artist P.K. Page of Victoria, B.C.
Several photographs and sound recordings were also included in this acquisition,
(originals, 4 m)
Political Acquisitions. Two large collections, the Honourable Paul Hellyer and the
Honourable J.W. Pickersgill papers, formerly on deposit, were donated to the
Archives. The personal correspondence, c. 1930-1965, of Maurice Boisvert (MG 27,
III C 20 - 12 m), member of parliament for Nicolet-Yamaska, were presented by
Mr. Boisvert.
Revillon Frères (MG 28, III 97). Photographs relating to Canada. (3 reels, F-1640 to
F-1642)
Starnes, John Kenneth (MG 31, E56). Correspondence, memoranda and clippings relating
to John Starnes' public service and writing careers, 1944-1983. (originals, 1.5 m)
Stechishin, Julian (MG 30, D 307). Julian Stechishin was one of the founders and leading
persons of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Canada until the time of his death.
The collection as received includes many newspapers, journals and other published
items, as well as a significant body of manuscript material relating to the interwar
period and photographs, sound recording and maps for the period 1895-1971.
(15.5 m)
Tarnopolsky, Walter (MG 31, E55). Material relating to Professor Tarnopolsky's career
in civil liberties and his teaching at the Institute of Human Rights, University of
Ottawa, were received. (6.1 m)
Control — Divisional staff made significant progress in this area. With the assistance
of COSEP and UBC students and term employees a large number of collections were
arranged and a number of finding aids were prepared or revised. The number of individuals requesting appraisals for tax credit continues to rise. This places particular pressure
on divisional staff.
A representative list of projects in this area follows.
Barnett Collection (MG 30, B 86). The collection has been fully arranged. The cataloguing
of the trade literature and the typing of the catalogue cards were completed. A finding aid covering all media found in the collection will be available in 1985.
Canadian Medical Association (MG 28, 1343). The collection, which dates from the
founding of the CMA in 1867, was arranged and accessioned. (2.5 m)
Canada East, Canada West, Provincial Secretaries. Reintegration of files from the
numbered correspondence of the Provincial Secretaries for Canada East and Canada
West (RG 4, C 1 and RG 5, C 1) progressed substantially. The election records of
Lower Canada and Canada East, Upper Canada and Canada West (RG 4, B 72
and RG 5, B 25) were organized, estrays refiled and a checklist undertaken to serve
as a finding aid for each series.
Communist Party of Canada (MG 28, IV 4). Arrangement of this collection is now complete with the integration of the Young Communist League material. Microfilming
has begun and is steadily progressing.
Diefenbaker, John G. (MG 26, M). Considerable progress was made in processing the
Diefenbaker papers. The finding aid for the 1940-1956 Series was completed and
the Family Series was paginated and readied for microfilming.
Endicott, James G. (MG 30, C130). The arrangement of the papers was completed and
an extensive finding aid and inventory entry prepared. (20 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Diefenbaker reference material. (C 106565)
■ 1 ÉW1E"3
jfBfllj
n ^i^^lMr1*"^^
Archivists processing Diefenbaker material. (C 120386) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
France: Archives des Colonies, Série C" A (MG 1). The inventory of volumes 6 to 20
and 51 to 65 was typed and the proper names were indexed by Microfor Inc. The
index for volumes 1 and 2 was typed on cards.
Harkness, D.S. (MG 32, B19). Arrangement and selection of the Harkness papers were
completed, (originals, 24.9 m)
King, W.L.M. (MG 26, J). The King Jl index up to 1936 is now available. Microfilming
of the J4 (Memoranda and Notes) Series is complete to Volume 409 and the J6 Series
(Pamphlets and Clippings) is also available.
Léger, Hon. Jules (MG 32, A 3). The arrangement and description of the collection were completed, (originals, 12.2 m)
LI-RA-MA Collection (Russian Consular Records (MG 25, C 7). The file list has now
been completed, as well as the historical introduction to the file list of the operational consular records section of the collection. The finding aid to the correspondence and subject files has been completed. (24 m)
MacGill, Elsie Gregory (MG 31, K 7). Correspondence, reports, memoranda, notes and
publications relating to Miss MacGill's career as an aeronautical engineer, and her
work with the Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women and as
a Commissioner for the Royal Commission on the Status of Women were accessioned and listed, and an appraisal report was prepared for the National Archival
Appraisal Board. (5.2 m)
Manuscript Group 40. This group was originally established to house small and
miscellaneous material received from British repositories that were not large enough
to warrant separate Manuscript Groups. Recent acquisitions have greatly increased
the size and importance of MG 40, and a reorganization is in process to aid
researchers in locating material.
Plaut, W. Gunther (MG 31, F 6). Much of the additional material was sorted and
arranged, (originals, 5.6 m)
Spry, Graham (MG 30, D 297). The organization of Series 1(18 m), the non-broadcasting
portion of the papers, has been completed. This series includes material relating
to Spry's political and war careers, family material and his work as Agent-General
for Saskatchewan in Great Britain and Europe.
Vatican: Archives of the Sacred Congregation of the "Propaganda Fide" (MG 17,
A 25). FA No. 1186 describes all documents of Canadian interest between 1622
and 1800; available on microfiche in English and French.
Conservation — More than 27,000 pages of documents were identified and sent for conservation treatment. The major projects were the papers of the Claus family, the Erma-
tinger Estate, and Sir John A. Macdonald as well as seigneurial records, especially those
from Sorel. Nearly 48 metres of documents were microfilmed for protective and other
purposes. More than 100,000 sheets were examined in the divisional portion of the
Archives Branch conservation survey. When the data has been analyzed the division will
have a reliable picture of the condition of its collection and will be better able to access
its conservation requirements and allocate resources in this area.
Over $28,000 was spent on preservation microfilming of 48.4 metres of holdings,
with the major projects being the Haldimand transcripts, W.L.M. King J4 Series, the
Lande collection and Steeles-College Memorial Chapel. Significant sums were also spent
on microfilming projects related to acquisitions and diffusion functions.
Public Service — Exhibitions — During the year, work continued in preparation for
the second exhibition in the Records of Our History series. This production will deal
with Canadian history from 1700 to 1760. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
The exhibition of constitutional documents and symbols of sovereignty was on
display on Parliament Hill from April to December. A supplementary exhibit, One Great
Confederation, relating to the involvement of the provinces in the political and constitutional development of Canada, was on display at the Archives from June until
September. A small exhibition focussing on the Loyalist Experience was mounted in
the third floor lobby for the summer.
An exhibit was prepared to commemorate the 35th Anniversary of the United Nations
Declaration of Human Rights and it also coincided with the division's efforts to acquire
material in the human rights field.
Publications — Several archivists prepared articles for The Archivist, including the issue
commemorating the 450th anniversary of Jacques Cartier's first voyage to Canada.
The seventh edition of Tracing Your Ancestors in Canada appeared in August, while
the fourth edition of Guide des sources généalogiques au Canada appeared in September.
A Guide to Sources for the Study of Ukrainian Canadians was published and a
draft of a similar guide on Polish Canadians was begun.
During the year, work continued on the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian
Repositories, a catalogue of unpublished manuscript material and government records
available to the public in archival institutions in Canada. A large part of the current
project, production of the supplement for 1981-1982, was completed. The editing of
the more than 11,000 returns from institutions was finished. More than 5,000 of the
entries were put into the computer system and extensive verification of the data was
carried out.
The planned consultation and recruitment work with repositories was continued
with a visit to 26 prairie archives. Repositories in central and eastern Canada will be
visited in the future in an effort to make the ULM system more complete and effective.
One third of Canadian repositories still do not participate.
Series V of the Finding Aids on Microfiche was issued, thereby adding 119 finding
aids to the more than 600 that are now available in that form.
The division completed its input for the publication Archival Citations that was
released in March.
An article on the United Empire Loyalists was prepared for the autumn issue of
the Loyalist Gazette.
Considerable time was spent on the Manuscript Division's volume of the General
Guide Series. Two staff members coordinated the draft with all sections providing input.
Work began on a revised edition of Checklist of Parish Registers and on the catalogue
for the second Records of Our History exhibition.
Professional Services — Staff members presented papers, served as commentators, advised
students and assessed students' essays for various Archives Courses offered in 1983-1984
at the Public Archives and elsewhere. Staff remained active in the activities of professional associations such as the Association of Canadian Archivists, the Association des
archivistes du Québec, the Eastern Ontario Archivists Association, the Canadian
Historical Association and the historical committee of the Canadian Institute of Mining
& Metallurgy.
A team of three students working for the Canadian Institute for Historic
Microreproductions (CIHM) has begun the survey of Manuscript Division holdings to
identify early printed material. The CIHM team began with Pre-Confederation and British
Archives sources while becoming familiar with manuscript material and Public Archives
terminology. The identification of valuable, rare and fragile printed material by the CIHM
team will assist us in our work on description, security and conservation aspects of the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
holdings. A copy of all cataloguing submissions they prepare is being provided to us.
This project continued throughout the year using volunteer workers.
Considerable time was spent on arranging for facsimile copies from the Bethune
collection for presentation to the Peking General Hospital by a Canadian delegation
to China.
Two staff members and the director of the National Film, Television and Sound
Archives served as resource persons/participants at a workshop on Ethnic Archives, sponsored by the Secretary of State's Ethnic Studies Advisory Committee. Another served
as a resource person in an Ethnic Archives Workshop at the Multiculturalism as a Canadian Reality conference in Thunder Bay.
Administration — In order to provide a sense of continuity during the director's absence
a small executive committee of the four acting directors was established. It met regularly
to discuss certain fiscal, policy and personnel matters relating to the division.
The Manuscript Division consolidated a considerable amount of its collections with
the move to the Journal Tower South building in the fall. This has resulted in the division obtaining space for growth for several years and also results in the division giving
more attention to its retrieval system and inventory control. The move raises some fundamental concerns about the conservation and security features of the area that must
be addressed in the immediate future.
Career Development — Manuscript Division staff participated in a wide variety of professional, technical and career development courses, as well as cyclical and continuous
language training.
Staff Activities — Staff members participated in the conference of the Association of
Canadian Archivists in Vancouver in June. Grace Hyam chaired the session on copyright,
Kathy Hall delivered a paper on archives legislation and Doug Whyte presented a paper
on legal archives. David Walden served as an associate editor of Archivaria and as
National Administrator of the National Archival Appraisal Board. Ian McClymont served
as assistant regional director, National Capital Region, of the National Archival Appraisal
Board. Victorin Chabot coordinated the publication of Les instruments de recherche
pour les archives, prepared by a group of archivists from the Association des archivistes
du Québec. He also presented a course on the arrangement, description and distribution of archival documents to students in a diploma program in archival science at the
Université du Québec à Montréal and gave several talks to various historical and
genealogical societies.
Several other staff members contributed to conferences or periodicals: George
Bolotenko, "Archivists and Historians: Keepers of the Well," in Archivaria; Myron
Momryk, "Ukrainian Displaced Persons and the Canadian Government, 1946-52," at
the conference on Ukrainian Displaced Persons, University of Toronto; Edward Laine,
"The Writing of Ethnic History — Publish and Perish," at the Canadian Ethnic Studies
Association, Thunder Bay; Edward Laine, "On Documenting the Russian Past in
Canada," in Russian Canadians: Their Past and Present, éd. T. Jeletsky et al.; Edward
Laine spent some time preparing the first issue of Scandinavian-Canadian Studies, the
journal of the Association for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies in Canada;
Patricia Kennedy and Marianne MacLean spoke to a number of local historical and
genealogical societies throughout the year; Carman Carroll continued on the executive
of the Canadian Historical Association as English-language secretary and as a coeditor
of the association's quarterly Newsletter. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
London Office
General — The seeds planted in the previous few years have begun to bear fruit during
this fiscal year. Progress has been made in the inventorying of manuscripts relevant to
Canada. Copying in smaller and medium sized institutions has expanded enormously.
The variety and quantity of acquisitions by purchase and donation continue to grow.
The office's role in representing the Public Archives has greatly increased.
Control — In their preparation of an inventory of documentation in Great Britain and
Ireland relevant to Canada, the staff has surveyed 182 institutions, visiting 81 of them.
The focus has been outside London in the south and southwest, the Home Counties
and the cities of the Midlands. Approximately six months work was done at Oxford
and Cambridge and one month in Northern Ireland. Southern Ireland, six counties bordering on Greater London and approximately half the institutions in Greater London remain
to be done. To date, in excess of 3,000 collections not previously copied and containing
material of relevance to Canada have been located. In 40 per cent of the cases, material
of relevance constitutes one volume or more.
Acquisitions — The London Office itself has produced 49 reels of microfilm, 42 from
General Post Office material and seven of Barnardo's Childrens Homes. Most of the
emphasis in the acquisition of microfilm, however, has been placed on the purchase of
film produced by repositories or commercial filming companies. Material has been
acquired from: Barnardo's (54 reels); Public Record Office (16 reels); House of Lords
(13 reels); National Library of Wales (12 reels); Gloucester Record Office (5 reels); Leeds
City Record Office (5 reels); West Sussex Record Office (4 reels); Magdalen College
(3 reels); Liverpool Record Office (3 reels); Clywd Record Office (2 reels); Wellcome
Institute for the History of Medicine (2 reels); University of Liverpool, Hereford and
Worcester Record Office, Bristol Record Office, and Manchester City Record Office
(1 reel each) for a total of 123 reels, containing portions of several hundred collections.
Photocopies have been ordered in some cases where microfilming facilities are not
available. Photocopy has been received from: Calderdale Library (Halifax);Bolton
Metropolitan Borough Archives; West Yorkshire Archives Service; Southampton City
Record Office; Wiltshire District Record Office; Portsmouth Record Office; Coventry
City Library; and Birmingham Public Library.
Further film is on order from: Andover Public Library, University of Birmingham,
Hampshire Record Office, Kent Record Office, King's 8th Regiment Collection (Liverpool), Merseyside District Archives, Rhodes House (Oxford), All Soul's (Oxford), and
Southampton University Library.
Substantial, long-term orders have been placed with: Public Record Office, Public
Record Office of Northern Ireland, Scottish Record Office, House of Lords Record Office
and Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine.
Material copied or on order represents only a fraction of what potentially could
be copied.
In a new departure, the London Office has inaugerated taping of concerts, readings,
etc. of Canadian artists at Canada House. Eight cassettes have so far been completed.
Acquisitions of original material by purchase or donation have also been heavy.
Among the more significant are: the Canada Club papers; diaries of James Bonar, the
Master of the Canadian Mint; memoirs of Vice Admiral J. Hughes-Hallet, the British
naval commander responsible for ferrying Canadian troops to Dieppe; journal of George
Allsopp, Deputy Provincial Secretary of Quebec; 25 sketches by a Royal Naval Surgeon,
Duncan McDiarmid; three sketches of Robert Herries; five Arctic sketches from the
Franklin search expeditions; photograph album of Sir John O'Brien, Lieutenant Governor PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
of Newfoundland; 120 photographs of the Niobe, one of Canada's first two warships;
and 10 reels of a movie film of Gaspé and Labrador in the 1930s by the Anglican Archbishop of Quebec.
Public Service — The office has responded to 40 letters, 94 telephone calls and 46 personal inquiries. The head of the office has given papers on the work of the office to
the British Library's Colloquium on Canadian Studies and to the Commonwealth
Archivists Consultative conference. The office has represented the Public Archives in
the affairs of the Society of Archivists, the British Records Association, the Business
Archives Council, the British Association for Canadian Studies and the planning committee of the Commonwealth Archivists Consultative conference. A new agreement concerning the distribution of its film to institutions in Canada has been negotiated with
the Public Record Office.
Paris Office
Throughout the year, research was done at private archives in the Paris region and
in Bordeaux, Rouen and Cherbourg for documents concerning Canada. Activities outside of research and public service focussed on the 450th anniversary of Jacques Carrier's
first voyage to Canada.
Research and Acquisitions — Printed Material — Forty-four rare originals were purchased for the Public Archives Library at the public sale of the library of the Institut
généalogique Drouin in Paris. Most are reference works, useful for tracing genealogies.
Manuscripts (59 reels of microfilm) — In Paris, private archives yielded most of the
acquisitions, with 30 reels of microfilm being made from the documents of an eighteenth-
century Bordeaux shipowner.
At Revillon Frères, a fur company in Paris, an analytical index has been made of
2,630 photos (1901-1936) taken in the Canadian North; the collection was also reproduced
on microfilm. This work resulted in three reels of microfilm, and a fourth was produced
from archival manuscripts.
At the Archives départementales de la Gironde, in Bordeaux, the local employee
completed work on the "Attributions administratives" of the Amirauté de Guyenne;
a research tool of about 5,000 cards was made up, and 12 reels of microfilm were obtained.
Two part-time contract employees continued scanning the "Attributions judiciaires"
of the same admiralty.
In Rouen, at the Bibliothèque municipale and the Archives départementales de la
Seine-Maritime, two researchers have worked principally on the seventeenth- and
eighteenth-century holdings of the Amirauté du Havre. Scanning is nearly completed,
and an analytical card index is being prepared. The sixteenth-century holdings of the
Tabellionage de Rouen were investigated and a few documents on cod fishing were selected
(1540-1545).
At the Archives départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, in Pau, the documents
previously selected from the records of notaries were reproduced on 10 reels of microfilm.
At the Archives de la Marine, in Cherbourg, one reel of microfilm was made from
the registers of the Inscription maritime de Granville (eighteenth century).
At the Archives nationales, one reel of microfilm was produced from the file on
Pierre-Alain de Lamotte, a Louisbourg merchant.
The Département des manuscrits of the Bibliothèque nationale also provided one
reel of microfilm. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-
Public Service — The head of the Paris Office received about 100 visitors during the
year and answered several hundred verbal and written research inquiries.
She also presented a paper at the annual conference of the Institut d'histoire de
l'Amérique française. The paper appeared in this organization's publication Revue.
At the Canadian embassy in Paris, the 450th anniversary of Jacques Cartier's first
voyage (1534-1984) is being marked in many ways. The head of the Paris Office helped
with publications and conferences of an historical nature, intended primarily for academic
circles. She received a large number of requests for information on sixteenth-century
North America, especially from the media. The exhibition Dreams of Empire - Canada
before 1700 is circulating as part of this anniversary. Between November 1, 1983 and
March 31, 1984, it was received with great interest in La Rochelle, Paris and Mulhouse.
In Paris, the exhibition's opening was preceded by a round-table discussion on archives
and their users—about 100 participants attended.
All these events are creating an upsurge of interest across France in Canadian history
and archives. The number and variety of the Paris Office's activities are increasing as
Federal Archives Division
The Federal Archives Division, as a component of the federal government records
management system, is responsible for the identification, appraisal, acquisition, selection and preservation of all archivally significant textual records created and received
since 1867 by departments and agencies of the Government of Canada. In order to ensure
that all non-current departmental records are examined and those of long-term value
transferred on a regular and continuing basis to the Archives Branch, archivists of the
division work closely with the Records Management Branch of the Public Archives and
departmental officials. Departments and agencies of the federal government are encouraged to transfer their records at the earliest date possible to the Public Archives so that
this valuable archival material, essential to both the continued, effective operation of
the government as well as historical research, may be preserved.
The Federal Archives Division is organized into six sections. The three line sections
have direct responsibility for the following archival records: State and Military Records
Section for records relating to central government administration or external relations,
defence and the military, and judicial, legislative, cultural and related matters; Trade
and Communications Records Section for records concerning the promotion and regulation of trade, commerce and communications; and Social Affairs and Natural Resource
Records Section for records relating to Canadian citizens as well as the development
and regulation of natural resources including Dominion Lands and federal land patents.
The Access Section is responsible for ensuring that all information that has been transferred to the Federal Archives Division is made available consistent with the provisions of
the Access to Information Act, the Privacy Act, corresponding regulations, Treasury
Board policy and Public Archives guidelines. The Reference and Information Processing Section provides basic front-line reference service for researchers in the division itself,
as well as the maintenance of the divisional subregistry and library, administrative and
operational typing, the input of data into the computerized control system (FEDDOCS),
and the coordination of finding aid projects and custodial services including accession
control. The Public Service Section is responsible for the following services for researchers in both the Federal Archives and Manuscript Divisions: the operation of the research
rooms, the circulation of archival collections to the public; the production of copies
of archival documents; the interlibrary loan of microforms; and the coordination of
researcher registration for the Archives Branch. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
:
:actor, Eldorado Nuclear Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario, 1952. National
Film Board Collection. Photo by Chris Lund. (PA 116481)
In addition to these organizational structures, the division also has two permanent
coordinators. The Regional Records Coordinator has the task of developing operational
procedures with regard to the maintenance of archival records in regional records centres and providing divisional liaison with staff in these centres. The Coordinator, Technical
Archival Programs, is responsible for the ongoing conservation, micrographics, publications, and exhibitions and loans programs of the division as well as accommodations
and security matters as these affect the archival collections held by the division.
Executive Summary — During 1983-1984, the Federal Archives Division was faced with
a notable increase in work load on several fronts. Lack of new resources to respond
to these demands necessitated the diversion of staff, particularly at the professional level,
from previously planned objectives. As a result, time spent on custodial work and such
discretionary work as the production of finding aids and the revision of inventories
dropped substantially. ARCHIVES REPORT 1'
Considerable efforts were made to respond to acquisition-related demands. The
implementation by departments and agencies of new Treasury Board policies regarding
records management and their response to the passage of Access to Information and
Privacy (ATIP) legislation resulted in a remarkable increase in divisional involvement
in the records scheduling process. Senior management emphasized the necessity for acquiring and bringing under control archival records housed outside the National Capital
Region. By the end of the year, the division had developed and begun to implement
accessioning procedures for those records maintained in regional records centres. Much
effort was made by the division to clarify its acquisitions policy and its relation with
the rest of the Archives Branch and the Records Management Branch in the identification, acquisition and selection of government records. The division played a significant
role in drafting and issuing to departments new guidelines on the scheduling of information, a project that came to fruition only after a long period of discussion with departments. These guidelines, which also formed the basis of instructions to departments on
the scheduling of personal information under the Privacy Act, will be included in revised
editions of Public Archives scheduling and disposal handbooks. Perhaps the most tangible
evidence of the Federal Archives Division's acquisitions work, however, was the establishment of another satellite storage facility and the subsequent transfer of some 9,100 metres
of archival records from the Ottawa Records Centre and departments in the National
Capital Region.
The division continued to expend considerable resources on the implementation of
ATIP legislation. The establishment of the Access Section at the end of 1982-1983 was
formalized with the staffing of the chief's position and the continued temporary assignment of two senior archivists. Much time was devoted to the development of procedures
for the review of archival records and disclosure of information for research purposes
as well as negotiations with departments on issues relating to access. By early summer,
the actual review of files pursuant to the legislation was underway in earnest. Some
welcome relief for the division's over-taxed staff was received late in 1983 with Treasury
Board's authorization of three person-years for divisional work relating to access in
1983-1984; due to staffing delays, only one of these positions was filed. In addition,
however, Treasury Board authorized twelve person-years to be used in 1984-1985 for
access-related tasks in the division.
Federal Archives Division's involvement in computer systems continued at a high
level. With the completion of the implementation of the facilities management project
on behalf of the Archives Branch, attention was turned to further developmental work
on the division's document control system (FEDDOCS), including its extension to the
production of reports used for access reviews. For the first time, the division, by utilizing
FEDDOCS, was able to carry out a detailed shelf by shelf inventory of all of its extensive archival holdings. The division also continued its involvement in the Department
of Communications' Office Automation Field Trial.
The Federal Archives Division played an important role in conservation-related matters. The first statistically-sound and rigorously-implemented collections survey of divisional archival textual records was carried out. Information from this survey, in which
most of the Archives Branch participated, as well as divisional policies relating to conservation, will be used in the planning of a conservation program for the Public Archives. In addition, the division was heavily involved in the development of the first
course ever to be given at the Public Archives on the conservation of paper.
While time devoted to the division's publications program was reduced substantially in favour of other divisional priorities, one notable title was produced. Early in
the year, the first volume of a new Archives Branch publications series was issued —
General Guide Series 1983: Federal Archives Division.
Finally, it is worth noting that the division was heavily involved in accommodations and security matters relating to the custody of archival collections. The spread
J PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
of the division's collections throughout the National Capital Region in buildings not
designed for the housing of archival records has resulted in the requirement for continued vigilance. Once again the Federal Archives Division was plagued by leaks in all
but one of its stack areas. In addition, the unfortunate defacing of the Proclamation
of the Constitution Act by a registered researcher resulted in the tightening of already
stringent restrictions concerning access to prestigious government records.
Acquisitions — Over the fiscal year, 10 per cent of the division's time was devoted to
acquisitions. The development of acquisition policy remained a priority as the division
attempted to describe formally its mandate and clarify its relationship with other areas
of the Public Archives. A formal mandate statement was drafted and discussed with
the director general of the Archives Branch. A draft acquisitions policy was submitted
to the Archives Branch acquisition policy officer. The roles of the Archives and Records
Management Branches with regard to the identification, acquisition, and selection of
paper and microfilm textual government records were clarified and an interbranch Information Management Committee consisting of representatives of the Federal Archives,
Machine Readable Archives, and Records Management and Micrographie Systems Divisions was established. This group was subsequently responsible for the production of
Public Archives documents regarding the requirements for scheduling of personal and
non-personal information; these documents were distributed to federal government
departments and agencies for implementation.
The division provided input into the Records Management and Micrographie
Systems' report to Treasury Board under the provisions of Chapter 460 on the state of
records management in the federal government. In addition, the division assisted in the
preparation of a report to the Senior Management Committee on archival records in
the regions. Work on sampling methodology for archival records continued with consideration given to the Infoman Inc. report, "Sampling Strategy on Legal and Corporate
Entities and Related Issues." PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
As previously indicated, the division's involvement in the records scheduling process increased as departments and agencies strove to meet the requirements of Chapter
460 of the Treasury Board Administrative Policy Manual and the Access to Information and Privacy Acts. Comparatively less time was spent on formal schedules, with
the division reporting to the Dominion Archivist on only 58 records and on 16 microfilm
submissions over the year. On the other hand, the Dominion Archivist approved six
recommendations to destroy a total of 485 metres of non-archival records. However,
far more activity was seen in the area of informal or draft scheduling, particularly with
regard to personal information banks; in the last quarter alone, 23 departments and
agencies submitted schedules for records containing personal information. This activity
will remain a priority as the June 15 deadline for approval by the Dominion Archivist
of personal information schedules approaches.
In addition to involvement with records scheduling, the division also carried out
negotiations with certain departments and agencies regarding the disposition of their
records. Contacts with the International Joint Commission resulted in an agreement to
transfer all records dating from 1909 and develop records schedules for the future. First-
time discussions regarding records transfers were held with the National Library, the
National Museums Corporation, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, Eldorado
Resources (formerly Eldorado Nuclear Ltd.), and Agriculture Canada in regard to the
Forestry Research Station near Saskatoon and the National Farm Products Marketing
Council. Six years of persistence resulted in an agreement to transfer an extensive, rich
collection of Parks Canada records dating from the early nineteenth century.
New initiatives were taken in the field of regional records. While in Vancouver for
the meetings of the Learned Societies, several archivists surveyed the records holdings
of government departments and agencies in the area. Attempts were made to accession
records in the Winnipeg Records Centre from existing documentation; this initiative had
to be abandoned as existing information in Ottawa was insufficient. Several accessions
W%^
Personnel of the Royal 22nd Regiment and Sherman tanks of Lord Strathcona's
Horse meeting vehicles of No. 54 Transport Company, RCASC, Korea, ca.
1951. National Defence Collection. Photo by Sgt. Paul Tomelin.
(PA 129108) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
of records from the Toronto and Montreal Records Centres were prepared for transfer
to Ottawa and the division's custody. A team of archivists spent a week in the Vancouver Records Centre appraising and accessioning archival records that had accumulated
over the past six years; this experience, in conjunction with the problems resulting from
long-distance attempts to accession records in Winnipeg, will provide valuable insight
into the development of policies and procedures for the control of regional records.
With total acquisition figures for the year of 9,105 metres, 2,739 microfilm reels
and 858 microfiches, it is obvious that the division received a wide variety of records.
A complete listing of the accessions received can be found in the divisional publication
Accessions 1983/84. The following brief highlights indicate the breadth of subject areas
covered: .6 metres of memoranda, minutes, reports and files of the Censorship Directorate, 1944-1963, and .15 metres of Cabinet Conclusions, 1953, from the Privy Council Office; central registry records consisting of 666.6 metres of files from the Canadian
Army, 1914-1964, 711 metres from the Royal Canadian Air Force, 1953-1964, and 170.7
metres from the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1945-1963, transferred from National Defence;
124.2 metres of central registry records of the Department of External Affairs, 1940-1963;
43.5 metres of records from the Office of the President, Canadian National Railways,
1912-1967, including the terms of Sir Henry Thornton, 1922-1932, Samuel J. Hungerford,
1936-1941, Robert C. Vaughan, 1941-1950, and Donald Gordon, 1950-1966; 5.1 metres
of records from the Atomic Energy Control Board relating to the recovery operation
for the Soviet Satellite Cosmos 954; 360.9 metres of central registry records from Parks
Canada, 1885-1960; 2.7 metres of National Energy Board hearings files, 1966-1969;
and 8.3 metres of records including ministerial correspondence and agenda and minutes
of the Executive Committee of the Ministry of State for Science and Technology,
1976-1980. In addition, three new record groups were created as a result of initial
transfers: 10.2 metres of files and field reports from the Curators of the National Herbarium of the National Museums of Natural Sciences, 1881-1970; 33.3 metres of research
Canadian Pacific Rai
Hotel Banff, Banff, Alberta. (PA 31967) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
grant files from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, 1973; and 27.9
metres of records concerning the uranium mining operations at Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan, 1953-1982, transferred from Eldorado Nuclear Ltd.
Control — The Federal Archives Division planned the control activity as a major function for 1983-1984. The majority of the time devoted to this function was to be allocated
to bringing newly acquired records under minimum levels of physical and intellectual
control, establishing minimum levels of description, then proceeding with such discretionary tasks as inventory revision. Unfortunately, this goal was largely unattainable,
due in part to the necessity for the division to absorb ATIP related duties, which resulted
in the reassignment of staff and the requirement for several archivists to double up in
acquisition and public service functions. To exacerbate the control situation, the division's holdings increased by 33 per cent.
The nine per cent of divisional time spent over the year on minimal control resulted
in the application of selection, boxing and listing procedures to only 1,383 metres and
212 microfiche copies of records; all line sections reported on their inability to meet
planned levels of custodial work, with the majority of projects being carried over. The
level of records under control across the division dropped substantially to only 63 per
cent. A comparative statistical review of the control status of the division's holdings
is found in Table XIII.
TABLE XIII
Custodial Statistics (in metres)
1981-1982 1982-1983 1983-1984
Total Holdings         26,782 27,096 36,143
Organization/Selection Backlog  4,803 4,333 13,164
Boxing/Listing Backlog  199 506 366
♦Under Control         21,780 22,322 22,613
Percentage under Control   81 82 63
In addition to the efforts on minimal control, 21 per cent of the division's time
was devoted to the preparation of finding aids, whether the manual production of file
lists or the development of automated file sorts, box lists and KWOC indexes, and
automated functions such as inventory revision and the input of custodial data into the
divisional computer system. Little time was allocated to the production of manual finding aids, with the notable exception of a detailed guide to the infantry units of the
Canadian Expeditionary Force and an updated guide to sources relating to Japanese-
Canadians, 1942-1950, with emphasis on the access status of these records. Some progress was made on computerized finding aids utilizing FEDDOCS for selected series of
records from the Privy Council Office (RG 2), the Governor-General's Office (RG 7,
G 26), Transport (RG 12), Justice (RG 13), Interior (RG 15), the RCMP (RG 18), Finance
(RG 19), Trade and Commerce (RG 20), Fisheries and Oceans (RG 23), the Public Service
Commission (RG 32), the CBC (RG 41) and the Canadian Transport Commission
(RG 46). In addition, efforts continued to find a means of converting RECODEX data
to MINISIS so that work on the extensive Indian Affairs (RG 10) finding aids might
be completed.
Although inventory revision was once again a divisional priority, staff shortage due
primarily to ATIP implementation and high public service demands militated against
the successful achievement of this goal. Attempts were made with considerable success
to revise the inventories for the Post Office (RG 3), External Affairs (RG 25), Labour
(RG 27) and Royal Commissions (RG 33) to publications standards. Revisions were also
made to administrative outlines and series entries for the Privy Council Office (RG 2), PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
The Honourable Lester B. Pearson and several diplomats at a formal luncheon
for the Polit Bureau during Russian Tour, 1955. L.B. Pearson Collection.
(PA 117596)
L
National Revenue (RG 16), Defence Construction Ltd. (RG 49), the Auditor General
(RG 58), Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks (RG 105), and the Chief Electoral Office
(RG 113). Drafting of procedures for the production of bilingual inventories not intended
for publication commenced. The division's control of the holdings was enhanced by further development of FEDDOCS. A comprehensive inventory of the archival records collection was made possible by the shelf-by-shelf location register. Documentation for
upgrading records accessions from selective to permanent retention and for identifying
access restrictions on records was developed. Functional specifications were also drafted
for the automation of the microfilm interlibrary loan system. Divisional expenditures
on the computer system dropped significantly with the implementation of the Branch
Facilities Management Project.
Conservation — The 4.6 per cent of divisional time devoted to conservation related more
to policy and program development, including the collections survey, than to the actual
physical restoration of records. While 42,087 documents were processed through the
Records Conservation Division, much of this resulted from damage to collections by
leaks in stack areas, not the systematic identification of material requiring repair.
A major branch initiative, the planning of a comprehensive conservation program,
involved a diversion of resources in the division. Much time was allocated to defining
conservation in the Federal Archives Division, revising conservation standards, and
designing and performing a detailed, statistically-rigorous collections survey. The survey
results, expected in May, will be used to report on the division's requirements for restoration and protective microfilming and will form a major part of interbranch conservation program development in the months ahead.
The division also participated in the development of a course on the conservation
of paper. This course, the first ever given by the Public Archives, will be offered to
staff of the Archives and other archives and libraries. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
Running sulphur determinations on gasoline in a research laboratory at the
refineries in Sarnia, Ontario. Imperial Oil Ltd. Collection. (PA 99847)
The unfortunate defacing by a registered researcher of the Proclamation of the Constitution Act with red paint required a considerable expenditure of time in liaison with
the conservation faculties as attempts were made to stabilize and treat the damaged document. Subsequent to a report from Picture Conservation on potential for treatment,
the Senior Management Committee decided to leave the document as it was. As a result
of this act of vandalism, the division revised its already restrictive procedures on public
access to prestigious documents and had made a specially designed showcase for reference
requests involving prestige items.
A new conservation technique, the deep-freeze method for killing insects infesting
archival records, was applied with the assistance of Records Conservation and Exhibition Services to a transfer of 60 metres of records harbouring silverfish. The division
continued its vigilant monitoring of stack areas for leaks. Aside from work on the recovery
of material from the Larivière flood of February 1983, which continued through into
the fourth quarter of 1983-1984, several hundred volumes of archival material were also
endangered by leaks in all but one of the division's six storage areas.
Divisional emphasis on the value of microfilming as a means of ensuring the security
and protection of valuable, often fragile archival records continued. Three cameras were
operated in the ongoing copying programs: 98.4 metres of records from selected series
of Indian Affairs (RG 10), Fisheries and Oceans (RG 23), Labour (RG 27) and the CBC
(RG 41) were filmed as were letterpress letterbooks from the Post Office (RG 3), Finance
(RG 19) and Treasury Board (RG 55). The contingency microfilming of contemporary
registries and indexes commenced with the copying of 43.6 metres. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Public Service — The public service function in the Federal Archives Division is divided
between those activities carried out by the Public Service Section and those performed
by the rest of the division. During 1983-1984, 21 per cent of divisional time, excluding
the Public Service Section, was devoted to meeting researcher requests for information;
12,748 oral and written inquiries were answered in the line sections and the Public Service Section.
Access to Information and Privacy — With the July 1, 1983 promulgation of the Access
to Information and Privacy Act, the Public Archives became responsible for making
accessible to the public not only its own operational records, but also those records
transferred by other government institutions to its control for archival or historical purposes. The Access Section, staffed by senior archivists on temporary assignment, was
given the responsibility for developing guidelines and procedures as well as reviewing
archival records in response to both formal and informal access requests. Such essential
documentation as access control lists, access information pages for inventories, divisional operational procedures, and guidelines for the public and government departments
relating to access to archival records and disclosure of personal information for historical
research at the Public Archives was prepared. Extensive negotiations were carried out
with government departments on common access issues, including the procedures for
access to files by government employees. During the year, 1,490 files or 210,000 pages
were reviewed informally for 189 researchers; in addition, 12 formal access requests,
including one for records relating to research conducted at the Allen Memorial Institute
in the 1950s and 1960s, were received.
Publications Program — The divisional publications program consisting of inventories
describing individual record groups, thematic guides relating groups by subject, and accessions listings was curtailed markedly as a result of the diversion of resources to other
priorities. The first title in a new Archives Branch series of researcher aids, the General
Guide Series 1983: Federal Archives Division, was produced early in the year. In addition, the annual listing of records acquired, Accessions 1982/83, was published and two
thematic guides, Sources for the Study of the Second World War and Sources for the
Study of Canada's National Parks, were reprinted.
Exhibitions Program — While the production of exhibitions has never been a priority
in the Federal Archives Division, time was allocated to several minor displays. The third
and final section of Opening Yukon, a travelling exhibition from the Yukon Archives,
was mounted. Records relating to the Crowsnest Pass Agreement were prepared for a
display during the signing ceremony held in the Railway Committee Room of the Centre Block for the new Act to regulate Crowsnest rail rates. An exhibition commemorating
the seventy-fifth anniversary of the creation of the Department of External Affairs was
mounted. The division coordinated Archives Branch participation in Expo Radio: The
Voice of the Century, a CBC exhibition on broadcasting. Records were prepared for
display to Princess Margriet of the Netherlands on the occasion of her visit to Ottawa.
Finally, the prestigious documents loaned to the Sergeant-at-Arms for the exhibition
on Parliament Hill depicting Canadian constitutional evolution were replaced with high-
quality facsimiles.
Public Service Section — Services to the research public were expanded with the addition of stacks in Journal Tower South to the circulation system. The implementation
of Bureau of Management Consulting recommendations to increase the operational efficiency of certain areas of the section commenced. The photoduplication backlog was
maintained consistently at a two-week turnaround for all but a few exceptionally large
orders. The refurbishing of the Microfilm Research Room was completed and received
unanimous approval from researchers using microforms. Work continued on the Archives
Branch Public Service Committee's efforts. 1982-1983
1983-1984
27,093
21,228
15,997
17,405
43,090
38,633
40,135
41,441
18,626
17,238
379,786
301,905
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
TABLE XIV
Public Service Section Statistics
1981-1982
Circulation
Federal Archives Division (Vols.)  22,723
Manuscript Division (Vols.)  17,307
Total (Vols.)  40,030
Microfilm Reels  36,135
Interlibrary Loans
Microfilm Reels  17,223
Photocopies  372,175
Staff Activities — Divisional staff continued to participate enthusiastically in professional associations. Terry Cook, Mark Hopkins, Robert Hayward, Dan Moore, Jerry
O'Brien and Jim Whalen were speakers at the annual Association of Canadian Archivists
meetings in Vancouver, while Dave Hume chaired a session. Paulette Dozois chaired
the ACA Membership Committee, Tom Nesmith was an active member of the Program
Committee for ACA '84 in Toronto, and Rod Young organized and chaired the ACA
Committee on Labour Archives. Gabrielle Biais served as the Secretary of the Outaouais
region for the Association des archivistes du Québec.
Margaret Mattson and Jim Whalen participated in the planning of the Canadian
Catholic Historical Association's fiftieth annual conference in Ottawa, and Glenn Wright
delivered a paper on CCHA founder, James F. Kenney, at the conference's plenary
session.
The Federal Archives Division was represented by Tom Nesmith at the Public History
Conference, University of Waterloo, and the Rural Studies Conference, Victoria, and
by Glenn Wright at the Ontario Historical Society annual meetings in Sudbury and the
CPR West Conference, Calgary. Paulette Dozois attended ACA meetings in Vancouver,
while Ghislain Malette and Denis Boulé participated in the AAQ conference, Quebec
City. Glenn Wright also helped organize a seminar on maritime history sources, which
was held at the Public Archives.
Professional development leave was granted to Terry Cook for work on an article
on Canada in the First World War, to John Smart for an article on Lloyd Percival,
and to Barbara Wilson for a book on Canadians in Britain during the Second World
War. Gabrielle Biais and Terry Cook continued to act as editors for the Canadian
Historical Association's Historical Booklet Series. John Smart delivered a paper on Lloyd
Percival and the Crothers controversy at the North American Society for Sport History
conference at the University of Pennsylvania. Glenn Wright presented a paper on shipping sources in the Federal Archives Division at a conference in St. John's sponsored
by the Maritime History Group of Memorial University and the Company of Master
Mariners of Canada; he also delivered a paper on James Kenney, Irish scholar, at the
annual conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies, Toronto.
A number of archivists gave sessions for the English and French Archives Courses,
the Records Management Course, and the first Conservation of Paper Course. John
Smart served as director of both English Archives Courses given in 1983-1984. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
National Map Collection
The past year has witnessed continuing activity in acquisition, control, conservation and public service. The approval of two New Employment Expansion and Development Program (NEED) projects has allowed the processing of a major government accession, the Geological Survey of Canada collection, and increased microfilm activity.
The space problems were somewhat alleviated late in the fiscal year when a move
of holdings from 151 Bentley Avenue to the West Memorial Building commenced. The
move is to be completed early in 1984-1985. Although the arrangement of holdings in
the various buildings will be rationalized, no expansion in space will be provided for
the future.
In 1983-1984, the National Map Collection witnessed more staff changes than in
recent years. At the end of the fiscal year, five positions were vacant, and two other
positions will become vacant early in 1984-1985. These staff changes have, of course,
affected divisional production. As of February 1, 1984, some minor organizational
changes were introduced in the division to allocate more resources to the government
sector and to centralize certain services.
Reader-printer copies from 105 mm microfilm negatives were successfully introduced
in this fiscal year. The major divisional publication was the 1984 Antique Map Calendar. Significant resources were used in the preparation of several publications that are
to be published in 1984-1985.
Acquisition — During the year, a total of 70,858 items were acquired, requiring about
4,161 person-hours of work.
Of the total number of items acquired the Government Cartographical and Architectural Records Section received 79.5 per cent (67 per cent government, 12.5 per cent
private); the Modern Cartography Section 20 per cent; and the Early Canadian Cartography Section 0.5 per cent. The numbers are substantially lower than predicted because
several large accessions were delayed due to lack of space and manpower; in one instance,
arrangements have been made to do the selection within the department in 1984-1985
rather than transfer all the material to the Public Archives.
Detailed planning for a pilot project on the identification and scheduling of cartographic records in government departments commenced late in the fiscal year after additional resources were allocated to the section responsible for government records. The
pilot project will take place in 1984-1985.
A joint Machine Readable Archives-National Map Collection project to investigate
the implications of acquiring computerized cartographic data by undertaking an inventory of systems in one department and assessing the application of archival techniques
to one system, commenced in 1983-1984, and will be continued in 1984-1985.
The major acquisitions received in 1983-1984 include the Geological Survey of
Canada collection, the records of Eldor Resources for the phased-out uranium mining
operation at Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan, the J. Morris Woolfson architectural collection, the Iron Cat Inc. architectural collection, and the Durnford collection relating to
the careers of members of the Durnford family, prominent as Royal Engineers.
In the past year, the Modern Cartography Section, in rationalizing its selection
criteria, has transferred the majority of provincial and some foreign geological series
to the library of the Geological Survey of Canada, with the agreement that if at any
time that institution decides not to retain this material, it will be returned to the Public
Archives. Various provincial topographic series and ozalid maps have been transferred
to some provincial archives. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
Control — During the year, a total of 9,605 person-hours were utilized in bringing 61,880
items under minimal control and 36,660 items under subsequent control.
The majority of post-accession control activities continue to be carried out utilizing contract personnel. The three-year contract with Cartographic Research Services for
first-level series research concluded at the end of December 1983; provisional first-level
entries now exist for 95 federal series and 47 provincial series. Verification will be completed as the records are processed for entry into UTLAS. Other contracts resulted in
the organization and creation of finding aids for the Power, Wallace, Floyd and Barnett
collections; the work on the first three noted having commenced in the previous fiscal year.
The work on the large Geological Survey of Canada collection (23,300 items) commenced in September 1983. Six employees hired through NEED worked on this project
until the end of the fiscal year. The work is to be completed in 1984-1985.
The contribution of students — six COSEP students during the summer of 1983,
one student intern from Carleton University, and a student from the Master of Archival
Studies program of the University of British Columbia — was also significant in catching up in control work. Of particular note is the work of three library science students
in cataloguing the current atlas collection; the early atlases having been catalogued earlier
by Documentation Section staff.
During the year, the division's Collection Management System has progressed as
planned. System installation and prerequisite activities, such as the compilation of the
UTLAS Coding Manual, the acquisition, installation and operation of a microcomputer
exqi
hand-coloured engraved ca.1730 version
he world's two polar regions with smaller spher
e world and vignettes representing the four
ire, air, earth and water. (NMC 52295) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1'
for manuals maintenance, partial staffing and training, and the selection, cataloguing
and coding of records for the UTLAS Pilot Project stage were completed. The system
was in the Pilot Project stage at the end of the fiscal year, with 1580 PRECIS authority
and bibliographic records input. The MARC Editor position was still not staffed at the
end of the fiscal year.
P2jj4N'tfjDart of It* &ymi't*rtf of Jlin-uut. .IttuaU u, the district of <. Mûri treat  Arc vinee  of
,f$fa^jjpiJ£&Z
Detail of Joseph Fortune's hand-drawn 1809 map of his survey of the seigneury
of Rigaud, Province of Quebec. (NMC 52297) UBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Conservation — During the year, a total of 3,499 person-hours were utilized in the conservation of 3,952 items and the microfilming of 33,961 map sheets.
The majority of items conserved were records of government departments, namely
Public Works, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Privy Council and the Registrar-
General, plus Admiralty and Ordnance plans. Some 1,400 (35 per cent) were current
sheets of the National Topographic series, to which extensions were added to enable
the sheets to be stored in vertical cabinets. Other major groups included maps related
to the First World War, fire insurance plans, maps loaned for exhibition purposes to
other institutions and architectural plans from the J.A. Floyd collection.
In preventive conservation measures, new cabinets and acid-free folders were acquired
for the township plans of the west and the large-size fire insurance plans; these two collections are now properly stored. The vertical cabinets for the topographic series were
reorganized. Preparations were begun for the conservation survey to take place in early
1984-1985.
The approval of a NEED project for microfilming provided a tremendous boost
for the divisional program. Four persons were hired commencing in September. As a
result, the microfilming of map sheets increased from 9,557 in 1982-1983 to 33,961 in
1983-1984, more than 300 per cent. The majority of the maps and plans microfilmed
were from various government record groups and in particular from Parks Canada and
Public Works. The last of the maps stored in vertical (VI) cabinets were microfilmed.
The program to microfilm poor quality ozalid prints as they are received continued;
in these cases, only the microfilm copy is retained by the National Map Collection.
Public Service — During the year, a total of 6,827 person-hours were utilized in the
performance of public service functions. A total of 3,831 inquiries were processed, 8,246
copies were supplied, 13,792 items were circulated and 347 researchers were registered.
The National Map Collection continues to respond to a wide variety of inquiries,
including architectural, land claims (native and other), genealogical, toponymie and land
use. In the last year, as preparations were made to celebrate the 450th anniversary of
Jacques Cartier's first voyage in 1534, there has been a tremendous interest in maps
of that era. Research continued for the Historical Atlas of Canada project.
The introduction of inexpensive reader-printer copies from the division's 105 mm
negatives, which can be supplied the same day, was welcomed by the researchers using
the holdings. The loan of coloured transparencies and slides increased in the last year.
Publications and Exhibitions — The 1984 Antique Map Calendar was published in May
1983, and like its predecessors in 1982 and 1983, was received enthusiastically by the
public. The division's work on the 1985 calendar was completed in the latter part of
the fiscal year. The division's information brochure was updated and published during
the year. Publications in preparation during 1983-1984 included the divisional guide,
the catalogue for the Treasures of the National Map Collection exhibition, and the union
list of foreign series.
The Treasures exhibition was dismantled in early June 1983. A selection from this
exhibition was displayed in the autumn on the occasion of the Society for the History
of Discoveries conference.
The National Map Collection had a small display booth entitled The National Map
Collection: Canada's Cartographic Heritage: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow at the
large international symposium, Auto-Carto Six, at the Palais des Congrès, Hull, in
October, which brought the division to the attention of delegates from all areas of the
world. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-
xT^2
f ~-*"r
A diagram showing the stratigraphy of southwestern Alberta based on data for
oil well borings which accompanied the 1915 summary report of the Geological
Survey by S.E. Slipper. Records of the Geological Survey of Canada.
(NMC 51961) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
A sketch of a schoolhouse drawn in the late 1850s by Thomas Seaton Scott,
the first Chief Architect of the Department of Public Works (1872-1881).
Thomas Seaton Scott Collection. (NMC 51963 and 51964)
fis /JtJt.àra^ PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
The National Map Collection continued to loan original maps and plans to other
institutions for exhibition purposes. In 1983-1984, these institutions included the Royal
Ontario Museum, the Center for Great Plains Studies in Lincoln, Nebraska, the Newfoundland Museum, the Canadian War Museum, the Marine Museum of Kingston, and
the Marsil Museum in St. Lambert, Quebec.
Small exhibits included Dust Jackets and Early Maps and a selection from Arctic
Images: The Dawn of Arctic Cartography. Work commenced on the exhibition for International Archives Day in October 1984 and an exhibition featuring the Floyd collection
for the summer of 1984.
Staff Activities — Publications — Louis Cardinal, as part of a five-person work group,
has published Les instruments de recherche pour les archives (La Pocatière: Documentor, 1984).
Three biographies of surveyors, written by Gilles Langelier, were published in Volume
V of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography. The surveyors are Jean-Baptiste Bédard,
Louis Charland and Etienne Guy.
In The Archivist, the following articles by National Map Collection staff appeared:
(a) March-April 1983 — Edward Dahl, "New Acquisitions," a description of the John
Marr plans of the citadel at Quebec; (b) May-June 1983 — Brian Hallett, "Ship Plans
in the National Map Collection"; (c) July-August 1983 — Betty Kidd, "Architecture
and the Environment"; (d) September-October 1983 — Tom Nagy, "Sources for Native
Studies in the National Map Collection" and Betty Kidd, "Society for the History of
Discoveries Conference"; (e) November-December 1983 — Edward Dahl, "Acquisitions - Earlier source of popular images," a description of a 1698 wall map by Nicolas
de Fer, which features the well-known beaver and cod-fishing scenes; and (f) January-
February 1984 — Gilles Langelier, two articles entitled "Jacques Cartier's Contribution to Canadian Toponymy" and "Jacques Cartier's Contribution to Cartography."
Edward Dahl continued his role as associate editor of Cartographica, in which he
is assisted by Louis Cardinal who prepares French abstracts for the journal, and Velma
Parker who prepares the bibliographic entries for the review section.
Edward Dahl also is an editorial advisor to The Map Collector and has accepted
the position of acting chairman of the Historical Maps Committee of the Association
of Canadian Map Libraries.
Conference Papers — At the annual meeting of the Association of Canadian Archivists
in Vancouver in May 1983, Ed Dahl prepared and presented with Terry Cook a workshop
on "Ethics and the Archivist."
At the Association of Canadian Map Libraries conference, also in Vancouver, Ed
Dahl presented an ethics workshop tailored to the interests of map curators. Also at
this conference, Betty Kidd presented the annual report of the National Map Collection.
Louis Cardinal and Betty Kidd presented a paper entitled "The Archiving of Computer Cartography" at Auto-Carto Six in October in Hull, Quebec.
Ed Dahl helped organize and spoke at a meeting of the Ottawa Chapter of the
Ontario Archaeological Association and the Ottawa Map Society, of which he is
cochairman.
On his way to Chicago in October 1983 to attend the Nebenzahl Lectures, Ed Dahl
addressed the Michigan Map Society on the topic "Early Maps and the National Map
Collection in Canada."
Dorothy Ahlgren Franklin spoke at a meeting of the Eastern Ontario Archivists
Association about architectural archives, along with Douglas Franklin of the Heritage
Canada Foundation. A television interview on CBC followed. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Association Roles — A number of staff members serve on the executives of associations, and chair or serve as members of working groups and committees. These include:
Velma Parker who was elected treasurer of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries
(ACML) in June 1983; Hugo Stibbe who continued as chairman of the Geography and
Map Libraries Section of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA); Maurice McCauley who, as a member of the Conservation Committee,
ACML, communicated with map collections across Canada concerning a joint order
of acid-free map folders; Betty Kidd who chaired the 1984 ACML Nominations and
Elections Committee and as chairperson of the History of Cartography Interest Group
of the Canadian Cartographic Association, organized and chaired the history of cartography session at the annual conference in Calgary in June 1983; Dorothy Franklin
who continued as treasurer of the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada; Nadia
Kazymyra-Dzioba who is a member of the council of the Society for the History of
Discoveries.
The Society for the History of Discoveries annual conference, held September 29-
October 1, 1983 at the Public Archives of Canada, was organized by Nadia Kazymyra-
Dzioba and Betty Kidd.
Betty Kidd made local arrangements for the annual meetings of the Canadian Council
on Surveying and Mapping and the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical
Names, held at the Public Archives in October 1983. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Picture Division
In 1983-1984, about nine person-years were devoted to control, an activity that was
intensified by the relocation of two sections. The acquisition activity required a little
more than three person-years. Many outstanding works were added to the collection;
the most notable one being perhaps the Jean-Joseph Girouard series of pencil portraits
of the "Patriotes" of 1837-1838. Five person-years were required to handle the division's public service functions. Three exhibitions were organized by the division itself
and the staff contributed to many other exhibitions presented by other divisions of the
Archives and by various institutions across the country. Five hundred and two works
were loaned for exhibitions. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
The "General Guide" to the division's holdings was finished and is being edited
for publication. "The Four Indian Kings" manuscript is at the same stage.
A study on the feasibility of a computerized inventory for the division's collections
was completed in February by the Bureau of Management Consulting.
TABLE XV
Picture Division Statistics
Total Holdings
1981-1982
1982-1983
1983-1984
Paintings 	
Drawings	
Prints	
2,886
            17,148
           87,315
2,928
18,894
90,278
12,878
10,609
2,971
19,646
90,543
Posters	
Medals	
            11,973
              9,369
15,449
11,290
Public Service
Inquiries	
             2,268
            12,388
2,552
14,405
993
2
81
3,326
12,740
Transparencies Loaned ..
              1,095
2
779
3
Works Loaned 	
                  79
502
Conservation
Items Treated 	
                796
372
334
The First Franklin Search Expedition: The Nancy Dawson, the Owen and the
Plover's Cutter Threading the Ice off Refuge Inlet, August 11, 1849
by John B. Anderson (British, active 1841-1850). Watercolour,
pen and black and brown ink over pencil on paper.
(C
1300) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REP(
Acquisition — Outstanding among this year's acquisitions were the John Roebuck Album
containing 50 works created ca. 1821-1824 and presented to the Earl of Dalhousie, then
Governor-in-Chief of Canada; eight watercolours and drawings by Frederick B. Schell
for Picturesque Canada, 1882; the Yvonne McKague Housser collection, containing 205
drawings documenting this Canadian artist's early student days and travel in Europe
in the 1920s; the Jean-Joseph Girouard collection of 93 drawings documenting the
"Patriotes" imprisoned in the Montreal Gaol during the Rebellion of 1837-1838; the
Henri Julien collection including 98 drawings and 43 prints documenting all aspects of
Julien's distinguished career as Canada's foremost newspaper illustrator of the late nineteenth century; and the Coutts Painters of Canada Series, a set of 46 silk-screened
Christmas cards, contained in their original sales album, the only known complete set
in existence.
Contacts initiated with cultural institutions for the acquisition of posters were highly
rewarding. On the other hand, several poster collections that have been held for some
time could not be acquired because of lack of funds. The same situation exists for a
number of important cartoon collections.
Notable medal acquisitions included the following: from Mrs. Dora de Pédery-Hunt,
a number of large plaster pieces and other preliminary artwork for medals designed by
her; from Mr. Norman Wells, a collection he had assembled of medals by the Canadian
engraver Stanley Hayman; and, by purchase from Mr. Warren Baker, a selection of
Canadian medals, mainly of the late nineteenth century. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
Control — Accession and Registration — The chief of the Collections Management Section, with the help of contract employees, dealt with accessions until the arrival of the
new registrar on December 19. Since then, the backlog of unaccessioned material has
been eliminated. Steps were also taken to control incoming material. As of January 1,
a transfer log was established to record incoming transfers and another log was begun
for incoming purchases from March 1, 1984. These logs are particularly useful with the
dispersal of the division in various locations. The Art Inventory Section has initiated
the use of a series of six forms in order to better control its collections. Works being
considered for acquisition and new acquisitions receive a brief notation or a summary
description while certain specific works are described in greater detail.
Arrangement and Description — With the help of COSEP and SCCA (Summer Canada
Career Access) students and contract employees, a great deal of progress was made in
arranging collections and creating finding aids. These included the arrangement and
description of several scrapbooks, sketchbooks and albums, the Upgrading and review
of accession records and the creation of an inventory of the oil paintings.
Over 400 architectural drawings were arranged and inventoried as was the collection of original portraits executed on paper. Four hundred works of art on paper in
the category of Historical Events were also arranged. Research was conducted on 79
artists and new files were created for each. New information was added to some 200
existing files and 1,054 new files were created specifically for poster artists. Four hundred and fifty-six newspaper articles were added to the documentary files of the Art
Inventory Section and 254 new files were created.
An index was prepared to the Sotheby Parke Bernet Canada Limited sales catalogue
of prints for 1968-1979. Other research tools included a finding aid for The Empire
Marketing Board posters, a card subject index to Picturesque Canada and another index
to the Coverdale Collection of Canadiana prints. A number of other finding aids relating
to various artist collections were begun.
Lamplight Watch: Portrait of Toronto Architect Kivas Tully by George Agnew Reid
(Canadian, 1860-1947). Pencil on paper. (C 120424) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Several hundred catalogue and cross-reference cards were added to the public service catalogue and a descriptive inventory of the medal collection was completed, although
older cards were not standardized to the current format.
Research was also conducted in search of a means of indexing messages presented
in textual form on placards. So far, 13,727 posters have been described to an intermediate
level for eventual entry in a computerized system. Since a certain number of these posters
were duplicates, the total number of separate titles is 10,260.
Several indices were created for the costume collection: an index of fashion engravers,
a chronological index of fashion plates from various fashion journals, and an index to
the religious orders in the Henri Beau collection. The accession forms of nineteenth-
century fashion plates in the Régor collection have now been almost entirely typed and
about two thirds of the fashion plates in the same collection (over 1,000) have been
catalogued.
Storage and Custody — Works of art in storage were rearranged into a logical artist/
subject collection sequence. This involved the movement of over 20,000 works of art
paper and the relocation of approximately 1,000 oil paintings. New indices and location
lists were prepared to reflect this rearrangement. Inventory lists for each artist are being
placed into solander boxes to reduce the amount of handling required to locate works.
Two thousand six hundred posters were relocated following the move of the collection
to the West Memorial Building. The move of the Medal, Heraldry and Costume Section
to the same building has required a great deal of reorganization for all the collections
concerned.
Blues Football 1981 by Theo Di PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Conservation — A survey, noting the condition, size and weight of every piece in the
medal collection was completed by a staff member of the Picture Conservation Division. A systematic survey of all the holdings of the division was begun in response to
long-term planning in this area initiated by the Conservation Committee. Some of the
regular conservation programs lagged because of conservation requirements for loans
and exhibitions.
New acquisitions were usually photographed as they arrived. With the move of the
poster, cartoon, medal, heraldry and costume collections to the West Memorial Building,
environmental problems, particularly with humidity levels, were encountered. Since paper
and medals require opposite humidity conditions for their conservation, a wall was built
to separate the two collections.
Public Service — The division has maintained high quality reference services although
the removal of two sections to another building has made this awkward in some cases.
A number of noted scholars made use of the division's research facilities. The number
of inquiries was again on the rise during the last quarter.
Outreach Services — Exhibitions — 1931 - Painters of Canada Series: Exhibition of
Christmas Cards (December 8, 1983 - January 15, 1984) — Diane Tardif-Côté worked
diligently to ensure that this special seasonal exhibition would be a success. Hallmark
Cards Canada, who lent examples to the exhibition, designed and printed an attractive
poster at their own expense and distributed it coast-to-coast to every store in Canada
that sells their cards. The Picture Division published a booklet featuring four colour
reproductions of cards. Copies of the poster were also distributed free-of-charge to visitors
to the exhibition. The popular subject inspired extensive media coverage on TV, radio,
and in magazines and newspapers. The exhibition was so successful that the division
is planning similar ones for the future.
Fact and Fantasy: The Portraits of Jacques Cartier (February 15,1984 - April 15,
1984) — Organized by Jim Burant and consisting of 12 original works from the Picture
Division collection as well as eight facsimiles and reproductions, the exhibition is accompanied by a special issue of The Archivist. The exhibition will travel to Quebec where
it will be on display at Les archives de la ville de Québec from June 23 to August 24,
1984. Negotiations were begun by Collections Management to send this exhibition to
Toronto for next Christmas.
Heirs to the Throne Visit Canada — This exhibition was mounted in the main lobby
in June, in explicit reference to the visit by the Prince and Princess of Wales. This display
comprised 25 different medals, most in duplicate to show both obverse and reverse; they
relate to the royal visits of I860, 1901, 1919 and 1983. The Royal Canadian Mint
cooperated by supplying two specimens of their 1983 commemorative medal as soon
as they were struck. The curator was asked by the Royal Canadian Mint to write an
article on the various historic royal visit medals; this was used in their news package
accompanying their new medal, and it was published in full in Canadian Coin News.
The exhibition Daily Smile returned in September 1983 to the Public Archives after
a two and a half year, eight-stop tour. The works returned in fairly good condition
after receiving many accolades wherever they were displayed.
The Widening Sphere continued to circulate and to receive good reviews.
Loans — The loan activities of the division continue to be extensive. Thirty-seven works
loaned last year were returned. This year's loans involved 220 works to 17 different institutions across Canada. Loans to six institutions are presently under consideration. The
loan program is fast becoming one of the major activities of the division.
Publications — Archives Canada Microfiches — After several years of inactivity, the
program was resumed with the appointment of Lydia Foy to the Documentary Art Section. The manuscript for the complete Henry James Wane collection (Microfiches 15-20), PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
This medal struck for the City of Le Havre, France was presented in 1935 to
Commander J.-E. Corriveau, President of the Société nationale Jacques-Cartier,
for the 400th anniversary of Cartier's arrival in Canada. Struck silver medal by
Pierre-Marie Poisson (1876-1953). (Obverse, C 123135; reverse C 123134) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
begun by Douglas Schoenherr, was completed by Lydia Foy. These microfiches should
be published in the next fiscal year, to be followed by the usual comprehensive Artist/
Geographic/Subject Index.
The "General Guide" to the division's collections prepared by Raymond Vézina
was submitted for final editing and publication.
The manuscript for "The Four Indian Kings" publication is at the editing stage.
The division's staff has been very active in publishing articles, delivering papers
and participating in seminars.
Administration — During the year, the Art Inventory Section and the Medal, Heraldry
and Costume Section were moved from the main building to the West Memorial Building.
This allowed a reorganization of the division's office space in the main building.
National Photography Collection
The fiscal year 1983-1984 has been one of the most active years on record for the
National Photography Collection. In order to gain better control of government
photographic records, the division began a pilot project to determine the viability of
scheduling them for retention or destruction. Exhibitions continued to be an important
part of the work, with the highlight being the opening of the show Private Realms of
Light, which outlines the growth and accomplishments of amateur photography in Canada
from 1839 to 1940. A major change was introduced into daily office routines with the
installation, in April 1983, of a five-user microcomputer system. This was intended as
a pilot project to determine staff reaction to daily use of computers. The automation
of a variety of daily work functions like typing and cataloguing has been smooth and
well received.
Acquisitions— During the year, the division added a total of 226 collections and 141,726
items to its holdings.
Government Acquisitions — A Government Photo Records Unit (GPRU), consisting
of four archivists, was created during the second quarter of the year and began work
by surveying existing photo collections in the three departments selected for the pilot
project — Environment Canada, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada and Public Works
Canada. Simultaneously, work began on the creation of a scheduling procedure and
the definition of selection criteria, uniting the work of departments, the Records Management Branch and the Archives Branch. The job was not an easy one since photo collections in the departments are stored, classified and used very differently from textual
records. Therefore, applying selection criteria and procedures based on earlier textual
models for file classification proved impossible. At this point, too, it became apparent
that recommendations for classification systems, storage and handling, and training for
records managers would need to be included. Nevertheless, a draft manual outlining
all the above for departmental records managers was produced by the end of the year.
The draft was discussed and approved by the Records Management Branch and the Information Management Committee, revised, and then presented to the records managers
of the three departments where it met with general consent. During 1984-1985, the GPRU
will work with the three departments to determine how easily the instructions in the
manual can be applied and to identify implied resource requirements for the application
of the guidelines throughout the government.
Owing to increased selectivity, stricter requirements for storage and accessibility
of new collections, the level of acquisitions has been somewhat lower than usual even
though the time devoted to acquisition negotiations has been relatively constant. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Control — During the year, 226 collections and 141,726 items were brought under minimal
control, while 799,069 items were brought under subsequent control.
Thanks to the microcomputer system improved finding aids were prepared for several
important collections. A standard format for records was created allowing anyone to
enter the required information easily. When the entry is finished the entire contents of
the collection are then printed out by as many index keys as are desired. Normally they
are printed by geographical location, by photographer's name and by physical order
in the collection. In this way, the work of the researcher is made far easier than was
ever possible previously and the time required to prepare these finding aids is less than
required to produce a single manually-typed copy.
During the year, 23 new findings aids to individual collections were added to the
finding aid library. In addition, Brian Carey completed an inventory of all the daguerreotype holdings and wrote a report outlining his findings together with a detailed listing
of the items themselves.
Evaluation of the J. Alex Castonguay collection, which contains portraits of many
locally and nationally famous people, dating 1920-1955, was completed and a first draft
of the introduction to the collection is in preparation.
A great deal was accomplished in the area of physical control as well. All of the
glass negative collections were reboxed in smaller non-acidic boxes when it was discovered
that the old boxes were beginning to deteriorate with age. The box by box inventory
of the collection, begun several years ago and repeatedly interrupted by outside factors,
was finally completed this year. There is now a much more accurate record of the holdings,
particularly those that were acquired before 1964. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
NOM "i^WSSSSSSt^-.
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t59
Murray Keating of the Canadian Olympic Team taking his first hammer t
at the Montreal Olympic Summer Games, Montreal, Quebec, July 26, 1976.
Photo by Paul Taillefer. Paul Taillefer Collection. (PA 140555)
The heavily used Duncan Cameron collection suffered from poor organization, causing wasted time and effort in retrieval. The work of reorganizing it has been partially
completed.
Another positive note was the approval for the contract work to integrate, resleeve
and microfiche the heavily used National Film Board collection. By the end of the year,
negotiations were completed and a contract signed to carry out the work during
1984-1985. Some 25,000 items in the Canadian Government Motion Picture Bureau section of the NFB collection were integrated into the main collection and copy negative
numbers transferred where necessary. Arrangements were also concluded to transfer the
remaining pre-1962 NFB negatives from the Film Board.
Conservation — During the year, 1,070 items were conserved.
Most of the items conserved were treated in preparation for exhibition. This consisted of writing condition reports and taking density readings of the photographs.
Duncan Cameron spent considerable time with the Branch Conservation Committee discussing and preparing for the branch-wide collection conservation survey sample
as part of the branch conservation goals. Two person-months were needed to examine
20,000 items in 480 boxes and to record their conservation requirements.
The Photo Conservation Unit of the Picture Conservation Division agreed to train
Custodial personnel in densitometry and condition reporting using the newly devised
grid system. The completed training will remove some of the work load from the unit
allowing its personnel to spend time on more necessary conservation work. It will also
mean speedier preparation of exhibition material when the work is done by the NPC
Custodial staff.
Public Service — Reference — During the year, the division responded to 6,397 inquiries,
registered 846 researchers, received 2,622 visits by researchers, supplied 19,486 copies
and circulated 954,156 photographs. Inuit graphic artist and sculptor Kenojuak Ashevak, West Baffin Cooperative
Cape Dorset, Northwest Territories, December 1980. Photo by Judith Eglingto
Judith Eglington Collection. (PA 140556) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
Notre Dame de Lourdes Church, Montreal, Quebec, 1884. Photo by
A. Henderson. Serge Vaisman Collection. (PA 138966)
During the past 18 months, there has been a steady increase in the number of inquiries. On the average there have been 533 inquiries per month this year, an increase of
28 per cent over the previous year. The increase in personal-visit inquiries has resulted
in crowded conditions in the Reference Room, which endangers originals when they are
consulted and makes it difficult for the staff to monitor and serve researchers. In order
to cope with the increasing volume, it has been necessary to utilize the resources of other
areas like cataloguing, where output has subsequently declined.
There is a direct relationship between the number of visitors and the number of
original photographs circulated and copied on request. Orders for reproductions of
photographs not previously copied require at least five times more staff time than items
for which copy negatives already exist. In the past year, the number of new copies
requested has increased by a phenomenal 125 per cent. Better finding aids and the new
edition of the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives will ease the work of the researcher, but will unfortunately also place a greater burden on the staff in moving and processing originals. For this problem there is no easy solution. In an effort to keep up
with the increasing demands placed on the Reference Services Unit, Elizabeth Krug commenced working in the unit two days a week and Mae Borris assumed responsibility
for sorting and filing catalogue cards.
Two reference surveys were completed during the year. The first identified and quantified the type of reference inquiries received by the division, determined the average
response time, the extent to which the division meets researchers' requirements and the
research value of the holdings and finding aids, and identified the division's community
of users and their requirements. The survey revealed that the division's holdings adequately met 67 per cent of inquiries, partially met 15 per cent and did not meet 18 per cent.
The second survey investigated the time required to process researchers' orders from
receipt of the inquiry to the mailing of prints. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
jjW
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CHMWPNW»t»X Sl'BM^ drafts'*
American Lucille Mulhall, Champion Lady Steer Roper of the World at I
Winnipeg Stampede, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 1913. Photo by Marcell
of Calgary. Hampshire Record Office Collection. (PA 138919)
s were catalogued and
Cataloguing and Documentation — During the year, 4,097 ii
10,278 were filed.
Peter Robertson completed a manual, including an extensive checklist of names of
Canadian military photographers, which will assist the division's staff when writing or
verifying National Defence captions.
Outreach Services — Exhibitions — The major event was the opening of the exhibition
Private Realms of Light on July 14 by Yousuf Karsh. This has proven to be the division's most successful exhibition to date and has generated many favourable reviews
and comments. It led to radio and television interviews, a feature article in Saturday
Night and several articles and a review in Archivaria. It will travel to such museums
as the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Centennial Museum in Charlottetown, the
Art Gallery of Ontario and the Glenbow Museum. On September 24, the division sponsored a day-long symposium, "International Perspectives on Amateur Photography,"
at the Public Archives in conjunction with the exhibition, bringing together approximately
200 people to hear speakers from Canada, the United States and England.
The Aperçu series of exhibitions continued to be shown in the main building and
included the architectural photography of Fiona Spalding-Smith and the gum bichromate
prints of Robert Taillefer and Gerard Poulin.
The Professional Photographers of Canada Annual Print Show, which has been
toured by the National Photography Collection for ten years, continued to be shown
at selected venues across the country. However, it was decided to withdraw from organizing the venues of this show beginning in 1985 although the division will continue to accept
the annual prize-winning prints from that show on permanent loan.
Ken Bell: 50 Years of Photography had a successful two-month venue at the
Edmonton Public Library.
The National Film Board Still Photo Division began work with the National
Photography Collection for the joint exhibition on the work of Walter Curtin. A contract was signed with Michael Torosian to produce a retrospective exhibition of the work PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
L
At Charles Camsell Indian Hospital, laboratory technician F. Vannot tests
patient Archie Half's vital lung capacity with a metabulator, Edmonton,
Alberta, 1950s. Photo by the National Film Board. Canada,
Department of National Health and Welfare Collection.
(PA 138918)
of Michel Lambeth to open here in July 1986. Theresa Rowat began work on the division's section of the Archives Week exhibition scheduled for this autumn.
Publications — The book "Private Realms of Light," to be published in November
1983, ran into scheduling difficulties making it impossible to be published this year. It
has been rescheduled to appear in November 1984.
Four COSEP students were hired to work on the new version of the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives during the summer of 1983. Without their aid it would have
been impossible to have considered publishing the Guide this year. Printing of the volume
_J PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1'
had been anticipated for March 1984, but programing problems, together with a much
larger number of entries than expected, made it impossible to meet the date. It should
appear in June 1984. This new edition will be a substantial improvement on the original
volume since it has almost three times as many entries and greatly expanded indices including a new one by photographer's name.
The final draft of the "General Guide" was completed on schedule in March 1984
and will be published later in the year.
Staff Activities — Joan Schwartz was elected vice-president of the Eastern Ontario
Archivists Association and Chris Seifried was made chairman of the Picture Division
of the Special Libraries Association. Andrew Birrell participated in a conference on
Regionalism and the Arts sponsored by the University of Western Ontario and lectured
on the interpretation of photographs in the Philosophy department at Carleton University. Andrew Rodger gave the keynote address to the annual banquet and awards night
of the Camera Club of Ottawa, on the subject of amateur photography in Canada to
1940, with special emphasis on Ottawa club activities. Lilly Koltun lectured to a class
in the Fine Arts department at Carleton University on "materials and methods" in the
visual arts.
Theresa Rowat's research on Prince Edward Island photography between 1839 and
1874 was published in the Fall-Winter 1983 issue of 77ie Island Magazine. Andrew Birrell
contributed an article to Archivaria on the origins of the amateur photography in Canada
project, which led to the exhibition Private Realms of Light, and all five contributors
to the exhibition prepared an article for the same publication which summarized its contents and themes. An article by Joan Schwartz on Daniel Beere, partner in the firm of
Armstrong, Beere & Hime, appeared in History of Photography/international quarterly.
Management Concerns — Microcomputer System — The five-user microcomputer system
mentioned in last year's report arrived and was installed at the start of the year. The
first application was word processing using the program Wordstar. A self-instruction
program was established for all employees and within six weeks all were able to use it
easily for preparing letters, memos and reports. As a result delays in typing were eliminated
and the typist, who supervises printouts only, was able to devote her time to more
necessary work.
Following this, a series of programs was written using the data base program DBASE
II to aid in a wide variety of functions including caption preparation and printing, address
labels for orders, cataloguing and printing catalogue cards, finding aid preparation and
printing labels for boxes. Additional programs controlling other office tasks will be added
in the coming year. It is too early to quantify the advantages or disadvantages of the
system. Inevitably, the introduction of the computer to all of these tasks has required
redistributing some work, but the reaction has been entirely positive and the initial impression is that the computer is making work more efficient. It is immediately apparent that
we are now able to provide researchers with far better information more readily than
in the past.
A first draft User Manual for the DBASE II programs was prepared and will be
updated in the coming year.
Space — Late in the year, the lack of space both for staff and for collections once again
became critical making it obvious that without additional space it will be impossible
to accept any major new collections in the coming year. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
Public Archives Library
4, the Public Archives Library promoted better diffusion of i
In  1983-IS
collections.
The first concrete result of this effort was the publication in December of the General
Guide for the division, which describes the collections and services available at the library.
Two other publications are currently being prepared. The first is a new edition of
an information brochure on the library. The final draft will be submitted to the Publications Division in March and the brochure will be available in July 1984. The second
project, much broader in scope, is aimed at familiarizing the researcher with the library's
services by describing the research procedures and techniques used. The final version
should be ready by September.
During the year, the Public Archives Library loaned a number of printed works
to exhibits. Locations of these exhibits included Quebec City, Longueuil, Ottawa and
Winnipeg.
Internal activities were focussed primarily on developing a work-station network,
which will enable the library to meet the documentation needs of the Archives' administrative units.
This year, consultants conducted two studies on computerization. The first dealt
with the services offered by the library and the second focussed on the needs of a particular client group. A detailed computerization plan for the library's services will be
developed upon completion of these studies.
Collection Development — During 1983-1984, the library's acquisition unit received
28,541 works. Of this total, 287 were donations and 477 were obtained through exchanges
with the Canadian Book Exchange Centre.
l significant share of
Documents transferred from other PAC divisions constitute
the acquisitions. In 1983-1984, 13,119 works were transferred.
The Public Archives Library subscribes to approximately 1,500 periodicals. These
publications are indispensable to the development of the various PAC activities —
historical research, records management, computerized services and management. During
the year, 10,4% issues of periodicals were received and forwarded to the appropriate areas.
Also added t
on the basis of re
the library's collection this year were 5,241 monographs, selected
earch trends and needs expressed by clients.
The valuable cooperation of the Paris Office led to some prestigious acquisitions.
Some works containing very interesting genealogical information were obtained at the
auction held when the library of the Institut Drouin was sold.
In 1983-1984, the Public Archives Library was able to acquire the telephone directories of New Brunswick on microfilm through the generosity of that province's government. The collection covers the period from 1889 to the present and will be updated
annually. A detailed guide, prepared by the Archives of New Brunswick, accompanied
the donation.
The following are two other importai
Chassant, A. and Henri Tausin. Die
1878-1895, 5 vol.
Chesnel, M.A.de. Dictionnaire encyclopédique des armées de te
que du soldat et du marin. Paris, Labitte, (n.d.), 2 vol.
t acquisitions:
des devises historiques et héraldiques. Paris,
re et de mer. Bibliothè-
Table XVI illustrates the development of the library's printed collec PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
1979-1980
1980-1981
1981-1982
1982-1983
1983-1984
Titles Received	
Titles Recorded	
Titles Inventoried ...
16,816
8,290
5,826
23,998
7,028
9,714
24,549
7,167
5,619
14,979
8,083
6,591
28,541
7,745
4,142
The role of the library with respect to collection development is threefold: to gather
material on the Canadian experience, to complement the Archives' documentary sources
and to contribute to the development of the Archives' administrative and technical
services.
Collection Organization — The organization of collections involves two important aspects
of document processing: physical control of the holdings and intellectual control of their
content.
This control entails a series of activities including: recording, cataloguing, classification, determination of subject headings, preparation of the works and processing of the
catalogue cards.
The control of holdings and their content also requires considerable human resources.
A balanced distribution of staff among various activities is not always easily achieved,
and shortage of resources in a single sector greatly reduces overall productivity, as the
following table of statistics for the last five years shows.
TABLE XVII
1979-1980   1980-1981    1981-1982   1982-1983   1983-1984
Titles Catalogued .
Entries Filed	
Titles Processed ..,
5,531
5,784
6,613
6,244
3,982
60,544
22,747
47,947
39,404
18,767
7,453
13,678
8,289
5,668
4,884
The backlog in some activities, particularly catalogue card production, is discouraging. After studying the matter, it seems that computerization is the best solution to this
problem.
Conservation — In 1983-1984, the Public Archives Library began using the mass
deacidification process. Some 1,657 volumes have been treated since July.
During the year, the restoration workshops treated 1,335 of the division's publications; work involved minor repairs, restoration work, binding and lettering of pamphlets.
Unbound periodicals remain a major problem, due primarily to the high cost of
conserving them. The library therefore obtains microfilm or microfiche copies of the
most requested publications whenever possible. In 1983-1984, all publications put on
microfiche by the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions were acquired.
This includes the entire first series of pamphlets (those listed in volume one of the
Catalogue of Pamphlets in the Public Archives of Canada, Magdalen Casey, Ottawa,
King's Printer, 1931), which is thus protected and conserved for posterity.
At the end of the year, the library did a sampling to determine the state of conservation of the library's works. The findings will be analysed and a systematic conservation plan implemented.
Public Service — The statistical data from the Public Service area indicates the cyclical
nature of requests, except in two areas: reproduction and research a UBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
TABLE XVIII
Public Service Statistics
1-1981    1981-1982   1982-1983   1983-1984
Documents Loaned  25,421
Pages Reproduced  64,018
Telephone Requests ... 1,339
Requests by Mail  563
Research Assistance ... 790
Visitors  3,669
20,435
29,067
22,599
29,490
37,873
31,750
25,615
24,981
1,423
2,217
2,317
2,173
678
897
748
700
1,374
3,101
3,326
5,402
4,529
4,873
4,612
5,258
The progressive decline in reproductions is due to a stricter application of copyrights,
a tighter policy regarding compliance with conservation standards and greater availability
of historical documentation through microfiches. The contribution of the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions has been significant in this area.
Research assistance has steadily increased over the last five years. The main reason
is the collection control backlog, which forces the researcher to request the assistance
of employees more frequently. The person responsible for public services must not only
allow more time for personalized service, but also be familiar with the library's new
acquisitions.
A more in-depth analysis of statistics reveals that each visitor borrows an average
of five documents and that this average has remained constant over the past five years.
Moreover, if services are considered in terms of contacts (telephone requests, requests
by mail, visitors), one sees a modest increase in the number of requests over the last
' five years (5,571 in 1979-1980, 6,630 in 1980-1981, 7,987 in 1981-1982,7,677 in 1982-1983
and 8,131 in 1983-1984).
There were two major reasons why the Public Service area was able to handle this
modest increase in requests. First, Public Service was divided into two sections —
Reference and Loan Service, and Research Service. The result was a certain degree of
specialization on the part of the employees and greater efficiency in the processing of
requests. Second, there has been staff stability in recent years, with the employees in
1983-1984 having been there since the beginning of this upward trend.
To a certain extent, the nature of the requests requires specialized services. Table
XIX indicates the areas that receive more than fifteen per cent of the total requests.
TABLE XIX
1982-1983
(%)
1983-1984
(%)
26.8
15.8
14.8
13.3
17 6
Geographical and Demographic
Genealogy	
Economic History	
History	
20.4
17.6
17.3
As can be seen, there is a marked decrease in biographical studies and an appreciable
increase in geographical history studies. The analysis of requests by mail shows an increase
in the number of local history projects. A few years ago, these projects most often involved
a parish or municipality celebrating its centennial. Today, more and more requests concern relatively new municipalities or those about to celebrate an anniversary. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
National Film, Television and Sound Archives
The most significant event of the year for the NFTSA was undoubtedly the acquisition of the Crawley Film collection. The oldest and largest independent film production
agency in Canada, the film library and production files of Crawley Films were regarded
as essential components in establishing a truly representative archives of Canadian national
productions in the moving image field. The acquisition of the Crawley Film collection
(the private sector) complements the program under which master elements of all National
Film Board productions (the public sector) are being identified, duplicated if necessary,
and deposited in the Archives.
The physical processing of the Crawley collection — 2,500 titles, 25,000 cans, 562.5
metres of shelf space — placed an additional burden on both the Collections Development Section and the Technical Operations Section, already strained with a substantial
increase in acquisitions over last year. Although the NFTSA has been endeavouring to
restrain the volume of acquisitions (there have been no increases in staff in the past four
years) the activities of the CBOT NEED project team generated a greater number of
deposits from television, and substantial transfers from government departments and
agencies such as National Defence, Health and Welfare and the CRTC has resulted in
a substantial increase in acquisitions.
In order to accelerate the processing of current accessions and unprocessed and
partially-processed holdings, the NFTSA contracted with the Bureau of Management
Consulting for a three-part study designed to apply electronic data processing to all aspects
of the control function in the division. Phase III of the study, the implementation phase,
was completed in November 1983, and the plan was approved by the departmental EDP
Committee early in 1984. Even partial implementation of the project in technical processing should result in a marked improvement in custodial control, a factor that becomes
increasingly vital as the Archives assumes custodial responsibility for the archives of
active production organizations that require immediate access to their deposits. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
The surge of acquisitions has also exhausted the NFTSA's storage capacity at Tun-
ney's Pasture in the Dominion Bureau of Statistics Building. Fortunately, another wing
of the building was made available at the end of the fiscal year and environmental controls and shelving are now being installed. At the same time the NFTSA has been actively
involved in the preliminary planning for the PAC Annex to be constructed in Hull. As
one of the non-textual media to be housed in the Annex, the NFTSA is considering the
possibility of developing communal public services for the new building, and in providing research access beyond normal working hours to that portion of the collection
available on either video or audio cassettes.
Acquisition — In order to minimize the processing necessary to accession substantial
acquisitions the NFTSA has been attempting to introduce elements of records management procedures into the management of moving image and recorded sound resources.
In dealing with the National Film Board, for example, the NFTSA has contracted with
the Board to properly identify and to duplicate titles, where necessary, so that master
elements on all Board productions can be systematically deposited with the NFTSA with
a minimum of additional processing. This project was accelerated in 1983-1984 — all
productions prior to 1950 have been deposited, and the NFTSA now expects to acquire
master material on all NFB productions by the end of March 1986.
This approach has been applied to moving image records in the Department of
National Defence with considerable success, but during the fiscal year the NFTSA accessioned deposits, in part stimulated by ATIP legislation, from Health and Welfare, the
CRTC, the Solicitor General's Department and the Federal Cultural PoUcy Review committee that were neither 'scheduled,' nor properly documented. This situation argues
for a comprehensive survey of moving image and recorded sound resources in government departments and agencies so that these records can be properly identified and
scheduled for transfer to the Archives.
Scene from the doci
ley Films, 1962. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
TABLE XX
Accession Statistics
Film
Television
Sound
Documentation
Accessions	
Hours	
....      211
....  4,387
80
4,415
147
5,470
29,662
The prime challenge with regard to records management is the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. As the single most voluminous donor of film, videotape and:
audiotape, the CBC absorbs the greatest amount of NFTSA's energy and resources.
Although the rate of videotape acquisitions from Montreal and Toronto slowed during
the year, a substantial volume of kinescope recordings, stored at the PAC Records Centres in Montreal and Toronto, were transferred to video. The NFTSA now hopes to
have all the kinescope recordings in the Toronto Centre moved to Ottawa by March
31, 1985. In addition, the project to acquire all the surviving black and white newsfilm
in the CBC National News Library in Toronto (through transfer to videotape), the purchase of vidéocassettes for the National News (direct satellite reception/recording will
begin in 1984-1985), and the off-air recording of television programing available in the
Ottawa area (3,500 hours this past year) have all contributed to the television acquisition program.
A balanced representative intake from television is difficult to achieve. Balance
between the English and French Language Services of the CBC is difficult enough, and
although there is agreement in principle for deposits by CTV, Global, TVA and other
educational broadcasters, the number of such deposits has been limited. Award-winning
productions from all aspects of broadcasting are being acquired, however, whether radio
and television commercials — by arrangement with the Radio Bureau of Canada, the
Television Bureau of Canada, and Publicité-Club in Montreal; news programing — by
arrangement with the Radio and Television News Directors Association of Canada; or
independent television productions — by arrangement with the CAN-PRO festival. The
NFTSA also continues to acquire vidéocassettes of award-winning international television productions by arrangement with the Banff Television Festival.
The NFTSA has explored the 'snap-shot' approach as well, and in cooperation with
the Department of Communications recorded a full day of radio programing as broadcast by 13 stations across Canada (312 hours). This project will be extended to television in 1984-1985 in order to record a 'typical' broadcast day (complete with commercial interruptions) in every region of the country.
Accessions this past year, as in previous years, have ranged from multi-million dollar
70 mm feature film productions to 8 mm 'home movies' shot by amateurs; from 2-inch
quadruplex original videotape of major television productions to '/4-inch vidéocassettes
recorded privately as living family albums; and from 16-inch transcription discs of radio
broadcasts to audiocassettes recorded as spontaneous 'oral histories.' Among the notable
accessions illustrating the range were the following:
Boudreau, Alain; 12 reels of 8 mm films (1938-1943) on the training of the Chaudière
Regiment during the Second World War.
British Film Institute; three hours of 35 mm film prints (1946-1948) of the feature films
Whispering City and Sins of the Fathers.
Burns, Gavin; 16 mm film (1916) entitled The Divisional Cyclists on the First World
War Bicycle Corps formed in Toronto.
Canada: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (Radio); Dance in Canada, 20 hours of
audiotape radio programing (1978-1979) on the dance in Canada. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Johnny Wayne and Frank Sinister, from the CBC Collectio
Canada: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (Television, Halifax); nine vidéocassettes
(1981-1983) of award-winning television programing at the Atlantic Film and Video
Festival.
Canada: Société Radio-Canada (Radio); (Le troisième quart du siècle) 40 xh hours of
audiotape radio programing (1975-1976) on the period 1950-1975.
Cronenberg, David; 35 mm film (1978) The Brood and 16 mm film (1976) The Italian
Machine.
Documentary Films: Ethnographic; 16 mm films such as Box of Treasures, Spirit of
the Hunt, Ninstints-Shadow, Keepers of the Past, acquired as a result of programing
for the International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences meeting
in Vancouver.
Kingsbury, Donald; 11 reels of 16 mm film (122 minutes, 1932-1933) of an expedition
to Papua, New Guinea shot by Hector Kingsbury.
Laidlaw, Alex; 9Vi hours of audiocassettes and audiotapes (1966-1980) of interviews,
conference proceedings and radio programs on the Antigonish Movement.
Les productions Pierre Lamy Ltée; six hours of videotape and vidéocassette (1972) of
French and English versions of the reedited (expanded) Kamouraska.
Prusila, George; 45 audiotapes (1958-1967) of meetings of the Sudbury local of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers.
Rainsberry, Fred; 100 hours of audiocassette or;
ment of children's television in Canada.
>s (1982-1983) on the develop- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
Audio research facilities.
Stursberg, Peter; 10 hours of audiocassette interviews (1983) for his project, Canadians
in China.
Taylor, Alison; Vh. hours of audiocassette oral history interviews (1983) with woman
broadcasters on their careers in broadcasting.
Tierney, Raymond; 350 reels of 16 mm docui
(1920-1950) produced in Canada.
Ville de Sherbrooke; two reels of 9.5 mm film (1937) on the celebration of the centenary
of the City of Sherbrooke.
York ton Short Film and Video Festival; Vh hours of vidéocassettes (1983) of award-
winning video entries.
Control — During the past fiscal year, the Media Cataloguing Section placed 57,673
audiovisual documents under minimal control — the collection level. At the same time,
9,148 documents (defined as 10 minutes in any media when played on the appropriate
equipment at the appropriate speed) were placed under subsequent control — individual
items catalogued in depth. Although much of the effort is still concentrated on maintaining control of ongoing deposits from the CBC and the NFB, the emphasis is now
shifting to the numerous small collections originating from production in the private
sector.
Having successfully launched the NFTSA's program to stimulate access to the collections, with the publishing of the Inventory of the Collections of the NFTSA and the
General Guide Series, the Media Cataloguing Section has been developing the tools
necessary to facilitate the automation of processing to be introduced next year. While
plans were being developed for a second edition of the Inventory (from a machine readable
data base) and a catalogue of moving image and recorded sound documents held by
the NFTSA that relate to the First and Second World Wars, the section continued work PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT l1
on the English and French language authority files, and on personality authority files.
At the same time, precise functional specifications were being drafted to facilitate implementation of the branch management committee recommendations.
Documentation and Public Service — The demand for access to the collections has grown
this past year, both in the complexity and volume of the requests. This has placing
increased strain on Technical Services as the number of requests for film-to-tape transfers
in order to service these requests has shown a dramatic increase. The provision of additional viewing equipment and the reorganization of viewing and auditioning rooms to
accommodate a greater number of viewers at one time has enabled the division to meet
the demand, and the redecoration and carpeting of the expanded finding aids/search
room has made consulting the documentation more comfortable and more efficient.
Documentation acquisitions this past year included a microfilm copy of the CBC
News Subject Card Index, which complemented the systematic acquisition of the newsfilm
itself, 3,000 stills from the CBC, 1,700 stills from the Festival Bureau, 500 production
and publicity stills relating to Whispering City/La Forteresse, and 5,000 stills (negatives
and prints) relating to the Crawley Film collection.
Conservation — The most significant technical innovation this past year was the decision to introduce 'C format 1-inch videotape as master storage for videotape. The
changeover was forced on the NFTSA by two factors: (a) 1-inch format has proven to
be superior to the 2-inch helical format the NFTSA has been using in all performance
characteristics at roughly two thirds the cost; and (b) notice from the manufacturer of
the intention to discontinue manufacturing 2-inch helical videotape. The challenge now
will be to maintain the two videotape recorders that the NFTSA now operates that are
capable of playing back 2-inch helical tapes for transfer to 2-inch quadruplex or to one
of the smaller vidéocassette formats.
The most significant technical innovation in 1984-1985 will undoubtedly be the introduction of digital recordings as master storage for sound recordings. The NFTSA conducted a feasibility study this past year and has determined that the 'state of the art'
has advanced sufficiently that a system can be considered for implementation next year.
During 1983-1984, .the NFTSA also installed an Anik 'D' satellite receiver on the
roof of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics Building at Tunney's Pasture, the building
housing the NFTSA's laboratory and vaults. Acceptance tests were held in the last quarter
of the year, and the unit, which will allow direct high-quality recordings of CBC broadcasts, should be operational early in 1984-1985.
The NFTSA moved to improve, consolidate and expand its storage facilities this
past year by installing environmental controls in the balance of Wing 4 (Tunney's Pasture
building), acquiring all of Wing 3 and initiating a contract to have it renovated to archival
standards, and by removing all the material stored in the Bentley Building, a 'holding'
area that lacked both adequate security and environmental controls.
Outreach and Staff Activities — The preparation and publication of the Inventory of
the Collections and the General Guide this past year, both compiled by Jean Guenette,
were the major efforts to reach out to a wider public and facilitate access to the collections. "Canadian Feature Film Index 1913-1984," compiled by D. John Turner, with
publication expected late in 1984, is another effort both to disseminate the information
the NFTSA has assembled on feature film production in Canada from 1913 to 1984,
and to indicate the division's holdings to the potential research community.
Another project to diffuse data was the compilation and editing of Film Canadiana
1980-1982. Under the direction of Jana Vosikovska, this project involved the active collaboration of the National Library and the National Film Board. For the first time, data
for this essential record of Canadian production will be processed electronically so that
accumulations can be readily published or the whole file readily searched. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Shooting of the feati
Mourning Suit, directed by Leonard Yakir, 1975.
NFTSA staff members contributed to the development of conservation programs
and to the development of research programs in the history of film, television and broadcasting in Canada by participating in conferences and seminars, and in the preparation
of special exhibits and broadcasts. Ernie Dick served a second term as president of the
Association for the Study of Canadian Radio and Television (ASCRT), chaired a session on the CBC history research project which the NFTSA is jointly sponsoring with
the Corporation, and presented a paper on the NFTSA's role in the archiving of broadcasting at the ASCRT annual conference in Vancouver. Ernie Dick and Richard Lochead
attended the conference of the International Association of Sound Archives in Washington
where the former chaired a panel on international perspectives on copyright, and the
latter presented a paper on the role of the archivist with respect to oral history.
The NFTSA continues to offer advice and assistance on oral history in Canada.
Richard Lochead edits the Journal of the Canadian Oral History Association and
presented a paper on national oral history trends in Canada at the association's annual
conference in Vancouver.
This past year, Pierre Stevens accepted a permanent position with the Collections
Development Section, after two and a half years service with the NFTSA as a SAPP
appointee from the National Museum of Man. He brings with him excellent relations
with the ethnographic and anthropological community in Canada and abroad, and one
of his chief tasks this past year was the organization of film screenings for the International Congress of the Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences meeting in Vancouver,
an event that led to the NFTSA acquiring a broad cross-section of the best film-making
of this genre throughout the world.
One of the ways that the NFTSA works with festivals and special exhibitions of
moving images and recorded sound is to act as the archives for the organization concerned. In this way, the NFTSA acquires prints or vidéocassette copies of the Academy
of Canadian Cinema/Canada Council Short Film Showcase, the winners of the Student
Film Festival, the Banff International Television Festival, the CAN-PRO Festival, the
Yorkton Film Festival, and others. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Machine Readable Archives Division
The EDP Information Systems Section was formally established with the hiring of
the chief and the development of Position Analysis Schedules for two staff members.
The chief of the section was very active in a number of projects related to the management of EDP data, particularly the development of guidelines for the scheduling of personal information and the automated office field trial study in the Department of Communications. The first phase of a major project was completed on the assessment of
automated cartographic systems in the federal government and the archival implications
of acquiring such data. An EDP feasibility study was completed and approved. The
study led to the design, development and implementation of a tape and file management system.
Work continued on the joint project with the Department of Communications for
the development of policies respecting the management, deposit and maintenance of
publicly-funded machine readable data files and for the development of a strategy for
an inventory of Canadian machine readable data files and data bases. The first four
issues of the divisional Bulletin were written, printed and distributed.
The Machine Readable Archives and the National Film, Television and Sound
Archives undertook a pilot project involving the use of a joint telephone receptionist
service. Considerable time was spent on the preparation and review of space requirements
for the proposed new building for the Archives. The divisional mandate and scope of
activities was reviewed, revised and approved by the director general of the Archives
Branch. The organizational structure of the division was examined in considerable detail,
an activity that will be continued into the first part of the new fiscal year.
The Management of EDP Data — A considerable amount of work was undertaken
throughout the year. The chief of the EDP Information Systems Section was involved
in a variety of projects that will provide the necessary information to form the basis
for the development of an integrated archival and records management approach to the
identification, description and scheduling of EDP files. During the first portion of the
year, the chief of the section devoted most of his time to revising Chapter 461 of Treasury
Board's Administrative Policy Manual and developing a plan for the implementation
of the policy. These tasks were undertaken as a result of a secondment for several months
to the Treasury Board Task Force on Access to Information and Privacy.
A Department of Communications (DOC) and Public Archives Information Management Working Group, under the chairpersonship of the chief of the EDP Information
Systems Section and composed of representatives from the Federal Archives Division
and the Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division, was formally established. This was a result of a DOC invitation to participate in the automated office field
trial that is underway in its Broadcasting and Social Policy Branch. The Working Group
undertook a number of activities: the development of terms of reference; the review
and description of the existing traditional records management system in the Broadcasting
and Social Policy Directorate, the results of which will form the basis for later assessment of the impact of the new technology on traditional information handling practices; the identification, description and evaluation of "work flows" as they exist in
the branch; the preparation and testing of interview questions to determine the relationships between secretaries, analysts, managers and the branch filing systems, as well as
to define personal work habits with respect to the creation, use, classification and
arrangement of records; and finally, the provision of advice concerning the incorporation of records management and archival management requirements in the technical
specifications for the automated system.
A procedures document was developed for the scheduling of personal information,
including an approach for carrying out the project in the Public Archives. In order to
emphasize the importance of the personal information scheduling project to all depart- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
ments and agencies, the Public Archives and Treasury Board held joint workshops
throughout the month of January. The chief of the EDP Information Systems Section
and officers from Treasury Board prepared a document, "Personal Information Scheduling: Applying the Policy," which provided agencies with guidance in applying the six
principles prescribed by the policy, and they also participated in the workshops. A procedures document providing guidance to PAC personnel in processing schedules and
in coordinating meetings with departments and agencies was completed. The first draft
schedules from federal departments and agencies were received in the latter part of the
year, divisional staff being required to devote a considerable amount of time to the processing of the schedules.
Another major activity in the program for the management of EDP data was the
initiation of a number of pilot projects in the departments of Employment and Immigration, Indian and Northern Affairs, and Statistics Canada. The purpose of the projects
is to test various approaches to the identification, description and scheduling of EDP
data in computer systems. The terms of reference and a workplan for the pilot project
in the Health Statistics Division of Statistics Canada were formally approved and a working group established. The objectives of this particular project range from the development of an integrated approach to scheduling, to the development of procedures for
scheduling personal information, to the establishment of guidelines for determining the
jurisdictional status of EDP data files, to the assessment of proposals for ensuring the
preservation of historically valuable data within the framework of Statistics Canada and
Public Archives legislation. Draft terms of reference for the pilot project in Employment and Immigration were forwarded to senior managers in the Management Information Systems Directorate for approval prior to the end of the year. The intent of this
project is to assess proposals for the scheduling and archival preservation of EDP data
managed in a large complex computer system containing sensitive personal information.
The pilot project with Indian and Northern Affairs was postponed due to other commitments and priorities within that department. It will be initiated in the new fiscal year.
The chief of the EDP Information Systems Section continued to participate in the
Data Dictionary Systems Working Group of the Government EDP Standards Committee. The PAC representative prepared a report on the legislative authorities for a data
management program and assisted in the conduct and analysis of a survey of data dictionary usage in over 400 government agencies, selected private corporations and academic
institutions. Both the report and the survey are to be folded into a major report on the
selection, installation and use of data dictionaries in federal government agencies.
The report on legislative authorities is based on research into the provisions of existing
laws and policies that oblige government agencies to apply good management practices
to the creation, use, storage and disposal of EDP data in systems. In addition to
tributing to the major report on data dictionaries, it will form the basis for the establish
ment of standards and procedures supporting the program activities of the new section
The results of the Data Dictionary Systems survey will be invaluable in providing the
EDP Information Systems Section with an understanding of which government agen
cies are most likely to be in a position to comply with Chapter 461, based on their commitment to the support of a data administration function.
Appraisal and Acquisition — Archivists continued to be involved in the appraisal and
acquisition of EDP data files. One hundred and twenty-four files were acquired during
the year. Major acquisitions were from Parks Canada, Employment and Immigration,
and the Department of Justice. Nineteen files were reacquired from the Department of
National Defence. These files had been appraised and acquired several years ago, but
had been recalled by the department. Since that time, a schedule was initiated, submitted and subsequently approved, resulting in the reacquisition of the records. Approximately 60 microfilm submissions and records retention and disposal schedules were processed during the year. Meetings were held with researchers at the University of Montreal concerning the acquisition by the PAC of a data base containing records on births, PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
deaths and marriages in Quebec from 1600 to 1730. Discussions were also held with
officials from the House of Commons regarding the transfer of the machine readable
versions of the House of Commons debates and the meetings of the Parliamentary Com-
. Three hundred and twenty-one descriptions of files were entered into the divisional automated inventory. Reports were produced for staff describing files in the inventory for which they have responsibility.
Staff examined the new Access to Information and Privacy legislation in order to
determine its impact on divisional procedures. A document was prepared outlining the
impact of the legislation on the activities undertaken in the division. The major area
affected was in the transfer of files. Negotiations for the possible acquisition of EDP
data from Revenue Canada and Statistics Canada late in the year led to a reexamination
of the document. Experience gained since the proclamation of the legislation was taken
into consideration as well, and a revised document was prepared. The revised document
emphasizes that archival data transferred to the division are considered to be under the
division's control with regard to access, although recommendations made by officers
in the creating institutions will be taken into consideration when determining access to
the data.
Work on a number of projects was undertaken during the year. The final report
outlining a sampling strategy for individual and corporate case files was submitted by
the contractor. The report will be reviewed and analyzed at both the branch and departmental levels before the proposed sampling strategies are accepted as policy.
The interim report on the use of automated cartographic systems in the federal
government and the archival implications of appraising, acquiring, describing, conserving and servicing such data was completed in July. The report, entitled "An Assessment
of Geographic Base Files," was forwarded to the director general of the Archives Branch
and the director of the National Map Collection for review and comments. Further work
on the project will await the return of the archivist who is presently on language training.
A number of meetings were held with officers from the Carleton University Social
Science Data Archives (SSDA) concerning the acquisition of Canadian gallup poll data
held by that institution. Much of this information is not accessible as the SSDA has
not had the necessary resources to process the data and prepare proper documentation
manuals. Negotiations continued throughout the year to develop a contract that could
satisfy all parties involved. The project is expected to begin in the first quarter of the
new fiscal year.
Work on the 1871 census project with the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) continued throughout the year. By the end of March, information on approximately 225,000
individuals who were included in the 1871 census of Ontario had been submitted. Special
coding was required for the religious affiliations and this has also been completed.
Information on 145,000 individuals was made machine readable and printouts produced
for the respective townships. OGS volunteers across the province are now verifying this
information against the microfilm version of the 1871 census. They are also continuing
the transcription of the required information from microfilm to the special coding sheets
for the remaining 675,000 individuals.
The directors of the Federal Archives Division, the Machine Readable Archives Division, and the Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division drew up terms
of reference for the new Inter-Branch Information Management Committee. The latter
is responsible for coordinating all joint archival and records management activities and
projects involving the Archives and Records Management Branches. A number of
meetings were held during the year with particular emphasis being given to the review
of procedures for the scheduling of personal information, the revision of the records
retention and disposal form, the degree of PAC involvement in the review of entries
submitted to Treasury Board by government departments for inclusion in the 1984 ATIP PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
publications, and the further refinement of an integrated approach to the scheduling
of operational records.
Control — During the year, the division processed 59 machine readable data files and
catalogued 69 data files.
Progress was made on the processing of the backlog of data files. Textual data
acquired from the Department of Justice posed some problems and a number of meetings
were held with personnel from Supply and Services Canada and QL Systems to gain
a better understanding of the ATS System used to manage the data. Work continued
on the cataloguing of the processed files throughout the year. A preliminary catalogue
record is now developed at the time of accessioning to provide better control over all
files held by the division.
Although short-staffed for most of the year, the tape library continued to provide
the day-to-day services required by the archivists. The staff of the tape library undertook an inventory of 4,566 tapes in the main library. Over 3,000 tapes were moved during the year.
As a result of an overall approach to automated control systems in the Archives
Branch, the division contracted with the Bureau of Management Consulting (BMC) of
Supply and Services Canada to review the existing divisional operations with particular
emphasis on informational and physical control of the holdings. A final report was completed in August. The BMC recommended, as an interim measure, that the division
develop two integrated data bases, one for the management of all tapes, and the other
for the bibliographic information, and that the MINISIS software package be used. The
results of the BMC study were approved by both the Archives Branch and Departmental
EDP Committees. The division will absorb the developmental costs of the system. A
contract with Systemhouse for the detailed design and development of the tape and file
management system was approved and work began in January. The staff of the Documentation and Public Service Section spent considerable time with the Systemhouse consultants in defining the data elements, as well as the various reports and products required
from the system. The report containing the detailed design was approved by the Divisional
Management Committee in February. The second stage of the project, the development
of the tape management data base, was completed at the end of March. This included
the testing of the system, the conversion of the data from the existing system into the
MINISIS-based system, the preparation of user manuals, and training sessions for the
head of the EDP Records Storage and Conservation Program.
The division became more involved in the Branch EDP Committee during the latter part of the year. In addition to its representative on the committee, the branch director general asked the division director to assist temporarily in the coordination of Archives
Branch EDP matters by organizing and chairing the meetings of the Branch EDP Committee, representing the Archives Branch on the Departmental EDP Committee, and
discussing with consultants from the Bureau of Management Consulting progress on
the various steps of the EDP feasibility studies being undertaken in the divisions and
at the branch level. The major items of discussion of the committee were the Archives
Branch 1984 Information Technology and System Plan and a detailed analysis of the
BMC Report on a Branch Integrated Indexing System.
Work on the development of a finding aid describing the EDP history and activities
of each department began late in the fourth quarter. The elements of the finding aid
were outlined and approved by the Divisional Management Committee. The purpose
of the finding aid is to provide a detailed background on the development of EDP in
each federal department, major systems which exist, and some information on future
plans in the creation or expansion of EDP systems. The finding aids will assist both
divisional staff and researchers in obtaining a comprehensive knowledge of the development of EDP systems and applications in the federal government. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
Conservation — During the year, 37 documentation manuals were microfilmed and 939
magnetic tapes were precision rewound.
The greatest portion of time in the conservation subactivity was devoted to a resolution of problems that had been experienced for some time with divisional magnetic tapes.
After considerable investigation by the head of the EDP Records Storage and Conservation Program, it was discovered that many of the problems with the magnetic tapes
resulted from accumulated dust and dirt on the tapes. This dust and dirt came from
a number of sources. First of all, the precision rewinding/cleaning machines had not
been equipped with their rotary cleaning blades at the time of their installation which
meant that, during the past six years, the tapes had been precision rewound and not
cleaned. It is the rotary cleaning blades that permit the cleaning of the tapes, removing
any dust or dirt that might accumulate on the tapes as a result of storage or the precision rewinding process. It appears that the blades had not been installed originally for
fear that they might tear the tapes. Because of this decision, dirt on the tapes was being
moved around, but not removed.
It was also discovered that the outer shells of the precision rewinding/cleaning
machines were not being cleaned as thoroughly as they should be. Furthermore, the walls,
ceiling and floor of the tape vault, as well as the tape racks, were not being cleaned
as often as was required, as a result of which there was a certain buildup of dust and dirt.
With respect to the equipment, it was decided that only scratch tapes would be precision rewound and cleaned using the rotary blades, essentially because the machines were
nearly six years old and they required a considerable amount of maintenance. At the
time that the original machines were purchased, no other models existed. However, in
six years, technology has advanced and there are now several more sophisticated models
on the market. As the equipment is vital to the divisional conservation program, it is
extremely important that the existing machines be replaced.
It was also decided that an annual contract would have to be established with a
company or an individual, at divisional expense, in order to have the tape vault thoroughly
cleaned, as well as the tape racks and the canisters in which the magnetic tapes are stored.
The service bureau with which the division has its largest computer processing contract
has been asked to investigate the maintenance schedule of its tape drives, as tests have
revealed that dust and dirt are quite evident as tapes pass through the drives. With these
and other stringent conservation measures, it is hoped that the problems will be resolved.
A considerable amount of time was spent by the head of the EDP Records Storage
and Conservation Program on the work of the Archives Branch Conservation Committee due to his duties as secretary for the first half of the year. Two committee projects
were initiated: the preparation of a document describing in some detail the conservation
activities performed in the division; and the review and revision of the 1979 divisional
standards for the storage, handling and transportation of magnetic tapes.
Public Service — During the year, the public service area responded to 183 inquiries,
provided 97 copies of material, welcomed 17 visitors and produced six publications.
The number of inquiries and requests for tape copies grew substantially this year.
With more emphasis being given to the distribution of information on the holdings of
the division, it is hoped that this trend will continue. The first volume of the quarterly
Bulletin was completed and distributed. Each of the four issues of Volume 1 concentrated on one of the archival activities undertaken in the division: appraisal of machine
readable records; processing of the records; and documentation of the data files. The
first issue provided a general history and overview of the division.
Considerable time was spent on the preparation of three major publications. The
descriptive entries and indexes for the second edition of the Catalogue of Holdings were
completed in both English and French. Publication of the Catalogue is expected early PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
in the next year. The General Guide Series 1983: Machine Readable Archives Division
was completed. The Guide provides an overview of the division, its organization and
services, as well as a listing of the titles of the data files held by the division by record
group. The organization of the division's holdings by record group should provide a
Link to other records of government departments held by the Archives Branch. The draft
of a joint publication with Health and Welfare Canada was completed. This publication is an inventory of Canadian data files and data bases in the health promotion and
disease prevention fields.
A new researcher request form and related procedures were developed. The form
will be used to record all requests for machine readable data files received in the division. Major work was undertaken to amalgamate the two existing mailing lists used in
the division.
A considerable amount of time was expended in the joint project with the Social
Policy and New Services Directorate of the Department of Communications to investigate
the various options associated with the development of a national on-line inventory of
Canadian machine readable data files and data bases and to investigate the need for
policies in the communications/cultural sector of the federal government for the deposit,
maintenance and management of EDP data of archival or research value. The first phase
of the project consisted of interviewing individuals in the public and private sectors from
across the country who are interested or involved in these areas. The second phase of
the project included the preparation of a discussion paper based on these interviews,
and the holding of a one-day forum at the Learned Societies Conference in Vancouver
on June 6. The third phase of the project, which is to be the preparation of a further
discussion paper, including recommendations for the consideration of senior officers
in both departments, has not yet been completed. The project resulted from the division's user survey and the Sovereignty Aspects Working Group of the Interdepartmental Task Force on Transborder Data Flows.
Staff Activities — Staff of the division continued their involvement in a number of associations and activities that resulted in the presentation of workshops, the writing of articles, and involvement in the planning of conferences. Pauline Charron lectured to participants of the seventh French Records Management Course organized by the Records
Management and Micrographie Systems Division. She also presented a paper on EDP
archival and records management issues at a conference organized by the Ottawa Chapter
of the Association des archivistes du Québec. Brian Billings prepared an article on the
machine readable records acquired from the Canadian Wheat Board. The article will
appear in a forthcoming issue of The Archivist. Katharine Gavrel gave information sessions on the activities of the division to the students taking the English Archives Course
sponsored by the PAC, and to the students from the University of British Columbia
who were undertaking their practica at the PAC. Along with three American colleagues,
she assisted in the presentation of a two-day preconference workshop on machine readable
records given at the 1983 annual meeting of the Society of American Archivists. She
also participated in a workshop on machine readable records organized by the American
Sociological Association at their annual conference. John McDonald was also involved
in the presentation of lectures and workshops. He provided a lecture on the management of EDP data to students taking the English Records Management Course held in
Edmonton. A similar lecture was given to those taking the Records Management Course
at Algonquin College. He also gave an information session at a monthly meeting of the
Ottawa Chapter of ARMA, focusing on the approach records managers should adopt
to the identification, description and scheduling of computerized information. During
a trip to Washington, he gave a special session to the Committee on Government Records
on the program activities of the EDP Information Systems Section. Harold Naugler
presented a paper on the conservation of magnetic recordings at the Society of American
Archivists' annual conference. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
A number of staff members held official positions in associations and were involved
in the planning of conferences. Katharine Gavrel continued as president of IASSIST
and also acted as coordinator of the 1984 IASSIST conference being held in Ottawa.
John McDonald acted as chairperson of the Local Arrangements Committee for the
IASSIST conference and Harold Naugler was chairperson of the Programme Committee. Winston Gomes was heavily involved in the work of ARMA. He is president of
the Ottawa Chapter, and a member of the Programme Committees for both the 1983
and 1984 ARMA International conferences. Oksana Migus acted as cochairperson of
the ACA Membership Committee, taking over from Harold Naugler in June of 1983.
Harold Naugler continued as cochairperson of the SAA's Automated Records and Techniques Task Force. He is also the Canadian representative on the ICA's Automation Committee and a member of the Board of Directors of the Social Science Federation of
Canada.
Assistance to the Archival Community
The Archives Branch devoted considerable resources to this activity in 1983-1984.
The projects described below form only a part of those undertaken and completed in
the year. In addition to such divisional activities, branch managers were increasingly
preoccupied with the rationalization, consolidation and coordination of existing initiatives
and the planning of new processes to better meet the needs of the wider archival
community.
Two sessions of the Archives Course were held in 1983-1984. Thirty students from
other institutions participated in these English-language courses, which were coordinated
by John Smart, and in which a number of PAC staff took part as session leaders. The
branch also continued assistance to the Masters of Archival Studies Program at the
University of British Columbia by providing a practicum for six students during the summer months in various PAC divisions.
The branch hosted the first annual meeting of the Society for the History of
Discoveries ever to take place in Canada, in the autumn of 1983. Together with the
National Film Board, the National Library and the Department of Communications,
the Archives organized two meetings on the subject of the National Audiovisual Data
Base Project, in order to develop a set of specifications for this data base. Staff of the
branch continued to provide adjudication services for a number of funding requests for
archival projects submitted to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.
Again in 1983-1984, Archives Branch staff edited Archivaria, the journal of the
Association of Canadian Archivists. This major role, assumed in response to an ACA
request, now accounts for the bulk of time devoted to archival assistance by the Federal
Archives Division. Regular offerings on archival bibliography were also provided to the
journal Archives of the Association des archivistes du Québec. Sam Kula authored a
monograph for UNESCO's RAMP Program on the archival appraisal of moving image
documents. Work began during the year on the planning of a Union List of Canadian
Machine Readable Data Files and Data Bases. This project had been identified as a major
requirement by social scientists, and by Canadian data archivists and librarians who
attended a one-day symposium held in the spring of 1983.
In the category of assistance to specific institutions, the following examples can
be cited. As the only Canadian institution with facilities to convert nitrate film to safety
film, the Archives responded to four such requests in 1983-1984. It was also able to
assist eight institutions by preserving substandard moving image and recording sound
documents. In addition, the Archives contracted with provincial archives in Alberta,
Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia to enable these institutions to carry out specific
projects in the identification and acquisition of film, television and sound records. The PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
department provided advice and assistance to the Smithsonian Institution, the Still Photo
Division of the National Film Board, the Dalhousie University Archives and the Simon
Fraser University Library's Special Collections unit on various aspects of automation
and cataloguing as they apply to photographic archives.
Assistance was provided to the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick and the New
Brunswick Museum in the preparation of an exhibition on the mapping of the province
from the earliest times to the present. This is only one example of assistance provided
on the design of exhibitions and on the possibilities for the loan of PAC material. Staff
of the branch also advised the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland concerning a major
purchase by them of about 75 post-1850 French hydrographie charts of that province.
Advice was given to the Hannah Institute on the format and content of its Directory
of Medical Archives in Ontario. In the same vein, a report was prepared for the
Presbyterian Archives at the University of Toronto on the conservation aspects of the
institution's environment. Finally, branch staff provided written advice on the state of
the archives held by the Toronto Harbour Commission.
Well over 1,000 reels of manuscript collections and government records were
duplicated for provincial archives under the Diffusion Program. For Manitoba and
Quebec, passengers lists in Immigration Branch records (RG 76) were copied. Ontario
received a large number of reels of Audit Office 12 and 13 records. Quebec was sent
the remainder of the Neilson papers and a series of pre-Confederation records, Commissions for Notaries and Advocates (RG 4, B 8). A duplicate copy of the New Brunswick
portion of the 1881 census was sent to that province and a small amount of genealogical
material was duplicated for Nova Scotia. One copy of the recently-arrived microfilm
of the Dominions Office records was made for Newfoundland. Portions of the Brooke
Claxton (MG 32, B 5) and CA. Magrath (MG 30, E 82) papers were copied for Newfoundland as well.  Conservation and Technical
Services Branch
The Conservation and Technical Services Branch was established April 1,1983 and
was assigned, by the Dominion Archivist, the responsibility for the conservation of Public
Archives and National Library collections, the provision of photographic services and
optical disc advisory services for the Public Archives and National Library, and the provision of computer system services to the Public Archives. Attached to the office of the
director general is an administration office that supports the branch activities.
The Records Conservation Training Program was implemented in August 1983 when
seven staff members were accepted into the training program. The course provides trainees
with on-the-job training and experience, and is designed to develop fully-qualified Records
Conservators within a maximum of six years.
The first module of a series of Conservation Courses was developed for presentation in April 1984. The course called, "The Conservation of Paper," provides information concerning all aspects of the conservation of paper records, and includes presentations such as Causes of Deterioration, Contingency Planning, Security and Alternatives
to Conservation. The course is to be presented to archivists, librarians and staff of the
Public Archives and National Library of Canada and is intended to improve the
knowledge and understanding of conservation practices within the two departments.
Future courses in the series will include conservation of photographs, motion picture
films, oil paintings, and video and audio records.
The director general was asked to chair a new Departmental EDP Committee and
to establish a committee structure for processing EDP systems applications and EDP
system enhancements. The new structure was established in August 1983 and includes
a Departmental Committee and four branch committees. Terms of reference for all committees were established and the 1984 Departmental Information Technology and Systems
Plan was completed and submitted to Treasury Board in February. The Departmental
EDP Committee proposes to monitor the use of microcomputers in the department for
the next two years to determine their effectiveness and the possible cost benefit.
The branch continues to assist the archival community by providing advice concerning the conservation of items and materials, and by presenting lectures and papers to
archival institutions and associations requesting branch participation.
Optical Disc Systems
Optical Disc Systems provides optical disc advisory services to the Public Archives
and National Library of Canada and researches, designs, develops and implements optical
disc storage and retrieval systems for the Public Archives.
At the request of Supply and Services Canada, the chief acted as the technical
authority during a study to assess the optical disc requirements of the federal government and to determine the possibility of developing a Canadian optical disc industry.
During the study, an optical disc workshop held at the Public Archives was attended
by approximately 200 representatives of departments that have expressed an interest in
this technology.
A brief summary of other optical disc involvements is outlined below.
National Photography Collection Study — A feasibility study was conducted to determine if photographic images could be digitized, stored on optical disc and then reproduced PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
as photographic prints. The black-and-white portion of the study was successfully completed and work has commenced on the colour portion of the project.
Machine Readable Archives — A magnetic tape containing textual and graphic information was produced. The chief evaluated the software and tape drives to determine
the best method for recording information on optical disc and then transferring the information onto magnetic tape.
National Film, Television and Sound Archives — The chief was involved in studying
methods for transferring images from disc to film and is now searching for more
economical methods of transferring images from film to disc.
Picture Conservation Division
The division provides preservation and restoration services for works of art on paper,
oil paintings, photographic records, medals and special items from the collections of
the Public Archives and National Library of Canada. Staff members are also engaged
in exploring new methods for the restoration of deteriorated photographic materials and
in developing an apprenticeship program for photograph conservators. The division is
building a bibliographic data base called PHOCUS on the preservation, storage and
restoration of photographic images. Staff members also prepare recommendations on
r of storage, on display in exhibitions and on handling works of art.
A conserved wi PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Prints and Drawings Conservation Studio — This unit was working again at full strength
with the hiring of John Grace as assistant conservator of Prints and Drawings. Principal items treated during this year included: 114 works, mostly lithographs, which were
displayed during the North American Print Council conference; four pastel portraits
from the Goodham collection; three views of Montreal by E. Whitefield, T. Patten and
R. Dillon; four watercolours by Harriet Cartwright; a large lithograph of the City of
Toronto by W. Armstrong; five hand-screened Christmas cards, two of which were by
A.Y. Jackson and one by Lawren Harris; five iron-gall ink drawings; 22 intaglio prints;
various works by T.J. Richardson, Capt. Geoffrey C. Mundy, Edward Bedwell, David
Milne, H.F. Ainslie, Philip John Bainbrigge, P. Kane, J. Peachey and William Henry PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Bartlett; 13 sepia watercolours by George Seton; 23 portraits by Goodridge Roberts,
Charles Comfort and Wilfred Melvin; six watercolours by J.P. Cockburn, J. Peachey,
G. Heriot and H. Lawes; 35 works by Henry James Warre; 15 illustrations by C.W.
Jefferys; 13 silhouettes, nine of which are by A. Edouart; five prints, which had been
hanging in the Canadian High Commission in London for over 50 years, and which
included works by J.P. Cockburn, W.J. Bennett and H.A. Strong; and works by H.
Ellis, W.G.R. Hind, A.J. Miller, H.C.B. Moody and W.H.E. Napier. Approximately
900 items in the Emily Carr collection were examined and reported upon.
On Friday, July 22, 1983, a visitor to the Public Archives poured red paint from
a small plastic bottle onto the Proclamation of the Canadian Constitution. The event
overshadowed the activities in the Prints and Drawings Conservation Studio for several
weeks. First aid treatment was applied in the stack area, followed by work on a suction
table in the studio. While the bulk of the paint could be removed when it was still wet,
a heavy red stain remained imbibed into the paper, leaving the text barely legible. During the following weeks intensive consultations were undertaken with various departments of the federal government and private industry, leading to the conclusion that
a relatively easy and inexpensive solution to removing the red stain did not exist. After
senior management was presented with a list of optional treatments, all of them being
of a more or less exploratory character, it was decided by the Dominion Archivist on
December 22 to halt, for the present time, all further attempts to restore the document
to its original state.
Oil Painting Conservation Studio — In August, Barbara Klempan joined the Picture
Conservation Division as fine art conservator. She had previously been employed by
the Canadian Conservation Institute. Her survey of the division's conservation facilities
for oil paintings led to the acquisition of numerous pieces of equipment, which improved
the facilities. A total of 12 oil paintings were treated, among them: a "Portrait of H.
Ruttan" by T. Hamel, dated 1856; a "Portrait of Sir George Prévost Bart," unknown
date; a "Portrait of Louis-Joseph Papineau" by A. Boisseau, dated 1881; a self-portrait
by Frederick B. Taylor, dated 1941; a "Portrait of Isabella Clark" by an unknown artist,
dated approximately 1843; a "Portrait of Donald Smith of North West River" by
W. Hind; a "Portrait of Jacques Cartier" by T. Hamel; a painting entitled "Landing
of the British Troops and Battle of the Plains of Abraham" by Francis Swain; three
ivory miniatures and one painting in enamel on a metal support.
Medal Conservation Unit — During the past year, 113 medals were examined and cleaned.
Since the entire National Medal Collection has been moved to the West Memorial
Building, studies are underway to establish conditions of 40% relative humidity inside
the storage safes for the medal collection. A condition report on approximately 10,000
medals was completed.
PHOCUS Data Base — The development and testing of the PHOCUS system, the
bibliographical control system on literature dealing with the conservation of photographs,
proceeded extremely well and was completed within a year. Retrospective conversion
of the existing manual records was begun. All amendments to the Universal Decimal
Classification (UDC), submitted by the division and prepared in collaboration with
representatives from the photographic industry, which incorporate the concepts of
deterioration, permanence, preservation and restoration into the UDC system, were finally
approved by its governing body, the Fédération internationale de documentation in
January 1984.
Photograph Conservation Laboratory — Approximately 610 items were examined in
the laboratory and 330 were treated. They included daguerreotypes, albumen prints, black-
and-white sheet film negatives, silver gelatin prints, dye transfer prints and a hand-
coloured over-size photograph of the Supreme Court Judges. The conservator of
Photographic Records, Doug Madley, left the division in September to pursue his career
elsewhere.
J PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Following a request for assistance from the International Development Research
Centre (IDRC) to the Dominion Archivist, K.B. Hendriks, director of the division, was
asked to undertake a mission to four French-speaking countries of West and Equatorial
Africa in order to examine the possibility of establishing a training centre for records
conservators in one of those countries. It would be a national school of international
scope serving approximately 20 African countries whose official language is French. A
report with his observations and recommendations, following five weeks of travels to
Africa and France from April 5 to May 7, was presented to the IDRC and to senior
managers at the Public Archives.
Numerous lectures were given by staff members during the past year. K.B. Hendriks,
who was presented with a Service Award by the Society of Photographic Scientists and
Engineers, gave presentations to the International Institute for Conservation - Canadian Group (IIC-CG) in Banff, Alberta, and to the Photo Materials Group of the
American Institute for Conservation (PMG-AIC) in Louisville, Kentucky. He lectured
at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in Rochester, N.Y.; at Concordia University and McGill University in Montreal; at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.;
and gave a one-day seminar at the Canadian Conservation Institute.
TABLE XXI
Picture Conservation Statistics
Oil Paintings
Examinations        35
Treatments         12
Watercolours, Prints and Drawings
Examinations    1,436
Treatments       479
Photographs
Examinations       610
Treatments       330
Medals, Ivory and Seals
Examinations       113
Treatments       113
Photographic Documentation
Black-and-White Negatives  828
Black-and-White Prints  236
Colour Slides  6,354
Test Samples   324
Records Conservation Division
Records Conservation provides conservation and restoration services for historical
and rare books, manuscripts, maps, atlases, posters and other paper, and leather-based
archival and library material for the Public Archives and National Library of Canada.
The division also provides a training program to develop qualified Canadian conservators
A Records Conservation Training Program designed to develop Canadian conser
vators was implemented August 8, 1983. Seven employees with varying degrees of experience were evaluated and accepted into the program according to their qualifi PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1
They were given an outline of their training requirements and are being given an opportunity to be trained to the senior conservator level.
Four additional trainees were hired during the year. They entered Phase I of the
training program and during the next four and a half to six years will be expected to
develop the skills, knowledge and abilities of a senior conservator.
At the invitation of the Society of Bookbinders and Book Restorers in England,
Jan Pidek, director of the division, travelled to Great Britain to attend the society's
national conference and to give a presentation on the Mass Deacidification System at
the Public Archives of Canada.
He was also invited to speak to the Ontario Association of Archivists during their
first annual conference, Queen's University Archives, Kingston, on "Conservation -
The State of the Art,in Canada."
Mass Deacidification — The acquisition of a second dryer has permitted the section to
process 10 additional cycles of books per week, increasing the number of deacidified
books by 30 per cent. The division is also considering shift work to optimize the use
of the system and has identified person-year and financial resources that would be required
to work three shifts per day.
After extensive research and testing on the suitability of book labels, Records Conservation has identified suitable labels, and results of preliminary tests are very encouraging. The division will recommend the type of label to be used and will issue a report
when all the tests have been completed.
Following the publication of the article, "A Well-Documented Solution," in the
November/December 1983 issue of Dm Pont Magazine, the American Chemical Society
requested permission to do a Science Scene TV news feature on the Deacidification System
at the Public Archives. A videotape of the operation of the system was produced in
February and was distributed to approximately 180 TV stations in the United States.
Books and Records — Principal items treated during the year included: 17 items for
the United Empire Loyalist Exhibition in New Brunswick; a portfolio for the collection
of documents presented to His Majesty Don Juan Carlos I of Spain by the Governor
General; two volumes of The Vision Tree to commemorate the Governor General's award
to the author Phyllis Webb; two portfolios for the Proclamation of the Constitution;
and the restoration of George Heriot's bound volumes of prints.
Maps and Records — Items restored and treated in the section included the George
Carmack Discovery Deed, one of the most significant documents belonging to the Yukon
Department of Tourism, Heritage and Cultural Resources; the rare and valuable hand
written poem "In Flanders Field" by John McCrae; maps, plans and drawings from
the Barnett collection; and the first postal map of Upper and Lower Canada drawn in
1832 by T.A. Stayner.
TABLE XXII
Records Conservation Statistics
Conservation
Documents and Manuscripts  24,642
Maps and Posters  3,992
Books   1,078
Deacidification
Sheets   1,850,290 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
Photography Services Division
The division provides photographie services to the Public Archives and National
Library of Canada and the researchers who use their facilities.
Late in the year the director, John Howard, retired following 30 years of service
and Charles Millins, the head of the Photographic Section retired after 13 years service
in the Public Archives.
During the year, a Reprography Quality Control Committee conducted a study and
presented a report recommending the type of services to be provided, the setting of PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-19
priorities, the training requirements for staff and the level of service to be established.
The new director will be a member of a committee formed to implement the operational
aspects of an improvement program.
Prior to John Howard's departure, he participated with Doug Sinclair, the division
EDP representative, in the development of an automated photography print numbering
and work scheduling system. They also participated in the selection and acquisition of
a microcomputer and printer.
The division also acquired a microprocessor with an automated facility for mounting and annotating slides. This equipment should make it possible to reduce turn around
time in the Slide Production Unit of the Colour Section.
TABLE XXIII
Photography Services Statistics
Negatives  12,899
Photographs   49,396
Photostats  1,710
105 mm Maps  3,152
Colour Items  10,463
Photographic Assignments  162
Computer Systems Division
The Computer Systems Division provides computer systems expertise for the development, coordination, implementation and maintenance of EDP applications for the Public
Archives.
The division was involved in a number of projects throughout the department. A
brief description of these projects follows.
PERSFILE System — The Data Enquiry subsystem was contracted out to the Advisory
Bureau of Computing, Personnel Application Centre (ABC/PAC), Supply and Services
Canada, since the subsystem interfaces with their IBM computer. A RCX70 communications board and HASP, a software package that allows data and printout transfers
between the Public Archives Data General C-150 and the ABC/PAC computer, were
installed.
A number of modifications made to the system during the year resulted in: listings
of historical files being transferred to the Archives Branch, the completion of Post Office
files processed in 1983, a demonstration package and a leave status subsystem.
Federal Records Centres Tape Library System — A new version of the Data Base Management system was installed on the Data General C-150 and revisions were made to user
documentation because of the numerous changes to the system.
Management Decision Support System — Work on the data entry portion of the system
continued and the initial entry of data dealing with forms, supplies, inventory and the
division library was completed.
Computer Output Microfilm Applications — Eleven COM applications were handled
this year. The programmer analyst supporting this function accepted a position in another
department and it was decided that all COM applications would become the responsibility of the Central Microfilm Operations. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
Photography Services Scheduling and Imprinting System — A system to schedule black-
and-white print processing and the imprinting of numbers on photographic items was
developed for the Photography Services Division of the Conservation and Technical Services Branch. Implementation of the system and the scheduling of colour processing
are to be completed in 1984.
During the year, two programmer analysts received special training and were assigned
to support users of the MINISIS package on the Hewlett Packard 3000 system. Two
other analysts assigned to support the Data General C-150 assisted with an audit of the
system. Recommendations following the audit included minimizing the number of controllers and as a result new applications are being implemented as subsystems on existing data bases.
Departmental EDP Advisor and Coordinator — The Departmental EDP Advisor and
Coordinator reports to the director general of the Conservation and Technical Services
Branch. He serves as secretary of the Departmental EDP Committee and is involved
in the coordination and management of departmental EDP activities and projects.
Significant EDP activities during the year were as follows: an Archives Branch
Feasibility Study that included a review and analysis of branch objectivés, indexing systems
and requirements, the identification of technological options with cost-benefit analysis
of these options and the development of a strategy and plan for detailed design, development and implementation; the initiation of two EDP systems in the Machine Readable
Archives Division, one to control the informational content and the other to control
the storage medium of their holdings (these systems will be developed using the MINISIS
software package and two distinct databases and the computer processing requirements
will be satisfied through the Facilities Management contract with Systemhouse); the
National Photography Collection experimental office automation project provided the
anticipated benefits including improved turn-around time for letters, memoranda, caption approval and cataloguing, highly improved access to work order processing data,
and improved performance in creation of finding aids; the Departmental Administration Automated Records Management System is in its implementation stage and will
be assessed by Records Management Branch officers for possible use in other government departments; the departmental automated leave system is fully operational and
is being modified to become compatible with Treasury Board's PARS/OLIS system;
major changes to the Financial Allotment Control System (FACS) management reports
were effected, making them more useful to managers; an automated bibliographic system
for the Picture Conservation Division of the Conservation and Technical Services Branch
was developed and is now operational.
The Public Archives participated in the Telidon User Group activities, a joint project of the Telidon Exploitation Program and the Government EDP Standards Committee. Telidon technology appears to have many features of interest to the Public
Archives, however, further familiarization with the advantages of this technology is
required before assessing its potential within the Public Archives.
During the year, five departmental managers participated in the testing of videotape
courses to train EDP project managers.  Departmental Administration
Departmental Administration is responsible for providing general administrative,
financial and personnel services jointly to the Public Archives and National Library.
It is also responsible for the provision of records services uniquely to the Public Archives.
The budget of Departmental Administration was $6,983,000 for 1983-1984 and the
person-year strength was 137.
As a result of a reorganization effective April 1, 1983, the Departmental Administra-^
tion branch mandate became purely administrative. Former operational components were
either transferred to other organizations within the Public Archives or amalgamated into
the new Conservation and Technical Services Branch.
Following the reorganization, a task force was formed to conduct a review of the
functions of Departmental Administration and to recommend services that might be
discontinued, reduced or performed differently so that related resources may be
reallocated. The task group completed its work towards the end of the year and decisions arising from this review will be taken by the branch management early in the new
year.
Branch Administration Office — The past year has seen the resources of the Branch
Administrative Office devoted to the provision of a centralized administrative service
for Departmental Administration and the Office of the Dominion Archivist, and a centralized word processing service for the branch and several areas outside the branch.
The office also administered the Suggestion Awards Program and the successful campaigns for the United Way and Canada Savings Bonds within both the Public Archives
and the National Library. In addition, several special studies such as the functional review
of the branch and an examination of word processing in both departments were undertaken and completed.
Financial Services
Financial Services provided to the Public Archives and the National Library financial planning and analysis, financial systems and training, and accounting operations.
During the year, considerable work was carried out in connection with the Financial Administration Manuals of both departments. The sections on "Relocation" and
"Financial Control Over Accounts Receivable and Revenue" (Archives) were published.
Several others were drafted and await publication. Courses were given concerning
Payables at Year End (PAYE) and Financial Management. The Financial Signing
Authorities Charts for the Archives were amended and published; those for the Library
were redrafted, but were held pending the appointment of a new National Librarian.
The use of the automated Financial Allotment Control System (FACS) was expanded
during 1983-1984. Accounts receivable and the inventory of furniture and equipment
for both departments were added. Supply and Services Canada (SSC) pay tapes are now
processed on FACS, generating reports for both departments. Reports to the senior
managements were improved through the use of FACS-generated reports and the graphic
services of SSC.
Throughout the year, the senior managers were kept informed of their approved
reference levels for all years covered by the 1984-1985 Multi-Year Operational Plan
(MYOP) and by the Fall Update with reconciliation schedules by Planning Elements
and by Branch as well as by 1983-1984 to 1984-1985 Main Estimates' audit trails. Special
reports detailed all 1982-1983 budget transfers for the Public Archives Senior Manage- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1983-1984
ment Committee and the status of all 1983-1984 resources by allotment for the Association National Librarian.
The third quarter saw the preparation and submission of the 1984-1985 Main
Estimates and Fall Update to the MYOP schedules, and the preparation, approval and
distribution of the timetables for the 1985-1986 MYOP. Financial and person-year data
for inclusion in Part III of the Main Estimates (the Departmental Expenditure Plan)
were verified to Public Accounts manuscripts and other departmental records. During
the fourth quarter, financial data was prepared and consolidated for inclusion in the
1985-1986 MYOP, and their submission to the Minister's Office and the Treasury Board
was coordinated.
Interim supply requests for the first quarter of 1984-1985 were approved by Parliament on March 29, 1984. Budgets for 1984-1985 and financial plans were submitted
to SSC prior to the February 15 deadline. The budget data was also loaded into the
FACS Control and User Accounts and the FINPLAN module.
Noteworthy submissions to the Treasury Board included: authority to purchase the
Sir Ernest MacMillan collection (NL); authority to purchase the Glen Gould collection
(NL); authority to purchase the Crawley Film collection (PAC); authority to purchase
the Marshall McLuhan papers (PAC); approval of guidelines for the establishment of
regional records centres (PAC); and approval for the reorganization of Departmental
Administration.
Personnel Services
The division's mandate to provide a comprehensive personnel and official languages
service in support of departmental activities remained unchanged. Significant initiatives
during the year included the following:
(a) review of the Employee Assistance Program and the subsequent decision to request
Health and Welfare Canada to provide the counselling and referral service for departmental employees under this program;
(b) the full automation of leave and attendance reports and the provision of semi-annual
reports to employees on their leave usage;
(c) the introduction of a program to inform and update employees on their benefits;
(d) an increase in the number of career planning courses offered to employees;
(e) the commencement of an analysis of the department's workforce and employment
systems to establish the necessary background to prepare objectives for the affirmative action program to be implemented in 1985; and
t of trainees for the Records Conservation
(f) the full implementation and recruitr
Training Program.
Organizationally, preliminary steps were taken to regroup the various functions
within Personnel Services. In particular, classification, staffing, official languages position identification and employee testing will be grouped together to provide an efficient
and effective one-stop service for managers in the recruitment of staff. Administrative Services
Administrative Services provides an administrative service to the Public Archives
and National Library in the fields of Property Management, Telecommunications,
Security and Emergency Measures, Record and Mail Management, Materiel and Forms
Management, and in the Exhibitions Production Workshop.
The major administrative change during this past year was the changing of the division's name from General Services to Administrative Services. Divisional mandates have
been updated and approved by the director general, and implementation of the approved
organizational changes continues (classification and staffing of positions). Work continues on Administrative Services' Policy and Procedural Manual, with the Forms
Management and Security Chapters receiving final approval and others at various stages
of review. The Manual was officially distributed during the fiscal year, with six chapters
of Materiel Management policies and procedures being issued. The division's Disaster
Contingency Plan, which is a support plan for other branches of the Public Archives
and National Library, has been drafted and is also at the review stage.
Accommodation planning remains a major preoccupation due to severe shortages
of adequate office and repository space for growing collections. Efforts have turned
from the development of space in Phase IV, Place du Portage, Hull, to a satellite building
to be located adjacent to the Printing Bureau in Hull. Detailed requirements have been
prepared and transmitted to the Department of Public Works.
Temporary relief was obtained with the addition of 4,6% square metres of repository
space in Ottawa. The year was very fruitful for accommodations outside of Ottawa.
The Winnipeg Records Centre was expanded to double its capacity to 7,636 square metres.
Another building (1,900 square metres) was added to the Montreal Records Centre. New
buildings were built in Vancouver (9,967 square metres) and Halifax (4,290 square metres),
both doubling their capacities. This accommodation has helped relieve some of the
pressures placed on the Federal Records Centres Division of the Records Management
Branch.
Although it has been a very active year for reconfiguration of Telecommunications
Services, there were no major projects. The policy and procedures manual was drafted
and reviewed for publication some time during the next fiscal year.
The Energy Conservation Program continued in the areas of paper recovery and
de-lamping. Several health and safety items were investigated and many problems
eliminated. Intrusion alarm systems and security procedures were upgraded in all Federal
Records Centres to meet clients' requirements. Success in streamlining the administrative
procedures for the Personnel Security Clearance Program has resulted in shortening the
time required to issue a clearance.
The file classification systems were developed or revised and implemented for many
new users; mail opening procedures were streamlined resulting in a time saving of approximately one half; and the "Records Services Users Guide" was drafted. Implementation of the automated records management system commenced in July of this year. A
proposed manuals and directives terms of reference was drafted and should be approved
some time during the next fiscal year.
An audit was initiated by the Treasury Board on the administration of service contracts — the resulting report was very favourable. Bilingual Material Management lectures were prepared for junior and middle managers. Distribution accounts were restructured to comply with Treasury Board policy. Forms Management conducted a program
to study the possibility of streamlining its operations. Several functions were allocated
to other areas as a result of this study. A revised functional review revealed many duplications; plans will be developed to automate this program within the next few years. 1+
SS6IK&I
rapport
annuel
1983/1984  1+
rapport
annuel
1983/1984 0 Ministre des Approvisionnements et Services Canada 1985
N° de cat. : SA1-1984
ISBN : f>662-53333-X Table des matières
Introduction
1
Vérification interne
7
Secrétariat exécutif
8
Planification et Évaluation des programmes
9
Services d'expositions
10
Division des publications
12
Direction de la gestion des documents
15
Division des systèmes de la gestion des documents et de la
micrographie
16
Division des centres fédéraux de documents
21
Centre national des documents du personnel
27
Services centraux du microfilm
31
Direction des archives
33
Division des manuscrits
35
Bureau de Londres
45
Bureau de Paris
46
Division des archives fédérales
47
Collection nationale de cartes et plans
58
Division de l'iconographie
67
Collection nationale de photographies
74
Bibliothèque des Archives publiques
82
Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement
sonore
85
Division des archives ordinolingues
92
Aide à la communauté archivistique
99
Direction de la conservation et des services techniques
101
Systèmes de disques optiques
101
Division de la restauration des peintures et estampes
102
Division de la conservation des documents
105
Division des services de photographie
107
Division des systèmes informatiques
108 Administration des départements
111
Services financiers
111
Services du personnel
112
Services administratifs
113
L Introduction
Ces dernières années, aux Archives publiques du Canada, nous avons vu s'accroître
nos responsabilités et notre charge de travail sans pour autant obtenir des ressources
supplémentaires.
Nous avons relevé le défi de deux façons : d'une part, nous avons amélioré le système
de gestion de manière à tirer le maximum de toutes nos ressources et d'autre part, nous
avons mis à profit la technologie moderne pour augmenter notre productivité.
Depuis quelques années, nous accordons une importance accrue aux techniques de
gestion, ce qui a donné lieu à une rationalisation du rôle du Comité de la haute direction
et des comités de gestion des directions, à des séances annuelles de planification menant
à l'élaboration de plans quinquennaux et à l'établissement de priorités, à la mise en place
d'un mécanisme de contrôle et à la création d'une tribune permettant aux cadres de discuter régulièrement des principales questions d'intérêt commun. C'est dans cette nouvelle optique également qu'on a créé un service de vérification interne et un service de
planification et d'évaluation responsable aussi de la mesure du rendement, que l'on a
revu le mandat du Secrétariat exécutif pour y inclure le développement des politiques
et effectué une importante réorganisation en vue de mieux répartir les tâches et les-res-
ponsabilités. À la suite d'une restructuration de l'Administration des départements, nous
venons de procéder à une revue fonctionnelle pour nous assurer que toutes les ressources étaient utilisées au maximum et tenter de mener à bien toutes les activités malgré
les compressions. Maintenant terminés, les premiers rapports d'évaluation se sont avérés très utiles. Cette année, une vérification intégrée a également été effectuée par le Bureau
du vérificateur général, qui soulignait dans son rapport le rendement satisfaisant des
Archives publiques du Canada.
La technologie moderne occupe une place de plus en plus grande aux Archives. Ainsi,
les projets-pilotes sur le développement de systèmes automatisés de contrôle et de localisation des collections seront élargis de façon à y inclure toutes les divisions de la Direction des archives. En outre, le département s'emploie actuellement à améliorer les systèmes
automatisés dans les secteurs du personnel et des finances, et depuis un certain temps
la Direction de la gestion des documents contrôle plusieurs millions de dossiers du personnel grâce au système PERSFILES.
Les rapports des directions et divisions dans les pages qui suivent montrent que malgré
tous les problèmes, les efforts de chacun ont porté fruit. Parmi les grandes réalisations,
il convient de mentionner la parution des trois premiers volumes d'une nouvelle Collection de guides généraux 1983 qui, lorsqu'elle sera complète dans quelques mois, donnera aux chercheurs et au grand public un aperçu des activités et des collections des huit
divisions de la Direction des archives.
Plusieurs sujets reviennent fréquemment dans nos rapports annuels, mais ils n'en
sont pas moins d'actualité.
1) Lois et règlements — La nouvelle loi sur les archives nationales et les documents
gouvernementaux que nous mentionnons depuis quinze ans dans les rapports annuels
n'a toujours pas été adoptée. Cette année, les Archives publiques et le ministère des Communications se sont employés à remanier un document qui devait servir à entamer des
pourparlers avec d'autres organismes gouvernementaux et à préparer un projet de loi.
L'ajournement du Parlement a malheureusement eu heu tout juste avant que le Cabinet
ne sanctionne le projet.
Les lois sur l'accès à l'information et sur la protection des renseignements personnels sont entrées en vigueur en juillet 1983. Les Archives publiques ont donc accordé
énormément d'attention à leur application, expliquant aux chercheurs l'impact qu'auraient
les nouvelles lois sur leurs travaux et créant une sous-section pour étudier les demandes RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1<
d'accès aux documents gouvernementaux. Les Archives ont également obtenu des années-
personnes supplémentaires pour faire face à l'augmentation inévitable de leur charge
de travail.
Cette année, les employés des Archives publiques ont également consacré beaucoup
de temps à l'application des nouvelles politiques du Conseil du Trésor en matière de
gestion des documents, de micrographie et de documents informatisés. À cet égard, ils
ont énormément apprécié le précieux concours du nouveau Conseil consultatif des documents. Les premières vérifications des systèmes de gestion des documents ont été effectuées dans divers ministères, et l'archiviste fédéral a présenté au Conseil du Trésor son
premier rapport sur l'état de la gestion des documents au gouvernement du Canada.
La conception des principaux éléments des systèmes automatisés de gestion des documents va bon train, et nous avons lancé des projets-pilotes en vue d'incorporer les documents cartographiques et photographiques des ministères ainsi que leurs plans de conservation et d'élimination dans le système d'archivage et de gestion des documents.
2) Locaux — Les locaux posent un problème depuis quinze ans, et la situation devient
critique. Des plans à court et à moyen termes ont été élaborés. Comme les Archives sont
presque toujours en quête d'espace, elles doivent se contenter à court terme d'occuper
des locaux souvent inadéquats dans différents secteurs de la région de la capitale nationale.
À moyen terme, elles espèrent obtenir un grand immeuble satellite qui convienne à l'entreposage des documents d'archives où s'installeraient certains services jusqu'à ce qu'un
nouvel immeuble principal soit construit. Depuis plusieurs années, la Bibliothèque nationale occupe des bureaux à Hull pour les mêmes raisons, mais certains retards et plusieurs
changements concernant l'emplacement proposé ont empêché les Archives publiques
d'obtenir des locaux convenables. La construction d'un nouvel immeuble principal pour
les Archives publiques semble la seule solution satisfaisante; la Bibliothèque nationale
pourrait alors occuper à elle seule le 395, rue Wellington. J'espère que le gouvernement
du Canada accordera une très haute priorité aux Archives publiques dans son programme
de construction.
Par ailleurs, les Archives ont tout lieu de se réjouir, car presque tous les centres
régionaux de documents ont obtenu soit un nouvel immeuble soit au moins une annexe.
3) Scène nationale — Les discussions se sont poursuivies durant l'année sur le développement de réseaux et sur le rôle du département au sein de la communauté archivistique. À cet égard, les associations d'archivistes professionnels ont présenté des résolutions, les archivistes en chef du fédéral, des provinces et des territoires et les ministres
provinciaux de la culture ont approuvé certaines recommandations et le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines a parrainé une étude. L'adoption d'une nouvelle loi sur
les archives nationales et les documents gouvernementaux et peut-être même d'une politique sur le patrimoine réglerait bien des problèmes. Entre-temps, le département continue d'offrir toute une gamme de services aux archivistes; la Direction des archives en
fait état plus loin et mentionne également le rôle actif que jouent les employés des Archives
au sein des associations professionnelles.
4) Scène internationale — Il convient de mentionner plusieurs événements en plus
des activités soulignées par la Direction des archives. L'archiviste fédéral a poursuivi
son travail de secrétaire général du Conseil international des archives et l'archiviste fédéral
adjoint est demeuré rédacteur de la revue CAD Information et président du Comité des
archives de l'Institut panaméricain de géographie et d'histoire. L'octroi de subventions
de l'ACDI aux pays en développement du Pacifique, du Sud-Est asiatique, d'Afrique
de l'Est et des Antilles pour la réalisation de projets d'archivistique a suscité beaucoup
d'intérêt. L'archiviste fédéral adjoint et le directeur de la Restauration des peintures et
estampes se sont rendus respectivement en Birmanie et en Afrique occidentale pour le
compte de l'UNESCO. Les Archives publiques ont renouvelé leurs ententes culturelles
avec plusieurs pays, dont la Chine, et ont accueilli de nombreux étrangers venus notamment d'Australie, de Birmanie, de France, de Nouvelle-Zélande et de Suède. Plusieurs RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1
imith, archiviste fédéral (à l'extrême gauche), observe Pati
donner au roi Don Juan Carlos d'Espagne certains détails
Cédulas reaies (décrets royaux) offerts par Son Excellence
général, Edward Schreyer, le 13 mars 1984.
employés ont travaillé à la préparation d'un cadeau que le Gouverneur général voulait
présenter au couple royal d'Espagne en visite au Canada. En effet, la Division des manuscrits s'est chargée d'acquérir pour le Gouverneur général, des documents du XVIe siècle
signés par des rois espagnols et concernant l'Amérique, tandis qu'un autre service des
APC a préparé le portefeuille. Tous les artisans de cette réussite ont été invités à la résidence du Gouverneur général pour la présentation.
5) Personnel — Parmi les employés qui ont pris leur retraite cette année, plusieurs
travaillaient déjà aux APC avant l'emménagement dans l'édifice de la rue Wellington
en 1967 : John Howard, Rita Gamble, Lloyd Chisamore et Donna Lawrence. John
Howard a été chef des Services reprographiques pendant des années et a donné des cours
de premiers soins de l'Ambulance Saint-Jean aux employés enrôlés dans la protection
civile. Une des rares employées à quitter l'Imprimerie de la Reine en 1956 pour suivre
les Services centraux du microfilm, Rita Gamble a été un superviseur hors pair pendant
bon nombre d'années. Après avoir travaillé à la Direction de la gestion des documents,
Lloyd Chisamore est devenu spécialiste des documents ferroviaires aux divisions des
Manuscrits et des Archives fédérales. Enfin, Donna Lawrence a occupé plusieurs postes
à la Division des manuscrits avant de prendre sa retraite.
Message personnel — J'aimerais souligner en terminant qu'il s'agit de mon quinzième
et dernier rapport puisque je prends ma retraite en octobre 1984. À l'exception du premier, qui couvrait une période de onze ans (1959-1969), tous les autres rapports ont
été consacrés à une seule année. C'est en fait depuis 1970 que les Archives publiques
ont connu leur plus grand essor, et je suis très heureux d'y avoir participé en tant que
cinquième archiviste fédéral. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
De 1969 à 1984, et particulièrement au début de cette période, les Archives publiques
se sont développées très rapidement comme le montre l'augmentation de l'effectif et
du budget qui, en quinze ans, sont passés respectivement de 263 à 807 employés et de
2 267 000 à 39 437 000 $. Mais ce sont les activités auxquelles ces ressources supplémentaires étaient destinées qui comptent; en fait, elles touchaient tous les secteurs des Archives
publiques.
Avec la création d'un Comité de la haute direction et de comités de gestion des directions et la mise en branle d'activités de planification, de mesure du rendement et de vérification interne, la gestion a connu d'importants changements au sein du département.
Des comités ont été créés pour l'étude de sujets comme la politique administrative, les
ressources humaines, la conservation, les locaux et l'informatique.
La gestion des documents se porte beaucoup mieux qu'avant notamment grâce à
la création de centres régionaux partout au pays et à la mise en place de systèmes automatisés pour les dossiers du personnel et d'une bandothèque. Les Archives ont aussi
été chargées d'appliquer les nouvelles politiques du Conseil du Trésor en matière de gestion des documents, de micrographie et de documents informatisés, d'innover dans le
domaine des systèmes automatisés de gestion des documents et d'évaluer les activités
s fédéraux dans ce secteur.
La Direction des archives compte maintenant deux fois plus de divisions, c'est-
à-dire huit, dont deux orientées vers les nouveaux supports archivistiques, à savoir les
Archives ordinolingues et les Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement Sonore. Les acquisitions de plus en plus nombreuses et variées atteignent maintenant environ 25 000 pieds cubes par année. Grâce à l'application d'une politique d'acquisition systématique, les Archives publiques possèdent aujourd'hui des collections sur
tous les aspects de l'histoire du Canada. De plus, l'octroi de crédits d'impôt a incité
beaucoup de gens à donner des documents d'importance nationale, tandis que le fonds
des biens culturels du ministère des Communications a permis de faire des acquisitions
supplémentaires. La conception de systèmes automatisés de contrôle des documents sur
divers supports a entraîné d'importants progrès. Mais il nous a fallu relever deux défis
de taille : améliorer les services au public alors que notre charge de travail dépassait nos
ressources et participer à l'application des lois sur l'accès à l'information et sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Des progrès intéressants ont été réalisés dans le
domaine de la conservation, de la désacidification et du disque optique, tandis qu'un
programme de diffusion des ressources des Archives auprès du public a été mis sur pied
grâce à des microfilms, des diapositives, des publications et des expositions itinérantes.
Les Archives publiques jouent un rôle prépondérant au sein du milieu archivistique,
notamment en participant à l'assemblée annuelle des archivistes en chef du fédéral, des
provinces et des territoires, en offrant régulièrement un cours en archivistique, en collaborant à des projets nationaux comme le Catalogue collectif des manuscrits conservés
dans les dépôts d'archives canadiens et le Guide des archives photographiques canadiennes, en donnant des séminaires et en prodiguant des conseils. Elles se sont également imposées sur la scène internationale, car beaucoup d'employés occupent des postes
de direction dans de nombreuses organisations internationales, siègent à divers comités
et agissent comme consultants à l'étranger. De plus, elles ont conclu des ententes culturelles internationales et accueilli des étrangers venus se renseigner ou suivre des cours.
Il n'est pas exagéré d'affirmer que les Archives publiques du Canada sont considérées
comme l'établissement moderne, progressiste et efficace par excellence.
En songeant aux événements et aux réalisations des seize dernières années, je me
rends parfaitement compte que rien de cela n'aurait été possible sans le travail assidu
de centaines d'employés et de spécialistes dont le dévouement n'a d'égal que la conviction. J'ai eu le privilège de diriger cette merveilleuse équipe et de contribuer avec elle
à notre patrimoine national. CHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1
Si l'augmentation du personnel a été salutaire à bien des égards, elle a aussi réduit
la camaraderie et même la communication entre les employés. Je regrette notamment
de n'avoir pu faire la connaissance de tout le monde.
Bien sûr, nos efforts n'ont pas toujours porté fruit. La nouvelle loi sur les archives
nationales et les documents gouvernementaux et le nouvel immeuble pour les Archives
rue Wellington se font toujours attendre, même s'il y a quinze ans que ces projets sont
à l'ordre du jour. En plus de ces deux priorités, mon successeur aura plusieurs défis
importants à relever avec ses collaborateurs : la conservation des documents d'archives,
le développement et l'obtention de ressources pour les systèmes automatisés de recherche
et de contrôle, l'automatisation de nombreuses activités, la clarification du rôle des
Archives publiques au sein de la communauté archivistique et la sensibilisation du public
à ce travail que nous accomplissons pour les Canadiens d'aujourd'hui et de demain.
J'aimerais remercier tous les employés pour leur dévouement et leur esprit d'initiative, tous mes collègues de la gestion des documents et les institutions d'archives au Canada
et à l'étranger, les nombreux donateurs de documents qui enrichissent notre héritage,
les ministres qui ont présidé aux destinées du département et les représentants des organismes culturels et autres dont la collaboration deviendra de plus en plus importante.
Je me rappellerai avec plaisir mes trente-quatre années aux Archives publiques et
je souhaite à ce grand établissement national tous les succès.
31 mars 1984 Wilfred I. Smith,
archiviste fédéral.  Vérification interne
Ce service a pour mandat d'assurer de façon autonome et systématique l'examen
et l'évaluation de toutes les activités des départements, afin de conseiller l'archiviste fédéral, le directeur général de la Bibliothèque nationale et les chefs de service sur l'efficacité et la rentabilité des politiques, pratiques et mécanismes de contrôle internes, ainsi
que de déterminer dans quelle mesure ils sont conformes aux directives des organismes
centraux concernant les Archives publiques et la Bibliothèque nationale.
Pour des fins d'administration, les Archives publiques, par l'entremise du Bureau
de l'archiviste fédéral, sont chargées de doter le service en ressources humaines et
financières.
Le service a un effectif de quatre années-personnes constitué d'un directeur, d'un
gestionnaire, d'un vérificateur supérieur et d'un adjoint administratif. En outre, le service engage à forfait des vérificateurs et des conseillers en gestion, ce qui représente quatre
années-personnes supplémentaires.
Au cours de l'année financière 1983-1984, 18 vérifications ont été entreprises aux
Archives publiques et à la Bibliothèque nationale. Le Plan de vérification à long terme
(1984-1985 à 1988-1989) a été approuvé en principe par les deux sous-ministres. Secrétariat exécutif
Le Secrétariat exécutif est responsable des relations avec les organismes centraux,
avec d'autres institutions culturelles fédérales, les gouvernements provinciaux, le secteur privé et les médias. Il propose des politiques au sujet des archives et coordonne
l'application de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. Son directeur relève de l'archiviste
fédéral et siège au Comité de la haute direction.
Des propositions visant à réviser la Loi sur les Archives publiques ont été formulées, ont fait l'objet de discussions avec les institutions concernées et ont été portées à
l'attention du ministre en décembre 1983. La nouvelle Loi sur l'accès à l'information
et les modifications apportées à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels
sont entrées en vigueur en juillet 1983.
Relations publiques — Au cours de l'année, la Section des relations publiques a émis
21 communiqués de presse, coordonné 91 interviews avec les médias, imprimé 4 affiches
et organisé 14 réceptions. Les activités ont porté surtout sur les expositions et les acquisitions. Des publications telles que Rêves d'empire, Guide des sources de l'histoire du
Canada conservées en France, et divers inventaires et catalogues ont été annoncés dans
les journaux. Le personnel a organisé 79 visites aux Archives publiques. Les 1 146 visiteurs venaient du Canada et de l'étranger.
En 1983-1984, les Archives publiques ont fait l'objet de reportages télévisés, parfois imprévus. L'annonce que la collection de films des frères Flaherty avait été restaurée
par les Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement sonore a été
largement diffusée. Les divers réseaux de télévision ont fait un grand usage de séquences
filmées de la collection.
Pour ce qui est des imprévus, un des deux exemplaires de la Proclamation constitutionnelle a été endommagé lorsqu'un chercheur y a déversé de la peinture rouge. L'incident a tout de suite été relaté dans tous les journaux et à la télévision.
L'exposition Le cœur au métier : la photographie amateur au Canada de 1839 à
1940 a reçu des critiques élogieuses dans la presse nationale. Une affiche a été réalisée
à des fins publicitaires.
L'annonce que les Archives publiques avaient acquis les papiers Marshall McLuhan
a aussi été diffusée à l'échelle nationale.
L'émission Morningside à la radio de la CBC a consacré toute une semaine à une
série d'interviews, d'anecdotes, d'extraits sonores et de commentaires sur les Archives
publiques. Des archivistes ont été interviewés et on a présenté des extraits de discours
politiques, d'intermèdes musicaux et de reportages de correspondants de guerre.
Le Bureau des relations publiques a conçu des affiches, des prospectus, des cartes
postales et des réclames pour promouvoir les manifestations, publications et services
des APC. Le procédé de désacidification de masse employé par le département pour
restaurer les livres a fait l'objet d'articles importants dans Du Pont Magazine et le magazine de bord d'American Airlines. Les Relations publiques ont souvent utilisé leur diaporama, l'envoyant même en Pennsylvanie et en Nouvelle-Zélande à des fins didactiques. Planification et Évaluation
des programmes
Cette division coordonne les opérations départementales de planification pour le
compte des Archives publiques, assure de façon périodique et indépendante l'examen
et l'évaluation des programmes départementaux pour le compte de l'archiviste fédéral
et du directeur général de la Bibliothèque nationale, met sur pied des systèmes de mesure
du rendement et en contrôle l'application aux Archives et à la Bibliothèque. La Planification et l'Évaluation des programmes oeuvre sous la direction générale de l'archiviste fédéral
et son directeur est membre du Comité départemental de la haute direction.
Au cours de l'exercice, les activités de planification ont englobé la coordination de
la session de planification stratégique de la haute direction et la préparation du document connexe Orientations stratégiques des Archives publiques du Canada, 1984-1989;
la participation aux sessions de planification des directions; la coordination de la rédaction du texte du plan de dépenses (3e partie du budget des dépenses) et du texte du plan
opérationnel pluriannuel du département; la participation, de concert avec l'Évaluation
des programmes, à une équipe de travail de Statistique Canada chargée de réviser l'Enquête sur les établissements du patrimoine, ainsi qu'à la préparation d'un supplément
sur les archives; la participation à des travaux de comités et l'établissement de contacts
suivis avec des représentants d'organismes centraux.
Les projets d'évaluation des programmes ont reflété les préoccupations actuelles
de la Bibliothèque nationale et des Archives publiques. En ce qui concerne la Bibliothèque, une étude d'évaluation du Programme de communication a été achevée, présentée
au directeur général et approuvée par celui-ci en septembre 1983. On a également terminé l'étude d'évaluation du projet-pilote iNet. Pour ce qui est des Archives, on a amorcé
l'étude d'évaluation de la composante « conservation », les rapports sur l'étude
préparatoire et le mandat étant terminés. Il en va de même de l'étude d'évaluation de
la composante « chercheurs et service au public ».
Des travaux sur la mesure du rendement ont été entrepris dans les deux départements.
À la Direction de la conservation et des services techniques des Archives publiques, le
système de mesure du rendement a été mis en place à la Division des services de
photographie, et on a terminé les travaux préparatoires à l'implantation du système dans
les divisions des Systèmes informatiques, de la Conservation des documents et de la
Restauration des peintures et estampes. Par ailleurs, on a établi le système pour la Gestion des formules, et des conseils et une aide techniques ont été dispensés aux Services
d'expositions, aux Langues officielles et à la Vérification interne. À la Bibliothèque
nationale, le Comité exécutif a élaboré et approuvé, pour le département, les lignes directrices concernant la mesure du rendement. La Direction du catalogage a entrepris, à
titre d'essai, la collecte des données. On a poursuivi, à la Direction des services au public,
les travaux en vue de l'automatisation du système en 1984-1985. Le Centre des systèmes
de bibliothèque a mis sur pied son système initial et a amorcé le travail en vue de
l'automatisation complète. Enfin, le Comité des coordonnateurs de la mesure du rendement a été créé à la Bibliothèque nationale. Services d'expositions
La division s'occupe des expositions, de l'audio-visuel, de la réservation de l'auditorium et des salles de réunion pour le compte des Archives publiques et de la Bibliothèque nationale. Elle est chargée par les Archives publiques des expositions itinérantes
et de la gestion de la maison Laurier.
Le foyer de l'auditorium a accueilli 12 expositions parrainées par les Archives publiques, la Bibliothèque nationale, des ambassades et des organismes à but non lucratif.
i stage, et 31 bénévoles ont travaillé
La division a reçu un total de 11 étudiants
au programme éducatif de la maison Laurier.
Conception et préparation des expositions — Une exposition majeure a été produite par
les Archives publiques : Le cœur au métier : la photographie amateur au Canada de
1839 à 1940.
Deux expositions prêtées ont été présentées : Les années de garnison : London,
Canada-Ouest 1793-1853, de la London Regional Art Gallery, et Découverte 1778 du
Vancouver Museum.
Parmi les 15 expositions mineures qui ont été préparées, mentionnons Documents
constitutionnels et symboles de souveraineté présentée sur la colline du Parlement, Les
loyalistes, Les droits de la personne, 1931 — Peintres du Canada et Québec : bastion
de la vieille Europe.
Expositions itinérantes — Deux exemplaires de l'exposition Rêves d'empire ont poursuivi leur tournée canadienne. L'une a circulé dans l'Ouest du pays, dans quatre institutions, et l'autre, qui circulait dans l'Est, a été expédiée au mois de septembre en France
pour être présentée à La Rochelle, à Paris et à Mulhouse. L'exposition a attiré plus de
130 000 visiteurs au Canada.
Vue de l'exposition Le RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1'
Une autre grande exposition, Vers des horizons nouveaux, a commencé à circuler
à Toronto, à Waterloo, à Longueuil et à Moncton. En tout, l'exposition a accueilli environ
6 550 visiteurs. Elle était accompagnée de la bande vidéo Vers l'égalité, qui retrace l'histoire des femmes au Canada.
Maison Laurier — En mai, une journée d'accueil a été organisée pour marquer la Journée internationale des musées. À cette occasion, les 425 visiteurs ont pu entendre l'Apex
Jazz Band. À l'automne, on a inauguré un nouveau programme entièrement administré
par des bénévoles et destiné à faire connaître aux jeunes la vie des premiers ministres,
en particulier celle de Laurier et de King. Dans le cadre du septième programme de Noël
pour les enfants, une séance sur les archives a de nouveau été organisée. Cette année
a vu en outre pour la première fois la tenue d'une séance de création théâtrale, une chasse
aux pièces de collection et une fête pour célébrer l'anniversaire de naissance de King,
le 17 décembre. Le programme spécial de visites guidées pour des organismes tels que
le Centre canadien Terry Fox s'est poursuivi, de même que les visites guidées pour près
de 160 membres du personnel des Archives.
À souligner l'acquisition des boutons de plastron et de manchette en onyx et de
diamants ayant appartenu à sir Wilfrid Laurier, don de George Rosengarten de Montréal.
Un total de 250 demandes de renseignements ont été traitées et 26 500 visiteurs ont
été reçus.
Services audio-visuels — L'auditorium et les salles de réunion ayant été utilisés presque
à pleine capacité par les Archives et la Bibliothèque, il est devenu plus difficile de permettre aux organisations à but non lucratif de se servir des installations. Au cours de
l'année, les activités ont inclus 58 réceptions, 146 films visionnés et projetés et 448 réponses
à des demandes.
EL! d s' ^B
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j
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ie années participant à un atelier sur
Mackenzie King. (C 121314) Division des publications
Le directeur de la Division des publications relève de l'archiviste fédéral adjoint
et est membre du Comité des publications de la Direction des archives. La division est
chargée de produire et de diffuser auprès des chercheurs et du grand public les publications sur les fonds et les services des Archives publiques.
L'année financière 1983-1984 a été des plus actives. La division a amorcé un nouveau programme intitulé Collection de guides généraux 1983, dont le but est de mieux
renseigner le public sur les ressources et les services des diverses divisions de la Direction
des archives. Trois guides ont été produits : Division des archives fédérales, Bibliothèque
des Archives publiques et Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement sonore. Les autres guides seront imprimés l'an prochain.
L'Inventaire des collections des Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de
l'enregistrement sonore est un nouvel instrument de recherche qui dresse, pour la première fois, une liste alphabétique de toutes les collections de la division. Des centaines
d'émissions radiophoniques et télévisées figurent sous la rubrique de Radio-Canada, et
73 films ou séries sont inscrits sous l'Office national du film.
Au cours de l'exercice, la division a été heureuse d'annoncer la parution de Collection d'œuvres canadiennes de W.H. Coverdale. Cet inventaire, accompagné d'illustrations, regroupe 500 peintures, aquarelles et dessins, et constitue un précieux ouvrage
de référence pour ceux qui s'intéressent à l'histoire illustrée du Canada.
L'accueil favorable qu'a reçu la co-édition du Calendrier de cartes anciennes a donné
lieu à la production du calendrier 1984. Cette troisième version contient de remarquables
reproductions en couleurs de 14 cartes originales de la Collection nationale de cartes
et plans.
Le bimestriel l'Archiviste a été une fois de plus bien accueilli par le grand public.
L'un des faits saillants a été le numéro spécial de janvier-février 1984 pour marquer le
450e anniversaire du premier voyage de Jacques Cartier au Canada.
Durant l'année, plusieurs publications ont été imprimées pour accompagner les expositions présentées par le département. Deux dépliants en couleurs intitulés Architecture
contemporaine et Québec : bastion de la vieille Europe ont accompagné la série Aperçu
de la Collection nationale de photographies. La brochure en couleurs 1931 — Peintres
du Canada a été produite pour étayer l'exposition des cartes de Noël de Coutts. Un livret
a été publié pour l'exposition Les années de garnison : London, Canada-Ouest 1793-1853,
de même qu'un petit dépliant pour l'exposition Les droits de la personne. En outre, une
brochure a été imprimée pour le Salon national de la photographie 1983 des Photographes
professionnels du Canada.
Pour venir en aide à ceux qui désirent citer des sources d'archives, les Archives publiques ont publié un guide intitulé Références aux documents d'archives. Un autre outil
précieux pour les chercheurs est la dernière édition du Guide des sources généalogiques
au Canada.
Un bulletin attrayant a été produit pour la Division des archives ordinolingues. Les
quatre premiers numéros ont été publiés et accueillis favorablement par le public.
Le Bulletin de la gestion des documents demeure un organe d'information et de
communication pour tous les gestionnaires de documents. Ont paru cette année les numéros 18 à 23. Est maintenant mise à la disposition des gestionnaires de documents une
autre publication intitulée Centres fédéraux de documents — Guide de l'usager. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
Parmi les autres publications, citons FIAF 1982, Acquisitions 1982-1983 de la Division des archives fédérales, le RG 46 — Archives de la Commission canadienne des transports, le Guide des sources d'archives sur les Ukrainiens-Canadiens, une brochure intitulée Collection nationale de cartes et plans et cinq réimpressions.
Les publications ont été diffusées de la façon suivante : 1 789 publications ont été
vendues à des particuliers ou à Approvisionnements et Services Canada; 58 347 publications gratuites (guides et autres brochures d'information) ont été distribuées pour répondre à des demandes; et 46 438 publications (l'Archiviste, bulletins, rapport annuel,
inventaires, etc.) ont été envoyées aux personnes inscrites sur les listes d'envoi.  Direction de la gestion
des documents
Au cours de l'année visée, deux événements ont eu des répercussions importantes
sur la Direction de la gestion des documents. Primo, la réorganisation des Archives publiques a donné lieu au transfert à la direction des Services d'experts-conseils en micrographie, du Bureau des normes micrographiques et des Services centraux du microfilm.
Il en est résulté une consolidation des attributions de tous les services de gestion de l'information offerts aux établissements de l'extérieur, ce qui permet d'améliorer les mécanismes de coordination et la qualité des services. Secundo, l'application des deux nouvelles
politiques du Conseil du Trésor énoncées dans les chapitres 460 et 445 du Manuel de
la politique administrative a permis de définir les responsabilités du département en
matière de gestion des documents et de micrographie. Les rapports des divisions qui
suivent font état de ces deux développements et d'autres activités importantes dans le
domaine de la gestion des documents.
NORMES ET DEVELOPPEMENT MICROGRAPHIQUES — Comme le mentionnait
l'introduction au dernier rapport annuel des Archives publiques, ce bureau a été transféré à la Direction de la gestion des documents dans le cadre de la réorganisation du
département au début de l'année.
Conformément à la politique de restrictions financières, le poste d'agent du développement micrographique a été supprimé à la suite de la retraite de M. E. Dupuis en
juin, ce qui a donné lieu à une modification des attributions du bureau. La participation du directeur à des organisations non gouvernementales internationales a été réduite
et l'administration des activités liées aux normes micrographiques a augmenté. La perte
de l'agent du développement micrographique sera en partie compensée par la participation accrue du directeur et du personnel de la Section de la recherche et du perfectionnement de la Division des systèmes de la gestion des documents et de la micrographie à
l'établissement des normes.
Normes — Les Archives publiques parrainent la mise au point des normes micrographiques à l'intention de l'Office des normes générales du Canada (ONGC), le bureau
en étant le secrétariat officiel. Présidé par le directeur et composé essentiellement de
Délégati
: technique 171 sur la micrographie
de l'Organisation internationale de normalisation tenue à Zurich
du 12 au 16 octobre 1983. Assis, de gauche à droite : William Wheeler et
Michael Andrews des APC et Donald Wilson de la Banque du Canada.
Debout : Donald Donoahue de Medrey, Inc. et John O'Neill de 3M Canada. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
représentants du secteur privé, le Comité de coordination des normes micrographiques
de l'ONGC supervise les travaux de cinq comités de rédaction des normes. Quelque 75
personnes participent bénévolement à l'élaboration des normes micrographiques dans
tout le Canada.
Le Comité de coordination a tenu deux réunions à Toronto, l'une en mai, l'autre
en novembre. Durant l'année, deux normes relatives aux sorties d'ordinateur sur microfilms (COM) ont été publiées comme normes nationales du Canada, ainsi qu'une norme
provisoire de l'ONGC. En outre, le comité des normes a terminé ses travaux concernant
deux autres normes qui en sont à l'étape de publication. On a établi le calendrier de
travail pour l'an prochain, qui comprend essentiellement la conversion de trois projets
de normes de l'Organisation internationale de normalisation (ISO) aux normes nationales du Canada, ainsi que l'examen de quatre normes nationales aux fins de modification ou de révision. On étudiera les propositions relatives à l'établissement de trois nouvelles normes micrographiques avant de procéder à leur préparation.
Le directeur a présidé la délégation canadienne à la réunion du Comité technique
en micrographie (TC 171) de ITSO, qui a eu lieu en octobre à Zurich. Quelque 60 délégués venus de 12 pays ont assisté aux réunions des sept groupes de travail du comité.
Associations non gouvernementales nationales et internationales — Le directeur a assisté
à la réunion annuelle du Comité de la reprographie des archives du Conseil international des archives (CIA), qui a eu lieu en septembre à Tolède (Espagne). Il a aussi représenté la Société micrographique du Canada (SMC) au Comité du programme de l'Association de gestionnaires d'archives et d'administrateurs (ARMA) chargé d'organiser le
congrès de 1984 de l'ARMA/SMC. À titre de président du Conseil consultatif des anciens
présidents de la SMC, il a coordonné les travaux préparatoires à l'étude des répercussions des nouvelles techniques sur la Société.
Division des systèmes de la gestion
des documents et de la micrographie
Cette année, d'importants changements et événements ont influé considérablement
sur le rôle et les attributions de la division. La réorganisation du département, l'adoption des nouvelles lois et de politiques connexes en matière de gestion des documents
et de micrographie et la nécessité de concentrer les efforts sur les opérations, sont autant
de facteurs qui ont contribué à rendre la dernière année financière des plus exigeantes.
Pour relever le défi que représente la prestation d'un service plus efficace et mieux
coordonné aux institutions fédérales, les Services d'experts-conseils en micrographie ont
fusionné avec la Division des services de la gestion des documents. La fusion de ces deux
fonctions allie la gestion traditionnelle des documents à un service d'experts en micrographie, ce qui constitue une consolidation des méthodes et des techniques existantes.
Cette intégration de compétences complémentaires représente sans contredit un pas en
avant. Conscients de ces avantages et désireux de maximiser l'utilisation des ressources
et de mieux s'acquitter de leurs responsabilités, les administrateurs de la division ont
créé quatre sections : Recherche et Perfectionnement; Évaluation; Consultation, Projets et Formation; et Conservation et Élimination. La session annuelle de planification
des opérations de la division a permis d'améliorer et de renforcer la direction en fixant
de nouveaux objectifs et en élaborant de nouveaux plans d'action. La planification à
long terme demeure toujours la pierre angulaire de la division.
Tout au long de l'année, la division a participé activement à l'application des politiques du Conseil du Trésor énoncées dans les chapitres 445 (micrographie) et 460 (gestion des documents), et s'est préoccupée des responsabilités qui lui ont été confiées en RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1
vertu des lois sur l'accès à l'information et sur la protection des renseignements personnels et des Lignes directrices provisoires : Loi sur l'accès à l'information et Loi sur la
protection des renseignements personnels du Conseil du Trésor. Aux termes de ces dernières, les institutions fédérales sont tenues d'établir des plans de conservation et d'élimination en conformité des principes établis. Découlant de nombreuses années de consultation entre les Archives publiques, le Conseil du Trésor et d'autres ministères fédéraux,
les nouvelles politiques soulignent la nécessité de renforcer la fonction de gestion des
documents et de micrographie au sein du gouvernement fédéral.
Activités des comités et des associations professionnelles — La division assure le secrétariat du Conseil consultatif des documents et délègue des membres à des organismes
tels que le Conseil fédéral de micrographie, l'Association de la gestion de l'image et de
l'information et le Comité interministériel de la conservation des dossiers d'affaires. En
outre, des membres de la division participent activement aux réunions des conseils exécutifs et des comités de l'Institut de gestion des documents, de l'Association de gestionnaires d'archives et d'administrateurs, de la Société micrographique du Canada et de
l'Association des archivistes du Québec.
Visites et visiteurs — La division a reçu la visite de personnalités de Nouvelle-Zélande,
du Sénégal, des Archives nationales de Suède, des Archives de Birmanie, du Conseil
mondial des Églises, du gouvernement du Québec, de la ville de Saskatoon, de l'université de la Colombie-Britannique et de la Société de logement des Territoires du
Nord-Ouest.
Le chef de la Section de la recherche et du perfectionnement a été délégué à la réunion
de l'Organisation internationale de normalisation, qui a eu lieu à Zurich (Suisse). Il a
également assisté à une réunion du Conseil consultatif des anciens présidents de la Société
micrographique du Canada à Toronto. Le directeur a rendu visite aux fonctionnaires
des National Archives and Records Services à Washington (D.C.).
Autres événements importants — Au cours de l'exercice, on a amorcé plusieurs projets
directement ou indirectement liés aux responsabilités globales de la division concernant
l'amélioration des activités de gestion des documents et de micrographie au sein du
gouvernement.
M. Joe Cardillo remettant le prix Cardillo 1983 à M. John Dumont (à droite).
(C 104496) RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
Le personnel de la division a participé à l'organisation de cérémonies pour marquer le 30e anniversaire de l'Institut de gestion des documents. Au fil des ans, les
Archives publiques ont noué des liens étroits avec l'Institut, et les membres du personnel de la division ont toujours participé de près aux activités de ce dernier en siégeant
au conseil exécutif et aux comités. Le point saillant de la réunion annuelle de l'Institut
a été la remise du prix Cardillo 1983 au directeur de la division, J.G. Dumont, en recon-
e de ses nombreuses réalisations dans le domaine de la gestion des documents.
On a reconnu la nécessité de créer un Centre de documentation à l'intention du
personnel de la direction et des personnes désireuses de parfaire des études dans le domaine
de la gestion des documents et de la micrographie. Les services de bibliothèque seront
éventuellement étendus grâce à l'acquisition d'un système automatisé de recherche
documentaire.
Les employés des Services d'experts-conseils en micrographie ont collaboré étroitement avec le Conseil fédéral de micrographie à la création et à la présentation d'un séminaire de formation. Ce séminaire portait sur une gamme étendue de sujets, et plusieurs
membres du personnel de la direction ont été invités à donner des conférences.
iu programme de formation offert du 6 au 9 novembre 1983 p
le Conseil fédéral de la micrographie. (C 16956)
Les Services d'experts-conseils en micrographie ont coordonné l'établissement de
la version française du Programme d'accréditation des techniciens en micrographie de
niveau 1. Dans le cadre du programme, la section offre des services de conseillers et
d'évaluateurs qualifiés des méthodes et des tests d'accréditation. Lors d'une cérémonie
marquant cet événement, M. W.I. Smith a remis la version française du programme
à M. D.R. Yeomans, commissaire du Service correctionnel Canada, qui a octroyé le
contrat initial dans le cadre d'un programme de formation industrielle de l'établisse-
- ment correctionnel de Bath.
Le Vérificateur général a vérifié les activités de la division. Après avoir étudié les
commentaires et les recommandations, les gestionnaires de la division ont commencé
à apporter les correctifs nécessaires aux services offerts aux ministères du gouvernement.
RECHERCHE ET PERFECTIONNEMENT — La section a consacré beaucoup de temps
aux évaluations micrographiques, aux essais et aux enquêtes sur l'application des procédés automatisés à la gestion des documents, ainsi qu'aux études pour la révision des
normes et des guides de gestion des documents et de micrographie, et ce, afin d'étayer
les programmes opérationnels et administratifs du gouvernement fédéral. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1
L'année en a été une d'ajustement pour les Services d'experts-conseils en micrographie, dont les attributions concernant l'application de la politique de micrographie
du Conseil du Trésor énoncée dans le chapitre 445 ont coïncidé avec l'intégration des
activités aux Services de gestion des documents. En dépit de cette charge de travail, la
section a fait des études et des enquêtes sur les systèmes, révisé des méthodes et effectué
des évaluations techniques pour le compte de 23 établissements du gouvernement.
Dans le cadre de ses activités courantes, la section a étudié et signalé 25 demandes
de microfilmage. En outre, pour mettre en valeur les techniques actuelles et mettre au
point un nouveau matériel d'essai, le contenu du cours de techniques en microenregistrement a été'modifié avant d'être donné en novembre 1983. Y ont participé 25 représentants de 19 ministères. Une communication sur le vidéodisque a été présentée à la
conférence de la Société micrographique du Canada en novembre, et plus tôt dans l'année,
la section a organisé un séminaire de deux jours sur les techniques de microfilmage, qui
avait pour thème le contrôle de la qualité et l'entreposage des microfilms. Au total,
46 employés du gouvernement ont participé au séminaire.
Les relations qu'entretient la section avec l'industrie micrographique lui ont permis
de se tenir au courant de l'évolution des nouvelles techniques dans ce domaine. À souligner aussi le temps consacré à l'établissement et à la mise en vigueur de normes micrographiques et à la participation directe aux activités des organisations nationales et internationales de normalisation.
Pour répondre aux besoins croissants d'aide à l'automatisation des diverses fonctions de gestion des documents, la Sous-section de l'automatisation a participé à des
projets et à des essais de concert avec d'autres ministères. Les études les plus importantes sont celles du ministère des Communications et des Archives publiques. Aux Communications, le groupe de travail chargé du Programme de la bureautique a terminé
le cinquième essai; il a formulé et évalué des propositions en vue d'appliquer les principes et les techniques d'archivistique et de gestion des documents à l'information générée, utilisée et éliminée par des procédés automatisés. L'expérience tirée de ces essais
permet à la division de mettre au point des principes et des normes, ainsi que de mieux
prêter assistance aux ministères. La division a aussi participé à une étude sur la façon
d'améliorer la qualité et l'efficacité des services de gestion des documents aux Archives
publiques par l'utilisation de systèmes automatisés.
Par suite de l'entrée en vigueur de la nouvelle politique de gestion des documents
du Conseil du Trésor en mars 1983, la division a poursuivi la révision du guide Organisation et opérations relatives à la gestion des documents. Elle a aussi poursuivi ses
travaux préparatoires à la révision des Plans généraux d'élimination des documents du
gouvernement du Canada (PGED). La division a consulté des spécialistes investis d'un
pouvoir d'administration et de réglementation au sein du gouvernement pour produire
un guide d'élimination des documents qui réponde aux besoins actuels.
Les circulaires RMB-83A Plans de conservation des renseignements personnels et
RMB 84A Pians de conservation des documents dans les institutions fédérales ont été
publiées aux termes des politiques de gestion des documents et de micrographie et des
Lignes directrices provisoires : Loi sur l'accès à l'information et Loi sur la protection
des renseignements personnels du Conseil du Trésor. Elles s'appliqueront jusqu'à ce que
le Plan de conservation et d'élimination des documents ait été révisé.
ÉVALUATION — En vertu des nouvelles politiques du Conseil du Trésor, les Archives
publiques se voient déléguer le pouvoir et la responsabilité de faire des évaluations quinquennales de la fonction de gestion des documents et de micrographie dans chaque établissement du gouvernement.
Dans cet esprit, la division, secondée d'un expert-conseil du Bureau des services
de vérification, a coordonné l'élaboration d'une stratégie d'ensemble afin d'appliquer
J RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1
les politiques en collaboration avec la Direction de la politique administrative du Conseil du Trésor et le Bureau du contrôleur général. Pour s'assurer que les objectifs sont
atteints, les services de vérification interne des institutions fédérales assureront la liaison avec les spécialistes de la gestion des documents de la Section de l'évaluation.
La nouvelle politique exige également la production d'un rapport annuel sur l'état
de la gestion des documents dans le gouvernement fédéral. En août 1983, l'archiviste
fédéral a présenté son premier rapport au Conseil du Trésor. Il comportait les résultats
d'une enquête menée auprès de 62 ministères en 1982. Les rapports ultérieurs feront
état de l'évaluation interne des activités du gouvernement et seront étayés de données
qui auront été rassemblées et analysées par la section. Le rapport de l'année 1983 sera
soumis au Conseil du Trésor au début de l'exercice 1984-1985.
CONSULTATION, PROJETS ET FORMATION — En vertu des politiques régissant
la gestion des documents et la micrographie au sein du gouvernement fédéral, les Archives publiques sont chargées de veiller à ce que les institutions fédérales aient des politiques et des programmes bien documentés. Pour ce faire, les Archives publiques sont
tenues de fournir, sur demande, aide et conseils sur tous les aspects des fonctions de
gestion des documents, tant traditionnelles que micrographiques, y compris sur les études
et enquêtes concernant l'organisation des documents et les activités automatisées, les
systèmes de classification des dossiers, les plans de conservation et d'élimination des
documents, et les études connexes sur les systèmes micrographiques.
En prévision de l'affectation des ressources à d'autres secteurs, les gestionnaires-
ont décidé cette année de restreindre le temps consacré à la consultation et de s'en tenir
aux priorités, compte tenu que les ministères ont pour première responsabilité d'assurer
la mise en oeuvre de pratiques de gestion des documents efficaces. En outre, la section
établit des procédures internes pour mener des enquêtes et prêter assistance aux ministères dans ce domaine. Cette année, une cinquantaine d'établissements ont reçu une aide
technique.
Dans le cadre d'un programme de formation sur les principes et les techniques de
gestion des documents, la division a organisé trois cours avancés de quatre semaines,
deux en anglais et un en français. Un total de 82 participants, tant de l'administration
centrale que des bureaux régionaux, ont suivi les cours. Huit cours d'introduction à la
gestion des documents, de quatre jours chacun, ont été donnés à Toronto, Halifax, Montréal, Ottawa (2), Edmonton, Vancouver et Winnipeg. En tout, 280 stagiaires ont assisté
aux sessions. La division a également organisé des cours de deux semaines sur les principes de la micrographie. Durant l'année, le contenu du cours a été modifié pour refléter
les nouvelles lois et politiques, ainsi que pour initier les participants aux techniques
d ' automatisation.
Par ailleurs, la division a aidé plusieurs ministères à élaborer des programmes internes
de gestion des documents. Elle a également délégué des conférenciers à des séminaires
et à des cours organisés par d'autres institutions fédérales.
CONSERVATION ET ÉLIMINATION — La Section de la conservation et de l'élimination a pour principal objectif d'aider et de conseiller les institutions fédérales en matière
d'établissement et d'application des plans de conservation et d'élimination des documents, ainsi que d'assurer le secrétariat de la coordination des procédures d'approbation des plans. Les exigences concernant l'établissement des plans ont été modifiées depuis
l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, ainsi que
des règlements et des lignes directrices énoncés dans le chapitre 460 (gestion des documents). C'est ce qui a motivé la direction à publier les deux circulaires intitulées Plans
de conservation des documents dans les institutions fédérales et Plans de conservation
des renseignements personnels. Elles visaient à renseigner les établissements sur la marche
à suivre pour établir les plans, conserver et éliminer les renseignements personnels aux
l RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
termes de la loi, ainsi qu'à les aider à se conformer aux règlements de la nouvelle politique de gestion des documents. Une bonne partie du travail a été consacrée à l'examen
et à l'évaluation de 98 demandes de projets de conservation ou d'élimination de documents et à la révision des procédures internes de traitement des demandes.
tion de docu-
1
Le tableau I indique le nombre de plans de conservation ou d'élin
nts et de demandes de microfilmage reçus de 1961 à mars 1984.
Nombre de projets de
Nombre de
conservation ou
demandes
d'élimination de
de micro
Total
Période
documents
filmage
Total
cumulatif
1961-1966 (mars).
1966-1971 (mars).
1971-1976 (mars) .
1976-1982 (mars) .
1982-1984 (mars) .
Total 23 ans	
rofilmage de 1961 à 1966 ir
Division des centres fédéraux de documents
La Division des centres fédéraux de documents a pour objectif d'entreposer et de
gérer de façon efficace et économique des documents généraux pour le compte des institutions fédérales de tout le Canada. À cette fin, des centres de documents ont été mis
en place à Halifax, Montréal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton et Vancouver.
Parmi les activités des centres, on compte l'acquisition des dossiers, la prestation d'un
service de référence, la mise en oeuvre de plans d'élimination des dossiers, la destruction
sûre des documents confidentiels, un service d'inspection des microfilms, une bandothèque et, en collaboration avec la Division des systèmes de la gestion des documents
et de la micrographie, des cours de formation et des services consultatifs dans les régions
autres que celle de la capitale nationale.
Les centres de documents ont une capacité d'entreposage allant de 25 000 mètres
de documents à Edmonton à 153 000 mètres à Ottawa, les fonds variant de 12 500 à
119 000 mètres de documents respectivement. Si l'on compare le coût moyen de rayonnage et d'entreposage des centres de documents et des ministères, on constate que les
premiers ont permis d'économiser sept millions de dollars l'an dernier. Des enquêtes
menées durant l'année ont révélé qu'il restait beaucoup de travail à faire et, par conséquent, beaucoup d'économies à réaliser. Des milliers de mètres de documents sont encore
entreposés dans des bureaux coûteux. Le défi à relever l'an prochain sera de rassembler
ces documents dans les magasins économiques des centres de documents, conformément
à la planification de l'espace disponible.
Locaux — Des progrès immenses ont été réalisés dans ce domaine cette année, les projets d'aménagement de nouveaux locaux ayant été fusionnés.
1. Le Centre fédéral de documents de Winnipeg a été doté, en juillet, d'une annexe lui
permettant de doubler sa capacité d'entreposage.
2. Le Centre fédéral de documents de Vancouver a emménagé, en décembre, dans un
nouvel immeuble, doublant ainsi sa capacité d'entreposage.
3. Le Centre fédéral de documents de Montréal, qui disposait déjà de deux immeubles,
s'en est vu octroyer un troisième en février, augmentant sa capacité de 40 000 boîtes. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
4. Le Centre fédéral de documents d'Ottawa a aussi obtenu un troisième immeuble,
ce qui lui permet d'entreposer 110 000 boîtes supplémentaires.
5. Les travaux de construction d'un nouvel immeuble ayant été terminés à la fin du mois
de mars, le Centre de Halifax doublera sa capacité d'entreposage.
L'acquisition de tous ces locaux a entraîné des mouvements massifs de documents.
Le Centre de Winnipeg, qui disposait de deux dépôts provisoires, a transféré 25 000 boîtes
dans son nouvel immeuble. Le Centre de Vancouver a dû déménager l'ensemble de ses
fonds de 117 000 boîtes. Par souci de rentabilité éventuelle, les centres surchargés
d'Ottawa et de Montréal ont transféré 80 000 et 12 500 boîtes respectivement dans leurs
nouveaux locaux. Grâce au travail et au dévouement du personnel, les services de référence ont été assurés au complet pendant toute la période de déménagement.
Exception faite du Centre de Montréal, l'espace ne devrait plus poser de problèmes
pour les cinq prochaines années. Le projet de création d'un centre de documents à Québec
devrait soulager le Centre de Montréal.
Le projet d'accroissement de locaux pour le Centre de Toronto va bon train, et
les plans d'aménagement du Centre d'Edmonton seront amorcés en 1984-1985.
Sondage auprès de la clientèle — Une enquête menée auprès des organismes gouvernementaux a révélé que le nombre d'utilisateurs éventuels des centres de documents s'élève
à 3 104, dont 1 025 sont servis par la division. Durant l'année, les gestionnaires des centres
de documents ont rendu visite à 893 usagers éventuels pour promouvoir l'utilisation de
leur service. Depuis, 49 nouveaux bureaux font appel aux centres. D'autres efforts seront
déployés l'an prochain pour favoriser l'utilisation des centres par des visites aux autres
usagers éventuels.
Bandothèque — La bandothèque du Centre fédéral de documents d'Ottawa, qui a été
mise en service le 15 janvier 1983, a terminé sa première année d'activité. Avec une capacité
d'entreposage de 100 000 bandes, la bandothèque conserve actuellement 36 376 bandes
provenant de 36 institutions fédérales, comparativement à 18 156 bandes provenant de
19 clients en avril 1983.
Le tableau II montre l'expansion de la bandothèque en comparant
vail du mois d'avril 1983 à celle du mois de mars 1984.
TABLEAU II
la charge de tra-
Avril 1983
Mars 1984
Écart
Bandes enregistrées ...
Bandes radiées 	
3 467
1 257
6 775
6 641
+ 3 308
+ 5 384
Au total, la bandothèque a
Le travail de promotion et
augmentation des activités da
enregistré et radié 101 629 bandes cette année.
d'enquête effectué durant l'année a entraîné une forte
is chaque centre de documents (voir le tableau III).
TABLEAU III
1982-1983
1983-1984
Écart
145 666
19
34 456
171 894
36
128 513
+ 26 228
+        17
+ 94 057
Nombre d'usagers	
Nombre de bandes traitées...
Cette augmentation de l'acti
lité d'automatiser le service er
vite montre qu'il faudra é
1984-1985.
tudier sérieusement la possibi- DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1
Nouveau Centre fédéral de documents de Vancouv RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983-1984
Inspection des microfilms — De bons progrès ont été réalisés dans ce domaine. Le troisième cycle d'inspection des microfilms entreposés au Centre de protection des documents essentiels est terminé, et le troisième cycle d'inspection des microfilms conservés
dans le Dépôt de documents généraux va bon train. En outre, tous les microfilms conservés dans les centres régionaux de documents ont été examinés et mis en boîtes. Les
données sont tellement volumineuses et complexes, que seul un ordinateur pourrait en
permettre l'utilisation intégrale.
Malheureusement, on a constaté que le ruban adhésif qui a servi à sceller les
200 000 contenants de microfilms réagissait aux produits chimiques, en dépit des garanties
écrites du fournisseur qu'il était conforme aux normes de la division. Il faudra donc
acheter et poser un nouveau ruban.
Le tableau IV montre les activités de l'année dans ce domaine.
TABLEAU IV
1982-1983
1983-1984
Écart
Bobines inspectées	
Mises en boîtes	
Bobines tachées	
10 040
66 068
3 401
20 410
19 119
5 388
+ 10 370
- 46 949
+   1 987
Documents essentiels — Le chapitre 460 du Manuel de la politique administrative a permis de relancer le programme. Nombre d'institutions fédérales se sont renseignées sur
la mise à jour de leurs documents essentiels. Pour le moment, 14 ministères seulement
participent activement au programme. Ce nouvel intérêt a suscité la création du Comité
consultatif des documents essentiels. Parmi les membres on compte le directeur de la
Coordination des opérations des mesures d'urgence de Planification d'urgence Canada
et le chef du Centre fédéral de documents d'Ottawa.
Le but du comité est de rédiger à nouveau les guides et principes directeurs relatifs
aux documents essentiels pour s'assurer la participation des institutions fédérales et pour
faire en sorte que les installations soient conformes aux normes établies.
Enfin, les dépôts régionaux de Planification d'urgence Canada ont demandé que
les centres fédéraux de documents assument la responsabilité d'administrer les dépôts
à l'extérieur de la région de la capitale nationale. Cette question sera étudiée l'an prochain.
Acquisitions — Cette année, le nombre d'acquisitions a été sensiblement le même, mais
l'ensemble des fonds de la division a diminué pour les deux raisons suivantes : 1) la nouvelle politique adoptée dans le cadre de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels restreint la prestation de services à certains établissements et exclut les grandes
sociétés de la couronne; 2) les activités d'élimination des documents sont plus efficaces
(en 1982-1983, 48 444 mètres de documents ont été éliminés contre 53 509 mètres en
1983-1984).
On a décidé de convertir tous les centres de documents au système des travées, ce
qui permettra d'éliminer une bonne partie du travail d'écriture lié à l'enregistrement des
acquisitions et d'améliorer la description des documents. Les centres fédéraux de documents d'Edmonton, de Winnipeg et de Toronto ont déjà adopté le nouveau système,
et les autres suivront l'an prochain.
Service de référence — Revenu Canada (Impôt) (RC-I) a fourni près de 50% du travail
dans ce domaine. Malheureusement, les recherches non satisfaites comptent toujours
pour 50% du travail accompli pour le compte du ministère, et environ 25% des ressources de référence de la division y sont affectées. Le Centre d'Edmonton, qui n'enregistre
plus les acquisitions de RC-I, a accusé une baisse des recherches non satisfaites de 12 160
en 1982-1983 à 4 335 en 1983-1984. Deux ans plus tôt, les recherches non satisfaites RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1983 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES l1
représentaient 69% du volume de travail pour RC-I, ce qui constitue tout de même une
amélioration de l'ordre de 19% cette année. Revenu Canada (Impôt) et les centres de
documents s'efforcent de diminuer davantage le nombre de recherches non satisfaites^
En outre, RC-I a transféré des ressources à la division pour aider à faire face au volume
Éliminations — À cause des changements aux critères d'établissement des plans de conservation résultant de la nouvelle loi, on prévoit un ralentissement des activités d'élimination des documents l'an prochain. Cette année toutefois, les éliminations ont considérablement augmenté. En 1982, 844 tonnes de papier ont été détruites contre 2 357 tonnes
en 1983, soit presque trois fois plus. En 1983, le service a employé 55 personnes handicapées et a détruit 228 541 boîtes de documents inutiles à 10 cents la boîte, ce qui représente une économie de 8 cents la boîte par rapport à 1982. En outre, le service soutient
non seulement le programme fédéral d'emploi des personnes handicapées, mais aussi
celui du recyclage du papier étant donné que plus de 99% des déchets de papier ont
été envoyés à des moulins.
Événements importants — Le temps rigoureux et l'infiltration d'eau par le toit ont endommagé 777 boîtes de documents au Centre d'Edmonton. Le personnel s'est servi de ventilateurs à air chaud pour éviter que les documents ne soient endommagés de façon
permanente.
Un grand nombre de chercheurs et de visiteurs ont été reçus à la division et aux
centres de documents. Parmi les personnalités, mentionnons Mme H. Ford des British
Archives, M. F. Strachon du gouvernement de Nouvelle-Zélande, et MM. Y. Tut et
M. Kyaing de Birmanie, M. B. Spiers, archiviste provincial adjoint d'Alberta, M. J.
Harding du gouvernement des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et MM. J. Frenière et
P. Grimard du gouvernement du Québec.
Durant l'année, des changements de personnel ont eu lieu. William Shea, chef du
Centre de Halifax, a démissionné; son poste a été occupé par Albert Cyr du Centre
d'Edmonton. Harris Christian a été nommé chef du Centre d'Edmonton.
La division a donné, à l'intention de tous les employés des centres de documents,
le premier d'une série de cours de formation sur tous les aspects de la gestion et des
activités des centres. Le cours, qui a été dispensé au Centre fédéral de documents
d'Ottawa, sera offert dans les autres centres l'an prochain.
Le Centre de Winnipeg a atteint une croissance telle qu'il faut procéder à une réorganisation, laquelle sera semblable à celle des centres de Montréal et de Toronto.
La division occupe maintenant les locaux dans les centres qui abritaient les Archives
nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement sonore, ainsi que les Services
centraux du microfilm.
Cette année, les centres de Toronto et d'Ottawa ont terminé deux études importantes sur l'automatisation des centres de documents. Compte tenu non seulement de
l'expansion de la bandothèque, de la multiplication des locaux, de la construction d'une
énorme banque de données sur les taches d'oxydoréduction des microfilms, mais aussi
de la croissance de tous les autres secteurs de la division, l'automatisation complète des
services dans un avenir prochain est ess