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BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Public Archives Canada annual report 1984-1985 Public Archives of Canada 1985

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Array   Annual Report 1984-1985
I*
Public Archives     Archives publiques
Canada Canada  Contents
Introduction
1
Internai Audit
9
Executive Secretariat
10
Planning and Program Evaluation
11
Exhibition Services
12
Publications Division
15
Records Management Branch
17
Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division
17
Federal Records Centres Division
21
National Personnel Records Centre
24
Central Microfilm Operations
28
Archives Branch
31
'Manuscript Division
33
London Office
51
, Paris Office
51
Federal Archives Division
52
National Map Collection
64
Picture Division
72
National Photography Collection
80
Public Archives Library
86
National Film, Television and Sound Archives
89
Machine Readable Archives Division
97
Conservation and Technical Services Branch
103
Optical Disc Systems
104
Picture Conservation Division
104
Records Conservation Division
107
Photography Services Division
108
Computer Systems Division
109 Departmental Administration
111
Financial Services                                                                                      111
Personnel Services
112
Administrative Services
112 Introduction
One of the most promising events of the year for the future development of
Canadian archives was the ratification, by the provincial ministers responsible for
cultural matters and by the federal minister of Communications, of the major principles of a Canadian system of archives that should greatly facilitate cooperation and
coordination among government archival institutions in Canada. This agreement indicates their will to cooperate and their desire for the harmonious development of
programs to meet present and future needs.
For the Public Archives, the major event was the departure in October of the
Dominion Archivist, Wilfred I. Smith, who retired after occupying the position for
sixteen years. He was the fifth Dominion Archivist since the creation of the Canadian
archives in 1872.
One area of activity that absorbed much more energy than usual was public
relations — publications, travelling exhibitions, archives weeks and open houses combined to make up a very special year for the dissemination of information about the
services and collections of the Public Archives.
The International Council on Archives signified the high esteem enjoyed by the
Public Archives and our country when it accepted Canada's invitation to hold its
quadrennial congress in Canada in 1992. The congress will take place in Montreal and
preparations for it will involve close cooperation with the Archives nationales du
Québec. This will be an opportunity for a major collective effort by Canadian archivists, who will want to show to their colleagues from all over the world dynamic
archives at the leading edge of technology, cooperating closely among themselves and
with the society they serve.
As will be seen in the various reports that follow, the Archives continues to play a
major role in managing the records of federal institutions and it continues to fulfill its
mandate to acquire, preserve and make available to researchers and the public a
wealth of original documents from the public and private sectors. We shall merely
highlight a few points of particular interest.
1) Accommodation — For several years the Archives has been requesting a new
building to bring staff and collections of documents together under better conditions.
The space occupied by the Archives in the building it now shares with the National
Library meets only a third of our needs. A large part of the collections and staff of the
historical archives is housed elsewhere, most often in space that does not meet the
applicable conservation requirements.
This year, the issue enters a new phase. The Minister of Public Works had announced, early in 1984, the construction of a satellite building in Gatineau to house
the visual and sound archives divisions and certain technical and administrative services. This construction would have met the most pressing needs but would have had
the effect — for a long time to come — of a major separation of collections and staff,
to the detriment of service to the public and researchers and of efficient Archives
administration. The Canadian Historical Association and a number of groups and
individuals had protested this division of the Archives. The new government decided
to postpone this construction and, instead, to consider a long-term solution that would
bring together the collections, the staff and public services. Proposals are also being
studied to meet immediate requirements, brought about by temporary space that has
proved totally unsatisfactory for the preservation of our national documentary
heritage.
2) Records Management — The Records Management and Micrographie Systems
Division has been reorganized to better meet the expectations of the administration PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
with respect to improved management and better control of information, and to the
implementation of Treasury Board policies and directives as stated in Chapters 445
and 460 of the Administrative Policy Manual, issued in March 1983.
The Advisory Council on Records, made up of representatives of government
departments, associations concerned with administrative records, the Canadian Historical Association and the Canadian Political Science Association, has been revitalized and has set ambitious goals for itself.
Several members of the Council took part in the preparation of the Guidelines on
Computer Assisted Records Management (1985), which was distributed to all deputy
heads and their institutions to help them computerize their records management
activities.
3) Access to Information — The access to information policy has had major consequences for the Archives. In order to meet the requests of researchers, extra staff
has been assigned to review records received from various government departments
on which restrictions had been imposed by the generating agencies at the time they
were sent to the Archives.
A detailed study has been undertaken of these records in light of the Act, and it is
hoped that many of the restrictions will be lifted. Researchers will have to bear in
mind, however, that the Privacy Act must be invoked for a large proportion of government archival material. To enlighten researchers in this respect and to provide them
with information on the Act as it applies to historical documents, the Archives has
published a brochure: Guidelines for the Disclosure of Personal Information for Historical Research at the Public Archives of Canada (1985).
4) Machine Readable Archives — Two of our Machine Readable Archives Division's
projects are likely to please many people. For the specialists who requested it, the
Archives is working with the Department of Communications to prepare a union list
of machine readable data files. The other project is the creation of a data bank -based
on the Ontario census of 1871; this is primarily designed for genealogists. More than
400 members of the Ontario Genealogical Society have given freely of their time to
this joint project. Two thirds of the work has been done, and we hope to complete the
project in December 1985.
5) Open House — Following the advice of the international archives community in
this matter, the Public Archives participates actively every five years in International
Archives Weeks. This time the festivities took place from October 13 to 31, 1984 and
were exceptionally wide-ranging. During the Open House of October 13 and 14 we
tried to describe and explain the work of the Archives and its various services by
means of photographs, demonstrations and exhibitions of records. Visitors were
greeted at the entrance of the Archives by a huge balloon, which was symbolic of the
theme — "A Canadian Adventure in lune."
The entire ground floor of the building was transformed into eleven display areas
illustrating various aspects of the Archives' work: public relations; Laurier House;
exhibitions and publications; traditional, audio-visual and machine readable historical
documents; technical services, including reprography, electronic data processing, optical discs, and conservation of paintings, prints, manuscripts and medals (the laboratories were also open to visitors); and records management with its four major services:
management experts, intermediary depots, personnel records centres and central
microfilm services. Some of the most beautiful pieces in our collections were brought
together in a special exhibition of paintings entitled The Painted Itist. Seventy-nine
employees were on hand to guide visitors and provide explanations on every aspect of
the exhibitions. Over 6,000 people visited tis, half of them during the two days of the
Open House. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
International Archives Weeks poster. (C 121717) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
6) Publications — We published four titles in the General Guide Series, which was
inaugurated last year. In convenient separate volumes under this general title, the
mandate, organization, functions and services are described for each of the eight
divisions of the Archives Branch, and an overview is given of their holdings. This
year's publications are from the divisions responsible for machine readable archives;
paintings, engravings and drawings; photographs; and manuscripts other than those
belonging to the federal government. These slim volumes enable researchers or other
interested individuals to obtain, very quickly, a good idea of the documents and
facilities available. The series will be completed shortly with the publication of the
guide on maps. Also designed for researchers, we should mention the second edition
of the union list of photographs, Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives. This
thick, 727-page volume drawn from computerized data provides a brief description of
8,631 holdings and collections preserved in 139 repositories, comprising several
million photographs, proofs and negatives.
Also released was a catalogue of the paintings, watercolours and drawings of the
W.H. Coverdale collection (or Manoir Richelieu collection). This work makes an
important contribution to our knowledge of nineteenth-century iconography. The 500
works described in this volume are reproduced in black-and-white, and the careers of
the hundred or so artists who produced them are outlined. With the introductions and
notes, this is an important reference work for historians, art historians and lovers of
Canadiana.
Another work likely to interest the public is entitled Private Realms of Light
(1985). It covers a century of amateur photography, 1839-1940, and includes nearly
200 reproductions and some 60 biographies of photographers.
7) Exhibitions — Our major travelling exhibition Dreams of Empire, Canada before
1700 was as successful as anticipated. Since June 1982, it has been seen by more than
140,000 people in 21 Canadian cities. In its European tour, which included a dozen
cities in France, Switzerland and Italy, it drew more than 14,000 visitors. A new
travelling exhibition, covering the period 1700-1760, and entitled Taking Root is
scheduled to open in December 1985, in Ottawa.
8) Federal-Provincial Meeting and Seminar — On October 15, the Dominion Archivist chaired a special meeting of the directors of provincial and territorial archives.
They planned the development of a national system of archives, based on voluntary
cooperation. This meeting was followed by a seminar held from October 16 to 20 on
the conservation of paper documents. In addition to exchanges of technical information, policies and planning were discussed.
9) The Canadian Archival System — The guidelines for the Canadian archival system
are the fruit of more than ten years of discussions among the federal and provincial
archivists and other archivists and their associations. The Symons report on Canadian
studies (1975) brought the issue of the archives' role to the forefront. The 1980 report
of the Consultative Group on Canadian Archives, set up by the Canada Council, described the existing situation and made numerous suggestions. A group of senior officials of Canadian archives met in Kingston in 1982 to suggest objectives, strategies and
structures. A committee of federal and provincial archivists prepared, clarified and
refined this material to produce, in August 1984, a document that has been accepted
by the provincial authorities. The federal institutions concerned have also viewed it
favourably and in March 1985, the federal minister of Communications gave it his
approval.
This "confederation" sets out some minimal obligations for the individual archival institutions and groups them into provincial councils, which in turn will make up a
Canadian archival council, presided over by the Dominion Archivist. The provinces
are responsible for assisting the archives in their own territories, taking the advice of
the provincial councils into account. The federal responsibility will be to assist PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
archives throughout the country and the provincial councils in particular, after consultation with the Canadian council.
10) The International Scene — The archivists of the Public Archives are very active on
the international scene through their participation in associations such as the International Council on Archives. Within the framework of the Council, they are members
of the Commission on Archival Development and committees on micrography, electronic data processing, audio-visual archives, literature and the arts, and liaison with
the IRMC (International Records Management Council).
UNESCO called on the expertise of our personnel for three of the thirty studies it
published under its archives program. Sam Kula, Klaus Hendriks and Harold Naugler
wrote on audio-visual archives, restoration of photographs and machine readable
archives — areas in which we enjoy an enviable reputation.
11) Visitors from Abroad— As in the past, we received several visits from directors
and senior officials of archival institutions outside Canada. This year they came from
15 countries: Algeria, West Germany, Australia, Burma, Brazil, Scotland, the United
States, France, Namibia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Senegal, Sri Lanka,
Thailand and Tunisia. Contacts were particularly frequent with our American and
Australian colleagues, concerning administrative policies and programs.
Some foreign archivists made extended stays. Gérard Naud of the French Archives and José Maria Jardim of Brazil wanted to observe our system of records
management and the organization of our machine readable archives, while Maung
Thaike and Mya Aung of Burma did practicums — a month on microfilming and three
months on records management, respectively.
Retirement of Wilfred I. Smith — The retirement of the Dominion Archivist, Wilfred
I. Smith, on October 15 was marked by numerous expressions of respect, esteem and
affection at a ceremony tinged with sadness.
Wilfred I. Smith (right)
reception PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Wilfred I. Smith (centre) with members of the Public Archives' Senior
Management Committee. (C 122308)
The senior director, Georges Delisle, presided. As Assistant Dominion Archivist,
I gave the keynote speech. I began by recalling that the associations of archivists,
records managers and micrographie experts had already paid tribute to Dr. Smith, and
highlighted the quality of the services Dr. Smith had rendered in the course of his 34
years at the Archives, 16 of them as its director. I described developments at the Public
Archives over the last three decades, marked by the considerable progress in the
management of government records, the considerable influx of audio-visual and machine readable documents and the introduction of new technologies.
I also emphasized the "total archives" philosophy advocated by Dr. Smith, which
has become a reality, through more systematic acquisition from individuals and institutions in the private sector, in particular, and — in the area of dissemination to the
public — by means of exhibitions and publications of the traditional sort or on microfilm, microfiches or slides.
I noted that Dr. Smith had instituted the annvial meetings of provincial archives
directors with the Dominion Archivist, and mentioned his active participation in and
support for associations of archivists, and his terms of office as president of the Society
of American Archivists, secretary general of the International Council on Archives
and secretary of the UNESCO Advisory Council on Information Programs.
The opinions of several people who have known Dr. Smith well were quoted in
praise of his competence, personal qualities and devotion to his work.
Each of the Archives' directors general honoured Dr. Smith and gave him an
appropriate memento. Susan Mann Trofimenkoff, president of the Canadian Historical Society, expressed the Society's appreciation for his services to research, and John
Bovey of British Columbia, dean of the conferences of federal, provincial and territorial archivists, recalled the conferences Dr. Smith had chaired with authority.
On November 1, Marcel Masse, Minister of Communications, gave a luncheon in
honour of Dr. Smith, and thanked him for his contribution to the preservation and
promotion of our Canadian heritage and to the advancement of archival science in
Canada and abroad. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1«
Dr. Smith's duties were assumed temporarily by the Assistant Dominion Archivist. On February 22, 1985, the Minister of Communications announced the appointment of Jean-Pierre Wallot, historian and Vice-Rector of Studies at the University of
Montreal, as Dominion Archivist. Dr. Wallot was to take up his new post early in
June.
Acknowledgements — On behalf of Dr. Smith and myself, I would like to thank all who
have donated documents; you are cherished collaborators in our mission. I thank the
members of the advisory councils and the committees, and the administrators of other
government departments who share our concerns. Lastly, I want to express my gratitude to the employees of the Public Archives for their spirit of initiative, their devotion
and their wholehearted cooperation; I benefited particularly from this over the last
five months as Acting Dominion Archivist.
March 31, 1985 Bernard Weilbrenner
Acting Dominion Archivist  Internal Audit
The mandate of the directorate is to provide an independent audit function,
which involves an objective systematic review and appraisal of the adequacy and
appropriateness of the framework of controls (including the managerial process and
controls), to both the Public Archives and the National Library. The degree to which
operations are in compliance with the control framework, and the efficiency, effectiveness and economy of operations are assessed. Areas requiring improvement are identified, recommendations as to how improvements can be made are formulated, and
the directorate reports all such matters directly to the Dominion Archivist, the National Librarian and their respective managements.
During the fiscal year 1984-1985,19 audits were undertaken on operations in the
Public Archives and National Library, and six audits were conducted on services that
jointly serve both departments.
The Long-Term Audit Plans (1985-1990) were presented to both Deputy Heads
for approval. Executive Secretariat
The Executive Secretariat is responsible for relations with central policy agencies,
other federal cultural institutions, provincial governments, non-government organizations and the media. The secretariat develops policy proposals related to archives and
coordinates implementation of access to information legislation. The director reports
to the Dominion Archivist and serves as a member of the Senior Management
Committee.
During the year, deputy heads of federal agencies responsible for historical resources met as a Heritage Committee. The Executive Secretariat participated in the
working group established to support the policy deliberations of the Heritage Committee. Beginning in January 1985, the Executive Secretariat was named to represent
the Public Archives in federal-provincial meetings developing a Canadian Archival
System. Approval in principle for the system was obtained and implementation plans
based on consultation were undertaken. In the last quarter of the year, authorization
was received to begin final development on new archives legislation. Documentation
on this subject was prepared for further consultation with federal government institutions. A detailed review of implementation of access to information and privacy legislation is found in the section of this report describing the Federal Archives Division.
Public Relations Office — During the year, the Public Relations Office issued 13 press
releases, coordinated 86 interviews with the media, printed three posters and six post
cards, and organized six receptions.
Much time and effort was devoted to planning and preparing for the Archives'
Open House, which was held on October 13 and 14, 1984. Over 6,700 visitors took
part in A Canadian Adventure in Time. The Public Relations Office coordinated the
project and was responsible for the production of all related promotional material.
The acquisition of the Crawley Film collection and the release of exhibits from the
Kellock-Taschereau Royal Commission attracted extensive national electronic and
print media coverage at the Archives.
The Public Relations Office organized 73 visits for 1,148 visitors to the Public
Archives from Canada and around the world. The office established contact with a
number of Canadian heritage and photographic magazines in order to promote the
Archives' collections. Advertisements and flyers were produced by the Public Relations Office to promote events, publications, services and facilities. Planning and Program Evaluation
This directorate coordinates departmental planning for the Public Archives;
provides for the cyclical and independent review and assessment of departmental
programs for both the Dominion Archivist and the National Librarian; and develops
and monitors the implementation of performance measurement systems in both the
Public Archives and the National Library. Planning and Program Evaluation operates
under the general direction of the Dominion Archivist and the director is a member of
the departmental Senior Management Committee.
During the year, planning activities included coordination of the Senior Management Strategic Planning Session and the related Strategic Approaches of the Public
Archives, 1985-1989 document; involvement in Branch planning sessions; coordination of the departmental Expenditure Plan narrative (Part III of the Estimates) and of
the Multi-Year Operational Plan narratives; contribution to the preparation of a report on departmental accommodation; participation with Program Evaluation, on a
Statistics Canada project team preparing the archives supplement to the Heritage
Institutions Survey; and extensive committee work and liaison with central agency
officials.
The Program Evaluation Office undertook and managed several evaluation studies in the Public Archives and the National Library. A Cabinet-requested evaluation of
the National Library's networking activities was initiated with an identification of
potential study issues. Itoo Public Archives' evaluation studies were completed during
the year. The Conservation component evaluation examined issues pertaining to conservation management, planning and decision making criteria. The study findings
resulted from internal and external interviews as well as studies of comparative institutions. The evaluation of the department's researcher assistance, outreach and assistance to the archival community programs involved some 15 separate research
methods, including a systematic survey of registered researchers and the questioning
of users and visitors to several travelling exhibitions. The study findings focused on
issues related to the rationale for selected researcher assistance activities, the impact
and effects of public service, and the availability of alternative program delivery
methods.
Performance measurement work was undertaken for both departments. For the
Public Archives' Conservation and Technical Services Branch, trial performance measurement data was collected in the Photography Services, Computer Systems, Records
Conservation, and Picture Conservation Divisions. Performance measurement work
elsewhere in the Public Archives included technical advice and support for Financial
Services, Internal Audit, Records Management Branch and Archives Branch. For the
National Library, a departmental performance measurement policy was developed
and approved by the Executive Committee. Trial data collection continued in the
Cataloguing Branch. Trial data collection also commenced in the Collections Development Branch. The Public Services Branch system continued to evolve towards automation in 1984-1985. The Library Systems Centre developed a fully-automated
system. The Performance Measurement Coordinators Committee of the National
Library continued to meet during this past year. Exhibition Services
The division provides exhibition, audio-visual and auditorium reservation services
to the Public Archives and the National Library, and manages the circulating exhibitions program and Laurier House for the Public Archives.
Ten exhibitions sponsored by the National Library and non-profit organizations
took place in the foyer of the auditorium during the year.
Circulation of Exhibitions — During the year, four major exhibitions (Dreams of
Empire, The Widening Sphere, Ken Bell and Private Realms of Light) were circulated
in Canada and were seen in 14 centres. Dreams of Empire completed its Canadian tour
of two and a half years and was seen by approximately 141,000 visitors in 20 centres.
Dreams of Empire also continued its t<
in six centres.
r of France and Switzerland and was seen
is were shown in 10 centres from Halifax, N.S. to Fort Smith,
Six minor exhibiti
N.W.T.
In 1984-1985, 48,475 visitors viewed the exhibitions — 41,161 in Canada and
7,314 in Europe.
n of the exhibition A Canadian Adventure in Tune,
presented at the Archives' Open House, October 13-14, 19É
International Archives Weeks. (C 123227) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Exhibition Design and Preparation — The major design project for the year was the
preparation of the exhibits for the Open House on October 13 and 14, marking
International Archives Weeks. The theme of the Open House was A Canadian Adventure in Time. Three exhibition areas and the main lobby were devoted to exhibits on
the collections and services of the Public Archives.
Representative of the 10 minor exhibitions prepared during the year were In the
Best Style of the Art, Aperçu . . . Track Record and 7. Austin Floyd.
i matted, 568 framed, 462 unframed, 1,569 dry-
In 1984-1985, 291 items v
mounted and 1,430 laminated.
Laurier House — The education program conducted over the past year consisted of
workshops on the life and times of Mackenzie King, the annual Christmas program,
and an open house for International Museums Day.
An important acquisition was a gold-enamelled snuff box, donated by George
Rosengarten of Montreal. The box was presented to Sir Wilfrid Laurier by the Duke
and Duchess of Cornwall and York during their tour of Canada in 1901. A new
(reproduction) slate roof was put on the house.
During the year, 110 documents and 27 artifacts were treated, 405 inquiries
processed, 36 volunteers utilized and 23,500 visitors received.
Audio-visual Services — The statistics in Table I reflect the combined use
auditorium complex by the Public Archives, National Library, other governm
partments, and non-profit organizations PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT IS
TABLE I
Percentage Use of Auditorium and Boardrooms (248 working days)
Auditorium
Room 154
Room 156
Morning 	
Afternoon   	
Evening	
46%
39%
63%
64%
58%
46%
58%
50%
44%
During 1984-1985, service was provided for 22 conferences of more than one day
duration, and a total of 244 films were checked and shown. Publications Division
The director of the Publications Division reports to the Assistant Dominion
Archivist and is a member of the departmental Publications Committee. The division
is responsible for producing and distributing publications on Public Archives holdings
and services to researchers and the general public.
Among this year's publications, the most prestigious is without doubt Private-
Realms of Light, based on the exhibition of the same name. This well illustrated
335-page deluxe volume traces the history of amateur photography in Canada from
1839 to 1940. The Antique Map Calendar is another prestigious publication, and 1985
marks the fourth consecutive year the calendar has appeared.
Four new titles were produced in the General Guide Series 1983, dealing with the
resources and services of the various divisions of the Archives Branch. A new title,
PHOCUS, appeared as the first of a new series on specialized topics related to the
Archives and to archives science. The division also produced 14 titles to complete its
series of brochures on each of the divisions and branches of the Archives. The Archives' three periodicals continued to be published on a regular basis.
The division also continued to publish finding aids and exhibition catalogues such
as Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives, a lengthy union list of the country's
photographic archives holdings, The Painted Past, a companion to the exhibition of
historical paintings held during the Archives' Open House in October 1984, and three
pamphlets in the Aperçu series.
A list of the main publications produced by the division follows. All are free,
unless otherwise indicated.
GENERAL GUIDE SERIES 1983
Machine Readable Archives Division. Ottawa, 1984, 37 pages
Manuscript Division. Ottawa, 1984, 53 pages
National Photography Collection. Ottawa, 1984, 51 pages
Picture Division. Ottawa, 1984, 44 pages
BROCHURES
Central Microfilm Operations. Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Conservation and Technical Services Branch. Ottawa, 1984, 12 pages
Federal Records Centres Division. Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Laurier House. Ottawa, 1984, 7 pages
Machine Readable Archives Division. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Manuscript Division. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
National Film, Television and Sound Archives. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
National Personnel Records Centre. Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
National Photography Collection. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Picture Division. Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Public Archives Library. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Public Archives of Canada. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
EXHIBITION CATALOGUES
Aperçu: Dressing Up. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Aperçu: Souvenirs of Evangeline Land. Ottawa, 1985, 6 pages
Aperçu: Track Record. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Private Realms of Light: Amateur Photography in Canada/1839-1940. Ottawa, 1985,
335 pages, $50
The Painted Past. Ottawa, 1984, 100 pages
FINDING AIDS
Accessions, 1983-1984, Federal Archives Division. Ottawa, 1984, 26 pages
Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives. Ottawa, 1984, 727 pages, $35
Tracing Your Ancestors in Canada. Ottawa, 1984, 41 pages
PERIODICALS
Machine Readable Archives Bulletin. 4 issues, 2 pages each
Records Management Bulletin. 3 issues, average 12 pages each
The Archivist. 6 issues, average 20 pages each
OTHERS
Antique Map Calendar 1985. Ottawa, 1984, 28 pages, $7.95
FIAF1983. Ottawa, 1984, 46 pages
PHOCUS: Bibliographic Data Base for the Conservation of Photographic Documents. Ottawa, 1985, 28 pages
Distribution — Publications were distributed in the following manner: 795 sold to
individuals or to Supply and Services Canada; 55,725 distributed free of charge in
response to specific requests; 40,078 sent to people whose names appear on mailing
lists. Records Management Branch
The mission of the Records Management Branch is the optimum management of
the records of the Government of Canada. The branch supports this objective through
the provision of up-to-date advice, training and assistance to government institutions
in records management and micrographics, as well as by evaluating on a regular basis
the effectiveness of records management programs within the various institutions. The
branch also offers a records centre storage service for inactive and essential ("vital")
records of departments and agencies in the regions of the country, and administers
centrally the personnel records of all former federal public servants, civilian and
military. In addition, a micrographics operational service is offered on a cost-recovery
basis. The branch also provides the secretariat for the development of national micro-
graphic standards for the Canadian General Standards Board.
OFFICE OF MICROGRAPHIC STANDARDS AND DEVELOPMENT— Standards
— The Public Archives sponsors the development of micrographie standards for the
Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB), with this office the designated secretariat. Under the chairmanship of the director, the CGSB Coordinating Committee on
Micrographie Standards oversees six standards-writing committees. Some 75 persons
across Canada, mainly from the private sector, are involved in the preparation of
micrographie standards and contribute their time and assistance voluntarily.
One meeting of the Coordinating Committee was held in Ottawa in March at
which closer harmonization with the Canadian contribution to the work of the International Organization on Standardization (ISO) was established.
During the year, three international draft standards were reviewed for adoption as
National Standards of Canada and they are expected to be published during the next
fiscal year. The National Standard "Admissibility of Microfilm as Documentary Evidence," issued in 1979, was revised and it too will be published during 1985. Work was
commenced on the five-year maintenance of two other National Standards and two
are awaiting updates of international standards. A CGSB Provisional Standard on
microfilm terminology was studied to determine if it would be adopted, but was
rejected in favour of an ISO standard nearing completion. At the close of the year two
standards were awaiting publication by the CGSB.
International and National Non-Governmental Organizations — The director attended
the annual meeting of the Committee on Archival Reprography of the International
Council on Archives held in Bonn, F.R.G. in June. Under his guidance, as chairman
of the Canadian Micrographie Society's Advisory Council of Past Presidents, an examination of the functions of the society was prepared for the Board of Directors. He
coauthored a technical paper on micrographie standards that was presented at the
CMS/ARMA conference in Calgary in October.
Records Management and Micrographie
Systems Division
The past fiscal year was also the first complete one since the division reorganized
to meet the challenges and responsibilities assigned to the department by recent
policies and regulations in records management and micrographics. To increase the
efficiency of resource utilization and to accommodate the demands of government
institutions for guidance and assistance, much time and effort was channeled into
integrating and consolidating activities and obligations in the areas of consulting services, training, records scheduling and research studies in automation and related PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
technologies. Of particular concern was the need to gain knowledge and expertise in
performing the newly-acquired task of evaluating the records management function of
government institutions and ensuring that institutions implement the centrally-
prescribed policies. These policies emphasize the need for firm, effective records
management and micrographie practices in the federal government.
As a continuing effort to ensure that institutions understand and comply with
government policy, sessions were held for all micrographie coordinators or designated
alternates to review the guidelines and directives of the micrographics policy and the
manner in which they were to be integrated within the institutions' implementation
plans. Additionally, progress continued in studying and promoting the application of
computer technology to records management functions and activities. Government
institutions were provided with guidelines for developing functional specifications for
automated records management support systems. The division also continued its involvement in the Department of Communications' Office Communications Systems
Program of field trials to further understand and advise on the impact of automated
office technology to records management operations.
Advice, Projects and Training — In accordance with Treasury Board policies, the
division continued to provide advice, on request, to government institutions concerning the management of their records. Studies and surveys were conducted of
systems and procedures involving hard-copy records, microforms and possible micro-
graphic applications. A total of 48 institutions received assistance.
Consultations were held with officials of institutions that had terminated operations or will be doing so shortly to determine the responsibility for exercising control
of the existing records. These included the Ministry of State for Social Development
and the Canadian Unity Information Office. Divisional staff were also involved in the
transfer of responsibilities of the Ministry of State for Economic Development and the
Ministry of State for Science and Technology to the Department of Regional Industrial Expansion. Internally, guidelines were drafted on the criteria for accepting requests for advice from institutions as well as written procedures for conducting
surveys.
"Records Management Principles and Practices," the four-week course for experienced records management personnel, was limited to two courses this year. Resource
constraints and other priorities forced the division to cancel some of the four-day
"Introduction to Records Management" courses normally provided. However, these
will be reinstated in 1985-1986. The "Microrecording Technology Course" was presented three times, including once for Royal Canadian Mounted Police personnel.
Throughout the year, lecturers were provided to give training seminars to various
associations, institutes and government institutions.
Evaluations — Extensive preparatory work was carried on in developing an audit
program for use by the division and by institutions' internal audit groups for evaluating
records management functions. Information for inclusion in the Treasury Board Administrative Policy Branch Five-Year Evaluation Plan (1985-1990) was prepared and
submitted. This information contains a description of the planned evaluation activities
of the Public Archives and provides a schedule with proposed dates when institutions
intend to carry out audits of their records management functions. During this time,
numerous meetings were held with officials of the Office of the Comptroller General
to determine the content for inclusion in an audit guide to be issued by that office.
Pilot evaluations were conducted in two institutions, while consultations were held
with other internal audit groups to discuss terms of reference and audit methodology,
to provide technical advice, and to prepare comments on their audit programs to
ensure that audit coverage is complete.
The second report on the State of Records Management in the Government of
Canada was submitted to Treasury Board. Generally, the report reflected on implementation activities of government institutions in complying with the new records PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
A consultant discusses the o
records management evahu
management policies; the efforts being made to urge institutions to schedule operational records and to describe personal information banks; and the use of automated
systems to support records management functions. Initial meetings were held with
Treasury Board officials to develop an outline for the 1985 report, review the Government Records Management Policy Evaluation Standards, and develop a reporting
mechanism to obtain an update of the institutional plans in order to assess progress
being made towards compliance with that policy.
Research and Development — Copies of the publication Guidelines on Computer
Assisted Records Management were issued to deputy heads of institutions included in
Schedules A and B of the Financial Administration Act. An interdepartmental working group chaired by the Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division
coordinated the publication.
A senior consultant of the division participated in accomplishing the objectives of
the Public Archives/Department of Communications' Information Management
Working Group, which were to propose recommendations concerning the application
of records management and archival management principles to information created,
used and disposed of within an automated office environment. An interim report was
produced describing the activities associated with the first phase of the project including the status of the records management function, the transmission of information
and the development of functional specifications. A consulting firm was contracted by
the Public Archives to develop and test office procedures using these new systems
functions, which will indicate the archival and records management requirements for
information generated in an office automation application.
At year's end, the survey questionnaires used to gather data on micrographie
applications in government institutions were being summarized. The data will be used
to create a base of information concerning micrographics in government and to iden- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
and assessing an automated records rt
application. (ARC/0855A/4)
tify significant trends that have occurred in the micrographie field during the past 15
years. An automated micrographie equipment catalogue, which is being developed,
will enable divisional consultants to be aware of current equipment specifications and
functions and will be available for consultation by micrographie coordinators
throughout the government. Evaluations continued on microfilming equipment and,
as well, work continued on assessing existing microfilm standards and determining
new standards requirements both nationally and internationally.
The publications Records Organization and Operations and General Records Disposal Schedules were thoroughly reviewed. They are to be reissued in 1985-1986. Two
other publications, Records Scheduling and Disposal and Subject Classification Guide,
are currently planned for amendment and reissuance in 1986-1987.
Records Scheduling — Records scheduling was a particularly demanding task in
1984-1985, as most government institutions strived to schedule their operational records as well as their personal information banks. The ARC-170 "Records Retention
and Disposal Authority" form was revised to accommodate changes in submitting
schedules for approval. Internal procedures to speed up the approval process were
developed. The ARC-197 "Records Microfilming Authority'' form also was being
revised to meet the responsibilities of the new micrographie policy.
Because of the complexity of scheduling personal information, considerable consultation was required by a large number of institutions. Table II indicates the number
of submissions (records schedules, amendments and microfilming submissions) processed from 1971 to March 1985. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Period
Number of Records
Schedules and Disposal
Proposals Submitted
Number of
Microfilm
Submissions
Total
Cumulative
Total*
1971-1976 (March) .
1976-1982 (March) .
1982-1985 (March) .
208
322
220
207
190
62
415
512
282
1,092
1,604
1,886
Total 15 years 	
750
459
1,209
1,886
The division maintained its long standing relations with associations and institutes
such as the Association of Records Managers and Administrators, Records Management Institute, Canadian Micrographics Society, Federal Micrographics Council, Association for Information and Image Management and others. It also serves as the
secretariat to the Advisory Council on Records.
Federal Records Centres Division
The Federal Records Centres Division provides storage and management for the
dormant general subject records of federal government institutions named in the
schedule to the Privacy Act. Services provided include bringing the records into the
centres, referencing the records, and disposing of them after the authorized retention
periods expire. Other services include the inspection and monitoring of microforms
for deterioration, the provision of a central disposal facility for security classified
records, the provision of a magnetic tape library service and, in cooperation with the
Records Management and Micrographie Systems Division, provides records management training and advisory services in regions outside of the National Capital Region.
This fiscal year has been one of tremendous growth. Tape library activity grew by
three fold in some records centres with a 28 per cent overall increase in holdings and a PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
i
il!
l§l
lu
1»?
058  513    3,070    1,085   29,997  123,332  130,212  10,060    3,005
551        12,256    2,443   84,204  369,493  332,968  13,531    3,293
524        12,668    35,989   137,176  282,809  225,481  99,739   96,806
444    2.5   11,320      680    66,273  262,310  380,055  10,607    9,095
976         9,143    2,243   37,027  204,251  267,530  22,419   21,865
495         2,521     1,828    17,406   17,152   13,758   2,406    2,411
533   425    5,943     4,355    40,410  190,452  269,521  17,732    15,373
1
427     1,132     6
543     1,912    12
524     2,660    17
444     2,207    17
976     1,062     6
095     2,323    5
944     1,296     5
8
o«
x    3    *>   s    g.   e    S
1 1 I i 1 1 i
a   1  5   (2  $   S  1
1 212 per cent increase in reference activity. The volume of non-accessioned classified
records destroyed doubled and the number of handicapped employees in this activity
increased by 45 per cent. The number of clients increased by 8 per cent.
Records centres are located in Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto,
Ottawa, Montreal and Halifax. Holdings in these centres range from a low of 17,500
metres in Edmonton to a high of 137,000 metres in Ottawa. The 1984-1985 net
increase in total holdings in the division was 29,053 metres.
Reference — Reference activity (returning records to clients on demand) increased by
about 2 per cent this year. Once again Revenue Canada-Taxation (RC-T) has had the
biggest impact. In the Vancouver Records Centre, 200,000 of 290,000 references were
for RC-T. In the Winnipeg Centre, 159,000 of 184,000 references were for RC-T. In
January, the Winnipeg Centre processed a peak of 40,000 references. In addition to
this workload, RC-T requested that some records centres begin refiling T-2 records
because of space limitations in their data centres. Up to now this work had been done
by RC-T staff. Despite this workload, the 24 hour service standard was maintained
throughout the year. Because this service standard was so well maintained in the
Winnipeg Centre the number of urgent requests dropped from 8,400 in 1983-1984 to
1,200 this year.
In recognition of this workload, RC-T agreed to transfer on a permanent basis the
17 person-years that had been on loan since 1982-1983. They also agreed to loan an
additional three person-years for 1985-1986. By this time, there is expected to be a
decrease in the RC-T workload.
Disposals — Disposal of accessioned records remained at about the same level as last
year. Levels for non-accessioned records however climbed dramatically. Results from
the Toronto Records Centre are typical. In 1983-1984, this records centre reported 14
clients making use of the disposal facility to destroy 130 metres of non-accessioned
classified records. This year, 53 clients used the service to destroy 680 metres of
classified records — a 423 per cent increase.
In the Ottawa Records Centre there was a 33 per cent increase from 1,200 to
1,600 tonnes of paper. This recycled paper represents a forest of 12,000 trees that has
been saved. Division-wide, these wastepaper projects employed, through contract
arrangements with local associations for the handicapped, 80 handicapped people,
.which is 25 more than the previous year.
In order to keep abreast of the demand for the classified records disposal service,
extensive modifications have been made. Floor space assigned to the facility in Ottawa
has been doubled and an extra shredder has been added to the two already in use. To
destroy records with a security classification higher than confidential, modifications
were made to the incinerator, which increased production from two tonnes per week
to one tonne per day.
Tape Library — Holdings and activities in the records centres' tape libraries have
expanded rapidly. The tape library in the Vancouver Centre opened in May 1984 and
within seven months had holdings of 1,650 tapes. Halifax holdings jumped from 3,500
to 10,060. Table IV shows the dramatic increases in activity of two other centres.
Registrations refer to tapes coming into the library and deregistrations refer to tapes
that have been recalled by the owner department for reference.
The 170,000 tapes stored and serviced by the division during the year would
normally have been sent for off-site storage to a commercial service bureau. By storing
these tapes in divisional facilities. $1,008,500 was saved in direct storage and service
fees. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Toronto
Registrations  5,760 10,607
Deregistrations  4,920 9,095
Ottawa
Registrations  60,218 99,739
Deregistrations  44,530 96,806
Accommodation — There are severe accommodation problems in the Toronto,
Montreal and Ottawa Federal Records Centres. Plans for a records centre in Quebec
City have not been carried out. It may not be possible to meet all records storage
demands in the Quebec region as a result. This new records centre was to have
relieved accommodation pressures on the Montreal Centre.
The same situation prevails in the Toronto Records Centre. Despite the transfer
of over 1,000 square metres of floor space from the National Film, Television and
Sound Archives and the Central Microfilm Operations, it will almost certainly be
necessary to curtail acceptance of records for storage in the coming year. There is at
present sufficient accommodation for an additional 24,760 PARC boxes of records in
the Toronto Records Centre. Of this, 75 per cent is in blocks of less than 100 consecutive spaces. The division is working closely with departmental Property Management to resolve these problems.
Promotion of Records Centre Services — Recognizing that use of the federal records
centres saves the government substantial amounts of money each year, much work has
been done to promote the services of the division. A total of 306 potential clients were
visited and 370 visitors toured the records centres. The division also participated
actively in ARMA seminars, serving on various committees, giving lectures and, for
the first time, presenting an exhibition explaining records centre services. All these
efforts resulted in 75 new clients using economical records centre services. The average cost of acquiring these new clients was $217 each.
Client Survey — A total of 940 questionnaires were sent to clients during the last
quarter of the year. The questionnaires were designed to determine if the records
centres met the needs of the clients. Of the 940, a total of 662 or 70 per cent were
completed and returned. The survey showed that 95.6 per cent were satisfied with the
overall service. Timeliness of the pickup and delivery service was 97.7 per cent satisfactory. The questionnaire responses will be studied to determine where necessary
adjustments need to be made to meet client needs.
National Personnel Records Centre
The primary functions of the National Personnel Records Centre (NPRC) are
twofold. First, the centre provides storage and reference services to federal departments and agencies, and the general public, on personnel and personnel-related records of former civilian and military federal employees. Second, it assumes, on behalf
of the Dominion Archivist, the responsibilities defined in current access and privacy
legislation for all non-current personnel records that are held under NPRC control.
The period from April 1,1984 to March 31,1985 was one of great significance to
the NPRC. Meaningful environmental changes took place within the centre and all sections reported either increased or more complex demands on the services provided
within their respective areas.
General — A newly-acquired Extel ComMaster terminal, which replaced the division's
outdated tape-operated Telex machine, became operational on August 1,1984. Three
employees of the centre received operator training on this new telecommunications
equipment and further training courses will be held in-house.
During this reporting period, all of the file storage room floors were painted. This
project was completed during weekends, to ensure minimal interruptions of service to
clients. The painting has greatly minimized the problems experienced with dust and
dirt throughout the stack areas.
Concordia University's research project on the development of personality and
intellectual functioning during the years of maturity began in June 1984. The Communications section forwarded, on behalf of Concordia University, over 400 recruitment letters and consent forms to Canadian Army veterans of World War II. In
addition, the Reference Services section made available 200 selected veterans files to
Concordia University personnel for detailed study and examination.
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT — This section directs the Automated Systems Processing and Maintenance areas as well as the Documentation area, and in addition,
develops new systems for additional record groups or for other administrative needs.
Some of the more noteworthy events undertaken in this area follow below.
(i) The project of entering current regimental numbers from DND listings to the
PERSFILE database was completed. This resulted in the addition of over 75,000
identification numbers to existing service records in the PERSFILE scheme, thus
updating the recently-released records, which are also the most active. As a result,
there has been a marked increase in inquiry matches on the first attempt into the
database.
(ii) The disposal of records of civilian personnel born in 1912 and 1913 has freed over
30,000 jackets that can now be used for files of persons recently released from the
public service. This represents approximately one third of the total of new jackets
required for these new files.
(iii) The interfiling of several groups of records that were previously held as indexes
has been completed. RCAF and RCN medal and memorial cards have been
indexed and integrated into the appropriate veteran's file. The centre also processed 12 metres of papers documenting civilian employees, which had accumulated over the past several years, and screened many metres of foreign service
records.
REFERENCE SERVICES — This section receives and integrates personnel records
from other government departments and agencies on a national basis, and controls
access to these records by government institutions. Important actions undertaken
during this period follow below.
(i) The NPRC verified the location of 7,616 personnel records in order that the
Superannuation Branch of Supply and Services Canada would be able to update
its records system.
(ii) A decision was made to accept agencies into PERSFILE in addition to those listed
in the schedule annexed to the Privacy Act. Each agency that approaches the
NPRC in this regard will now be dealt with on an individual basis, and the
appropriate decision made. This will allow the NPRC much greater flexibility in
dealing with this type of request.
(iii) Special assistance was provided to the Auditor Generals Office, Department of
National Defence, when an audit of the Directorate of Pay Services was carried
out. Over 400 specially-selected records were provided for review. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Many requests for Access to Information are received over the phoi
(ARC/2070/A7)
'W ffiftgppr
Research clerk PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
TABLE V
Reference Services Statistics
Type of Requests
1983-1984
1984-1985
Military 	
Civilian  	
                     37,926
16,760
33,712
20 003
RCMP	
Internal 	
X-Rays   	
                      5,014
                    32,236
1,298
6,649
31,595
1,367
1,147
Ancillary	
                         814
Total Requests 	
                    94,048
94,473
COMMUNICATIONS—This section provides all communication services, both internal and external, and prepares the responses to requests for information from various
governments and the general public, ensuring compliance with existing access and
privacy legislation. During the year, officials of the division met with officials of the
Department of National Defence about common areas of concern regarding the application of the Privacy Act and with Veterans Affairs Canada to improve the services
that are provided to them.
During the period under review, the Correspondence unit actioned 32,901 informal and general requests for information with a percentage breakdown as follows:
letters — 61.7 per cent; telephone — 19.3 per cent; Telex — 17.8 per cent; personal
visits — 1.2 per cent. The Review and Restructuring Unit actioned 3,516 formal
requests for information under the Access to Information and Privacy Acts, which is a
29.3 per cent increase over the same period last year.
Statistics related to the services provided by the Communications section are
shown in Tables VI and VII.
Activities of the NPRC
Informal and General Requests for Information
Inquiries Processed (Total) .
Personal Visits .
Telex 	
Telephone   	
Letters  	
32,901
399
5,866
6,362
20,274
Letter Inquiry Type
Routine* 	
Complex   	
Sensitive   	
Genealogical	
Total 	
Response Time (%)
Under 30 Days    31 to 60 Days Over 60 Days
21,405
3,862
85.71
61.80
94.40
0.64
3.94
Total Number of Photocopies Provided
* Includes all Telex requests. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Activities of the NPRC under the
Access to Information and Privacy Acts
Response Time (%)
Access to Information Act Under 30 Days    31 to 60 Days Ov«
Number of Formal
Requests
Processed     103 89.32 10.68
Number of Photocopies
Provided         7,611
Privacy Act
Number of Formal
Requests
Processed           3,413
Number of Photocopies
Provided       296,777
Total Number of
Formal Requests
Processed           3,516
Total Number of
Photocopies
Provided       304,388
Central Microfilm Operations
The past year was a year of moderate growth, of improved productivity and of
consolidation.
The mandate of the Central Microfilm Operations (CMO) was reviewed and
revised to more accurately reflect the strategic goals of the Public Archives. The
Central Microfilm Operations was defined as a common service organization with
right of first refusal, providing centralized micrographie operational services to the
Public Archives, to the National Library, and to other government institutions when
vacant capacity exists.
In light of its revised role and responsibility, the Central Microfilm Operations is
realigning its resources to better serve its main client, the Archives Branch of the
Public Archives. The conservation and preservation of the holdings of that branch are
of vital concern and the Central Microfilm Operations hopes to provide an effective,
efficient and economical method of preserving these historical records for future
generations.
The preservation of historical documents on microfilm is of course not new. It is a
process that has been ongoing for many years. This past year alone, in excess of 1.2
million pages of records have been microfilmed, including: the records of the Privy
Council Office and the Post Office; the papers of the Right Honourable John Diefen-
baker; records of the Communist Party; letterpress letter books; Italian immigration
files; and records of the National Film, Television and Sound Archives. The holdings
of the Archives Branch are microfilmed not only for their long-term historical value,
but also to provide research and reference copies and to facilitate access to material
that would not otherwise be available, such as the recently-released Gouzenko papers.
In all, more than three million records from 30 government departments were microfilmed during the year, including 3,500 theses from universities across Canada. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Central Microfilm Operations employee microfilming originals. (C 121772)
In addition to the continuing program of microfilming original documents, the
Central Microfilm Operations provides a valuable duplication service. This year, over
1,000 rolls of 35mm microfilm of the Hudson's Bay Company records were duplicated
for the'Manitoba Provincial Archives in cooperation with the Manuscript Division,
Archives Branch. Microforms may also be viewed by researchers in Archives Branch
facilities. Over 3,700 rolls of film were inspected, repaired and cleaned as part of an
effort to improve the services available to researchers at the Public Archives.
The CMO contributed to the publishing efforts of the Records Management and
Micrographie Systems Division by providing microfiche copies of the publications
produced by the Records Management Branch. The microfiche copies were presented
to students and trainees attending the Archives Course and the Microrecording Technology Course. Additionally, microfiche were sent to records managers and will be
provided as handouts at the ARMA conference in Winnipeg in May 1985. As part of
an ongoing commitment, the CMO provided the Canadian Institute for Historical
Microreproduction with 23,000 archival microfiche from the institute's masters.
In addition to its conventional microfilming activities, the CMO provides computer output microfilming and duplication services to 17 federal government departments and agencies.
Central Microfilm Operations Statistics
Camera Exposures    3,285,939
Film Processing (metres)   856,814
Roll Duplication (metres)   1,143,127
Microfiche Duplication  5,752,565
COM — Exposures  22,769,738  Archives Branch
This in many ways has been a satisfying year of consolidation and progress along
the lines of already defined objectives.
Much has been achieved on the long-term project of developing suitable EDP
systems to improve physical and intellectual control over our holdings. All divisions
are now on the path to achieving automated control over accession registration, inventory and material tracking, slated for completion later in this decade.
The divisions have had an opportunity to prepare responses to a branch-wide
Conservation Report undertaken last year and it is clearly evident that major initiatives for the better preservation of all our archival media must be undertaken.
Further progress has been achieved in the development of an acquisitions policy
for the Public Archives with the completion of a draft of a mandate statement for the
branch. Studies undertaken on exhibition policy and researcher service will also have
an impact on the branch.
In the area of acquisition, new initiatives related to government records inaugurated last year have continued, with the National Photography Collection, Machine
Readable Archives Division and the National Map Collection maintaining their pilot
projects on the identification, scheduling and acquisition of government records relevant to their responsibilities. The National Photography Collection has experienced a
heavy influx of material from its efforts in this area. The Machine Readable Archives
Division continued its active participation in the Department of Communications
automated field trial study.
The year has been an important one for publications, with the launching of the
catalogue W.H. Coverdale Collection of Canadiana (Picture Division), as well as the
release of the much-praised Private Realms of Light and a new edition of Guide to
Canadian Photographic Archives (National Photography Collection). Work has commenced on a Canadian Union List of Machine Readable Data Files and editing begun
on a guide to textual records relating to Canada in Great Britain and Ireland.
Details of activities and accomplishments of the year are to be found in the
divisional reports that follow. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
TABLE IX
Selected Output Statistics
Activities 1983-1984 1984-1985
Acquisition
Metres of Government Textual Records    9,105 5,895
Metres of Private Textual Records     1,170 1,358
Photographic Records  141,726 868,614
Film, Television and Sound Records
(10-minute segments)     87,688 123,810
Cartographic Records   70,858 71,474
Machine Readable Data Files   124 99
Iconographie Records   4,312 5,899
Published Items    28,541 27,204
Control (records brought under minimal control)
Metres of Government Textual Records     1,383 2,230
Metres of Private Textual Records     848 1,085
Photographic Records  141,726 857,944
Film, Television and Sound Records
(10-minute segments)     57,673 55,045
Cartographic Records   61,880 63,745
Machine Readable Data Files   59 82
Iconographie Records   2,702 7,158
Published Items    6,141 8,032
Conservation
Items Conserved or Transferred to Other Formats
by Branch Staff
Magnetic Tapes Rewound  939 1,715
Film, Television and Sound Records Processed   38,751 41,519
Cartographic Records Microfilmed  33,961 14,242
Items Transferred to Other Formats by Service Bureaux
Metres of Government Textual Records Microfilmed . 142 110
Metres of Private Textual Records Microfilmed  44.5 57
Service to the Public
Researchers Registered  6,853 6,690
Researcher Attendance  28,273 29,044
Inquiries Responded to  96,603 91,368
Photocopies Supplied     335,132 475,919
Photographs Circulated  954,156 747,175
Textual Containers Circulated
(government and private records)  80,074 90,620
Microfilm Reels Supplied on Interhbrary Loan
(copies of textual records)    17,238 15,556
Pages Reviewed for Access and Privacy  210,000 389 575 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Manuscript Division
The mandate to acquire, preserve and service records from the private sector was
assigned to the Public Archives when it was founded in 1872. It is the division's
primary responsibility to fulfill this mandate. In spite of economic restraints on activities, we have been able to ensure that private records of national significance continue to be preserved as part of our national heritage.
Research interest in private records remains high — as attested to by the number
of articles and books citing our holdings. Reacting to present needs of researchers and
in anticipation of future trends in research, the division actively sought out records
relating to social, constitutional and environmental issues, and to individuals and
groups concerned about women's issues, native rights and civil liberties. At the same
time, we have not lost sight of the importance of traditional source material such as the
papers of prime ministers and other leaders in Canadian society.
Planning was a major activity this year as the division tried to exploit the potential
of computers in performing major functions such as description and inventory control.
Staff members served on divisional committees concerned with developing and implementing location and accession control systems. At a three-day planning session for
the division's managers at the Federal Study Centre, the major topics of concern to the
division were discussed fully and a planning document was produced in support of
branch and divisional goals.
One of the major concerns identified at the planning session was the continued
and pressing need for adequate storage for material. During the year, several serious
problems arose concerning storage areas in the Journal Building and the main building. Severe damage to records could have resulted had it not been for the prompt
action of staff members and our disaster planning preparations.
Another concern involved the organizational structure of the division. During the
period April to December, the division continued to be administered by a management committee of four members with one of the members acting in place of the
director, R.S. Gordon. Mr. Gordon's secondment to work on the acquisition policy
document was extended to the end of December. Carman Carroll, Victorin Chabot,
Patricia Kennedy and Charles MacKinnon served as acting directors during this
period. While this system worked well as a temporary measure, it was felt that the
division would benefit by requesting a Bureau of Management Consulting study of the
organization. This study will be undertaken in 1985.
As in years past, the division continued to play an active part in providing assistance to the cultural community. Members of the staff were frequently called upon
to offer archival advice and present papers relating to archival work. The division was
again actively involved in the Union List of Manuscripts project and the Diffusion
Program. Work continued on the second Records of Our History exhibition and publication, and a display was prepared for the Open House during Archives Weeks. A
number of divisional archivists played active roles in a variety of professional associations by serving as officers and by presenting papers at meetings.
Staff Activities — Robert Gordon was elected vice-president of the Manuscript Society, completed his fourth year on the Council of the Society of American Archivists
and served as a member of the International Council on Archives' committee on arts
and literature. He also addressed a meeting of the New England Archivists Association. His address "There's Gold in Them There Hills" dealt with the Public Archives'
acquisition activities in the United Kingdom, France and Spain.
Victorin Chabot presented a paper at the meeting of the Association des archivistes du Québec and taught students in the Archives Course at the University of
Montreal. He also served on a working group within the Bureau of Canadian Archivists to establish standards for the description of archival documents. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Carman Carroll completed his fourth year as English language secretary of the
Canadian Historical Association and had an article published in the Canadian Parliamentary Review entitled "Parliamentarians and the Public Archives."
Patricia Kennedy and Marianne McLean presented papers at the Ontario Historical Society's annual meetings, and Patricia Kennedy and Patricia Birkett prepared
articles on access and religious archives, respectively, for The Archivist.
Walter Neutel, Edward Laine, Lawrence Tapper and Myron Momryk of the
National Ethnic Archives (NEA) participated at conferences on historical and ethnic
studies. Edward Laine presented a paper at "Finn Forum '84" in Turku, Finland,
entitled "Finnish Canadian Archives and Their Development in Canada, 1882-1984"
and was interviewed by members of the Finnish media. He also edited a book of
essays, Scandinavian — Canadian Studies. Another NEA archivist, George
Bolotenko, contributed several articles to Archivaria.
Two archivists were seconded to other institutions during the year. Norman Ball
left for a two-year secondment to the Museum of Science and Technology. David
Walden was seconded to the Moveable Cultural Property Secretariat of the Department of Communications after serving as acting section chief of the Social/Cultural
section in Judi Cumming's absence.
Colleen Dempsey served as vice-president of the Eastern Ontario Archivists
Association. Marielle Campeau attended a special archival training course in conservation techniques held in Paris from January to March 1985.
FRENCH ARCHIVES — The French Archives section is responsible for records
pertaining to the first Europeans in North America and to the New France period. It is
also responsible for documents related to the seigneurial system and to the history of
the Catholic Church in Canada. It acquires and conserves original manuscripts and
copies of documents from European, American and Canadian repositories.
Major Acquisitions
Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (MG 17, A 28). Documents from the
Secretariat for the Visit of Pope John Paul II to Canada, 1982-1984. (12.8 m)
France: Archives de la Marine, Service hydrographique, Series 4 JJ, Ships' Logs
(MG 2). Microfilm of articles 1 and 2. Microfilms, seventeenth and eighteenth
centuries. (2 reels)
France: Archives départementales de la Gironde (Bordeaux) (MG 6, A 17). Series 6 B,
Amirauté de Guyenne: Attributions administratives, excerpts from articles 23 to
31; Attributions judiciaires, excerpts from articles 1248 to 1283. Microfilms,
1718-1775. (9 reels)
France: Archives départementales de la Seine-Maritime (Rouen) (MG 6, A 9). Series
216 BP, Amirauté du Havre: excerpts from articles 2 to 45. Microfilms, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. (4 reels)
France: Archives nationales, Series 62 AQ, Dugard Papers (MG 3, III). Documents
pertaining to the company's activities in New France between 1635 and 1792. The
holdings deal with the Dugard shipping company in Rouen (accounting, correspondence and legal proceedings) and the manufacturing of Darnétal dye for
royalty. (7 reels)
Control — Several finding aids were prepared or revised and completed in order to
make records more accessible to the public. Of particular interest are the analytical
inventories prepared for the following holdings:
France: Archives départementales de la Gironde (Bordeaux) (MG 6, A 17) Finding
Aid No. 1339. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT l1
France: Archives départementales de la Seine-Maritime (Rouen) (MG 6, A 9). Finding
Aid No. 1105.
France: Archives départementales du Calvados (Caen) (MG 6, A 15). Finding Aid
No. 1337.
France: Archives des Colonies, Series G 1 (MG 1).   Finding Aid No. 446.
New France: Arrêts, édits, mandements, ordonnances et règlements concernant Montréal (MG 8, C 6).
Vatican: Secret Archives (MG 17, A 1). Inventory of documents of Canadian interest
that have been conserved in several series. This inventory was prepared as part of
a project directed by the Research Centre in the Religious History of Canada of
Saint-Paul University and the Canadian Academic Centre in Italy with a grant
from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.
A contract with Microfor Inc. produced an index of all proper names that appear
in the finding aids on analytical cards.
Public Service — Preparations for the second exhibition and publication in the Records
of Our History series (from 1700 to 1760) continued. Several articles were written for
The Archivist. A student from the François-Xavier-Garneau CEGEP worked in the
section for a three-week training period.
BRITISH ARCHIVES — The British Archives section is responsible for records and
manuscripts from British sources that relate to Canada, including material copied
from the Public Record Office and the British Library. Records of the British military
and naval forces in Canada, the pre-Confederation records of the Governor General's
Office, and papers relating to the fur trade are also the responsibility of this section. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Major Acquisitions
Barnardo's Homes (MG 28, 1334). Additional microfilm, consisting of registers of
children coming to Canada between 1886 and 1911, was received. (59 reels)
Finlayson, Nicol (MG 19, A 52). Original diary of the fur trader Nicol Finlayson,
describing travels from Ungava to New Brunswick to Montreal and finally to Red
River, during the years 1831-1839, was acquired through the London Office.
Nicol Finlayson was a brother of Duncan Finlayson, who was Governor of
Assiniboia from 1839 to 1844. (63 pp.)
Great Britain, Customs (MG 43). Selections from the series Customs 4, 6, 8, 10 and
12, relating mainly to the trade exports and imports of British colonies in the
nineteenth century, were obtained from the Public Record Office, Kew, England.
(20 reels)
Hudson's Bay Company (MG 20). Additional reels of Series II, Post Records,
1870-1904, were received from the Hudson's Bay Company Archives in Winnipeg. (100 reels)
Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (MG 40, R). Photocopies of material relating to immigration to Canada from Ireland, the War of 1812 and other military
events in Canada, the Newfoundland fisheries, and the search for Sir John Franklin, were obtained from the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast.
(40 cm)
Control
Great Britain, Dominions Office, D.O. 35 (MG 42). Progress has been made on the
shelf list of this large and important unit.
Great Britain, General Post Office (MG 44). A new administrative history of the
General Post Office was completed, all holdings reviewed, and new or revised
inventory entries for all holdings (excluding recently-received material in Post 29
and Post 39) were prepared.
Great Britain, Hydrographie Department (MG 40,1). A new administrative history of
the department was prepared, all holdings reviewed, and all inventory entries
revised.
Manuscript Group 40. Work has commenced on the reorganization of MG 40 and the
revision of many inventory entries. Four new Manuscript Groups are being created from portions of MG 40: MG 41 — Cabinet Office; MG 42 — Dominions
Office; MG 43 — Customs; and MG 44 — General Post Office.
Public Service — During the year, the section replied to 385 written inquiries and
1,295 oral inquiries.
Assistance to the Archival Community — A microfilm copy of the Public Record Office
unit Dominions Office 35 (590 reels) was provided to the Provincial Archives of
Newfoundland and Labrador, through the Diffusion Program.
Work has begun on the final editing of entries to be published in the inventory of
records and manuscripts in Britain relating to Canada.
PRE-CONFEDERATION ARCHIVES — This section is responsible for the records of
colonial governments, 1760-1867; corporate records and private papers concerning
the colonies that became Canada; private papers relating to native peoples,
1760-1867; and for records of interdenominational organizations and other religious
bodies.
Acquisitions — The rigorous application of selection criteria resulted in only 55 units
being accessioned. In some cases, potential acquisitions were found to duplicate the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
section's holdings and in others, material inappropriate to our mandate was referred to
the appropriate repositories.
Major Acquisition
Mumford, W. T. (MG 24, H 80). The diary of ship's carpenter W.T. Mumford
(d. 1908), kept aboard HMS Resolute during the expedition in search of Sir John
Franklin, 1852-1854, was purchased with the financial assistance of a Cultural
Property Grant. Some 19 sketches and several maps illustrate the diary, while a
number of printed playbills and broadsides (produced by the Melville Island
Press) offer insight into the social activities aboard the vessel. (3 cm)
Control — The goal of maintaining a balance among acquisition, control, conservation
and public service activities was met in large part through the contributions of two
summer students. Their work in processing large series permitted professional staff to
devote time to projects requiring more complex levels of analysis and description. The
major projects are noted below.
Canadian Council of Churches (MG 28,1328). Analysis to establish basic series and
initiate arrangement was carried out. Printed and duplicate material was identified for transfer to the Public Archives Library or for disposal. Plans for the
detailed arrangement and description of the unit were elaborated, taking due
account of expected additions to be integrated. The second stage of arrangement
was commenced. (90 m)
Provincial and Civil Secretaries Offices (RG 4 and RG 5). Reorganization and reintegration continued in the B series, to identify records astray from the Numbered
Correspondence Files (RG 4, C 1 for Canada East and RG 5, C 1 for Canada
West), in preparation for the resumption of microfilming of those two series. The
feasibility of reintegrating several subseries of related records was investigated.
The potential research values of the records amply justify the efforts devoted to
their arrangement and description.
Upper Canada: Board of Audit Records (RG 1, E 15B). The reconstruction of the
original order of the audited Public Accounts was largely completed by the two
summer students. They are now arranged according to the covering schedules and
their sequence of presentation to the Board of Audit, the Minutes of which are
available in RG 1, E 1 and serviced by a (somewhat idiosyncratic) contemporary
index. The preparation of a file list must await the review of related records from
the Inspector General's Office (RG 5, B 34, 5.4 m). (9 m)
Conservation
De Salaberry Family Papers (MG 24, G 45) and Finding Aid 58. Both were microfilmed as a protective measure and to facilitate research access.
Northcliffe Collection (MG 18, M). This collection was boxed as a protective measure
and the storage conditions of prestige items housed in the vaults, horizontal and
vertical cabinets were reviewed in relation to contingency planning.
Searches conducted for misplaced and misfiled documents resulted in recommendations for improvements in boxing and labelling.
Public Service — While the volume of oral and written reference work increased, the
staff was able to reduce the time spent on routine inquiries by improving finding aids
and making card indexes available on microfiche.
Assistance to the Archival Community — This year's activities included the assessment
of grant proposals at the request of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council of Canada; the review of appraisals for income tax purposes at the request of
the Cultural Property Export Review Board; advice to Consumer and Corporate
Affairs on a case of misleading advertising; and discussions with colleagues from other PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
institutions on a wide variety of questions in archival science, most noticeably in the
area of exhibition loans diffusion. Tours were provided for visiting archivists and other
professional colleagues.
Diffusion — Diffusion Program activities related to past projects, and smaller new
projects were both frequent and numerous this year.
Ron Kuhnle served as the division's liaison with the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions in its survey of the Manuscript Division^ holdings.
PRIME MINISTERS ARCHIVES — The responsibility for the acquisition, description and servicing of prime ministerial papers lies with this section. Acquisition is
dependent to a large degree upon donations by prime ministers or those in possession
of prime ministerial documents. In order to encourage donations and to provide a
service to incumbent prime ministers, the section promotes an "on deposit" system
that provides for the safe storage of dormant papers of the Prime Minister. Major
deposits were received from Messrs. Clark, Trudeau and Turner during the year. As a
result of Mr. Trudeau's retirement as Prime Minister, negotiations concerning the
eventual disposition of his papers are under way.
A number of people who worked in senior positions in the Prime Minister's Office
(PMO) during the Trudeau years have also availed themselves of the "on deposit"
service. It is hoped that the section will be able to acquire a full record of the operations of the PMO from 1968 to 1984.
Edna Diefenbaker on her wedding day, June 29, 1929. (PA 117864) VES REPORT 1984-1985
Major Acquisitions
Diefenbaker, J. G. (MG 26, M). The section acquired a microfilm copy of the Family
series, 1888-1979. (36 reels)
Pearson, L.B. (MG 26, N). Microfilm copies of the Pearson scrapbooks were made
from originals in the possession of Geoffrey Pearson. (1 reel)
Control
Diefenbaker, J. G. (MG 26, M). Microfilming of the Family series was completed and
the originals were sent to the Right Honourable John George Diefenbaker
Centre on the Saskatoon campus of the University of Saskatchewan. A finding aid
was also completed for this series. Pagination of the PMO numbered series was
completed and 110 volumes microfilmed. At the request of the University of
Saskatchewan, screening of official material in the PMO series was undertaken by
a number of government departments. Their recommendations concerning access
to such material will be considered by the university when access restrictions are
decided. The basic arrangement of the Reference series was completed.
King, W.L.M. (MG 26, J). Indexing of the Jl Primary Correspondence series continues to have high priority. Indexing is now complete to the end of 1942 and the
computer output index covering the period 1922-1937 is available in the Reference Room.
The organization and description of the J10 Laurier House and Kingsmere series
was completed.
Assistance to the Archival Community — Ian McClymont visited the Diefenbaker
Centre at the University of Saskatchewan to advise on archival matters relating to the
papers of J.G. Diefenbaker. Sharon Mitchell, director of the centre, and Ted Regehr
of the University of Saskatchewan visited the Archives in connection with their work
on the Diefenbaker papers.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS ARCHIVES — The Public Affairs Archives has as its mandate the
acquisition, description, conservation and public service responsibilities for private
papers in the following post-Confederation subject areas: cabinet ministers and members of parliament, political parties and related political papers; governors general;
and military, juridical, diplomatic and public service units of national significance.
Acquisitions — The federal general election resulted in a significant increase in the
amount of material received on deposit. In other areas of responsibility, new material
was received as a result of active solicitation, contacts by donors, referrals from
researchers and through previous donor agreements.
Deposit — Political events, including the September 1984 federal election, resulted in
many changes in the House of Commons. Through our security deposit arrangement,
most Liberal cabinet ministers, the party leaders and many members of parliament
deposited their papers at the Public Archives. Negotiations for donation of these
papers will take place in the future. In all, the section received 162 deposits measuring
1,631.76 metres.
In addition to the papers received on deposit, the section accepted a number of
significant units by donation.
Major Acquisitions
Bell,  Thomas (MG 32, C 6). Papers as Conservative member of parliament,
1953-1974, formerly on deposit were donated. (7.54 m) Churchill, Gordon (MG 32, B 9). Correspondence, diaries, memoirs and memoranda
dealing with the Machine Gun Battalion of World War I and the 1st Canadian
Armoured Carrier Regiment of World War II, 1916-1919, 1928,1942-1947. The
section currently holds Mr. Churchill's parliamentary papers. (10 cm)
Danforth, Harold W. (MG 32, C 66). Mr. Danforth donated his parliamentary files,
which had been on deposit. He served as a member of parliament, 1958-1974.
(2.6 m)
Dinsdale, Hon. Walter (MG 32, B 35). The extensive Dinsdale collection was formally
donated. It provides a detailed account of his military, personal and parliamentary career as minister and member of parliament, 1934—1981. (4.45 m)
Grosart, Hon. Allister (MG 32, C 65). Daily journals, scrapbooks, photographs, personal and business correspondence, congratulations and speeches, 1876-1985,
mainly documenting his work for the Progressive Conservative Party and as senator. (1.5 m)
Hales, Alfred D. (MG 32, C 63). Mr. Hales donated his parliamentary files,
1957-1974, which had been on deposit. (2.9 m)
Holt, Simma (MG 32, C 60). Mrs. Holt donated files relating to her journalistic and
parliamentary careers, 1974-1979. (3.3 m)
Lewis, David (MG 32, C23). Additional correspondence, subject files, research material, pamphlets, reports relating to federal government activities, the New
Democratic Party, Socialist International and Carleton University, 1952-1981.
(1.5 m)
Sifton, Clifford (MG 27, III D 15). Additional correspondence between Sifton and
R.W. Perks, and other documents concerning the planned construction of the
Montreal, Ottawa and Georgian Bay Canal, 1910-1932. (10 cm)
Briggs, Earl J. (MG 30, E 453). Photographs, logbooks and printed material bearing
on the RCAF and the Ferry Command of the Royal Air Force, 1937-1949.
(40 cm)
Roy Family (MG 30, E 447). Diaries, 1917-1919, of A. Caryle Roy of the 10th Seige
Battery, letters written to Georgette Simpson Ross, scrapbook of Lucy Simpson
and letters to William Roy, 1867-1950. (8 cm)
Turnbull, Fred (MG 30, E 460). Diaries of Able Seaman Tumbull highlighting the
landings in Sicily, Italy, Southern France, Greece as well as the D-Day landing of
the Royal Canadian Navy, 1943-1945. (2 cm)
PROFESSIONAL AND PUBLIC
Ferns, Harry S. (MG 32, G16). Correspondence, memoranda and subject files relating to Ferns' public service and university careers, 1940-1981. (1.5 m)
Lamothe, Henry (MG 30, E 471). Pollbook from 1900 to 1906 were donated. (75 cm)
Smith, Arnold (MG 31, E 47). Additional correspondence, reports, subject files,
photographs and other items, relating to Smiths long diplomatic career, including
his period as first Secretary General of the Commonwealth Secretariat
1934-1975. (50 cm)
Control — Considerable staff t S REPORT 1984-1985
Ajax Club (MG 28,1409). Nominal files, subject files and a scapbook relating to the
operation of the club established in 1940 for the personnel of the Royal Navy and
Royal Canadian Navy, 1939-1980, were organized. (1.6 m)
Boisvert, Maurice (MG 27, III C 20). The arrangement and description of the papers
of this former member of parliament were completed, 1948-1956. (10 m)
Bryce, R.B. (MG 31, E 59). His papers reflecting his period as a senior public servant
were arranged, 1936-1971. (1.6 m)
Dymeht, lohn T. (MG 31, E 60). Papers relating to Dyment's career as chief engineer
with Trans-Canada Airlines and Air Canada were received and arranged,
1919-1983. (1 m)
Haythome, George V. (MG 31, E 23). Additional material relating to Haythorne's
career in the Department of Labour was arranged and described, 1938-1975.
(1.2 m)
Latulippe, Henri (MG 32, C 36). The papers of this former member of parliament are
being arranged, 1962-1974. (5.7 m)
Lloyd, Hoyas (MG 30, E 441). Lloyd's papers reflecting his career as Dominion
Ornithologist were arranged and a finding aid prepared, 1910-1974. (3.5 m)
Martland, Ronald (MG 31, E 48). The papers of this former justice of the Supreme
Court of Canada have been arranged and described, 1958-1982. (7.8 m)
Minto, Sir Gilbert John Elliott, Fourth Earl (MG 27, II B 1). Additional material
relating to Lord Minto's years as Governor General was accessioned and the
finding aid revised, 1868-1919. (45 cm)
Social Credit Party of Canada (MG 28, IV10). The arrangement of this collection was
completed, 1959-1979. (35.1 m)
Winters, Robert (MG 32, B 24). The arrangement and description of this collection
were completed. The collection details Winter's parliamentary and business careers, 1945-1968. (29.4 m)
SOCIAL/CULTURAL ARCHIVES — The section has acquisition, custodial and reference responsibilities for all post-Confederation private papers in the social and
cultural fields. The acquisition program of social archives is, at present, concentrated
in the areas of Women's History, Human Rights, Sports and Recreation, and Children
and Youth on the one hand, and Education, Northern Exploration and Native
Peoples, and Social Sciences on the other. The cultural archives program specializes in
the acquisition and preservation of papers reflecting our Literary Heritage, Art,
Theatre, Music, Dance, Film and Broadcasting.
Major Acquisitions
SOCIAL ARCHIVES
Armstrong, Hugh (MG 31, D166). Papers relating to the Canadian Union of Students
and the Americanization of Canadian universities, 1965-1975. Presented by
Hugh Armstrong. (20 cm)
Bell, Ruth Marion (Cooper) Rolph (MG31, K22). Correspondence, reports, publications and other material documenting her involvement with various women's and
political organizations, n.d., 1927-1984. Presented by Ruth Bell. (7.78 m)
Callwood, June (MG 31, K 24). Papers relating to her writing and journalism careers
and her involvement in various organizations concerned with the interests of
women, children and youth, and with civil liberties, n.d., 1939-1984. Presented
by June Callwood. (5.7 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Canadian Philosophical Association (MG 28, I 413). Correspondence, minutes of
meetings, manuscripts, reports, briefs and financial statements, 1959-1983. Presented by Pierre Laberge of the University of Ottawa. (3.8 m)
Cotton, Dorothy (MG 30, E 464). Memoirs of Dorothy Cotton, a nursing sister with
the Canadian Army Medical Corps, relating her service with the Anglo-Russian
Hospital in Petrograd, 1915-1916. Presented by Mrs. CH. MacLaren. (65 pp.)
Frayne, Trent (MG 31, D 171). Manuscripts, sports reference files, sports memorabilia and other material, 1925-1976, relating to Frayne's career as a sportswriter.
Presented by Trent Frayne. (60 cm)
Mowat, Farley (MG 31, D 168). Typescripts of tape recordings that Mowat made
during his trip across the Canadian North in 1966 when he interviewed Inuit,
Indians, fur traders and government workers in Arctic communities. Main subjects relate to changing social and economic conditions and the future of the
northern peoples. (7.5 cm)
Riel, Jean (MG 29, C 124). Correspondence, scrapbooks and other material,
1885-1911, concerning the education of Jean Riel, son of Louis Riel, as well as
material relating to the trial and hanging of Louis Riel. Presented by Georges
Alphonse Daviault through the National Library. Photographs of Louis Riel and
several members of his family were transferred to the National Photography
Collection. (10 cm)
Royal Canadian Legion (MG 28, I 298). Records of the legion were received, ca.
1917-1974. Copies of The Legionary, 1926-1974, were transferred to the Public
Archives Library. (17.75 m and 49 reels)
SadlierlChadwick Family (MG 29, C122). Correspondence and other material, n.d.,
1867-1931, relating to the Sadlier and Chadwick families were acquired. Mrs.
James and Anna Sadlier were among the few successful nineteenth-century novelists in Canada; Francis Chadwick, to whom the Sadliers were connected by marriage, was an official in the House of Commons. (35 cm)
Snowden, Donald (MG 31, D 163). Snowden (1928-1984) was instrumental in the
development of the Canadian Arctic as head of the Industrial Division of the
Department of Northern Affairs and fostered numerous Inuit handicraft cooperatives from Alaska to Labrador. He was active in CIDA, CCRD and DREE and
was a governor of the Board of Governors of the National Film Board and a
commissioner of the Royal Commission on Labrador. His papers, ca. 1948-1981,
were presented by the Snowden estate. (6.4 m)
Tarnopolsky, Walter Surma (MG 31, E 55). Additional papers, ca. 1960-1984, consisting of historical resource files on discriminatory laws in Canada, and manuscripts
and related documents for his Discrimination and the Law in Canada. Presented
by Walter Tarnopolsky. (3.3 m)
Vo, Thanh Minh (MG 31, I 6). Poems by Dr. Vo, n.d., 1950-1965, on Vietnam,
Switzerland and peace, written in Vietnamese, Chinese and French. Presented by
Murray Thompson. (7.5 cm)
Women's Thematic Guide. (Post-Confederation Sources for the History of Women in
Canada) — This guide has been organized as follows: Women's Papers; Papers of
Women's Organizations; Other Organizations (which contain material relating to
women's activities); Family Papers; and Miscellaneous References to Women in
our Collections. There are approximately 300 entries under Women's Papers and
60 inventory entries under Papers of Women's Organizations. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
CULTURAL ARCHIVES
Beament, Thomas Harold (MG 30, D 302). The papers of Montreal artist, Harold
Beament (1898-1984), were acquired from Mrs. Beament. They include correspondence, memoranda, printed material, pictorial material and photographs,
1917-1984, relating to his career as an artist and as a naval commander, including
material documenting his work with RCNVR and as an official war artist during
World War II. (68.5 cm)
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre (MG 28, I 414). Records of the CFDC,
1967-1982, established to promote the work of independent Canadian filmmakers were presented. They include booking records, filmmakers' files, subject
files and other material, 1967-1982. (5.27 m)
École de Danse Lacasse-Morenoff (MG 28,1369). Additional material for this school,
1907-1981, which was founded in 1895. Presented by Maurice Laçasse. (30 cm)
Eggleston, Wilfrid (MG 30, D 282). Additional papers, n.d., 1920-1984, relating to
his career as chief censor, World War II; the Press Gallery, Ottawa; Carleton
University's School of Journalism; the Ottawa Civil Liberties Association; and
biographical files on prominent Canadian writers and politicians. Presented by
Wilfrid Eggleston. (2.6 m)
Glassco, John (MG 30, D 163). Additional papers of Canadian poet John Glassco
(1909-1981) were acquired. They include manuscripts, personal material and
translations, n.d., 1953-1980. (40 cm)
Julien, Henri (MG 29, D 103). Correspondence and scrapbooks, n.d., 1847-1976,
containing clippings, photographs, letters, drawings, etc., relating to the
Montreal artist and cartoonist Henri Julien were acquired. (15 cm)
League of Canadian Poets (MG 28, 1301). Additional papers, n.d., 1969-1981, consisting of correspondence, minutes and other records were acquired. (2.1 m)
Lismer, Arthur (MG 30, D 184). Additional papers consisting of correspondence,
manuscripts and printed material, 1916-1970. Presented by the artist's daughter,
Marjorie Bridges. (2.5 cm)
McCullough, Norah (MG 30, D 317). Family papers, 1888-1983, including correspondence received by Miss McCullough's uncle, the artist James Kerr Lawson
and his wife; correspondence received by Miss McCullough from the artists
Arthur Lismer, A.Y. Jackson and others; and family correspondence including
letters from James Kerr Lawson. Presented by Norah McCullough. (20 cm)
Rlttenhouse, Charles (MG 30, D 315). Papers, n.d., 1879-1982, consisting of correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, scripts, etc., of theatre director, producer,
playwright and teacher Charles Rittenhouse; and typewritten memoirs of C.B.
Rittenhouse, father of Charles Rittenhouse. Presented by Jonathan and David
Rittenhouse and Beatrice Fortier. (75 cm and 3 microfiches)
Springford, Norma (MG 31, D 164). Papers of theatre producer, director and teacher
Norma Springford consisting of personal material and material on Mountain
Playhouse, Canadian Theatre Centre and Theatre Canada, and playscripts, subject files, etc., 1922-1983. Presented by Norma Springford. (4.05 m)
Watson, William Robinson (MG 30, D 310). Papers of a Montreal art dealer, n.d.,
1917-1972, including correspondence from artist Harold Beament, correspondence and memoranda relating to Watson's war service and invention of a direction finder to be used on hydrophones, 1917-1920, and a typescript of his
memoirs. Presented by Claire Watson Fisher and Louise Slemin. (10 cm) aver, Robert (MG 31, D 162). Correspondence files, memoranda and clippings,
1949-1984, relating to the career of this radio producer, editor and anthologist
with CBCs "Anthology" and Tamarack Review, including correspondence with
most of the important Canadian literary figures of this period. Presented by
Robert Weaver. (1.75 m)
Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (MG 28, 1151). The original body of records, presented in 1971, and material presented at subsequent dates was reorganized, placed in acid-free file folders and described according to modern
standards. (17.7 m)
Canadian Museum Association (MG 28, 1344). All accessions have now been arranged. The unit includes records of the constitution and by-laws, the executive,
annual conferences, committees and other records, 1908-1979. (11.4 m)
ECONOMIC/SCD2NTD7IC ARCHIVES — The section has acquisition, custodial and
reference responsibilities for post-Confederation private manuscripts in the economic and scientific fields. Programs have been established for Business, Labour
and Science and Technology.
Major Acquisitions
Canadian Actors Equity Association (MG 28,1352). Contract files, 1960-1976, from
the national office of Actors Equity. Presented by the association. (15 m)
Canadian Food & Allied Workers (MG 28, 1186). Additional records, 1944-1980,
from the national office relating to the Packinghouse Workers and the Food and
Allied Workers. Presented by the union. (16.5 m)
Canadian Labour Congress (MG 28,1103). Minutes of the Executive Council of the
Canadian Congress of Labour, 1940-1956, and minutes of the Executive Council
of the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, 1939-1956. (20 cm, additional)
Co-operative Union of Canada (MG 28, 115). Correspondence, reference material,
publications and reports, 1902-1982. Presented by the national office of the
CUC. (37.7 m, additional)
Crawley Films Ltd. (MG 28, III 99). Production files, correspondence, financial material, 1946-1978. Purchased from Crawley Films Ltd. (42 m)
Dominion Bridge (AMCA International) (MG 28, III 100). Manuscripts, printed material, photographs, films, audio tapes and plans, 1879-1974, relating to Dominion Bridge and its activities. Included are annual reports, financial records,
employee and training records, administrative outlines, in-house publications,
company histories, technical manuals and press clippings. Presented by AMCA
International. (28.5 m)
Forsey, Eugene (MG 30, A 25). Memoranda and correspondence, ca. 1970s-1984,
relating to Senator Forsey s activities concerning the proclamation of Canada Day,
the status of the official opposition in Alberta, and correspondence with various
senators and members of parliament. (17.5 cm)
Hannah Institute for the History of Medicine (MG 28, 1406). A series of tapes and
transcripts of interviews with individuals associated with the medical faculty at the
University of Toronto, 1978-1984, was received from the Hannah Institute. The
interviews were undertaken by the institute as part of its oral history program.
The tapes were transferred to the National Film, Television and Sound Archives. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1
First train of the Lotbinière and Mégantic Railway greeted by a masquerade
ball party of the Club Deschaillons, 1894. (PA 135133)
Kaplansky, Kalmen (MG 30, A 53). Manuscript of Kalmen Kaplansky's "Notes on
the Reports on Activities for Improved Human Relations for 1946-1956." Presented by Kalmen Kaplansky. (30 cm)
McGarry, James Henry (MG 30, B 159). Office consultation books, daily record and
appointment books, ledgers and cashbooks relating to the medical practice of
James Henry McGarry, M.D., 1895-1936, Niagara Falls, Ontario. In the 1920s,
Dr. McGarry was joined in the practice by James Richard McGarry and John
Martin McGarry and some of the later records relate to these individuals. Presented by Howard McGarry. (2.5 m)
Merrilees, Andrew Audubon (MG 31, A 10). A collection of material relating to
Canadian and American railways, 1836-1980; water transport, 1780-1979;
Mossom Boyd Company, 1881-1914; and other aspects of Canadian history. Presented in 1983 by the estate of A.A. Merrilees. (8.1 m and 44 reels)
Molson Archives (MG 28, III 57). Business records of Molson's Brewery Ltd., and
personal papers of T.H.P. Molson, Herbert Molson and Hartland Molson,
1901-1983. Presented by Molson Companies Ltd. of Montreal. (6.4 m)
Reford, Robert Company (MG 28, III 59). Account books, clippings, and vessel
voyage cost accounts relating to the Robert Reford Company, 1866-1940. Presented by Alexis Reford of Montreal. (60 cm)
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (MG 28,1356). Individual files
of approximately 500 deceased members, containing completed application forms
for certification and admission as a fellow, 1933-1980. Approximately 5,000 individual files on members and fellows of the Royal College, containing applications, correspondence, reports and exam evaluations, 1940-1984. Presented by
the college. (22.80 m)
Scott, Dr. W. Clifford M. (MG 31, J 20). Personal, professional and family correspondence; files relating to the Canadian Psychoanalytic Society, Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis, British Psychoanalytic Society, McGill University and
Montreal General Hospital; World War II Emergency Medical Service (U.K.)
examination and treatment files; child analysis course records; Canadian and
British private patient files; World War II military patient files; research notes, PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT l1
Quebec Southern Railway Engine No. 104 and train, PierreviUe, Quebec,
October 1906. (PA 135134)
published and unpublished papers; and documents relating to various other conferences, and societies, 1919-1980. Presented in 1984 by Dr. Clifford Scott of
Montreal. (16 m)
Sifton, Clifford and Winfield Burrows (MG 30, A 105). Additional papers,
1915-1928, of Winfield Burrows Sifton. Presented by Michael C. Sifton of Markham, Ontario. (18 cm)
United Steelworkers of America (MG 28, 1268). Collective agreement files,
1941-1981, from the USWA national office, containing correspondence, notes
and agreements for USWA locals in Canada. Presented by the union. (14.2 m)
Van Home, William Cornelius (MG 29, A 60). A microfilm copy of the incoming
correspondence of WC. Van Home, 1856, 1868-1938. Acquired from the Glen-
bow Museum, Calgary. (2 reels)
Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines Ltd. (MG 28, III 81). Records, 1932-1962, relating to
the company's operation in the South Porcupine area were accessioned and a
finding aid prepared. (6.8 m)
Canada Starch Company (MG 28, III 94). A finding aid was prepared for the records
of this pioneer company. The collection contains corporate and technical material, 1840-1971, on the company's operations, which included the production of
laundry and industrial starch and a wide variety of foods. (4.6 m)
Canadian Institute of Mining & Metallurgy (MG 28, 1394). A finding aid is now
available to the institute's records, which consist of minutes, 1891-1981, and
membership files, 1920-1983. (10.8 m)
Canadian Labour Congress (MG 28, 1103). The description of some 900 reels of
CLC records continued. This year, 57 reels were described, bringing the total of
processed reels to 218. Greater progress towards completing this project is expected in 1985-1986.
Churchill Falls (Labrador) (MG 28, III 73). A comprehensive finding aid was completed for this voluminous collection relating to the construction of the hydroelectric power dams at Churchill Falls and Twin Falls, Labrador. (25.5 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
International Union of Electrical Radio and Machine Workers (MG 28, 1264). Arrangement of the Montreal office subject file series was completed and work
started on the national office records. (1 m)
Keys, Dr. David Arnold (MG 30, B 59). A finding aid is now available to this collection that documents Dr. Keys' life and work, 1900-1977, first as professor of
physics at McGill University and later as a scientist at Atomic Energy of Canada
Ltd. (2.8 m)
MacDonald, Donald (MG 31, A 10). A finding aid for the manuscript portion of the
collection, donated by the estate in 1983, was completed. (8.3 m)
Wagg, Larry (MG 31, B 36). Papers, 1935-1981, of Larry Wagg, former education
director of the Canadian Labour Congress, were organized and a finding aid
prepared. (1.5 m)
ETHNIC ARCHIVES — The Archives established the National Ethnic Archives program to make its holdings more fully reflective of Canadian society in the past.
Through an active program of seeking out and soliciting materials of national significance, the section has acquired collections that delineate the history of some communities extensively. The goal is to acquire material that will permit the study of all
ethno-cultural communities as fully as possible.
These records are of interest to those involved in the study of family history,
particularly on the part of persons who trace their ancestry to central and eastern
Work commenced on guides to sources for the history of Polish Canadians, to be
published in 1985, and on sources for the study of German Canadians, to be published
in 1986.
Major Acquisitions
Bremen, Staatsarchiv and Bundesarchiv and Hamburg, Kirchenarchiv (MG 10, D 3).
Files relating to the emigration and transit of emigrants from Germany and other
parts of Europe via the ports of Bremen and Hamburg, 1831-1951, were microfilmed through the cooperation of those institutions. (3 reels)
Congregation Shaarey Zedek (MG 9, E 5-5). In cooperation with the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, the Ethnic Archives microfilmed the original records of
western Canada's oldest synagogue, 1889-1983. (7 reels)
Helling, Rudolf (MG 31, H 137). The research notes, correspondence and draft
manuscripts prepared by Professor Helling in the course of his studies on ethnic
community life in Canada and on the history of the German-Canadian community, 1859-1982. Presented by his widow. (1.45 m)
Pawluk, Stephen (MG 31, D 155). Correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports,
manuscripts, notes, microfilms, scrapbooks, publications and other material relating to Pawluks involvement with the Ukrainian Canadian Research Foundation, Ukrainian Canadian Veterans Association and other Ukrainian community
organizations, 1911-1983. (3.8 m)
Ronson, R. Lou (MG 31, H 138). The Ethnic Archives received an extensive unit
from R. Lou Ronson of Toronto, a national leader within B'nai Brith Canada and
member of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, 1926-1984. (4 m)
Stechishin, Paul (MG 30, D 307). Diaries, correspondence, reports, manuscripts,
publications and periodicals relating to the career and interests of this early leader
of the Ukrainian Canadian community, n.d., 1914-1980. (22.56 m) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1'
Stern, Harry Joshua (MG 31, F12). The papers of Rabbi Stern, who served at
Temple Emanuel in Montreal for more than 40 years, were presented to the
Archives by his family after his death in September. The papers will provide a rich
source of information on the Montreal Jewish community, 1920-1984, Canada's
largest for most of that period. (7 m)
Zayid, I. (MG 31, H 133). The papers of Dr. Ismail Zayid consist of correspondence
and subject files on media stereotyping of Arabs in Canada and on Palestinian
human rights. There are also articles, lectures and addresses on Canadian Arabs
and on Canadian foreign policy in the Middle East, as well as associational
literature of the Arab Canadian Association of the Atlantic Provinces,
1973-1984. (25 cm)
Negotiations continue with a number of people and organizations for the transfer
of their archives. The Association of United Ukrainian-Canadians, with which a large
part of the community was associated in the past, has agreed in principle to the
transfer of its records at an early date.
Control — The major achievements were the completion of large detailed finding aids
to: the papers of Andrej Zhuk, a leading Ukrainian nationalist; the records of the
Finnish Organization of Canada; the North American Baptist Immigrant Aid Society;
and the Canadian Council for International Cooperation. A large part of the Li-Ra-
Ma collection, the papers of former Russian consular officials, was microfilmed. Microfilming is expected to be completed soon.
During the year, Walter Neutel spent considerable time preparing a new set of
procedures and guidelines for the arrangement and description of collections that are
in the custody of the division. Also he was seconded to outline the requirements for
and assist in the design of the new automated information system that will be introduced by 1987 to control and manage the division's holdings.
CURATORIAL SERVICE — The Curatorial Service is responsible for divisional storage areas, the accession procedure, the registry of acquisitions, the divisional receptionist service and the general administration of the division.
To facilitate retrievals and to assist researchers, a rationalization of storage areas
through the relocation of materials within buildings was undertaken with the assistance of other sections. At the end of the fiscal year, the Manuscript Division was
utilizing 20,574.96 metres of shelf space.
There were 580 accessions registered this year, comprising 898.17 metres of manuscript material, 1,294 reels of microfilm and 151 microfiche. A total of 279 new units
of papers were created.
Receptionist duties were altered with the installation of the new National Capital
Region telephone system.
RESEARCH AND INQUDOES SERVICE — There are three units in this section: the
Secretarial unit, the Genealogical unit and the Reference Room unit.
Secretarial Unit — The Research and Inquiries Service coordinates in a central office
all research activities undertaken by professional and clerical staff in the Manuscript
and Federal Archives Divisions, in response to written inquiries for information. The
Secretarial unit handles the typing of virtually all the correspondence of the two
divisions, as well as a large proportion of the miscellaneous typing.
The total number of items processed (inquiries, letters and miscellaneous typing)
amounted to more than 11,000. The Secretarial unit has also been actively involved in
the processing of several texts, including some for publication.
Genealogical Unit — In 1984-1985, the Genealogical unit replied to close to
10,000 oral and written inquiries. Answering oral requests from the public in the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1
Reference Room is an important function that requires one person-year of the unit's
time. Other functions have been performed by this unit, such as preparing indexes for
microfilming, giving media interviews, guiding tours, and providing advice for specialized publications. Also, the unit is now responsible for the accession and control of
collections of genealogies.
Reference Room Unit — The Reference Room unit is responsible for all reference
tools entering the Reference Room with special emphasis on finding aids and card
indexes. The responsibility includes the coordination of research services in the Reference Room and the registration of researchers. Staff of the Reference Room process,
file and update reference tools and provide a reference service. The Reference Room
unit cooperates with other responsibility centres of the Manuscript Division to produce finding aids on microfiche and to ensure the availability of inventory entries of
manuscript and record groups of the division, as well as thematic guides. A total of
187 finding aids were processed this year — 83 new ones and 104 revised or corrected
ones. There are now 968 finding aids available on microfiche in both the Reference
Room and the Reading Room. A total of 525 new, revised or provisional inventory
entries were filed into the various inventories, and copies of these inventory entries
were selected and filed into appropriate thematic guides. Main entry catalogue cards
were added or revised accordingly. This year 6,500 cards were added to the General
Index, consisting mainly of nominal and subject cross-references to finding aids. Researchers using the holdings of the division are required to register and obtain a
research pass. For the fiscal year 1984-1985, there were 4,021 new or renewed registrations, 3,585 oral inquiries at the reference desk, and 2,368 inquiries at the registration desk.
OUTREACH AND TECHNICAL SERVICES — The service has responsibility for
compiling, editing and publishing the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, a catalogue of unpublished manuscript material and government records available
to the public in archival institutions in Canada. The manuscript of the fourth supplement, that for 1981-1982, was completed. It contains descriptions of about
9,000 collections reported by 73 repositories. During the past year, the second half of
the inputting was carried out, as were data verification and proofreading of the text.
Conservation — More than 16,000 pages of documents were identified and sent for
conservation treatment. The major projects were the papers of the Chevalier de Levis
and Sir John A. Macdonald, as well as records of the Ermatinger Estate and the
International Typographical Union. Nearly 100 metres of documents were microfilmed for protective and other purposes.
The analysis of the data from the conservation survey carried out in February-April 1984 indicates that the condition of the division's collections is a cause for
serious concern; of the two million pages exhibiting damage more than half are in
need of immediate action. The detection of high levels of acidity in virtually all
documents adds much urgency to the situation. In response to these findings, the
division has prepared a set of options for both treatment and conservation microfilming and submitted them to the department's technical services area for comment and
further planning work.
Series VI of the Finding Aids on Microfiche project was issued, including 71 revised finding aids and 377 new ones. It is now possible to purchase an inexpensive
copy of almost 1,000 of the division's 1,500 finding aids.
Diffusion Program — Almost 1,000 reels of microfilm were duplicated for provincial
archives under the microfilm deposit portion of the Diffusion Program. For British
Columbia, records from the Colonial Office and from the Department of Indian
Affairs were copied. Alberta selected lists of passengers arriving in Canada, found in
Immigration Branch records. Four major series were copied for Manitoba from the
papers of Sir Robert Borden. Ontario chose material relating to that province from PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 15
the "C" series and the Department of Indian Affairs, as well as a copy of the War of
1812 Losses Claims. The diaries of Louis-Joseph-Amédée Papineau were copied for
Quebec. New Brunswick received two sets of records from Great Britain: Customs,
Plantation Papers and selections from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in
Foreign Parts. Prince Edward Island selected relevant portions of records from the
Canadian Tuberculosis Association and the Charles Wright papers. Nova Scotia received Treasury Office 50 records from Great Britain: Miscellanea — Documents
Relative to American Refugees.
Computerization — The division pressed ahead in the area of computer utilization.
Two Bureau of Management Consulting feasibility studies were carried out on aspects
of the division's activities. As a result of this work, it was decided to develop two
control applications immediately. A task force was set up to prepare for an inventory
or physical control system. Consultants were then selected and the functional specifications and system design work completed. Preliminary work was also done on an
accessions control-management information system, including the setting up of a task
force to define the requirements.
ARCHIVAL APPRAISAL SERVICE — The Public Archives provides donors with
receipts for tax credit purposes that indicate information required by Revenue Canada-Taxation including the fair market value of the donation. Where the donation is
worth less than $1,000, an in-house appraisal by qualified staff members is acceptable
to Revenue Canada Taxation. If the value exceeds $1,000, an outside appraisal by
expert examiners is usually required. Revenue Canada does accept in-house appraisals
for more than $1,000 "in unusual circumstances, if it is difficult to find a competent
appraiser or if it would involve unwarranted expense" (Gifts in Kind, Revenue Canada Taxation pamphlet, 1983). Where an outside appraisal is in order, the Public
Archives uses the services of independent appraisers or the National Archival Appraisal Board (NAAB). The latter is an independent non-profit organization that is
national in scope and provides expert appraisal service to any archival institution.
Since the NAAB is a non-profit organization, the cost of its appraisals is usually less
than the cost of independent appraisals. It should also be kept in mind that where a
donation is valued at more than $5,000, the Canadian Cultural Property Export
Review Board (CCPERB) requires two independent appraisals or a NAAB appraisal.
In order to avoid having donors pay the capital gains tax that might normally
apply to the donation, the Public Archives applies to the Canadian Cultural Property
Export Review Board for a Cultural Property Income Tax Certificate. Possession of
the document will permit the donor to claim an exemption from this tax. Thus, by
TABLE X
Appraisal Reports, 1984-1985
Prepared for Prepared by	
National Archival Other
Staff        Appraisal Board       Appraisers        Total
Manuscript Division           24 39 1 64
National Photography
Collection           12 2 14
National Film, Television
and Sound Archives  .. 2 2 4
National Map Collection 5 4 9
Picture Division  6 9 15
Library  6 6
Total        55 43 14 112 furnishing the donor with a receipt, and where applicable a CCPERB certificate, the
Archives enables the donor to claim a deduction from taxable income for the tax year
in which the donation was made; where the amount of the donation exceeds the
taxable income in the year of donation, the excess may be carried forward and deducted the following five years. This provision of the Income Tax Act has resulted in
increased donations to the Public Archives and other archival repositories.
London Office
During the year, Bruce Wilson returned to the Public Archives in Ottawa, after
three years as chief of the London Office. Anita Burdett became acting chief upon his
departure. Earlier in the year, Mr. Wilson was involved in the Commonwealth Archi-.
vists Consultative Conference, at which he gave a paper; Mrs. Burdett became treasurer for the Commonwealth Archivists Association. Numerous conferences were
attended, including the Society of Archivists in Dublin. Mrs. Burdett gave a lecture at
London University on the London Office and sources for Canadian History in Great
Britain. The Archives continued to participate regularly in meetings of the Commonwealth Surveyors and Copyists group.
Control — Several hundred institutions were surveyed as part of the manuscript survey
by post and personal visits. Work is now complete in Northern Ireland, Eire, additional repositories in Scotland, and about two thirds of all London libraries, museums
and archives. The range of Canadian material unearthed is from single sixteenth-
century documents to vast twentieth-century files, relating to exploration, emigration,
economics, politics and broadcasting.
Acquisitions — In addition to work undertaken on items not eventually obtained, at
least 25 per cent of office time was spent attending auctions, and undertaking research
and viewing in relation to acquisitions. Donations of special interest included the
Harry Ferns papers. The purchase of the year was the Arctic journal of W.T Mumford, relating to one of the Franklin search expeditions.
Microfilm and photostatic copies were obtained on a regular basis from county
record offices and various private institutions. New sources included the Scottish
Record Office and the National Library of Scotland. A major purchase of microfilm of
various record groups from the Public Record Office was completed, and the film
shipped to Canada.
Public Service — Assistance was rendered to the National Museum of Man in Ottawa,
the Department of External Affairs, the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland, and
numerous British researchers. Several members of the Public Archives, including Dr.
W.I. Smith, visited the office during the year.
In 1984-1985, a total of 181 inquiries (telephone, letter and in-person) were received.
Paris Office
The Paris Office's activities in 1984-1985 centred around the theme "Jacques
Cartier," and went well beyond the usual scope of duties into the areas of information
distribution and public service. Research on old manuscripts and printed material also
continued in Paris, Bordeaux and Rouen. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
External Relations — The 450th anniversary of Jacques Cartiert first voyage brought
an increased number of general requests for information about Canadian history and,
in particular, about the discovery and exploration of North America. The head of the
Paris Office received a number of journalists, wrote some ten articles and presented a
paper at the annual conference of learned societies.
The exhibition Dreams of Empire — Canada before 1700 displayed very important
information on the origins of the country. About 5,000 people viewed the exhibition in
Mulhouse, Sélestat, Saint-Malo, Loudun, Palluau and Lyon. It was also the subject of
colloquiums and conferences, and overall received excellent press.
Research and Acquisitions — Printed Material — Part of the Almanach royal de-
France, a valuable finding aid, was acquired. Volumes covering 25 years between 1699
and 1776 were found in high-quality bindings. These specially-bound volumes are
precious examples of the bookbinding that was done during the Ancien Régime.
A facsimile based on the original edition of the 18-volume L'Encyclopédie by
Diderot and d'Alembert was also obtained for the Public Archives Library in Ottawa.
Count Renesse's Dictionnaire des figures héraldiques will be useful for research on
the history of the nobility and genealogy.
Manuscripts — During the year, 32 reels of microfilm were produced. At the Archives
départementales de la Gironde, research on the holdings of the Amirauté de Guyenne
continued. A research guide on the "Attributions administratives" (6B A 612) was
prepared by C. Turgeon (80 pages). Eight reels of microfilm of selected documents
from this series were obtained. The scanning and microfilming of the "Attributions
judiciaires" continued (three reels).
At the Archives départementales de la Seine-Maritime in Rouen, scanning and
microfilming of the holdings of the Amirauté du Havre continued (four reels). Scanning of the notaries' records from Rouen covered the periods from 1522 to 1534 and
from 1576 to 1578. Four hundred and seventy documents were retained, the majority
of them related to the cod fishery in Newfoundland. A research report was prepared
by Monique Bois.
At the Archives nationales de France in Paris, the Dugard collection (62 AQ)
provided seven reels; Dugard was a merchant in Rouen. Articles 4JJ1, 4JJ 2, 3JJ 258,
3JJ 259 and 3JJ 278 were microfilmed (five reels) at the Service hydrographique. The
inventories of the M and MM series were also obtained on microfilm (three reels).
Other acquisitions included the printed inventory of "Colonies C 8B Martinique" and
a report on the departmental, communal and hospital archives, in two volumes.
At the Bibliothèque nationale, one microfilm reel was produced from the Moreau
collection in the "Département des manuscrits," and another from the reserve section
of the "Département des imprimés."
The number and variety of these accomplishments may be attributed to the work
done both in Paris and in the rest of France by an efficient and versatile team.
Federal Archives Division
The Federal Archives Division, as a component of the federal government records management system, is responsible for the identification, appraisal, acquisition,
selection and preservation of all archivally significant textual records created and
received since 1867 by departments and agencies of the Government of Canada. In
order to ensure that all non-current departmental records are examined and those of
long-term value transferred on a regular and continuing basis to the Archives Branch, archivists of the division work closely with the Records Management Branch of the
Public Archives and departmental officials. Departments and agencies of the federal
government are encouraged to transfer their records at the earliest date possible to the
Public Archives so that this valuable archival material, essential to both the continued,
effective operation of the government and historical research, may be preserved.
The Federal Archives Division is organized into six sections. The three line
sections have direct responsibility for the following archival records: State and Military Records section for records relating to central government administration or
external relations, defence and the military, and judicial, legislative, cultural, and
related matters; Trade and Communications Records section for records concerning
the promotion and regulation of trade, commerce and communications; and Social
Affairs and Natural Resource Records section for records relating to Canadian citizens as well as the development and regulation of natural resources including Dominion Lands and federal land patents. The Access section is responsible for ensuring that
all information that has been transferred to the Federal Archives Division is made
available consistent with the provisions of the Access to Information Act, the Privacy
Act, corresponding regulations, Treasury Board policy, and Public Archives
guidelines. The Reference and Information Processing section provides basic frontline reference service for researchers in the division, itself, as well as the maintenance
of the divisional subregistry and library, administrative and operational typing, the
Poundmaker during 1885 trial for treason. (C 1875) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
input of data into the computerized control system (FEDDOCS), and the coordination of finding aid projects and custodial services including accession control. The
Public Service section is responsible for the following services for researchers in both
the Federal Archives and Manuscript Divisions: the operation of the research rooms;
the circulation of archival collections to the public; the production of copies of archival
documents; the interlibrary loan of microforms; and the coordination of researcher
registration for the Archives Branch.
In addition to these organizational structures, the division also has two permanent coordinators. The Regional Records Coordinator has the task of developing
operational procedures with regard to the maintenance of archival records in regional
records centres and providing divisional liaison with staff in these centres. The Coordinator, Technical Archival Programs is responsible for the ongoing conservation,
micrographics, publications, and exhibitions and loans programs of the division as well
as accommodations and security matters as these affect the archival collections.
Acquisitions — Over the fiscal year, ten per cent of the division^ time was devoted to
acquisitions, with much of these resources allocated to responding to departments and
agencies striving to meet the requirements of the Privacy Act. The expected decrease
in divisional involvement with departments trying to schedule personal information
did not materialize. Scheduling activity continued to be very heavy, particularly in the
last half of the year. Archivists discovered that, rather than concentrating on merely
adding the archival limitations for personal information contained in Personal Information Bank (PIB) schedules, they were actually helping records managers develop
the schedules. With regard to the scheduling process, it has been reconfirmed that a
sizeable percentage of federal government records have never been scheduled. The
requirement for records managers to meet Privacy Act requirements by setting definite disposal dates for records over which they have never had control, as well as for
the vast quantities of machine-readable files, has made the scheduling process for
departments a time-consuming and painful experience. It can safely be predicted that
this very heavy Federal Archives Division involvement with records scheduling will
continue for at least the next two to three years.
The division played a key role in the deliberations of the Interbranch Information
Management Committee (iMC). A major preoccupation of this committee continued
to be the scheduling of personal information and the formulating of a Public Archives
response to Treasury Board initiatives on the control and description of such holdings.
The type of information that should be included in the 1985 report to Treasury Board
on the state of records management in the federal government was defined more
clearly. Close cooperation continued with the Records Management and Micrographie
Systems Division (RMMSD) through the operations of the IMC. The division
provided comments on RMMSD's draft evaluation standards for monitoring departments' compliance with the provisions of Chapter 460. Comments were also made on
the RMMSD draft list of services offered by the Archives to institutions covered by
the Privacy Act. The Federal Archives Division brought to the attention of the Advisory Council on Records the deficiencies in the proposed terms of reference for a
study of the benefits and costs of providing centralized as opposed to decentralized
records management services in government departments. As a result of these suggestions, the terms of reference for the study were broadened. A degree of participation
continued in the Machine Readable Archives Division pilot project on the scheduling
of machine-readable records in Statistics Canada, Indian Affairs and Northern Development, and the Employment and Immigration Commission.
The requirement as expressed in both Chapter 460 and ATIP legislation for sound
disposal arrangements for government records has underlined the need in the Federal
Archives Division for comprehensive, formally documented appraisal and selection
criteria. By the end of the year, a draft outline for a report on divisional appraisal
criteria had been prepared. Some progress was also made on the application of sampling techniques to government records. A discussion paper on sampling options was PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
prepared and distributed to the staff, and a report on sampling from Infoman Inc. was
submitted to the Archives Branch and discussed with the director general. Unfortunately, real progress was not made on such planned initiatives as applying sampling
techniques to case files contained in PIB or regional records. Such work must await
further discussion of sampling methodology.
Activity was maintained in the regional records program. Acquisition trips were
made by two teams of archivists to the federal records centres in Winnipeg and
Halifax, with the accessioning, respectively, of 735.3 and 329 metres of archival records. Procedures for the identification of archival records in regional records centres
were developed and distributed to the centres' staff. Work on the integration of
regional records into divisional inventories, finding aids and reference systems, to
permit the level of control required under ATIP legislation, continued. Also, draft
procedures were prepared on acquisition, control, custody and public service. In
addition to the material accessioned in Winnipeg and Halifax, 1,228.4 metres of
records were transferred physically to the Public Archives from the Toronto and
Montreal Regional Records Centres.
Extensive negotiations were held with several departments and agencies with
regard to the disposal of their records. As a result of these discussions, it is expected
that direct transfers of records will be forthcoming from the National Library, the
Committees Branch of the House of Commons, and the Office of the Sergeant-at-
Arms. In addition, preliminary consultations were held with the Chief Electoral Officer in order to identify the kinds of records created by his office; these discussions
Immigrants skipping on the Empress Britain, ca. 1910. (C 9660) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
may lead to the preparation of a "one-shot" schedule. The closing down of several
federal government agencies led to negotiations regarding the disposal of records.
Archivists held extensive meetings with officials of the Canada Sports Pool, the Canadian Unity Information Office, the Office of the Special Assistant to the Federal
Cabinet Committee on Social Development in the Ministry of State for Social Development, and the Conservation of Non-Petroleum Products Branch of Energy, Mines
and Resources, and scheduled records of the Ministry of State for Economic and
Regional Development. The organizational confusion created by the closing down of
government agencies and the potential for the actual loss of valuable records underlined the necessity for the Archives and Records Management Branches to develop
clear guidelines describing their individual responsibilities in dealing with soon-to-be
defunct agencies. As a result, draft procedures were developed in the division and
approved by the IMC for the handling of records from such agencies.
Although divisional involvement with scheduling was very heavy, the Federal
Archives Division reported to the Dominion Archivist on only 19 records and six
microfilm schedules, an indication of the level of revisions required on most departmental records submissions. The Dominion Archivist approved 58 recommendations
to destroy 209.5 metres of non-archival records. Thirty-two of these destruction actions involved records accessioned by a visiting team of archivists at the Vancouver
Federal Records Centre last summer.
Acquisitions dropped over the year to a more customary level with a total of
5,895 metres, 8,636 reels and 28,818 microfiches accessioned. While a comprehensive
listing of all divisional accessions may be found in the publication, Accessions,
1984-1985, the following selection illustrates the diversity of records acquired:
.6 metres of Cabinet conclusions and documents, 1954, from the Privy Council Office;
6.6 metres of postal history cards documenting the establishment, staffing and closing
of post offices, ca. 1800-ca.l970, from the National Postal Museum; .9 metres of
records from the Special Committee on the Defence of Canada Regulations,
1939-1945, from the Committees and Private Legislation Directorate of the House of
!!!»%
Relocation of Japanese Canadians to camps in the interior of British
Columbia. Photo by Tak Toyota. (C 46350) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT l1
Commons; 9 metres of policy development and review files for such major social
programs such as spouses' allowances, the Canada Pension Plan, welfare, old age
security and family allowances, 1958-1979, from National Health and Welfare;
3 metres of records and most of the exhibits from the Royal Commission to Investigate
the Facts Relating to and the Circumstances Surrounding the Communication, by
Public Officials and Other Persons in Positions of Trust, of Secret and Confidential
Information to Agents of a Foreign Power (Kellock-Taschereau), 1942-1946;
111 metres of central registry records of the Canadian Forestry Service, 1935-1982;
the final 717 metres of corporate records of the Canadian corporation for the 1967
World Exhibition (Expo '67), 1963-1968; 330 microfilm reels of passenger lists and
records of entry for immigrants arriving in Canada between 1908 and 1919 from the
Employment and Immigration Commission; and 34.3 metres of corporate records of
Eldorado Nuclear Limited and its predecessor companies, 1932-1982. As well, three
new record groups were created in response to initial transfers of records: .9 metres of
miscellaneous records from the Office of the Secretary, Canadian Wheat Board,
1948-1974; .3 metres of minute books of the New Westminister Pilotage Authority,
now part of the Crown corporation, the Pacific Pilotage Authority, 1904-1970; and
24 metres of records relating to research, intergovernmental liaison, pollsters' surveys,
and major fairs and special events, 1977-1985, from the Canadian Unity Information
Office.
Control — It was expected that the amount of time dedicated to the control activity
would increase substantially since the staffing of positions in the Access section ended
the necessity for personnel reassignments to perform ATIP-related tasks and the
consequent doubling up in acquisition and public service functions by some archivists.
Felling trees in British Columbia. (PA 11629) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
t:
ss PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
However, high activity levels in acquisitions, particularly records scheduling and in
public service, meant that once again divisional control objectives were not always
met. Time spent on preliminary control of records through established minimum
levels of description, revising unpublished inventories, and producing finding aids
dropped slightly from the previous year. A substantial task was completed with the
approval and implementation of a detailed procedure paper on all aspects of accessioning in the division.
The 11 per cent of divisional time spent on minimal control resulted in the application of selection, boxing and listing procedures to 2,230 metres of records. The
greatest percentage of these records were merely listed by several term employees
hired to provide this basic means of control as required under the access to information and privacy legislation for those accessions that had neither lists nor finding aids.
Comparatively little processing of accessions was carried out in the line sections. It
must be noted that, for all the work done in the custodial area, only 517 metres of
records were actually brought under preliminary control. The percentage of records
under complete control has dropped significantly.
Another perspective on the divisional custodial backlog may be seen when the
growth in the holdings of the Federal Archives Division over the past ten years is
considered. A pictorial representation of this growth is provided on page 58.
The division spent 16 per cent of its time on subsequent control activities — the
preparation of finding aids, both the manual production of file lists and the development of automated file sorts, box lists and KWOC indexes; inventory revision; and the
input of custodial data into the divisional computer system. Work proceeded slowly on
revisions to the guide to the records of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (RG 9). A
bilingual source guide to all divisional records relating to Japanese-Canadians during
and immediately after World War II was completed. Procedures were drafted for the
development of a numbering system for all finding aids, which will permit the generation of a centralized list of this information for the reference area in the division.
Considerable time was also spent on compiling information for the development of a
long-term finding aids plan. Progress continued to be made on the computerized
finding aids, utilizing FEDDOCS for input and sorting of selected series of records
from the Privy Council Office (RG 2), the Post Office (RG 3), Transport (RG 12), the
Dominion Lands Branch of the Department of the Interior (RG 15), the RCMP
(RG 18), Finance (RG 19), the Marine and Fisheries Branch of Fisheries and Oceans
(RG 23), the Public Service Commission (RG 32), the Emergency Measures Organization (RG 57) and the Northern Affairs Program (RG 85). A successful means of
converting RECODEX data to MINISIS was finally found. As a result, work may now
by completed on extensive Post Office (RG 3) and Indian Affairs (RG 10) finding aids
produced several years ago.
Limited success was made on inventory revision, a longstanding priority in the
division. In order to permit the constant updating of inventories as records are added,
a system of provisional administrative outlines was developed. Some progress was
made on revising administrative outlines and series entries. Among the inventories
worked on were: the Privy Council Office (RG 2), Public Works (RG 11), Transport
(RG 12), Agriculture (RG 17), the CBC (RG 41), Defence Production (RG 49), Loto
Canada (RG 62), Canada Ports Corporation (RG 66), the Northern Canada Power
Corporation (RG 96), Communications (RG 97) and Supply and Services (RG 98).
Slow progress was made on the readying of the inventories for the Post Office (RG 3),
Labour (RG 27), and Railways and Canals (RG 43) for publication in the new fiscal
year, and that for Royal Commissions (RG 33) the following year.
Procedures for the accessioning of archival records were completed and implemented in the division. These procedures, which amalgamated those previously contained in a variety of divisional instructions and included many procedures that had
not previously been written, described in a detailed way the interaction of the divisional computer system FEDDOCS with divisional accessioning processes.
1 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Conservation Program — Once again the time allocated to conservation in the division
was spent more on policy development and program planning than on the actual
physical restoration of records. While five per cent of divisional time was devoted to
this function, only 25 items were restored during the year.
Considerable conservation resources in the division were devoted to the planning
of a comprehensive conservation program, a major Archives Branch initiative. The
Coordinator, Technical Archival Program continued to coordinate the collections survey project in the branch. The final survey results, received from the Bureau of
Management Consulting, were viewed with some consternation in the division as
20 per cent of the archival records require restoration or copying in the next 15 to
20 years. A divisional report assessing the results of the survey and converting the
sample figures into actual operational requirements was prepared. Divisional management decided regretfully not to institute a systematic program to identify the 233,000
individual items in need of immediate restoration. Instead, divisional conservation
hopes will be pinned on mass treatment systems. The division has identified from the
survey some 20,300,000 pages needing microfilming in the next five years. In addition,
further developments will be sought in mass deacidification systems for individual
documents, optical data disc, and microfilm technology as it applies to the copying of
poor quality archival originals.
The division continued to emphasize microfilming as a conservation tool, a means
of ensuring the security and protection of often fragile original records; 110 metres of
records were microfilmed, primarily from the Post Office (RG 3), Public Works
(RG 11), the RCMP (RG 18), Fisheries (RG 23), Labour (RG 27), the Commission
on Italian Immigration (RG 33/99), the Marine Branch (RG 42) and Railways and
CPR Engine 5773 in British Columbia. (C 24993) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Canals (RG 43), as well as contemporary registers and indexes from a variety of record
groups that are being filmed as part of the division's contingency planning. One
camera was dropped from divisional plans when the filming of Privy Council orders in
council had to be halted because certain information contained therein could not be
released under the privacy regulations. Due to the lack of resources for microfilm
project preparation, this camera was then signed over to the Manuscript Division for
the final seven months of the year. Over six weeks of camera time were unexpectedly
diverted to meeting the tight deadline contained in the Solicitor General's announcement that the Public Archives would microfilm and make available to the public the
recently transferred records and exhibits of the Kellock-Taschereau Commission. In
addition, the division provided space for two external filming projects: Micromedia
Limited microfilmed the 1st Session of the 32nd Parliament and Transport Canada
copied approximately 2,500 aircraft registration files from RG 12 with an additional
5,000 files returned to the department for filming by Correctional Services. The accessioning by contract personnel of a considerable backlog of microfilm revealed several
serious technical problems resulting in large part from the inability of the cameras to
capture adequately information from excessively large registers and indexes. As a
result of these problems, Central Microfilm Operations made several modifications to
the filming and quality control techniques for archival records. Unfortunately, the
"retake" rate in the division was much higher than usual this year.
Constant vigilance was required to ensure the safety of archival records in the
division's various stack areas. No real progress was made on the upgrading of divisional satellite storage facilities. Twenty-five leaks were reported during the fiscal
year; good luck and the appropriate placement of the ubiquitous plastic sheeting
protected most of the archival records, however, 88 PARC boxes, 71 archival volumes
and one poster suffered various degrees of water damage. In response to these incidents, as well as to the roof failure in the Larivière Building of two years ago, the
division participated enthusiastically in a test of Records Conservation's new freeze-
drying chamber. Unfortunately, mechanical breakdowns invalidated the test, which
will be rerun in the new year.
Public Service — The public service function in the Federal Archives Division is
divided between those activities carried out by the Public Service section and those
performed by the rest of the division. During 1984-1985, 25 per cent of divisional
time, excluding the Public Service section, was devoted to meeting researcher requests; as indicated in Table XI, the demand for reference services has increased
steadily.
TABLE XI
Public Service Inquiry Statistics
1982-1983
1983-1984
1984-1985
10,366
1,407
10,487
1,530
11,621
Written Inquiries	
1,819
Total  	
11,773
12,017
13,440
Access to Information and Privacy — During the course of the year, secondments of
staff from the areas of the division to perform ATIP-related tasks ended as most of the
positions in the Access section were filled. The bulk of resources in the Access section
was allocated to the informal review of records, a process that permits the Public
Archives to balance the requirement of records being reviewed to determine possible
exemptions before disclosure with its traditional commitment to public service. Some
20 formal requests under the Access to Information Act and two formal requests
under the Privacy Act were processed for researchers interested in such subjects as PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
immigration policy in the immediate post-World War II period, Canadian-Soviet relations in the 1950s, and the research work of the Defence Research Board. As an
additional point of interest, one of these formal requests involved the operational
records of the Public Archives, itself, a request which underlined the fact that not only
archival government material in the Archives but also the department's current registry records are accessible under the access to information and privacy legislation. In
total, the Access section reviewed 3,166 files or 388,487 pages for 397 researchers.
Consultations were held with several government departments and agencies including
National Defence, External Affairs, the Privy Council Office and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. A bilingual document setting out the guidelines for the
disclosure of personal information for historical research was prepared on behalf of
the department for distribution to deputy ministers and privacy coordinators
throughout the federal government.
Publications Program — The divisional publications program consisting primarily of
inventories describing individual record groups, thematic guides relating groups by
subject, and accessions listings was curtailed again by the necessity to divert resources
to acquisitions and public service priorities. Accessions, 1983-1984 and Records of the
Canadian Transport Commission (RG 46) were published as was a departmental brochure, Guidelines for the Disclosure of Personal Information for Historical Research at
the Public Archives of Canada. Publication of the inventories for the Post Office
(RG 3), Labour (RG 27), and Railways and Canals (RG 43) was postponed to
1985-1986.
Exhibitions Program — Resources allocated to exhibitions were limited. A selection of
government records was prepared for inclusion in the Archives Branch exhibition
mounted in conjunction with International Archives Weeks. As well, an exhibition
entitled Indians in 1885 was presented to commemorate the centennary of the Northwest Rebellion. A small display of archival records was prepared on very short notice
for a ministerial luncheon on Parliament Hill to mark the centennial of Parks Canada
and the announcement that 1985 would be "heritage year."
Public Service Section — The most noteworthy increase in public service demands was
in photoduplication, which showed a substantial jump of 29 per cent over the previous
year. Staff redeployment and the judicious hiring of agency personnel enabled the
section to maintain a turnaround of four weeks or less for all but a few large special
orders. Further modifications were made to operations in order to increase efficiency
and control orders, while pricing policies were discussed with Financial Services.
Preliminary investigations of the computerization of administrative and control functions, one of the key recommendations made previously by the Bureau of Management Consulting, were carried out. The chief of the section participated in the study of
public service at the Archives, which was carried out by Planning and Program Evaluation, as well as the deliberations requested by the director general on the feasibility
of coordinating and centralizing some key public service activities in the Archives
Branch. Attempts to improve efficiency through the physical centralization of the
section's farflung units were stymied by delays in implementing the division's accommodations plans. This relocation will continue to be pursued diligently in the new
fiscal year.
Staff Activities — Divisional staff continued their customarily high level of involvement in professional associations. Bill Russell gave a paper on pre-1914 records-
keeping practices in the Department of Indian Affairs, and Tom Nesmith delivered a
paper on the impact of scientific agriculture in the late nineteenth century at the
annual conference of the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA) in Toronto, while
Terry Cook chaired the keynote and electronic office sessions. Paulette Dozois and
Judith Roberts-Moore cochaired the Membership Committee and Rod Young
organized and chaired the Committee on Labour Archives. Tom Nesmith was also on
the Program Committee for ACA '84. Gabrielle Biais continued as secretary of the
Outaouais region for the Association des archivistes du Québec. Doug Whyte was PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
elected president of the Eastern Ontario Archivists Association. A new archival association, the Ontario Association of Archivists, was formed with John Smart and Brien
Brothman elected president and secretary, respectively. Mark Hopkins became the
director, Communications and Public Relations, for the Ottawa Chapter of the Association of Records Managers and Administrators and continued serving on the Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee of ARMA and the ACA. Glenn Wright
became a member of the provisional Board of Directors of the Canadian Nautical
Research Society and the Board of Directors of the Canadian Canal Society.
Conference attendance continued to be a major component of professional development in the division. The annual conference of the ACA was attended by Gabrielle
Biais, Brien Brothman, Bob Hayward, Dan Moore, Judith Roberts-Moore, John
Smart, Doug Whyte and Rod Young. The Canadian Historical Association (CHA)
annual meeting included Terry Cook, Bob Hayward, Margaret Mattson, Dan Moore
and John Smart. The Eastern Ontario Archivists Association sessions was attended by
Doug Whyte, and the Ontario Archivists Association by John Smart. Divisional staff
also participated in more specialized conferences. Terry Cook attended the "Parks in
the West" conference at Sun Valley, Idaho; Dave Hume and Bill Russell, the Native
Peoples of Canada Conference at the State University of New York in New Platz, New
York; Margaret Mattson, the Canadian Business Conference at Trent University; Jim
Whalen, the Western Legal History Conference in Calgary; Bob Hayward, the "Conference on Privacy: Initiatives for 1984," a conference sponsored by the Ontario
Government in Toronto; and Sandra Wright, the "Emergency Planning for Museums,
^>
Igor Gouzenko, ca. 1945. (C 123662) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
Galleries and Archives" conference sponsored by the Provincial Museum of British
Columbia. As well as attending conferences, several staff presented papers and
chaired sessions. John Smart delivered two papers on the public history role and the
union experience of the Historical Research Group before the National Council on
Public History in Los Angeles and the CHA in Guelph. Glenn Wright represented the
Archives on a panel on access to information at the CHA annual conference and
chaired a session on archival sources for maritime history, as well as delivering a paper
on such records in the division at the Maritime History Conference at Royal Military
College, Kingston. Terry Cook delivered a commentary on a paper presented at the
"Archives, Automation and Access" conference in Victoria.
Divisional staff also continued to find time to work on publications. Terry Cook
and Gabrielle Biais served as editor and coeditor, respectively, of the CHA Historical
Booklets Series with two new titles on the Great Depression and the Canadian North
issued. Jim Whalen had an article entitled "The Application of Solicitor-Client Privilege to Government Records" published in Archivaria. Glenn Wright had his paper
"James Francis Kenney, 1884-1946: Founder of the Canadian Catholic Historical
Association" published in Study Sessions 1983: The Canadian Catholic Historical Association. Bill Russell and John Smart were granted professional development leave to
work on articles on Indian records and sports history, respectively.
Assistance to the Archival and Other Communities — With the tightening of the
definition of assistance activities by the branch, only one per cent of total divisional
time was devoted to that function and most of that concerned the production of
Archivaria. Terry Cook served as general editor for numbers 17 and 18 with Tom
Nesmith succeeding him for numbers 19 and 20; in addition, several staff in the
division assisted with the proofreading of articles. Sandra Wright sent copies of the
Archives Branch Contingency Plan to and discussed disaster planning, in general,
with the University of Waterloo Map Library, the University of Texas, the Centre de
conservation de Québec, the Directorate of History (Department of National Defence), the Crime Detection Laboratory of the RCMP, and the Northwest Territories
Archives. In addition, she delivered "Confronting the Unthinkable: Contingency
Planning for Cultural Institutions" at "Ounce of Prevention," a symposium sponsored
by the Toronto Area Archivists Group and the Archives of Ontario, in Toronto.
Extensive tours of the division were given to many individuals and groups including
Gérard Naud from France, Josef Hanke from Germany, Clive Holland from Great
Britain and Takehiko Kato from Japan. This latter visitor was of particular interest to
the division in that he is a specialist from the Section of Information Freedom in the
Shiga Prefectural Government and was touring North America familiarizing himself
with information practices prior to his own government's development of an access to
information program.
National Map Collection
In 1984-1985, the National Map Collection was faced with a number of staff
changes, the result of deaths, departures and new arrivals. The pilot project on the
identification of maps held in government departments and the development of a
schedule for sending them to the Archives made great progress. Closer contact was
established with map producers and distributors in Europe who provide a considerable number of foreign maps and atlases. The move of part of the holdings to the West
Memorial Building was completed, but space problems continue to be critical.
Acquisitions — During the year, 71,474 items were acquired, requiring about 2,547
person-hours of work.
Of the total number of acquisitions during the year, the Government Cartographical and Architectural Records section received 55 per cent (66 per cent government, PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Desnos and Nolin's 1760 Globe Terrestre, the fifteenth pre-1850 globe
acquired by the National Map Collection.
34 per cent private), the Modem Cartography section 44.8 per cent and the Early
Canadian Cartography section .2 per cent. The number of acquisitions was slightly
higher than had been predicted. Included are a considerable amount of transferred
government series sheets and foreign thematic sheets, as well as collections of plans
for Canadian planes and ships.
Considerable progress was made on the pilot project for the identification and
scheduling of cartographic records in government departments. The survey of government institutions was conducted. The records management studies in the Canadian
Hydrographie Service, in three directorates of the Department of National Defence
and in the Surveys and Mapping Branch of the Department of Energy, Mines and
Resources, were concluded by Brian Hallett. Internal reports on the findings in all
these areas were prepared as well as reports for the records managers or the deputy
ministers of these departments. Finally, a report on the role of the National Map
Collection in the records management process for cartographic records was prepared
for the consideration of senior management.
In the public sector, the most significant collections acquired were World War II
ship plans and microfilm aperture cards of equipment and parts for former RCAF
aircraft, received from the Directorate of Documentation and Drawing Services, Department of National Defence; accessions from Parks Canada-Quebec concerning
canals; Public Works-Montreal concerning marine engineering; Public PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Works-Headquarters concerning architecture and marine engineering; the National
Film Board concerning equipment and accommodation; and the International Joint
Commission concerning the St. Lawrence River project. Over 5,600 sheets from the
federal topographic and thematic series (National Topographic Series — various
scales; aeronautical series; hydrographie series; geologic series; area screening series;
and military city maps, soil maps, MCR series, flood risk maps, sectional maps and
township plans) were added to the holdings, including both current and superseded
sheets.
Amérique du Nord, 1856, by AH. Dufour. (NMC 52712) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
The Topographie Resource Centre, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Energy, Mines
and Resources Canada, transferred some 12,500 foreign thematic maps to the division. These maps fill major gaps in the collection of foreign topographic maps.
Cartographic and architectural collections were also acquired from the private
sector, including 4,000 additional items from the Merrilees collection. Maps from 20
Manuscript Groups were transferred to the division.
In the area of pre-1850 maps, 90 original documents were acquired. Most were
geographic and marine maps, although there were some atlases and two globes. Most
of the more interesting maps in this group date from the eighteenth and nineteenth
centuries; some are from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The division acquired 102 maps from the 1850-1920 period.
With respect to foreign maps, ties with European map distributors were strengthened. At the end of the summer, Louis Cardinal, chief of the Modern Cartography
section, met with representatives of the Directorate of Overseas Surveys in
Southampton, Great Britain, and with officials from GeoCenter, the world's major
map distributor, in Stuttgart, West Germany. These meetings made it possible to
evaluate relations and to increase the possibilities for bibliographic research and
exchanges.
Eight antique and modern globes and 102 atlases, 20 of them from Canada, were
also acquired. The files on orders for atlases published in sheets and separate books
were brought up to date.
Control — During the year, 13,764 person-hours were utilized in bringing 63,745 items
under minimal control and 55,190 items under subsequent control.
The description of documents was carried out by divisional staff and by people
working on contract or by students of the summer employment program.
During the year, the Documentation section completed cataloguing the modern
atlas collection, with the exception of boundary and insurance atlases.
The main collection of Canadian hydrographie charts, numbering about 8,000,
was catalogued. Cataloguing of the second collection will be done in 1985-1986.
Work on arranging and describing the collection of 1,235 ships' plans from the
Department of National Defence began as soon as the collection was received in order
to meet the strong demand from researchers. Arranging of the more than
12,500 foreign thematic maps received in May was also begun. The finding aid for the
Power collection was completed. The organization and listing of cartographic records
from the Geological Survey of Canada was nearly completed.
The division began using the Cataloguing Support System (CATSS), which is part
of the University of Toronto Library Automated System (UTLAS) already in place,
for its control activities. It also worked with the Archives Branch to study the implementation of a computerized network for controlling documentation in each division
and in the administrative offices. Another study dealt with cataloguing the holdings of
the Government Cartographical and Architectural Records section. Much time was
devoted to analysing, verifying and writing codes and procedures for UTLAS, and to
studying its products.
Conservation — During the year, 4,473 person-hours were utilized in the conservation
of 10,276 items and the microfilming of 14,242 map sheets.
The National Map Collection took part in a survey on conservation needs, carried
out in the Archives Branch by the Bureau of Management Consulting (BMC) of the
Department of Supply and Services, by examining more than 800 documents
individually. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
-rmrnp
=oL-^: j/
srap^aB^j
Ontario transportation map series 1:250 000, 1983. Ontario Ministry of
Transportation and Communications, Map No. 1. (NMC 49480)
The major document groups conserved this year were records from the Registrar
General and Privy Council, and the set of maps of nineteenth-century Irish municipalities, which are often used for genealogical research. The drawings of architect J. A.
Floyd were restored, and as is done every year, new acquisitions in the government's
topographic and geological series were prepared for storage in vertical cabinets.
Sixteen large and three extra-large horizontal cabinets and 60 standard horizontal
cabinets were acquired, making it possible to store a considerable number of maps and
plans that had previously been kept in inadequate cabinets. Also, 30 new roller-shelf
cabinets, the first for the division, enabled the proper storage of maps that had been
filed on library shelves. These cabinets also made for better use of space.
Moving the holdings from the Bentley Building to the West Memorial Building
was completed in the spring. Storage and working conditions, as well as public service,
have improved as a result of the move, but the overall problem of lack of space in the
division is more or less unchanged.
Microfilm — The end of the NEED program in June and the departure of one camera
operator caused a decrease in production. Nonetheless, the production level remained
relatively high, with 10,642 articles microfilmed. During the two years of the NEED
program, 25,000 records were microfilmed, nearly half the total production since the
microfilming program began in 1977. At the very end of the year, an eight-month
microfilming contract began. The more important records microfilmed this year were
the "S"(Shelf) maps, the set of maps of nineteenth-century Irish municipalities and
portions of the government collections.
Public Service — During the year, 3,915 inquiries were processed, 6,637 copies were
supplied, 27,405 items were circulated and 322 researchers were registered. Some
5,140 person-hours were utilized for public service functions.
There was considerable demand on the part of model-builders and historians for
reproductions of the ships' plans acquired this year from the Department of National
Defence. Other areas of research included the Riel Rebellion, 1985 being the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
I
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Rigging details for rr
n sail of a 27-foot motor whaler, 1976. (NMC 53823)
100th anniversary of the uprising; native settlements in Canada; publication of the
Historical Atlas of Canada; production of a film in the "Heritage and Recreation"
series by the National Film Board; preparation of a book on Admiral Bayfield, an
important figure in Canadian hydrography in the nineteenth century; the history of
architecture in Canada; Canadian lighthouses, for the design of a commemorative
stamp; the history of the Public Archives of Canada; publication of an atlas of Alberta
railways; and a bibliography of maps of Ontario. More traditional research dealt with
urban history, land use, genealogy and toponymy.
The system for lending colour transparencies of the most prestigious documents,
set up several years ago, was used often by publishers. Loans were made to the
magazine The Alaska Journal for a short article on Arctic cartography, to the Nelson
publishing house for its book Canadian Illustrated Biography and to the New Canadian Encyclopedia for its article on map-making in Canada.
Publications and Exhibitions — During the summer, the division published the Antique Map Calendar, 1985. This is the fourth consecutive year that the calendar has
appeared. In March, the manuscript of the Union List of Foreign Topographic Maps in
Canadian Map Libraries was completed. The manuscript for the General Guide of the
division was submitted to the Publications Division. Preparation of the work Treasures
of the National Map Collection continued.
There were no major exhibitions this year; however, some architectural drawings
from the Floyd collection were shown to mark last summer's meetings in Ottawa of the
Canadian Society of Landscape Architects. The division took part in the second phase
(1700-1760) of the series of exhibitions entitled Documents of Our History by reproducing cartographic records and preparing technical information. Also, it contributed 12 maps, plans and drawings, and three globes for the exhibition organized for
the Open House in October 1984.
The division loaned originals for the following exhibitions: Lake Huron at the
Sarnia Public Library and Art Gallery; The Métis: 1885-1985 at the Glenbow Institute; Mariners Kingston at the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes, Kingston; and
St-Francis Watershed at the McCord Museum. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Antique
Map
Calendar
Calendrier
\à cartes
Cover of the 1985 Antique Map Calendar, the fourth such calendar, featuring
Danckerts" ca. 1680 world map. (C 121855)
Administration — There were many staff changes this year. Maurice McCauley of
Conservation Services retired after 37 years in the Public Service, 20 of them with the
National Map Collection. Official Documents clerk Verna Mole, camera operator
Richard Danis and Vivien Cartmell from Cataloguing Control all found new jobs
elsewhere. They had 14,10 and 11 years of service, respectively. In June, Lou Seboek
from the Modern Cartography section passed away suddenly. Six new employees came
to work in the division.
Professional Services — On November 5 and 6, the National Map Collection cospon-
sored a conference on architectural archives with the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal. The division also established communications with the Architectural
Drawings Advisory Group of the Center of Advanced Study of Visual Art at the
National Gallery of Art in Washington.
Dorothy Franklin was director of the Public Archives of Canada's course in archives science that was given in September.
Gilles Langelier and Betty Kidd participated as lecturers in the two conservation
courses given in 1984-1985.
Louis Cardinal gave a lecture on cartographic archives for an archives course at
the Université du Québec à Montréal.
The division is sponsoring the Eleventh International Conference on the History
of Cartography, to be held at the Archives July 8-12,1985. Organizational activity was
spread over the entire year. Ed Dahl is chairperson of the conference and coordinator
of the program. Betty Kidd is in charge of local arrangements.
Staff Activities — Publications — Several articles by staff members appeared in various publications. Ed Dahl's article "The Original Beaver Map — De Fer's 1698 Wall PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
m
Map showing the distribution of radioactivity on Great Slave Lake from
Cosmos 954 debris, 1978. (NMC 73699)
Map of America" appeared in the December 1984 issue of The Map Collector. Tom
Nagy's article on disaster contingency planning, based on his presentation at the 1984
ACML conference, appeared in the December 1984 issue of the ACML Bulletin. In
the same issue of the Bulletin, Ed Dahl contributed a short item entitled "Doughty's
Record as a Map Reference Officer."
National Map Collection staff continued to contribute to The Archivist. Articles
included: (a) March-April 1984 — Louis Cardinal, "Map news"; (b) May-June 1984—
Nadia Kazymyra-Dzioba, "Plans for functional farms"; (c) July-August 1984 —
Donna Porter, "Mapping Canada's economic history"; (d) November-December 1984
— Ed Dahl, "Fifteenth pre-1850 globe acquired by the National Map Collection"; (e)
January-February 1985 — Ed Dahl, "Religion and early maps"; and (f) March-April
1985 — Carol White, "Nature in Canadian maps." The July-August 1984 issue also
contained an article entitled "Public Archives award-winning map calendar series."
Conference Papers — Hugo Stibbe delivered a paper entitled "The Use of the University of Toronto Automated Library System (UTLAS) for Automated Control of the
Collections in the National Map Collection, Public Archives of Canada" at the Archives, Automation and Access Conference in Victoria, British Columbia, March
1-2, 1985.
Brian Hallett addressed a meeting of the Pacific Institute of Cartographers' Society in Sydney, British Columbia.
At the congress of the Association des archivistes du Québec, held in Trois-
Rivières from May 16 to 18,1984, Gilles Langelier presented a paper on the loaning of
original documents for exhibitions.
At the 1984 annual meeting of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries in
Fredericton (June 19-22), Tom Nagy gave a paper on disaster contingency planning,
and Betty Kidd presented the annual report of the National Map Collection.
Association Roles — A number of staff members play active roles in various associations. For example, Velma Parker and Tom Nagy serve on the executive of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries. For the same association, Ed Dahl assumed the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
position of chairman of the Historical Maps Committee, which is principally involved
with the production of facsimiles of historical maps of Canada.
Tom Nagy and Betty Kidd accepted the positions of interim editors of the ACML
Bulletin in order to get production back on schedule.
Hugo Stibbe continued his duties as chairman of the IFLA Section of Geography
and Map Libraries and secretary of the IFLA Division of Special Libraries.
Dorothy Franklin and Bruce Weedmark continued as treasurer and executive
secretary, respectively, of the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada.
Donna Porter assumed the position of executive secretary to the Canadian Oral
History Association (COHA) in October 1984.
Other — Ed Dahl made the opening remarks for an exhibition at the Agnes Eth-
erington Art Centre in Kingston titled Europe Looks at the World: The Evolution of
European Cartography from 1493 to 1761. Approximately 75 people were present for
the opening. He also attended a four-day meeting in Rio de Janeiro, in May, of a Pan-
American Institute on the History of Cartography working group preparing a study
relating to the history of North and South American cartography, which will eventually be published.
Picture Division
This year was exceptional in many ways. Important acquisitions have enriched the
permanent collection of the division and some interesting material remains under
negotiation. Exhibitions mounted for special occasions were well received by the
public and the media. During the North American Print Conference sponsored by the
division, the Honourable Charles Lapointe, Minister of Supply and Services, presided
at the official launching of the catalogue W.H. Coverdale Collection of Canadiana
authored by W Martha E. Cooke.
Following the feasibility studies, it was possible to embark on a serious program
leading to the automation of the rich and varied collections of the division. It is hoped
that in the near future our participation in the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) will allow the division to play a more important role in the establishment of descriptive standards for art works.
Acquisitions — Acquisitions continue to be the main activity of the Documentary Art
section. Despite a staff shortage, which placed considerable strain on the remaining
officers, a large number of items were added to the collection: 37 oil paintings, 1,928
drawings and watercolours and 435 prints, totalling 2,400 items, over double the
number acquired in 1983-1984.
Among the notable donations, mention should be made of the Harold Beament
collection containing 1,053 works in pencil, pen, chalk and watercolour, both loose
and in sketchbooks. The collection includes commercial work, World War II material
and Arctic sketches dating from ca. 1920 onwards, together with a large archive of
photographs documenting Beament's major paintings. This acquisition was a gift from
the estate of Harold Beament, Montreal.
Two interesting portraits by Théophile Hamel were very generously given: Portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Garneau, 1847, oil on canvas, donated by Claire and
Claude Bertrand, Outremont.
Three significant donations were added to the growing collection of political
cartoons: Henri Julien, Portrait of Sir Richard Cartwright, 1895, brush and pen and
black ink over pencil, gift of Janin David, Gatineau; Sid Barron, 100 original editorial PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Portrait of Mrs. Charles Garneau, 1847. Oil on canvas by Théophile Hamel.
Gift of Claire Bertrand and Claude Bertrand, Outremont. (C 123830)
:, 1964-1983, various media, gift of the artist, Victoria; a fascinating collection
of original self-portraits by 65 international cartoonists including 17 from Canada,
14 from Great Britain, 29 from the United States and five from various European and
Asian countries, gift of Creighton Aquin, Fredericton.
Two special grants from the Minister of Communications, under the Cultural
Property Export and Import Act, permitted the repatriation of a collection of 124
watercolours, including the work of anonymous artists, a sketchbook of Halifax and
Quebec, ca. 1849, by "HSM," and 81 watercolours by Lieut. William Smyth Maynard
Wolfe of the Royal Artillery documenting his posting in New Brunswick in 1853-1854.
Also included was the journal of W.T. Mumford, a carpenter on board the Resolute,
who inserted in his manuscript 20 watercolours and drawings illustrating the Belcher
expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, 1852-1854. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1'
TABLE XII
Picture Division Statistics
Total Holdings
Paintings	
Drawings  	
Prints	
Posters  	
Medals  	
Public Service
Inquiries	
Reproductions	
Transparencies Loaned
Exhibitions	
Works Loaned	
Conservation
Items Treated   	
2,928
2,971
3,038
18,894
19,646
22,040
90,278
90,543
91,164
12,878
15,449
17,457
10,609
11,290
11,704
2 5"52
3,326
2,514
14,405
12,740
10,513
993
779
1,647
The acquisition of the following sketchbooks and albums added many new subjects and artists to the collection: William Simpson, a sketchbook containing 28 pages
of mostly pencil drawings documenting Hamilton, Grand River, Toronto, Brock vil le
and the coast of Labrador, 1855-1857; J. Stanley, two sketchbooks, one containing
44 pages of pen and ink and watercolour drawings depicting Saguenay River, Montreal
and Niagara Falls, 1873-1874, and a second containing 33 pages of mostly pencil, pen
and ink and grey wash drawings documenting visits to Niagara Falls and Wat kins Glen,
N.Y., 1875; the Capt. Charles P. Wilbraham album containing some 53 watercolours
pertaining to his stay in Canada, 1838-1839; the Charlotte Schreiber collection of
24 oils, 445 watercolours and drawings and eight prints documenting the career of this
well-known Canadian artist who was a charter member of the Royal Canadian Academy at its founding in 1880; Paul Kane's Roman sketchbook containing 31 pencil
sketches of views and three brown wash figure studies of Italian peasants, 1841-1842,
together with two undated pencil studies of flowers by his wife, Harriet Clench; the
John Agmondisham Vesey Kirkland album including 16 Canadian watercolours and
29 prints mostly dated 1839-1840; Elizabeth Durnford Sewell, a sketchbook containing 18 Quebec watercolours dated 1864-1867; and the William Sedgwick Saunders
album containing five watercolours and drawings by Mary R. Mckie of Halifax, 1849.
Two important small oil paintings on panel by Augustus Rockwell were purchased: Eskimo Huts, Grove Point, Coast of Labrador and Indian Settlement, Grove
Point, Coast of Labrador, both dated 1867, documenting the American artist's sketching expedition to this remote part of the country.
A number of rare prints were purchased individually: Comte Charles de Lasteyrie
after Werner, Castor du Canada, ca. 1819, lithograph with watercolour; W. Walton
after John Greaves, The Village of La Chine & The Indian Village of Caughnawaga on
the River St. Lawrenge [sic], lithograph in black with tint stone, printed by Hull-
mandel. London, 1826; and a collection of 210 Canadian trade cards, mainly late-
nineteenth-century chromolithographs, bearing the names of Canadian businesses
from St. John, N.B., to Moosomin, Sask., and advertising everything from picture PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
Cartoon of Sir Richard Cartwright, 1895. Brush, pen and black ink by Henri
Julien. Gift of Janin David, Gatineau, Quebec. (C 97660)
frames to pianos. The following single watercolours and drawings were acquired
through purchase: Midshipman (?) H. (?) Hall, A Moravian (?) Missionary Visiting an
Eskimo Settlement in Labrador, ca. 1800-1830, watercolour; Walker Hodgson, Portrait of Sydney Prior Hall, 1892, black chalk and wash; Edward Roper, a group of
23 grisailles on three sheets recording the artist's trip to the Klondike during the Gold
Rush, ca. 1897; A.E. Santagnello, Indian Woman on the Shore at Glen Stewart,
P.E.I., 1854, watercolour; and Frank Watson Wood, First Welcome to Canada: Two
Canadian Destroyers Meet the Royal Empress in Cabot Strait, 1939, watercolour made
by the official artist accompanying the Royal Tour of King George VI and Queen
Elizabeth.
Each year a few significant items are added to the collection of minatures and
silhouettes. Mary Anne Knight's portrait miniature of Maj. John Norton dressed as a
Mohawk Chief (Teyoninhokarawen), watercolour on ivory, exhibited at the Royal
Academy, London, in 1805, depicts John Norton, the adopted nephew and deputy of
Joseph Brant and his successor as chief, diplomat and warrior. An interesting silhouette is a cut-out profile of a young boy, probably of the Taylor family of Ottawa,
with the Hubard Gallery trade label, ca. 1826-1831.
Among medals of recent issue added to the National Medal Collection was the
only specimen of the Ontario Bicentennial Medal to be preserved formally for the
historic record; specimens of the new police and correctional services medals of the
Canadian Honours System; an unusual two-piece medal for the Jeunesse musicale, by
artist Yves Trudeau; and three medals for Catholic church authorities, by artist Sylvia
Daoust. Also acquired were a selection of cast medals by Susan Murar, who was
recently represented in several exhibitions in Canada and the U.S.A., and plaques
and medals of Marshall McLuhan obtained by the Archives with his papers. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Arrival of the first Spring Steamer, Fredericton, 5th May 1854. Watercolour by
Lieut. William Smyth Maynard Wolfe, Royal Artillery. One of 124
watercolours purchased with a special grant from the Minister of
Communications under the terms of the Cultural Property Export and
Import Act. (C 122339)
Indian Settlement, Grove Point, Coast of Labrador, 1867. Oil on panel by
Angustus Rockwell. (C 124474) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
A few remaining items were added to the Régor collection acquired in 1971,
namely, 110 fashion drawings by Roger Régor, 80 drawings by George Vladar, a
number of fashion journals, a few nineteenth-century fashion plates, press clippings
and other documents that provide background information to the whole collection.
From Nancy Scarth were acquired 24 fashion plates of American and European journals, and from George Vladar a costume collection comprised mostly of fashion plates
and fashion journals. The Dictionnaire des figures héraldiques by Th. de Renesse,
obtained through the Paris Office, was a valuable addition to the specialized library.
Among the 105 posters purchased were a Chéret, a Capiello and 19 Vittorios.
Two hundred and sixty-three posters were transferred from the Marshall McLuhan
papers and 152 others from the Expo '67 collection. The main source of acquisition for
posters remains government departments and agencies. Material is received regularly
from the National Arts Centre and this year the National Film Board gave 164 posters.
Upon closing, the Canadian Unity Information Office let the division have its posters
and some publicity material.
Control — Accession and Registration — Steps were taken to control all new acquisitions shortly following their arrival. Work was continued on the RG 37 "C" series of
Public Archives of Canada records to retrieve information on acquisitions prior to
1931 when the division began keeping accession registers. Similar steps were taken for
the National Medal Collection, as a partial computer listing in 1970 contained virtually no acquisition data and no medal accession registers or accession files were
maintained before 1977. The backtracking, which will cover most medal acquisitions
to 1959, will be a lengthy process as earlier documentation is scarce.
Arrangement and Description — Several important collections were added to the
public service catalogue, among them the Merrilees collection, the Roebuck album, a
large number of architectural items, portraits and costume depictions.
The entire poster collection has been catalogued for computer entry, but the data
still has to be edited for standardization and uniformity. A number of finding aids were
created, among them, numerous artist files, including files of poster designers, fashion
designers and cartoonists. An index to the prints in the Coverdale collection and a
finding aid to the architectural depictions in the collection as a whole were completed.
Automated Control — Using a sampling of 500 works catalogued according to divisional standards, the Computer Systems Division of the Archives has designed and
developed an experimental data base in conjunction with the staff of the Art Inventory section. This data base will serve to test descriptive methodologies before initiating a definite automated control system. Interface with the CHIN network is also
being explored.
Conservation — Conservation work continued to be carried out almost exclusively for
exhibitions and loans. Some seventeenth and eighteenth-century engraved portraits as
well as the Daniel Fowler collection were sent for conservation. The divisions collection of grangerized volumes was forwarded to Records Conservation for treatment and
rebinding.
Public Service — Reference — Numerous tours and visits continued on a periodic basis
and were usually handled by the Collections Management section. Interest in the
costume collection increased as the public became more aware of the value of the
holdings for design and research projects.
The heraldic unit has conducted research on several specialized subjects, as well
as assisting towns and associations in the design and heraldic description of their coats
of arms.
Outreach Services — Exhibitions — In the Best Style of the Art: Commercial and Fine
Art Printing in Canada 1850-1950, organized by Lydia Foy, was an important contri- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Canadian Physicians for African Refuge
medal by Susan Mur
s Medal. 1984. Obverse, bronze
r. (C 126462)
bution to the North American Print Conference. The display was accompanied by an
attractive catalogue and remained on view at the Public Archives of Canada from May
Forty agricultural medals were displayed in the main lobby of the Archives during
the year.
The Painted Past, organized by Douglas Schoenherr and the staff of the Documentary Art section with Martha Marleau as coordinator, displaying 40 of the divisions most impressive oil paintings was mounted to coincide with the department's
Open House in October 1984. Although on display for only four weeks, the exhibition
was very well received by the public. An accompanying catalogue was written by the
staff members of the Documentary Art section.
Divisional exhibitions that circulated were Fact and Fantasy: The Portraits of
Jacques Cartier and 1931 — Painters of Canada Series: Exhibition of Christmas Cards.
Auguste Vachon selected the works and wrote the accompanying explanations for
the division's contribution to the Open House display A Canadian Adventure in Time.
Loans — A total of 122 items were loaned to 16 institutions in Canada and abroad.
Publications — The Painted Past catalogue will serve as the basis for a slide series, but
the production of the actual slides will be delayed until colour photography is completed.
The manuscripts for Microfiches 15-20 were sent for typesetting. The photographs
serving to prepare the black-and-white microfiches were sent to the processing company Herrmann and Kraemer and the completed products were received in good
condition. Microfiche 15 marks the end of Sir George Back's drawings and the beginning of those of Sir Henry James Warre, which continue to Microfiche 20. Lydia Foy
has completed the manuscript for the comprehensive Artist/Geography/Subject index
for Microfiches 11-20. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
A French Canadian. An Inhabitant of Quebec, 1828. Hand-coloured etching.
(C 123861)
The typesetting and design for the publication of John G. Garratt's 77ie Four
Indian Kings was completed.
Conferences and Seminars — The North American Print Conference, organized by
the staff of the Collections Management section, took place from May 9 to 12 at the
Archives. Over 100 delegates from five provinces, 30 states and three countries took
part in this conference. The conference included 12 talks by various experts, including
Jim Burant on Canadian graphic art after 1850.
The curator of the National Medal Collection, Norman Willis, attended an International Medallic Art Workshop held at Pennsylvania State University and delivered a
paper entitled "Who needs whom?" He also participated as a student in learning to
model and pour cast medals. Jim Burant delivered a paper on "Visual Records in the
Victorian Age," while Jeanne L'Espérance spoke on "Repeatable Images" at the Association of Canadian Archivists' Annual Meeting in Toronto in May.
The executive of the Working Group on Canadian Iconography held a session at
Quebec on May 22 in cooperation with the Canadian Museums Association. A number of projects were planned. This year's Newsletter in Canadian Iconography contained a number of interesting articles and the Dictionary in Canadian Iconography,
which is essentially an authority list comprised of the names of artists, is being studied
with a view to its inclusion in the National Library's Canadiana Authorities project.
Denis Castonguay has presented the methodology used in the preparation of the
division's thesaurus for the subject indexing of works of art to both the Canadian
Heritage Information Network and to students participating in a session on indexing
principles and methodology held at the Archives.
The director made a special appeal at Cape May, New Jersey for the maintenance
of membership for Quebec and Ontario with the Northeast Museum Conference. He
also presided over the discussions of the ICOM Working Group on Pictorial Archives
and represented the Heraldry Society of Canada at the IXth General Meeting of the
International Confederation of Genealogy and Heraldry.
Administration — Denis Castonguay was appointed chief of the Art Inventory section
following the resignation of Raymond Vézina. His revised mandate will allow a greater
concentration on the division's automation program. As a result, the poster collection
along with its curator, Denys Seguin, was integrated into the Medal, Heraldry and
Costume section. The responsibility for cartoons went to the Documentary Art
section. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
National Photography Collection
The year 1984-1985 was a significantly active period for the National Photography Collection. Acquisition activity was high particularly during the implementation
stage of the pilot project for scheduling government photo records. The resleeving and
microfiching of the National Film Board collection and the addition of several new
finding aids will make researchers' access to collections easier, while the completion of
the box by box inventory and the updating of the security cage inventory have increased physical control over the collections. Two major publications appeared, Private Realms of Light and the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives.
Acquisitions — During the year, the division added a total of 345 collections to its
holdings.
Government Acquisitions — The Government Photo Records Unit completed the
pilot project undertaken in 1983 to create and test a system for scheduling photographic documentation held in government departments. A report to senior management evaluated the project's usefulness, provided time/resource statistics and
projections for the creation of photo schedules, and made recommendations for future
action. The project revealed the massive volume of photographs not yet under proper
records management and the varied difficulties to overcome if a serious attempt is to
be made to implement records scheduling for them.
Several important collections were acquired from government sources. These
included 110,000 colour transparencies from the Public Relations and Information
Section of Public Works Canada, 31,000 items from Design Canada, an additional
24,000 negatives and prints for the already substantial National Film Board collection,
and 20,000 items from the Department of Health and Welfare. The most significant
acquisition was 58,000 colour photographs taken by Robert Cooper as the Official
Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau and Princess Diana during the 1983
visit of the royal couple to Ottawa, Ontario. From a collection of over
60,000 photographs taken by Robert Cooper for the Office of the Prime
Minister between 1980-1984. (Accession 1984-133, Item 1376-14) ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
Photographer to the Right Honourable Pierre Elliott Trudeau during his later years as
Prime Minister of Canada.
Private Sector — Several substantive private sector acquisitions were added to the
collections. They included rare historical material such as the Pinkney album of Newfoundland views dating to 1886, a fine large ambrotype taken at Niagara Falls, a
number of impressive autochromes in the Albert Van collection, and an exceedingly
rare half-plate daguerreotype, the gift of André L'Homme of France, showing an 1855
group in costume bearing identifying inscriptions and the photographer's name, T.C.
Doane of Montreal.
In the contemporary field, the National Photography Collection received the
entire production of Pierre Gauvin-Evrard, a free-lance photographer closely connected with the union activities of the Confédération des syndicats nationaux in
Quebec. This material totalled approximately 350,000 negatives, prints and other
related documentation from the 1960s to the early 1980s. Major collections were
acquired from Hans Blohm, Dominion-Wide, and the Toronto Star, all prominent in
the pursuit of commercial and photo-journalistic photography in Canada. A special
word must also be said for the long-awaited donation of the photography and related
documentation of the career of Michel Lambeth, an influential figure in the Toronto
art and photography scene in the 1950s and 1960s.
Gilles Villeneuve at WatMns Glen, 1979. Photo from the exhibition 7>ac*
Record: Photographs by Allan de la Plante. (PA 135637) PUBLIC ARCH
Control — During the year, 345 collections and 868.614 items were brought under
minimal control, while 192,183 items were brought under subsequent control.
The organization this year of the National Film Board collection under contract
by Archival Services Ltd. was a major achievement. The year-long project consisted of
resleeving. integration and microfilming of the collection of 346,000 items and all
supporting documentation. This step will considerably reduce wear on the originals
and make reference to the collection easier and less time consuming. Copying of
nitrate negatives in the Montreal Gazette collection continued. The updating of the
inventory of items in the security cage, where all the most valuable items are kept, was
begun with completion expected in April 1985. The reorganization of the Andrew
Merrilees collection, composed of several hundred thousand negatives and prints
relating to the history of Canadian transportation, was begun as a first step in making
it fully accessible to researchers. Completion of the work will take several years.
Construction workers on the Hydro-Québec Project, Rivière-des-Pr;
Quebec, August 24, 1983. This photo is one of 300,000 in the Pierre (
Evrard collection that document the activities of the Confédération
syndicats nationaux. 1978-1983. and the evolution of Quebec soci
1962-1983. (PA 142707)
_ PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1
Finding Aids — Much was achieved in improving control over some important holdings. Work on the finding aid for the Duncan Cameron collection was continued and
item level finding aids were begun for the Andrew Merrilees and the Pierre Gauvin-
Evrard collections. The initial stage of an inventory of all stereographic photographs
and an inventory of William Notman material were completed. During the year, a total
of about 14,000 new entries were created in control data bases for these finding aids
and inventories.
The catalogue of finding aids held by the National Photography Collection was
converted to an on-line data base on the division's microcomputer system. It identifies
over 1,000 volumes in a collection of 152 finding aids. Thirty-eight new finding aids
were added to the library during the year.
r, 6,888 items were catalogued and
Cataloguing and Documentation — Durinj
22,923 items were filed.
Four students were hired under the Summer Canada program to catalogue accession data and collection descriptions for entry into the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives data base. Some 2,872 new entries were coded, of which 1,000 were
keyed and loaded into the data base, and 2,910 records were updated during the year.
The data base, with 9,361 descriptive entries containing accession file data, has become a key instrument of physical and intellectual control of National Photography
Collection holdings.
Conservation — During the year, approximately 365 items were conserved. The total
number of items treated was lower than last year because of a shortage of trained staff
to work on the conservation and restoration of photographs. There is an urgent need
to improve this situation.
Daguerreotype highlighting Saint Jean-Baptiste Day (Alfred Chalifoux and
four boys in costumes). Photo by -Thomas Coffin Doane, Montreal, Quebec.
Gift from André L'Homme. (PA 139333) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT î
Public Service— During the year, the division responded to 6,170 inquiries, registered
921 researchers, received 2,462 visits by researchers, supplied 18,709 copies and circulated 747,175 items.
The level of researcher demand, while dropping slightly from 1983-1984, is consistent with recent years. The closing of the National Film Board collection, which
previously accounted for 17 per cent of copies supplied, is believed to have had an
effect on researcher demand.
A number of automated systems supporting researcher services became fully
operational. Work order and letter registers provide improved access to user data, and
can be analyzed using programs that identify volume and turnaround time. The availability of such statistics is of considerable benefit in managing researcher services.
The second edition of the Guide to Canadian Photographic Archives was published. It cumulates all entries from the first edition (1979) with new descriptions of
photographic collection in Canadian repositories to 1982. The 1984 edition has a
greatly expanded subject index, a photographer name index, and a slightly new layout
intended to make it easier to use. It contains 8,631 descriptions of collections of
historical photographs held by 139 Canadian repositories. The new edition is expected
to have an enormous impact on research at the National Photography Collection and
in other repositories across the country, providing an unprecedented level of access to
millions of photographic records.
Outreach Services — Exhibitions — The National Photography Collection continued
to produce well received exhibitions. Private Realms of Light, Canadian Amateur
Photography, 1839-1940 was shown in the Montreal Musée des Beaux Arts from
April 12 to May 27, 1984. The Aperçu exhibitions continued successfully in the main
building, featuring the colour auto-racing photography of Allan de la Plante in Track
Record, Canadian historical costume in Dressing Up, and Nova Scotia landscape
scenes from 1896 by A.L. Hardy in Souvenirs of Evangeline Land. Each was accompanied by an illustrated brochure.
The division helped produce the Professional Photographers of Canada Print
Show for 1984 and arranged its series of venues. This will be the last year of our
participation in this event. Staff members prepared the photographic component for
Cod flakes, ca. 1886. Taken by an unidentified photographer and frot
album of Newfoundland and Labrador views. (PA 139025) the department's Open House exhibition held in October 1984, and arranged a venue
for Ken Bell: 50 Years of Photography retrospective in Belleville, Ontario. Work is still
under way for the Walter Curtin retrospective being completed jointly with the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, and for the major retrospective of the
work of Michel Lambeth, with the assistance of Michael Torosian.
A small exhibition entitled A Passing Glance was mounted in the Reference
Room. It consists of a selection of photographs from recent collections to illustrate the
variety of divisional holdings and of historical photographic processes and techniques.
Publications — Private Realms of Light, based on the exhibition and written by five
staff members, was copublished with Fitzhenry and Whiteside of Toronto. Containing
335 pages and over 300 high-quality duotone and colour reproductions, the book has
been praised in publications as diverse as The Globe and Mail and the Financial Post,
as well as on radio and television. It represents a major contribution to the history of
photography in Canada and effectively publicizes the activities and holdings of the
Public Archives in this field.
Another of the divisions publications released in 1984-1985 was General Guide
Series 1983: National Photography Collection. It is intended to make information on
the National Photography Collection available to a wide spectrum of the general
public, and describes the division's mandate, organization, functions, holdings and
As was mentioned under "Public Service," the public
Photographic Archives became available to the public.
i Guide to Canadian
This view looking east along "Nan White" Beach shows personnel of the
9th Canadian Infantry Brigade landing from LCI(L) 299 of the 2nd Canadian
(262nd RN) Flotilla on D-Day, Bernières-sur-Mer, France, June 6,1944.
Photo by Gilbert A. Milne, Department of National Defence. (PA 137013) Staff Activities — Ontario Museums Association — Andrew Birrell chaired the first
day's proceedings of the workshop "Managing and Caring For Photographic Collections." Lilly Koltun, Christopher Seifried and Duncan Cameron all gave lectures.
North American Print Conference — A. Birrell and L. Koltun gave lectures on photography and prints. Symposium: "An Atlantic Album, 1870-1920" (Mount Saint Vincent University). — L. Koltun lectured on using and interpreting photographs.
Photoheritage '84 — A. Birrell lectured on the role of the National Photography
Collection as a collecting body. Special Libraries Association — C. Seifried organized
and chaired a session on computer applications in photography collections. Association of Canadian Archivists Annual Meeting — Andrew Rodger gave a lecture on
photography in the federal government. Newfoundland and Labrador Archivists Association — C. Seifried participated in a panel discussion at the annual conference.
Ontario Heritage Foundation — Theresa Rowat spoke at a workshop on collecting
photography on the subject of the history and collecting of nineteenth-century work.
Staff members also lectured at several universities and at the Archives Course.
Management Concerns — Five more terminals and a printer were added to the existing
microcomputer system thus relieving the pressure on staff. This has allowed a great
deal more work to be done in the areas of cataloguing and creating finding aids. A
number of new functions were added such as a letter register, a circulation control
register and a data base of auction prices realised for photographs. The first two allow
statistical analysis as well, providing information that was previously impossible or too
time consuming to produce. The latter currently has 3,000 entries.
No additional storage space was added during the year. Consequently, there is no
storage space for future collections.
Public Archives Library
In 1984-1985, the Public Archives Library came one step closer to computerizing
its services. Several feasibility and cost-effectiveness studies enabled the Archives'
library services to develop an integrated approach to the total archives concept and to
research needs.
The library's collection of printed material is evenly divided into three main areas:
(1) historical documents that are useful for research on Canadian history and make it
easier to consult other archives records; (2) archival documentation that is used for
research on and development of archival practices and theory, including such related
techniques as conservation, restoration and the handling of microfilm and microfiches;
and (3) administrative documents that are helpful for managing the Public Archives.
The library has for several years been decentralizing its collection, and the process continued this past fiscal year. The relocation of various administrative units in
different buildings makes control problems even greater. Computerized services
should be an adequate solution to the problems that have arisen.
The library's clientele is becoming diversified as more and more researchers,
journalists, media specialists and parliamentarians join the historians and genealogists
who themselves form the core of regular researchers.
Administration — Human resources management was one of the main administrative
concerns this year. With three employees on extended sick leave, others had to spend
long hours staffing term positions and training employees. Nonetheless, the library
was able to reach most of its established goals, despite the difficulties created by this PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT—Almost two thirds of the total number of acquisitions were documents transferred from other divisions of the Public Archives.
Donations are another significant source of important works, many of which
cannot be found on the book market. Some 2,000 items were donated to the library
completing a collection on transportation in Canada.
The third method of acquisition, purchases, is used to try to fill gaps in the
collection. This year, for example, the library acquired business catalogues from various periods and various parts of the country. Works of this type are very useful to
people doing research into economic or comparative history. They are also of great
value in organizing economic and business archives.
TABLE XIII
Activity
Number
27 204
 . .            7.303
Conservation and restoration of documents make up the section's second most
important activity. One study, based on a scientifically selected sample, showed that
the collection will need major restoration work in the near future.
The acidity of paper and certain inks remains a major problem. The library has
high hopes for the mass deacidification system now being developed at the Public
Archives. During 1984-1985, 3,600 works were treated using this new process.
Section chief Dawn Monroe gave presentations on the Merrilees collection (documents on the history of transportation in Canada) to two groups, the Moccasin Club in
Cornwall, Ontario, and the Bytown Historical Society. The response to these mini-
lectures was very encouraging.
The section was not able to reach all its objectives, and a delay in having works
inventoried after they were received because of a staff shortage, created control problems. With the introduction of a computer, planned for the next fiscal year, the section
should be better able to deal with these emergency situations.
COLLECTION ORGANIZATION — The section had to adapt to a new distribution of
human resources, namely the ratio of librarians to support staff. The section chief
took part in several preliminary studies for computerization.
The arrival of a new cataloguer will help reduce the backlog of work that has built
up over the past two years, a period during which the library has had only one
cataloguer.
Through a summer employment program, the section was helped by two female
students studying library techniques. This additional support made it possible to
organize a special collection containing some rare volumes.
Activity
Number
          6,069
         42,933
Titles Processed	
          4,786 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1
Although there was a marked increase in cataloguing (nearly 48 per cent), the
number of entries filed and titles processed decreased because of the lack of support
staff. The use of computers seems to be the only solution to the problem.
Last year's backlog in preparing sets of cards could not be eliminated, even
partially, in 1984-1985. As a result, many works can be accessed by author and title
only.
REFERENCE AND LOAN — During the year, the Reference and Loan section loaned
24,492 articles and circulated 4,287 periodicals. The drop in the number of articles
loaned, almost 5 per cent as compared with 1983-1984, is due in large part to the
increased level of assistance given to researchers coming to the library. The number of
times staff members provided direct assistance to help or better orient researchers
rose more than 22 per cent. With better direction, researchers consulted fewer sources
to find the documentation or information they needed, thus saving time and effort.
The number of reproductions requested by researchers is constantly increasing,
and went from 24,981 pages in 1983-1984 to 41,819 pages in 1984-1985. Because of this
increase, it was necessary to write a more explicit policy on reproductions, taking into
consideration the restrictions imposed by current legislation, and basic principles of
conservation.
In 1984-1985, 368 researchers used passes issued by the library, 4,415 visited the
library, 363 sent written requests and 1,897 contacted the library by telephone. The
number of telephone requests increases every year.
The section increased its efforts to better serve the archival community. The
section chief coordinated the archives bibliography that is published from time to time
in the magazine Archives, and in cooperation with the head of the French Archives
section, organized a seminar on indexing. The seminar, chaired by Mrs. Bertrand-
Gastaldy, director of the School of Library Science at the University of Montreal, was
held November 19-23,1984 at the Public Archives. As it has done for several years, the
section extended its hours to accommodate those participating in the archives science
seminars sponsored by the Public Archives; two seminars were held in 1984. Finally,
the section broadened its interlibrary loans service by making its entire collection
available to the archival community through this system.
The reference collection was weeded and brought up-to-date, and in accordance
with the Access to Information Act, the section made available to the general public
the manuals of the various branches of the Archives.
The section took part in celebrations in honour of Jacques Cartier by loaning
Ramusio's Navigationi et viaggi to the Quebec Museum for one of the many exhibitions held during the summer.
The section chief wrote a user guide to library services for Public Archives
employees.
Activity Number
Articles Loaned  24,492
Pages Reproduced  41,819
Telephone Requests    1,897
Requests by Mail     363
Research Assistance  ... ,.„,.,  6,177
Visitors  4,415 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1'
RESEARCH SERVICES — During 1984-1985, Research Services staff produced 288
research reports in response to requests sent by mail and 381 reports in response to
telephone requests. These figures represent a drop of 5 per cent and an increase of 12
per cent, respectively, as compared with 1983-1984.
The section handled 10,338 telephone calls, including 1,711 requests for general
information; 4,057 of these calls were referred to other divisions of the Public Archives
or the federal department responsible for the subject involved.
The section produced 2,695 reference cards for published materials. As of December 1984, the section's main finding aid contained more than 10,000 cards.
Work continued on the biographic index of the reference room and the index of
Bulletins de recherches historiques published after 1925.
Statistics show that the areas in which researchers are active remain more or less
unchanged from year to year.
Members of the section selected published materials and wrote texts for the
Public Archives' Open House exhibit, which ran from October 13 to 14, 1985. The
themes of the documents prepared by the library were the cost of living in the last
century, sanitary conditions and the great epidemics, capital punishment, winter and
home heating, and methods of transportation. There was a warm public response to
this exhibition, which remained on display after the Open House until February 1985.
The section also helped publicize the materials conserved by the library by regularly submitting to the editors of The Archivist articles based on works from the
collections.
Type
Mail (research reports)            288
Telephone (research reports)     381
National Film, Television and Sound
Archives
Acquisitions — In 1984-1985, the division experienced a significant decrease from the
previous year in terms of the number of film and television acquisitions (27,420 film
and 27,493 television documents in 1983-1984). This reflects both the policy of restraint that the NFTSA has implemented and the fact that there has been no single
major accession equivalent in size to the Crawley Film collection. While the volume is
expected to remain at roughly this level, the NFTSA has been attempting to improve
the quality of the intake by working closely with production organizations, particularly CBC and NFB, to identify, document and schedule the productions before
they are deposited. TABLE XVII
Accession Statistics, 1984-1985
 Film Television Sound Documentation
Accessions  163 167 185
Hours          1,467 3,856 15.312
Documents           8,802* 23,136* 91,872* 24,1%
* A moving image recorded sound document is defined as any recording ten minutes or less in length when
played at the appropriate speed.
Approximately 85 per cent of the accessions were government records (CBC/
Radio Canada, NFB and government departments) and 15 per cent were from the
private sector.
Among the notable acquisitions illustrating the range were the following:
Archives Deschatelets; four hours, 1927-1954, disc sound recordings of religious
chants and songs in Eskimo and French recorded in northern Canada.
October 1962, CBC-TV launched Scarlet Hill, the first daytime drama
series independently produced in Canada (by Taylor Television Productions,
Toronto). Seen here are Larry Cherniak and Elizabeth Cole in the episode PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Banff International Television Festival; 25 hours, 1982-1984,3/4-inch vidéocassettes of
seminars and 1984 award-winning television productions from international
samples.
i (optical track) for two feature
British Film Institute; three hours, 1946-1948, 35 m
films, Whispering City and Sins of the Fathers.
CKAC; 31 hours, 1962-1983, audiotapes of a variety of radio programing originated
by CKAC.
CKEY; 13 hours, 1960-1978, audiotape of radio programing produced by CKEY
including such titles as The Consumer's Desk and Perry scope.
Canada, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — Radio, Corner Brook; 500 hours,
1940s-1960s, of audiodiscs of radio programing primarily originating in
Newfoundland.
Canada, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — Radio Program Archives Main Catalogue; 3,099 hours, 1950s-1960s, of audiotape and audiodiscs from the Program
Archives Main Catalogue.
Canada, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — Television (CBOT Film Project) ; 391 hours, 1950s to 1970s, of CBOT film production including material from
the series Consommateurs avertis and Something Else. (CBOT Video Inventory);
70 hours, 1980s, of 2-inch videotapes of a variety of CBOT programing including
the series Country Report transferred to NFTSA's preservation format.
Canada, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — Television (North); 35 hours of 2-inch
videotapes of native language programing in the series Tarqravut transferred to
NFTSA's preservation format. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Canada, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — Television (Videotape Recycling); 274
hours, 1976-1982, of 2-inch videotapes of a variety of series transferred to
NFTSA's preservation format. (National/Journal); 70 hours, 1982-1984, on 3/4-
inch vidéocassette of CBC's nightly newscast. Also, in July of this year, our
recording of this series directly from satellite began. (Kinescope Inventory); 886
hours, 1950s to 1970s, of kinescope recordings of CBC network programing transferred to NFTSA's preservation video format.
Canada, Conseil des arts; 70 hours, 1970-1983, 16 mm films supported by Canada
Council's film program.
Canada, Department of National Defence; 30 hours, 1940s-1980s, film elements of a
variety of DND film productions and projects.
Canada, Health and Welfare; 186 hours, 1970-1982, audiotapes and videotapes of
Health and Welfare productions and public hearings.
Canada, Library of Parliament; 44 hours, 1984, of audiocassettes of oral history interviews with Jack Marshall, Roland Michener, Marcel Lambert, Mary MacDonald,
David Currie, Gerald Duquet, Ged Baldwin and Ernest Manning.
Canada, National Film Board; 162 hours, 1943-1958, of film elements for NFB productions transferred to the NFTSA under the archival transfer project.
Canada, National Research Council; 227 hours of audiotape, film and videotape for
radio and television programs, educational purposes, research, etc., produced at
the National Research Council.
Canada, Public Archives of Canada — Radio Stations Survey; 143 hours, 1984,
audiotape recordings of complete broadcast days for selected radio stations
across Canada.
Canada, Société Radio-Canada — Radio; 301 hours, 1940s-1966, of disc sound recordings of a variety of radio programing including the series Present Television; 498
hours, 1970s, of 2-inch videotape of the series Femme d'aujourd'hui and Rencontres preserved on NFTSA's preservation format.
CAN-PRO; 39 hours, 1983-1984, 3/4-inch vidéocassettes, award-winning and independently produced Canadian television programing.
Catholic Episcopal Corporation of Whitehorse; seven minutes, 1931, 16 mm film entitled Un sacre aux glaces polaires.
Chambers, Jack ; four hours, 1965-1972,16 mm film elements for film productions by
Canadian artist, Jack Chambers.
Clark, Joe; 300 hours, 1979-1983, audiocassettes and audiotapes of speeches and
interviews with Joe Clark while he was Leader of the Opposition and Prime
Minister.
Crone Films Limited; 130 hours, 1962-1964, film elements and videotape of the television series Scarlet Hill and Room to Let.
Dinsdale, Walter; 25 hours, 1950s-1980, audiotape of speeches, interviews and public
events pertaining to Walter Dinsdale, former member of parliament and cabinet
minister.
Dominion Bridge (AMCA International); 75 hours, 1970-1972, audiotape of oral history interviews with employees of Dominion Bridge Company about its history.
Dreville, Jean; 13 hours, 1928-1959, videotape copies from films loaned by donor of
French features. :HIVES REPORT 1
Dundas Historical Society Museum; one hour, 1917, 35 mm film entitled Manufacturing an Eight Inch High Explosive Howitzer Shell.
Les entreprises Pierre Blouin; 90 hours, 1980s, 2-inch videotape of television series Les
trouvailles de Clémence and Au fil de la semaine broadcast on Société Radio-
Canada.
Global Television; 80 hours, 1981-1984, 2-inch videotapes of Global programing such
as Citizen's Alert, Newsmakers, Kidsbeat and Newsweek transferred at NFTSA to
divisional preservation format.
Gray, Elizabeth; 45 hours, 1970s to 1980, audiotape and audiocassettes of radio
programing done by Elizabeth Gray while working from CBO.
Hannah Institute for the History of Medicine; 125 hours, 1970s, audiotapes of oral
history interviews about the history of the faculty of Medicine at the University of
Toronto.
Kingsbury, Donald; three and a half hours, 1927-1937, 16 mm black-and-white
footage shot by Hector M. Kingsbury in southeast Asia of aboriginal peoples and
mining operations.
Kluzek, Stanley; one hour, 1940s, 16 mm film, amateur footage of the Ferry Command in the North Atlantic.
Larson, Henry; three hours, 1930s-1950s, 16 n
son's travels and explorations.
i film of footage shot on Henry Lar- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Ontario Federation of Labour; 64 hours, 1981-1983, audiotapes of proceedings of
annual conventions of the Ontario Federation of Labour.
Roberts, Wayne; 11 1/2 hours, 1984, audiocassette oral history interviews of Murray
Cotterill and Donald MacDonald (retired labour leader) by Wayne Roberts.
Spry, Graham; 46 hours, 1939-1981, audiotape, audiocassette, film and videotape
recordings of radio programs, interviews, public events, etc., involving Graham
Spry.
Standard Broadcast News; 900 hours, 1984, audiotape and VHS recordings of daily
news feed supplied to radio stations in Canada.
Stern, Harry Joshua; 87 hours, 1950s-1973, audiotape, audiocassette, film and
vidéocassette recordings of lectures, religious services and public events.
Telepro Inc./Telefilm Canada; one half hour, 1984, vidéocassette of Canadian fiction
short, La creche du village, supported by Telefilm Canada and made available
through an arrangement negotiated in the past quarter.
Van de Water, Anton; three and a half hours, 1972,35 mm film elements for Canadian
feature length films And I Love You Dearly and La maîtresse.
Control — During the year, approximately 90 per cent of the media cataloguing time
was allocated to government records. Compared to last year, as Table XVni indicates,
the overall volume of documents placed under minimal control substantially increased
(55 per cent) in 1984-1985 as did the number of hours of documents placed under
subsequent control (30 per cent). This has been the result of streamlining procedures
and the application of new technology — vidéocassette players that allow fast scan.
The number of cataloguers has remained the same.
TABLE XVIII
Audio-Visual Control Statistics
Type 1983-1984 1984-1985
Collections Under Minimal Control                    450 580
Documents Under Minimal Control             57,700 90,000
<9,600 hours) (15,000 hours)
Collections Under Subsequent
Control                    75 126
Documents Under Subsequent Control                 9,100 12,000
 ( 1,500 horns) (2,000 hours)
In preparation for the implementation of MISACS (Moving Image and Sound
Archives Control System) the Media Cataloguing section has been revising the authority file and updating the inventory of collections. The MISACS system design was
completed in 1984-1985, and the requests for proposals on implementation and staff
training were issued at the end of the fiscal year.
Ongoing projects in the Control section include compilation of the detailed catalogue of military holdings (1,700 entries to date); cataloguing of the Dawson City
collection; and an intensive evaluation of the entire newsfilm holdings in order to
select items for the 1987 exhibition Reporting Canada.
Documentation and Public Service — Notable documentation acquisitions this past
year included 1,000 film stills from the Film Festival Bureau, 56 microfilm Teels of EMI
— Pathé Film Library Catalogue (1896-1970), 50 boxes of radio and television hroad- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1«
La turlutte des années dures (Canada, 1983 and directed by Richard Boutet
and Pascal Gélinas) is a documentary about the depression in Canada during
the 1930s. In 1984, it won a Quebec Association of Film Critics award.
cast rating reports acquired from the CBC, six original posters for Max Linder's films
(1915-1916), and the index to some 100,000 incidental references in Cinema Canada
(nos. 1-100). Other activities included total revision of the NFTSA's duplicate negatives for still photographs file and the removal of all nitrate negatives; the processing
of all 5,000 stills in the Crawley collection (with rewashing where necessary) and their
organization in preservation files and acid-free folders; the microfilming of all film title
vertical files (approximately 9,800 documents) from Film Canadiana 1980-1982; and
the preparation of an index to research materials compiled for Dreamland: A History
of Early Canadian Movies.
TABLE XIX
Documentation and Public Service Statistics, 1984-1985
Documents Placed Under Minimal Control  20,809
Documents Placed Under Subsequent Control  22,211
Responses to Inquiries  8,705
Researchers Registered  304
Researchers in Attendance  667
Copies or Extracts Supplied  3,053
Items Circulated  14,173
During the year, members of the division compiled Bibliography: FIAF Members'
Publications 1984 and Film Canadiana 1980-1982, a joint publication of the NFTSA,
the National Film Board and the National Library. Film Canadiana is the first catalogue of Canadian film productions produced entirely through a data base, and the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
first catalogue also available on-line through UTLAS, a nation-wide automated system.
Conservation — In 1984-1985, the Technical Operation section conserved 68,246
documents and placed 115,876 documents under storage control. During the course of
the year, the section completed the changeover to 1-inch C format videotape for
master videotape storage, introduced digital recording for master audiotapes storage,
and regularly recorded the evening news and other public affairs broadcasts directly
off the Anik B and D satellites.
Extension Services — The NFTSA continues to serve the wider archival (and museum
and library) community in a variety of ways. A partial list of extension services in
1984-1985 follows below.
(a) Technical services on the transfer of substandard and obsolete recordings including nitrate film, soft-cut broadcast discs, 9.5 mm and 8 mm film, 2-inch quadruplex videotape, and 16 mm kinescopes.
(b) Direct contractural support of regional development in moving image and recorded sound conservation, including surveys of available resources and acquisition of CBC regional broadcasting in radio and television (provincial archives in
Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador were
involved).
(c) The organization of a workshop on the archival handling of moving image and
recorded sound documents attended by archivists from across Canada (in response to a request by the Association for the Study of Canadian Radio and
Television).
(d) Presentations and papers for such groups and events as the National Film Theatre
(D. John Turner), the Ottawa Collectors Club (Richard Lochead), the Annapolis
Royal Historical Society (Ernest J. Dick), the PAC Archives Course (Jacques
Gagné and Sam Kula), the PAC Open House (Jacques Gagné and Jean-Paul
Moreau), the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference (Ernest J. Dick), the
Oral History Association (Richard Lochead), the Association for the Study of
Canadian Radio and Television (Ernest J. Dick), the Canadian Oral History Association (Richard Lochead), the Association of Canadian Archivists (Ernest J.
Dick), the International Association of Sound Archives (Ernest J. Dick), the Sao
Paulo UNESCO/FIAF Seminar in Film Documentation for Latin American Archives (Jana Vosikovska), and the ICA/ALA Panama Seminar on Audiovisual
Documentation (Sam Kula).
(e) The preparation of sound archives extracts for CBOF's (radio) Les flâneries du
samedi matin (Jean-Paul Moreau), and for a special program devoted to the
NFTSA in the CBC series Play It Again (Rosemary Bergeron).
(f) Training of individual archivists through short courses and study visits (Saroja
Wettasingha, National Archives of Sri Lanka).
(g) Consultation advice and contributions towards international standardization and
development on the conservation of moving images and recorded sound through
active membership in the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF), the
International Federation of Television Archives (FIAT), the International Association of Sound Archives (IASA), and the International Council of Archives
Working Group on Audiovisual Documents (ICA/PAV). PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Machine Readable Archives Division
Considerable attention and time were given to the scheduling of personal information banks by the staff of the division. The scheduling of these banks is required
under the Privacy Act and pursuant regulations. In addition to the scheduling of
personal information banks, work continued on the pilot projects in Employment and
Immigration, Indian and Northern Affairs, and Statistics Canada.
The division continued its active participation in the Department of Communications' automated office field trial study. The results of the participation will lead to the
development of guidelines for the management of information created in automated
office e
The second stage of the development of the Machine Readable Data File System
was completed. The detailed design, development and implementation of the File
Management Component was completed and tested. The backlog of descriptions of
files was entered. The system provides automated control and access to the holdings.
Optical data disc tests were completed in January and the results indicated that digitized information could be converted from magnetic tape to optical data disc and back
again successfully with no loss or degradation of data.
A major project to develop a Canadian Union List of Machine Readable Data
Files was begun in January. The project is being undertaken in response to the needs
expressed by the research community who use machine readable data.
An internal audit was completed during the year, the previous audit having been
performed in 1979. The most serious observations made dealt with the backlog in the
conservation program. The backlog has resulted from the lack of staff, outdated
equipment and the difficulties in obtaining new equipment. A major project was
undertaken to analyze the workflows for both the administrative and operational
functions of the division. The results of these studies will eventually lead to the
implementation of an automated office application in the division.
As a result of a pilot project last year involving the services of a joint telephone
receptionist for the Machine Readable Archives and the National Film, Television and
Sound Archives, a permanent divisional secretary position was established. One of the
two permanent positions in the EDP Information Systems section was filled at the end
of the fiscal year.
The Management of EDP Data — The chief of the EDP Information Systems section
was involved in a variety of projects throughout the year that will provide the necessary information to form the basis for the development of an integrated archival and
records management approach to the identification, description and scheduling of
EDP data.
The review of formal and informal schedules covering the retention and disposition of personal information, as required under the Privacy Act and pursuant regulations, together with regular scheduling activities and pilot projects in several
departments concerning the scheduling of EDP data, absorbed a major portion of
staff time. Advice was also provided to a number of agencies concerning the application of EDP scheduling procedures. Internal procedures were designed to control the
review and processing of schedules and submissions received within the division. The
support of the archivists, based on these procedures, was required in order to compensate for the lack of staff in the EDP Information Systems section and to cope with the
increased workload associated with the personal information scheduling project. This
project and, in particular, consultations that took place with officers in various departments and agencies contributed substantially to the development of the Interim
Guidelines on the Identification, Description and Scheduling of EDP Data. Work on
the scheduling of personal information will continue into the next fiscal year, particularly in light of a new directive from Treasury Board requiring departments and agencies to review and revise their personal information bank descriptions for the
1985 Index and to provide retention and disposal schedule authority numbers.
Work continues to progress on the three pilot projects related to the testing of
various approaches to the identification, description and scheduling of EDP data in
automated systems. The three departments chosen for the pilot were Statistics Canada, Employment and Immigration, and Indian and Northern Affairs. In the Health
Division of Statistics Canada, the working group concentrated on the review of existing documentation and finding aids associated with two systems, Vital Statistics and
Tuberculosis Statistics. The group agreed that, as well as the scheduling objective, the
activity of describing both systems and linking them to other existing finding aids
would be a major accomplishment of the project. System overviews were developed
and a draft schedule for the two systems plus seven other systems containing personal
information maintained by the Health Division were completed.
After a somewhat slower start, work progressed well on the pilot project in
Employment and Immigration. The pilot is focusing on the development of schedules
for the Immigration System. A report on the conclusions from this project is underway. In Indian and Northern Affairs, the project continues to progress. The descriptive overview approach has been adopted using the Indian Membership System as the
test. In all three departments, the pilot projects have been extremely useful in providing a working example of how the identification and scheduling of EDP data can be
applied.
A considerable amount of work was undertaken on the various aspects of the
Department of Communications' automated office field trial study. One major product
from the Archives' Information Management Working Group was the preparation and
issuance of an Interim Report describing the work undertaken by our departmental
representatives to date, as well as their findings and preliminary recommendations.
Considerable time was devoted to the development of the office procedures for the
management of information in the field trial site based on established office procedures and practices as well as government-wide information management policies
and standards. Staff were trained to use the system and, in particular, to file and
retrieve documents from an electronic corporate records system and to transmit documents through various approval levels of the organization. The project has now entered an assessment stage. Major reports are being prepared assessing the impact on
staff, on the archiving function and the overall impact of the office automation equipment on the working environment. Over the next few months the Working Group vrift
be investigating and testing various media as they relate to the off-loading of information from the system.
The chief of the EDP Information Systems section was involved in the preparation of two reports from the Government EDP Standards Committee's Data Dictionary Systems Working Group. The Survey of Data Dictionary Usage and Guidelines on
Implementing Data Dictionaries will be issued early in 1985-1986.
Appraisal and Acquisition — Despite the time spent on the review of schedules,
archivists continued to be involved in the appraisal and acquisition of EDP files. There
were 99 files acquired during the year. Major acquisitions were from the Canadian
Wheat Board, Environment Canada, Health and Welfare, and the House of Commons. Negotiations are underway to acquire a substantial number of survey files from
the Canadian Unity Information Office prior to its dissolution. Two files were acquired from the Prime Ministers Office relating to the correspondence systems of
Prime Ministers Clark and Trudeau. The files acquired from the House of Commons
are the computerized versions of the House of Commons debates and the meetings of
the Parliamentary Committees.
The divisional appraisal guidelines were reviewed and revised, particularly those
sections dealing with the legal value of machine readable records and the value of
machine readable data created in an automated office environment. A report on a PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
sampling criteria for individual and corporate case files was completed during the first
quarter by a private consultant. A copy of the bilingual report was submitted to the
director general of the Archives Branch, together with the following recommendations as to courses of action to take: a detailed review, consultation and discussion
within the Public Archives; a number of pilot projects or field tests within several
government departments to test the archival sampling strategy from a practical point
of view; consultation with federal agencies and the researcher/user communities; and
the sponsorship of a consultative conference consisting of representatives from various
constituencies. A detailed action plan is being developed following this approach.
After many months of discussion and negotiation, a contract with the Social
Science Data Archives at Carleton University for the cleaning of the Canadian Gallup
Poll data was finalized and approved. Work began early in the second quarter and will
conclude on March 31, 1985. Approximately 200 polls are being processed and documented. The result will be that the research community will have access to this data in
a more usable form. As a result of the contract, agreement has been reached with the
president of Canadian Gallup Poll Limited for the Archives to obtain copies of the
data, publish descriptions of the polls in the Catalogue of Holdings and to have certain
distribution rights.
Work on the 1871 census project with the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS)
continued throughout the year. Data on approximately 62 per cent of the total number of heads of households recorded in the census have been coded and made machine
readable. Nearly 400 OGS volunteers have been involved in the project to date. The
project is expected to conclude by the end of the 1985 calendar year.
Work on the cartographic project, which involves the detailed e
automated cartographic systems and their implications on archival functions, was
continued. The archivist will he working closely with personnel from Environment
Canada to obtain hands-on experience with the records. A detailed action plan for the
project has been developed for the next fiscal year.
Control — There were 82 data files processed and 25 files catalogued in 1984-1985.
Considerable time was spent in reviewing existing divisional holdings from Employment and Immigration and identifying recently transferred files from that department
that may be affected by the new ATTP legislation. Because of the latter, the files have
not been processed or registered pending clarification of the situation with departmental officers.
Archivists have been investigating the advantages and disadvantages of producing
machine readable documentation for the files processed. The creation of machine
readable codebooks has a number of advantages, particularly for updated files in
which documentation changes little or not at all. Problems do occur with equipment
and software as the division does not have access to good text processing capabilities
through its current service bureau contract. The Divisional Management Committee
has recommended the creation of machine readable codebooks.
Following the design, implementation and testing of the Tape Management Component of the Machine Readable Data File System at the end of 1983-1984, the
second stage of the automated system, the File Management Component, was begun.
Consultants refined the detailed design and buik and tested the data base. Outputs
and batch procedures were developed. A publication output, plus a laser printing
interface, weredeveloped and tested. The catalogue outputs were designed and tested
to meet divisional requirements. Three days of user training, plus an additional three
days of intensive data base training were provided. Substantial testing of the data base
was undertaken and minor problems were identified and resolved. New equipment
has been ordered to provide easier entry and access to the data base. The completion
of the File Management Component provides the division with fully automated control over its holdings, as well as automated access to the files and publication capa- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
bilities. The Machine Readable Data File System consists of the Tape Management
Component that controls the location, assignment and conservation requirements for
the physical medium, and the File Management Component that provides both control and access to the intellectual contents of the files. The two components are linked
through the accession number. The development of the automated system fulfills the
requirements of the Archives Branch with respect to gaining control over divisional
holdings through automation. The hiring of a summer student in 1984 permitted the
entry of the brief information on all files accessioned by the division as well as detailed
descriptions on all processed files.
The division director and divisional EDP coordinator participated in the work of
the Archives Branch EDP Committee throughout the year. The division director
continued to serve as acting chairperson of the committee. The focus of the committee
was on phase two of the Archives Branch EDP Feasibility Study. A consultant from
the Bureau of Management Consulting provided an analysis and summary of the
results of the various EDP studies that were undertaken in the divisions and at the
branch level and provided a report outlining the branch's EDP requirements. The
Archives Branch Management Committee approved the Bureau's report on the recommendation of the Branch EDP Committee. Guidelines on microcomputer acquisition and use in the Archives Branch were developed by committee members and work
began on the development of a Long Range Informatics Plan for the branch.
In the division, work began on the development of a finding aid describing the
EDP holdings and activities of departments. A draft of a finding aid for the Public
Archives of Canada is nearing completion. The finding aid contains information on
the mandate of the Archives, the use of EDP within the department, the various
systems used, and the purpose of the systems. Technical information on the computers
and software used is also included.
Conservation — There were 1,715 reels of magnetic tape precision rewound and
cleaned during the year. Work began on the recopying of data files that have been in
the division for five years. Because of the small number of documentation manuals
available, it was decided not to forward them for microfilming in 1984-1985, but to
combine them with those produced in the new fiscal year.
A large backlog of tapes requiring cleaning has developed due to a lack of staff for
six months during 1983-1984 and equipment problems in 1984-1985. As was reported
last year, the equipment used for cleaning and rewinding tapes was considered outdated. Approval was obtained to rent new equipment, which finally arrived in September, six months after the request had been submitted. The lack of equipment had a
serious impact on the conservation program.
Considerable time was spent on the evaluation of new tapes purchased under the
federal government's National Master Standing Offer. Testing these tapes, first at a
private company and then on newly acquired divisional equipment, revealed that over
50 per cent did not meet divisional standards. The quality of the tapes was extremely
poor with considerable shedding of the mylar base occurring. Several replacement
shipments were received and then tested. A number of these tapes had to be returned
as well. The full replacement of all the tapes has still not been completed. This
problem not only used up valuable staff time, but also emphasized the importance of
purchasing high quality magnetic tapes.
Tests were completed on the transfer of EDP data from magnetic tape to optical
disc and then back to tape. Although some minor problems were experienced early in
the tests, the transfer of data was successfully completed. A pilot project is being
proposed for the next fiscal year in which some of the problems identified during the
tests will be investigated, software developed and extensive evaluation of the medium
undertaken. Public Service — There were 252 inquiries and requests processed by divisional staff
and 126 copies or extracts of files were provided. Twenty-seven visitors were in the
division throughout the year, and a total of seven publications were produced. Visitors
from Australia, France, Namibia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the CEGEP de l'Out-
aouais, the City of Toronto Archives, Brazil and the National Archives and Records
Service of the United States were received in the division during the year. The inquiries covered a wide variety of subjects, among them divisional conservation and pricing
policies and EDP records scheduling procedures.
The preparation and distribution of divisional publications continued with the
printing of the General Guide Series 1983: Machine Readable Archives Division, the
production of a divisional poster, the review and revision of the divisional brochure,
and the preparation of a joint publication with Health and Welfare Canada describing
machine readable data files in the health promotion and disease prevention fields.
Four issues of the divisional Bulletin were published. The first issue completed the
series of articles on the activities of the division with an article on conservation practices. Two issues focused on two Canadian data archives, the Social Science Data
Archives at Carleton University and the Institute for Social Research at York
University.
In preparation for the division's participation in the department's Open House,
four staff members spent considerable time on the review and revision of the slide and
sound presentation. The new version reflects more accurately the archival functions in
the division. It was a major component of the division's exhibit at the Open House in
October. The second part of the exhibit was on-line access to statistics from a
one per cent sample of the 1871 census data. Cross-tabulations were available from
the file. The division's participation in the Open House, however, was not an enormous success. An analysis was undertaken and it provided a number of recommendations on how to improve the division's profile in this kind of exhibition. Since then,
photographs depicting various activities undertaken in the division have been enlarged
and mounted for display. In future exhibitions, the division will be able to participate
more effectively.
Extension Services — As a result of the responses from the MRA User Survey in 1982
and the consultations with the research community undertaken jointly with the Department of Communications' Social Policy and New Services Directorate, the division
is providing the funding for the development of a Canadian Union List of Machine
Readable Data Files. The Union List has been identified as the most useful tool for
the research community. The data base is being developed by the Social Science
Computing Laboratory at the University of Western Ontario. University archives and
libraries will be asked to contribute descriptive information on their holdings according to the standards for machine readable records. The project will continue to the
end of the 1985-1986 fiscal year at which time we will be able to determine the costs
involved and the possibility of expanding the data base to include descriptions of
holdings from other institutions and organizations. A printed catalogue will be available at the end of the project.
Staff Activities — The staff presented a number of information sessions and workshops to different groups throughout the year. Katharine Gavrel, John McDonald and
Harold Naugler gave sessions to the students taking the English Archives Course
sponsored by the Public Archives in September 1984.
Katharine Gavrel also presented an information session to the University of
British Columbia's archival science students undertaking their practica at the Archives. She was a member of a team of archivists from the Society of American
Archivists' Automated Records and Techniques Task Force who gave a workshop on
machine readable records at the SAA's annual conference in Washington. The same
group was invited by the State Archives of Utah to give the course to archivists,
records managers and computer personnel. In March 1985, she presented a paper on PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1!
access to machine readable records at a conference on Archives, Aecess and Automation at the University of Victoria.
Pauline Charron gave an information session to students participating in the
French Records Management Course organized by the Records Management and
Micrographie Systems Division of the Archives. Roger Biais participated in a symposium on conservation organized by the Toronto Area Archivists Group (TAAG).
His talk concentrated on the conservation of magnetic tape.
John McDonald presented papers and information sessions to participants of
several English Records Management Courses. He presented a paper on the Public
Archives' involvement in the Department of Communications' automated office field
trial at the annual conference of the Association of Canadian Archivists in June 1984.
Another paper on the identification, description, scheduling and appraisal of machine
readable data was delivered at the annual conference of the Society of American
Archivists. He also participated at the ARMA International Conference in the fall of
1984, presenting two papers — one on office automation and the other on documentation standards for computer systems.
In March, Winston Gomes gave a presentation to the Montreal Chapter of
ARMA on the archival aspects associated with machine readable records. Halyna Kis
and Harold Naugler provided a one-day workshop on machine readable records given
in Koblenz, West Germany, prior to the Tenth International Congress of Archives.
The workshop was sponsored by the ICA's Automation Committee. Harold Naugler
was invited to present a paper on the appraisal of non-traditional archival material to
the second conference of the South-west Asian Branch of the International Council on
Archives (SWARBICA) in Islamabad, Pakistan.
Divisional staff continued to participate actively in a number of associations.
Katharine Gavrel acted as chairperson of the 1984 IASSIST Conference held in
Ottawa in May. Harold Naugler was chairperson of the Program Committee for the
conference and John McDonald was the chairperson of the Local Arrangements
Committee.
Winston Gomes was vice-president of the Ottawa Chapter of ARMA. He was a
member of the Program Committee for the 1984 ARMA International Conference in
Calgary and is presently the chairperson of the Program Committee for the 1985
ARMA International Conference to be held in New York City. Harold Naugler continued as Cochairperson of the Automated Records and Techniques Task Force of the
Society of American Archivists. He is the Canadian representative on the Automation
Committee of the International Council on Archives and a member of the 1985 Program Committee of the Association of Canadian Archivists. Conservation and Technical
Services Branch
The Conservation and Technical Services Branch provides picture and records
conservation, photography services and optical disc advisory services for both the
Public Archives and the National Library of Canada. The branch also provides computer systems services for the Public Archives.
During the year, the branch directed a feasibility study of office automation in
several divisions of the Archives Branch. The study involved analysing administrative
functions processed by branch administrative offices and by Personnel, Financial and
Administrative Services of the Departmental Administration branch. Results of the
study were presented to senior management for consideration and for approval of an
office automation feasibility study at the departmental level.
The Office of the Director General coordinated the development and presentation of the first Public Archives Conservation Course. Module I, "The Conservation of
Paper," was presented in April to 35 archivists, librarians and support staff from the
Public Archives and the National Library. The course was given a second time in
October 1984 to provincial and territorial archivists during their visit to the Public
Archives when they attended Archives Week. Module II, a "Course on the Conservation of Non-Paper Records," is being developed by a committee chaired by K.B.
Hendriks, director of Picture Conservation, and will be presented in the spring of 1986
to staff of the Public Archives and the National Library.
Participants on the Conservation and Technical Services Branch Conservation
of foper Course presented to provincial and territorial archivists and to staff
of the Public Archives. (C 123157) PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Optical Disc Systems
This area provides optical disc advisory services in the research, design, development and implementation of optical disc retrieval and storage systems for the Public
Archives and the National Library.
A major concern of the Archives Branch is the development of an optical disc
system to record machine readable information on an archival medium. During the
year, a process for transferring data from computer tapes to an optical disc and from
the disc back onto computer tape was established. Optical Disc Systems plans to
establish a one-year pilot project in the Machine Readable Archives Division where
the process can be tested in a working environment. An evaluation of the pilot project
will include replacing the computer tape working copies with optical disc copies that
will then be subjected to all the operational processes.
The chief of Optical Disc Systems arranged for several tests to be conducted by a
private company to determine the feasibility of electronically reproducing black-and-
white and colour photographic prints. The results were low quality prints that could be
used as "proofs," however, the resolution and the density range of the reproductions
should be improved. Further study is required to determine if current technology can
meet the departmental standards for photographic prints.
In late December, Dennis Mole, chief of Optical Disc Systems, retired from the
Public Archives. Prior to leaving he was presented with a 35 years of service medallion
and certificate.
Picture Conservation Division
This division's mandate is to preserve and restore a variety of pictorial records
such as oil paintings; prints, drawings and watercolours; photographs; medals; and
special items from the collections of the Public Archives and National Library. Staff
members are engaged in searching for new methods for the restoration of deteriorated
photographic materials and developing a training program for photograph conservators. The division has established a bibliographic data base, called PHOCUS,
covering the literature on the conservation of photographic records. Staff members
also prepare recommendations on the manner of storage, display and handling of
works of art.
Prints and Drawings Conservation Studio — Principal items treated this year included
203 prints by various artists such as E. Roper, D. Fowler, P. Drevet, L'Enfant, C.
Mellan, B. Picart, J. Lubin, L. Harris, A.Y Jackson, Hogarth, R. Dighton, J. Gillray.
J. Sayers and J. Cruikshank; 140 watercolours by another group that included Escourt,
F.H. Varley, C.W Jefferys, E. Roper, W Armstrong, F Taylor, Mr. B., J. Duncan and
J.H. Caddy. Over 200 drawings were also conserved. These were by artists such as E.F.
Hale, D. Fowler, J.-J. Girouard, FB. Taylor and C.W. Jefferys.
The Codex Canadiensis, a volume of seventeenth-century iron-gall ink drawings
by Louis Nicolas belonging to the Thomas Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma,
was examined closely for the Picture Division with respect to techniques and materials
used.
Oil Painting Conservation Studio — During the past year, 43 items were conserved.
Among them were a portrait of Henry Ruttan by Théophile Hamel (1856); a portrait
of Sir George Prévost Bart attributed to Robert Field (ca. 1816); and several major
works for the in-house exhibition The Painted Past. Items conserved for the latter
exhibit included a full-length portrait of Louis XV from the studio of Louis-Michel TABLE XX
Picture Conservation Statistics
Oil Paintings
Examinations  155
Treatments  43
Watercolours, Prints and Drawings
Examinations  1,027
Treatments   937
Photographs
Examinations  153
Treatments   97
Medals, Ivory and Seals
Examinations  128
Treatments   116
Photographic Documentation
Black-and-White Negatives     1,258
Black-and-White Positives  546
Colour Transparencies   7,896
Test Samples   650
Density Readings   10,121
PHOCUS Entries    2,637
Van Loo (after 1761); a portrait of James Wolfe attributed to Joseph Highmore (ca.
1749?); and a view of Halifax, Nova Scotia, by an unknown artist (approximately
1840).
Medal Conservation Studio — During the past year, 116 items were examined and
treated. Among them were medals of William Pitt, Louis XV, King George III, a
plaque dating from 1792 and depicting George Washington, and a medal from the
Dominion Drama Festival. The use of the drying agent silica gel is being studied in
order to control relative humidity in medal storage safes. A year-long study on the
suitability of the Public Archives' main lobby for displaying original archives documents has also begun.
Photograph Conservation Laboratory — In early December 1984, Brian Thurgood, a
graduate of Sir Sandford Fleming College (Peterborough) and of Ryerson Polytechni-
cal Institute (Toronto), joined the division as conservator of photographic records. A
number of standard conservation treatments for historical still photographic records
were performed on 97 items. Among the special projects completed during the year
were "The Duplication of Stained Black-and-White Negatives Using Filters" and "A
Study of the Relationship between the Log Exposure Range of Black-and-White
Photographic Papers and the Effective Density Range of Negatives."
Data Base Library — The Fédération internationale de documentation (FID) gave
final approval for amendments to the Universal Decimal Classification (UDC)
Scheme proposed by this division, which introduced the concepts of permanence,
conservation and restoration of photographic materials. In May 1984, they were published by the FID in Extensions and Corrections to the UDC 1983 (FID Publication
248/12:1). The PHOCUS data base has grown to approximately 5,000 records, including all converted manual records and most of the backlog. Over 500 journal titles are PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1<
An automated in-house data base known as PHOCUS provides literature
references on the manufacture, properties in terms of permanence,
preservation and restoration of photographic materials, as well as of other
contemporary media used to store information.
A specially built instrument, called a swellmeter, is used in the Picture
Conservation Division to measure the swelling and deswelling of gelatin
layers on photographic prints as they pass through a series of chemical
solutions designed to restore faded or discoloured images. HIVES REPORT 1'
cited. The system has been enhanced to include additional subject fields (health and
safety; conservation of non-paper records) and to permit search access to these separate subject areas, and to published materials only. All system documentation has
been updated, and training of selected users to search the data base, without the
librarian's assistance, has begun. A technical paper, describing the history of the
project, and notable features of the system, has been published by the Public Archives
under the title PHOCUS.
G. Morrow and B. Klempan prepared a display on conservation techniques for
the Public Archives' Open House. The division continued to successfully employ
summer students to assist in research work into the development of restoration methods for faded or discoloured photographic prints. The division director, K.B.
Hendriks presented results of these experiments to an international audience in September in Copenhagen (ICOM, 7th Triennial Conference) and to the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) in May in Los Angeles. At the latter conference, the
data base librarian, D. Hopkins, presented a paper on PHOCUS in the general
session, and B. Klempan and G. Morrow each gave presentations in special sessions.
Several staff members attended the 11th annual conference of the International Institute for Conservation-Canadian Group (nC-CG) in Peterborough, Ontario. In the
course of the year, K.B. Hendriks lectured at the Rochester Institute of Technology
(RIT) in Rochester, N.Y., at McGill University in Montreal, and at Queen's University in Kingston.
Records Conservation Division
The Records Conservation Division preserves and restores historical and rare
books, manuscripts, maps, atlases, posters and other paper and leather-based archival
and library material for the Public Archives and National Library. The division conducts a training program to develop qualified Canadian conservators and provides
conservation advice to other archives and libraries.
Two special projects undertaken during the year were the development of a
continuous spray deacidification system to treat single documents and manuscripts
that cannot be processed in the Mass Deacidification System, and the development of
a strengthening process to treat fragile and weakened paper records. Two strengthening processes are being considered: a chemical process using resins, and the electronic
welding of paper fibres. Both will require extensive testing prior to being accepted by
the division.
Mass Deacidification — The section continues to test materials to determine whether
they can be processed in the mass deacidification system. Labels, inks and adhesives
were selected, and recommendations have been made to both the Public Archives
Library and the National Library.
The section increased production greatly this year and has deacidified 6,000,000
sheets of paper since the system became operational in 1980.
Books and Records — In addition to treating items systematically selected for conservation by the Public Archives and the National Library, the section specially bound
four volumes of Marie de l'Incarnation for presentation by the Governor General to
His Holiness Pope John Paul n, and conservators restored and constructed a protective case for The Indian Mohawk Prayer Book presented to Her Majesty Queen
Elizabeth during her 1984 visit to Canada.
Maps and Records — Items conserved in this section included a rare parchment map
of Vermont dated 1770, a hand-coloured map with three seals attached to the bottom
edge, and the J. Austin Floyd collection of archival drawings for the National Map PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Collection; the Claus papers consisting of 3,658 items for the Manuscript Division;
and a small thirteenth-century parchment manuscript with a pendant seal for the Nova
Scotia Archives.
John Winch, a senior paper conservator, attended a two-week refresher course on
seal restoration at the Public Record Office in London, England. Following his return,
the special equipment and materials used in the conservation of seals were acquired
and demonstrations were given to staff members including the conservator trainees.
He also gave presentations on seal restoration to visitors to the Records Conservation
Division during the Archives Week Open House.
TABLE XXI
Records Conservation Statistics
Conservation
Documents and Manuscripts  15,718
Maps and Posters     8,211
Books     922
Cases/Portfolios   119
Deacidification
Sheets     3,169,964
Photography Services Division
The division provides photographic services to the Public Archives and National
Library, and to the researchers who use their facilities.
In September 1984, Ernie Butler was appointed director of the Photography
Services Division. He joined the Public Archives following twenty-five years as a
photographer with the Canadian Armed Forces.
During the year, several quality control procedures were introduced, and several
cameras and processors were replaced. As a result, the response time to requests was
reduced, and the quality of photographic reproductions was improved.
Research and testing of SO-015 black-and-white direct duplicate film continues
and a senior photographer will be sent to the National Archives in Washington to
acquire additional information about its keeping quality. The division has also been
consulting with the Northeast Document Conservation Centre where the direct duplicate film is also being tested.
Preservation — During the year, the section assisted Optical Disc Advisory Services by
processing 50 test negatives for verification of the computer enhancement program.
Among items produced in this section during the year were 500 replacement
negatives of the Montreal Gazette collection, 150 negatives from the Glen Gould
collection, and replacement negatives for the nitrate negatives in the Castonguay
collection.
Black-and-White — Photographic items produced or treated in the section included
250 slides of the Mackenzie King Estate; watercolours by Wilbraham; reproductions of
prints of former prime ministers for Laurier House; negatives of deteriorating sheet
music for the Music Division (National Library) and of paper seals for the Manuscript
Division; and special sepia toning of the Topley collection. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
A photographer exposes a 4 x 5 inch transparency of an oil painting.
Colour — Items produced in the section included slide duplicates of negatives from
the former Prime Minister Trudeau collection; transparencies of oil paintings of the
Jesuit College and Church of Notre Dame de la Victoire by D. Serres; lithographs of
tall ships from the Coverdale collection; and the Constitution Proclamation 1982.
TABLE XXII
Photography Services Statistics
Negatives   12,413
Photographs  44,825
Photostats  2,086
105 mm Maps    1,920
Colour Items   8,622
Photographic Assignments    125
CGPC Transactions     158
Computer Systems Division
The Computer Systems Division is responsible for providing expertise for the
coordination, development, implementation and maintenance of EDP applications
within the Public Archives.
A description of the projects that the division was involved with during the year
follows. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Henry Pasko (centre), director of the Computer Systems Division, advises
the departmental EDP Committee on application portfolios of EDP systems
in the Public Archives. (ARC/2536/A3)
PERSFILE System — Although two new data bases, Medical Library and X-rays,
were created and a demonstration package was developed for use during Archives
Week, the primary focus of the year was consolidation and enhancement. The 36
projects completed included feasibility studies, position papers, systems and programing work.
Federal Records Centres Tape Library System — A newly-installed version of the
DBMS software presented both opportunities and problems. The data base was redesigned and most of the programs in the system were modified. The 44 projects
completed this year were primarily related to system design, programing and
documentation.
MINISIS Assistance — Due to the limited number of staff, a decision was made during
the year to provide full support to specific MINISIS applications rather than provide a
minimum level of support to all MINISIS users. As a result, the Record Services and
Picture Division applications are currently receiving support. Of the 48 projects completed this year, most related to the supported applications.
PhotoSched System — The black-and-white print scheduling and print numbering
system was implemented in May. The system is currently being redesigned to include
the scheduling of colour print work.
Data Flow Diagrammer — Two summer students were employed to work with
divisional staff on the development of a system for designing and printing Gane and
Sarson Data Flow Diagrams. The system is currently operational on one of the two
Tandy 2000 microcomputers purchased this year. Work is expected to continue this
summer to enhance the system to drive the production of a Data Dictionary.
Microcomputer Support — During the year, demand for support in the area of microcomputer applications grew dramatically. Several managers were given assistance in
assessing the feasibility of using microcomputers to support their program objectives. Departmental Administration
Departmental Administration is responsible for providing general administrative,
financial and personnel services jointly to the Public Archives and the National Library. It is also responsible for the provision of records services uniquely to the Public
Archives.
The budget of Departmental Administration was $7,537,000 for 1984-1985 and
the person-year strength was 138. Activities occurring during the year were highlighted by the findings of the branch Functional Review. This exercise was conducted
to review all functions being performed in the branch and to recommend services that
might be performed by alternative means, discontinued or reduced whereby related
resources may be reallocated to maximize the use of human resources.
The impact of the recommendations of the study affected all divisions of the
branch. In total, 202 actions were required or alternative solutions were reviewed and
decisions made as a result.
Person-years were allocated from the branch Administration Office to Personnel
Services and Financial Services. Personnel authorities were decentralized to the divisional director level. A major reorganization was effected in Personnel Services. In
Financial Services, the Financial Development Program was discontinued and the
Financial System and Training Unit was disbanded. In the Administrative Services
area, independent reviews of the records and mail management functions were initiated and are expected to be completed in the early part of 1985.
Branch Administration Office — The branch Administrative Office provided general
administrative services within Departmental Administration and the Office of the
Dominion Archivist. During the year, the office administered the Public Archives/
National Library Manuals and Directives Program, the Suggestion Award Program
and coordinated the Eastern Children's Hospital Campaign in the Public Archives.
Financial Services
Services provided to the Public Archives and National Library by Financial Services included financial planning and analysis, financial systems development, and
accounting operations.
During the year, a reorganization was effected within the division in order to
increase the emphasis in the area of automation, and to improve the quality of the
service delivered. As a result, the systems development responsibilities were added to
those of the chief, Accounting Operations. Several officers were reassigned or seconded to other duties.
Following the successful operation of the Financial Allotment Control System
(FACS) during 1983-1984, a strategy of moving away from the service bureau facility
towards an in-house operation was initiated. By the end of 1984-1985, the testing of
the "FACS micro version" had been in process for several weeks.
The internal copies of the 1985-1986 Main Estimates were also revised to reflect
the imposed reduction to the operating base and removal of the inflation factor from
operating costs. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
Personnel Services
Personnel Services underwent a major reorganization during 1984-1985 with the
primary objective being the improvement of service to its clients. In order to better
achieve its objectives, functions of a similar nature were regrouped and two new
Personnel Service units responsible for the classification, staffing and language identification of positions were established. One Personnel Service unit serves the'Public
Archives while the other serves the National Library. Through a "one-stop-shopping"
system now in place in these service units, any Personnel Action Request received is
assigned a personnel officer who is responsible for all aspects of the request.
Human Resources, on behalf of the Public Archives and National Library, completed the Affirmative Action implementation reports and plans in response to the
federal government's affirmative action initiative. The Performance Review and Employee Appraisal System was reviewed and a new Employee Orientation Program was
developed and implemented. Personnel Services undertook the implementation of the
first Multi-Year Human Resource Plan (MYHRP) for the Public Archives for the
years 1986-1989.
The advisory services of the department's Employee Assistance Program were
contracted out to Health and Welfare Canada, while Personnel Services retained the
program's coordination function. This decision followed a thorough study of the program and consultation with the bargaining agents.
The department's request for the delegation of the Second Language Evaluation
test was approved by the Public Service Commission. This results in a more timely
testing service and a corresponding reduction in the time required to staff positions.
Public Archives Employee Statistics, 1984-1985
Type
Anglophones    478 (62%)
Francophones  293 (38%)
Total  771
Women    325 (42.1%)
Men   446 (57.9%)
Handicapped    17
Indigenous  	
New Employees (Indeterminate)    46
New Employees (Term)    100	
Administrative Services
Administrative Services provides assistance in the fields of Property Management, Telecommunications, Security and Emergency Measures, Records and Mail
Management, and Materiel and Forms Management, plus is responsible for Fabrication Services.
The Functional Review played a key part in the planning and reorganizational
roles of the division. The Exhibition Production Workshop was reassigned to the
assistant to the director. A full-time architect was hired to assist in the property
building and planning programs. The responsibility for staff clearances (on leaving the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT T
department) has been transferred to Personnel Services and several other similar tasks
are being considered for reassignment. This division also coordinated the successful
United Way Campaign on behalf of the two departments.
Property Management — Accommodation planning continued to be the focal point
due to the acute shortage of acceptable office, operational and repository space for
personnel and growing collections. Planning for a satellite building remained a high
priority.
Two new records centres were officially opened — Halifax with a gross area of
9,132 square metres and Vancouver with a gross area of 9,932 square metres.
Some 441 projects involving outside contractors and Public Works were coordinated and supervised, and another 882 projects were handled internally.
Major studies were conducted for air circulation at Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
and as a resuit a Public Works' Design Group was hired to improve configurations
contributing to air circulation problems.
The Energy Conservation Program continues in the area of paper recovery where
considerable monetary gains are realized. Investigations of health and safety problems
continue and a number of problems have been resolved.
Pursuant to a study by the Government Telecommunications Agency, the National Personnel Records Centre converted its Telex operations to the Government
Data Network in order to take advantage of economical rates provided by the government shared services.
The reconfiguration of the department's telephone systems to the new government Enhanced Exchange Wide Dial (EEWD) telephone system began in September
1984. By the end of the 1984-1985 fiscal year, approximately 30 per cent of the Public
Archives telephones will have been converted over to EEWD with the remaining 70
per cent scheduled for completion by the end of 1985.
Security Services — Changing requirements and criteria dictated by the department's
collections and customers made it essential to upgrade the standard level of security
within the Federal Records Centre and the regional centres. For example, alarm
systems were upgraded to be more economically efficient and to meet increased
standards for EDP Tape Storage Vaults.
The security and safety systems for the main building were approved by the
Dominion Fire Commissioners Office and work has begun on the physical security
safeguards prior to the installation of the monitoring system.
Materiel and Forms Management — This area continues to respond to the heavy
volume of requisitions for goods and services.
A new method of gathering statistics has been devised and will be used to report
more meaningful statistics to allow managers to more readily observe trends towards
seasonal spending and procurement from the trade rather than Supply and Services
Canada.
The renewal of the convenience photocopier contracts resulted in substantial
savings and the upgrading of several machines throughout the two departments. The
Distribution Accounts System produced its first official printout — all Distribution
Account contacts are in the process of verifying the information for accuracy.
Records and Mail Management — During this fiscal year, the Records Services User's
Guide and the Mail and Messenger Operations manuals were printed and distributed.
The Automated Records Management System is now operational — some 55,000
records have been entered onto the system; the functions of classification, chargeout,
brought forward and recording of correspondence are being performed within the PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1984-1985
system; and file labels and file recall forms are being produced automatically using
slave printers.
Holdings increased from 305 to 488 metres during this fiscal year. The records and
mail management program was audited by the Records Management Branch and the
Audit Services Bureau — recommendations will be implemented during the next two
years. Two internal studies are being carried out, one to assist in creating a file by file
inventory of records not presently controlled by the program and to determine the
person-years required to control all departmental records, and the other, a mail messenger study to look at the possibility of contracting out more services.
Fabrication Services — As of April 1, 1984, Fabrication Services reported to the
assistant to the director. Four major exhibitions were produced during this fiscal year,
two for the National Library and two for the Public Archives.  Rapport annuel 1984-1985
I*
Archives publiques     Public Archives
Canada Canada
■îli
Canada'  Rapport annuel 1984-1985
I*
Archives publiques     Public Archives
Canada Canada  Table des matières
Vérification interne
9
Secrétariat exécutif
10
Planification et Évaluation des programmes
11
Services d'expositions
12
Division des publications
15
Direction de la gestion des documents
17
Division de la gestion des documents et de la micrographie
18
Division des centres fédéraux de documents
21
Centre national des documents du personnel
25
Services centraux du microfilm
29
Direction des archives
31
Division des manuscrits
33
Bureau de Londres
52
Bureau de Paris
52
Division des archives fédérales
53
Collection nationale de cartes et plans
65
Division de l'iconographie
73
Collection nationale de photographies
81
Bibliothèque des archives publiques
87
Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement
sonore
90
Division des archives ordinolingues
97
Direction de la conservation et des services techniques
105
Systèmes de disques optiques
106
Division de la restauration des peintures et estampes
106
Division de la conservation des documents
109
Division des services de photographie
110
Division des systèmes informatiques
111 Administration des départements
113
Services financiers
113
Services du personnel
114
Services administratifs
114 Introduction
Un des événements les plus prometteurs de l'année pour le développement futur
des archives canadiennes fut la ratification, par les ministres provinciaux de la culture et
par le ministre fédéral des Communications, des grandes lignes d'un système canadien
d'archives qui devrait donner un solide élan à la coopération et à la coordination entre
les institutions d'archives aux différents niveaux de gouvernement. Cet accord signifie
leur volonté de coopération, leur désir d'un développement harmonieux des programmes destinés à répondre aux besoins qui ont été ou seront identifiés.
Pour les Archives publiques l'événement marquant fut le départ, en octobre, de
l'archiviste fédéral, M. Wilfred I. Smith, qui prenait sa retraite après avoir occupé le
poste pendant seize ans. Il était le cinquième archiviste fédéral depuis la création des
Archives canadiennes en 1872.
Un domaine d'activités qui a absorbé beaucoup plus d'énergie qu'à l'ordinaire fut
celui des relations publiques : publications, expositions itinérantes, semaines des archives et journées d'accueil se sont conjuguées pour constituer une année toute spéciale
pour la diffusion d'information touchant les services des Archives publiques et leurs
collections.
Le Conseil international des archives a manifesté la haute estime dont jouissent les
Archives publiques et notre pays quand il a accepté l'invitation du Canada à tenir son
congrès quadriennal au Canada en 1992. Le congrès sera préparé en étroite collaboration avec les Archives nationales du Québec, et aura lieu à Montréal. Ce sera l'occasion
d'un effort collectif considérable de la part des archivistes canadiens qui voudront
montrer à leurs collègues du monde entier des archives dynamiques, à la pointe de la
technologie, et qui travaillent en étroite collaboration entre elles et avec la société
qu'elles servent.
Comme on pourra le voir par les rapports des différents secteurs, les Archives
continuent à jouer un rôle de première importance dans la gestion des documents des
institutions fédérales, et elles s'acquittent avec persévérance de leur mandat dans
l'acquisition, la préservation et la mise à la disposition des chercheurs et du public d'une
riche documentation originale venant du secteur public et du secteur privé. Nous nous
contenterons ici de relever un certain nombre de points d'un intérêt particulier.
1) Locaux — Depuis plusieurs années les Archives réclament un nouvel édifice pour y
regrouper personnel et collections de documents dans les meilleures conditions. L'espace réservé aux Archives dans l'édifice présentement partagé avec la Bibliothèque
nationale ne^satisfait qu'un tiers des besoins. Une partie importante des collections et
du personnel des archives historiques est logée ailleurs, le plus souvent dans des locaux
qui n'offrent pas les conditions désirables de sécurité et de conservation.
La question entre cette année dans un nouveau cycle. Le ministre des Travaux
publics avait annoncé, au début de 1984, la construction d'un édifice satellite, à Gati-
neau, pour loger les divisions d'archives visuelles et sonores et certains services techniques et administratifs. Cette construction aurait répondu aux besoins les plus
pressants, mais aurait effectué, et pour longtemps, une division importante des collections et du personnel, au détriment du service au public et aux chercheurs et de
l'efficacité de l'administration des archives. La Société historique du Canada et plusieurs groupes et individus avaient protesté contre cette division des archives. Le
nouveau gouvernement a décidé de surseoir à cette construction et d'envisager plutôt
une solution à long terme qui verrait au regroupement des collections, du personnel et
des services publics. Des solutions sont aussi à l'étude pour satisfaire les besoins
immédiats, causés par des locaux temporaires qui se sont avérés tout à fait inadéquats
pour préserver le patrimoine documentaire du Canada. APPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1!
2) Gestion des documents — La Division de la gestion des documents et de la micrographie a été réorganisée pour mieux répondre aux attentes de l'administration pour
une meilleure gestion et un meilleur contrôle de l'information, et pour l'application des
politiques et directives du Conseil du Trésor telles qu'énoncées dans les chapitres 460 et
445 de son Manuel de la politique administrative, émises en mars 1983.
Le Comité consultatif des documents, regroupant des représentants des ministères, des associations concernées par les documents administratifs, de la Société
historique du Canada et de l'Association de science politique du Canada, a été revitalisé
et s'est donné des objectifs ambitieux. Plusieurs de ses membres ont participé à la
préparation du document : Lignes directrices sur la gestion automatisée des documents
(1985) qui a été distribué à tous les sous-chefs et à leurs institutions, pour les aider dans
l'informatisation de leurs activités de gestion des dossiers.
3) Accès à l'information — La politique de l'accès à l'information a des retombées
importantes pour les Archives. Pour répondre aux demandes des chercheurs, du personnel supplémentaire a été alloué à la révision des dossiers reçus des divers ministères
sur lesquels pesaient des restrictions imposées par les organismes créateurs au moment
de leur versement aux Archives.
Ces dossiers ont commencé à faire l'objet d'une étude détaillée à la lumière de la
loi, et on espère que beaucoup de ces restrictions seront levées. Les chercheurs devront
cependant se rappeler que la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels doit
être invoquée pour une forte proportion des archives gouvernementales. Pour éclairer
les chercheurs et les informer de l'application de la loi à l'égard des documents historiques, les Archives ont publié une brochure à leur intention : Lignes de conduite pour
la communication de renseignements personnels aux fins de recherches historiques aux
Archives publiques du Canada (1985).
4) Archives ordinolingues — Deux projets de la Division des archives ordinolingues
sont de nature à plaire à plusieurs. Pour les spécialistes, qui en ont fait la demande, les
Archives, avec la coopération du ministère des Communications, sont à préparer un
catalogue collectif des fichiers de données ordinolingues. L'autre projet est dédié en
premier lieu aux généalogistes : il s'agit de la création d'une banque de données à partir
du recensement de l'Ontario de 1871. Plus de 400 membres de l'Ontario Genealogical
Society ont contribué leur temps à ce projet conjoint des Archives et de la Société. Les
deux tiers du travail ont été faits; on espère terminer le projet en décembre 1985.
5) Journées d'accueil—Suivant en cela les avis de la communauté archivistique internationale, à tous les cinq ans, les Archives publiques participent activement aux « semaines internationales des archives ». Cette fois, les célébrations ont eu lieu du 13 au 31
octobre 1984 : elles ont eu une ampleur exceptionnelle. Pour les journées d'accueil,
tenues les 13 et 14 octobre, on avait tenté de décrire et d'expliquer le travail des Archives
et de ses divers services par des photos, des démonstrations et des expositions de
documents. Un immense ballon accueillait les visiteurs à l'entrée des Archives —
symbole du thème : « Un voyage dans le temps ».
Pas moins de 11 stands envahissaient tout le rez-de-chaussée de l'édifice pour
révéler les fonctions des Archives touchant les relations publiques; la maison Laurier;
les expositions et les publications; les documents historiques traditionnels, audiovisuels et ordinolingues; les services techniques : reprographie, informatique, disque
optique, conservation des peintures, des estampes, des manuscrits et des médailles (on
pouvait également visiter les laboratoires); et la gestion des documents avec ses quatre
services majeurs : experts en gestion, dépôts intermédiaires, dépôts de documents du
personnel et services centraux du microfilm. Une exposition spéciale de tableaux,
intitulée Le passé en peinture, regroupait quelques-unes des plus belles pièces de nos
collections. Soixante-dix-neuf employés étaient sur place pour diriger les visiteurs et
leur donner des explications à chacun des éléments d'exposition. Plus de 6 000 visiteurs
furent reçus, la moitié durant les deux jours d'accueil, les autres dans les jours qui
suivirent. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1984-1985
Affiche publiée à l'occasion de la Semaine internationale
des archives. (C 121717)
Visiteurs lors des journées d'accueil des Archives, les 13-14 octobre RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1!
6) Publications — Nous avons publié quatre titres de la Collection de guides généraux,
inaugurée l'an dernier. On y trouve, sous une forme commode, pour chacune des huit
divisions historiques des Archives publiques, le mandat, l'organisation, les fonctions,
les services et aussi une vue d'ensemble des archives conservées. Les parutions de cette
année émanent des divisions responsables des archives ordinolingues, des peintures,
gravures et dessins, des photographies et des manuscrits autres que ceux du gouvernement fédéral. Grâce à ces petits volumes, le chercheur ou la personne intéressée peut,
très rapidement, avoir une bonne idée des documents et des facilités qui lui sont offerts.
Cette collection sera terminée sous peu avec la parution du guide sur les cartes géographiques. Également pour les chercheurs, il faut signaler la seconde édition du catalogue
collectif des photographies, Guide des archives photographiques canadiennes. Ce fort
volume de 727 pages, publié à partir de renseignements informatisés, décrit succinctement 8 631 fonds et collections préservés dans 139 dépôts, et comptant plusieurs
millions de photographies, épreuves ou clichés.
Une œuvre importante pour la connaissance de l'iconographie du 19e siècle a été
officiellement lancée. Il s'agit du catalogue des peintures, aquarelles et dessins de la
collection W.H. Coverdale (ou collection du Manoir Richelieu). Dans ce volume, les
500 œuvres décrites sont l'œuvre d'une centaine d'artistes dont on a retracé la carrière;
elles sont toutes reproduites en noir et blanc. Avec les introductions et notes, c'est donc
un sérieux instrument de travail qu'historien, historien de l'art et amateur de Canadiana
se voient remettre entre les mains.
Un autre ouvrage susceptible d'intéresser le public s'intitule Le cœur au métier
(1985). Il traite d'un siècle de photographie amateur, de 1839 à 1940. Il comporte près de
200 reproductions et une soixantaine de biographies de photographes.
7) Expositions — Notre grande exposition itinérante Rêves d'empire, Le Canada avant
1700 a connu le succès que nous en attendions. Depuis juin 1982, elle a été vue par plus
de 140 000 personnes dans 21 villes du Canada. Dans sa tournée européenne, comportant une douzaine de villes de France, de Suisse et d'Italie, elle a attiré plus de 14 000
visiteurs. Une nouvelle exposition itinérante, pour la période 1700-1760, intitulée
« L'enracinement » doit commencer son périple en décembre 1985, à Ottawa.
8) Réunion fédérale-provinciale et séminaire — Le 15 octobre fut tenue une réunion
extraordinaire, présidée par l'archiviste fédéral, des directeurs des archives provinciales
et territoriales : on y planifia le développement d'un système national d'archives sur une
base de collaboration volontaire. Cette réunion fut suivie, du 16 au 20 octobre, par un
séminaire sur la conservation des documents sur papier. En plus de la transmission
d'information technique, on y discuta de politiques et de planification.
9) Système canadien d'archives — Les lignes directrices pour le système canadien
d'archives sont le résultat de plus de dix ans de discussion entre les archivistes fédéraux
et provinciaux, les autres archivistes et leurs associations. Le rapport Symons sur les
études canadiennes (1975) avait mis de l'avant la question du rôle des archives. Le
rapport de 1980 du groupe consultatif sur les archives canadiennes réuni par le Conseil
des arts décrivait la situation qui régnait alors et faisait de nombreuses propositions. Un
groupe des principaux responsables des archives canadiennes se réunissait à Kingston
en 1982 pour proposer objectifs, stratégies et structures. Un comité d'archivistes
fédéraux et provinciaux préparait, clarifiait et raffinait ces données pour arriver, en août
1984, à un document qui a été accepté par les autorités provinciales. Les institutions
fédérales concernées se sont également montrées favorables. En mars 1985, le ministre
fédéral des Communications y apportait sa sanction.
Ce système confédératif prévoit des obligations minimales pour chaque institution
d'archives, le regroupement des archives en des conseils provinciaux et un conseil
canadien qui en sera issu, sous la présidence de l'archiviste fédéral. Les provinces
assument la responsabilité d'assister les archives de leur territoire en tenant compte des
avis du conseil provincial, tandis que la responsabilité du fédéral sera d'aider les RAPPORT DES ARCH
archives de tout le pays et en particulier les conseils provinciaux, après consultation du
conseil canadien des archives.
10) Scène internationale — Les archivistes des Archives publiques sont très actifs sur la
scène internationale par leur participation à des sociétés telles le Conseil international
des archives; dans cette société, ils sont membres de la Commission pour le développement des archives, et des comités de la micrographie, de l'informatique, des archives
audio-visuelles, de la littérature et des arts, et de liaison avec 1TRMC (Conseil international sur la gestion des documents).
L'UNESCO a fait appel à l'expertise de notre personnel pour trois de la trentaine
d'études qu'elle a publiées dans le cadre de son programme sur les archives. Sam Kula,
Klaus Hendriks et Harold Naugler ont couvert des domaines où nous jouissons d'une
solide réputation : les archives audio-visuelles, la restauration des photographies et les
archives ordinolingues.
11) Visiteurs étrangers — Comme par le passé, nous avons reçu plusieurs visiteurs
étrangers, directeurs ou cadres supérieurs d'archives. Cette année, ils venaient de
quinze pays : Algérie, Allemagne de l'Ouest, Australie, Birmanie, Brésil, Ecosse,
États-Unis, France, Namibie, Pays-Bas, Royaume-Uni, Sénégal, Sri Lanka, Thaïlande
et Tunisie. Les relations ont été particulièrement fréquentes avec nos collègues des
États-Unis et d'Australie sur les politiques administratives et les programmes.
Quelques archivistes étrangers ont fait des séjours plus prolongés comme Gérard
Naud des Archives de France et José Maria Jardim du Brésil qui ont voulu observer
notre système de gestion des documents et l'organisation de nos archives ordinolingues,
tandis que les Birmans Maung Thaike et Mya Aung faisaient des stages, l'un d'un mois
en microfilmage, l'autre de trois mois en gestion des documents.
Retraite de M. Wilfred I. Smith — Le 15 octobre, une cérémonie empreinte d'un certain
regret, pour la retraite de l'archiviste fédéral, M. Wilfred I. Smith, fut l'occasion de
plusieurs témoignages de respect, d'estime et d'affection.
M. Wilfred I. Smith (à droite) M. Wilfred I. Smith (;
:t les membres du Comité de la haul
publiques. (C 122308)
La séance fut présidée par le doyen des cadres, Georges Delisle. En tant qu'archiviste fédéral adjoint, j'ai prononcé le discours de circonstance, en rappelant d'abord
que les associations des archivistes, des gestionnaires de documents et des experts en
micrographie avaient déjà rendu hommage à M. Smith; en soulignant ensuite la qualité
des services rendus par M. Smith au cours des trente-quatre ans passés aux Archives,
dont seize ans comme leur directeur; et en décrivant en parallèle les développements
des Archives publiques au cours des trois dernières décennies, marqués par le progrès
considérable du secteur des archives récentes du gouvernement, l'entrée en masse des
documents audio-visuels et ordinolingues et l'introduction de nouvelles technologies.
J'ai aussi souligné la philosophie des « archives totales » dont M. Smith se fit le
propagandiste et qui se matérialisa particulièrement par une acquisition plus systématique dans le secteur privé auprès des individus et des institutions, et dans le domaine de
la diffusion pour le public par des expositions et des publications, traditionnelles ou sur
microfilms, microfiches ou diapositives.
J'ai également noté l'institution par M. Smith de la réunion annuelle des directeurs
des archives provinciales avec l'archiviste fédéral, sa participation active et son appui
aux associations d'archivistes, et ses mandats comme président de la Society of American Archivists, secrétaire général du Conseil international des archives, et secrétaire de
la Commission consultative de l'UNESCO sur l'information.
L'opinion de plusieurs personnes qui ont bien connu M. Smith fut ensuite citée
pour vanter sa compétence, ses qualités personnelles et sa dévotion à son travail.
Puis chacun des directeurs généraux des Archives lui rendit hommage au nom de
son secteur et lui remit un souvenir approprié. La Société historique du Canada, par sa
présidente Susan Mann Trofimenkoff, le remercia des services rendus à la recherche,
tandis que le doyen des participants aux conférences des archivistes fédéral, provinciaux
et territoriaux, John Bovey de Colombie-Britannique, rappela les conférences que
M. Smith avait présidées avec autorité.
Le 1er novembre, le ministre des Communications, Marcel Masse, offrait un
déjeuner en l'honneur de M. Smith; il le remerciait pour sa contribution à la préservation et à la promotion du patrimoine canadien, ainsi qu'à l'avancement de l'archivis-
tique au Canada et à l'étranger. L'intérim fut assuré par l'archiviste fédéral adjoint. Le 22 février 1985, le ministre
des Communications annonçait la nomination, comme archiviste fédéral, de Jean-
Pierre Wallot, historien et vice-recteur aux études à l'université de Montréal, qui devait
occuper son nouveau poste au début de juin.
Remerciements—En mon nom et en celui de M. Smith, je désirerais remercier tous les
donateurs de documents, qui sont des collaborateurs de choix de notre mission. Merci
aux membres des conseils consultatifs et des comités ainsi qu'aux administrateurs des
autres ministères qui partagent nos préoccupations. Enfin je désirerais exprimer ma
gratitude aux employés des Archives publiques pour leur esprit d'initiative, pour leur
dévouement, et pour leur franche collaboration dont j'ai particulièrement bénéficié au
cours des cinq derniers mois où j'ai agi, temporairement, comme archiviste fédéral.
ernard Weilbrenner,
rchiviste fédéral par intérim  Vérification interne
Ce service a pour mandat d'assurer de façon autonome et systématique 1'
l'évaluation de la structure des contrôles (y compris les méthodes et les contrôles de
gestion) qu'utilisent les Archives publiques du Canada et la Bibliothèque nationale du
Canada. Il détermine dans quelle mesure les opérations sont conformes à la structure
des contrôles, et il en évalue l'efficacité et la rentabilité. Le service identifie les secteurs
où des améliorations devraient être apportées, formule des recommandations sur la
façon de les mettre en œuvre et en fait directement rapport à l'archiviste fédéral, au
directeur général de la Bibliothèque nationale et à leurs administrations respectives.
Au cours de l'année financière 1984-1985,19 vérifications ont été entreprises aux
Archives publiques et à la Bibliothèque nationale, de même que 6 vérifications des
services communs aux deux départements.
Les plans de vérification à long terme pour la période 1985-1990 ont été soumis aux
deux sous-ministres pour fins d'approbation. Secrétariat exécutif
Le Secrétariat exécutif est chargé des rapports avec les organismes centraux, les
autres établissements culturels fédéraux, les gouvernements provinciaux, les organismes privés et les médias. Il élabore des énoncés de principe relatifs aux archives et
coordonne l'application delà Loi sur l'accès à l'information. Le directeur du Secrétariat
relève de l'archiviste fédéral et siège au Comité de la haute direction.
Le Secrétariat exécutif a participé aux activités du groupe de travail chargé d'appuyer les délibérations du Comité du patrimoine qui est formé des sous-ministres des
organismes fédéraux responsables des ressources historiques. Depuis janvier 1985, le
Secrétariat représente le département aux réunions fédérales-provinciales sur le Système canadien d'archives. Le système a été approuvé en principe, et on est à élaborer
des plans de mise en œuvre en fonction des consultations effectuées. Durant le quatrième trimestre de 1984-1985, le Secrétariat a eu le feu vert pour entreprendre les
derniers travaux en vue de la nouvelle loi sur les archives, et il a préparé la documentation qui servira lors des discussions à cet égard avec les autres établissements fédéraux.
La section du rapport consacrée à la Division des archives fédérales comporte un
compte rendu détaillé de l'application des lois sur l'accès à l'information et sur la
protection des renseignements personnels.
Bureau des relations publiques — Cette année, le Bureau des relations publiques a
diffusé 13 communiqués, organisé 86 interviews et 6 réceptions, et fait imprimer
3 affiches et 6 cartes postales.
Beaucoup de temps et d'efforts ont été consacrés à la planification et à l'organisation des journées d'accueil des 13 et 14 octobre. Quelque 6 700 personnes ont participé
au Voyage dans le temps. Le Bureau des relations publiques a coordonné le projet et
produit tout le matériel publicitaire.
L'acquisition de la collection de Crawley Film et la diffusion des témoignages
entendus par la Commission royale Kellock-Taschereau ont attiré beaucoup de journalistes de la presse écrite et parlée.
Le Bureau des relations publiques a en outre organisé 73 visites guidées pour
1 148 Canadiens et étrangers. Il a aussi contacté beaucoup de magazines canadiens sur
le patrimoine et la photographie pour faire connaître les collections des Archives.
Enfin, il a produit des annonces et des prospectus pour promouvoir les activités,
publications, services et installations des Archives publiques. Planification et Évaluation
des programmes
Cette division coordonne les opérations départementales de planification pour le
compte des Archives publiques, assure de façon périodique et indépendante l'examen
et l'évaluation des programmes départementaux pour le compte de l'archiviste fédéral
et du directeur général de la Bibliothèque nationale, met sur pied des systèmes de
mesure du rendement et en contrôle l'application aux Archives et à la Bibliothèque. La
Planification et l'Évaluation des programmes œuvre sous la direction générale de
l'archiviste fédéral, et son directeur est membre du Comité de la haute direction.
Au cours de l'exercice, les activités de planification ont englobé la coordination de
la session de planification stratégique de la haute direction et la préparation du document connexe, Orientations stratégiques des Archives publiques du Canada, 1984-1989;
la participation aux sessions de planification des directions; la coordination de la
rédaction du texte du plan de dépenses (3e partie du budget des dépenses) et du texte du
plan opérationnel pluriannuel du département; la participation à la préparation d'un
rapport sur les locaux du département; la participation, de concert avec l'Évaluation des
programmes, à une équipe de travail de Statistique Canada chargée de préparer le
Supplément sur les archives de l'Enquête sur les établissements du patrimoine; la
participation à des travaux de comités; et l'établissement de contacts suivis avec des
représentants d'organismes centraux.
Le Bureau de l'évaluation des programmes a dirigé plusieurs évaluations aux
Archives publiques et à la Bibliothèque nationale. À la demande du Cabinet, une
évaluation des activités de mise sur pied du réseau de la Bibliothèque nationale a été
entamée par la délimitation des domaines d'étude possibles. Deux études d'évaluation
des Archives publiques ont pris fin au cours de l'année. L'évaluation de la composante
conservation a porté sur des critères de gestion, de planification et de prise de décision.
Les constatations ont été faites à partir d'interviews, tant au sein de l'organisme qu'à
l'extérieur, et après examen d'organismes comparables. L'évaluation des programmes
de soutien aux chercheurs, de relations publiques et de soutien à la communauté
archivistique a nécessité le recours à 15 méthodes de recherche distinctes, dont une
enquête systématique auprès des chercheurs inscrits et un sondage auprès de visiteurs
dans plusieurs expositions itinérantes. Les observations de cette évaluation ont porté
principalement sur des questions comme le bien-fondé de certaines activités de soutien
aux chercheurs, les répercussions des services au public et les méthodes de remplacement pour la prestation des programmes.
Des travaux sur la mesure du rendement ont été entrepris dans les deux départements. À la Direction de la conservation et des services techniques des Archives
publiques, le système de mesure du rendement a été mis en place aux divisions des
Services de photographie, des Systèmes informatiques, de la Conservation des documents et de la Restauration des peintures et estampes. Dans les autres secteurs des
Archives publiques, les travaux de mesure du rendement ont consisté à fournir des
conseils et un soutien techniques aux Services financiers, à la Vérification interne, à la
Direction de la gestion des documents et à la Direction des archives. À la Bibliothèque
nationale, la division a élaboré des lignes directrices départementales concernant la
mesure du rendement, qui ont été approuvées par le Comité exécutif. La Direction du
catalogage a continué la collecte de données à titre d'essai; et la Direction du développement des collections a entrepris elle aussi la collecte de données à titre d'essai. Quant
à la Direction des services au public, on y a poursuivi les travaux en vue de l'automatisation du système en 1984-1985. Le Centre des systèmes de bibliothèque a mis sur pied un
système entièrement automatisé. Enfin, le Comité des coordinateurs de la mesure du
rendement à la Bibliothèque nationale s'est encore réuni au cours de l'année. Services d'expositions
La division s'occupe des expositions, de l'audio-visuel et de la réservation de
l'auditorium et des salles de réunion pour le compte des Archives publiques et de la
Bibliothèque nationale. Elle est aussi chargée par les Archives publiques des expositions itinérantes et de la gestion de la maison Laurier.
Le foyer de l'auditorium a accueilli durant l'année 10 expositions parrainées par la
Bibliothèque nationale et des organismes sans but lucratif.
Expositions itinérantes— Quatre expositions majeures (Rêves d'empire, Vers des horizons nouveaux, Ken Bell et Le cœur au métier) ont fait une tournée canadienne, ce qui
s'est traduit par la visite de 14 localités. Rêves d'empire, qui a complété sa tournée
canadienne de deux ans et demi, a accueilli 141 000 visiteurs dans 20 localités.
Rêves d'empire a aussi poursuivi sa tournée française et suisse par la visite de 6
localités.
Six expositions mineures ont été présentées dans 10 localités, de Halifax (N.-É.) à
Fort Smith (T.N.-O.).
Les expositions ont accueilli cette année 48 475 visiteurs (41 161 au Canada et
7 314 en Europe).
Un voyage dans le temps. Archives publiques — Journées d'accueil durant la Semaine
internationale des archives, 13-14 octobre 1985. (C 123227) ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1!
Conception et préparation des expositions — La préparation des expositions pour les
journées d'accueil du 13 et 14 octobre, organisées pour la Semaine internationale des
archives, sur le thème Un voyage dans le temps, a constitué la plus importante entreprise
de l'année. Irois aires d'exposition et le hall d'entrée principal ont été consacrés aux
collections et services des Archives publiques.
Dix expositions mineures ont été préparées, notamment Selon les règles du métier,
Aperçu : En piste et /. Austin Floyd.
En 1984-1985,291 articles ont été garnis d'un passe-partout, 568 ont été encadrés,
462 ont été désencadrés, 1 569 ont été montés à sec et 1 430 ont été pourvus d'un
renforcement lamellaire.
Maison Laurier — Des ateliers sur Mackenzie King et son époque, le programme
annuel de Noël et la tenue d'une journée d'accueil à l'occasion de la Journée internationale des musées ont constitué le programme éducatif de l'année dernière.
George Rosengarten de Montréal a fait don d'une tabatière émaillée en or, offerte
à sir Wilfrid Laurier par le duc et la duchesse de Cornwall et de York au cours de leur
tournée du Canada, en 1901.
Une nouvelle couverture en ardoise, identique à la première, a été installée sur la
maison.
Pendant l'année, on a traité 110 documents et 27 objets, répondu à 405 demandes
de renseignements et reçu 23 500 visiteurs; en outre, 36 bénévoles ont travaillé au
programme.
L'Apex Jazz Band à la maison Laurier — Journée d'accueil, Joi
13 mai 1984. (C 121576) VES PUBLIQUES 1!
Services audio-visuels — Les statistiques du tableau I sont le résultat de l'utilisa
commune de l'auditorium et des salles de réunion par les Archives publique:
Bibliothèque nationale, d'autres ministères et des organismes sans but lucratif.
Pourcentage d'utilisation de l'auditorium et des
(248 jours ouvrables)
Auditorium
Salle 154
Salle 156
Matin
64%
58%
46%
58%
Après-r
Soir ..
nidi 	
39%
63%
50%
44%
Pendant l'année, la division a fourni des services pour 22 ci
jour, et 244 films ont été visionnés et projetés. Division des publications
Le directeur de la Division des publications relève de l'archiviste fédéral adjoint et
est membre du Comité des publications du département. La division est chargée de
produire et de diffuser, auprès des chercheurs et du grand public, les publications sur les
fonds et les services des Archives publiques.
Parmi les publications d'importance cette année, la plus prestigieuse est sans
contredit Le cœur au métier, qui fait suite à l'exposition du même nom. Luxueux volume
de 335 pages, abondamment illustré, il retrace l'histoire de la photographie amateur au
Canada de 1839 à 1940. Le Calendrier de cartes anciennes, pour 1985, est une autre
publication prestigieuse; il paraît pour la quatrième année consécutive.
Quatre nouveaux titres ont paru dans la Collection de guides généraux 1983, sur les
fonds et les services des différentes divisions de la Direction des archives, tandis qu'un
premier titre, PHOCUS, a paru dans une nouvelle série qui traitera de sujets spécialisés
reliés aux Archives et à l'archivistique. La division a également complété sa collection
de brochures d'information sur les différentes divisions et directions des Archives en
produisant 14 titres. Les trois périodiques des Archives ont continué de paraître
régulièrement.
En outre, la division a poursuivi la publication d'instruments de recherche et de
catalogues d'exposition, notamment le Guide des archives photographiques canadiennes, volumineux catalogue collectif des fonds d'archives photographiques au pays,
Le passé en peinture, qui accompagnait l'exposition de peintures historiques lors des
journées d'accueil des Archives en octobre 1984, et 3 dépliants de la série Aperçu.
Voici une liste des principales publications des Archives; elles sont gratuites, sauf
indication contraire.
COLLECTION DE GUIDES GÉNÉRAUX 1983
Collection nationale de photographies.   Ottawa, 1984, 51 pages
Division de l'iconographie.   Ottawa, 1984, 44 pages
Division des archives ordinolingues.   Ottawa, 1984, 37 pages
Division des manuscrits.   Ottawa, 1984, 53 pages
BROCHURES D'INFORMATION
Archives nationales du film, de la télévision et de l'enregistrement sonore.   Ottawa, 1984,
6 pages
Archives publiques du Canada.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Bibliothèque des Archives publiques.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Centre national des documents du personnel.   Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Collection nationale de photographies.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Direction de la conservation et des services techniques.   Ottawa, 1984,12 pages
Division de l'iconographie.   Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Division des archives ordinolingues.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Division des centres fédéraux de documents.   Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
Division des manuscrits.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Division des systèmes de la gestion des documents et de la micrographie.   Ottawa, 1984,
6 pages
Services centraux du microfilm.   Ottawa, 1984, 8 pages
La maison Laurier.   Ottawa, 1984, 7 pages RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1<
CATALOGUES D'EXPOSITION
Aperçu : En piste.   Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Aperçu : La valse des atours. Ottawa, 1984, 6 pages
Aperçu : Souvenirs du pays d'Évangéline.   Ottawa, 1985, 6 pages
Le cœur au métier : la photographie amateur au Canada de 1839 à 1940. Ottawa, 1985,
335 pages, 50 $
Le passé en peinture. Ottawa, 1984,100 pages
INSTRUMENTS DE RECHERCHE
Acquisitions 1983-1984 de la Division des archives fédérales.   Ottawa, 1984, 26 pages
Guide des archives photographiques canadiennes. Ottawa, 1984, 727 pages, 35 $
Guide des sources généalogiques au Canada.   Ottawa, 1984, 41 pages
PÉRIODIQUES
L'Archiviste.   6 numéros publiés, 20 pages environ chacun
Bulletin de la gestion des documents.   3 numéros publiés, 12 pages environ chacun
Bulletin des archives ordinolingues.   4 numéros publiés, 2 pages chacun
AUTRES
Calendrier de cartes anciennes 1985. Ottawa, 1984, 28 pages, 7,95 $
Fiafl983. Bibliographie des membres de la Fédération internationale des archives du
film. Ottawa, 1984, 46 pages
PHOCUS : Base de données bibliographiques pour la conservation des documents
photographiques. Ottawa, 1985, 28 pages
Distribution — Les publications ont été diffusées de la façon suivante : 795 vendues à
des particuliers ou à Approvisionnements et Services Canada; 55 725 gratuites, distribuées en réponse à des demandes; et 40 078 envoyées aux personnes inscrites sur les
listes d'envoi. Direction de la gestion
des documents
La Direction de la gestion des documents a pour mission de gérer de façon optimale
les documents du gouvernement fédéral. La direction remplit cette mission au sein des
institutions gouvernementales en leur fournissant des conseils, une formation et une
aide constamment mis à jour en matière de gestion des documents et de micrographie et
en procédant à une évaluation continue de l'efficacité de leurs programmes de gestion
des documents. La direction offre également un service d'entreposage pour les documents inactifs et essentiels aux bureaux régionaux des ministères et organismes fédéraux. Elle centralise la gestion des dossiers du personnel de tous les anciens
fonctionnaires civils et militaires. En outre, elle offre un service opérationnel de
micrographie contre remboursement des frais. Enfin, la direction assure un service de
secrétariat à l'Office des normes générales du Canada pour la définition des normes
micrographiques nationales.
BUREAU DES NORMES ET DU DÉVELOPPEMENT MICROGRAPHIQUES
(BNDM) — Normes — Les Archives publiques subventionnent l'élaboration de normes
micrographiques pour l'Office des normes générales du Canada (ONGC), dont le
secrétariat désigné est le BNDM. Sous la présidence du directeur, le Comité de coordination des normes micrographiques de l'ONGC supervise 6 comités de rédaction de
normes. Quelque 75 personnes bénévoles d'un bout à l'autre du Canada, provenant
surtout du secteur privé, participent à la préparation des normes micrographiques.
Le Comité de coordination a tenu en mars à Ottawa une réunion qui a permis
d'harmoniser plus étroitement les activités du comité avec la contribution canadienne
aux activités de l'Organisation internationale de normalisation (ISO).
Au cours de l'année, trois projets de normes internationales ont été examinés en
vue d'être adoptés à titre de normes nationales au Canada, et leur publication est
prévue pour la prochaine année financière. La norme nationale intitulée « Microfilm—
Preuve littérale », qui a paru en 1979, a été révisée et sera également publiée au cours de
1985. On a entrepris la révision quinquennale de deux normes nationales, et deux autres
attendent la mise à jour des normes internationales. On a procédé à l'étude d'une
norme provisoire de l'ONGC sur la terminologie des microfilms pour déterminer s'il y
avait lieu de l'adopter, mais on lui a préféré une norme de 1TSO dont la formulation est
presque achevée. À la fin de l'année, deux normes attendaient d'être publiées par
l'ONGC.
Organisations non gouvernementales internationales et nationales — Le directeur a
participé à la réunion annuelle du Comité sur la reprographie des archives du Conseil
international des archives, qui s'est tenue à Bonn (R.F.A.) en juin. C'est sous son
autorité de président du Conseil consultatif des anciens présidents de la Société micrographique du Canada (SMC), que fut préparée pour le Conseil d'administration une
étude des fonctions de la Société. Il a rédigé en collaboration un document technique
sur les normes micrographiques, qui a été présenté à la conférence de la SMC et de
l'Association d'administrateurs et de gestionnaires de documents (ARMA) qui a eu lieu
à Calgary en octobre. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES 1984-1985
Division de la gestion des
documents et de la micrographie
La dernière année financière a également été la première année complète depuis la
réorganisation opérée dans la division afin de lui permettre de faire face aux problèmes
et aux responsabilités imposés par les politiques et les règlements récents en matière de
gestion des documents et de micrographie. En vue d'aboutir à un meilleur usage des
ressources et de répondre aux demandes d'aide et d'orientation de la part des établissements gouvernementaux, on a consacré beaucoup de temps et d'efforts à l'intégration et
au regroupement des activités et des obligations dans les domaines de l'assistance
technique, de la formation, des plans de conservation et des études sur l'automatisation
et les technologies connexes. On attachait une importance particulière à l'acquisition
des connaissances et des compétences nécessaires pour exercer les nouvelles tâches
consistant à évaluer la fonction de gestion des documents des établissements gouvernementaux et à faire en sorte que ces établissements appliquent les politiques prescrites
par l'administration centrale. Ces politiques soulignent la nécessité d'instaurer dans le
gouvernement fédéral des pratiques constantes et efficaces en matière de gestion des
documents et de micrographie.
Participant à l'effort permanent destiné à faire en sorte que les établissements
comprennent la politique du gouvernement et s'y conforment, tous les coordinateurs en
micrographie, ou leurs suppléants désignés, ont pris part à des séances d'étude pour
examiner les lignes directrices et les directives découlant de la politique en matière de
micrographie, ainsi que les modalités d'intégration de ces mesures dans les plans
d'application des institutions. Par ailleurs, de nouveaux progrès ont été réalisés dans
l'étude et la promotion de l'application de l'informatique aux fonctions et activités de
gestion des documents. Les institutions fédérales se sont vu communiquer des lignes
directrices pour l'élaboration de prescriptions fonctionnelles pour les systèmes automatisés de soutien à la gestion des documents. La division a également continué à
participer aux essais pratiques du Programme de la bureautique du ministère des
Communications, en vue de mieux comprendre les incidences de la bureautique sur les
activités de gestion des documents et de fournir des conseils dans ce domaine.
Consultation, projets et formation — En conformité avec les politiques du Conseil du
Trésor, la division a continué à fournir sur demande aux institutions fédérales (48 cette
année) des conseils relatifs à la gestion de leurs documents. On a consacré des études et
des enquêtes aux systèmes et aux procédures concernant les documents écrits, les
microformes et les applications micrographiques éventuelles.
On a procédé à des consultations avec des représentants des institutions qui avaient
mis fin à leurs activités ou qui le feront sous peu, notamment le ministère d'État au
Développement social et le Centre d'information sur l'unité canadienne, en vue de
déterminer à qui revient la responsabilité d'assurer la surveillance des documents
existants. Le personnel de la division a également participé au transfert au ministère de
l'Expansion industrielle régionale des responsabilités du ministère d'État au Développement économique et du ministère d'État aux Sciences et à la Technologie. À l'intérieur de la division, on a rédigé des lignes directrices pour l'établissement des critères
qui doivent régir l'acceptation de demandes de conseils provenant d'institutions, ainsi
que des procédures écrites pour la conduite d'enquêtes.
« Principes et pratiques de la gestion des documents », le cours de quatre semaines
destiné au personnel expérimenté en gestion des documents, n'a été donné que deux
fois durant l'année. Des contraintes budgétaires et d'autres priorités ont obligé la
division à annuler certains des cours d'introduction de quatre jours à la gestion des
documents. Ils seront cependant offerts de nouveau en 1985-1986. Le cours consacré
aux techniques de microenregistrement a été donné à