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Public Archives Canada annual report 1975/1976 Public Archives of Canada 1977

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Array    © Minister of Supply and Services
Canada 1977
Le Droit Ltée Printers
Requisition No.: 02011-6-2380
Cat. No.: SA1-1976 Contents
Introduction
1
Records Management Branch
5
Headquarters Records Centres Division
5
Regional Records Centres Division
12
Office of Records Management Services Division
18
Historical Branch
25
Manuscript Division
26
London Office
53
Paris Office
55
Public Records Division
55
National Map Collection
64
Picture Division
74
National Photography Collection
84
Public Archives Library
101
National Film Archives Division
105
Machine Readable Archives Division
111
Administration and Technical Services Branch
117
Policy and Program Development
117
Office of Technological Studies
117
Administrative Services Division
118
Management Services Division
120
Personnel Division
121
Official Languages Division
122
Technical Division
123
Exhibition Services Division
129
Information Services Division
133  Introduction
The annual reports of recent years have recorded a period of rather
dramatic expansion and development in the entire range of activities of the
Public Archives of Canada. It is evident, however, that, at least in the immediate
future, additional resources will be minimal. The only area singled out for
development is the National Film Archives. While still in an early stage of
development, its objectives received Cabinet approval early in 1976, and it is
hoped the NFA will become fully operational over the next few years. Otherwise
this year has been a period of consolidation, reappraisal of objectives and
priorities, and emphasis on economy and efficiency.
A Senior Management Committee has been established, to which several
standing and ad hoc committees report. For example, the EDP Committee is
responsible for coordinating the increasing range of activities in electronic
data processing and for developing EDP policy and plans within the Department. A committee on information management is examining the present and
future role of the Public Archives in regard to the management of information
in the federal government and the integration of the various media — paper,
microfilm, magnetic tapes, etc. — into a single system. This committee has
also prepared proposals for new legislation. In regard to administration, a task
force has been established to prepare manuals on financial administration and
other subjects and to develop a management information system.
Several significant studies have been conducted during the year. One by
J. D. Currie was entitled "Study on Micrographics in the Government of Canada
with Special Emphasis on the Public Archives of Canada." An immediate result
of this study was the appointment, at the request of the Dominion Archivist,
of a micrographie coordinator in each department and the formation of a
Federal Micrographie Council which will advise the Dominion Archivist. A
committee of the FMC is studying the use of COM (Computer Output Microfilm)
in the federal government. Consultants were engaged to study the feasibility
of separate administration services for the Public Archives and the National
Library. An internal study on conservation has resulted in a report on the
nature and extent of the conservation requirements of the Historical Branch
as a basis for a long term program. An intensive study of the functions of the
Branch in 1975 has determined the need for additional study on acquisition
with a view to developing a national program and on reference systems
including automated systems which may have national and international
implications.
Despite restraints on finances and manpower, satisfactory progress was
achieved in all areas of the broad mandate of the Department. Since details
are given in the reports of the branches, only a few illustrative items need be
mentioned here.
Historical Branch — A new division, the National Photography Collection,
was formed by dividing the Picture Division. The National Film Archives
acquired the archival collection of the Canadian Film Institute and planned PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
the implementation of agreements with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the National Film Board, and the Canadian Film Institute. The Machine
Readable Archives Division is now operational although still on a reduced
scale. The development of a MARC format for maps continued in cooperation
with the National Library. A new edition of the Union List of Manuscripts in
Canadian Repositories (ULM) was published in July 1975 with the use of computer techniques in compilation and printing. A supplement will be published
annually. The increasing popular interest in oral history is indicated by the
publication of several books based on taped interviews in the Archives. Current
recording of historical events includes a direct line from the National Press
Building to our recording room. Documentary acquisitions range from microfilm of records in Spain relating to North American fisheries in the sixteenth
century to the records of Mr. Robert Stanfield who retired recently as Leader
of the Progressive Conservative Party.
Records Management Branch — An important stage in the integration of
machine readable records into the records management system is the development of an inventory of such records in all departments. The courses in records
management in Ottawa which have been given in English for many years will
be supplemented by courses in French in the fall of 1976. Additional courses
have been given this year in several regions. A report on records management
for the government of Alberta was completed. The Director and Assistant
Director of the Branch conducted a survey and prepared a report on records
management for the Government of Mexico. Considerable attention was given
to a more sophisticated system for reference to military and personnel files.
Administration and Technical Services Branch — The pHot project to
develop a process for the mass deacidification of documents and books continued. During the year, a photo-conservation chemist was employed to develop
a conservation program for our extensive photographic holdings. Shortage of
space continues to be a serious problem. During the year accommodation and
planning staff were busily engaged in negotiations for additional space as well
as planning for a new Archives Building.
National — The sixth Annual Conference of Dominion, Provincial and
Territorial Archivists met in Quebec City, 14-15 April 1975. It expressed interest in the implementation of the bill on controlling export of cultural items, and
general satisfaction with the report of the Commission on Canadian Studies
chaired by Professor Symons. It discussed several matters of common interest.
It decided also that its meetings should be more structured and that statistics
should be gathered on financial expenditures on archives.
It is with great satisfaction that the" Public Archives saw the publication
in March 1975, of volumes I and II of The Report of the Commission on Canadian
Studies, To Know Ourselves by Professor T. H. B. Symons, under the auspices
of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada. Not only did the
commission endorse all the recommendations included in the brief presented
by the Public Archives in 1973, but it contained strong statements on the
importance of archives generally and on the role of the Public Archives
particularly.
To cite for example, in the introductory paragraph of the chapter devoted
to Archives: INTRODUCTION
"... the future quality of Canadian studies is directly linked to the condition and resources of Canadian archives. It is not too much to say that
Canadian archives are the foundation of Canadian studies." (p. 69)
and as for the Public Archives in particular:
"The keystone of the Canadian archival system is the Public Archives of
Canada. For over one hundred years the Public Archives has played a
dual role as an essential arm of Government and as an important research
institution. In the former role it is charged with management of Federal
Government records and with the responsibility for ensuring that the
federal administration is fully documented for the formulation of public
policy. In the latter role it is responsible for acquiring from any source all
significant documents relating to the development of the country and of
value to Canada, and for providing suitable research services and facilities
to make this material available to the public. As a result of its conscientious fulfilment of these two roles, the Public Archives of Canada has
acquired a wealth of documentation on every aspect of Canadian life,
on political, economic, scientific, social and cultural affairs. It has become
the indispensable source for research on Canada.
However, as it enters its second century, the Public Archives is challenged by new circumstances and opportunities. In order to continue to
fulfil its proper role in Canadian cultural and public life it will require
new resources and an increased scope of activity. The Commission would
like to take this opportunity to draw the attention of the Canadian public
in general, and of public officials in particular, to the needs and opportunities by which this important Canadian institution is now confronted."
(P. 75)
It is hoped that this appeal to the Canadian Government and the general public
will be heard.
International — Associations with international organizations and archives
in other countries continue to increase. During the last year the Dominion
Archivist was re-elected to the Bureau of UNESCO's International Advisory
Committee on Documentation Libraries and Archives. He attended meetings
of the International Round Table on Archives in Kiev, and the Executive Committee of the International Council on Archives in Varna, Bulgaria. He also
participated in the secpnd Caribbean Archives Conference in Guadeloupe and
Martinique and in an archives conference in Mexico. The Assistant Dominion
Archivist was appointed Deputy Secretary of the Committee on Archival Development and continued to be Chairman of the Archives Section of the Pan
American Institute of Geography and History. The Senior Adviser on Technological Studies was elected to the presidency of the International Council for
Reprography and continued to be active in other international organizations
in the field of microfilm. In addition to the mission to Mexico, the Director of
the Records Management Branch attended a seminar on records management
in Djakarta, Indonesia, which was sponsored by the South East Asia Branch of
the International Council on Archives. Members of the staff served on ICA
Committees on EDP and Business Archives. The Photo Conservation Chemist
served on an ANSI Committee to review American photographic standards and PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
a member of the National Map Collection continued his duties as Chairman
of IFLA's International Standard Bibliographic Description for Cartographic
Materials (ISBD [CM]). The Head of the Sound Archives was appointed Secretary of the International Association of Sound Archives. Members of the
Association visited and held a session in the Public Archives in August 1975.
In November 1975, two archivists, V. A. Krastine, Head of the Archives
Department, Council of Ministers of the Latvian S.S.R., and A. P. Kourantov,
Director of All Union Scientific Research Institute on Documentation and
Archives, Moscow, visited the Public Archives under the terms of the Canada-
U.S.S.R. Cultural Agreement. Other visitors from abroad included Dr. Kristjan
Eldjarn, the President of Iceland; Mr. Masaru Katsumi, Japanese representative
of the Olympic Coin Program; Mr. Michael Roper, Public Records Office,
London; Mr. Forest L. Williams, Assistant Archivist for Records Management
and Mr. Edwin A. Thompson, National Archives and Records Service, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Conrad Swan, York Herald College of Arms, London; Miss
Helen Rowe, Bermuda Archives; Mary McCrae, Archives of Tasmania and Mr.
Hidio Dijuchie, Assistant to the Director of the Bureau, Administrative Management Agency, Tokyo.
I would like to express thanks to the members of our staff who in the
quality of their work, initiative, and suggestions help to improve the standards
of the Public Archives and the achievement of its goals and also to those
outside the Archives whose assistance and cooperation is so valuable: records
managers and others in federal government departments and agencies, colleagues in other archives, donors of archival material, and those devoted
"friends of the Archives" who assist us in the preservation of our heritage.
31 March 1976
Wilfred I. Smith
Dominion Archivist Records
Management Branch
The fiscal year 1975-1976 was the 10th year of Records Management
Branch operations and the 20th completed year for the Headquarters (Ottawa)
Records Centres. It was the 11th year for the Toronto Centre, the 10th year for
the Montreal Centre, the 4th year for the Vancouver Centre, and the 3rd year
for the Centres serving the Winnipeg and Halifax regions.
Under the terms of the Public Records Order (P.C. 1966-1749 dated 9
September 1966) the Records Management Branch is authorized to provide
a comprehensive service in its field to government departments and agencies
in Ottawa and the larger metropolitan centres across Canada. This service
includes: records centre storage and reference facilities; advice and assistance
in records scheduling and disposal; the provision of training courses, printed
standards and guides in records management; records surveys, audits, and
evaluations; and assistance in other related aspects of records management
including the federal government's Essential Records Program.
Table I gives a breakdown of the total volume of records held by the Records Management Branch as it services Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific
Oceans. The details of the specific activities of each division of the Branch are
given in the pages following.
TABLE I
Total Holdings as of 31 March 1976
Volume
of Records
Shelving Occupied (approx.)
Records Centres
Cubic Feet
Cubic Metres
Miles
Kilometres
Halifax	
Montreal	
Ottawa Complex	
Toronto	
Winnipeg  	
Vancouver 	
24,626
156,753
601,376
147,294
31,058
67,734
738
4,702
18,041
4,418
931
2,032
4.7
29.7
114
27.9
5.9
12.8
7.6
47.8
183.43
44.9
9.5
20.6
Totals
'    1,028,841
30,862
195
313.83
Headquarters Records Centres Division
The Division consists of three sections, two of which are designated as
records.centres: the General Records Centre, the Canadian Forces Records
Centre, and the Personnel Records Systems and Services Section.
During the year, numerous procedural changes made by user departments
necessitated internal changes in procedures. Considerable time was expended
in reviewing new proposals such as the Canadian Penitentiaries Services
PERSCHEME (personal files) proposal for inmates, off site storage of depart- PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
ments* computer tapes, and on proposals to computerize PERSCHEME operations. The sheer bulk of PERSCHEME operations has created problems in
processing, due mainly to machine limitations. This has necessitated overtime
by machine room staff and overtime will continue at an increased rate as the
master index grows.
GENERAL RECORDS CENTRE — Accessions — Despite many operational
problems, accessioning was maintained at a reasonable level during the year;
1,612 cubic metres of records were accessioned compared to 1,756 cubic
metres last year.
Reference — Requests on general files increased by 15.067 for a total of
171,685 compared to last year's all time high of 156,618. The three largest
users were as follows: Central Mortgage and Housing with 44,170 requests;
Revenue Canada with 38,166 requests; and Supply and Services with 17,398
requests. Other major users were Indian and Northern Affairs with 10.752
requests and Health and Welfare with 7,570.
There was a tremendous increase in interfiles from 37,317 to 95,131 due
to CMHC's procedural changes and to a recent Canada Pension Plan accession which resulted in 16,466 loose interfiles being integrated with the main
accession.
Procedural changes of a few years ago continue to pay off in that research
was kept to a minimum again this year, 101 hours.
Physical Disposals — Waste Paper — During the year 610 cubic metres of
records were scheduled for disposal. Due to strikes only about half were
physically destroyed.
Classified Disposals — Although 171 cubic metres of these records were
scheduled for disposal, mill problems and security reasons prevented their
physical destruction.
Transfers — Some 91 cubic metres of records were returned to departments
for various reasons. Also, 41 cubic metres were scheduled for transfer to the
Public Records Division as historical records. Due to lack of storage facilities
the latter are still stored at the Centre.
Extra Duties — During the year the Centre provided a total of 11 man-days to
the Office of Records Management Services Division to service the repository
of essential records as well as transporting course material to Chaffey's Locks.
Fumigation — Two man-days were expended in fumigating some 2 cubic
metres of records for the Historical Branch.
New Customers — The only new customer this year was the Canada Pension
Plan Branch of Health and Welfare Canada. Records from that Branch have an
initial high activity rate at present but will stabilize when procedures are ironed
out.
During the year the federal government announced the closing of Information Canada and the Company of Young Canadians. As a result the Records
Management Branch and the Historical Branch of the Public Archives were
called to gather their records. Because of the fact that the personnel working
for these services had to secure other jobs within the government as soon as RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
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possible or face possible loss of employment, much of the material has been
dispersed throughout the buildings of both agencies. The Records Management Branch now has about 8 cubic metres of operational files from Information
Canada and about 6 cubic metres of financial records from the Company of
Young Canadians, both of which still require sorting out before they can be
listed. In fact, the Company of Young Canadians material cannot be totally
accessioned until auditors have finished with it, which should be by 31 May
1976.
Relocations — Relocations were kept at a minimum again this year. Supply
and Services contracts (40 cubic metres) were moved to accommodate pers-
files. A review by Regional Economic Expansion of their records necessitated
relocation of 12 cubic metres. Central Mortgage and Housing revised some
accessions and it was necessary to relocate 102 cubic metres of records.
Some 8 cubic metres of World War II Navy records and 14£ cubic metres
of Daily Routine Orders Part II were relocated to accommodate World War I
processed files. A total of 1,500 metres of shelving was erected in this regard. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
CANADIAN FORCES RECORDS CENTRE — Miss J. Dignard, newly appointed
Head of the Centre, was extremely busy making operational changes and
attending courses. Mr. D. Gannon was transferred to the Regional Records
Centres Division, and a competition will soon be held for his position. There
has been a heavy staff turnover during the year and this has created operational
problems. Also, two key personnel in the Research Unit, Miss G. Gaudreau
and Miss F. Lefebvre, retired after 35 years service.
Accessions — A total of 92 cubic metres of records was accessioned this year,
an increase of 53 cubic metres from the previous year.
Reference — During the year there was a slight decrease in reference service
from 86,048 to 84,434 requests. This was due to more files being documented,
thereby eliminating the need to search in more than one place for an individual's record.
Interfiles — There was a considerable increase in interfiles, 338,535 from
280,739. This was due to a clean up on loose papers which had been around
for some time.
Research — There was a decrease in research, 3,175 hours from 3,828 due to
more files being processed on master index as well as improvements in
procedures.
Physical Disposals — An increase in disposals, 10 cubic metres from 4, was
due mainly to screening overage files during documentation.
Correspondence — There was increased activity in correspondence, 41,325
from 29,487. This was due in part to increased holdings and also legislative
changes in the Veterans Affairs Act regarding benefits to Prisoners of War and
Widows' pensions.
PERSONNEL RECORDS SYSTEMS AND SERVICES SECTION — The present
operating system for personnel records is deteriorating. The sheer volume of
punched cards (1.4 million), the constant daily growth, the excessive in and out
movement of cards, and the increasing access requirements have all combined
to create an unprecedented system maintenance and control situation for
servicing personnel records.
Again, because of present system limitations, it was necessary to stop
the conversion program of the manual civilian index and, as well, even with
approval, the Section could not implement the creation of a centralized storage
and retrieval system for the Canadian Penitentiary Services inmates case files
record group.
Throughout the year there was a heavy involvement of Sectional staff in
the investigation of alternative systems. The most promising appears to be the
phonetic browsing system "Alpha Search Inquiry System" marketed by IBM.
A matter of growing concern is the requirement now for continuing overtime to maintain servicing capability. This need will continue to grow not only
on the maintenance end but will also spill over to the indexing operation. The
more cards in the system the more activity there is, and hence the higher
requirement for this maintenance. Another spill off problem is the control on 10 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
the system to reduce errors. This now requires more staff time and reduces
the resources available for processing.
Civilian Personnel Records Centre — As a result of staff vacancies and the
secondment of manpower resources to other divisional units, it was necessary
to halt the processing of backlog military reserve records and concentrate on
processing civilian and current reserve releases. Consequently there were
50,268 fewer reserve records processed this year, however, civilian production
increased along with attestation card processing, resulting in a decrease of
8,265 persons processed for the year.
Decentralization of departments continues to present servicing problems
and it was necessary to conduct a survey to determine departmental policies
regarding centralized or decentralized control of inquiries, and to establish a
control listing of those field offices of the departments and agencies participating in the CiVPERS scheme which are authorized to deal directly with the
Civilian Personnel Records Centre.
Punch cards used in retrieval of information through automated card storage system.
The conversion program of the civilian index has been discontinued. With
the size restriction of punch cards (80 columns) it was necessary to limit the
given names to four characters thereby losing the uniqueness of this prime
identifier. The processing of the RCN "U" series and RCAF Reserves series has
been completed. All of the 1971 and 1972 civilian releases have now been processed. The disposal of files of persons born in 1902 and 1903 was completed.
The processing was completed foe the 1970 Canadian Forces (Reserves) releases. The RMB Information circular 76A advising departments and agencies
to forward the 1974 releases was mailed to all participating departments and
agencies.
Automated Services — Because of operational problems the staff of this Unit
had to respond by developing new procedures and by going into overtime
schedules. The only way to complete large sort/merge or validation/edit pro-
m RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 11
cessing runs is by overtime, as the index must be available for reference
service during normal hours. The alternative, should the system not be changed,
is shift work. Because of the size of the master file, special search runs have
been discontinued.
Automated index area at Tunney's Pasture.
It was necessary to initiate the operational policy of holding the sub-
index growth to 15,000 cards and the merge to the master index because of
problems encountered in servicing.
The jacket number integrity match programs were completed on the 67,
68, 69, 70, 71, and 78 series. The errors detected and corrected indicate that
this program must be continued through the wartime groups. Future match program runs must be done on overtime because of card manipulations required.
An additional field of data was added to the punch card. This field designates Male/Female, and would be a prime search field in an enhanced system.
Cards previously punched are being updated.
Regular Forces releases for October-December 1974 to July-September
1975 have been processed. The second disposal action on the RCMP service
record groups has been completed. This disposal was based on those born in
1885 and resulted in 389 records being removed for disposition. Also completed
was the processing up to letter "G" of the Wartime Army group.
J 12
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Because of card deterioration through constant handling and machine
runs, it was necessary to create a card duplication procedure and an 029 was
acquired to perform the card interpretation.
Integration and Support Services — The following projects were undertaken
by this Unit during the 1975-1976 fiscal year:
(a) Processing up to letter "R" of the 1957-1962 paysheet groups was completed. This is the last series in the backlog of reserve pay records to be arranged in alphabetical order.
(b) The integration of the 1973 civilian releases was completed.
(c) The integration and sequencing of the 1970 and 1971 Reserve Forces
pay record group was completed.
(d) The project for relocating 144 cubic metres of Part II Orders, the 3,240
metres of CEF (World War I) records, and the 750 metres of miscellaneous
ancillary milpers records has commenced.
(e) Because of other operational priorities the Wartime Access integration
project has been curtailed.
Regional Records Centres Division
The Regional Records Centres Division has three main activities which
correspond roughly to those general activities in the foregoing pages dealing
with the Headquarters Records Centres Division. Indeed the variations in such
activities arise largely from geographical location, differing types of records
held and serviced, and consequently different methods of indexing. Thus,
activities include:
I.The provision of economical storage facilities for departmental dormant
records of the general or subject category in the regions where the federal
government has its main metropolitan areas of activity, i.e. in Halifax,
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver; but this does not include the
servicing of personnel records (civilian or armed forces) all of which are
centralized in Ottawa and referenced by automated indices.
2. The provision to departments and requesting agencies of a complete reference to the local records stored in the regional records centres.
3. The provision of a service for the physical destruction of obsolete or
useless (dead) records by their incineration, or by shredding, baling, and
despatch to waste paper contractors. This is done to return money from
the sale of such waste paper to Treasury, to assist departments crowded
for space, and to vacate records centre space for further storage use.
4. Additional to the mentioned functions, the Division provides coordinating
services to other units of the Public Archives. These include: arrangements and controls for the destruction of security records forwarded
periodically from the Headquarters Records Centres Division (Ottawa) to
the Montreal area; reception and temporary storage in regional centres RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
13
of local records designated as historical by the Historical Branch; and
the safeguarding of those records until such time as they may be transferred to the Public Archives in Ottawa for permanent retention.
General — The regional centres are experiencing financial strain and lack
of adequate staff in order to cope with increased activities. This has resulted
in the temporary suspension of some services. Coordinating the various requests for services, as the regional centres are now being used along the
lines of regional archives, brings about additional administrative, financial,
and manpower burdens in regional areas which are already taxed to capacity.
Serious considerations will have to be given towards increasing the regional
budget, as well as manpower, should the regional centres be expected to
continue developing at the same pace.
In the course of the year the Chief was requested to attend many accommodation meetings which has at the same time permitted him to inspect the
centres involved at least once. With the appointment of an Administrative Assistant it is now hoped that more time will be diverted towards visiting the centres.
Despite numerous obstacles, the year 1975-1976 recorded a continuing
progress and expansion in all regional centres. Further significant increased
demands for services throughout the country have led to increased workloads
in all areas. Efforts to maintain a balance between incoming and outgoing
records were unable to prevent a sharp increase in accessioning which has
created a requirement for expansion of facilities in Montreal, Vancouver, and
Toronto.
In Montreal, a total 1,458 square metres of floor space was obtained on
the second floor at 645 Montée de Liesse. Some 3,780 metres of shelving has
already been ordered.
In Toronto, the expansion which was required for December 1974 is still
in abeyance, and records are still being placed temporarily on the floor.
The Vancouver Centre obtained 452 square metres of floor space at 3121
Thunderbird Crescent, Burnaby, and 12,096 metres of shelving has been
ordered.
The occasional department has been making demands for services, and
for active records outof proportion to their entitlement. Thus attempts are
being made to use the centres more as central registries than records centres.
A policy revision appears to be imperative in this case, as one department
alone is requesting more service than all other departments combined.
The market for waste paper is not improving. The price received for low
quality paper prohibits shredding and baling, since labour proves to be more
expensive than revenues derived from the sale of such paper. Hence, only
classified records are now to be shredded, and where a considerable quantity
is involved it is cheaper to have the paper burned or destroyed under supervision rather than pay the salary of a machine tending operator for shredding
and baling. Shredding takes care of the security aspect of the records but
still leaves the problem of the disposal of the paper. In Toronto, since there
was no outlet for paper disposal, the paper was incinerated at the City of 14
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Toronto incinerator although the Archives had to pay the cost for that service.
In Montreal, the Archives is fortunate in being able to dispose of waste paper
by the normal channel, that is, through Crown Assets Disposal Corporation.
In Winnipeg, no buyer could be found for low quality paper, and a certain
amount of good quality was sold under Crown Assets' authorization on the
proviso that the buyer remove also the poor quality of paper at the same time.
But trouble may be expected in disposing of the paper during the coming
year. In Vancouver, provincial regulations prevent burning of the paper, and
outside facilities for destruction are nonexistent. This requires shredding of
classified records for Government Departments. Disposing of the paper thereafter is still being done through tendering by Crown Assets. In Halifax, however,
we have experienced no difficulty as yet in the matter of paper disposal.
HALIFAX RECORDS CENTRE — The Halifax Records Centre continued to progress exceptionally well. The numerous visits made by the Head to various
government departments or agencies in the Maritimes were again fruitful, since
the Centre has serviced eight new departments this fiscal year. Visits to the
Centre were made with notable enthusiasm by some departmental officers and
with mixed emotions by others. On the positive side, departmental officials
who, when first approached, appeared rather apprehensive about using the
facilities and services, relented later and jumped at the opportunity to store
their dormant records at the Centre. The Head of the Centre has again this
year performed splendid missionary work in order to convince officials of
departments or agencies of the benefits and advantages of using the Centre's
services and facilities.
Visitors from Environment Canada (Ottawa), Energy Mines and Resources
(Dartmouth), Revenue Canada — Taxation (St. John's), National Harbours
Board (Halifax), as well as seven unit heads of Canadian National Railways
were very impressed with the Centre and by the efficient services offered.
During the year the Centre accessioned 363 cubic metres of records, destroyed 16 cubic metres of accessioned records, and disposed of 16 cubic
metres of nonaccessioned materials. For the 1976-1977 fiscal year, 176 cubic
metres of records are already scheduled for destruction. The Centre had a
298.14 per cent increase in reference requests during the fiscal year (from
8,722 requests to 26,004).
MONTREAL RECORDS CENTRE — The Centre's workload activity has increased substantially. During the year the Centre accessioned 1,639 cubic
metres of records and destroyed 871 cubic metres of accessioned records, as
well as 104 cubic metres of nonaccessioned material. The disposal figure accounts for all the records that could be destroyed during the 1975-1976 fiscal
year. For the 1976-1977 fiscal year, 925 cubic metres of records are scheduled
for destruction. Four new customers have started to use the facilities during
the year: the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Manpower and Immigration,
Consumer and Corporate Affairs, and Regional Economic Expansion.
The Centre was visited by some executives from the Quebec Government
regarding records scheduling and disposal policies, methods, and procedures.
An information session, and lecture and slide presentation on the Records RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
15
Centre operations and facilities were given to a group of students from the
University of Montreal.
Field visits were made to Sherbrooke, Chicoutimi, Quebec, and Three
Rivers. The Montreal Records Centre is presently storing 1,050 cubic metres
of records from Quebec City and regions further to the north. Additional accommodation for over 900 cubic metres of records has been planned in 1975-1976
and will eventually be ready for occupancy.
Table III shows the particular services rendered to the Department of
Revenue in comparison with services to all other departments in the Toronto
and Montreal areas.
TABLE III
Number of Requests from
Revenue Canada for 1975-1976
Customs
and
Balance of
Yearly
Requests
from Other
Departments  Total
Centre
Excise
Taxation
Total
Serviced
Requests
Montreal
Toronto
13,080
16,750
131,710
154,303
144,790
171,053
87,880
47,212
232,670
218,265
TORONTO RECORDS CENTRE — During this fiscal year the Centre accessioned 946 cubic metres of records, destroyed 1,093 cubic metres of accessioned records, and disposed of 86 cubic metres of nonaccessioned materials.
During the next fiscal year, 703 cubic metres of records are scheduled for
destruction. The reference requests have increased by more than 18 per cent
over last year's total.
Chronic staff problems made it compulsory to reassess the efficiency of
the whole operation, especially in the area of staff management. This necessary
decision has resulted in major changes in three managerial positions. The
Centre, which was already operating without an Assistant Head position, as
well as an Administrative Clerk position, was further weakened by the resignation of the Head and the two top supervisors. Despite this critical situation, the
Centre was able to maintain the same standard of service, and means are now
under way to bring the establishment back to a normal situation.
The Toronto accommodation problem has now reached a critical stage.
The expansion which was requested over two years ago now has not yet
materialized. Decisions were made but not implemented, with the result that
the Centre is now overflowing and the steel shelving, purchased for the expected expansion, is still stored awaiting installation.
WINNIPEG RECORDS CENTRE — During the fiscal year 1975-1976, arrangements were completed with the Office of Records Management Services in
Ottawa and the Public Service Commission in Winnipeg to conduct a condensed version of the Records Management Course, which was held at the
Records Centre in December 1975. Early in March 1976 the Centre was asked 16
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
by the Regional Director of the Unemployment Insurance Commission to hold
a seminar for their district records managers. Later in the month the Assistant
Head held a seminar at the UIC Regional Office, and twelve records officers
from Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, and Calgary attended.
At the request of the Director of Crop Insurance, Department of Agriculture, the Centre Head visited Regina in February to discuss the records problem
of the Prairie Farm Assistance Administration which had been "phased out".
After examination and grouping, more than 510 metres of the records were sent
to the Winnipeg Records Centre to be stored.
During the year the Records Centre accessioned 284 cubic metres of
records, destroyed 12 cubic metres of accessioned records, and disposed of
33 cubic metres of nonaccessioned records. The Centre has serviced four new
departments, namely Public Service Commission, Transport Canada, Labour
Canada, and Justice Canada. The inventory of the records to be destroyed
during the next fiscal year shows that in accordance with the schedules, 200
cubic metres of records could be disposed of.
VANCOUVER RECORDS CENTRE — During the 1975-1976 fiscal year the
Centre's staff was involved in many activities over and above the regular day-
to-day operations of the Centre. In November 1975 the Records Centre hosted
the first Records Management Training Course outside of the Ottawa area,
conducted jointly by the Archives and the Public Service Commission. Members
of the staff provided a tour of the Records Centre operation. Sponsored by the
Association of Records Managers and Administrators, the Head of the Centre
lectured on modern filing and records control at the Vancouver Community
College. His involvement with the American Records Management Association
during the fiscal year included speaking at meetings of the Association in
Victoria and Edmonton. He was also on the National Program Committee for
the American Records Management Association Conference held in Toronto
in October 1975 and was the Program Chairman for the Vancouver Chapter of
ARMA.
Among the various department and agency representatives from British
Columbia and Ottawa who visited the Records Centre during the year were
officers from the Insurance Corporation and the Justice Development Commission of British Columbia, as well as people from the Federal Government Committee on Warehousing.
. The staff at the Records Centre made a number of trips to Dominion Bridge
Company Limited on behalf of the Historical Branch to survey and pick up
records, and on three occasions they have picked up, packed, and shipped film
for the National Film Archives in Ottawa. For the first time since the opening of
the Records Centre, the Head visited Penticton, Kelowna, Vernon, and Kamloops, contacting both user departments and possible new users. Another trip
was made to Victoria for the same purpose.
During the year the Vancouver Centre accessioned 463 cubic metres of
records, destroyed 90 cubic metres of accessioned records and disposed of
167 cubic metres of nonaccessioned records. During the next fiscal year 887
cubic metres of records are scheduled for destruction. The Centre has serviced
one new department this year, Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
17
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"IIIJI 18 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Expansion in the nature of 450 square metres of floor space in the same
building took place during the course of the year.
PROPOSED LONDON RECORDS CENTRE — The feasibility of opening a new
records centre to service the area of southwestern Ontario, centred at London,
is now under consideration following a recent Department of Urban Affairs population projection which indicated that the cities in that region constitute one of
the most rapidly developing areas in Canada. The London proposal has been
identified by the Department of Public Works in their work project program for
1977-1978. It is expected that the establishment of a centre in this area would
relieve the pressure for continuous expansion of the Toronto Centre, eliminate
the necessity for shipment of records on the long haul between Toronto and
Windsor, as well as give faster and better service to the federal offices in the
immediate area of southwestern Ontario.
Office of Records Management
Services Division
The Office of Records Management Services Division has basic responsibilities for the following activities:
1. To assist government departments in the development of records schedules for both manual and automated records, to process and apply these
schedules and to make recommendations to the Dominion Archivist concerning the disposal of records.
2. To survey and audit the performance in records management of departments, to prepare reports for departments, the Dominion Archivist, and
the Treasury Board, and to maintain an inventory of records holdings,
equipment, and staff.
3. To provide an advisory service in records management for government
departments and to assist them in projects to improve efficiency in records management.
4. To conduct regular training courses in records management for the staff
of government departments and agencies and in other ways to provide
formal instruction in records management.
5. To prepare and publish manuals and guides for the use of government
departments in establishing and maintaining efficient procedures and
acceptable standards in records management.
6. To service the government's Essential Records Program to ensure protection of vital records against nuclear or natural disaster.
7. From 2 above to identify the requirements for additional records centres
across Canada.
8. To provide for the ultimate disposal of all records held at the Ottawa
Records Centre.
9. To promote the use of records centres by government departments and
agencies in the interests of efficiency and economy. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
19
The major activities of the Division are described below, topically, not
necessarily in order of importance.
Records Scheduling and Microfilm Submissions — Table V indicates the number of submissions concerning records schedules, records destruction proposals, and microfilm submissions from 1961, when the Public Archives assumed
the responsibility for the examination of these submissions, to 31 March 1976.
TABLE V
Number of
Records
Schedules or
Destruction
Number of
Fiscal
Five-Year
Proposals
Microfilm
Five-Year
Annual
Cumulative
Year
Period
Submitted
Submissions
Total
Total
Total
—
1961-66
(March)
194
58*
252
—
252
1966-71
(March)
373
52
425
—
677
1971-76
(March)
208
207
415
—
1,092
1971-72
—
50
28
—
78
81
—
1972-73
40
41
—
1973-74
—
26
59
—
85
—
1974-75
—
45
50
—
95
—
1975-76
—
47
29
—
76
—
Totals
15 years
775
* Includes proposals for microfilm equipment from 1961 to 1966 inclusive.
A total of 108 man-days was devoted to the examination of, and reporting
on, the seventy-six records scheduling and microfilming submissions during
the year.
Records Disposal, Ottawa Records Centre — The Office of Records Management Services is responsible for the application of approved records schedules to the Public Archives holdings of dormant departmental records.
Table VI indicates the total volume of records disposed of at the Ottawa
Records Centre (both general subject files and civilian personnel files) for the
years indicated. For the total twenty years the figures are listed in five-year
blocks. For the last five years each individual year is also shown for purposes
of comparison. In the twelve-month period from 1 April 1975 to 31 March 1976,
a total of 907 cubic metres of records was disposed of, comprising 7 cubic
metres of civilian personnel files and 900 cubic metres of general files. The
total volume of general subject records and civilian personnel records disposed of between 1956 and 31 March 1976 is 15,222 cubic metres, considerably
more than the capacity of the main Ottawa Records Centre building and
enough records to fill over 153.6 kilometres of shelving.
The total volume of records destroyed would have been greater if one of
our larger customer departments had not been having staff difficulties internally which seriously curtailed the disposal of a large volume of routine records. Hopefully, the department concerned will be able to return to normal 20
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
operations in 1976-1977 and enable disposal totals to revert to a more normal
level. A total of 395 man-days was devoted to this activity, which includes 185
separate disposal actions.
Publications and Directives on Records Management — Because of financial
restraints only one publication in the Records Management Series was printed
and distributed during the year, the English edition of the Subject Classification Guide. The French edition, Guide de classification idéologique, was sent
for printing late in the fiscal year and should be available by the summer of
1976. A total of 75 man-days was devoted to publications activity in the fiscal
year.
TABLE VI
Ottawa Records Centre
Cubic Metres Disposed of from 1956 to 31 March 1976*
Fiscal
Five-Year
General
Personnel
Five-Year
Annual
Cumulative
Year
Period
Files
Files**
Total
Total
Total
1956-60
633
5
638
638
1961-65
2,772
49
2,821
3,459
1966-71 *
6,219
81
6,300
9,759
(March)
1971-76
5,423
40
5,463
15,222
1971-72
1,110
14
1,124
1972-73
1,148
2
1,150
1973-74
1,087
7
1,094
1974-75
1,178
10
1,188
1975-76
900
7
907
Totals
20 Years
15,047
175
15,222
15,222
* On 1 April 1967, the Records Management Branch converted from a calendar year to a fiscal
year reporting system.
'* This total includes only Civilian Personnel files.
Training — In the fiscal year 1975-1976 the Division gave eight courses and
contributed resource personnel to other courses. The Division conducted two
full four-week Records Management Courses, Numbers 24 and 25, with an
enrolment of 60 students, 37 from departmental headquarters, 16 from departmental field offices, two each from the Province of Alberta and the Regional
Government of Ottawa-Carleton, and one each from the Governments of
Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Newfoundland. In addition, the Division
conducted two courses in records management for 59 staff members of the
Government of Saskatchewan. Also, the Division gave two courses in records
management for federal field office employees in Vancouver and Winnipeg.
The Division conducted two additional courses, Numbers 3 and 4, in EDP
(Electronic Data Processing) records management for 59 records management
personnel. In addition, the Division contributed resource personnel on records
management subjects for courses offered by the Public Archives in Micro-
recording Technology and Archives Principles and Techniques, courses by
the Public Service Commission in Systems and Procedures Analysis, and
courses by the Departments of the Secretary of State, Statistics Canada, and
Communications. Finally, staff members addressed the Ottawa Chapter of the
American Records Management Association. The Division is also preparing RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
21
for participation in an Alberta Government course in Records Management in
June 1976, and continues to work on the development of training aids, lectures, etc. for the French Records Management Course which is scheduled for
September 1976. A total of 590.5 man-day was devoted to the training activity.
Essential Records — The total holdings of those records essential to the continuity of government in the event of a natural or nuclear disaster now are 289
cubic metres, an increase of 9 cubic metres over the previous year. During
the year additional shelving for the storage of computer-generated material
was installed. A total of 94 trips took place during the fiscal year, an increase
of 22 over the previous year. Man-days devoted to the activity totalled 147.5.
Departmental Projects — The Public Archives, under the Public Records
Order, ensures that departments properly document their programs and policies. In addition, departments refer many of their records management problems to the Public Archives for advice and assistance. Consequently, the
Office of Records Management Services, as usual, was deeply involved during
the year with various projects for departments: conducting surveys and preparing reports; developing new, or revising old, classification systems; developing procedural manuals; conducting mail management surveys; and giving
assistance and advice in records office organization, staffing matters, equipment, layout, and space. Table VII indicates the number of projects undertaken
for departments over the period from 1967 to 1976 inclusive.
TABLE VII
Technical Assistance Provided to Departments
Total Number
Fiscal Year(s) of Projects
1967-71   51
1971-72  16
1972-73  18
1973-74  94
1974-75  76
1975-76  110
Total      365
The total number of projects completed in 1975-1976 increased by 34
over the previous year, and was more than the combined total of the first
six years of this activity. A total of 1,751.5 man-days was devoted to this activity.
Other Projects — In addition to assistance given to specific departments, the
Division was involved in projects for the general improvement of records management. At the request of the Government of Mexico, the Public Archives
conducted a Records Management Survey in Mexico during February 1976.
The survey report will be completed early in 1976-1977. A total of 47 man-days
was assigned to the project by the Division late in the 1975-1976 fiscal year.
In addition, 13.5 man-days were assigned to work for the Saskatchewan and
Alberta Governments, mostly the latter, completing the Alberta Provincial
Records Management Survey almost finished in the previous fiscal year and
contributing support sporadically in various areas to officers of the Provincial
Government. 22 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
The Public Archives Information Management Committee, formerly known
as the Legislation Committee, continued its work during the year, holding
seven meetings. The Division contributed a member to the Committee. The
prime object of the Committee is to prepare a draft National Records and
Archives Act for the consideration of the Departmental Senior Management
Committee. Division staff members attended 15 meetings involving the Departmental EDP Committee's activities, dealing with such subjects as the Departmental Annual EDP Report, the proposal to automate the index to military,
civilian, and other personnel files, and the Peat-Marwick consulting firm's study
of EDP facilities within the Department, etc.
The Electronic Data Processing Records Management Program developed further during the year. Several staff members were engaged in the
preparations for an inventory of federal government machine readable records
in order ultimately to be able to schedule these records. They prepared drafts
of forms, and instructions and letters for the inventory, discussing them with
the staff of the Machine Readable Archives Division, the Departmental EDP
Adviser, staff of Statistics Canada and Treasury Board, as well as sample
departments. The package of letters, forms, and instructions was distributed
to departments in the third quarter, and many returns were in by the end of
the year. The inventory should be completed and analysed in the new fiscal
year, and the aim of the entire project, records scheduling, should proceed.
Two staff members also visited the National Archives of the United States in
Washington, in connection with the project. The Division contributed members to the Departmental Ad Hoc Committee on Micrographics which was
established during the year to study the report prepared by J. D. Currie entitled
"A Study on Micrographics in the Government of Canada with Special Emphasis on the Public Archives and in Canada at Large." The Ad Hoc Committee
held five formal meetings during the year to study various aspects of the Report, and there were numerous other meetings to discuss the recommendations. In addition, members of the staff were involved with the newly-created
Federal Micrographics Council and the Canadian Government Specifications
Board's Committee on Micrographics Standards.
During the year the most active subcommittee of the Advisory Council on
Public Records was the one on the Classification of Records Office Positions
which held 11 meetings. The year's main task has been the drafting of Position
Analysis Schedules (job descriptions) for records office positions in the Administrative Services Category. The drafts of the Clerical and Regulatory positions, seven in number, were completed, approved by the Council, and submitted to the Treasury Board in the summer. Since that time the Committee
has concentrated on the positions at the Administrative Services levels.
The Division has continued to contribute to the Records Management
Institute's activities, particularly membership on the Training Committee which
met three times during the year.
The projects described (with the exception of the EDP Records Management Project which is covered elsewhere under Departmental Projects) consumed some 250 man-days and are included under the heading of "Administrative Overhead" in the Operational Performance Measurement statistics. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
23
Visitors — In addition to visitors from the federal government, the Division
iVelcomed representatives of the Congo, Trinidad and Tobago, the British Public
Records Office, the Administrative Management Bureau of Japan, the Union
of Soviet Socialist Republics, the Archives of Tasmania, the New Brunswick
Provincial Archives, the Newfoundland Government, the Ontario Government,
the Records Management Service of the Alberta Government, the Toronto
Harbour Commission, Sir John Abbott College of Ste. Anne de Bellevue, and
the National Archives and Records Service of Washington, D.C. These visitors
provided the opportunity to exchange information of mutual interest in records
management theory and practices. Twenty-nine man-days, shown under "Administrative Overhead", were devoted to visitors.
Selection Boards — During the year staff members sat on various selection
boards to assist departments to choose the best available records management personnel. There was a total of 13 such boards to select persons ranging
from Clerical and Regulatory Grade Four to Administrative Services Officer
Grade Six. This activity consumed 37 man-days.
Operational Performance Measurement System — This was the third full year
of the introduction of the Operational Performance Measurement System
within the Division.
TABLE VIII
Authorized man-days 4.978
Vacancies (man-days) 82
Available man-days      4,896
Output      Percentage
Input (number    of Available
Activity (man-days)       done)       Man-days*
Training Courses    590.5 13 12
Departmental Projects  1,751.5 110 35
Essential Records  147.5 94 3
Records Scheduling and Microfilming Submissions 108 76 2
Records Disposals   395 185 8
Publications Preparation  75 —
Selection Boards  37 13
Meetings with Departments  43 51 1
Administrative Overhead * *  643.5 — 13
Nonproductive Time* * *
Vacation Leave   362 — 7
Illness Leave  \  211.5 — 4
Special Leave  54.5 — 1
Courses Taken  78 — 2
Language Training  186 — 4
Statutory Holidays  167 — 3
Secondments to Other Units  46 — 1
Vacancies   82 —- 2
* Rounded off to nearest whole number.
** Of this total 250 man-days were devoted to "Other Projects" and 29 man-days were devoted
to "Visitors".
*** Total nonproductive time was 1,105 man-days, or 22 per cent of the authorized man-days.
General Comments — The Office of Records Management Services Division's
authorized establishment during the fiscal year 1975-1976 was 19 man-years.
During the year 82 man-days were lost in vacancies. In addition 186 man-days 24
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
were invested in language training. Illness accounted for 211.5 man-days. The
combined total of vacancies, those on language training and illness accounted
for 479.5 man-days (2.2 man-years) or almost ten per cent of the authorized
man-years of the Division.
The largest growth areas of the Division's activities over the previous
fiscal year are shown in Table IX.
TABLE IX
Activity
Departmental Projects .
Training Courses	
Essential Records	
1974-75
Output
1975-76
Output
Output
Increase
76
5
72
110
13
94 25
Historical Branch
Yet another Division, the National Photography Collection, was created
this year. The Branch now has custody of every media of record used in Canada from the days of parchment onwards and the Dominion Archivist as the
"keeper of records" in the fullest sense exercises the functions of acquisition,
custody, reference, and public service. These functions now form the basis
for all reports and studies by the Branch.
During the fall of 1975 the Branch Director and division chiefs undertook
two days of intensive examination of the functions of the Branch. It resulted
in a much closer relationship and a determination to solve problems and plan
the future by mutual agreement at the Branch level. Two task forces were
proposed: one to identify new fields of acquisition within the whole Canadian
perspective and to map out the role of the Branch in what could become a
national acquisition policy; and the other to examine the reference systems
presently used in the Branch and to study the feasibility of common systems
of reference, much greater refinement, sophistication, and coordination. Meanwhile, it was agreed that even in times of budgetary restraint, acquisition must
remain a very high priority as it is necessary to fulfil the first goal of the Archives, the preservation of the country's documentary heritage. This does not
mean that public service in the traditional sense would be neglected but rather
that expansion of the service may have to be postponed until better times.
We may have to ask the public to bear with delays and inconveniences which
frustrate archivists just as much as their clients since we have not received
resources in line with public demand for our services. It may become necessary
to occasionally limit the availability of archivists for consultation by the public
in order that our mounting backlog of archival material can be processed; we
believe that our clients will be patient with us if we strive to release new areas
of research not hitherto available.
Despite financial restraints we are in general pleased with what we have
accomplished during the year and, challenged by the need for economy, we
have often found ways of increasing output and efficiency.
Some highlights from the year's work, exclusive of acquisition, are in the
areas of documentation, cataloguing, and diffusion.
The National Film Archives has undertaken the custody and readying for
servicing of the Canadian Film Institute Library and documentation on cinema.
The Library is developing its documentation files on archival science and
Canadian history.
The study of methods and procedures for machine readable archives is
nearly completed and the Machine Readable Archives Division is now operational. Good progress was made in the development of the Canadian MARC
format for maps and its adaptation for international acceptance.
The major event in diffusion for researchers was the publication of the
second, and much enlarged edition, of the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, covering 170 repositories. The first series of slides of 26 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
visual documents (140 slides in four sets) has been completed, and the first
of a series of microfiches in colour, each reproducing a number of works of
an artist, has been prepared, and will be ready for distribution soon. While
the slides are particularly suited to illustrate lectures in the schools, the microfiches have been prepared to answer the needs of researchers in Canadian Art.
The Catalogue of the National Map Collection has been prepared for filming and publication by G. K. Hall. Microfilm of 105 mm will be used for the diffusion of maps or as a substitute to consultation of originals.
Two new travelling exhibitions have been prepared: Canada's Sports
Heritage: 1807-1914 and Into the Silent Land. Previously prepared exhibitions
will have wider audiences. The exhibition Telecommunications: The Canadian
Experience will be shown at Man and His World in Montreal, and the W. H.
Coverdale Collection of Canadians and the Overland to Oregon exhibitions
will be shown in the United States during the bicentennial year.
Manuscript Division
The Manuscript Division continued to expand its holdings and services
reflecting a growing demand for new documentation. The demand for new
sources began to manifest itself some years ago, but was given fresh impetus in the 1970s when historians and other researchers developed new
specialized fields of interest. Aware of the shortcomings in these, and in some
of the more traditional fields, the Division embarked on a vigorous acquisition
program in such areas as: literature, drama, and other fine arts; business and
labour; medical, pure and applied sciences; ethnology and ethnicity; and native peoples' rights, feminist movements, and the protection of the environment. Encouraged by the responses, the Division was able to formalize plans
for a more systematic program, particularly in the areas of the arts, business,
and labour.
Several factors contributed to the growth of demand for additional documentation. Large amounts of public funds were made available to such research projects as the Local Initiatives Program, New Horizons, Native Peoples' Claims, Ethnic Studies, Restoration of Historic Sites, Oral History, etc.
The enrolment in graduate studies continued to expand with strong emphasis on socioeconomic studies, multiculturalism, political ideologies and
movements, and the protection of ecology. The presence of a new leisure
group — the genealogists, local historians — began to be felt in increasing
numbers, thus adding further to the demand for archival services. At the same
time technological advances in reproduction of documents dramatically increased the volume of collections that were being entrusted to the Manuscript
Division. During 1975-1976 the Division received 487.5 metres of manuscript
materials.
Unfortunately, because of the policy to restrict expenditures and to reduce
available manpower the acquisition program had to be severely curtailed. The
Arts, and Business and Labour Archives projects were left in their embryo
stages, and a moratorium was placed on transfers of large collections of corporate records and papers of individuals. Other activities, such as the Science HISTORICAL BRANCH
27
Archives, the Feminist movements, and the Protection of the Environment
projects were shelved. One of the more dramatic results of these measures
was the growing backlog of unprocessed collections. Of the 487.5 metres of
new accessions the Division was able to process less than half.
More positive results were achieved however in the publications program.
The Union List of Manuscripts, which is the national catalogue of archival
holdings in Canada, was published in July 1975. The two-volume catalogue
took several years to prepare, and involved complicated computer techniques,
both in the compilation and in printing. It now covers all but a few minor repositories. Almost immediately, work began on the first of the yearly supplements
which are planned for the U.L.M.
The Division continued to compile and publish additional volumes in the
series of General Inventories of Manuscript Groups. Volume 7, representing
MG 29 — Nineteenth Century Post-Confederation Manuscripts, was issued in
the spring of 1975. Volume 2, MGs 11 to 16 has gone to the printer and should
be available for distribution shortly. Work has continued on Volume 8, MG 30;
and plans are underway to complete the series next year with Volume 6, MG 28.
In an effort to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the staff, the
Sections were encouraged to develop professional specialization in the areas
of their responsibilities. To maximize the existing expertise, the Sections were
allocated distinct areas of acquisition and custodial functions. For this reason,
cognate projects such as the Arts, Business, Labour, Education, and Sports
Archives became the core of the Socio-Economic Section, while Military,
Judicial, and Political Archives were centred in the Public Affairs Section.
Other sections received corresponding mandates. In line with this policy the
old Pre-Confederation Section was split into three new sections: French Archives, British Records and Manuscripts, and Pre-Confederation. The present
organization of the Manuscript Division is as follows:
French Archives Section is responsible for records copied from repositories in France and for related original materials.
British Records and Manuscripts Section is responsible for records
copied from British repositories and for original records of Governors General,
Lieutenant Governors, and other British offices and authorities in the North
American colonies.
Pre-Confederation Records and Manuscripts Section is responsible for
records of provincial governments in Canada. 1760-1867, for corporate records
and private manuscripts created and/or accumulated in the colonies which
became Canada, and for copies of provincial records and selected local records after 1867.
Prime Ministers Section has responsibility for all papers of Canadian
Prime Ministers and their correspondents.
Public Affairs Section has responsibility for private papers of individuals
and corporate records of organizations and institutions active in the national
public affairs: elected or appointed public officials, judiciary, military service,
political parties, etc. 28
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Socio-Economic Section has responsibility for manuscripts and records
received from the private sector including the arts, business, labour, philanthropy, sports, scholastics, etc.
National Ethnic Archives Section has responsibility for private papers of
individuals and corporate records of associations and institutions serving the
various cultural communities in Canada.
Research and Inquiries Section has responsibility for coordinating the
incoming correspondence and the research undertaken in response to public
inquiries for historical data. The Section also coordinates inquiries for information from records of the federal government.
Reference Room Unit has responsibility for the various calendars, indexes, and other finding aids which are available for public reference and
examination. It also coordinates the consultant service offered to the public by
professional and support staff in the Reference Room.
Union List of Manuscripts Unit has responsibility for compiling, editing,
and publishing \he*Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories. It acts
as liaison with other repositories.
Technical Services and Diffusion Unit has responsibility for coordinating
divisional programs on conservation, Divisional microfilming, and the Diffusion
Program.
FRENCH ARCHIVES SECTION —- On 1 October 1975 the former French Archives subsection was separated from the Pre-Confederation Records Section
and became an independent section. Its main function is to locate documentation on Canada derived from archives in France. It acquires original
documents relating to the French rule in Canada, and those of some religious
institutions.
Finding aids were prepared for the following: Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal;
Ministère des Affaires étrangères, Correspondance politique. Grande-Bretagne; B3 Series Marine, Letters Received: Colonies C11C, North America, Correspondence, Memoranda, and Miscellaneous Documents: and an index of
the papers of psychiatrist Kazimierz Dabrowski. Electronic processing of the
D2C Troupe des Colonies Series has also been undertaken.
A guide entitled La justice en Nouvelle-France : ses formes pensées et
agies, sources du dépôt canadien les peignant has also been prepared.
The Centre d'études acadiennes of the University of Moncton. N.B.. has
published, with permission from the Archives and as an integral part of the
Inventaire des sources documentaires sur les Acadiens. a manuscript entitled
"Guide des sources de l'histoire acadienne aux Archives publiques du Canada, 1962".
As a follow-up to the study on Champlain and his period (Champlain et
son époque), a number of. documents have been identified and selected for
publication. The work is most advanced on the period ending in 1635.
To provide maximum protection, a large number of fragile documents
have been replaced in the stacks by photocopies. HISTORICAL BRANCH
29
In conjunction with St. Paul University (Ottawa) and largely through the
efforts of Fathers Pierre Hurtubise and Alexander Baron, O.M.I., the Section
continued to identify and microfilm archival collections of the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith in Rome (seventeenth, eighteenth
and nineteenth centuries).
Acquisitions
MICROFILM
Archives des Colonies, Séries E; Dossiers personnels, cartons 314 to 393.
Archives des Colonies; Répertoire chronologique et analytique des arrêts du
Conseil des dépêches, 1611-1710.
Archives départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Séries B; Justice et procédures, registers 31 to 35.
Archives nationales du Québec; Insinuations, jugements et délibérations du
Conseil supérieur de Québec.
ORIGINALS
Papiers de la seigneurie de Rouville et Chambly
Papiers Dabrowski
BRITISH RECORDS AND MANUSCRIPTS SECTION — In October 1975 the
British Records Unit became the British Records and Manuscripts Section.
The Section is responsible for records copied from British repositories and
housed in Manuscript Groups 11-16, 20, 21, and 40, as well as for original
material in Record Groups 7 and 8. In addition the Section cooperates with
other sections in the Manuscript Division with respect to documents of British
provenance.
Arrangement and Description — The major activity for 1975-1976 continued
to be the preparation of Volume 2 of the General Inventory Manuscripts. This
contains MG 11, Colonial Office; MG 12, Admiralty; MG 13, War Office; MG 14,
Audit Office; MG 15, Treasury; and MG 16, Foreign Office. With the checking
and typing of the index completed, the volume will be available in the summer of 1976.
As the inventories for MGs 11-16 have been revised, a new manuscript
group has been opened up and expanded, MG 40, Records and Manuscripts
from British Repositories. The MG now contains such collections as the Duplicate Despatches, which came to the Public Archives from the Colonial
Office in 1909; copies from the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich such
as Lloyd's Register of Shipping (not previously inventoried) and the Halifax
Dockyard Records; transcripts of General Post Office Records; microfilm of
Customs and Plantations Papers (not previously inventoried); and selected
copies of records from Public Record Office groups, such as State Paper
Office and Cabinet Office. 30
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
The revised inventories in Volume 2, the consolidated and partially revised MG 40, as well as the improved Main Entry Catalogue, should result in
greater control over the Section's holdings. This will improve access to the
papers for researchers and staff.
Finding Aids — Most of the work on finding aids had to be postponed pending
completion of the inventory revision. However, consolidated finding aids were
prepared for MG 14, Audit Office (FA 250) and MG 15, Treasury (FA 310), and
improvements were made in a number of others. Finding Aid 90, British Records on Microfilm, is being retyped, and will be available on microfiche. When
the job is completed this finding aid can be diffused as an aid to researchers
and interlibrary loan staff in the Public Archives and across Canada.
Public Service — The Section continued to offer oral and written reference
service. This role shows no sign of diminishing. For example, by February the
Section had already surpassed the projected estimate of written enquiries for
the entire fiscal year.
Restoration — Work continued on the restoration of RG 8 "C" Series, British
Military Records, with the most severely damaged and deteriorated volumes
now restored, back in circulation, and under control.
Acquisitions — An important accession was an original manuscript on the
properties of heat by the eighteenth century natural philosopher, Henry Cavendish. This item was purchased privately by Dr. Jason Hannah and donated
to the Archives. The Section also acquired an original letterbook of John
Dalton, Deputy Adjutant General at Quebec, 1796-1797. Microfilm copies arrived from the Public Record Office of Colonial Office 616, Dominions (War
of 1914-1918), Original Correspondence, and its register classes, CO. 752 and
753; as well as CO. 880, Confidential Prints, North America, [1677]-1913; additions to the collections of CO. 5, America and West Indies, Original Correspondence; and Admiralty 2, Admiralty and Secretariat, Out-Letters. Microfilm
selections from the McGrigor Papers and the Longmore Pamphlet Collection
at the Royal Army Medical College were also accessioned.
PRE-CONFEDERATION RECORDS AND MANUSCRIPTS SECTION — In October 1975 the Canadian Records Unit became the Pre-Confederation Records
and Manuscripts Section, with responsibility for the records of the colonial
governments 1760-1867, corporate and private manuscripts accumulated in the
colonies which became Canada, and provincial and local records after 1867.
Two special projects are also its concern: cooperation in the acquisition of
religious archives and the investigation and copying of Spanish archival holdings relating to Canada. The staff consists of three archivists; a clerk will be
added to the establishment in the coming year.
Acquisitions — The influx of acquisitions continues at a high rate, although
as yet an active and organized acquisition program exists only for the two
special projects. Priorities in the reception of incoming collections and the
servicing of researchers' requests for information and assistance diverted
most of the available manpower to such an extent that the work on the Guide
to Pre-Confederation Public Records was virtually halted. HISTORICAL BRANCH
31
SPAIN
The work of Selma Barkham to identify source material relating to Canada
in Spanish archives and to arrange for copying has borne the first fruits this
year with the microfilming of the Burgos insurance records. Work at Onate has
brought to light three documents actually written in Canada, 1572, 1577 and
1584. Microfilming of the notarial records at Onate is to begin in 1976.
Burgos: Archivo de la Diputaciôn Provincial (MG 10, F2); registers of maritime
insurance policies, 1565-1597, underwritten by the merchant guild of
Burgos, the Consulado de Mar y Universidad de Mercaderes. The registers contain many policies for ships sent to the whaling grounds off
Labrador. Microfilm, reels K-59 to K-66. Copied by the Centro Nacional
de Microfilm of Spain from the originals in the Archivo de la Diputaciôn
Provincial at Burgos. A finding aid is in preparation.
Onate: Archivo de los Protocolos de Guipuzcoa (MG 10, F1); Selected documents relating to Spanish Basque participation in the whaling and cod
fisheries off the Labrador coast, 1547-1564. These notarial records illustrate the wealth of material to be copied in future. Microfilm, reel K-1.
Copied from originals in the Archivo de los Protocolos de Guipuzcoa at
Onate, Spain.
ECCLESIASTICAL RECORDS AND RELIGIOUS LIFE
Canadian Council of Churches; the most outstanding acquisition of the year
came from the Canadian Council of Churches. Under an agreement signed
with the Council at the meeting of the General Board in October 1975,
some 36 metres of records were transferred to the Archives, which becomes the official repository for the Council and further transfers will be
made regularly in future. The records of the Council and its predecessors
will be a rich and a valued source for studies of the ecumenical movement
and the development of social welfare programs in Canada and by Canadians abroad.
L'Abbaye de Port Royal (MG 17, A 23); papiers tirés des pièces d'archives
françaises se rapportant à l'abbaye de Port Royal des Champs et son
cercle, et à la résistance contre la Bulle Unigenitus. Plusieurs des pièces
copiées concernant le Canada et l'activité des jansénistes au Canada,
1692-1744. Microfilm, bobines K-34 à K-43. Copiés des originaux aux
Archives royales d'Utrecht en Hollande.
Dade, Charles, Rev. (MG 24, K 41); journals of Rev. Charles Dade, 1829-1870,
recording his experiences as a clergyman and as a teacher at Upper
Canada College. Of note are the meteorological observations at Toronto,
1831-1837. Originals, 7.5 cm. Also available on microfilm, reel C-9164.
Presented by Mrs. R. M. Pearson of Vancouver, B.C., through the courtesy of the Atmospheric Environment Service, Toronto.
Diocese of Ontario (MG 17, B 6); letterbooks of the Secretaries of the Synod
for the Anglican Diocese of Ontario, namely Ven. T. A. Parnell, Canon A.
Spencer, and Canon G. W. G. Grout, 1864-1916. Each volume has a nominal index. Microfilm, reels M-3697 to 3704. Copied from originals in the
Diocesan Archives, Kingston, Ont. 32
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Langlois, Wilfrid, Mgr. (MG 31, F 2); correspondence, ecclesiastical records,
and family papers of Mgr. Langlois, including financial and legal papers
and genealogical notes on the Langlois, Ouellette, and related families,
1796-1971. Originals, 30.5 cm.
Oblats de Marie-Immaculée (additional) (MG 17, A 17); The Month, published
at St. Louis College, New Westminster, 1892-1896, under the patronage of
bishop Paul Durieu. Microfilm, reel M-2311.
Ottawa Lay School of Theology (MG 17, F 4); correspondence and committee
minutes, papers of W. A. Monaghan and L. M. Read relating to the Ottawa
Lay School of Theology and the National Steering Committee for Lay
Schools of Theology of the United Church of Canada, 1959-1973. Originals, 30.5 cm. Finding Aid 943. Presented by the School.
Religious Society of Friends in Canada (Quakers) (MG 17, G 1); minutes of
meetings of the Conservative, Orthodox, and Genessee (Hicksite) Friends,
with some miscellaneous related records, 1756-1970. Microfilm, reels
M-3797 to 3855. A file list of the collection was prepared at the University
of Western Ontario while the papers were on deposit there. Microfilmed
by the Ontario Archives from the originals.
Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, Montréal (additionnel) (MG 17, A 7-2); documents
relatifs aux emplacements de la ville de Montréal et des banlieues classés d'après les numéros du deuxième terrier, 1648-1854, de même que des
documents relatifs aux terres dans la seigneurie du Lac-des-Deux-Mon-
tagnes, 1783-1832. Microfilm, bobines M-3690 à M-3692 et M-3707 à
M-3710. Copiés des originaux en possession des Archives du Séminaire
de Saint-Sulpice de Montréal.
Stonor, Christopher, Mgr. (MG 23, 119); "Report on the state of the Catholic
religion in the English colonies of America" (in Italian), with a brief description of the position and problems of the Church in Quebec, Nova
Scotia, Newfoundland, the colonies which became the United States, and
the West Indies, as well as comments on the role of the Vicar Apostolic,
ca. 1764-1765. Microfilm, reel A-930. Copied from the original in the South-
wark Diocesan Curia offices, London, U.K.
PARISH REGISTERS AND RECORDS
With some assistance from the National Ethnic Archives Section, a considerable growth in the holdings of parish registers on microfilm was effected.
The Checklist of Parish Registers was revised and updated to include everything received by 1 April 1975, and was published in late summer.
Aylmer, Que.: Christchurch (Anglican Church) (MG 8, G 57); parish registers,
1864-1971, for Aylmer and vicinity. Reels M-3695 and 3696.
Buckingham, Que.: St. Stephen's Anglican Church (MG 8, G 61); parish registers, 1845-1948. Reels M-3856 and 3857.
Cambridge (formerly Preston), Ont.: St. Peter's Lutheran Church (MG 9, D7-
48); parish registers, 1834-1955. Reels M-3241 and 3242. HISTORICAL BRANCH 33
Clayton, Ont.: Clayton United Church (MG 9, D7-47); parish registers of Clayton
United Church, its Congregational, Methodist, and Presbyterian predecessors in North Lanark Twp., 1852-1965. Reels M-3243, 3687 and 3688.
Hamilton, Ont.: Temple Ansche-shalom (MG 9, D7-51); records of the Temple
congregation. Reel M-3739.
Hull, Que.: Hull Baptist Church (MG 8, G 60); parish records, 1916-1924. Xerox,
58 pp.
Hull, Que.: St. James Anglican Church (MG 8, G 12); parish registers, 1854-
1944, including Chelsea and Gatineau Missions. Reels M-3689.
Kitchener, Ont.: St. Matthew's Lutheran Church (MG 9, D7-36): parish records,
1929-1976. Xerox, 6 cm.
Montreal, Que.: Holy Ghost Ukrainian Catholic Church (MG 8, G 19, Vol. 26);
parish registers, 1968-1974. Originals, 4 cm.
Ottawa, Ont.: St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (MG 9, D7-35); records of the
Kirk Sessions, Temporal Committee, missionary societies, women's societies, and other bodies, 1829-1974. Originals, 11.9 m. The Church agreed
to make the Archives the official repository of these records and to effect
periodic transfers in future.
Ottawa, Ont.: St. Hyacinth Catholic Church (MG 9, D7-52); parish records of
the Polish community, 1969-1974. Originals, 7.5 cm.
Quyon, Que.: St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church (MG 8, G 51); parish
registers, 1889-1946, including Onslow and Bristol Missions. Reel M-3132.
Sorel, Que.: St-Pierre de Sorel (église catholique) (MG 8, G 59); registres de la
paroisse, 1675-1973. Transcriptions, 51 cm.
South Gower Twp., Ont.: South Gower Baptist Church (MG 9, D7-53); parish
records, 1873-1922. Xerox, 186 pp.
Toledo, Ont.: St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (MG 9, D7-45); parish registers, 1844-1913. Xerox, 4 cm.
Victoria, B.C.: James Bay Methodist Church (MG 9, F7-1); parish records,
1891-1936. Reel M-2311.
Wilno, Ont.: Our Lady Queen of Poland Catholic Church (MG 9, D7-50); parish
records, 1881-1975. Originals, 21 cm.
Winnipeg, Man.: Holy Ghost Catholic Church (MG 9, E5-4); parish records,
1878-1947. Originals, 7 cm.
PUBLIC LIFE
A significant proportion of acquisitions was formed by the papers of
figures active in public life — politics, judicial affairs, the militia, etc.
The Albion (MG 24, B 157); newspaper clipping taken from the New York
Albion, concerning the Rebellion of 1837-1838, illustrating Americans
reacting to the event. Originals, 2 cm. 34
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Banks, Sir Joseph (additional) (MG 23, J4); two letters of Johann Ludwig Tiarks
to Banks concerning surveys for the Quebec boundaries, 1818-1819. Originals, 8pp.
Belcher, Jonathan (MG 18, F 38); letter from Thomas Hancock, merchant in
charge of the transportation of the Acadians to Boston, explaining the
reasons of the refusal of the Massachusetts Government to accept an
Acadian refugee contingent and requesting reimbursement of expenses,
29 September 1762. Originals, 3 pp.
Chipman, Ward, Sr. and Jr. (MG 23, D 1); the records of the Deputy Muster
Master General's Office (Volumes 24-30) were microfilmed and are now
available for interlibrary loan. Included in these volumes are muster rolls
of Loyalist regiments.
Duckworth, Sir John Thomas (additional) (MG 24, A 45); correspondence,
memoranda, reports, lists, maps, and other documents accumulated by
Duckworth during his term as Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Newfoundland, 1810-1812. Topics of interest include prisoners of war, their
treatment and exchange; convoys, American fishermen, and spying during
the War of 1812; education, religion, and the Beothuk Indians. Originals,
290 pp.
Fitton, Robert Wiley (MG 24, B 155); certificates, commissions, and correspondence, 1816-1852, relating to his career as a surgeon, Coroner, and Registrar of Bonaventure County, Quebec. Originals, 30 pp. Presented by the
Monterey, California History and Art Association.
Gourlay, Robert Fleming (additional) (MG 24, B 33); letter of Robert Gourlay
to James Hamilton regarding his health and family, and a projected visit
to America, 1856. Originals, 2 pp.
Hoyle, Robert, M.L.A. and Collector of Customs (additional) (MG 24, B 141);
militia records, ca. 1837-1840, and a petition for appointment to office,
1842. Originals, 20 pp. Presented by Mr. G. L Van Vliet of Montreal.
Jarvis, Edward James, chief justice of Prince Edward Island (additional) (MG
24, B 13); correspondence, estate and financial records, legal documents,
and newspapers accumulated by E. J. Jarvis during his legal and judicial
career in New Brunswick, Malta, and Prince Edward Island, with some
papers of his son Henry Fitzgerald Jarvis, M.D., largely relating to his
medical studies. Originals, 40 cm. Presented by Michael Jarvis of Ottawa.
Labouchere, Henry, Baron Taunton (additional) (MG 24, A 58); memoranda concerning the government of Vancouver Island, its administration by the
Hudson's Bay Company and the future of the colony, 1849-1857, with some
correspondence of British political figures on the subject. Originals, 91 pp.
Lay, Horatio Nelson and family (MG 24, L 13); correspondence of George T.
Lay to his son H. N. Lay (1832-1898) concerning affairs in China, 1842-
1845, with some manuscripts published by H. N. Lay, correspondence and
articles concerning his career in China as Inspector General of Customs,
and related material, 1842-1966. The most significant part of the collection
is an original copy of the Treaty of Tientsin, 1858, which H. N. Lay was !
HISTORICAL BRANCH
35
chiefly responsible for
negotiating
on behalf of Lord Elgin.
Orig
nais
12
cm. Presented by Adm
H. Nelson
Lay of Balderson, Ont.
Merritt family (MG 24, E1); the papers of Thomas Merritt, his son William Hamilton Merritt, and his grandson, Jedediah Prendegast Merritt, including records of the Chace-Prendegast family into which William Merritt married,
1775-1897, were microfilmed (reels C-7061 to C-7070).
Morin, Pierre-Louis (MG 18, H 28); lettre de Benjamen Suite, 17 avril 1883, au
sujet des erreurs relevées chez l'abbé Cyprien Tanguay et au sujet des
falsificateurs de l'histoire du Canada. Originaux, 4 pp.
Papineau, famille (additionnel) (MG 24, B 2); papiers de la seigneurie de la
Petite-Nation, vers 1810-1910, ayant fait partie du patrimoine de Louis-
Joseph-Amédée Papineau et comprenant des documents touchant à
l'activité de Joseph Papineau, de Denis-Benjamin Papineau ainsi que de
certains membres de la famille Bourassa. Originaux, 137 cm.
Townshend, George, fourth viscount and first marquis (additional) (MG 18, L 7);
letters to his wife Lady Charlotte concerning personal and military matters,
1759-1761. Originals, 17 pp. Documents relating to the defeat of General
Braddock, and to the 1759 Quebec campaign, 1755-1760. Microfilm, reel
A-931. Copied from originals in the possession of the National Army Museum, London.
SETTLEMENT
Records of the "common man", chiefly relating to immigration and settlement, also formed a significant proportion of acquisitions.
Alves family (additional) (MG 24, I 126); correspondence of John, James, and
Alexander Alves, 1837-1840, with commentary on the political life of the
U.S.A., Upper Canada, and England, including their life in exile following
the Rebellion. Xerox, 25 pp. Copied from originals held by John Alves of
Washington, D.O, U.S.A.
Beatty family (MG 24, I 168); eight land deeds, 1835-1882, relating to property
acquired by the Beatty family in the vicinity of Bytown (later, Ottawa).
Originals, 26 pp. Presented by Mrs. G. (Bessy) Skuce of Ottawa.
Campbell, David S. (MG 29, B 26); field survey notebooks, registers of survey
reports, correspondence, and accounts of David S. Campbell (b. 1841),
who surveyed much of Perth and Huron Counties on behalf of the Canada
Company, 1855-1891. Originals, 35 cm; xerox, 5 cm. Presented by Mrs.
W. C Murdie of Ottawa.
Crerar family (MG 24, I 167); letters of the Crerar family in Great Britain,
1821-1865, reflecting the economic conditions which prompted their
emigration to Eastern Ontario. Xerox, 115 pp. Copied from originals held
by Peter Crerar of Vernon, Ont.
Johnston family (MG 29, A 49); George B. Johnston (1845-1923) and his
brother Edward James Johnston (1836-1921) engaged in lumbering and
other activities in the Ottawa valley, including teaching and preaching. 36 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
The collection includes documents relating to the Masham region of
Quebec and the Ottawa valley, as well as the family, 1867-1974. Originals,
15 cm. Finding Aid 942. Presented by Mrs. Reby (Johnston) Dodds of
Ottawa. Photographs included with the collection were transferred to the
National Photography Collection.
Nairne, John (MG 23, G III 23); parchment land grant for the seigniory of
Murray Bay, given to John Nairne by James Murray, 1764. Originals, 2 pp.
Presented in 1974 by Mr. Duggan Gray and family of Montreal.
Van Vliet, Traver (MG 29, C 84); diary and memoirs of Traver Van Vliet, Postmaster of Lacolle, Que., 1852-1890, recounting his experiences ca. 1840-
1890 and family history. Xerox, 276 pp. Copied from the original owned
by G. L. Van Vliet of Montreal.
Wilmot, Sir Robert (MG 23, D 14); parchment grant to Sir Robert Wilmot by
Montague Wilmot, 1764, of an island in the Saint John River and land on
the nearby shore. Originals, 2 pp.
MISCELLANEOUS
Kelly Collection (MG 30, D 217); correspondence, notes, and manuscripts
relating to the biography of Esther Wheelwright prepared by Gerald Kelly
(b. 1908), historian. Included are originals and photocopies of documents,
1804-1966. Originals, 4.3 cm; photocopies, .7 cm. Presented by the collector.
Kupp Collection (additional) (MG 18, O 12); volumes 13-16 (20 cm) of Dr. Jan
Kupp's Collection of documents from Dutch and French archives relating
to Dutch participation in the cod fisheries and the fur trade during the
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
LOCAL RECORDS
Berthier, Que. (MG 8, F 9); livre des comptes de la Corporation du Village de
Berthier, 1852-1863. Originaux, 53 pp. Transféré de la Bibliothèque nationale du Canada.
Cornwall, Ont. (MG 23, H II 20); account book of an unknown merchant, believed
to have been a resident of Cornwall, Ont., 1791-1794. Originals, 178 pp.
Presented by H. A. Skeith of Vancouver, B.C.
Cranbrook, B.C. (MG 9, F8-1); constable's record book of the police magistrate's court, 1899-1904. Microfilm, reel M-2311. Copied from the original
in the Provincial Archives of British Columbia.
Eardley Township, Que. (MG 8, F 134); register of Meetings of the School
Commissioners for the Municipality of the Township of Eardley, 1866-
1877. Photocopies, 35 pp.
Les Éboulements (MG 8, F 131); documents concernant surtout la famille de
Sales Laterrière et formés d'actes de notaires, de concessions de ventes,
de déclarations, d'obligations, d'arpentages, de comptes, de reçus et de
correspondance. À noter aussi les livres terriers de la seigneurie, 1683- HISTORICAL BRANCH
37
1811. Microfilm, bobines, M-3220 à M-3226. Copiés des originaux en
possession de la maison provinciale des frères du Sacré-Cœur, Ancienne-
Lorette, Québec.
Mastram Township, Que. (additional) (MG 8, F 133); local records of Masham
and Wakefield relating especially to roads and schools and including
proceedings of the sessions of the Municipal Council of Masham together
with returns, account books, and other papers, 1845-1964. Originals, 62
cm.
Missisquoi County Agricultural Society (MG 28,1 227); minutes, account books,
entry and prize lists, judges' reports, correspondence, and other papers
of the Missisquoi County Agricultural Society, 1857-1927. Microfilm, reels
M-3790 to 3794. Copied from originals in the Missisquoi County
Historical Museum.
Prescott and Russell Counties, Ont.: 9th Division Court (additional) (MG 9,
D8-55); procedure Book of the Court, 15 November 1906-1910, September
1914. Originals, 2.5 cm.
Strathroy, Ont. (MG 9, D8-59); history of the Public Utilities Commission of
Strathroy, 1832-1971, by W. C. Pearson. Xerox, 2.5 cm. Copy received
from the author.
Thunder Bay Historical Society (MG 9, D8-57); selected newspapers and other
documents relating to the Lakehead area, 1824-1967. Microfilm, 25 reels,
M-3761 to M-3785. Copied from the originals in the Thunder Bay Historical
Society.
White Lake, Ont. (MG 9, D8-62); daily register recording the attendance of
pupils in the public school of the village of White River, McNab Township,
Renfrew County, Ontario, 1919-1934. Photocopies, 2.5 cm.
GENEALOGICAL STUDIES, CHARTS, AND NOTES
A large number of reports prepared by researchers working at the Archives and elsewhere continue to be deposited with the Section and added
to MG 25.
Among other records useful to the genealogists are the cemetery
recordings. The Ontario Genealogy Society has been particularly active in
this field and has presented copies of their work.
Ontario Cemetery Recordings (MG 9, D7-40); recordings from 72 cemeteries of
Ontario, ca. 1789-1975. Photocopies, 15 cm.
Quebec Cemetery Recordings (MG 8, G 45); recordings from several cemeteries of Quebec, ca. 1850-1975. Photocopies, 112 pp.
Arrangement and Description — With the growth of acquisitions and the limited
staff available, the chief effort of arrangement has been devoted to new material, with two notable exceptions: RG 1, E 11, the oaths of office and allegiance,
were sorted and a new shelf list prepared to serve as interim finding aid until
the series is indexed; and Volumes 1-123 of the Provincial Secretary's files,
Lower Canada (RG 4, C 1) were prepared for microfilming, paginated, and 38
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
provided with identification slips for the files located elsewhere.
Several older finding aids were revised or updated and microfilmed. Those
included with the Diffusion Program's microfiching project are noted elsewhere in this report. Microfilm was chosen for the remainder because of size
and other factors. The Index to the Quebec Gazette (RG 4, D 1) and that for
Submissions to the Executive Council of Upper Canada (RG 1, E 3) are now
available through the interlibrary loan arrangement, as are the contemporary
indexes and registers which serve as a finding aid for the Provincial Secretary's files for Lower Canada (RG 4, C 1). The Calendar of the Upper Canada
Sundries (RG 5, A 1) has also been filmed.
Improved shelf lists were prepared to accompany the inventory descriptions of the Upper and Lower Canada Land Petitions (RG 1, L 3 and L 3 L), as
well as the Provincial Secretary's files for both Lower and Upper Canada (RG
4, C 1 and RG 5, C 1). Several series of private papers, such as those of Lord
Shelburne (MG 23, A 4) also received special shelf lists. The documents in MG
24 also received particular attention in this regard.
Following on the work done in past years to revise the inventory description of holdings, revision, and updating of finding aids has been undertaken
as a major priority. The inclusion of new material, addition of introductory or
explanatory notes, and amendment of entries has been completed for 19 units.
Nineteen finding aids were also prepared for recent acquisitions and older
holdings.
PRIME MINISTERS SECTION — A significant part of the Prime Ministers
Section's resources were devoted to the preparation of the computerized
index to the Bennett Papers. Because of this, and due to a shortage of clerical
staff, it was not possible to complete as many projects as were planned for
this fiscal year. Nevertheless, finding aids were prepared for portions of several
collections, and a number of existing finding aids were updated. Arrangement
of the large collections of the more recent prime ministers continued. The
amount of time spent on oral and written reference service continued to
increase. Despite lack of time for systematic acquisitions work, holdings
showed a steady increase through donations, purchases, and security
deposits.
Control — The major project of the year was the completion of input via OCR
(Optical Character Recognition) typing for the index to the R. B. Bennett
Papers. Several batches of typing were sorted by the computer and four printouts were received and checked. All that remains to be done is the typing of
the entries found to be in error and the amalgamation of the batches into one
complete printout. As well, the Invitations Series (2 m) was reboxed, indexed,
and microfilmed; and the Clippings Series (32.1 m) was rearranged, boxed, and
sent for microfilming, which is currently 52 per cent complete. Thus we expect
to be able to return the Bennett Papers to the University of New Brunswick
during 1976.
The concentration of resources on the Bennett index meant that very little
progress was made on the indexing of the King Papers, however, specifications HISTORICAL BRANCH
39
for a pilot project and the typing was begun in March. File lists for the J7
(Family Correspondence), J10 (Laurier House and Kingsmere) and J12
(Personal Miscellaneous) Series were prepared. Recommendations regarding
the easing of access restrictions on the J7 and J10 Series were made to the
Literary Executors. It was decided to create a new series comprised of the
papers of the Literary Executors and this material was sorted and arranged.
Also, the material slated for destruction was reviewed and its disposition
decided. The checking of the file list to the J2 (Prime Ministers Office) Series
is 50 per cent complete, and the listing of the J3 (Laurier House Correspondence) Series is 74 per cent complete.
The arrangement of the papers of the more recent prime ministers
continued. The checking and revision of the file list for the St. Laurent Papers
was completed and a study of the value of the card indexes was begun. Dates
are being added to the pre-1948 file titles, a project which is 35 per cent
complete. Arrangement of various series of the Pearson Papers is underway.
The reboxing and listing of the C2 Clippings Series (84.3 m) is 98 per cent
complete, and the reboxing of the Prime Ministers Office 1965-1968 Series
(61.5 m) is 59 per cent complete. Work is progressing on the post-1968 material
(22.6 m). The Pearson photos were transferred to the National Photography
Collection, a list of the card indexes to the Pearson Papers was prepared, and
a list of the location of historical documents suitable for display purposes was
begun. The sorting of the pre-1957 material (27 m) in the Diefenbaker Papers
began and is about 26 per cent complete.
Revision of the finding aids for the Borden and Bowell Papers was begun
and the inventory and finding aids for the Thompson Papers were revised.
A microfilm copy of the Macdonald Papers and the accompanying finding
aid were sent to each of the provincial archives in August under the Diffusion
Program.
Conservation — The preservation of the Borden Papers and the Mackenzie
letterbooks was a matter of concern. The Borden Papers will be replaced by
copies taken from the microfilm. This project was begun in May but unfortunately due to lack of staff is only 14 per cent complete. Extensive work was
done to determine the best method of reproducing the Mackenzie letterbooks
before parts of them became completely illegible. Reproduction by photocopying was begun.
Acquisitions
Borden, Sir R. L.; twenty-four letters from Borden to his wife Laura were added
to the family correspondence. The papers of the Laird family which
contain information about Borden's ancestors were added to MG 25.
King, W. L. M.; three pages of material relating to King's 1937 visit to Scotland
were added to MG 55, and 1.3 m of material was added to the J2 (Prime
Ministers Office) Series.
Laurier, Sir Wilfrid; two letters were added to the collection.
Macdonald, Sir John A.; four letters were added to the papers. 40
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Mackenzie, Sir Alexander; additional correspondence was added to the papers
(2.5 cm).
Pearson, L. B.: approximately 1.5 m of additional material was received.
Security Deposit — Mr. Diefenbaker sent over 2.5 m of additional material for
security deposit. A total 131.2 m of Trudeau papers was received and arrangements were made whereby material will be transferred for security storage on
an annual basis.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SECTION — The Public Affairs Section is responsible for
military, judicial, diplomatic, public service, and political (excluding prime
ministers) manuscripts in the post-confederation era.
During the year a number of important collections were added to each of
these categories, the papers of the Honourable Robert L. Stanfield and a large
accession of party records of the CCF/NDP being the most significant. A large
quantity of material was placed on deposit in security storage, final disposition
of these papers to be determined at a later date. Because of a steadily
accumulating backlog of work in processing archival materials, it was found
necessary to devote more time to establishing control over these materials
in this year. This trend is expected to continue in the future.
Major Accessions
GOVERNORS GENERAL
Dufferin and Ava, Marquis of; seven letters of Dufferin to various individuals,
dated 1861-1879. Acquired from Joan Enders. (20 pp.)
Lome, Marquis of; materials relate to the period when Lome was Governor
General of Canada (1878-1882) and deal with subjects such as the Letellier
Affair, the Sitting Bull incident and the Canadian Pacific Railway. Acquired
from Sotheby's, London. (10 cm, additional)
POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS
CCF/NDP Records; the National Council of the New Democratic Party decided
to transfer additional CCF papers and New Democratic Party papers to
the Archives from Woodsworth House. The papers cover the period from
the beginning of the CCF through the founding of the New Democratic
Party to 1971, and consist of correspondence files, research files,
constituency files, publications, and posters. (34.8 m. additional)
Liberal Party; manuscript and printed material, sound tracks, and video-tapes.
Received from Liberal Party headquarters. (15 m, additional)
Progressive Conservative Party; constituency and national convention files
received from the PC. Party national headquarters. (91 cm, additional)
Ralliement des créditistes: microfilm des procès-verbaux du parti, 1958-1970.
Originaux prêtés par le parti (microfilm, 1 bobine). Correspondance et
dossiers. 1963-1968. (60 cm) HISTORICAL BRANCH 41
Social Credit; pamphlet material distributed by the National Social Movement
in the 1940s. Presented by Mr. Yablonski of Toronto. (3 cm, additional)
POLITICAL FIGURES
Bothwell, Robert(1944- ), historian; summaries of interviews with Professor
Dale Thomson on the subject of the St. Laurent government. Received
from Robert Bothwell. (5 pp.)
Buck, Tim (1891-1973), Leader of the Communist Party; photocopies of Tim
Buck's publications and speeches, 1967-1969. Received from the
Communist Party of Canada, Toronto. (10 cm, additional)
Caouette, Real (1917-1976), homme politique; coupures de presse, affiches
électorales, quelques lettres et photos. Don de M. Caouette. (30 cm)
Chevrier, Hon. Lionel (1903- ), homme politique; dossiers de M. Chevrier
alors qu'il était ministre, Président de la Voie maritime et Haut-Commissaire à Londres. (24.38 m)
Drew, George (1894-1973), Leader of the Opposition; papers relating to Drew's
activities as High Commissioner in Britain. Presented by Edward Drew.
(86 cm, additional)
Howard, Frank (1925- ), Member of Parliament; papers relating to his
career as an M.P. for Skeena, dating from 1957 to 1976. Presented by Mr.
Howard (15 m)
Laing, Arthur (1904-1975), Cabinet Minister; papers, the majority of which
relate to Arthur Laing's early political career, were received from Mrs.
Laing of Vancouver. (1 m)
Lewis, David (1909- ), Leader of the New Democratic Party; papers were
received from Mr. Lewis. (4.8 m, additional)
Motherwell, W. R. (1860-1943), Cabinet Minister; transferred to the Archives
from the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. (60 cm)
Saltsman, Max (1921- ), Member of Parliament; surveys of his constituents.
Received from M. Saltsman.
Stanbury, Richard J. (1923- ), Senator; papers including correspondence
and memoranda relating to his Presidency of the Liberal Party of Canada
(1968-1973). Received from Senator Stanbury in 1976. (20 cm, additional)
Stanfield, Hon. Robert L. (1914- ), Leader of the Opposition; Dr. W. I. Smith
and Mr. Stanfield met and an agreement was signed transferring Mr.
Stanfield's Leader of the Opposition files to the Public Archives. The
papers cover the period 1967-1976. (110 m, additional)
Stevens, H. H. (1878-1973), Cabinet Minister; correspondence, memoranda,
and notes concerning the career of H. H. Stevens. Received from the Rev.
Francis Stevens of Vancouver. (2.5 cm) 42
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
MILITARY FIGURES
Acland, Peregrine (1891-1963), soldier; letters and papers relating to his
service in World War I. Received from Miss Mary Acland, Ottawa, through
Barbara Wilson. (2.5 cm)
Curtis, W. A. (1893- ), Air Marshall; correspondence, memoranda, and
photographs most of which relate to Curtis' career in World War II and
after, together with a film on the Arrow aircraft. Received from Air
Marshall Curtis. (35 cm)
Ramsay, J. Frederick (1870-1907), military officer; copies of letters written by
Mr. Ramsay to his family describing his enlistment in the Royal Canadian
Regiment and his subsequent military service in the Boer War. Donated
by Mr. Duncan Derry, Port Credit. (26 pp.)
Watson, W. G. (1892-1974), flying officer; photos, correspondence, and a log
book pertaining to Watson's career in the RAF during World War I.
Received from Mrs. Watson through C R. Dunlap. (1.5 cm)
PUBLIC SERVICE AND JUDICIARY
Bushnell, Ernest L. (1900- ), broadcaster; the personal papers of E. L.
Bushnell, President of Bushnell Communications and former Vice-
President of CBO (1.7 m)
Désy, Jean (1893-1960); discours, articles, conférences et photos, lettres et
dédicaces de Georges Bernanos. Don de Mme Désy-Wallis. (15 cm)
Fee, Norman (1889-1973), archivist; correspondence and memoranda relating
mainly to Fee's career in the Public Archives. Received from Mrs. Fee.
(10 cm)
Irvine, Col. G. A.; pages of a manuscript history of the RCMP compiled by
Colonel Irvine, Commissioner of the force from 1880-1886. The pages
were received from Mrs. J. P. Turner of Ottawa. (15 pp.)
Jarvis, Ernest F. (1862- ), public servant; papers relating to Ernest F.
Jarvis, former Assistant Deputy Minister of the Department of Militia and
Defence, as well as documents pertaining to his father, Henry F. Jarvis
of Summerside, P.E.I., and other members of the Jarvis family (ca. 1850-
1957). Presented by E. A. Meredith Jarvis in 1976. (10 cm)
Kirkwood, K. P. (1899-1968), diplomat; additional papers concerning Kirk-
wood's diplomatic career. Received from Mrs. Kirkwood, Ottawa. (30 cm)
Lanctot, Gustave (1883-1975), archiviste fédéral; manuscrits de ses ouvrages
et articles, notes historiques et copies de documents, correspondance,
mémoires, journaux et notes de voyage, coupures de presse. Présentés!
par Mme Lanctot. (1 m)
Langevin, Edmond J. (1858-1909), sous-secrétaire d'État et greffier du Sénat.
Comprend des lettres reçues, 1867-1909, commissions et diplômes, 1858-
1883, notes et souvenirs, documents financiers et 2 albums de photos de
famille. Présenté par Mme Dagenais d'Ottawa. (20 cm) HISTORICAL BRANCH
43
London Public Library and Art Museum; several photographs, pamphlets, and
one item of correspondence which concerns the Archives in 1909.
Received from the London Public Library. (2.5 cm)
Magrath, Charles A. (1860-1949); received a scrapbook relating to Magrath's
service with the IJC from the offices of the International Joint Commission
in Ottawa. (70 pp.)
Matheson, J. R. (1917- ), judge; material deals with Matheson's participation on the Flag Committee of 1966 and includes minutes of the Committee.
Received from Judge Matheson. (30 cm)
Notman, J. G.; James Notman served with the government from 1942 to 1946
as Assistant Coordinator of Production, Department of Munitions and
Supplies, and simultaneously on several boards and committees involved
in war supply and post-war reconstruction. These records document his
activities in government for those years. Included is a daily diary. (1942-
1945,2 m)
Panet, Edouard de Bellefeuille (1881- ), public servant, military officer;
early family correspondence and telegrams, notes, and publications
concerning the Royal Tour of 1939. Received from Mr. A. de L. Panet,
Ottawa. (10 cm)
The following papers were received for security storage. They are not
available for research.
Andras, Robert
5m
Baker, Walter
1.5m
Basford, Ronald
1.5m
Brewin, Andrew
2.4 m
Broadbent, Edward
4m
Dubé, J.-E.
8.3 m
Gillespie, Alastair
.90 cm
Hellyer, Paul
25.8 m
Jamieson, Donald
45 m
Knowles, Stanley
7.6 m
Lang, Otto
69 m
MacQuarrie, Heath
30 cm
Marchand, Jean
48 m
Munro, Donald
•      1.52 m
Munro, John
40.23 m
Pelletier, G.
3m
Reisman, S. S.
.60 cm
Stanbury, Richard
15 cm
Stanbury, Robert
60 cm
Turner, John
2.3 m
SOCIO-ECONOMIC SECTION — The acquisition, custodial, and reference
responsibilities of the Section extend to all private manuscripts in the post-
confederation era which are nonpolitical. The Section has custodial and
reference responsibilities for the larger portions of Manuscript Groups 28, 29,
30, and 31. 44
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
During the year the exhibition Canada's Sports Heritage: a Selection
1807-1914 was researched and prepared by Mr. G. G. Cumming of the Section,
and opened in November 1975.
Accessions
ARTS
Bélisle, Louis-Alexandre; Mr. Bélisle transferred a collection of correspondence and other material relating to his publications such as the Dictionnaire général de la langue française au Canada. (2.2 m)
Deyglun, Henri (additional), dramatist; Mme M. d'Estée-Deyglun loaned for
photocopying several letters and a manuscript by H. Deyglun. (5 cm)
Harris, Lawren S., artist; manuscript, printed and pictorial material and one
reel of television film relating to the late Canadian artist Lawren S. Harris
were donated by his children. These papers contain biographical information and material pertaining to Harris' artistic career, and reflect his
philosophy of life andart. Included is correspondence with other members
of the Group of Seven. (1 m)
Kennedy, Leo; papers of poet Kennedy were placed in the Archives. (30 cm)
Lampman, Archibald (additional); xerox copies of correspondence, manuscripts, and clippings relating to the poet Archibald Lampman were
presented to the PAC by Simon Fraser University Library, and were
accessioned as an addition to the Lampman Papers. (12^m)
Minifie, James M.; correspondence, notes, and diaries of journalist and broadcaster James M. Minifie were presented by Mrs. E. Minifie of Victoria, B.C.
(12 m)
ASSOCIATIONS
Canadian Association of College and University Student Services, Student
Affairs Division; minutes of meetings, reports, and correspondence
presented by Mrs. E. A. Chard of Halifax. (5 cm)
Canadian Cycling Association; the records of the Association include a negative microfilm copy of the Canadian Wheelman, 1883-1887, minutebooks
of the Wheelmen's Association, 1921-1964, record books listing licenced
.   riders and race winners, ca. 1938-1954, and minutes of the Dominion and
Ontario Racing Boards, ca. 1936-1960. (ca. 30 cm)
Canadian Institute on Public Affairs, ca. 1946-1970; subject files, correspondence  files,   booklets,   and  scrapbooks  concerning  the  CouchichiniH
Conferences and the program of the Institute. (1.5 m)
Canadian National Institute for the Blind; minute books of national council
and annual meetings, 1918-1950, presented by CNIB for microfilming.
Fédération des femmes canadiennes-françaises, ca. 1918-1964; correspondence, minutes, financial reports, committee reports, and clippings
presented by the Federation. (1.5 m)
m HISTORICAL BRANCH
45
Frontier College (additional); instructors' correspondence and files relating
to labourer-teachers was presented by Frontier College. (22.5 m)
Young Men's Christian Association (additional); proceedings of the annual
meetings, 1867-1896, and the official publication, The Lever, 1896-1909,
of the Maritime Branch of the YMCA. Transferred by the University of
Western Ontario. (30 cm)
BUSINESS
Baker, Russell, (ca. 1940-1960), air line executive; correspondence, clippings,
memoranda, articles, journals, and memorabilia relating to the career of
Mr. Baker, and to the creation and operation of Pacific Western Airways.
A number of photographs were transferred to the National Photography
Collection. Presented in 1975 by Mr. R. A. Munro of Edmonton. (4.2 m)
Canadian Chamber of Commerce; the essential part of the collection is an
extensive series of minutebooks relating to annual meetings and meetings
of the Directors, Executive Council, and Committees. Correspondence is
composed mainly of material dealing with the annual meetings. An extensive assortment of pamphlets, research papers, and policy statements
completes the collection. The papers are a natural complement to other
collections such as the Toronto Board of Trade, the Montreal Board of
Trade, and the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. (19.5 m)
Canadian Reconstruction Association; minutebooks related to the organization's activities in the immediate post-World War I period. Also included is
a minutebook of the Canadian Home Market Association, a body
composed largely of the same individuals as the CRA, which was active
during the controversy over the tariff in 1911. The collection outlines the
response of business to challenges posed by competition and trade
dislocations. Presented by Henry Borden. (10 cm)
Mossom-Boyd Company (additional); a wide range of ledgers, invoices, shanty
logs, and records relating to the Peterborough, Ontario lumbering firm.
Received through Mr. Howard Pammett of Peterborough. (8 m)
Twaits, W. O., oil company executive; scrapbook containing correspondence,
speeches, clippings, and memorabilia outlining the career of the former
chairman of Imperial Oil Limited. Microfilmed by the Public Archives of
Canada. (1 reel)
FEMINISM
Bird, Florence (Anne Francis), broadcaster; the correspondence, manuscripts,
clippings, and photographs in this collection were accumulated in the
course of Anne Francis' career as a journalist and broadcaster, particularly during the fifties. There is also material relating to the Royal Commission on the Status of Women which she chaired from 1967 to 1970. (1 m)
Fernet-Martel, Florence; une des premières bachelières québécoises et très
active dans la lutte pour le suffrage féminin, Mme Martel a versé papiers
personnels, correspondance de famille, souvenirs, coupures de journaux
et photographies datés de 1869 à 1970 environ. (60 cm) 46
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
LABOUR
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, Toronto Joint Board, 1923-1966;
this industrial union of workers in the men and boys' clothing industry, j
loaned for microfilming its minutes and those of the benefit and retirement
funds that the Toronto locals established. These are the only dormant
records that the Joint Board has been able to preserve; many old records
were destroyed in the late 1960s. The minutes include reports from the
locals, officers' reports, presentation of grievances, committee reports,
and synopses of correspondence from other organizations.
Canadian Union of Public Employees, ca. 1944-1975; the files of retiring
national president, Stanley A. Little and of his onetime executive
assistants, the late F. K. Eady and A. Millard, were placed in the Archives.
Most of the papers relate to CUPE, presently the largest national union
in Canada. Little was president of CUPE from its founding in 1963 until
1975. Included in the CUPE records are chronological correspondence
files, subject files, and files on conventions, executive board meetings,
regions, and the various departments of the Union. There are also some
files on the predecessor organizations. (2.4 m)
Ottawa Labour Council; minutebooks and other records of the Ottawa Labour
Council, ca. 1870-1974. (6.3 m)
Ottawa Typographical Union; records of the Ottawa local of the International
Typographical Union, ca. 1870-1970. (6 m)
Parent, Madeleine and Rowley, R. Kent, union organizers; correspondence,
minutes, reports, publications, trial records, and photographs of Madeleine Parent and R. Kent Rowley who began their work in the labour
movement as organizers for the United Textile Workers in Quebec. The
documents cover the period from the late 1930s to the 1950s including
the important textile workers' strikes at Valleyfield, 1946 and Lachute,
1947. (7.2 m)
Seymour, Edward, labour union officer; records collected by Ed Seymour,
Canadian Education and Research Director of the Textile Workers Union
of America. (30 cm)
Textile Workers of America, Local 1430; records of the Local including some
of its predecessor, the Canadian Brussels Carpet Weavers' Benefit
Association, ca. 1925-1974. (60 cm)
SCIENCE
Barnett, John Davis, Collection, ca. 1800-1900; clippings, offprints, articles,
correspondence, trade catalogues, pamphlets, and drawings collected
by Barnett relating to technological, scientific, and engineering information. Presented by the University of Western Ontario. (90 m)
Canadian Association of Pathologists; the records of the Association consist
of correspondence, committee reports, and financial accounts relating
to the development of pathology in Canada. (1 m) HISTORICAL BRANCH
47
Canadian Dental Association, 1902-1970; minutes, proceedings, and financial
statements of the CDA and Dr. Gullett's collection of documents for his
"History of Dentistry in Canada". (9 m)
Jenness, Diamond, 1913-1916, anthropologist; three diaries for the period
when Jenness was with the Canadian Arctic Expedition of 1913-1918 were
received through the National Museum of Man. The diaries provide
detailed ethnological information on the Eskimo groups that Jenness
studied in northern Alaska, the Coppermine River area and Victoria Island.
Extensive information is also provided on the course of the Expedition,
meteorology, and geology. Presented by Mrs. Jenness. (8 cm)
Livingstone-Learmonth, F.V.C., arctic explorer; the papers of Frederick Valiant
Cotton Livingstone-Learmonth, an explorer, military officer, and argicui-
turalist from Australia were accessioned. They consist of a one volume
diary of a trip to Iceland in 1887 and a two volume diary of a trip on a
whaling ship to Baffin Strait and Davis Bay in 1889. The diaries provide
not only extensive descriptions of whaling and native peoples, but also
some 130 photographs. (20 cm)
Medical Council of Canada, 1912-1975; the minutes, financial records, examination papers, and photographs of the Council were transferred to the
Archives. Also included in the collection are articles, notes, correspondence, and memoranda concerning the Canada Medical Act and
Dr. Gérin-Lajoie. (2.03 m)
URBAN PLANNING
Cauchon, Noulan, 1899-1931, town planner; correspondence, reports, maps,
and pictures created by Noulan Cauchon who was a president of the Town
Planning Institute and for years chairman of the Ottawa Planning Commission. Transferred from the National Capital Commission. (4 m)
Community Planning Association of Canada; minutes of meetings, correspondence, and reports relating to the 1946 establishment and early
programs of the CPAC. These records were received from the Canadian
Council on Social Development whose Executive Director, R. E. G. Davis,
was the first president of CPAC. (15 cm)
Seymour, Horace Llewellyn, planning consultant; correspondence, surveys,
reports, and plans relating to town planning in Canada between 1921 and
1940. Presented by Miss Marion Seymour of Ottawa. (2 m)
NATIONAL ETHNIC ARCHIVES SECTION — The National Ethnic Archives
Section continued its work of informing ethnic communities of the nature and
importance of archival material relating to their history and soliciting their
cooperation to ensure its preservation. Organizations and individuals possessing important historical records were encouraged to place them in an
appropriate archival repository.
In establishing new contacts with potential donors particular attention
was paid last year to the communities of Scandinavian, Polish, Asiatic, and
Jewish origins.  Staff members attended  meetings of ethnic groups  and 48
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
cooperated with other government departments, such as the Department of
Secretary of State, to contact donors and disseminate information about the
Section. Persons needed for linguistic and other requirements were hired
on contract for acquisitions work in the Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Jewish,
Polish, Hungarian, and Finnish communities, or to organize collections relating
to these groups.
To mark the acquisition of a major collection on the history of Canadian
Jewry — the papers of Louis Rosenberg of Montreal — an exhibit of items
from the Rosenberg collection was displayed at the Public Archives and
subsequently at the Jewish Community Centre of Ottawa. A small display on
Italian immigrants in Toronto was used to advertise the work of the Public
Archives and the National Ethnic Archives.
The acquisitions program showed important results in each of the
Section's major areas of operation: Northern Europe, Central Europe, Eastern
Europe, the Mediterranean, and Afro-Asia. From groups of Central European
origin, many smaller collections were received, including material dating
back to early German settlement in Nova Scotia and Ontario. An agreement
of cooperation with the Czechoslovak National Association was signed, and
negotiations were-initiated to reach similar agreements with the national
societies of the Swiss, Slovaks, and Hungarians. Discussions were held with
representatives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church Archives, Saskatoon,
and the Mennonite General Conference Archives, Winnipeg, to cooperate in
collecting material on these religious groups. Former leading members of
German rightist and leftist organizations in Canada were contacted and
persuaded to offer their services to help document the history of these
political groups.
Among groups of Eastern European origin significant progress was made
in the Polish community. Through the helpful services of such individuals as
Walter Chuchla we received the records of the Polish Canadian Association,
Calgary and the dormant files of the Polish Society of Brotherly Aid, Coleman,
Alberta. These collections illustrate the way Polish Canadians organized their
mutual assistance, and, more generally, their pioneer life in the Canadian
West. Especially welcomed was the transfer to the Public Archives of the
dormant files of the Polish Alliance Friendly Society. From post-World War II
immigrants the Archives received several important collections, including that
of Tadeusz Romer, formerly minister of foreign affairs of the Polish government-in-exile. This collection contains many significant documents on Polish
diplomatic activities, 1919-1946.
Within the Jewish community many organizations and their executives
were contacted, and some 40 collections were received. Major donations in
this area, in addition to those listed in this report, are the papers of the late
Rabbi Samuel Cass, who served as chaplain with the Canadian forces during
World War II, and the papers of the former Senator Lazarus Phillips. The latter
includes an impressive collection of Judaica. The Public Archives also is cooperating with the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada to microfilm
the records of the Western Office of the Canadian Jewish Congress and
Jewish Immigration Aid Services of Western Canada. HISTORICAL BRANCH
49
Some success also attended the efforts to acquire documentation on
Afro-Asian communities, especially among Japanese Canadians. Japanese
communities in Winnipeg, Calgary, Vancouver, and a number of smaller
centres in Alberta were visited which resulted in the discovery of photographs,
films, and other types of documents, many of them relating to the internment
of Japanese in Canada during Word War II. Archival repositories in Hong Kong
were checked to locate documents pertinent to former Chinese Canadians.
The earliest volumes of the first Arab Canadian newspaper, the Lebanese
Mercury, were received and a search is on to locate additional dormant files
of this important publication as well as other material on Lebanese life in
Canada.
With the Section's program well established in relation to the Italian
community, work on groups of South European origin concentrated on Greek
and Portuguese Canadians. Important contacts were established with the
Greek communities in Montreal, Edmonton, Hamilton, and other centres with
the assistance of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association
and its affiliated national orders. Records in the Italian External Affairs
Archives in Rome were examined and some consular documents on early
Italo-Canadian relations were copied.
The work among the groups of North European origin showed most
notable success, vis-à-vis the Finns. The Finnish Organization of Canada
presented its archival collection and all of its dormant records to the Public
Archives, and also influenced the transfer of the records of the "Yritys" Sports
Club of Toronto and those of the Finnish Canadian Amateur Sports Federation.
Another significant accession was the records of the Vapaa Sana, the largest
circulation Finnish language newspaper in North America. The FOC and
Vapaa Sana represent opposite ends of the ideological spectrum of this
community.
With the program firmly established in each of the major areas of operation
and in the larger ethnic communities, the Section continued to accumulate
holdings which will eventually reflect the aspirations and activities of all
cultural minorities in Canada. An increasing number of researchers is using
the resources acquired through the National Ethnic Archives Section and this
trend will probably continue for some time. The growing interest in this area
is shown by the fact that the number of graduate students writing theses on
"ethnic" subjects has more than doubled in the past few years and that
elementary and high school teachers from across Canada are asking for
information for use in their classrooms.
Some Accessions
American Hellenic Progressive Association (est. 1930); minutebook of the Sir
Edward Codrington Chapter, Ottawa, 1930-1938. Presented by the Executive. (2.5 cm)
Antonovych, Katerina (1884-1975), painter and art teacher; correspondence,
sketchbooks, scrapbooks, clippings, and other material relating to
K. Antonovych and her work. Presented by Mrs. K. Antonovych of
Winnipeg. 50
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Brentani, Mario von (1908- ), artist and publisher; correspondence, photographs, and financial records of the Montrealer Nachrichten Publishing
Company, 1954-1973. Presented by Mr. M. von Brentani of Huntingdon,
Quebec. (3.6 m)
Chiel, Arthur A. (1920- ), rabbi; correspondence, clippings, and other
material relating to Chiel's book, Jews in Manitoba, and Jewish settlement
in the West. Presented by Arthur A. Chiel of New Haven, Connecticut.
(47.5 cm)
Finnish Organization of Canada (est. 1911); the dormant records of the FOC's
head office in Toronto, as well as the holdings of the FOC Archives in
Sudbury. Presented by the Finnish Organization of Canada. (38 m)
First Slovak Radio Club in Canada (1938-1965); correspondence and radio
scripts of the club. Presented by Mr. P. Vyrostko of Welland. (17 cm)
Foster, Margaret (fl. 1942-1975); petitions, resolutions, circulars, newsletters,
and other documents relating to the evacuation and deportation of
Japanese Canadians during World War II. Presented by Miss M. Foster
of Richmond, British Columbia. (4 cm)
Frank, Joseph N. (1906- ), businessman; personal correspondence of
J. N. Frank, a Montreal businessman and past president of the Zionist
Organization of Canada. Presented by Mr. J. N. Frank of Montreal. (1 m)
Italy, External Affairs Department, consular records; correspondence between
the Italian Consul in Montreal and the Foreign Office in Italy, 1861-1869.
Copied from the originals in the possession of the Ministry of External
Affairs Archives, Rome. (2.5 cm)
Lindal, W. J. (1887- ), judge; published and manuscript records relating
to the work of Judge Lindal, chiefly dealing with bilingualism and multi-
culturalism. Presented by W. J. Lindal through Mrs. Grace Hykawy of
Winnipeg. (21 cm)
North American Baptist Immigrant Aid Society, the NABIAS was established
in 1929, essentially to assist the emigration of German Baptists to Canada.
The minutes, financial records, and correspondence include information
on the Society's activities and on the thousands of immigrants who were
assisted during the Society's 57 years of existence — most of these
immigrants came after 1949. (18.1 m)
Podoski, Wictor (1895-1960), diplomat and merchant; correspondence, official
documents, newspaper clippings, and articles of W. Podoski, a minister
of the Polish Government-in-Exile during World War II. Presented by Miss
C Podoski of Ottawa.
The Polish Alliance Friendly Society (est. 1922); minutes of the Board of
Directors, committees and conventions, correspondence with its branches,
the government and other institutions, actuarial reports, and other records
relating to the activities of the Society and its branch organizations.
Presented by the Polish Alliance Friendly Society. HISTORICAL BRANCH
51
Rabin, Joseph (1892-1968), cantor; records of Cantor Rabin documenting his
career, 40 years of which were spent in the Jewish Community of Ottawa.
Of particular interest is a large collection of manuscript music scores
which he prepared for use by Choirs and Solo voices in worship services.
Rosenberg, Louis (1893- ), sociologist; personal papers, copies of interoffice memoranda of the Canadian Jewish Congress, records of the
Jewish Colonization Association, as well as other material relating to
Rosenberg's work as a teacher, director of the Jewish Colonization
Association in Western Canada and research director of the Canadian
Jewish Congress. Presented by Mr. L. Rosenberg of Montreal. (6.9 m)
Tucker, M. Grace (1902- ), missionary; correspondence, minutes, financial
statements, and other records of the Co-operative Committee on Japanese
Canadians, 1945-1947, 1968, as well as reports of the Anglican Japanese
Mission, 1942-1943. Presented by Miss M. G. Tucker of Vancouver.
Woycenko Collection; this collection was presented by Mrs.Olga Woycenko
of Winnipeg, a writer and activist within the Ukrainian Community and
cultural association in Manitoba. The collection includes, in addition to
her own papers, those of her late husband, P. H. Woycenko, and several
former editors of Ukrainian Voice, namely: M. Stechishin, W. Kudryk, and
L. Biletsky. The papers are especially significant for the light they cast
on the Canadian Ukrainian representations at Versailles, 1918-1921, on
behalf of the independent Ukraine republic, and the establishment of
the Ukrainian Orthodox and Ukrainian Catholic Churches in Canada.
(10 m)
RESEARCH AND INQUIRIES SECTION — The Research and Inquiries Section
coordinates, in a central office, all research activities undertaken by professional and clerical staff in the Manuscript and Public Records Divisions, when
a written reply to an inquiry is required. The Genealogical Unit also provides
an oral reference service for genealogists. The Secretarial Subsection handles
the typing of most of the correspondence of the two Divisions, as well as a
large proportion of the miscellaneous typing.
The Section processed approximately 8,396 written inquiries and 3,100
other letters during the year, for a total of approximately 11,500 requests.
The number of genealogical inquiries remained virtually the same as for the
previous year, the number of general inquiries and letters related to acquisitions increased somewhat, and there was a marked increase in miscellaneous
correspondence. A word-processing machine, which was acquired during the
year, has permitted an increase in efficiency in answering reasonably routine
inquiries, and has proved invaluable for special assignments.
The mail strike resulted in a decrease in the workload of the Section
during October, November, and December, although the time was put to good
use for special projects. Following the mail strike there was a very heavy
volume of correspondence.
The Genealogical Reference Desk has proved very successful. Researchers have expressed great appreciation of this service. The Section has also 52
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
attempted to maintain a high standard of quality in answering numerous other
inquiries received from a broad cross-section: the general public, university
students, professors, project researchers, authors, local historians, editors,
and journalists.
Reference Room Unit — The major tasks carried out by the Reference Room
Unit were the control, development, and improvement of reference tools.
Finding aids, typed by personnel of the Unit, are prepared according to
the rules established for a standard format. Forty-six finding aids were revised
and 68 new ones were added which brings the total of finding aids in the
Reference Room to approximately 1.000 in number. The finding aids, the
finding aid register, and the finding aid index are also being examined systematically to ensure their proper control and description.
Card indexes in the Reference Room also received attention. Five
thousand six hundred subject, nominal, and place entries were added to the
General Index while 1.100 outdated entries were removed. Its predecessor,
the Second Index, a handwritten preconfederation card index, was also revised
and a large number of cards, outdated and repeated elsewhere, were removed.
A number of new card indexes were added to the Reference Room including
part of a card index on grants, licences, and leases of land in Upper Canada
(RG 1. L2), an index of submissions to the Executive Council of Upper Canada
(RG 1, E3), and a partial index to the papers of Sir Charles Fitzpatrick (MG 27,
Il C1). The cabinets containing the room's 34 card indexes were labelled and
grouped according to subject and a list was prepared describing the nature
and use of these indexes.
The Main Entry Catalogue, the most important index, received a simplified
format and retyping was commenced. In addition, other areas of public reference service were examined: the reference desk archivist has been placed
in a different location in the Reference Room and has been provided with a
manual. A committee was formed to study the operation and equipment of
the reference desk and submitted a preliminary report in March 1976. Principal
recommendations of the committee that were accepted by the Division will be
put into effect next year.
Union List of Manuscripts Unit — Marking the culmination of several years of
work by the Unit, the revised and enlarged edition of the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories was published in July 1975. The two-volume
catalogue contains approximately 26.000 entries from 171 archival repositories
across Canada. These repositories include federal, provincial, and municipal
archives; university archives and libraries; church archives; historical societies; public libraries; and other repositories that collect archival material and
are open to the public. The material listed in the U.L.M. includes correspondence, diaries, legal papers, financial records, minutebooks, drafts of works
that were later published, and other similar papers.
Participating repositories had prepared returns describing their holdings,
and the U.L.M. team edited and indexed these returns. The information was
then typed into computer storage. The processing was done by means of a
new and fairly complex program which permitted not only the sorting of main- HISTORICAL BRANCH 53
entry titles in alphabetical order but also the preparation of the cross-
reference index and the index-by-repository (a list of the titles held by each
archives). The index-by-repository, a new feature, has been particularly
welcomed by archivists and researchers. The photocomposition, which was
also done by computer, resulted in a high-quality product, virtually the equivalent of cold type. To keep the Union List as current as possible, annual supplements are planned. Work has been started on the supplement to be published
in 1976. The Unit has also begun to prepare a thesaurus of personal names
and subject entries, in order to establish a higher level of standardization for
future editions. Liaison with contributing repositories is a continuing responsibility of the Unit.
Technical Services and Diffusion Unit — Budgetary constraints severely
restricted the operation of the diffusion program. In spite of them, approximately 300,000 pages of Immigration Branch records were duplicated and
distributed to the three Prairie archives.
The Divisional conservation inventory was completed and revealed some
unexpected information. Total Divisional holdings as of 30 September 1975
exceeded 6,000 metres or approximately 32 million items. In 1970 holdings
were only 2,550 metres. In the past six years the Division has acquired more
material than in the first century of the Public Archives' existence. The conservation problems created by sucha large collection are immense. It is estimated
that 1,875,000 items will require restoration in the next two decades, with
more than 300,000 of these requiring immediate repair. This year approximately
25,000 items were repaired, 62 posters mounted, and .60 volumes bound.
For the third consecutive year the number of entries in the Register of
Dissertations declined, falling from 2,058 to 1,978. The contraction in graduate
programs in universities accounts for the gradual reduction in the size of the
publication over the past three years.
French and English courses on Archival Principles and Administration,
sponsored jointly by the Public Archives of Canada and the Archives Section
of the Canadian Historical Association, were given in 1975. The French course
was given in August to fourteen students: one from abroad, four from the
Public Archives of Canada, and nine from other Canadian institutions. The
English Course was held in September and seventeen students attended: two
from abroad, seven from the Public Archives of Canada, and eight from other
institutions in Canada. Plans were well advanced to modify the course for 1976.
It will be given at the graduate level in the history department of the University
of Ottawa, in association with the Public Archives of Canada. It will be more
intensive and will be expanded to six weeks. The teaching load will be shared
by personnel from the Public Archives of Canada, the University of Ottawa and
other Canadian institutions.
London Office
The London Office continued its search of official and private repositories
for manuscripts relating to Canada. Of note was a bulk purchase of copies
of a complete series of World War I records, CO. 616, together with the index 54
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
volumes CO. 752 and CO. 753. This purchase, at a considerably reduced
price, has been the result of arrangements with Australia and New Zealand.
On the copying of papers held by private repositories and individual
owners, the microfilming in the London Office has shown a creditable return
with the continuing of earlier contacts and the introduction of new sources.
Among the latter, mention must be made of the Jewish Colonization Association and the Church of England Children's Society: the directors in each
organization have been extremely kind in making records available, and their
cooperation is much appreciated.
Gifts of original documents consist of some papers and photographs
remaining after the death of Geoffrey d'Egville, a journalist, and for a time
apparently resident in Canada as a professional photographer: a recent
acquisition is a group of miscellaneous Canadian material sorted from solicitors' deposits collected by the British Records Association.
Purchases at Sotheby's auctions have continued throughout the year.
Notable purchases include the Lome Collection and the Duckworth Newfoundland Papers.
The total number of enquiries remained about the same as in previous
years: 371 by telephone, 126 by letter and 117 personal visits.
Statistics
Documents Copied in the Public Record Office No. of Reels
CO. 5, Vols. 817-1194 (Mainly Extracts)       7
CO. 616, Vols. 1-82 (Complete Series)        59
CO. 752, Vols. 1-8 (Complete Series)       5
CO. 753, Vols. 1-5 (Complete Series)       3
Total     74
Copies of Papers in Other Repositories
Brasenose College Library, Oxford (filmed by the Bodleian Library,
Oxford); C J. Ottoway's scrapbook of the English Cricket Team's
tour of Canada in 1872       1
The British Library; journal of John Lees, merchant in Quebec, 1768     1
Hertfordshire County Record Office; papers relating to British North
America        2
Lambeth Palace Library; papers of Archbishop Moore, nos. 147-161      1
Total       5
Copies of Documents, etc., in Private Ownership Made on the Canadian Microfilm Camera Installed in the London Office from Originals Held by:
The Army Museum Ogilvy Trust  3
Dr. Barnardo   23
Church of England Children's Society  7
Jewish Colonization Association  5
The Labour Party Library (Archives)  2
Messrs. Richardson, Duck and Co. (Held by Mr. Barton)  1
Total     41
Total number of microfilm reels accessioned from all above sources    120 HISTORICAL BRANCH
55
Paris Office
The year 1975-1976 was marked by an expansion of the program of
searching for documents in France. At present the work is being carried out
in two main repositories: the Archives des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, located in
Pau, and the Archives nationales in Paris.
Scrutiny of extensive series of documents relating to the activities of the
Basques in Canada continued. By examining the registers of the Amirauté
de Bayonne, it was possible to update a large body of documentation on this
subject; the study of notaries' minutebooks conserved at the Dépôt d'archives
départementales des Pyrénées-Atlantiques revealed an equally rich source
of documentary evidence. In the space of a few months some 15,000 pages of
documents of Canadian interest were identified. The latter are of particular
interest in that the notaries' minutebooks yield a considerable amount of
information that is not found in the more impersonal records of the Amirauté.
There was also renewed progress in the search for documents at the
Archives nationales in Paris. This year's work was focussed on the Archives
des colonies series, which had hitherto been only partially examined. As a
result, more than 25,000 pages of documents relating to Canada were located.
The following series of the Archives des colonies were examined:
Series A:
Actes du pouvoir souverain
Series F1A
Fonds des colonies
Series F2*
Compagnies de commerce
Series F2B
Commerce aux colonies
Series F2C
Colonies en général
Series F4:
Bureau du contentieux
Series F5B
Passagers
Public Records Division
During 1975-1976 the Public Records Division established a committee
structure to improve communication and increase staff involvement in
decision-making and the planning process. The committees established were:
a Management Committee; a Training Committee; a Committee on Acquisition
and Access Policy; a Finding Aids Committee; and a Publications Committee.
Acquisitions — This year the Division launched a thorough reappraisal of its
acquisition policies and techniques. The most important element in this
process was the appointment of a Committee on Acquisition and Access to
investigate the current situation. The Committee has made an excellent start
on establishing a concrete policy for the acquisition of records now lodged in
government field offices. It also tackled the question of Crown Corporations
and has prepared a set of specific recommendations for acquiring such
records. The chairman of the Committee serves on the Branch Task Force
on Acquisition Policies and Priorities. 56
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
FIELD OFFICE RECORDS
From January to November 1975, the staff of the Division located a
considerable volume of valuable records in field offices from Saint John,
New Brunswick to Vancouver, British Columbia. Financial stringencies prevented further work in this area during 1975-1976; however, the Division hopes
to continue this activity during 1976-1977, within the context of overall Departmental acquisition policies and programs. Significant material that has been
located this year includes:
(a) National Parks Branch files, 1914-1930 (19 m), seven letterbooks of
the Parks Commissioner, 1887-1970, administrative files of the Department of Mines and Resources, 1940-1968 (26 m), and 2,000 photographs at Banff National Park;
(b) registry files (115 m), for Elk Island, Jasper, and Wood Buffalo National
Parks;
(c) files, minutes, paylists, and letterbooks in the district offices of Indian
Affairs at Fort Francis, 1870-1961 (38 m); Geraldton, 1938-1975 (45 m);
Kingston, 1913-1961 (10 m); Sault Ste-Marie, 1963-1970 (28 m); Sioux
Lookout, 1934-1960 (24 m); Thunder Bay, 1965-1975 (15 m); Moose
Factory, 1940-1970 (43 m); Manitoulin Island, 1840-1970 (21 m); Orillia,
1915-1965 (13 m); Southampton, 1880-1960 (7 m); Kenora (1.5 m); and
Quebec City, 1950-1975 (177 m);
(d) registry files, notebooks, logbooks, plans, and accounting records,
1928-1972 (123 m) at the National Harbours Board office in Churchill,
Manitoba, and additional files, vessel registers, notebooks, journals,
and a minutebook of the Saint John Harbour Commission, 1912-1971
(69 m) at the NHB office in Saint John, New Brunswick;
(e) Canadian National Railways, Edmonton regional office records,
including files, plans, accounting records, and glass plate negatives
for the period 1906-1975 (226 m) and for Winnipeg, 1905-1975 (300 m);
and
(f) records of the Department of Agriculture's Experimental Farm at
Indian Head, Saskatchewan, for the period 1910-1959 (90 m).
ACCESSIONS — During the year the Division accessioned 634.8 metres of
original records and 234 reels of original microfilm. The Public Archives
Records Centre is holding a considerable volume of records pending acquisition of further shelf space by the Historical Branch.
The most important accessions for the year appear below, arranged
according to the name of the creating department or agency.
Anti-Dumping Tribunal; files relating to various cases submitted to the Tribunal
for decision, 1969-1973. (5.4 m) HISTORICAL BRANCH
57
Canadian Radio Television Commission; a microfilm copy of the transcripts of
the public hearings conducted by the CRTC and its predecessor, the
Board of Broadcast Governors, 1959-1973. (37 reels)
Canadian Transport Commission; files of the Board of Railway Commissioners
and the Board of Transport Commissioners concerning the regulation of
rail transport in Canada, 1904-1960. (26 m)
Comptroller of the Treasury; files relating to the Comptroller's pre-audit
responsibilities, 1942-1967. (60 cm)
Consumer and Corporate Affairs; documentation concerning the various
activities or agencies now either defunct or a part of the Department
(Patents, Copyright, Prices and Incomes Commission etc.), 1934-1972
(4.2 m). Files from the Minister's Office dealing with the work of the
Department, 1971-1974 (60 cm).
Economic Council of Canada; registry files covering all aspects of the work
of the Council, 1955-1969. (4.8 m)
External Affairs; central registry files, 1940-1963; records concerning Newfoundland, 1935-1949; registers and subject files from the Washington
Embassy, 1927-1949; and records of the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Ottawa in 1973. (10.7 m)
Finance; files from the office of W. C Clark, former Deputy Minister of Finance,
dating from 1932 to 1954; files of J. F. Parkinson, departmental Economic
Adviser, 1938-1969; and central registry files relating to the Federal-
Provincial Relations Division, the International Programmes and International Finance Division, the International Economic Relations Division,
and the Tax Policy Division. (28.9 m)
Food Prices Review Board; minutes, tapes, and administrative and operational
files of the Board, 1973-1976. (24 m)
Forestry; seventy-five ledgers created by the Forestry Branch of the Department of the Interior, 1908-1936, concerning appointments and disbursements.
Indian Affairs; letterbooks of the British Columbia Indian Reserve Commission,
1880-1905, and Shannon files on British Columbia Lands, 1890-1920.
(1.5 m)
Labour; representations and suggestions received by the Department between
1945 and 1972 on a number of topics, including strikes, lockouts, and
the operation of the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act.
(60 cm)
Marine; registry files concerning steamship inspection, Canadian Government
ships, pilotage, shipbuilding, and the Life Saving Service, 1900-1936.
(16 m) 58
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
mi
The Canadian Government ship Earl Grey, 1910, working the ice on the Prince Edward
Island ferry service prior to her sale to the Russian Government in 1914, PA-29628. The
records of the Department of Marine include records of the Earl Grey as well as other
Government vessels. (RG 42) HISTORICAL BRANCH
59
National Capital Commission; eighteen volumes of official minutes of the
Ottawa Improvement Commission, 1899-1927, Federal District Commission, 1927-1959, and the NCC, 1959-1967; four letterbooks for the OIC;
and three volumes of annual reports for the FDC and the NCC.
National Defence; a microfilm copy of "Secret" and "Confidential" Army
central registry files, ca. 1938-1955. The originals no longer exist.
(197 reels)
National Health and Welfare; central registry files, 1945-1970. (4.5 m)
National Parks Branch; records of the Planning Section, National Parks
Service, relating to exhibitions, conferences, game regulations, rights
of way, etc., 1918-1972 (60 cm). Records concerning the activities of the
Parks Branch in Banff, Cape Breton Highlands, Point Pelee, Jasper, and
Glacier National Parks, 1881-1972. (3.6 m)
The CPR Hotel in Banff, ca. 1920, with Mount Rundle in background overlooking the road
to the Banff townsite, PA-31580. Records of Canada's National Parks, including the
original park at Banff, are located in the collection of the National Parks Branch. (RG 84)
National War Labour Board; additional records concerning labour disputes
in the form of reports, working papers, and case files, together with some
administrative files, 1941-1949. (5.8 m) 60
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Hi
Itata
tt__l
l&9ê*
The Canadian Government ship C. D. Howe, of the Eastern Arctic Patrol, off-loading
supplies at Pangnirtung, N.W.T., July 1951. Documentation on the Patrol, which was
administered jointly by the Departments of Transport, National Health and Welfare, and
Northern Affairs and National Resources, can be found in the recent accession of records
from the latter department. (RG 85)
Northern Affairs and National Resources; departmental studies and Deputy
Minister's Office files relating to the various subjects dealt with by the
Department, 1940-1969. (5.4 m)
Privy Council Office; a selection of registry files for the World War II period.
(10.5 m)
Royal Commissions; transcripts of hearings, exhibits, and working papers of
the Air Canada Inquiry, 1968-1976. (2.2 m)
Surveys and Mapping; documentation relating to the operation of the British
Columbia — Yukon — Northwest Territories Boundary Commission, HISTORICAL BRANCH
61
1898-1967; and historical files, largely from the Department of the Interior,
collected by Don W. Thomson when preparing Men and Meridians. (1 m)
Trade Marks Branch; letterbooks, indexes, registers, accounts, and dockets,
1868-1952. (27 m)
Transport; central registry files concerning marine operations in the St. Lawrence River and Gulf, 1911-1965. (1.5 m)
Treasury Board; files relating to supply bills in the House of Commons, 1940-
1967 (1.4 m). Files of the Planning Branch relating to the study of tools
for measuring and improving productivity in the public service, 1960-1969
(80 cm). Decision files 709000 to 714999, 29 November 1971 to 1 June 1972.
(5.4 m)
Water Resources Branch; hydrographie surveyors' notebooks containing
technical data and figures gathered as a result of surveys on Georgian
Bay and Lake Huron, 1883-1909. (90 m)
Custody — Yhe situation with regard to processing and custody of records
as of 31 March 1976 may be summarized statistically as follows (comparative
figures for 31 March 1975 appear in parentheses):
Total Holdings _   18,339    m (17,622 m)
Backlog Requiring Organization
and/or Selection 1,941.9 m (1,417 m)
Backlog Requiring Boxing and Listing 1,127.4 m (1,594 m)
Extent Fully Processed 15,269.7 m (14,603 m)
Percentage Processed 83% (83%)
As indicated under "Accessions", the Division held back from transfer a
considerable volume of records in the Public Archives Records Centre because
of a shortage of shelf space. This volume amounted to approximately 4,500
metres. If these eventual accessions had been added to the total holdings,
the extent fully processed would amount to only 67 per cent. In fact, therefore,
the Division fell behind in this important category by 16 per cent over the course
of 1975-1976. This situation will probably deteriorate further during 1976-1977.
CONSERVATION
The Divisional Conservation Co-ordinator participated in the Branch
Conservation Inventory, assisted in the preparation of long range priorities
for protective microfilming, monitored the Division's microfilm projects, and
advised divisional management and staff on matters relating to document
conservation.
FINDING AIDS
A new Committee on Finding Aids was formed during the year to study
the various problems relating to the production and improvement of finding
aids in the Division. The Committee was charged with recommending appropriate measures and projects to the management of the Division that would
make the production of finding aids both easier and more efficient and make 62 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
such guides more comprehensi ble to the researcher. The Committee presented
its first report during March 1976. Already this has proved to be a useful aid to
management in planning measures to facilitate the production of both automated and manual finding aids. The Chairman of the Committee serves on
the Branch Task Force on Information Control.
INDIAN AFFAIRS PROJECT
Good progress was made on this project, despite financial pressures
midway through the year, which forced the reduction of the number of microfilm cameras from six to three. The records filmed are as follows:
Black (Western) Series correspondence registers, 1872-1959; 7 out of 44 books
were copied.
Black (Western) Series Registry Files (69 m); the whole series was copied.
Deputy Superintendent-General's Letterbooks, 1862-1924; all 56 books were
copied.
General Headquarters Letterbooks, 1871-1920; 519 out of a total of 1,461 were
copied.
Headquarters Registry Files, 1837-1970; 22 metres of this material was filmed.
Red (Eastern) Series correspondence registers, 1872-1964; all 155 were copied.
Red (Eastern) Series indexes to registers; all 74 indexes were copied.
School Branch Registry Files, 1879-1953 (98 m); 234 out of 419 volumes were
copied.
Trust Fund Ledgers; all 85 ledgers have now been copied.
At the end of the fiscal year, 531 reels of microfilm had been accessioned
and were available for research use. Meanwhile, planning and preparation of
material for indexing continued and an EDP pilot project was run successfully.
The Indian Affairs departmental file clearance team completed its work.
As a result, 21,610 files were fully cleared for research, 9,862 files (mainly in
the band membership category) were restricted, and 1,275 files were approved
for release after the exclusion of certain documents. In addition, a team of
retired administrators from Indian and Northern Affairs revised the guidelines
for retention and disposal of Indian Affairs housekeeping records. Division
staff served in a liaison and consultative capacity in this process, reviewing
the recommendations upon completion.
IMMIGRATION RECORDS
Unfortunately, the microfilming of the Immigration Branch records had to
be stopped because of lack of funds; however, the Division managed to film
488 out of 689 volumes before the project ceased. It hopes to film the remainder
during 1976-1977.
During the summer of 1975 the Resource Records Section was also able
to secure the help of researchers hired by the Native Council of Canada in HISTORICAL BRANCH
63
organizing and indexing Métis land claims records. They were able to sort all
applications for 1885 and 1900 and prepared a detailed index to the 1900
applications.
1871 CENSUS
Preparation of the 1871 census for filming was completed this year.
Budgetary restraints slowed down the microfilm of this material but by the
end of March all the Ontario and Quebec districts had been filmed and a start
made on those in New Brunswick. In all, 220 rolls of film were produced.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS PROJECT
In late November of this year the Division decided to make a special effort
to complete the outstanding custodial work, the work on finding aids, and the
inventory for the CNR records in its custody. This task fell to members of the
Trade and Communications Section and excellent progress was made on
boxing and fisting unprocessed deposits. Sixteen of the seventeen outstanding
deposits (73.6 m) were fully processed and work was continuing on the last
one at the close of the year.
Meanwhile, a pilot project was started in cooperation with the Finding Aids
Committee to produce computer sorted descriptive entries. This has proved
successful and will be employed during the coming year to produce up-to-date
CNR listings. As well, excellent progress was made on completing a detailed
inventory for the CNR records.
Public Service
PUBLICATIONS
Budgetary restraints slowed down the Division's publication program considerably. Major Accessions 1974-75 was produced and printed but no funds
were available to produce printed copies of inventories to the records of Trade
and Commerce (RG 20); Statistics Canada (RG 31); Canadian Commercial
Corporation (RG 62); Wartime Prices and Trade Board (RG 64); the Privy Council Office (RG 2); Treasury Board (RG 55); and Public Works (RG 11). Manuscripts now exist for these inventories and it is hoped that funds will be
available for publishing'them in the coming year.
During the year, Divisional publication matters were handled by the Publications Committee. The Committee is charged with editing Divisional publications, setting up publication schedules, and proposing appropriate policy
to the Management Committee. The Committee has involved itself mostly in
editing and in drawing up a revised version of Suggestions for Citing Manuscripts and Records in the Public Archives of Canada, as well as devising a
new accessions procedure for the Division.
PUBLIC SERVICE SECTION
This Section serves both the Public Records and Manuscript Divisions.
Some difficulty was experienced during the year in the Section, especially in 64
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
the photoduplication and microfilm processing areas. Various causes lay
behind the problems in this vitally important Section, such as temporary equipment and staff shortages and the national mail strike which caused artificial «
back-up in orders. Matters have now been taken in hand and effective steps
taken to reduce all backlogs and to improve procedures in the various areas.
Notable among such improvements has been the implementation of a self-
serve microfilm system, new rules for accessioning microfilm, and the adoption
of new regulations, in concert with the National Library, for governing the
use of the fourth floor study rooms.
Circulation of original holdings stood at 63,020 volumes in 1975-1976 as
compared to 68,771 volumes in 1974-1975, a decrease of 8 per cent. Microfilm
circulation within the building was 17,862 reels in 1975-1976 as compared with
18,810 reels last year, a decrease of 5.3 per cent. In the area of photoduplication the Public Service Section provided 160,878 pages for copying by requisition and 57,701 pages directly at the Circulation Desk, for a total of 218,579
pages. This represents a decrease over the 1974-1975 total of 224,547 pages.
The number of researcher.registrations for the year was 3,703.
The actual marginal decline in most categories of the public service
sector can be accounted for in reduced grants to various university programs
and a reduced number of students entering graduate studies in history and
related disciplines. The major drop in interlibrary loans for microfilm can also
be expiai ned by the prolonged mail strike.
National Map Collection
The year 1975-1976 was a year of growth in the National Map Collection.
Although beset by staff and monetary shortages, there was evidence of a team
spirit which resulted in an increase of 200 per cent in the number of maps
catalogued as the Division readied its card catalogue for microfilming and
publication by G. K. Hall & Co. The automation program made significant progress and the Division acquired some items which filled significant gaps in the
Collection. Edward Dahl was officially named as Head of the Canadian Section
during the year, and Gilles Langelier and James Knight became Heads of the
Reference Unit and Cataloguing Unit, respectively.
Acquisition — During 1975-1976, 55,926 maps, plans, atlases, etc. were accessioned, as compared to 46,156 in the previous year.
Maps and plans continue to be received as a result of various acquisition I
strategies, mostly passive in nature. Maps received were transferred from other
government departments (either directly or through the Public Records Division), were donated by map producers, map collections or individuals, were
purchased from dealers, commercial firms and individuals or were copied from
other archival repositories and map collections.
Among the maps transferred from government departments were thousands from the Canadian Hydrographie Service; while many were Canadian
hydrographie and British admiralty charts, there was also a wide range of HISTORICAL BRANCH
65
other cartographical, engineering, and architectural material. A sizeable acquisition was received of plans of numerous structures within the Halifax
Citadel; most are from the early twentieth century.
Other map collections in Canada continue to donate items to the Collection. For example, the University of British Columbia donated 164 World War I
maps from the estate of the late Colonel Harry Logan. The map library at the
University of Ottawa donated numerous interesting maps and atlases. Of special note is an 1826 manuscript map by Joseph Bouchette, entitled "Diagram
part of township of Inverness". The University of Western Ontario donated an
incomplete 1901 atlas of London, England by Charles Goad.
fjrrisiLYjssà
^SuB£/>S
40k*
Manuscript plan by Joseph Bouchette donated to the National Map Collection.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Phillips donated a 1667 manuscript atlas of the
world by Joh: Heinricus Breiining who may have been a priest in Wurttemberg,
Germany. Apparently a labour of love by an enthusiastic and artistic amateur,
the atlas consists of 27 maps and 81 pages of Latin text.
The Division acquired a large number of insurance plans and atlases,
which were purchased from the Insurers' Advisory Organization in Toronto.
The Organization had recently terminated production of such plans and was
offering their holdings for sale. The material, dating from the 1880s almost to
the present day, has great interest to urban and local researchers.
An agreement was reached with representatives of the Inuit Land Use
and Occupancy Project to transfer the Project's records, consisting of maps,
tapes, field notes, etc., to the Public Archives. 66
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976 HISTORICAL BRANCH
67
«,
t_8f
-*-\:fn_#Sffl*
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^v.   ?•        \^   ..j .»	
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Atypical insurance plan, L'Epiphanie, 19
A small contract was given to Joan Winearls of the University of Toronto
who was doing research in the historical cartography of Ontario in British map
collections. Since she was familiar with the Collection, the contract with Miss
Winearls was for ordering copies of significant items, not held by the National
Map Collection. She worked 44 hours on the Division's behalf; the photo-
reproductions are still being received.
Noteworthy atlases purchased in 1975-1976 were Hopkin's Atlas of the
Town and County of St. Johns, Province of Quebec, 1880 and the 1561 Ptolemy
atlas of the world. The Hopkin's atlas seems to be very rare. A microfilm copy
of Hopkin's atlas of Three Rivers was purchased from the New York Public
Library, to complete the known production of the Hopkin's firm. The Ptolemy
atlas, entitled La Geografia di Claudio Tolomeo Alessandrino ... M.D.LXI. is a
welcome addition to the small Ptolemaic collection.
A number of maps were purchased to complete significant gaps in the
Collection. The cartographers include famous names such as Bouchette, Goss,
Purchas, Lotter, John Thornton, Blackmore, Bonne, de Vaugondy, Kitchin,
Cluny, Bowen, Nolin, Cary, Wyld, Dunn, Hawkins, and des Barres. The National Map Collection sent letters to approximately 150 current map producers,
requesting copies of maps produced in the past year. Some government agencies automatically send copies of their maps as they are produced, but since
provincial archives do not normally collect current cartographic materials, it 68
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
k
Ê
es
«t
iXfiEMË^
I f r)
Tjr 11   _ri a * *|    w ^j
rînuïJ'f *
OF
syoiixsi
lM.OVINCKoi QlKljIX',.
From Actual Surveys,Hnsed upon the Cadastrai Plans
Deposited in the office of I he Depart m.mi! of Crown Lands.
j*
Title page of recently purchased atlas. HISTORICAL BRANCH 69
seems likely that a portion of the current provincial map production may be
tost to a future generation of researchers.
The majority of maps and charts of other nations continue to be received
through the map exchange agreements that are in effect with various countries,
including Australia, Belgium. France, Japan, New Zealand, the Republic of
South Africa, and the United Kingdom. The Division is also a depository for
selected maps of the U.S.A.
A tabular breakdown of the sources of the acquisitions follows:
Federal Agencies  21,950
Provincial Agencies  556
Municipalities     66
Map and Book Dealers (Commercial Companies)  24,387
Purchases from Individuals  57
Donations  320
Universities     397
Maps of Other Countries  3,192
All Other  128
Total       55,926
Custody
CATALOGUING
Pre-1850        1,037
1851-1950       6,002
1951-   770
Bibliographie cartographique internationale
Separate Sheets  448
Series Sheets   1,728
Indexing Foreign Maps  2,001
Maintenance to Catalogue  212,981
The number of maps catalogued in 1975-1976 increased almost 200 per
cent from 2,701 in 1974-1975 to 7,809. The concentrated effort to ready the
card catalogue for the G. K. Hall & Co. publication was responsible for this
increase. Most of the maps for which only preliminary entries were on file
previously have been catalogued completely. The project to catalogue the
rolled maps (the "R" classification) is nearing completion. Despite this progress, the card catalogue as published will describe only a small fraction of
the holdings of the National Map Collection (an estimate is 10 to 12 per cent).
Similarly, the maintenance work in cataloguing increased from 133,413
items in 1974-1975 to 212.981 this year. 70
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
The Canadian contribution to the Bibliographie cartographique internationale described 2,416 cartographical items. This is the only international
annual cartobibliography; the National Map Collection is the only Canadian
institution reporting on Canadian map production.
In the area of eventual automation of cataloguing in the National Map
Collection, a number of significant developments occurred in 1975-1976. On
21 April 1975, a joint communiqué announced the cooperation between the
National Library and the Public Archives in the areas of Canadian MARC for
Maps and authorities for author and area. The National Library agreed to accept the geographic area name authorities established by the Public Archives
as applicable in records of all materials presently handled by the automated
cataloguing system; the Public Archives agreed to accept authorities established by the National Library for personal and corporate names used in the
Public Archives records as applicable.
Work on area names which was started in 1974-1975 continued slowly
through 1975-1976. Area name authorities at the country level have now been
established for Africa, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. In
December 1975, work was begun on Canadian names. A skeleton of names of
the provinces and territories and the next hierarchical level consisting of counties and districts is being established. At their October 1975 meeting, the
Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names promised cooperation in the project.
The subject authorities used in the National Map Collection were carefully examined in 1975-1976 and a new subject authority list was established.
The National Union Catalogue of Maps Committee of the Association of
Canadian Map Libraries met at the Public Archives in April 1975. At this
meeting, the chapter on the Canadian cataloguing rules for maps, which deals
with single maps, was submitted for discussion.
The work on cataloguing rules was being carried on at the same time as
the International Standard Bibliographic Description for Cartographic Materials
(ISBD[CMJ) was being developed. Hugo Stibbe, a staff member of the Division,
is Chairman of the Joint Working Group on ISBD(CM). The first draft of the
ISBD(CM) standard was finalized in December 1975 and the second draft is
now underway. The Canadian cataloguing rules for maps are being made
compatible with those of the ISBD(CM) and the ISBD(G).
In cooperation with the ACML-NUC Committee, recommendations for revisions of Chapter 11 of the Anglo American Cataloguing Rules were prepared
for submission to the editors of the second edition of the AACR, the Canadian
Cataloguing Committee, and the Joint Steering Committee of the AACR.
A draft outline for a MARC Canadian Communications Format for Maps,
based on the 1973 ACML-NUC outline and updated in accordance with cataloguing standards and other MARC standards was submitted to the Canadian
MARC Office in October 1975. This draft must be revised again to conform with
the ISBD(CM) standard. HISTORICAL BRANCH 71
CONSERVATION
Work sent to the Records Conservation Section and returned during
1975-1976:
Maps Mounted with Linen-Lamatec  1,282
NTS Current Mounted with Linen-Lamatec  659
Maps Mounted with Permalife-Linen-Lamatec  205
Maps Mounted with Linen  105
Maps Mounted with Nylon  14
Photostats Mounted with Mylar  66
Atlases and Books  24
Labelling  8
Extensions Added  9
Binders and Portfolios  27
Repairs   9
Other  4
Total       2,412*
* This is an increase from 1,894 in 1974-1975.
The National Map Collection was extremely pleased in 1975-1976 with
the excellent quality of the conservation work by the map conservator in the
Records Conservation Section.
The Division established a Conservation Committee whose primary concerns this year have been in the areas of preventive conservation. The wearing
of cotton gloves has been introduced when working with rare materials. The
Committee held a staff training session where conservation was discussed and
arranged a session in the Records Conservation Section for interested staff
members.
In cooperation with the Canadian Conservation Institute, a hydrothermo-
graph was placed in the storage area at 151 Bentley Avenue, where a large
part of the Collection is held. The humidity readings were alarmingly low.
The larger maps, stored in horizontal drawers, were separated into two
groups, one for rarer, older material and the other, twentieth century material
in fair condition. At the suggestion of one of the staff members, Lawrence B.
Earl, the vertical storage cabinets which were causing damage to the material
were altered mechanically to alleviate the problem. Other steps were also taken
to ensure the most economical use of available storage space in the Division.
Also negatives of maps were transferred to acid-free envelopes during the year.
Further testing of 105 mm microfilm, both in Montreal and in Hull with the
cooperation of the Department of National Defence, confirmed that this is a
satisfactory method of map reproduction. Not only does the National Map Collection visualize 105 mm as a conservation measure but also as an integral part
of its automated cataloguing procedures. A contact print of the 105 mm microfilm will be part of the main catalogue entry in the future.
Public Service — In spite of the postal strike in the third quarter, the number
of enquiries varied little from the previous year. There were 3,526 enquiries as
compared to 3,530 in 1974-1975. 72
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
In addition, there were numerous requests for Divisional publications; in
the last quarter (the only statistics available), 113 requests were received.
Photoduplications prepared:
Photostats     6,253
Photographs  1,453
Xerox     3,858
Microfilm     38
Transparencies   177
New Photostat Negatives  1.833
New Photograph Negatives  506
Total  14,118*
* This was an increase from 12,179 in 1974-1975.
A number of institutions and individuals have also requested permission
to take photographs or elides in the Division. There are no statistics on the
number of such photoreproductions. The decentralization of Historic Sites has
resulted in the receipt of requests for large amounts of material, sometimes in
multiple copies.
The Foreign Section recorded 56 loans during the year with a total of
246 items being lent.
The only publication which became available in 1975-1976 was County
Maps: Land Ownership Maps of Canada in the 19th Century, compiled by
Heather Maddick with an introduction by Joan Winearls. The catalogue describes the fifty-nine maps published of Ontario-Quebec and Maritime counties
during the mid-nineteenth century. The maps are the predecessors of the later
county atlases, which were described in a 1970 catalogue published by the
Division.
In 1975-1976, preparatory work was done for the July 1976 opening of the
Bird's-Eye Views exhibition. In addition, maps were loaned to the Canadian
War Museum for the Revolution Rejected exhibition and plans of the Parliamentary Library to the National Library for an exhibition. A small display of
photocopies, entitled The Chignecto Isthmus was prepared for the ACML conference in Sackville, N.B., and these photocopies were later donated to Mount
Allison University. The Foreign Section mounted a display of city and leisure
maps in the fourth floor lobby.
The redistribution program continued to play a major role in the activities;
of the Foreign Section. There are 24 university map collections participating
and their response to the program has been extremely favourable. Statistics
on the number of map sheets redistributed have been kept only since October
1975. For the latter part of the fiscal year, 1,327 map sheets were sent out. Such
institutions continue to contribute their surplus to the National Map Collection,
often resulting in important items being acquired for the Collection.
Numerous tours were provided for groups and individuals visiting the
Division in 1975-1976. Several staff members went to schools and other loca-
•» HISTORICAL BRANCH 73
tions to speak about cartography and the National Map Collection. Betty Kidd
spoke to the Smiths Falls and District Historical Society in October on the
history of cartography in Canada with special emphasis on the building of the
Rideau Canal and the resulting cartographical production. She also reported
on activities of the Division to the Vancouver Joint Meeting of the Western
Association of Map Libraries and the ACML, and to the Sackville meeting of
the latter association.
Staff Notes — During this fiscal year, a number of staff members were actively
involved in projects or associations related to their work.
James Knight, as Chairman of the Archives Committee of the Society for
the Study of Architecture in Canada organized a conference at Stanley House,
New Richmond, Quebec on "Architectural Records and Archives".
Several publications by Edward Dahl became available. La Ville de Québec, 1800-1850: un inventaire de cartes et plans by Edward Dahl, Hélène
Espesset, Marc Lafrance, and Thiery Ruddell was published in the National
Museum of Man Mercury Series. "Maps in the Study of Winnipeg's Urban Development" by Alan Artibise and Edward Dahl appeared in Cities of the West:
Papers of the Western Canada Urban History Conference, National Museum of
Man Mercury Series.
Using Maps in Tracing Your Family History by Betty Kidd was produced
as Publication 74-14 of the Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society.
"Microforms and their applications to map collections" by James Knight
appeared in Vol. 1, No. 1 of Archivaria, winter 1975-1976.
A number of staff members continue to be active in the Association of
Canadian Map Libraries — Thomas Nagy is the current secretary and editor
of the 1975 conference Proceedings; several others act as chairpersons of
various committees; more are involved in committee work.
There is an increasing interest in two new associations — the Association
of Canadian Archivists and the Canadian Cartographic Association. A number
of employees are becoming involved in their activities, for example, Edward
Dahl is one of the editors of Archivaria.
The Public Archives held a reception for the delegates to the Canadian
Permanent Committee on Geographical Names and the Canadian Council on
Surveying and Mapping when the groups met in Ottawa in October. At that
time, the photograph exhibition Into the Silent Land was available for viewing.
Dr. W. I. Smith is the official archival member of the CPCGN and Betty Kidd is
a member of the Sub-Committee on Toponymie Research.
Two members of the Division actively participated in the activities of the
Association des Archivistes du Québec. Gilles Langelier is the official Ottawa
correspondent for the Chronique, and Louis Cardinal was one of two members
chosen to establish a new regional group (I'Outaouais) of the AAQ.
Hugo Stibbe's role as Chairman of the ISBD(CM) Committee is outlined
earlier in this report because of the close connection with the development of
cataloguing guidelines. 74
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Picture Division
In July, the Division lost one of its major sections, the Historical Photographs Section, which became a division of its own. It was on this occasion
that the Division reassessed its main activities for the preéent and the near
future. Six areas were defined: Archives of Canadian Art, National Portrait
Collection, Poster Collection, Heraldry Collection, Costume Documentation
Centre, and Medal and Seal Collections.
This separation also led to a reorganization of the Picture Division. Three
sections were created: the Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Section, to be
responsible for the Archives of Canadian Art, the National Portrait Collection,
and the Poster Collection; the Special Collections Section, responsible for the
Heraldry Collection, the Costume Documentation Centre, and the Medal and
Seal Collections; and the Exhibitions Section and Custodial Services. In addition to these sections a diffusion unit was also organized.
Statistics
Total Holdings
Paintings	
Drawings	
Prints	
Service to Public
Persons Registered	
Enquiries   	
Reproductions Supplied
1973-1974
1974-1975
1975-1976
2,505
12,841
81,812
2,529
12,944
82,481
2,613
13,181
82,727
385
373
449
2,569
2,149
2,624
2,149
4,791
7,207
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, AND PRINTS SECTION — Mr. Raymond Vézina, a
doctoral graduate from the University of Paris, was appointed as Head of the
Section in September. Previously, he had been professor of art history at Laval
University and the author of numerous books and articles on Canadian art.
He has not yet occupied his position, as he is presently on language training.
Also in September, a cataloguer was hired to fill a position which had been
vacant for some time. The first task at hand was to standardize and update
the entries for the major collections in the reference catalogue. It will be some
time before the backlog of uncatalogued pictures can be dealt with.
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS SECTION —- In July, Mr. Auguste Vachon, a member
of the Picture Division staff since April 1967, was appointed curator of the
Special Collections Section which has the custody of iconographie documents
relating to costume, heraldry, flags, and seals. The Section has an interesting
and challenging task ahead since there is very little study and documentation
in these specialized areas. Among pressing matters to be dealt with is the
organization and cataloguing of the collection purchased in 1972 from
Mr. Roger Régor, a costume designer and professor of fashion design. It is
composed of hundreds of original drawings and watercolours and of thousands
of publications which will provide a solid base from which to build an increas- HISTORICAL BRANCH
75
ingly more thorough and specialized costume documentation. It is expected
that the medal collection will be transferred to this Section in the near future.
Hired on contract as part of the federal government's multicultural
program, the heraldic artist, Mr. Hans D. Birk, has documented and depicted
in colour the arms of 206 families from the various ethnic communities in
Canada. When completed this roll of arms with the accompanying documentation will constitute an impressive dossier on the multicultural heraldic
heritage of this country.
Acquisitions — Due to a scarcity of funds, the Picture Division was represented
at only two of the important auctions during 1975. Few items were purchased
and, as a result, the acquisitions program for the permanent collection has
relied greatly on donations and transfers. The following is a list highlighting
the major acquisitions:
PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS
Gold, Lt. Gen. Charles Emilius (act. in Canada 1836-1839); three watercolours,
one of Montmorency Falls and two of Niagara Falls were purchased.
Montmorency near Quebec, by Lt. Gen. Charles E. Gold.
Watercolour, 248 x 172 mm. 76
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
G. A. (act. 1825); a watercolour entitled "Breakfast ot£the North Shore of
Lake Huron" by an artist identified only by his initials was purchased.
He is believed to have accompanied Sir John Franklin on his second
expedition to the Arctic.
c E
I»
_r ">
qj cm
"S x
-J o HISTORICAL BRANCH
77
Lome, Marquis of (1845-1914); two watercolours entitled "Touchwood Hills,
Saskatchewan" and "North and South Thomson RiverfT which were
executed during Lome's trip across Canada in 1881 as Governor General
were purchased. 78 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
May, Karl (1901-1976); the Public Archives had the opportunity to select representative works from the collection of the German-Canadian artist Karl
May. Of the items selected were 13 prints, 39 drawings, 2 sketchbooks,
2 oil paintings, 11 lithographs, several original Christmas card prints,
numerous exhibition announcements, photographs, and a monograph on
the artist. Some were purchased while others were donated. HISTORICAL BRANCH
m 4/
79
I 3 r
3aer
hi
jSnjfl
Ochsenfurter Braut Costume, by Elisabeth Heinen.
Pencil, 279x210 mm. 80 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
CARTOONS
Original works by the following cartoonists: L. Norris, Yardley Jones,
R. Chambers, J. Reidford, D. Macpherson, I. Johnson, T. Innes, P. Kuch,
J. Boothe, R. Smith, R. Bierman, E. Uluschak, Blaine, and Weiss were transferred from various collections of the Manuscript Division.
HERALDRY
One hundred and fourteen photographs of Canadian grants and matriculations from the Lord Lyon Register, Scotland were received as a gift from
H. D. Birk. The following heraldic items were also received: Letters Patent from
the College of Arms granting armorial bearings to Mr. Arthur Stephen Pearson
in 1936; an illuminated painting of the achievement of Arms by A. S. Pearson;
a painting of the Pipe Banner of the Essex Scottish Highlanders; and paintings
of the Colours of the Essex Scottish Regiment by E. Masson, a gift from the
estate of the late Colonel Arthur S. Pearson.
The Anriortal Bearings of
of South Vvu\dsor.C\.t»rio.C_n_el_i, Bamster-at-Litu,
Solicitor of the Supreme Court of CVitarift
Ueutertant Cota .el ComirUKtdinq
the Çseex Scottish, .lequnent:
_jlUg« of Arme.
Lou**.
L_t\c*r«a- Herald.
The Armorial Bearings of Arthur Stephen Pearson, College of Arms, London.
Watercolour and gold paint with pen and ink on vellum, 381 x 279 mm. HISTORICAL BRANCH
81
Public Service — In 1968, as a result of public demand, the Picture Division
began supplying colour prints and transparencies of the art works in its
Collection. Soon it became evident that the cost of producing good quality
colour prints was prohibitive and, moreover, the system was awkward because
the photographer working from a negative on file constantly had to refer to the
original work for the exact colours. As a result, in 1972, the production of
colour prints was discontinued and it was decided to produce and loan original
transparencies rather than sell for a nominal fee, copies made from negatives.
The new method had two distinct advantages. With the original at hand, the
photographer could reproduce exact colours and, with the loan system, a bank
of colour transparencies was rapidly built up. After more than three years of
operation, we can say that this system is functioning well in spite of some
problems with transparencies being returned late or damaged. Colour prints
are still requested for decorative purposes. This demand could eventually be
met by publishing printed series of selected works from the Collection.
The Imperial Oil Collection of C. W. Jefferys historical drawings and
paintings which was donated to the Archives in 1972 has now been indexed
and is available to researchers on illustrated catalogue cards.
Publications
Archives Canada Series
Upon completion of the fourth slide set in the first series, the Commercial
Division of the National Film Board launched their promotional campaign with
the distribution of a publicity leaflet to School Boards across Canada. The first
four sets (including catalogues) are now available from the exclusive NFB
distributors in Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal: A. J. Miller's West: The
Plains Indian, 1837; Image of Canada; Western Odyssey, 1881; and The
Kwakiutl of Alert Bay, 1919-1923.
Introductions, texts, and transparencies were completed for the four slide
sets in the second series, which shall be published in 1976-1977: Picturesque
Quebec, 1826-1832; To the Oregon Territory, 1845-1846; Two Artists in the
Klondike, 1898-1899; and In Search of Moose Deer on the St. Maurice River,
1842.
Topics selected for the third series include: posters of the First World
War; drawings and engravings by John Webber from Captain Cook's Third
Voyage, 1776-1780; and watercolours by George Back from the second
Franklin Overland Expedition, 1825-1827.
Archives Canada Microfiches
Two events of the summer of 1975 marked the official birth of the colour
microfiches project, which had been in the planning stages for several years.
A meeting between the Picture Division and Kodak officials took place at the
Marketing Education Center in Rochester, N.Y., where final details concerning
input, format, and production schedule were established. Shortly thereafter,
Bruce Wilson was hired as a permanent research officer to prepare the microfiches catalogues under the supervision of the General Editor, Douglas
Schoenherr. 82
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
After three sets of proofs had been produced to achieve the highest M
possible quality, we received in early February the first order of 850 distribution copies of Microfiche 1: Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874), 500 for Supply and
Services Canada which will act as distributor and 350 for the Public Archives
for promotional purposes. To the Division's dismay, the distribution copies
were considerably inferior to the proofs which had been approved. Because
of their lack of quality, the order had to be redone. Microfiche 2: James
Peachey (active 1773-1797) and Microfiche 3: Henry Francis Ainslie (1803-
1879) — James Hunter (active 1776-1792) — John Herbert Caddy (1801-1883)
are currently in production at Rochester, and the accompanying catalogues,
painstakingly typed by Anna Bevilacqua, are being printed through the Information Services Division. The catalogue manuscripts and the transparencies
for the remaining two microfiches, J. S. Meres (active 1786) and Thomas
Mitchell (1833[?]-1924), have been completed.
With the cooperation of the Information Services Division, a handsome
promotional brochure was prepared to announce the microfiches program.
This brochure, to be sent to all university art departments, university libraries,
art libraries, galleries, and museums in Canada, as well as to important
research institutions in the United States and Europe, will solicit subscriptions
for the first series of five microfiches, offering over 200 colour reproductions
of important paintings, drawings, and prints in the Division's CollectîÔTT:
Artists selected for the second series (12 microfiches) include Alexander
Cavalié Mercer, William Ogle Carlile, Thomas Davies, Frederick Horsman
Varley, and Henry James Warre.
Overland to Oregon in 1845
This publication is an illustrated catalogue to accompany an exhibition
of 66 art works of Henry James Warre, a British Officer sent on a reconnaissance mission into the disputed territory of Oregon in 1845-1846. Like many
other military officers, Warre was a trained draughtsman and was able to
capture with pencil and watercolour the people and scenes he encountered in
the course of his strenuous overland journey. He also kept an extensive journal
and later published an account of his journey illustrated with lithographs after
his works and titled Sketches in North America and the Oregon Territory,
London, 1848.
Overland to Oregon in 1845 is illustrated with original sketches made by
Warre on his journey. Also reproduced are the preparatory sketches for the
lithographs as well as examples of the completed lithographs which appeared
in his published account. The images are accompanied with corresponding
excerpts from his journal and the whole is prefaced with an introduction by
Madeleine Major-Frégeau of the Picture Division who edited the Warre manuscripts, prepared the catalogue, and selected the art works. The exhibition will
be circulating in the United States as part of that country's bicentennial
celebrations. It will then travel to different parts of Canada.
Catalogue of paintings, watercolours, and drawings in the W. H. Coverdale
Collection of Canadiana
Purchased in 1970, the W. H. Coverdale Collection of Canadiana is HISTORICAL BRANCH
83
comprised of approximately 2,500 historical documentary pictures depicting
the Canadian landscape, military and social events, and personalities. This
collection formerly adorned the walls of the Manoir Richelieu Hotel in Murray
Bay, P.Q. owned by Canada Steamship Lines. A catalogue of the entire collection acquired by the Archives has been in preparation for over four years and
is being completed under the direction of W. M. E. Cooke.
The actual writing of the catalogue has been the fulltime job of two persons for over a year and is scheduled for completion in April 1976. Extensive
research through visits, correspondence, and innumerable telephone calls to
institutions and private collectors in Canada and abroad has yielded considerable new documentation on the lives and works of the artists represented,
especially the military topographers. The dissemination of such new findings
is always a stimulus to researchers to dig deeper and it is hoped the Coverdale
catalogue shall do likewise.
Exhibitions — Quebec and its Environs an exhibition of 31 watercolours and
drawings by James Pattison Cockburn (1779-1847) travelled to Trois-Rivières,
Quebec, Guelph, Montreal, and Kingston. The exhibition of selected works
from the W. H. Coverdale Collection of Canadiana which was on display in
major cities across Canada from 1973 to 1975 will be touring the United States
this fall along with Overland to Oregon in 1845. The two exhibitions are contributions to that country's bicentennial celebrations.
Loans — In the course of the year, a large number of loans were solicited from
the Picture Diyision. Responding was difficult because of a shortage of staff
and because requests were often made on short notice so that conservation
work, framing, and packing had not been planned or budgeted for. In spite of
difficulties an impressive number of major art works were loaned.
"Shooting the Rapids" and "Canoe with passengers paddling along side high
rocky cliffs", oil paintings by Frances Ann Hopkins loaned to the Agnes
Etherington Art Centre, Kingston for an International Women's Year display titled From Women's Eyes.
"Nicolas Vincent Isawanhouhi, Principal Christian Chief and Captain of the
Huron Indians established at La Jeune Lorette . . ." and "Three Chiefs of
the Huron Indians residing at La Jeune Lorette . . ." litographs after
C. Chatfield and "A Crée Hunter and Family at Fort York" watercolour by
Peter Rindisbacher were loaned to the National Museum of Man for the
Speyer Exhibition of Indian artifacts.
"Fort William (Laramie)" a watercolour by Alfred Jacob Miller, was loaned to
the University of Wyoming Art Museum for a display titled Artist Activity
in Wyoming: 1837-1897.
"A bird's Eye View of the lower town of Quebec taken from the Bishop's Palace
Shewing the Citadel & Chateau" watercolour by James Hunter and "An
East View of Montreal in Canada" engraving by Pierre-Charles Canot after
a drawing by Thomas Patten were loaned to the Smithsonian Institution
in Washington for a bicentennial display titled The Dye Is Now Cast.
"North West aspect of the Citadel & Halifax, Nova Scotia 1781" aquatint after
Lieut. Col. Edward Hicks was loaned to the National Maritime Museum in 84
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Greenwich, England for a display sponsored by the Times and Sunday
Times to commemorate the bicentennial of the American War of Independence.
Several prints and watercolours and a low relief view of Montreal in marble by
William Tyler were loaned to the Canadian War Museum for a display titled
Revolutjon Rejected — La révolution refusée, 1775-1776.
Custody — One of the main objectives in hiring a custodian in November 1974
was to devise an efficient location system for the works of art in the Collection.
Unfortunately, with involvement in numerous displays and loans and with the
increase in the number of originals photographed to aliment the slide ser4es
and microfiches programs, the custodian was unable to pursue his work on the
index, particularly afterthe departure of his assistant in May 1975.
For many years the Picture Division has been aware of the pressing need
for the adequate storage of its Collection and for conservation treatment to be
performed on a high percentage of its holdings. For this reason, the staff of
the Picture Division welcomed the creation of a Conservation Committee at the
Branch level and participated actively, stressing the particular conservation
requirements of its art collection. In the course of the year a large number of
art works were recalled from various government offices where they had been
displayed for a long period of time, often under adverse environmental conditions. Borrowers were usually reluctant to part with the works and could only
be persuaded through diplomatic and firm argumentation. The fire at the
Quebec Citadel in February was a sharp reminder that the preservation of
works of art necessitates a constant vigilance. The building contained 14
original prints on loan from the Archives since 1928. None of the prints were
irremediably lost but all had suffered from exposure to smoke and water.
National Photography Collection
The National Photography Collection is now a separate division within
the Historical Branch. Although this represents a change in name and status
for the former Historical Photographs Section of the Picture Division, the staff
and their concerns remain basically unaltered: to serve as the national archival
repository for still photographs of enduring value to Canada and to serve as the
repository for noncurrent photographic records of the Government of Canada.
The evolution of the National Photography Collection reflects a recognition of
the major role that still photography has assumed over the past decades as a
documentation of Canada's multifaceted heritage. Moreover, in creating this
new division the Public Archives has laid the foundation for a national centre
for historical research into Canadian photography.
The necessary physical and procedural adjustments occasioned by
change to divisional status began in July. The Division has been structured
with an Office of the Chief and three Sections: Acquisitions and Research,
Photo Control, and Public Service. Richard J. Huyda has been appointed Chief
Curator of the National Photography Collection; Andrew J. Birrell as Head of
Acquisitions and Research and Acting Head of Photo Control; and Claude
Minotto as Head of Public Service. HISTORICAL BRANCH
85
In common with the general government situation, financial and manpower cutbacks have restrained divisional activities over the past nine months.
As a result growth has been slower than anticipated, certain projects deferred,
manpower reshuffled, and work consolidated to provide essential services and
to meet commitments. The necessary adjustments in attitudes and approaches
to the expanded responsibilities and limited resources have been made.
Acquisition and research work progressed steadily. Severely strained by
space, supply, and manpower shortages the staff involved in custodial work just
managed to cope under the pressures of increased accessions and reference
demands. Public service activities were geared to developing dynamic new
approaches to meet the needs of the Division's clientele and to reach outward
to a larger Canadian public. Indeed, the Division reports with some pride and
not a little amazement that it has survived as a viable organization. It is making
a positive and continuing contribution to the Department and to the nation.
Its reputation as one of the world's foremost photo archives has been solidified.
The ramifications of its new status and approaches should be even more
evident next year.
Acquisition
Number of Contacts Made    350
Number of Collections Acquired           357
Number of Photographs Acquired  531,000
NEGOTIATIONS AND CONTACTS
The Division continued as in past years to initiate and maintain contact
with individuals and organizations across Canada and within the government;
the objectives being to locate photographic records of interest to the Department and to negotiate for the acquisition of new collections. This activity was
moderated somewhat by financial austerity and staff changes.
The major survey of photographic records within federal government
departments and agencies which was anticipated to be undertaken this year
has been postponed until 1976-1977. Only a pilot survey of Agriculture Canada
photo records was initiated, however, government contacts have been maintained as required and transfers negotiated with numerous other departments
and agencies: Information Canada, Transport Canada, Environment Canada,
Public Works, Indian and Northern Affairs, the Company of Young Canadians,
and Energy, Mines and Resources.
Private sector work was confined mainly to Central Canada with the exception of some work in Alberta and British Columbia. Important contacts were
made with professional photographers, among whom were Y. Karsh, A. Gilbert,
R. Greenhill, N. Newton, M. Semak, K. Bell, E. Spiteri, D. Cameron, C. Gutsche,
D. Miller. P. Gaudard, R. Brooks, R. Harrington, O. Semchishen, and W. Houn.
Numerous individuals and organizations who possess important photo collections were also contacted. In cases such as Dominion Bridge and Capital Press
negotiations for the acquisition of collections were successfully completed.
On the other hand no satisfactory agreements were reached for the acquisition 86
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
of collections of the works of J. Vanderpant, a prominent West Coast Salon
photographer of the 1920s-1930s and of the works of Peter Pisteouluk, a noted
Inuit photographer. Negotiations are still underway for other collections
including that of B. Harmon, the noted early twentieth century mountaineering
photographer from Banff, that of Bill Sansom, an amateur photographer
involved in early bush flying, and that of Reva Brooks, a prominent Canadian
photographer now residing in Mexico.
Through constant communication and involvement with the Professional
Photographers of Canada Inc. the Division has been able to keep in active
touch with the greater portion of the Canadian professional photographic community. The increasing contact with more community colleges and universities
has also widened the sphere of involvement as has the continued interest in the
Canadian Photographic Historical Society. Unfortunately, due to lack of funds,
the Division was unable to continue the worthwhile and important project of
acquiring works from various noted ethnic photographers. The Division has
also had to suspend indefinitely the project to contact other Canadian archival
institutions who hold ma^or photo collections and with whom the Archives was
prepared to offer assistance in terms of protective copying.
In general, the increasing public awareness of the Division's existence
and role and a growing reputation and recognition as the national photo
repository has greatly eased the task of making and maintaining meaningful
contacts throughout the Canadian photographic community. However, the
increased awareness of the value of photographs, the increased interest in
photographs by collectors, the increased involvement of other archives in
photo acquisition, the escalating pricing in the market of historical photo-
graphica, and the greater knowledge of tax credit incentives have made
negotiations correspondingly more complex and costly for the Division.
MAJOR ACQUISITIONS
Within the federal government transfers of photographic records have
been carried out on a regular basis throughout the year. With some departments and agencies the transfers are additions to collections previously turned
over to the National Photography Collection. This was the case for example
with the transfers of photo records from both Information Canada Photothèque
and the Canadian Government Photo Centre. These two transfers complement
and complete the Division's holdings up to 1964 of the old National Film Board
Still Photo Library. Similar additions were made to the major collections from
Central Mortgage and Housing, Canadian Government Travel Bureau, and
Public Works Canada. Other major government transfers have come from
External Affairs, Forestry Services of Environment Canada, and Marine
Services of Transport Canada.
There have been notable acquisition from nongovernment sources: among
them a number of important nineteenth century series. A dozen superb prints
by the Montreal photographer Alexander Henderson were purchased from
T. B. Higginson and the Sandford Fleming material purchased from R. Morin
included a copy of Henderson's Canadian Views and Studies. A fine collection
of selected Canadian stereo views was purchased from E. McCann. Another
exciting addition was a beautiful print by James Inglis of the funeral of Thomas HISTORICAL BRANCH
87
D'Arcy McGee. A further accession of photos from the Hazen Sise estate
yielded several daguerreotypes. Another important nineteenth century accession was a photo album received from the Service des collections de la bibliothèque Morrisset, université d'Ottawa. The album, entitled Government
Expedition to Hudson Straits and Bay, 1897, Under the Command of Dr. W.
Wakeham, contains 241 original prints taken during the Wakeham Expedition. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Srreer in St. John, N.B., ca. 1865.
Photographer unknown. C-80167.
Lumberman's shanty, ca. 1860-1875.
Portable photographie dark tent in front of shanty.
Photographed by Alex Henderson. C-81689. HISTORICAL BRANCH
89
Funeral procession of the late Hon. Thomas D'Arcy McGee, Montreal, 13 April 1868.
Photographed by James Inglis, C-83423. 90
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
i-._: ^__._ -   ;•--_._ (T_i___:-'!
Raising the Union Jack, Kickerton Island, 17 August 1897.
Wakeham Expedition, Kekereten Island, N.W.T.
Photographed by Graham Drinkwater, C-84686.
Eskimo girl, 12 September 1897.
Wakeham Expedition, on board Diana.
Photographed by Graham Drinkwater, C-84709. HISTORICAL BRANCH
91
IShJ
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immL:
Church of the Messiah, Montreal, ca. 1860.
Photographed by William Notman, C-85154. 92
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Beaver Hall, Montreal, ca. 1860.
Photographed by William Notman, C-85156. HISTORICAL BRANCH
93
Safety gate, Charlevoix Street "Brewsters" Bridge, Montreal, 17 March 1920.
Photographer unknown, C-86476.
Charlevoix Street taken from the top of Brewsters Bridge, 30 September 1910.
Photographer unknown, C-86477. 94
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Canadian Forces rifleman in front of the Montreal City Hall during FLQ Crisis, 15 October
1970.
Photographed by Garth Pritchard.
The funeral of Pierre Laporte, Notre-Dame Church, Montreal, 20 October 1970.
Photographed by Tedd Church. HISTORICAL BRANCH
95
Early twentieth century photographs acquired included the loan for protective copying and reference of some 3,000 glass negatives selected from the
important collection of the Toronto Harbour Commissioners. This collection
documents the development and changes of the Toronto downtown core and
waterfront from 1910 until 1947. Three collections of early Canadian aviation
were received from Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame: those of F. Roy Brown,
Leigh Brintnell, and Billy Barker. The Curtis Collection also relates to early
aviation and depicts World War I aircraft.
Important works were also acquired from numerous contemporary professional photographers. Marcel Ray, a prominent Toronto portraitist of the
fifties donated his negatives which contain many portraits of nationally known
musicians, dancers, and artists, plus assignments done for the CCF party.
Neil Newton of Enniskillen, Ontario donated negatives from the late fifties and
early sixties which include excellent coverage of activities in the heyday of
radio station CHUM in Toronto. The purchase of 26 prints of historic Ontario
architecture from Ralph Greenhill was followed by the gift of a further 80 prints
from which the plates were made for his book Ontario Towns. Al Gilbert, the
eminent Toronto portraitist, delivered a series of his prints representing a
cross-section of his work. Print series have also been purchased from two
Italian photographers of Toronto: Pietropaulo and Vic Lovello. Hutterite life
in Alberta has been documented in a series of prints received from Ed Spiteri
of Calgary. Also to be noted was the deposit of the 125 prints of the award
winners included on the 1974 National Print Show of the Professional Photographers of Canada Inc.
The works of other prominent Canadian photojournalists have also been
acquired. Many of these are included in recent additions to the collections
from The Gazette, The Toronto Daily Star, and The Globe and Mail. Of particular note are the important additions to the Duncan Cameron Collection. Since
1967 Duncan Cameron, proprietor of Capital Press Services Ltd. Ottawa, has
turned over portions of his and the firm's negative holdings which date back to
the early fifties. This year's additions include photo reportage of the period
1968 to 1976: photos of prominent individuals engaged in Canadian public life;
the official and unofficial regular political activities in Ottawa; the federal
election campaigns of 1972 and the Federal Conservative Party Leadership
Convention of 1976; special coverage of various government activities abroad
ranging from those of CI DA in Africa and South-East Asia to the trips of the
Prime Minister to China in 1973 and Cuba and the Caribbean in 1976.
Photo acquisitions under the multicultural-ethnic program have not been
directly made by the National Photography Collection this year as no specific
funds had been allotted to the Division for this purpose. However, numerous
collections of photographs such as an interesting group of five collections
from Canadian Japanese sources have been transferred by the National Ethnic
Archives Section of the Manuscript Division.
Transfers from other sections of the Manuscript Division, particularly from
those actively involved in the SNAP program, have inundated the Division with
a great many smaller photo collections of varying value which have accompanied important manuscript acquisitions. Among the more significant transfers are those related to prominent Canadians involved in politics, business, 96 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
sports, and the arts; personages such as Lester B. Pearson, Paul Martin,
Frances Bird (pseudo Ann Francis).
Custodial
Number of Items Evaluated   24,631
Number of Items Organized     35,714
Number of Items Copied       4,553
EVALUATION AND RESEARCH
Evaluation was completed on a number of small collections. The major
collections worked on were the massive DND Collection and that of the Yukon
Consolidated Gold Corporation. A large collection of Agriculture Canada
aerial photographs which duplicated EMR records was examined and recommended for destruction. Research work, as in previous years, related both to
specific collections within the National Photography Collection and to aspects
of the historical development of photography in Canada for which no prior
information was available.- Research work was carried out on the Dominion
Bridge and Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation collections. The L. Brintnell
and W. H. Norrish Collections were identified. Reports on The Gazette
(Montreal) Collection, the Sandford Fleming Collection, and on pre-Confedera-
tion Halifax photographers were typed. Research projects were initiated on
pre-Confederation photography in Toronto, early photography in British
Columbia, early photography in Quebec, and on the photographic career of
Samuel McLaughlin, Canada's first photographic publisher and first official
government photographer. A number of collections were appraised for tax
credit purposes.
TRANSFERS, STORAGE, AND ORGANIZATION
The full operation of the Photo Control Section has not been possible this
year due to manpower shortages; in particular, the lack of an appointment of
the permanent Section Head. Organization was undertaken on the following
collections: Indian and Northern Affairs; Dominion Bridge; Public Works
Lachine Canal; Marine Service Branch Transport Canada. With storage facilities of the Division at a premium transfers from government departments have
been curtailed. Despite some relief space loaned by the National Film Archives
and PAC Library Divisions most incoming collections are now being stored in
the stack area aisles. In order to bring the collections of the Division under
closer custodial control and to compensate for manpower shortages, staff
access to the stacks has been strictly regulated and researcher use of original
documentation restricted to a limited number of collections. Holdings have
been consolidated: prototypes of more effective containers have been
requested and new approaches to shelving and space utilization investigated,
both to cope with present storage requirements and in anticipation of expected
future accessions.
CONSERVATION AND PROTECTIVE COPYING
Peter Robertson as Divisional representative on the Branch Conservation
Committee took an active part in Committee deliberations and conducted a HISTORICAL BRANCH
97
statistical survey of the conservation requirements of the holdings. Close
liaison was established with Dr. Klaus B. Hendriks, the photo conservation
chemist newly appointed to the Reprography Section. Dr. Hendriks has
familiarized himself with the Division's requirements and is in the process of
establishing a laboratory for the further analysis and processing of photographs. Protective copying by the Preservation Unit of the Reprography Section has continued on both negative and print collections, however, the volume
of items processed this year has been less than previous years due mainly to
difficulties in negative copying. The traditional source of direct copy negative
film — Ferrania — has ceased producing the film used since 1964. The switch
to alternative films such as Kodak S.O.-015 has necessitated operational
adjustments which have reduced normal production outputs.
Public Service
Number of Personal Enquiries  1,643
Number of Postal Enquiries   1,642
Number of Phone Enquiries   1,582
Number of Items Catalogued   13,000
Number of Reproductions Supplied   23,808
Public reference service and activities dealing with the dissemination of
information on holdings and operations are now primarily the responsibilities
of the Public Service Section.
REFERENCE SERVICES
Approaches to servicing have been restructured to provide more effective
and fuller information to researchers while at the same time streamlining
operations and better protecting the holdings. Staff work on enquiries has been
redistributed and procedures consolidated. Access to original documentation
has been restricted to those collections which have been sufficiently processed and can be safely handled by a selected public. Greater emphasis has
been placed on the more effective use of the card catalogue system as the
primary tool for researcher reference. For administrative and researcher convenience the Division has joined four other divisions in a joint registration
system. Several new standardized forms have been created, which, in making
reference responses more precise, eliminate lengthy individual correspondence, avoid unnecessary repetition and duplication of effort, and establish a
more rigorous but clearer contractual arrangement between researchers and
the Division. A compulsory credit acknowledgement is now requested for all
public uses of the holdings.
CATALOGUE OF PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS
The following approach has been adopted for the cataloguing of reproductions: priority is first given to photographic documents reproduced at the
request of researchers; secondly, to recently-received, small collections or
fonds; and thirdly, to other collections on which one can interrupt the cataloguing work if necessary. The fonds in this third category represent long-term
projects and are not urgently required by the public. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
The reproductions catalogued during the year came from a number of
collections, of which we shall mention only the most important. First of all
there are the prints by C. M. Johnston, an amateur photographic artist.
In response to various research requests the Division has reproduced and
catalogued photographs illustrating the early days of broadcasting in Canada.
Other requests have led to the cataloguing of a selection ot photographs from
the Collection des Canaux de Québec, the William Lyon Mackenzie King
Collection, and the North American Boundary Commission Collection.
Research toward the mounting of an exhibition on the Canadian North has j
necessitated the reproduction and cataloguing of the photographs in the
R. M. Anderson and William Wakeham Collections. Several other important
collections have been studied with a view to entering them in the reproduction
catalogue. The first of these was the Ministry of Transport, Railways Branch
Collection. The photographs were taken in 1899-1900 in northern British
Columbia near the Yukon border. The second group is a collection of portraits
from old Archives acquisitions, including portraits of various Canadians of the
period since 1840. Among other photographic documents catalogued are some
from the following collections: the National Parks Collection, the United Electrical Workers Collection, and the Joseph-Louis Cartier Collection.
A new format has been designed for the caption files. This new file card,
when used with a form giving the compulsory credit line for the photographs,
will enable the researchers to provide complete references for the documents
from the National Photography Collection.
EXHIBITIONS
Into the Silent Land: Survey Photography in the Canadian West, 1858-1900,
researched and selected by a staff team directed by A. J. Birrell, was the major
exhibition prepared by the Division this year. Among 105 original works displayed are those of H. L. Hime of The Assiniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition, 1858; the Royal Engineers Photographers on the North
American Boundary Commission, 1858-1862 and 1872-1875; Benjamin Baltzly
on the Geological Survey of 1871; Charles Horetzky of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Surveys, 1871-1879; G. M. Dawson and J. B. Tyrrell of the Geological
Survey of Canada, 1875-1900; and E. Deville, J. J. McArthur, W. Ogilvie, and
C. A. Biggar of the Dominion Land Surveys and International Boundary Commission, 1886-1900. The Institution of Royal Engineers, Chatham, England,
very generously loaned the rare prints from the Boundary Commission of
1858-1862. Miss Mary Millman of Toronto donated an album of original prints
assembled by her father, Thomas Millman, assistant surgeon on the Boundary
Commission of 1872-1875, while Mrs. Lois Winslow-Spragge through the McGill
University Archives presented two albums of Boundary Commission photographs assembled by George Mercer Dawson who was attached to the Commission as naturalist and geologist. A complementary and nonrepetitive group
of prints of the same Boundary Commission was deposited with the Public
Archives by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The remaining photographs
were drawn from the Public Archives collections of Sandford Fleming, the
Geological Survey of Canada, and the International Boundary Commission.
Into The Silent Land was officially opened on June 16 at the Public Archives
in Ottawa. In October it began a two-years tour of eight exhibition centres HISTORICAL BRANCH
99
across Canada; thus far being presented at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg
and the Mendel Gallery, Saskatoon.
Mrs. Lois Winslow-Spragge, who has graciously donated many valuable photographs to
the Public Archives of Canada, speaks with Dr. W. I. Smith (right), Dominion Archivist,
and Andrew Birrell of the National Photography Collection at the opening of the exhibition Into the Silent Land.
Relentless Verity: Canadian Military Photographers Since 1885, an exhibit
launched in 1973, continued to be circulated across Canada by the Department
of National Defence.
The National Print Show of the Professional Photographers of Canada, a
joint PAC-PPOC exhibition, successfully toured across Canada. The 1974
National Print Show ended its tour with a showing at the Public Archives,
Ottawa in May. The 1975 National Print Show opened in Calgary in October
and from there travelled to Edmonton, Victoria, Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay, and Hamilton.
Preliminary research and selection by a staff team directed by C. Minotto
was also undertaken for future photo exhibitions. One is to be a major travelling
exhibition of photographs taken during expeditions into the Canadian North. 100
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Another is a small permanent in-house exhibition designed to acquaint the
public with the Division's services, various selections from its holdings, and
its more recent acquisitions.
The Division was also involved in exhibitions sponsored by other
organizations. It assisted in bringing an exhibition of portraits of renowned
musicians by the noted photographer, Cavouk, to the National Arts Centre in
Ottawa for the World Music Congress. The Division has also been involved
with The Camera and Dr. Barnardo, an exhibition of the National Portrait Gallery of London, England, which will tour Canada in 1976-1977 under the joint
auspices of the National Museum of Man and the Public Archives.
PUBLICATIONS
The illustrated catalogue prepared by A. J. Birrell to accompany the
exhibition Into The Silent Land: Survey Photography in the Canadian West,
1858-1900 was published and distributed. The Royal Canadian Geographical
Society reprinted the catalogue as a feature article in the October issue of
The Canadian Geographical Journal.
A general information brochure entitled The National Photography Collection was prepared by C. Minotto and published in March. This illustrated
brochure serves as an introduction to a planned series of guides which will
give more detailed information about the role and services of the National
Photography Collection.
"Seeing is believing" is the title of an article by C. Minotte^which appeared
in Archivaria, Vol. 1, No. 1. This illustrated article introduced the National
Photography Collection and its role to the archival community.
Another series of promotional posters has been published. The two new
posters carry facsimiles of original view photographs by Alexander Henderson
of Montreal and by Frank Micklethwaite of Toronto. Henderson's view is
"Montreal Harbour from the Customs House, P.Q.", taken ca. 1870; Mickleth-
waite's is "King Street West from Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario" taken ca.
1894.
PRESENTATIONS, LECTURES, AND TOURS
On numerous occasions members of the staff were invited to deliver
lectures or presentations relating to the National Protography Collection, its
holdings, archival approaches to photo records, and the history of photography
in Canada. Among the presentations given this year were C. Minotto's training
sessions on photographic archives during the CHA-PAC course in Archives
Administration and an address to the Ottawa Camera Club. A. Birrell addressed
the Historical Group of the Royal Photographic Society in London, England.
R. Huyda gave presentations to the Canadian Photographic Historical Society
and to students of the Rochester Institute of Photography and the University
of Ottawa. A number of radio and television interviews were afso given on the
activities of the National Photography Collection.
Tours and in-house presentations have been given on a regular basis
throughout the year by various staff members. It is the intention of the National HISTORICAL BRANCH
101
Photography Collection to encourage the public to visit the reference facilities.
To this end plans have been made to prepare a standard lecture and tour of the
National Photography Collection in conjunction with the small permanent
exhibition in the reference area. As in past years, training sessions were given
to visiting Canadian and foreign archivists and curators.
The Division has also taken steps to ensure an active role in upcoming
encounters with history teachers and professors as well as with other groups
and individuals involved in Canadian historical studies. Proposals have been
put forward to the Canadian Historical Association, the Société des professeurs d'histoire du Québec and the Institut d'histoire de l'Amérique française.
The National Photography Collection plans to set up an exhibition booth and
give a presentation on research methodology for historical photographic
archives at the 1976 annual meetings of each of these associations.
Public Archives Library
The Public Archives Library is primarily a library specializing in Canadian
history and serves the researchers coming to the Archives and the staff. The
Library is also Departmental in nature serving the needs not only of the Historical Branch but also of the Adminrstration and Technical Services Branch,
and the Records Management Branch. The books which are in constant use
in the divisions are located in the divisions, but are catalogued by the Library
which retains a copy of the catalogue cards for inclusion in the Main Catalogue.
In order to keep the personnel of the Library abreast of the objectives of
the several divisions comprising the Historical Branch, the Library invited each
division chief to talk to the staff on their respective divisions. The program enhanced the knowledge of the Library staff about the Archives and helped to
clarify the role of the Library in relation to its services to the other divisions.
In 1975-1976 the Public Archives Library pursued its program of the organization of divisional libraries. Thus the monographs of the National Map Collection are now classified and catalogued. The bibliographical description of
some rare atlases will complete the operation. The substantial library acquired
from the Canadian Film Institute by the National Film Archives is currently being catalogued and converted from the Dewey Decimal Classification System
to the Library of Congress Classification. The project is expected to take six
months to effectuate. It thus completes the control of the eight divisional libraries of the Historical Branch. Hopefully, this program will be extended across
the Public Archives as a whole.
Acquisitions, cataloguing, and services to the public continued at a high
level. The activities of the Library were also directed towards the preliminary
listing of incoming material and the clearing of the backlog in the typing and
filing of author/title catalogue cards so that all books and microfiches and
microfilms could be made more readily available to researchers.
The systematic descriptive cataloguing of periodicals and the updating
of the "Visirecord" which describes the holdings of the Library, have been
dropped because of lack of manpower. However, the "linedex" was almost 102
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
completed giving the minimum of information about all periodicals (4,600) —
that is title and location.
In spite of production difficulties and a shortage of staff the reproduction
on microfiches of rare pamphlets progressed satisfactorily. Some 570 titles
were catalogued and processed.
Efforts continued to better organize and place at the disposal of researchers documentation on Canadian history and archival science.
As usual, the Library has sent its annual contribution to the International
Bibliography of Historical Sciences. The war years of 1939-1945 and monetary
restrictions had compelled the Comité International des Sciences Historiques
to curtail for several years the printing of the annual volumes. Through the
amalgamation of some production years and a strict control over the selection of material, the gap has now been cleared.
Extensive work has been done on the Biographical Index. Letters A
through C were done with the following results: 9,690 cards (or individual's
names) were verified, exact references and sources noted, typed according
to established rules and finally filed. This project unfortunately had to be
dropped due to lack of personnel.
A systematic index on cards of reference files is in progress and will be
a useful information tool for research.
A Bibliography on Archival Science compiled by Gisèle Beauvais, Louise
Lallier-Milot, and Normand St. Pierre was revised. Some 1,176 titles were
selected, catalogued, and organized for the use of archivists. In some cases
photoduplication became necessary as all titles had to be available for the
1975 Archives Course. The Library has also assumed responsibility for the
publication of a current bibliography on Archival Science for the new publication Archivaria published by the Canadian Association of Archivists.
Special research projects were also carried out during the year. Much
time was devoted to the verification of the manuscript "Canadian Chronology"
for Statistics Canada and to checking entries and indicating Archives'
holdings for the National Capital Region's History and Heritage Bibliography.
As a means of promoting career development, several members of the
staff attended courses on management, on genealogy, on indexing and text
analysis, and a seminar on automated reference services. The Library was also
involved in the Branch Conservation Committee, the Electronic Data Processing Committee, the Historical Branch Committee, and the Committee on
Security.
General Statistics
Researchers' Visits   13,293
Cataloguing
Books, Pamphlets, Broadsides, and Microforms Prepared  7,751
Preparation and Filing of Library Catalogue Cards  59,583
Titles of Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides Catalogued  4,311 HISTORICAL BRANCH 103
Titles of Microforms Catalogued   11
Titles of Periodicals and Government Publications Catalogued .. 454
Acquisitions
Books and Pamphlets  6,353
Gifts     252
Periodicals and Government Publications   18,437
Preparation and Filing of Temporary Cards  10,459
Volumes, Pamphlets, Rare Books Bound, and Broadsides
Mounted   1,044
Special Publications Added to the Public Archives Library
Almon, John, 1737-1805. The anecdotes of the life of Right Honourable William
Pitt, Earl of Chatham, and of the principal events of his time with his
speeches in Parliament from the year 1736 to the year 1778. London: J. S.
Jordan, 1793.3 vols.
William Pitt died while making a speech pleading for better relations with
the American Colonies. In 1761 he refused the position of Governor of
Canada which was offered him. The volumes are a portrait of a man, his
ideology, his colleagues, and of an era when the foundation was being
laid for the British North American Colonies.
Kalm, Peter, and Backman, Daniel A. Med Guds walsingnade Nad och weder-
borande Tilstand yttrade Tankar om Myttan, som kunnat tifalla wart kjara
Fadernesland, at des Nyoygge i America fordom Nya Swerige kallad.
Abo, Finlande, 1754.15 p.
Daniel Backman, co-author of the pamphlet Med Guds walsingnade Nad
och wederborande . . . was a student of Peter Kalm. In literal translation
the publication contains "thoughts about the usefulness which could befall our beloved homeland, coming from the homesteaders in America
formerly called New Sweeden".
Montcalm-Gozon, Louis Joseph de, marquis de Saint-Véran, 1712-1759. Copie
de la lettre de Mr. [sic] de Montcalm, [s.l.n.d.] 4 p. 24 cm.
The letter explains the events beginning 6 July 1758 and the strategy employed to gain victory at Carillon on 8 July 1758. The value of this published account of the battle is enhanced with the inclusion of a list of
dead and wounded and a list of participating officers.
The Library also acquired a special collection of volumes on French architecture and construction relating to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
These volumes were obtained from the personal collection of an architect who
participated in the restoration of Louisbourg.
Printed Material from Archival Collections Transferred to the Public Archives
Library
Briefs of the Royal Commission on the Canadian Liberal Party (MG 28, IV 9)
Status of Women (RG 33) Collection Edouard Langevin (MG 29,
Canadian Forestry Association  (MG E84)
28,1188) 104
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Collection Pierre Brunet (MG 30, D Parent-Rowby Collection (MG 31, B
156) 19)
Department of Supply  and  Service Reby Dodds Collection (MG 29, A 49)
(RG 98) St. Lawrence Seaway Authority (RG
Department of Veterans Affairs (RG 52)
38) William and Parry Collection (MG 24,
J. J. Kelso Collection (MG 30, L 2) H 49)
Donors to the Public Archives Library
Mrs. R. F. H. Abeson
Action Life
Alberta. Legislative Library
Amon Carter Museum of Western Arts
Association Canadao Américaine
Mary Beaton
Roger Bessette
Mrs. S. Bilinski
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bonar
G. Bonavia
Dr. Hans Booms
Christopher Bradshaw
Brasserie Labatt Limitée
Brazil. National Archives
Wilfrid Bruce
Mrs. W. F. Cameron
Canada. Several departments and
agencies
Canadian Association in Support of
Native People
Canadian Conference of the Arts
Canadian Estonian Historical Commission
Carleton University. Library
City of London, Ontario. Department
of the City Clerk
Coca-Cola, Co.
J.Tegg Colburn
Paul Collins
Ted G. Davy
Direction des Archives de France
David Dugal
Guillaume Dunn
Douglas Eagles
Economic Council of Canada
Dr. M. Emard
Embassy of Finland
Mrs. E. C. Evans
Patrick M. O. Evans
Forest Press
Bernard C. Froom
Norma and Stewart Geggie
Mrs. Y. Goldberg. Conservateur du
Musée de la Monnaie
Great-West Life Insurance Company
Ralph Greenhill
W. F. Harrington
Gilbert E. Higgins
L. Holodryzak
Harry Middleton Hyatt
India. National Archives
Institut de Memramcook
Miss F. Iveson
Henry Kelly
Raoul Lachapelle
Mrs. S. K. Lakhanpal
Mrs. Gustave Lanctot
P. L. Lapointe
Law Reform Commission of Canada
Rev. J. C. Lead beater
J. Lyman
Mary A. Lynch
McGill University
Mrs. Douglas J. Mather
Mika Publishing Company
Evelyn Miller
Newfoundland. Department of Tourism. Historic Resources Division
Mrs. N. Nicholson
Cameron Nish
R. Onifrichuk
Ontario. Ministry of Environment. Environmental Approvals Branch
Mrs. Florence Patterson
Perpustakaan Negara Malaysia
James Peters
Gordon Phillips
E. Philps
D. M. Poulantzas
Mrs. G. N. Pratt HISTORICAL BRANCH
105
^Christopher Frank Pullen
Québec (Province). Ministère de l'Industrie et du Commerce
Charles C. Randolph
Rev. Dr. W. H. Reid
Republic of South Africa. Director of
Archives
Royal Ontario Museum
R. A. Saunders
Scottish Records Office
Mrs. G.W.V.Shaw
Smithsonian Institution. NCFA/NPG
Library
Dr. Allen P. Spete
Miss E. Spicer
Hon. Ralph Stewart, M.P.
Stoney Creek. Corporation of the
Town of
W. D. Swartzmiller
Ukrainian National Home
U.S. Philatelic Classics Society. Planning Commission
Université de Montréal
Mrs. D. van Parys
Mrs. Florence M. Vint
Mrs. Jane L. Webster
Tom Wegner
E. R. L.Williamson
William Yeo
Dr. V. Zuehlsdorf
National Film Archives Division
Progress during the year was marked by the National Film Archives taking
custody, in May 1975, of the collections of the Canadian Film Institute's archives division, the Canadian Film Archives, and by the subsequent initiation
of documentation services in the Hunter Building. Other noteworthy events
were the publication of a bilingual manual on procedures in the Sound Archives; the admission of the National Film Archives to the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) as an Observer; the repatriation of 35mm
original nitrate prints of 66 National Film Board productions (the World in
Action and Canada Carries On series) from the Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles; the agreement with the Canadian Motion
Picture Distributors Association and the subsequent approach to all member
companies to deposit prints of foreign and domestic films distributed in
Canada; and the custody at the PRC Toronto, of 27,000 cans of kinescope
recordings representing the history of English language television broadcasting between 1953 and 1963.
FILMS AND VIDEOTAPE COLLECTIONS — Reference, Cataloguing, and Conservation Services — Wkth the addition of the Canadian Film Institute material
to the National Film Archives, the number of general enquiries rose rapidly.
The library staff now handles about 100 enquiries per month which deal with
general matters related to film. This staff also provides a research facility
which is beginning to be used heavily by students and other researchers. There
were 47 registrationsPm March, the first month records were kept on the use
of the library. Other members of the staff serviced many requests from production agencies such as the CBC, CTV, and OECA. The Division was very much
involved in providing various producers at the CBC with material on earlier
Olympic games. The Division now has a 35mm telecine capacity and can dub
this format onto 1.9 cm cassettes for reference purposes.
During the year over 5,000 film titles were catalogued. Much of this was
done with the assistance of summer students hired for the summer of 1975. 106
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
Over 11,000 catalogue cards were created, as well as 5,000 partial cards relating to material held at the Bentley Building. Work began by the Public Archives
Library on converting the library card index from Universal Decimal Classification to Library of Congress Classification. Also, over 91,440 metres of
nitrate stock and 16mm safety film were transferred and conserved. Unless
this rate of conversion is tripled, a great deal of material Will be lost within
five years.
Two special projects were undertaken during the year. The first came as
a result of several breakdowns of the air conditioning system at the Rockcliffe
nitrate vaults. All the material at the vaults was inspected and catalogued and
some material was found to be deteriorating and had to be transferred to
safety film. The second was a project to take stock of the material (largely
production elements) stored at the Bentley Building. All the material there
has now been identified, with evaluation and selection to proceed in the near
future.
Acquisitions — 2,128,524 metres of nitrate and safety film were acquired in
1975-1976, including the following:
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science War Library; National Film Board
War Films, ca. 31,394 metres of 35mm nitrate films, 66 titles. Most are the
World In Action and Canada Carries On series. The National Film Board
originals of these films were lost through fire and deterioration.
Air Canada Collection; All For Canada (Canada 1943), ca. 74 metres. Trans
Canada Airlines during the war.
Dr. Bahyrycz (Polish Archives); Polish newsreels, ca. 2,896 metres.
Blackhawk Films; Trail of the Royal Mounted, ca. 7,924 metres. An early serial.
B.C. Planetarium; ca. 3,657 metres, 8 titles. Titles are as follows: Life Begins,
1935,-wikrTown sound track; Inagi (Tribal Legend of the Congo), 1940;
Trigaji, 1940; Bombing of Nanking, 1939, Japanese invasion of China;
The Pearl Necklace, 1925-1926, produced by Great Wall of China Film Co.
of Shanghai; Views of Peking, Commercial Press of Shanghai; Advertising
Shorts, 1930s-1940s; and Dr. Sun-Yat-Sen, 1913-1920, a film biography.
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation; ca. 14,325 metres, 60 titles. Included are
many from the "Nation's Business"; press conferences and other interviews relating to the history of the CBC; the 25th anniversary of the CBC
special presentation; the official opening of the CBC head office; etc.
Canadian Film Archives; safety film — 1,211,458 metres, 2,554 titles, and nitrate film — 56,233 metres, 66 titles. The collection is approximately %
international and Vz Canadian; it covers the entire history of the cinema
and contains a great many feature films and short fiction films.
Canadian Football League; Canadian Football News Coverage, 3,048 metres.
Thirty-six news stories on 35mm nitrate ranging from the 1909 Grey Cup
Game to the 1955 Grey Cup Game between Edmonton and Montreal.
Athletic Documentary Films, 2,590 metres. Thirty-two 16mm films, some
in colour, showing university football teams in action. Mainly the 1930s HISTORICAL BRANCH
107
with some from the 1940s and 1950s. Also some film on track events,
women's hockey, and dancing.
Clifford Thomas Collection; Murder on the Yukon, 1940, ca. 609 metres, fiction
feature film. The Fighting Trooper, 1934, ca. 518 metres, fiction feature
film.
Department of National Defence; ca. 24,688 metres, 31 titles. Titles include:
Trooping the Colours-King George VI; Inside Fighting Canada; With the
Canadians in Korea; Collège Militaire Royal de St-Jean; and Train Busters.
Several of these films were produced by the National Film Board.
Fox Movietone; Fox Newsreels, ca. 7,620 metres. Three hundred and twenty-
nine items covering a wide range of activities in the first 25 years of this
century — funerals, ceremonies, sporting events, human interest stories,
etc. — all on 35mm nitrate, most of which is in various stages of deterioration. These are being salvaged and converted at present as highest conservation priority.
Liberal Party; a collection of 14 titles covering the period 1966-1975.
Library of Congress, Washington; a collection of 45 pre-war German films.
Meridian Films; 60,960 metres of material from feature films such as The
Reincarnate, Bonnie Pruden, Explosion, etc.
National Film Archives, London, England; Whispering City, ca. 2,494 metres.
A 1946 fiction feature film produced by Québec-Productions and directed
by Fedor Ozep.
The Polish Veterans Association; Manewry (Naneuvers), Poland, 1938, 16mm,
ca. 90 metres; Przed Jutrem, Poland, 1942, 16mm, ca. 118 metres; Jak O
Na Manewrack Ladnie, Poland, 16 mm, ca. 89 metres.
Public Archives of New Brunswick; J. L. O'Brien Collection. To Britain by
Bomber, Canada, ca. 219 metres; trip to Great Britain, tour around wartime London, personalities (Churchill, etc.). South, 1949, Canada, ca.
365 metres. Timber Front, ca. 213 metres; the timber industry in Canada
during the war. Sawdust, Canada, ca. 441 metres; lumbering. International Frontier Week, St. Stephen, Calais, Canada, 1961, ca. 381 metres.
Home, Canada, ca. 350 metres. Britain at Bay, Great Britain, excerpt, ca.
70 metres. John Ëracken-Canadian, ca. 228 metres. Big Hole, ca. 243
metres. The Atlantic meeting, ca. 243 metres; the meeting of the Big Three
in the mid-Atlantic during wartime.
Saskatchewan Government Films; ca. 3,657 metres. Titles include: Growing
Registered Seed in Saskatchewan; Registered Seed; Cow Testing; Cream
Grading; Seeding; Saskatchewan's War on Grasshoppers; National Building in Saskatchewan; Through Life's Window; Selecting a Dairy Cow;
Improvement of Crops; Field Crops; Parts of the World; Moose Jaw Normal School; Prince Albert National Park; Sheet Cuts; Jubilee; Madte
Lake; York Lake; and Moose Jaw Creek. Several other unidentified reels.
Mrs. Hazen Size; In Memory of Dr. Bethune, 1962, 114 metres; an account of
Dr. Norman Bethune's work among the Chinese. Heart of Spain, 1936-1937, 108
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
304 metres; the establishment of the first mobile blood bank to be used in
war and Bethune's role in its establishment and operation.
Social Credit Party; Promo-Social Credit, 16mm, ca. 170 metres. M. Legault
No. 1, 1965, 16 mm, ca. 274 metres. G/7/es Grégoire T.V. Shows, Canada,
1963-1965, 16mm, ca. 1,524 metres.
Dennis Zahoruk; The Shakespeare Murders, Canada, 1973, 16mm, ca. 624
metres. 7A?e Last Freak in the World, Canada, 1974, 16mm, ca. 1,124
metres. Jason Borwick, Canada, 1972, 16mm, ca. 274 metres.
SOUND ARCHIVES SECTION — Although human and material resources were
held at the same levels as those for last year, 1975-1976 was in many respects
the most productive year on record for the Section. As was the case in 1974-
1975, the main efforts for this year were directed towards acquiring an increased number of collections, and diffusing information about the holdings.
Thus, in 1975-1976 one can see from the statistics below a marked increase
in acquisitions and written and oral inquiries received as compared to last
year. Improvements made during the last two years to technical facilities allowed the Section to increase its re-recording for preservation. The preservation re-recordings include new material copied from originals made available
on loan only, as well as material already in the Section's custody which was
re-recorded because it was in immediate danger of deterioration. The services
of a technician were hired on contract to perform this urgent copying. The
expanded technical facilities also made it possible to copy a huge volume of
recordings requested by broadcasters, producers of audio-visual teaching
aids, and professors. In order to cope with the increased output in accessions,
inquiries, and re-recordings the Section has been able to catalogue only a
slightly greater volume of recordings as compared to 1974-1975, and has had
to virtually eliminate indexing and transcribing.
Statistics
Acquisitions
Hours of Recording
Written and Oral Inquiries
Re-recording for Preservation (hours)
Cataloguing of Recordings (hours)
Indexing of Recordings (hours)
Transcribing of Recordings (hours)
Organization — The new office in Room 252 of the West Memorial Building was
cleaned and modestly renovated during the first months of the year under
review. Improvements were made in the wiring of the audio equipment in Room
242 of the West Memorial Building, and some small pieces of equipment were
added to increase the quality and quantity of re-recordings. A voice-operated
relay system was designed and installed by the Section's technician, Michel
Bourbonnais, allowing automatic recording of all press conferences held in the
National Press Building.
The re-thinking and revision of the Section's administrative and operational procedures undertaken in 1974-1975 have resulted in the publication of
1974-1975
1975-1976
140
209
3,205
5,132
662
1,471
520
1,734
524
671
155
15
70
26 HISTORICAL BRANCH
109
a bilingual manual entitled, Manual: Sound Archives. Further discussions of
administrative and operational procedures have resulted in the designing and
printing of a complete set of forms, which are being included as examples in
the revised second edition of the manual. Papers on the objectives, programs,
and financing of the Sound Archives were prepared for incorporation with the
submission made to Cabinet and Treasury Board on behalf of the National Film
Archives.
Acquisitions — The list of acquisitions made in 1975-1976 is too long to be
mentioned here therefore we will mention only those acquisitions which provide samples of the variety of material acquired. As part of the regular deposit
of CBC radio recordings, 443 discs and 66 tapes were received from the Program Archives in Montreal, and 93 tapes from CBO producers. From CTV,
562 tapes were obtained of sound tracks for some of CTV's major series such
as "W5" and "Human Journey". The Canadian Film Institute transferred a
collection of 256 discs and 115 tapes, most dealing with Canadian cinema.
From Rev. Gordon Nakayama wire and disc recordings were received which he
and his family made of church services held in the Anglican Japanese Mission
in Coaldale, Alberta, ca. 1947-1955. Dr. J. B. Rudnyckyj donated disc and tape
recordings of the interviews which he made during the 1950s with Ukrainian
settlers in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.
An important part of the Section's acquisitions program is to provide
assistance to individuals and groups conducting oral history interviews. Thus,
the Section offered professional advice and supplied blank tape to a group
of University of Toronto students who recorded interviews with Canadians
having lived through World War I. Before the tapes were transferred to the
Section, partial transcripts were made for use in a book which will shortly be
published by the New Hogtown Press under the title, The Great War and Canadian Society. In similar fashion, Professor Susan Mann Trofimenkoff deposited
the tapes of the interviews which she conducted with Stanley Knowles, using
the Section's recording facilities, in preparation for a biography of Mr.
Knowles. The Section has also provided professional advice and blank tapes
to the National Research Council for its recording of oral history interviews
with NRC scientists, on the understanding that the recorded tapes be deposited with the Archives. Peter Stursberg deposited the last of his interviews with
top-ranking Conservative and Liberal politicians about the Diefenbaker period,
1956-1967. The first of Mr. Stursberg's books based on these interviews was
released in October 1975 by the University of Toronto Press under the title
Diefenbaker, Leadership Gained 1956-62.
In pursuit of continuing efforts to ensure the recording of historical events
as they happen the Section has come to an agreement with Newsradio to
record, via a 5 kilocycle line between the Newsradio office in the National
Press Building and the Section's recording room, the radio news reports and
actuality coverage transmitted by Newsradio to radio stations subscribing to
this service. Thus, this line allowed the Section to record Newsradio's coverage
of the Progressive Conservative Leadership Convention which elected Joe
Clark as that party's new leader. Several major press conferences held in the
National Press Building were recorded via the line from the theatre of the
National Press Building. The debates of the House of Commons and its com- 110
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
mittee continue to be recorded on-the-spot according to the agreement which
the Section has with the House of Commons, thus tapes covering proceedings
from 22 January to 20 December 1975 were received during this fiscal year.
Diffusion — According to an agreement with the Saskatchewan Archives, the
Section has forwarded them taped copies of over 400 original 40cm transcription discs of radio broadcasts collected by the Saskatchewan CCF, Progressive Conservative, and Liberal Parties. The Saskatchewan Archives had previously transferred to the Section the original discs in these collections. Copies
of the recordings by William Aberhart have been made for the Social Credit
League of Alberta, the Provincial Archives of Alberta, the Provincial Archives
of Manitoba, and the CBC Program Archives. The Section also supplied Radio-
Canada with copies of René Lévesque's -reports on Pearson's visit to the
U.S.S.R. in 1955. Extracts were provided of talks by Canadian Governors-
General Lord Stanley and Viscount Willingdon for the opening of the National
Library's exhibition, 85 Years of Recorded Sound. In addition, a few original
disc recordings borrowed from the holdings were on display as part of the
exhibition. More material was copied in response to requests from broadcasters, such as the request received from CBO for material on the Canadian
flag which was included on the program "All in a Day" broadcast on 1 July
1975 and from radio station CFGO, Ottawa, for broadcasts on the "Golden
Days of Radio."
The staff of the Sound Archives Section contributed to the organization
of the joint meeting of the International Association of Sound Archives and of
the U.S. based Association of Recorded Sound Collections, held in Montreal
from 17 to 23 August 1975. The conference included a trip to Ottawa, and a
guided tour of the PAC Sound Archives. At the International Association of
Sound Archives business meeting, Léo La Clare was elected to a three-year
term as treasurer, thus solidifying the Section's continuing administrative support to the IASA. Another association to which the Sound Archives Section
provides logistic support is the Canadian Oral History Association of which
Léo La Clare and Denis Gagnon are respectively President and French-
Language Secretary. Thus, the Section contributed to the organization of the
Canadian Oral History Association's second annual conference held in St.
John's from 3 to 5 October 1975, and are making all arrangements for the third
annual conference to be held at the Public Archives of Canada on 8 and 9
September 1976. Following the Canadian Oral History Association Conference,
the Section will host the U.S. based Oral History Association's 1976 workshop
and colloquium to be held at the Public Archives on 9 and 10 September and
at the Château Montebsllo from 10 to 12 September.
Sound Archives staff presented papers or participated on panels at
workshops and conferences sponsored by several associations such as the
Canadian Oral History Association, the Oral History Association (U.S.), the
Association of Recorded Sound Collections (U.S.), and the International Association of Sound Archives. Of special note is the paper on William Aberhart,
accompanied by recordings of selected talks by this former Social Credit
Premier of Alberta, presented by Ernest Dick at a session on the Social Credit
Party as part of the Canadian Historical Association's annual meeting held in
Edmonton in June 1975. The CHA conference co-ordinator, Roderick Macleod, HISTORICAL BRANCH
111
reported in the August 1975 issue of the CHA Newsletter that the tapes provided by the PAC, "added immeasurably to the session on Social Credit."
Also of special mention are the papers read by Jean-Paul Moreau and Denis
Gagnon at the conference of the Institut d'histoire de l'Amérique française,
held in Montreal on 17 October. These presentations were broadcast later the
same evening by Radio-Canada, thus giving further publicity to the activities
of the Public Archives in the field of oral history and sound archives.
The staff also wrote a number of articles and reports for publications such
as the Phonographic Bulletin published by the International Association of
Sound Archives, the OHA Newsletter published by the Oral History Association (U.S.), the Bulletin and Journal published by the Canadian Oral History
Association, Chroniques and Archives published by the Association des Archivistes du Québec, La Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française published by
the Institut d'histoire de l'Amérique française, and the Newsletter and Archivaria published by the Association of Canadian Archivists. Of special note are
the following articles published in The Archivist; "Hearing is Reliving" and
"To The Sound of Gunfire" by Jean-Paul Moreau; "William Aberhart, Preacher
and Premier" by Ernest Dick; and "Voices of the Past" by Richard Lochead.
Conclusion — Since more and more historical sound recordings are being
created, the Sound Archives has no choice but to accept the greater quantity
of material offered to it and to take highly selective initiatives for the acquisition
of audio recordings. At the same time the Section must meet an ever-increasing
number of requests for copies of recordings because there is an important
self-sustaining public interest for them.
Machine Readable Archives Division
The Machine Readable Archives Division is responsible for the provision
of archival services for machine readable records — records generated by
computers — that have long-term value produced by the federal government
and those of national significance produced by the private sector. This means
ensuring that machine readable records of long-term value are acquired,
processed, preserved, and ensuring that reference services are available to
meet users' needs. The, Division was established in 1973 and currently has
17 authorized man-years.
The past fiscal year has been one of overall consolidation by the Division.
Major policy papers were prepared, procedures tested, and revisions proposed. It can be said that the Division now has the foundation for an operational
program.
Nature of Machine Readable Archives — Machine readable records may come
in the form of punched cards, paper tape, magnetic tape, optic sense sheets,
discs, or in a variety of other media that are used to input data to the computer.
They are characteristically (i) vulnerable to destruction if improperly handled
or stored, (ii) in a form that can be read by a machine, and (iii) likely to be
machine dependent. Records on magnetic tape can be easily copied or erased PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
which does not contribute to the archival objective of storing records of
long-term value for an indefinite period of time. The problem is further compounded by the necessity for machine readable records to have supporting
documentation, for without it files are virtually useless. These two factors —
media and supporting documentation — have resulted in a oolicy of acquiring
machine readable records as close in time as possible to their point of creation.
Machine readable archives do offer considerable advantages to researchers. Their capacity to be processed by a computer provides an opportunity
to manipulate formerly unthinkable quantities of raw data to support a research
study, an administrative service, a policy decision, or numerous other activities.
General acceptance of the computer as a sophisticated tool for processing
data has led to its increased use, particularly in research and planning. As a
result, the amount of information of long-term value being created and retained
in machine readable form in both the government and the private sector has
increased tremendously. If these records were placed in archives, researchers
in government or in the private sector would have a wider range of information
for research purposes than has ever been available before.
Acquisition — The Division, in determining the long-term value of machine
readable files, has relied to a great degree on traditional selection criteria.
This position assumed that the medium of the information had not drastically
changed the criteria of selection. Since the Division had entered a new area
of archives activity, it was felt that some guidelines should be formally
prepared. The following are those guidelines:
In considering which records should be preserved permanently it is
necessary to establish appraisal criteria which are applicable to a
particular department or to particular kinds of records. These criteria
should take into account not only the value of records for the long-term
purposes of government or of the department but also their value for much
wider research needs. The following general descriptions of the main
kinds of records which should be kept permanently are intended as
guidelines for use in deciding detailed appraisal standards.
(1) Machine readable files which were or may be used to support the
formulation of government policy, e.g. files used in the production
of a report for submission to a minister or senior official, or to Cabinet
or a Cabinet Committee, or produced for a commission of inquiry.
(2) Machine readable files which were created for a study which might
be considered seminal either because of the subject of the study or
a new type of analysis used, e.g. files which recorded results of first
satellite observations on sun activity.
(3) Machine readable files which were created for a study conducted
by a famous or group of famous individuals, e.g. Mr. P. E. Trudeau.
(4) Machine readable files which relate to issues which are or were the
subject of interest or controversy on a national or international plane,
e.g. drug abuse. HISTORICAL BRANCH
113
(5) Machine readable files which contain information of a nonhouse-
keeping nature and which are not of limited value for further analysis
or reanalysis (this criterion is vague but is included in recognition
of the fact that machine readable files may not fall under any of the
previous categories, yet are quite possibly of future use), e.g. personal
files defining a profile of federal government employees.
When faced with a large volume of machine readable records, a decision
may be made to take a sample. It should be borne in mind that sampling
will always reduce the utility of the records to a greater or lesser extent
and it is desirable only when the preservation of the whole is impractical.
The decision whether records should be kept in their entirety or statistically sampled depends broadly upon two factors: the potential cost to
store the total volume of records from the system; and, whether it is
possible to select an unbiased sample of sufficient size to justify confidence in any general conclusion drawn from it about the whole or any
significant part of the whole.
In determining appraisal criteria or deciding on whether or not to take a
sample, it is important that the users responsible for the file/system be
consulted and that their recommendations be a major influence. Any
decisions in these areas should have the support of the user group.
The Division intends eventually to use the existing records management
procedures for textual government archives to acquire files. This means that
the files in departments are inventoried, schedules are established and
approved by the Dominion Archivist, the schedules are applied by the departments, and once the operational life of the files has ended, the dormant and
historical files are transferred to the Public Archives. The only change in this
system will be a telescoping of the timeframe from the point that files of long-
term value are identified to their eventual transfer to the Historical Branch.
In the past, once files were scheduled, the Public Archives would wait
until they had no operational value to departments before the files were
transferred. This procedure has changed with machine readable records.
Since tapes are so vulnerable, are so easily copied, and many problems can
be encountered in interpreting and collecting the supporting documentation,
the Division requests, as soon as possible, that a copy be transferred as soon
as machine readable files are identified as archival. If this were not done it is
possible that some files might be unusable once they were transferred.
The records management system will not be operational from the Machine
Readable Archives Division's viewpoint until the beginning of 1979-1980. In the
interim the staff of the Division has tried to identify and appraise files from
whatever sources were available. As a result of this approach the Division
appraised during 1975-1976, 323 files of which 155 were identified as having
long-term value.
During 1975-1976 the Division acquired 83 files from various departments
and commissions. The contributing departments and agencies were: Health
and Welfare; Manpower and Immigration; Urban Affairs; Secretary of State;
Public Service Staff Relations Board; Indian and Northern Affairs; Bilingual 114 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1975-1976
District Advisory Board; Canadian Dairy Commission; Science Council of
Canada; Department of Communications; Department of Transport; Chief
Electoral Office; Industry, Trade and Commerce; and Veterans Affairs. Files
were also received from several commissions of inquiry. From the private
sector the Division acquired the Inuit Land Use Survey from McMaster Univer- I
sity and the 1974 Canadian Election Study from Carleton University.
Processing and Conservation — The basis of the archiving system for machine
readable records as previously reported in 1974-1975 is magnetic tape. This
medium was chosen since it was felt that there were no cost effective or
technically feasible alternatives. To overcome the inherent problems of
magnetic tape, two copies of any file are stored in separate physical locations
and a computer output microfilm (COM) copy of the file is made. Thus, if
problems of lost data arise with one file, there is a backup copy; if these
problems are duplicated on the backup files, there is the COM backup, and
the lost data can be manually inputted. During 1975-1976 a project was begun
called the Machine Readable Archiving System (MARAS). Part of the MARAS
development included the conservation system presented above. This element
and the entire MARAS system will be fully developed and operational by the
end of 1976-1977.
Another area related to the conservation of data on magnetic tape is the
development of the proper procedures and specifications for its handling and
storage. In 1974-1975 the Canadian Government Specifications Board was
commissioned to prepare such a standard and its completion is expected in
1976-1977 after a one year delay.
In the area of processing of machine readable archives it can be said
that there are few similarities with the processing of the more traditional
archival media. Since machine readable archives are generally statistical files,
the processing is so oriented. The main purpose of the processing is to ensure
that the machine readable files correspond to the original data capturing
document which was made machine readable, and if there are variations,
where these variations are, and can they be corrected. No development was
done during 1975-1976 in the area of computer programs to help the Division
do this processing. The Division was already using the Statistical Package for
the Social Sciences (SPSS) and this was found to be adequate. The Division
did introduce a terminal linkup to a service bureau to make its processing
activity more efficient. The Division also began to look at a statistical program
package called OSIRIS to use as an alternative or in conjunction with SPSS.
The development of a modified requirement for an archiving system
began in 1975-1976. This is the MARAS system. Most of the development is
centred on making the Division independent to a great degree of any service
bureau and enabling the Division to handle most types of formats that magnetic
tape may be in. The third major area of development will be an automated
system of control over the magnetic tape and the files on the tape.
Two significant changes were made in the original proposal for the
archiving system. Firstly, the Department has delayed the acquisition of its
own computer facility because of the lack of sufficient information to substan- HISTORICAL BRANCH
115
tiate such a proposal. The second change was a Departmental decision not
to convert all incoming files to one standard archives format. It was felt that
the Division should study this question further before making the necessary
commitment. In general, the overall reaction to the proposed archiving system
was to proceed but with caution.
As part of the processing of machine readable files, the Division required
procedures for the description of its holdings. During the year the Division
worked with the American Library Association's Subcommittee on Rules for
Cataloguing Machine Readable Data Files to prepare the final recommendations to the Cataloguing Committee. These recommendations will likely be
approved in July 1976, and then presented for discussion with the British
counterparts to form part of the new Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules. The
Division has prepared, on the basis of the subcommittee's recommendations,
procedures for the description and standardizing of formats for machine
readable files. The year 1976-1977 will be a year of testing these rules and
making revisions where necessary.
Public Service — One of the more interesting aspects of machine readable
archives is how researchers will be given access to them. A great proportion
of the files that have been or will be received by the Division fall into the
category of personal and confidential datarThe Machine Readable Archives
is concerned that where necessary or deemed to be necessary the anonymity
of individuals will be scrupulously maintained. The requirements for handling
confidential data, coupled with the fact that most of the files the Division will
be receiving will be less than 30 years old, can limit the access of researchers
to the records in its custody. It is hoped that the Division's services will provide
as much access as possible while at the same time maintaining confidentiality.
The first service which the Division provides is a simple file copy service
whereby entire copies of files on magnetic tape together with the necessary
supporting documentation are supplied to researchers. The second service
is one of data element extraction. Mainly because of the confidentiality of the
data, but also for the convenience of researchers, a portion of a file is copied
onto magnetic tape and provided along with the necessary supporting documentation. The third service is a data processing one, and is provided for the
reasons mentioned in the data element extraction service. The researcher
defines the analysis desired and the work is done on his behalf. These services
are oriented only to magnetic tape as an input/output medium. The Machine
Readable Archives will do everything possible to provide researchers with
files that are in a physical format (labels, blocking, density, and bit coding)
compatible with the researcher's data processing needs. The Machine
Readable Archives is under a partial cost recovery system for these services.
Publications — The development of archives in the field of machine readable
documents has created a great deal of interest and the Chief