BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

BC Historical Books

Report of the Public Archives for the year 1942 Public Archives of Canada; Lanctôt, Gustave, 1883-1975 1943

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcbooks-1.0307316.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcbooks-1.0307316.json
JSON-LD: bcbooks-1.0307316-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcbooks-1.0307316-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcbooks-1.0307316-rdf.json
Turtle: bcbooks-1.0307316-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcbooks-1.0307316-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcbooks-1.0307316-source.json
Full Text
bcbooks-1.0307316-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcbooks-1.0307316.ris

Full Text

Array DOMINION OF CANADA
REPORT
PUBLIC ARCHIVES
FOR THE YEAR
1942
GUSTAVE LANCTOT
Keeper of Public Records
OTTAWA
EDMOND CLOUTIER
PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY
Price, 50 cents  DOMINION OF CANADA
REPORT
PUBLIC ARCHIVES
FOR THE YEAR
1942
GUSTAVE LANCTOT
Keeper of Public Records
OTTAWA
EDMOND CLOUTIER
IINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY f^oof TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of Transmittal         v
Report of the Keeper of Public Records       vii
Reports of Divisions        xv
List of Donations       xxi
HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS
I. Early Rationing in Canada      xxix
II. Early Control of Prices xxxvii
III. Treatment of prisoners during the War of 1812       lvii
Calendar of Series Q:
Calendar of State Papers composed of the official correspondence
of the Governors of Canada for the years 1839-1841	  LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
Ottawa, December 30,1942.
To the Honourable Norman McLarty, P.C., K.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you herewith the Annual Report
of the Public Archives for the year 1942.
This year the report is accompanied by a number of documents which
show that food rationing and the control of prices are not new in the history
of our country. Following them will be found two extremely interesting
items on the treatment of prisoners during the War of 1812. There is also
an appendix containing the final instalment—covering the years 1839 to
1841—of the calendar of the official correspondence between the Governors
of Lower Canada and the British Government.
Respectfully yours,
GUSTAVE LANCTOT,
Keeper of Public Records.  REPORT
THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES
FOR THE YEAR 1942
During the year that has just ended, the influence of the war has been
lelt at the Archives in many ways. It should be first pointed out that
between 1939 and 1942 the personnel was reduced by 24%. As to the
budget in general—salaries and expenses—the reduction amounted to 22%
and that of expenses alone reached 57%. In consequence of these restrictions, although the Archives has not been able to acquire materials to the
same extent as in the past, it has, however, thanks to the co-operation and
goodwill of the staff succeeded in maintaining, almost completely, its usual
program and in supplying through its various services the documentation
and information! requested by Government departments and historical
students. In addition, the Department has been able to contribute to the
war effort by giving office space to the Wartime Prices and Trade Board.
At the same time, in accordance with the policy of the Government
regarding post-war social rehabilitation, the Archives is contemplating a
program permitting a wider and more complete use of its historical and
sociological materials by the creation of special courses, the publication of.
pamphlets, and the use of microfilms.
While on the subject of war, it is fitting to add here that the Dominion
Archivist during the year 1942, in the capacity of Chairman of the Military
Museum Board, has been able to turn over to our war industries, either by
sale or through salvage committees, 208 field guns, 89 trench mortars, and
203 machine guns, trophies of the last war, as well as 82 ancient cannons,
which had been transmitted by the towns, municipalities, and institutions
that owned them. If these figures are added to those of last year it will
be seen that the Board has recovered to date, the end of December, 1942,
305 field guns, 111 trench mortars, 270 machine guns, and 85 old cannons.
Finally, it should be mentioned that the War Museum, officially opened
to the public last January, has already had more than 24,000 visitors to
view its collections. This is a remarkable attendance considering the steep
drop in tourists during the year.
In its own sphere, the Archives has maintained, despite a reduction
in staff, the regular activities of the several divisions. In spite of the
growing concentration of the war effort, many historians and students
have frequented our rooms and repositories in search of materials contained
in our documentary, geographic, and iconographic collections.
This year the Archives held only one historical exhibition, that of
the tercentennial of the founding of Montreal, consisting of a considerable
number of manuscripts and pictures concerning the early beginnings ot
the former Ville-Marie. Some of these items were lent, for an exhibition,
to the Art Association of Montreal.
Last year, 1941, the Archives had the honour of being visited by
Princess Zita, formerly Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, as
well as Princess Juliana of the Netherlands. In July this year a Yugoslavian delegation, composed of D. Bozidar Markoviteh (Minister of
Justice), Miloch Trifunovitch and Branko Cubrilovic, paid a^ visit to the
Archives. Several months later the Archives had a visit from the Brazilian
Minister to Canada, Mr. Caio de Mello-Franco. viii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
The Manuscript Division received from the Governor General's office
an abundant collection of the highest historical interest. It consists of
198 volumes containing the official correspondence of the Governors General
with the Colonial Office from 1890 to 1913. Among the other acquisitions
of this division we must at least mention the following: twelve diaries
and note-books of the Reverend Allan Salt (1865-1906), a Methodist
missionary who occupied various posts in the St. Clair and Georgian Bay
districts; a file of documents of William McDougall, one of the Fathers
of Confederation; a score of letters by Louis Joseph Papineau to Abbe
Bourassa, 1844-1866; about thirty letters by Sir John A. Macdonald to
Samuel Amsden, of Dunnville, 1858-1865; thirty or so letters and documents of John Mclntyre, of the Hudson's Bay Company (1855-1874),
among them letters by Wolseley and Donald Smith; a letter by Louis Riel
to his wife written a month before his execution.
The Map Division was much occupied during the year looking up
materials for the use of numerous students and preparing memoirs in
response to requests for information. Thirty-two new items were received,
among them three important maps of Montreal in 1801, 1803, and 1825.
The Print Division has continued its important work of cataloguing its
items, which illustrate the history of Canada; this catalogue has now
reached 65,000 entries. From among this year's acquisitions may be noted
two albums of views of British Columbia in 1896 and 1900, a view of
Brockville in 1851, two photographs of Fort William in 1870. The division
has acquired, thanks to the National Film Board, two large photographic
collections; one being 995 negatives and the other 1,259 lantern slides.
These photographic items, which formerly belonged to the Department of
Immigration and Colonization, represent views of Canada: landscapes,
cities, industries, and events of the last thirty years.
The Library received, through the Prime Minister, four volumes of
speeches by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, which the President was
good enough to present to the Archives with an autographed inscription.
On instructions from the Prime Minister, the Division of Technical
Auxiliary Services received from the Department of Public Works the model
for the beautification of Ottawa, prepared by Mr. Jacques Greber, the
French town planner. This model is now on display in one of the Archives
exhibition rooms.
This year the report is accompanied by a number of historical documents and an appendix. Taken from our collections, these documents
show, once again, how the present resembles the past. To-day our
thoughts are turned somewhat to rationing and the control of prices,
although so far no one can nor wishes to complain. It is timely perhaps
to recall that this is not a new condition but something very old, even in
our brief Canadian history. The limitation of profits, price fixing and
ceiling prices, rationing of consumption, prevention of hoarding and
exportation of foods, fines for infractions and subsidies for production—
all this was practiced in the past, as well as the regulation of housing
conditions.
The first rationing in Canada dates back exactly four hundred years,
the year 1542, when Roberval, Lieutenant General for Francis I, receiving
instructions to found a colony in the Laurentian valley, went to Fort
France-Roy at the mouth of the Cap Rouge River, nine miles above Quebec.
In the month of September, having made an inventory of his provisions
in view of wintering there, he found them so reduced that he deemed it
necessary to establish immediately a system of rationing. It was such
that "in eche messe they had but two loaves weighing a pound a piece,
and a halfe a pound of biefe.    They ate Bacon at dinner with a halfe ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1942 ix
a pound of butter: and Biefe at supper, and about two handfuls of Beanes
without butter. Unfortunately the text does not say into how many
messes the garrison of a hundred men under Roberval was divided.
• i2oe UjXt case of rationinS took Place at Quebec, under Champlain
in 1628 and 1629, when the St. Lawrence was blockaded by the Kirke
brothers at Tadoussac. Since 1627 provisions had become so scarce
that they were already at a premium: for instance, a barrel of biscuits
sold for seven beaver skins, a record price for that period. The following
year the scarcity was even more serious. In June, Champlain wrote
that he was reduced to four or five barrels of biscuits, with some peas
and beans. Soon famine set in, "each man being reduced to seven ounces
of peas per day." At one time they were fortunate enough to obtain
eels brought by the Indians, who sold them at the high price of one beaver
skin for ten eels.
With the coming of the winter of 1629, the situation became still
more acute: the ration of seven ounces of peas a day was cut to less than
half of that. To keep from dying of hunger the inhabitants had to "search
the woods as far as five or six leagues distant to find roots good to eat,
for those in the neighbourhood of Quebec had been all consumed." They
gathered in particular a root called Solomon's Seal which "they used
mostly as bread, & other times they mixed it with acorns & a little barley
flour, bran & straw which they boiled & reduced to a broth." This situation
lasted until the arrival of the British Fleet in July, when Champlain
had to surrender Quebec after having obtained honourable terms.
At that time Quebec, the only establishment in the colony, was
merely a trading post, with the slim population of 94 persons. But Canada,
in the middle of the following century, with a population of 70,000 souls,
was to experience a veritable famine during the Seven Years' War.
At the beginning of 1757, the Administration had to aid, with shipments
of food, the Acadians in the French part of Nova Scotia, who were reduced
to 10 pounds of peas and 12 pounds of meat a month. In the colony
itself the harvest of that year was spoiled by rains and early frost. The
wheat that was harvested was dried up and rusted. The ships failed to
arrive from France and famine was soon felt in the whole Laurentian
valley. On October 1st, the soldier's ration was set at a pound of bread,
a quarter of a pound of peas and a quarter of a pound of pork a day. In
December, the ration was cut to half a pound of bread, half a pound of
beef, half a pound of horse meat, a quarter of a pound of peas with half
a loaf of bread paid in money. The civil population also had to accept
some horse meat. The Intendant ordered from twelve to fifteen hundred
horses to be slaughtered and the meat sold to the people below cost price.
To the poor he distributed a quarter of a pound of pork and half a pound
of cod a day. During this time the cost of living mounted steadily. The
Bishop of Quebec made an appeal to the charity of France asking for cotton,
cloth, and food.
In order to camouflage horse meat and make it more acceptable, the
soldiers used to subject it to the following treatment: "At night they put
on the horse meat to cook, skim it well, throwing away the first water,
remove it, making good soup with it in the morning in putting rt in the pot
with the beef, eating the beef used in the soup in the morning, and the
horse meat at night in stew."
In the homes of the superior officers, even in General Montcalm's
home, horse meat was served regularly.    The cooks prepared it in many
elaborate ways: Petits p&tes de ch
filet de cheval a broche, semelles
elaborate ways: Petits pates de cheval a l'espagnole, escaloppe de cheval,
•■"■■-•  •      -he, semelles de cheval au gratin, langue de cheval X PUBLIC ARCHIVES
au miroton, frigousse de cheval, langue de cheval boucanee. And Montcalm declared that horse meat "is very much better than moose, caribou,
or beaver."
But this rationing was not carried out without provoking criticism,
discontent, and protests. Among the troops in garrison at Montreal
there were attempts at mutiny. In November, j Chevalier de L6vis,
who was in command there, had to intervene several times. He threatened,
first to the marines and a few days later to the soldiers, that the first man
who refused to accept the prescribed ration would be hanged. There
was no more trouble.
As to the people of Montreal, they actually rebelled against the distribution of horse meat. The women took the initiative in the revolt. They
gathered in front of Governor Vaudreuil's house and requested an interview.
Four were admitted, who told him that they had come to ask for bread.
The Governor replied that the King was not obliged to provide bread
for the people, but he offered them horse meat at six sous a pound. The
women protested they had an aversion to eating horse meat and that they
would sooner die than eat it. Vaudreuil replied that it was only a silly
notion on their part, that people had always eaten horses and the meat
of them was excellent. On saying this he dismissed them with the threat
that if they caused further trouble he would have them put in prison
and have the half of them hanged.    The uprising was not repeated.
The control of prices, as rationing, goes far back into Canadian history.
It seems that the first case happened during the French Regime in 1653.
The colony then numbered about 2,000 inhabitants. As there was a
dearth of metal coins, black and white beads had been used to replace them,
following the custom of the Indians. It was therefore necessary to set a
uniform value on this medium in order to assure equity in trading. By
an ordinance dated November 8, 1653, Governor de Lauzon fixed the
value of these beads: the white beads at two deniers, being one sixth of
a sou, and the black ones at four deniers, being one third of a sou; for
the denier was only worth a twelfth of a sou.
A week later an ordinance of November 15 fixed the prices of wheat,
corn, and peas. The reason for this was that, still short of currency,
and even beads, the inhabitants had resorted to bartering to make purchases and pay wages. But it happened that certain persons refused
to accept these products at the prices paid for them by the others, bringing
about a condition of unfairness and loss. Therefore, in order to assure
equality in all cases, the Governor established by ordinance that the
price of wheat must not exceed one hundred and twenty sous the bushel;
that of corn, one hundred sous; and that of peas, eighty sous. This is
probably the first example of a price ceiling in Canada.
Some years later in view of protests from the inhabitants, who complained of the increased cost of living, the Quebec Council decided to intervene. On August 25, 1663, it published an ordinance regulating the price
of merchandise and fixing the rate of profit for the merchant. This rate
was set at 65% of the cost, and the price was established by producing
the invoice.    The price of grain was also regulated by ordinance.
Also, in 1664, the price of beaver skins, the only product of the country,
having dropped in France caused the merchants who received them to
raise immediately the price of their merchandise. Thereupon, the Sovereign Council decided to pass a new regulation. A decision of June 30
ruled that on producing invoices, the merchants could sell dry goods
at a profit of 55% of the cost price, and liquids at the rate of 100% to 120%,
according to quality.    Finally, the Council named Louis Rouer de Villeray ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1942 xi
and Mathieu d'Amours to execute the law; thus they became the first
price controllers in Canada.
The same day, preceding and surpassing even our most recent methods,
the Council ordered that the merchants must present to the Council,
under penalty of a fine, the invoices of goods that had just arrived and it
forbade the captains of ships to unload cargoes of merchandise without
verification of the invoices.
In the wake of abuses committed by the merchants, another ordinance
dated July 9 decreed that four members of the Council should visit the
shops, examine dry goods and mark the selling price on each article. Each
merchant had also to keep a record of his sales showing the name of the
purchaser, the quantity of goods and the price of the sale, and give to
each purchaser a receipt describing the nature and price of the goods.
Next, on July 30, the Council ordered that the scale of prices must be
adhered to at all times, and that a copy of the price rates, distributed to
the merchants, must be posted in the shops and public places. Finally,
selling above the scale of prices was punishable by fine, as well as the
reimbursement to the customer of the overcharge in price. Thus, for
not giving a bill of the price of goods to a customer, Sieur de LaMothe
was sentenced to a fine of one hundred livres on November 19, 1664.
On December 17 three other merchants, Grignon, La Garenne, and Charron,
who had not made a declaration of their merchandise had each to pay
a fine of one hundred livres. Finally, on April 22, 1665, for having sold
wine at twenty-two sous the pot instead of the fixed price of twenty sous
Gabriel Lemieux and his wife Marguerite Leboeuf had to pay a fine of
ten ecus.    The ecu was worth three livres and the livre, twenty sous.
Practically a necessity at the start of colonization, because of the
difficulties of transportation and food supply and on account of the absence
of any colonial manufacturing, even domestic, this control of prices soon
steadily diminished. Being minute to excess, the regulations became more
and more difficult to enforce with the increase in population and might
easily have provoked widespread smuggling. Consequently, they soon
applied only to the essential foods of meat and bread.
But the principle of fixing prices and controlling commerce by colonial
authority was never completely abandoned. It continued to be applied
any time the situation made it necessary. Soon after the arrival of a new
Intendant, and with his consent, the Sovereign Council introduced something that does not exist even in our time, a democratic element in the
control of prices: the consultation of the people themselves. A regulation
dated May 11, 1676 stated that in future two meetings would be held
each year, one on the fifteenth of November and the other on the fifteenth
of April, to which "the principal inhabitants of this city [Quebec]. will
be called, at which the price of bread will be fixed." Actually, the first
meeting was not held until January 14, 1677 and as a result of the deliberations the Council, by its decree of February 15, fixed the price of the loaf of
white bread weighing eleven ounces at If sous, and brown bread at 2 sous for
a pound loaf and it ordered that there should be only three bakers in the town.
As to wine, the Council fixed a price ceiling on it of 16 sous the pot.
Here is another example of price control, this time at Montreal. In
1688, on representations made to him, the Town Magistrate published
an ordinance dated May 5. In it he stated that owing to the scarcity ol
liquor, the sale of wine at 25 and 30 sous the pot and brandy at 3 livres
or 60 sous had been tolerated, but the arrival of new stocks had made
these prices excessive. Consequently, after having conferred with the
"most intelligent inhabitants", he ordered wine to be sold at 22 sous the
pot and brandy at 50 sous.
60613—BJ xii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Price control also applied to meat when the occasion arose. For
instance, a Sovereign Council regulation intervened on March 24, 1692
to reduce the excessive prices which had prevailed for two years. After
having heard the views of the principal inhabitants at a meeting, the
Council ordered that the butchers would be obliged to declare how many
cattle each of them could slaughter a week. Then it fixed the price
of beef at 5 sous a pound from Easter until June 30 and at 4 sous from
July 1 until Lent. It was also forbidden to kill calves less than a year
old. No person in the town or country could sell meat without having
first offered it to the butchers of the town at a sou less than the selling
price. Finally, innkeepers and hotel-keepers were forbidden to buy meat,
fowl, butter, eggs, and other foods on the market before eight o'clock,
in order to permit private citizens to supply themselves with necessary
provisions.
The documents described above suffice to exemplify the system of
price control under the French Regime—a system that was continued
until the Conquest.
In the English period, even with the wars of 1775 and 1812, there
seems to have been only one case of rationing; it was a loose sort of
rationing that only applied to imported foodstuffs, and took place in Nova
Scotia. On February 3, 1752 the Halifax Council decided to intervene
in order to prevent the monopolizing and hoarding of provisions and the
consequent rise in the cost of living. Therefore, it ordered that provisions
imported into the province should be exposed for sale on the market
for two days, in order to prevent the monopolizing of them in large quantities by certain individuals and to allow private citizens to get their supplies without any difficulty. During these two days it was forbidden
for any person to make purchases beyond the needs of his family, under
penalty of a fine of six pounds sterling each for the buyer and seller alike.
In short, mild though it was, it was still a rationing of provisions on sale
to the public.
On the other hand, there are under British rule several examples of
price control and the regulation of commerce, as well as subsidies on production just as they apply to-day on butter, milk, and bacon.
Thus in April 1751, the Nova Scotia Council, in order to encourage
the fisheries, the economic basis of the province, established a subsidy
of six pence a hundredweight on dried and salt fish and a subsidy of twelve
pence the barrel on pickled fish, caught and pickled in the province, as
well as a subsidy of two shillings and six pence a barrel on whale oil, seal
oil, and fish oil, when these products were exported from the province.
In order to provide a fund for the payment of these subsidies, the Council
imposed a tax of six pence a gallon on rum and alcoholic liquors.
Another curious measure of the Halifax Council, dated February,
1752, granted a subsidy on the production of beer and fixed a ceiling price
on the barrel of beer. With the double aim of reducing the importation
of beer and decreasing the consumption of alcoholic spirits, the Council
decided to pay the brewer for a year two shillings and six pence for each
barrel of beer manufactured and sold in the province, provided that the
price did not exceed twenty-seven shillings and six pence a barrel.
Finally, another ordinance of the Halifax Council of September 17,
1754 forbade the exportation of corn without a special permit from the
Lieutenant-Governor, under penalty of a fine of fifty pounds sterling,
of which half went to the informer and the other half to the Government
of the province, j That, if not a war measure, was at least an ante-war
one, with a view to prevent the exportation of grain needed by the province ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1942 xiii
and above all to stop the shipment of it to the neighbouring French possessions in Cape Breton and on the coast of the Bay of Fundy. Less
than three weeks later another ordinance hurled the same interdiction
at the exportation of wheat, rye, barley, oats, peas, and all other cereals.
In chronological order in the British period, under date of January
15, 1760—when in this country Quebec alone was in British hands—
an ordinance was issued by General Murray fixing the prices of bread and
meat. According to quality, white bread was sold at ten sous a pound,
semi-white bread at eight sous and brown bread at six sous. As to meat,
beef sold at ten sous a pound and mutton at twelve sous. After the
cession of the country by the Treaty of Paris, civil government was
formally established in April, 1764 consisting of a Governor assisted by a
Council. On September 3, this Council decreed that a four-pound loaf
of white bread should sell at six pence and a six-pound loaf of brown bread
also at six pence.
, Here is another ordinance by the same Quebec Council which had
for its aim—a problem to-day—the reduction of the cost of living. Passed
on the 9th day of March, 1780, this ordinance prohibited for two years the
exportation of wheat, peas, oats, biscuits, meal, flour and also cattle, without
a permit from the Governor approved by Council, under pain of a fine
and confiscation of the articles exported in order to bring down the cost
of living.
Ten years later, August 17, 1790, still another ordinance of the same
type forbade for a year the exportation of all grains in order to prevent
"a scarcity of bread so necessary for the sustenance of the people" and
at the same time an inevitable rise of prices.
Perhaps the most curious thing is that the past also had its housing
problem. This crisis occurred at Halifax in 1776 with the arrival of British
troops and United Empire Loyalists. Thereupon, in view of the exorbitant
rents demanded by landlords, the Council ruled that, on the basis of the
rent two months before (which represents our basic period), the rents
could be doubled. But it decided also to regulate and moderate the rents
of houses not yet leased.
Several months later, because of the higher cost of living due to the
presence of the refugees, the Council issued a proclamation, August 13,
1776, fixing a ceiling price on beef of nine pence a pound and on other
meats in proportion; the price of butter was set at one shilling a pound.
In Upper Canada only one law has been found designed to prevent
the scarcity of food and assure the population of a supply of provisions.
It was adopted by the Legislative Assembly in 1813, during the War of
1812. As the text cannot be found, we have to be satisfied with the title,
which reads as follows: An Act to authorize the Governor, Lieutenant Governor
or Person administering the Government of this Province to prohibit the
Exportation of Grain and other Provisions, and also restraining the Distillation of Spirituous Liquors from Grain. This title is sufficient to show
that it was a case of the control of food similar to that exercised by the
Canadian authorities to-day.
In New Brunswick only in 1817 was it necessary to resort to_ law in
order to assure the food supply. Following a poor harvest the Legislature
passed a law, February 17, 1817, forbidding the exportation of wheat,
rye, barley, oats, flour, and bread as well as potatoes for a period of four
months, under penalty of a fine of one hundred pounds sterling. After
deducting the costs, half of this fine was payable to the informer or the
official who conducted the seizure.
From all these historical documents it can easily be seen that the
laws of to-day are indeed very old ones, and that they are just a repetition
of past history.    There is nothing new under the sun! xiv PUBLIC ARCHIVES
The documentary part of the report ends with two items of special
interest in this time of war; they refer to the treatment of war prisoners.
What a contrast between yesterday and to-day! The first document is a
treaty passed by Canada and the United States during the War of 1812.
With a humanitarian spirit and a respect for word of honour which the
Germans have trampled underfoot, this treaty provided for the liberation
and return of prisoners to their country as soon as possible, with the sole
restriction that they must not engage in military service until a regular
exchange had been made. The American prisoners were to be transported
to Boston, the Lower Canada prisoners were to be taken to Saint John,
and those from Upper Canada to the nearest port of entry.
The second document is the pledge that a prisoner of war had to make
in the old days. In this case it concerned Quartermaster Nathaniel Bell
of the 4th Regiment of the Lincoln Militia, captured during the War of
1812. Instead of being shut up in a prison camp, behind a barbed wire
fence guarded by soldiers with fixed bayonets, according to the system nowadays, the soldier was assigned to live in the town of Cheshire, Massachusetts. The conditions imposed on him were quite lenient: he must
not break stated bounds without a special pass; he must be of good conduct;
obey the law; and above all refrain from all communication, directly or
indirectly, either written or oral, with anyone whomsoever, except through
the intermediary official appointed for that purpose, in order that the
latter might have full knowledge of these communications. Subsequently,
and this is most astonishing, Bell was ordered to go as soon as possible to
the appointed place—but apparently alone and without any guard whatsoever—and present himself to Captain Daniel Brown, who was to help
him find lodgings. He was then free to go about within certain town
limits fixed by Captain Brown, with only the obligation of reporting personally at Captain Brown's house every Saturday between nine o'clock and
noon; but he was forbidden to go into the fields or public places and to be
absent from his lodgings after six o'clock in the evening from October to
March, and eight o'clock during the other months. Finally, he had to
submit for examination all the letters he received or sent and to abstain
from all conversation with the citizens in the matter of public questions.
Following the above-mentioned documents will be found as an appendix
the continuation and completion of the calendar of State papers containing
the official correspondence of the Governors of Lower Canada. The
publication of this calendar, commenced in 1890, was suspended in 1903.
Resumed last year, it is completed in the present appendix with the years
1839-1841. In the foreword that heads the appendix to last year's Report
a schedule indicates the dates of the Reports containing the preceding
installments of the calendar, covering the years 1760-1838.
GUSTAVE LANCTOT,
Keeper of Public Records. MANUSCRIPT DIVISION
ACCESSIONS
Transcripts from Canada
Montreal—
Archevgche de: Lettres diverses sur la politique 1871-1886.
Bibliotheque municipale de:
Cession de certains droits par Maisonneuve, 4 avril, 1668.
Remise par Jeanne Mance de 20,000 livres pour l'h6pital de
Montreal, 29 mars, 1659.
Palais de Justice:   Will of Dulhut and other personal documents.
1697-1710.
Universite de Montreal:
Baby Collection.
Documents concernant la famille Lanaudiere, 1768-1894.
Quebec—
Seminaire de Quebec: Journal de Labadie, 1794.
Restigouche—
Ste. Anne de Restigouche:  Register of births, marriages and deaths,
1759-1795.
Sorel—
Seigneurie de Sorel:   Documents concernant la Seigneurie de Sorel,
1683-1854.
Originals from Government Sources
England—
House of Commons: Accounts and Papers, 1831-1832.
Ottawa—
Department of Pensions and National Health, Special Committee.
Minutes, etc.    1932.
Governor General's Office:
Register of Despatches to the Secretary of State for the Colonies,
1900-1909.
Register of Despatches from the Secretary of State for the Colonies,
1897-1909.
Despatches from the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the
Governor General, 1897-1909.
Secret   and   Confidential   Despatches   from   Colonial   Office,
1874-1909.
Secret and Confidential to Colonial Office, 1871-1911.
Despatches to Washington, 1895-1909.
Despatches from Washington, 1895-1910.
Drafts   of   Despatches   to  the   Governor   General  from  U.S.
Ambassador, 1895-1900. xvi PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Drafts   of   Despatches   from   the   Governor   General   to   U.S.
Ambassador, 1895-1914.
Drafts of Despatches from the Governor General to the Colonial
Office,  1897-1913.
Secret  and   Confidential   from  the   Governor  General  to   the
Secretary of State, 1871-1908.
Miscellaneous Despatches, 1891-1913.
Letter Books, 1890-1910.
Letters received—general, 1905-1909.
Index to General Register, 1894-1909.
Governor General's Office Register, 1905.
Historic Sites and Monuments Board:
Laurier's birthplace dedication.    Letters and clippings, 1941.
Department of National Revenue:
Shipping Register, Kincardine, Ontario, 1924.
Originals from Miscellaneous Sources
Manuscript re Battle of Queenston Heights, by James Crooks, 1812.
Essay "Irish Settlers of Bytown" by Mme. G. J. Desbarats.
Letters of Robert Gourlay, 1821-1845.
Manuscript re History of Leeds and Grenville counties, Rebellion of 1837.
Papers of Wm. McDougall, 1859-1892.
Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald, 1858-1865.
Letters of T. D'Arcy McGee, 1855-1868.
Papineau-Bourassa Letters, 1844-1866.
Typescript re Dummer Powell (Chief Justice of U.C.) 1779-1809.
Photostat of Relation de Detroit, 1683.    (Original in Library of Congress.)
Diaries of Rev. Allan Salt, 1865-1906.
Signatures, Kings of France, etc.
Speech, St. Regis Mohawk Chiefs, 1800.
Letter to Governor General Monck, Manitoulin Island, 3 Aug. 1867.
Letters and Addresses re Leeds Militia, 1834-1846.
History of Princess Louise Fusiliers (photostat).
Index of General Orders, 1811-1815.
Letters to Joseph Brant, 1786 (photostats).
Worsley-MacDonald Collection.    Letters, 1869-1889.
List of Medical Supplies, Riviere-du-Loup, October 6, 1841.
Letter, Mathews to Dease re Audit of Public Accounts, Sept. 10, 1798.
Monck—Autograph, March 1, 1864.
Letter, Sir John A. Macdonald to Campbell, Nov. 19, 1884..
Letter, Louis Riel to his wife, September 17, 1885.
War Ration Cards for sugar, 1942.
Letters from Donald McKenzie to W. P. Hunt, Red River, 1825-1830.
Document re Abraham Markle, 1770-1826. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xvii
MAP DIVISION
RESEARCH
Requests for information: 104.
Number of students and others who consulted maps in the Map Division:
Photograph and photostat prints supplied: 445.
ACCESSIONS
Maps and Plans
Maps and Charts Accompanying Report of Captain J. E. Bernier on
"The Cruise of the Arctic in 1908-9". Department of Marine and Fisheries,
Ottawa.    Nine Plans.
Plan Officiel de La Paroisse de Charlesbourg, Comt6 de Quebec, Fait
conformement aux dispositions du chapitre 37 des Statuts Refondus du
Bas Canada et de l'Acte 27, 28 Victoria Chapitre 40. Bureau des Terres
de la Couronne, Quebec, 24 Decembre 1873. "Sign6", P. Fortin, Commis-
saire des Terres de la Couronne.    Blue print (enlarged).
Municipality du Village De Charlesbourg, Comte de Qu6bec, Compile
d'apres les Plans du Cadastre. Bureau du Cadastre, Quebec 22 Decembre
1931.    P. A. Picard.    Blue print (enlarged).    Copy.
Plan Des Fortifications De La Ville De Montreal avec les reserves
interieures et exterieures, &c. par Louis Charland. A true copy of the
original hereof remaining of record in my office. Jos. Rielle, P.L.S. Blue
print.
Plan de la Ville et Cite de Montreal avec les projets d'accroissement
dans l'etendue qui lui a et6 fixee par proclamation de Son Excell^ Alured
Clarke, Ecuier, alors Lieutenant Gouverneur de cette Province, fait en
conformite des 26me et 27me clauses d'un Acte du Parlement provincial,
de la trente neuvieme annee du regne de sa pr6sente Majeste, intitule
Acte qui amende un Acte pass6 dans la trente sixieme ann£e du regne de
sa presente Majeste, intitule Acte pour faire, r6parer et changer les chemins
et points dans cette province et pour d'autres effets, par (sign£) Louis
Charland, Inspecteur des Chs Bas Canada 1301. E. P. J. Courval, Dessin-
ateur Geom£tre en Chef, H6tel de Ville, Montreal, 20 octobre, 1919.
Archives du Bureau des Dessinateurs—Plan No. 1184.    Blue print.
Map of the City Suburbs of Montreal Exhibiting distinctly every
property public and private, the Course of the Water Works, the River
Line in front of the City and the Lachine Canal from its Junction with
the Port to the distance of 1| Miles above—Constructed from a New
Survey 1825 by John Adams. H.P. Royi Mil* Survey and Draftsman.
Blue print.
Wakefield, Quebec. Diagram of Wakefield, Quebec. With references.
Surveyed by Anthony Smallwell in 1835.    Photostat copy.
Maps No. 1 to No. 4 Showing the Lands adjacent to the route of the
Rideau Canal. By W. Chewett, York. January 29th 1829. Surveyor
General's Office York 7th March 1839. W. Chewett Act* Survey0' Gen1-
4 sections.    True copy.    1829.    Blue print. xviii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Map of Section of Rideau Canal shewing the Estimated Expense
of the Whole Work, The Amt Expended to The 1 July 1830. The Lands
Purchased, The Crown & Clerg Reserves Required &c. L1 Col* By.
Corn8 R1 Engineers. John By, L* Colonel Roy1 Engrs Com8 Rideau
Canal   13th July  1830.    Blue print.
Plan of the Town of Picton, Upper Canada. Surveyed at the Request
of The Revd Wm Macaulay, William McDonald, H. Bonycastle & J.
Overend, Del. Gov' Litho0 Press, York, U.C.    Tazawell, Lithr- Litho.
Plan of the Town of Picton, Ontario. By William McDonald. Blue
print.
Manuscript Map of land grants in the Province of New York-, possibly
the original of the "Chorographical Map of the Province of New York"
by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1779. (Atlas K). Original in Sir Henry
Clinton Papers, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, Mich.    Photostat copy.    7 sections.
National Topographic Series, Prepared by The Geographical
Section of the General Staff and Published by the
Department of  National  Defence
Sheet 21 E        Province of Quebec, Sherbrooke.
"    30 M 11 Province of Ontario, Toronto.
"    30 M 12 Province of Ontario, Brampton.
"    31 H   5 Province of Quebec, Lachine.
National Topographic Series,  Compiled,  Drawn,  and Printed at
the Office of the Surveyor General, Ottawa, and Received
from Hydrographic and Map Service, Department
of Mines and Resources
Sheet 82 1/13 Province of Alberta, Calgary Southeast.
"     83 N.E. Province of Alberta, White Court, Athabasca.
General Topographical Maps
Map of Dominion of Canada, South of Latitude 75° Department of
Mines and Resources, Honourable T. A. Crerar, Minister, C. Camsell,
Deputy Minister. Surveys and Engineering Branch, J. M. Wardle,
Director. Reproduced and printed at the Office of the Surveyor General
and Chief, Hydrographic Service, Ottawa, 1937.
In addition to the above maps, thirteen plans of Townships in the
Province of Saskatchewan were received from the Department of Natural
Resources, Saskatchewan.
NORMAN FEE.
PRINT DIVISION
I. Research
Number of investigations completed: 144.
In addition, much time has been taken in giving information and
help to research workers who visited the Division.
II. Paintings, Drawings and Prints
Pictures received: 62.
Illustrated volumes received: 2.
Albums of photographs received: 5.
Number of pictures catalogued: 4,431.    About 65,000 pictures have
now been catalogued. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xix
III. Photostats and Photographs
Photostat negatives prepared and indexed: 251.
Photograph negatives prepared and indexed: 5.
Photostat prints supplied: 512.
Photographic prints supplied: 222.
Photograph negatives received from the National Film Board: 955.
IV. Lantern Slides
1,259 lantern slides have been received from the National Film Board.
The negatives and slides transferred from the National Film Board
have been received recently and have not yet been catalogued.
JAMES F. KENNEY.
INDEX AND INFORMATION DIVISION
Index
In the course of the year, the Index section finished classifying the
32,000 index cards of the Acadian Series, which provides an extensive
source of information for genealogists.
In order to facilitate the searches necessary to comply with the
numerous requests for information regarding the United Empire Loyalists,
a card index of names is being made of each volume of the Minutes of the
Committee of the Executive Council. As this Council was charged with
studying the requests made by those who wished to settle in Upper Canada,
its archives contain an important documentation. The years from 1789
to 1826 have been done, about 36,580 cards.    The work is continuing.
The index of the Military Series has been increased by 8,350 names
of German soldiers who served under the British flag during the American
War of Independence.
An increase of 2,800 cards has also been made to the research index.
The indexing of the English and French calendars of the official
correspondence of the Governors, Quebec Series, Lower Canada, is
continuing; also that of the same series for Upper Canada. This index
has been increased by 15,500 cards during the present year.
The staff is also working on the reclassification of the Militia rolls
and paylists of the War of 1812—a reclassification which facilitates searches
and saves time. j
Fifteen volumes of manuscripts of Series S, Office of the Governor s
Secretary, have been prepared for binding.
Information
During the year this section has continued to give replies and data
to students and institutions that have sent in requests for information.
The number of searches resulting from these requests reached nine hundred
and twenty-three, one of the highest figures for several years.
In the last twelve months, this section acquired one hundred and
eleven military registers, containing records of officers between the years
1775 and 1926, as well as many items concerning the history ot various
.regiments. These acquisitions will add still further to the sources ol
information at the disposal of this section. TTptpN BRAULT xx PUBLIC ARCHIVES
PUBLICATIONS DIVISION
During the present year, the Publications Division translated the
Report of the Public Archives for the year 1942 and saw it through the press.
The Division not only translated the general report of the Department,
but also the reports of the divisions and the several appendices.
Since Canada entered the War, to economize has been the word of
command that every public service as well as each individual must obey.
Continuously since the autumn of 1939, this Division has carefully revised
the list of persons and institutions receiving our publications free of charge.
As a general rule, all the names of those who do not expressly state the
wish to continue receiving the publications of this Department are struck
off that list. This reduction in our mailing list has resulted in a considerable
saving of time, paper, and money, which has cut in a like proportion the
expenditure that does not directly contribute to the war effort of the
country.
SERAPHIN MARION.
LIBRARY DIVISION
There was a decrease in the personal visits to the Library for research
purposes, yet the volume of written requests for information was well up
to the average of pre-war years.
These inquiries concerned, in the main, research for historical, economical, constitutional and political studies. Requests came from widely
separated sources and, since the official entry of the United States into the
war, especially from American correspondents.
In spite of the imperative restrictions of wartime economies, the
routine services of the Library have been performed as adequately and as
promptly as possible. Purchases have been confined to current reference
works and such new publications as are needed for research.
Substantial additions were made to the collection of pamphlets, which
is now one of the largest and most comprehensive of its kind available to
students.    The total of accessions was 553.
Classes of the Library School of McGill University and Ottawa University on specially arranged tours visited the Library during the year
and were conducted through the Archives by members of the staff.
The Library had the good fortune to receive as a special gift the four
volumes of The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt,
compiled and arranged by Samuel I. Rosenman, covering the years 1937,
1938, 1939, 1940, published by Macmillan in 1941. These were expressly
autographed by the President and transmitted to the Archives through
the Prime Minister in January. Thanks also are extended for gifts of items
of particular interest to students of the Canadian scene from: Queen's
University, Estate of Sir Robert Borden, Dr. J. C. Webster, Mrs. Frank
Egerton, Mrs. S. L. Elliott, Pierre Bedard, Louvigny de Montigny, Arthur
G. Penny, G. R. F. Prowse, Emile Vaillancourt, H. LeBreton Ross, Anson
McKim and from Historical Records Survey Projects and the William L.
Clements Library.
A. F. MACDONALD.
DIVISION OF TECHNICAL AUXILIARY SERVICES
In spite of the director's absence and of certain changes in personnel,
the Division has carried out many important duties in the course of the
year. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxi
With the co-operation of the other divisions, it arranged an exhibition
of historical materials in commemoration of the tercentenary of Montreal.
In addition, several items were lent for an exhibition celebrating the same
event which was held at the Montreal Art Gallery, October last. It may
be added that this Division was at the disposal of several associations and
educational institutions that visited the museum during the year. Finally,
it should be mentioned that this year more than five thousand persons
visited our exhibition rooms.
Thanks to the unfailing interest of the Prime Minister, the Right
Honourable W. L. Mackenzie King (it was he who officially opened the
new wing of the building in 1925), the museum acquired the model for the
beautification of Ottawa, prepared by the French town planner, Mr. Jacques
H. Greber. This model was formerly on exhibition in the hall of the House
of Commons.
The bindery section repaired 5054 manuscripts, bound 462 volumes
of manuscripts and books and mounted 75 maps. In addition, Messrs.
W. A. Procter and J. E. Noble completed binding the Book of Remembrance
of the Great War, now deposited in the Memorial Chamber in the Peace
Tower.
In the course of the year the photographic section made 10,321 prints
of pictures and documents.
C. J. DEWAR,
Acting.
DONATIONS, 1942
For all the gifts received in the course of the present year and acknowledged below, as well as the items transmitted by other departments of the
Dominion Government, the Public Archives wishes to express its sincerest
thanks.
Manuscript Division
Crooks, Mrs. A. D.: Memoir on the Battle of Queenston Heights, by James
Crooks, 1812.
Desbarats, Mrs. G. J.: Essay on the Irish of Bytown, 1826.
Elliott, T. C.: Four original letters from Donald McKenzie to W. P. Hunt,
Red River, 1825-30.
Jones, Alpheus:  Memoir regarding Leeds and Grenville Counties, 1837.
Lanctot, Dr. G.: War Ration Cards for Sugar, 1942.
Macintyre, Lt.-Col. D. E.:   The Papers of John Mclntyre of Hudson's
Bay Company, 1855-1874.
Madden, Mrs. M. E.: Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald, 1858-65.
Markle, A. R.: Memoir on Abraham Markle, 1770-1826.
Ollivier M.: Letter of Louis Riel to his wife, dated Sept. 17, 1885.
Robinson   Prof. P. J.:   Relation de Detroit, circa 1683.    [Photostat copy
from the originil in the Library of Congress.]; Notice of the Progress
of William Dummer Powell, Chief Justice of the Province of Upper
Canada.    [Typewritten copy from the original, which belonged to the
late Aemilius Jarvis.]
Samuel, Dr. S.: Signatures of Kings of France. (onft T   ^
Seaborn, Dr. E.: Speech of the Mohawk Chiefs at St Regis, 1800; Letter
to Governor General Monck, dated 3 August, 1867. xxii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Sherwood, Miss Eleanor: Five letters written by, or received from Col.
P. Young relating to the Leeds Militia (1838-1846); Printed addresses:
Reply of the Lt.-Gov. to Electors of the Home District, May 28, 1836;
Address of Electors of City of Toronto to Lt.-Gov. Sir Francis Bond
Head and his reply; Election address of Henry Sherwood, June 8,
1836; Inhabitants to Gov. C. P. Thomson, Oct., 1839; Reply to address
from Inhabitants; Address of Montreal Constitutional Society to
Inhabitants of British America, Jan., 1836; Address of Jonas Jones
to Electors of Leeds Co., June 14, 1836; Address of Electors of Johnstown District to the Lt.-Gov. and his reply, May 24, 1836.
Wainwright, E. P.: Memoir regarding the Princess Louise Fusiliers.
White, E. G.: Index of General Orders of Militia, 1811-1815.
Witton, W. P.: Letters to Joseph Brant, 1786.    [Photostat.]
Worsley, W.: Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald, 1869-1889.
Worthington, E.: A list of Medical Supplies at Riviere-du-Loup in 1841.
Print Division
Badgley, Mrs. C. W.: Ten photographs of the last Sun Dance, Battleford,
1895.
Borden, Estate of Sir Robert:  Group of military police of the 157th Battalion at Camp Borden.    [Photograph.]
Curry, Col. F. C: Photograph of a view of Brockville in 1851.
Egerton, Mrs. Frank: Old Hudson's Bay Blockhouse, Fort William; Fort
William, 1870.    [Photographs.]
Hester, Major H. H.: Three photographs of the presentation of the colours
of the 2nd Batt. to the War Museum, 26 July, 1942.
Historic Sites and Monuments Commission: Photographs re the birthplace
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
Ilsley, Hon. J. L.: War Weapons Cavalcade scroll, signed by Mayors of the
Province of Quebec during the War Savings campaign.
Matthews, Major J. C.: Menu card of a dinner given in honour of the Hon.
Philippe Roy and Mrs. Roy, in Paris, 1936.
National   Film   Board:    Two   photographs   showing   Canadian   troops
marching; 1259 lantern slides and 955 photographic negatives; Eight
photographs of Mr. King, Col. H. C. Osborne, and Col. A. F. Duguid,
at the Archives examining the Book of Remembrance, Nov. 5, 1942;
Two photographs of the House of Commons in session.
Pell, S. N.: Seven coloured postcards, views of Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y.
Rolland Paper Co., Montreal:  Coloured print "By the Hands of all Free
Men", an allegorical picture, by Chas. Simpson.
Secretary of State, Dept. of:  Album of photographs of the Ottawa and
French Rivers, in connection with the Georgian Bay to  Montreal
navigation survey, 1908.
Wilson, P.R.: Pictorial Map of Historical Montreal by P. R. Wilson (artist)
and C. P. Wilson (historian).
Library
Anderson, James (Kansas Commission for the Restoration of Fort Osage):
The United States Trading House or Factory at Fort Osage, 1808-1827,
a documentary history.    [Typescript.]
Audet, F. J.: "Adam Thorn, 1802-1890" by the donor. Reprint from
Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, Vol. XXXV, 1941. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxiii
Borden, Estate Sir Robert: Pamphlets on various subjects.
British High Commissioner: 50 facts about India by the British Information
Services.    [Mimeographed.]
Buffal° Historical Society: Reports of Joseph Ellicott, as chief of survev
(1797-1800)  and as agent  (1800-1821)  of the Holland  Company's
purchase in western New York, edited by Robert Warwick Bingham
Vol. 11 (1941). 5
Caldwell, N. W.: "Charles Juchereau de St Denys" by the donor.    Reprint from Mississippi Valley Historical Review.
Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science: "A Bibliography
of  Current  Publications  on  Canadian  Economics".    Reprint from
Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, Feb., 1942.
Clarke, Irwin and Company Limited: An Act to Incorporate the  Upper
Canada Academy under the Name and Style of Victoria College   27
August, 1941 (Toronto, 1941).
Collyer, Francis J.: "Five Fur Trade Posts on the Lower Qu'Appelle
River, 1787-1819" by Arthur S. Morton.    Reprint from Transactions
of The Royal Society of Canada, Vol. XXXV, 1941.
Crouse, C. G.: Memorial to Captain Bradshaw by Manley Ostrander and
C. G. Crouse (Oshawa, 1942).
Curry, Lt.-Col.: Upper Canada Political Posters 1832-38.
Czechoslavak National Council of America: News Flashes from Czecho-
slavakia and other publications.
Debien, G.: Le Peuplement des Antilles Frangaises au XVlie siecle by the
donor (Cairo, 1942).
de Montigny, Louvigny: Genealogie de la Famille Testard de Montigny
by the Reverend Father Archange Godbout (Montreal, 1942).
Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales, Montreal: Notre Milieu: apercu
general sur la province de Quebec by Esdras Minville (Montreal, 1942).
Ecrivains Canadiens, Spctete' des: Ville 6 ma ville by the donors (Montreal,
1942).
Egerton, Mrs. Frank: Picton Academies .   .   .   (Picton, 1850); The Albion
or British Colonial and Foreign,  Weekly Gazette (New York,  1836)
[Newspaper]; Palladium of British America (Toronto, 1838).    [Newspaper.]
Elliott, Mrs.:  The Women Pioneers of North America by S. L. Elliott
(Gardenvale, 1941).
Ewart, T. S.: The British Commonwealth of Nations; Opinions Regarding
its Composition, Objects ... by the donor (Ottawa, 1942).
Federal Works Agency: Publications of the Historical Records Survey
Projects of the Federal Works Agency (49 vols.).
Food Research Institute: Wartime Food Developments in Germany by H. C.
Farnsworth (Stanford, 1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Foulke, Roy A.: The Sinews of American Commerce on the occasion of the
100th anniversary of Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., New York, 1841-1941,
by the donor, (1941).
Fox,  Sherwood:  "St.   Ignace,  Canadian Altar of Martyrdom    by the
donor.    Reprint from the Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada,
Third Series, Section 11, Vol. XXXV, 1941.
French  Institute in the U.S.,  Pierre B6dard   director: Publications de
Langue Frangaise aux Etats-Unis et au Canada (New York, 1942).
[Pamphlet.] xxiv PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Freres Mineurs Capucins de Ste Anne de Ristigouche: Le P. Pacifique de
Provins: le voyage de Perse et Breve Relation de Voyage des lies de
I'AmSrique by P. Godefroy of Paris, and P. Hilaire of Wingene (Assisi,
1939).
Gibbon, John Murray: The New Canadian Loyalists by the donor (Toronto,
1941).    [Pamphlet.]
Godfrey, Miss. An Act of Commemoration and Thanksgiving to Mark the
Seventy-Fifth anniversary of the Confederation (1942).
Guillet, E. C: An Autobiographical Sketch by Charles Rubidge (Peterborough, 1870).    [Typewritten.]
Harvey, Jean Charles: Odd copies of Le Jour.    [Newspaper.]
Hdtel Dieu, The Reverend Mother Superior of: "Le Nouveau Pavilion
de l'Hotel Dieu". Reprint from Journal de I'H&tel-Dieu (November-
December, 1941).
Lacasse, Senator G.: Soixante-et-quinze Ans de Vie Catholique et Frangaise
en Ontario (1941).    [Pamphlet.]
Lanctot, Dr. Gustave: Art of Australia by Sydney Ure Smith, O.B.E.
(New York, 1941); Bulletin Bibliographique de la SociSte des Ecrivains
Canadiens: Annies 1937 & 1941 by Rina Lasnier (Montreal, 1941);
L'Enseignement Traditionel de la Race Frangaise by Albert Cousineau
(Montreal, 1942); Les Annates, 1924-5; Revue D'Ottawa, Nos. 1, 2, 3,
(May, June and July, 1926).
Landon, Fred.: When Laurier Met Ontario by the donor (Ottawa, 1941).
[Pamphlet.]
League for the Defence of Canada: The Plebiscite (1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Lessard, Richard: Prods pour le Pain BSnit: Bertrand vs Pierre Lavergne
a St. Leon en 1804 by Sarsel.    [Pamphlet.]
Libby, O. G.: "The Journal of La Verendrye, 1738-39" by H. E. Haxo
(1941). Reprint from North Dakota Historical Quarterly, Vol. VIII,
1941.
McKim, A.: The Story of Advertising in Canada: A Chronicle of Fifty Years
by H. C. Stephenson and Carlton McNaughton (Toronto, 1940).
Macmillans in Canada: Publishing in Wartime by Ellen Elliot; Poetry and
Life by Audrey Alexandra Brown.    [Pamphlets.]
Matthews, Mayor (Vancouver): Killed in Action by I. E. Mackay (Vancouver, 1942); I Shall not Cease by J. F. Bursill (Vancouver, 1942).
Miller, Orlo: An Address to the Public Introducing a Letter to the Rev. Mr.
Pollard .   .   . by M. Gunn (1853).    [Pamphlet.]
Montreal Standard: Canada's 75th Birthday (Montreal, 1942). [Newspaper].
Morse, William I.: The Chronicle: Mountain Lake Number by the donor
(Boston, 1942).
Munro, William B.: The Canadian Club of Harvard University (Cambridge,
Mass., 1905).    [Pamphlet.]
National Committee of the U.S.A. on International Intellectual Cooperation: Report to the National Committee of the United States of
America .   .   .  by E. E. Ware (New York, 1942).
New York Public Library: Excerpt from A History of the Bank of North
America.    [Photostat.]
Norwegian Legation, The Royal (Washington, D.C.): News of Norway,
Vol. 1, Nos. 1-42 (January 17 to November 13, 1941).    [Newsprint.]
Nova Scotia Department of Education: Library Survey of Nova Scotia
by Nora Bateson (1938). REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxv
Nova Scotia, Superintendent of Education: Annual Report of the Superintendent of Education for Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1942).
Ontario Department of Lands and Forests: Dominion Government list,
16th July, 1938, of Public Harbours prior to 30th June 1867 (1938).
[Mimeographed.]
Pan-American Section of the International Committee for Bird Preservation, N.Y.: Bird Migration in the Western Hemisphere by F. C
Lincoln (New York, 1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Parent, Roger D.: CISment Lerige, Sieur de La Plante by the donor (Montreal, 1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Patrick, J. S.: Le Jour, October 29, 1938 to December 20, 1941.    [Newspaper.]
Pennsylvania Historical Commission: Pennsylvania History and Morale
(Harrisburg,   1942).    [Pamphlet];   Pennsylvania  History  in   Outline
by S. K. Stevens (Harrisburg, 1942).    [Pamphlet]; Some Pennsylvania
Leaders (Harrisburg, 1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Penny, Arthur G.: Souvenir: Plays at Government House 1872 to 1879.
[Pamphlet.]
Pierce,   Lome:   Thoreau   MacDonald   by   the   donor   (Toronto,   1942).
[Pamphlet.]
Post, W. K.:   Vie Militaire dans le Dakota; Notes et Souvenirs 1867-1869 by
Regis de Trobriand (Paris, 1926).
Procter, W. A.:   Requiescant and Other Poems by W. Q. Ketchum (1919).
[Pamphlet.]
Prowse, G. R. F.:   Sebastian Cabot Lied by the donor (Winnipeg, 1942).
[Pamphlet.]
Queen's University, Kingston:   Queen's University:  a Centenary Volume,
1841-1941 (Toronto, 1941).
R.M.C., The Editor: Royal Military College of Canada Review, Graduating
Number, June, 1942.
Roosevelt, Franklin D., President of the United States: The Public Papers
and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Vols. 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940,
by the President (New York, 1941).
Ross, H. Le B.:   The British Dominions in  North America by Joseph
Bouchette, Vol. 1 (London, 1832).
Sanderson, Charles R.:   "Some Notes on Lord Sydenham" by the donor.
Reprint from the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 25 (1941),
Manchester, England.    [Pamphlet.]
Scott, F. R.:   The Plebiscite Vote in Quebec by the donor (Toronto, 1942).
[Pamphlet.]
Shufelt, H. B.:   Three Churches by H. C. Williams (Knowlton, 1941).
[Pamphlet.]
Smithsonian Institution: Problems Arising from the Historic North Eastern
Position of the Iroquois by W. N. Frenton (Washington, 1940).
Sceur Mondoux:   Les VSritables Fondateurs de Ville-Marie by the donor.
(Montreal, 1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Talman, J. J.:   "The Newspaper Press of Canada West, 1850-60" by the
donor (Ottawa, 1939).    Reprint from Transactions of the Royal bocie.y
of Canada, Vol. XXXIII, 1939.
Toronto City Clerk: Municipal Handbook; City of Toronto, 1942 (Toronto,
1942).
Transport, Department of: Forty-one pamphlets and magazines. xxvi PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Vaillancourt, Emile:  Guillaume d'Orange by the donor (Montreal, 1941)
[Pamphlet]; Strange Loyalties: a Practical Lesson in Canadian History
by the donor (1942).    [Pamphlet.]
Walton, Jesse M.:   The Loyalist Quaker Settlement, Penfield, N.B., 1783
(Aurora, 1941).    [Typewritten, with photographs.    Bound.]
Webster, Dr. J. C: Memorial on Behalf the Sieur de Boishebert translated
by Louise Manny (Saint John, 1942.).    [Pamphlet.]
Western  Ontario,   University  of,   London:    The  Canada  Company  and
Anthony Van Egmond by W. B. Kerr (1940).    [Scrap-book.]
William L. Clements Library:   Guide to the Manuscript collections in the
William  L.   Clements Library compiled by H.  H.  Peckham  (Ann
Arbor, 1942).
Wykes, E.:  The Hatfield Book by C. A. Wight (Springfield, 1908).
Map  Division
Clements Library: Manuscript Map of land grants in the Province of
New York, possibly the original of the "Chorographical Map of the
Province of New York" by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1779.
Egerton, Mrs. Frank: Blueprint of the Town of Picton, by William
McDonald; Plan of the Town of Picton, Upper Canada, surveyed by
William McDonald, at the request of the Rev. Wm. Macaulay.
Montreal City Archives: Three Plans of the City and Fortifications of
Montreal, dated 1801 and 1825.    [Blueprints.]
Sherwood, Lady: Maps and Charts Accompanying Report of Captain
J. E. Bernier on "The Cruise of the Arctic in 1908-9."
Division of Technical Services
Borden, Estate Sir Robert: Several albums and addresses.
Byng of Vimy, Lady: Medal struck in commemoration of the reign King
Edward VIII (1936).
MacLean, F. R. (RCA Inc.): Phonograph record containing Prime Minister
Churchill's address, House of Commons, Ottawa, Dec. 30, 1941 and
President Roosevelt's address, Arlington, Nov. 11, 1941. HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS  I. EARLY RATIONING IN CANADA
RATIONING IN 1542
Of the Fort of France-Roy, and that which was dona there1
And in the moneth of August, and in the beginning of September
every man was occupied in such woorke as eche one was able to doe. But
the fourteenth of September, our aforesayde Generall, sent backe into
France two Shippes which had brought his furniture, and he appoynted
for Admirall Monsieur de Saineterre, and the other captaine was Monsieur
Guine-court, to carie newes unto the King, and to come backe againe unto
him the yeere next ensuing, furnished with victuals and other things, as
it should please the King: and also to bring newes out of France how the
King accepted certaine Diaments which were sent him, and were found in
this countrey.
After these two Shippes were departed, consideration was had how
they should doe, and how they might passe out the Winter in this place.
First they tooke a view of the victuals, and it was found that they fell
out short: and they were scantled so, that in eche messe they had but
two loaves weighing a pound a piece, and halfe a pound of biefe. They
ate Bacon at dinner with halfe a pound of butter: and Biefe at supper,
and about two handfuls of Beanes without butter.
On the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday they did eate dry Cod, and
sometimes they did eate it greene at dinner with butter, and they ate of
Porposes and beanes at supper.
About that time the Savages brought us great store of Aloses, which
is a fish somewhat redde like a Salmon, to get knives and other small trifles
for them.
RATIONING AT QUEBEC IN 1628 AND 1629
The Basques on arriving at Tadoussac gave my letter to General Kirke,
whom we were awaiting from day to day. After having made enquiries
of the Basques, he assembled all the men of his vessels, and particularly
those in command, to whom he read the letter. Thereupon they decided
not to waste time, as they saw that there was nothing to be done; for they
believed that we were better supplied with provisions and munitions of war
than we really were, each man of us at the time being reduced to seven
ounces of peas a day, while of gunpowder we had only 50 lbs., with very
little in the way of fuse or any other supplies; so that, if they had pushed on,
it would have been very hard for us to resist them, because of the wretched
condition we were in; which shows that on such occasions it is a good thing
to put on a bold countenance. During this time we kept careful watch,
my companions being continually on duty.
While we were awaitini
were eating our peas very sparingly, which d!
most of our men becoming feeble and sickl;
. Biggar, Ottawi
The Works of St
, 296-8, 300-2.
•. Published fro:
olain. The Publ!
news of this fight with great impatience, y
"lished our strength greatl;
And seeing ourselves thi
s with translations, notes and appendices.   1
Champlain Society, Toronto, 1933, Vol. V. i
XXIX XXX PUBLIC ARCHIVES
destitute of everything, not even having any salt, the idea struck me.to
make wooden mortars, in which the peas could be ground into meal, which
we found more profitable than before, but the process being laborious we
were a long time in the condition mentioned. I then thought that it would
be still easier and more profitable to make a mill to work by hand; and, as
we had no millstone (which was the principal thing), I asked our locksmith
if he could find a suitable stone to make one. He encouraged me to hope
so, and went to look for the kind of stone required, and, having found it,
he shapes the stones and a joiner undertakes to set them up. The necessity
we were in thus caused us to devise what in the previous twenty years had
been considered impossible. The mill was finished with diligence, and each
man brought his week's allowance of peas, which was ground for him, and
from which he got good pease-meal, which made our soup stronger, and
did us much good and put us again in a little better condition than before.
The eel-fishing came on, which helped us considerably; but the savages,
who were skilful fishers, gave us very few and sold them very dear, men
giving their coats and other possessions for the fish. We bought 1200 with
goods from the storehouse, giving new beaver-skins in exchange; for they
would not take any but new ones, ten eels for one beaver; and these were
distributed to all, but it did not amount to much.
We were hoping that the land belonging to Hebert and his son-in-law
might, at the harvest, yield us some grain, and they gave us reason to hope
that it would; but when the time to gather it came, it turned out that all
the help they could let us have was a small basinful a week of barley, peas,
and Indian corn, about nine ounces and a half in weight, which was a very
small quantity among so many persons; and so we had to go through a very
wretched time.
1629
Our men had fatiguing work all through the winter in cutting wood
and dragging it more than 200 yards over the snow for fuel. It was a
necessary evil incurred for the sake of a greater gain. Some savages came
to our relief with a few moose, although only a small number for so many
persons. The one who assisted us was called Chomina, which means
"the Grape", a very well-disposed and serviceable savage. I sent some of
our people to the chase, to see if they could imitate the savages in the taking
of a few beasts; but they were not as honourable as the natives, for having
taken a moose of great size, they spent their time in devouring it like
ravenous wolves, without giving us any share beyond about twenty pounds.
This caused me on their return to reproach them for their gluttony, reminding them that I had not had a morsel of victuals of which I had not given
them their full share; but as they were fellows without honour or manners,
they had acted accordingly; and after that I did not send them out again,
but employed them in other ways.
The length of the winters very often caused us to think of the disasters
that might happen, such as a second capture of our ships, and of the means
we could adopt to provide for our necessities, which were now greater than
they had ever been, since our vegetables ran out entirely in May, in spite
of all the economy I could practise, that being the time when we expected
fresh supplies, or, at latest, at the end of the month. And it was better
to go on suffering than to eat up everything at once, and then perish of
starvation; that is what I was always preaching to all our people: that
they should try to have patience while awaiting our relief.
I decided that, if the vessels did not arrive by the end of June, and if
the Englishmen came as they had promised, seeing that we were beyond all
hope of succour, I would seek to make the best possible composition with REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxxi
them, since they might then do us the favour of taking us home, and have
compassion on our miseries; for otherwise we could not keep alive.
THE INHABITANTS WERE OBLIGED TO EAT ROOTS1
The month of May went by without hearing any news from France,
which has brought grief to all the wintering inhabitants whose teeth were
growing like grass in good soil, for lack of usage, for according to their
calculations several ships should have arrived at the beginning of the month,
& which would have been very necessary at this time when all foods were
running out, for [the ration] of seven porringers of grain that Sieur Champlain had ordered a week since last Christmas for each person in the
settlement, had had to be cut by more than half & the woods searched as
far as five or six leagues distant to find roots good to eat, for those in the
neighbourhood of Quebec had been all consumed.
There is one root among the others which we called Sigillum Salominis,
Solomon's Seal, which aided them greatly, for it is good enough, except
that it is a little strong eaten raw. I have heard that it is an excellent cure
for hemorrhoids, cut in round slices & worn on the neck against the bare
flesh as beads, by which a Lady of Paris assured me she was cured of them.
They used it mostly as bread, & other times they mixed it with acorns &
a little barley flour, bran & straw which they boiled & reduced to a broth,
but since the acorn is very bitter in that country, & cannot be eaten without
resorting to invention, they boiled the kernel in water with cinders two
separate times, then the acorn being well washed & cleaned of cinders,
they ground it & mixed it with half-cooked barley flour to thicken the
broth, into which was mixed also some shredded fish, when there was any,
but without salt, for there was no longer any in Kebec.
M. de Vaudreuil
MONSEIGNEUR
RATIONING IN ACADIA
Montreal, April 19, 1757.2
Although we ourselves are in want nevertheless Monsieur Bigot sent
a ship laden with food to Miramichi, but unfortunately it was held up by
the contrary winds it met. The misery of the Acadians is so great that
Monsieur de Boishebert has been obliged to reduce their ration to 10 pounds
of peas and 12 pounds of meat a month and that only because he brought
40 head of cattle from Petkekoudiac, that was the ration for the month
of January and he cannot hope to have the same supply for the following
months, that of fishing being exhausted.
Finally, the Acadian women see their babes dying at their breasts
not being able to give them sustenance; most of them cannot go out,
because they have no clothes to cover their nudity.
Many Acadians have died, the number of sick people is considerable
and those who are convalescent cannot get built up because of the poor
quality of the food they eat, often being forced to eat extremely thin horses,
seals and cow hides. .       _. ,
Such, Monseigneur, is the state of the Acadians.    Monsieur tfigot
is going to send a ship when the ice goes out to carry to them the a
which it is possible for us to give them.
Vaudreuil. xxxii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
REDUCTION OF THE TROOPS' RATIONS
17571
The Marquis de Vaudreuil on September 28 gave orders to Chevalier
de Levis to reduce the rations of the four battalions that were at Saint Jean
and Chambly, to start on the first of October: a pound of bread, a quartern
of peas and a quartern of pork. Chevalier de Levis had the orders of the
Marquis de Vaudreuil in this respect passed on to the battalion commanders and showed them the necessity there was to submit to this reduction in food. It went into effect on October 1st.; the soldiers complied
willingly.
October
The same reduction was ordered for the Montreal and Quebec garrisons
that the Marquis de Montcalm had put into effect with the Berry regiment.
THE MARINE TROOPS REFUSE THE NEW RATIONS
1757
1st November2
Chevalier de Levis received orders from the Marquis de Vaudreuil
and Monsieur de Montcalm to reduce further the rations of the soldiers in
the Montreal garrison to a half a pound of bread, three quarters of a pound
of beef, quarter of a pound of cod and a quartern of peas, with half a pound
of bread paid in money, to start November 1st; that of Quebec had been
reduced to the same level, which had been effected without difficulty.
The Marine troops who were to take them at the same time refused
to receive them and to submit to this reduction, and left the place where
the distribution was being made.    Their officers were unable to hold them.
Chevalier de Levis went there immediately with several officers of
the ground troops who had dined at his home; on arriving he found the
Marine soldiers crowded in the court without order and grumbling; he
silenced them and made them take their arms, showed them the necessity
of submitting to the reduction in food, told them that the regular troops
had submitted thereto without difficulty, that they must do the same, and
that he would hang immediately the first one who hesitated to take food.
In consequence, he ordered the first company to take it, which they did
the same as the rest of the Marine troops without another murmur.
RIOT ON THE SUBJECT OF HORSE MEAT
December, 1757.3
On the first of December, they cut off entirely the quarter of a pound
of bread that was being distributed to the people and in its place wanted
to have them given half beef and half horse meat, for which the pound of
each of them would cost but six sols. But the people expressed repugnance
at horse meat and refused to take it. In the afternoon there was an
uprising of women; they assembled in front of the Marquis de Vaudreuil's
door; they demanded to speak to him. The Marquis de Vaudreuil had
four of them admitted to his house. He asked them what was the reason
of this riot. They replied that they came to ask him for bread. The
Marquis de Vaudreuil said that he had none to give them; that he had none
1 Journal des Campaanes du Chevalier de Levis, Montreal, 1889, pp. 105-6. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxxiii
even for the troops, whose rations they had been forced to cut; that the
King was not obliged to supply bread to the people and that they ought
to provide it for themselves; that, however, he had had cattle and horses
killed to assist the poor in this time of want; that those who wished to get
it could go to the King's slaughter-house and obtain it at six sols a pound.
The women replied to Monsieur de Vaudreuil that they had an aversion to
eatmg the flesh of the horse; that he was the friend of man; that religion
forbade the Mlling of horses and that they would sooner die than eat them.
Monsieur de Vaudreuil told them that it was a notion and an idle fancy
on their part; that people had always eaten them; that they were good and
that he had ordered that they be killed carefully and in the same manner
as cattle; that it was the only relief he could offer to the people.
Monsieur de Vaudreuil dismissed the women and told them that the
first time they should cause a disturbance he would have them all cast into
prison and that he would have half of them hanged; he ordered Messrs.
de Martel, Commissary of the Marine, and de Monrepos, Police Judge,
to conduct the women to the slaughter-house to show them that the horses
and cattle were of good quality; they acknowledged this and said that
they would not take any, nor would any person, not even the troops.
After that they dispersed and went to their homes holding seditious designs.
Messrs. de Martel and de Monrepos ought to have had some of them
arrested, which they did not do.
Monsieur de Vaudreuil told the Chevalier de Levis, on December 4,
that he had just received a letter from the Intendant who pointed out the
necessity that existed, that the troops in garrison at Quebec and Montreal
must eat horse meat. In consequence, the ration was set at a half a pound
of bread, half a pound of beef, half a pound of horse meat, a quarter of a
pound of peas and a half a pound of bread paid in money.
HOW MONTCALM SERVED HORSE MEAT
Quebec, December 4, 1757.*
The Intendant told me last night, Sir, to write the General that the
garrison at Montreal should be put on horse meat the same as the one here
and to inform you of it. Our troops have accepted it willingly, and I have
no doubt that it will be the same with the ones under your command.
This matter concerns only the town of Montreal. The fort at Chambly is
so small that I doubt that it is necessary to extend it there, particularly since
the soldiers are not already too content with a difference between them and
those at Fort St. Jean in the matter of bread. However, if it is wished
that they also be put on horse meat, they must also take it as the others.
They are no better than the others nor more difficult to handle. Take
note that we have decided that instead of giving a full ration of horse meat
and a full ration of beef, we give half of one and half of the other. Our
soldiers have liked it better like that. If yours like it better otherwise,
they may be given that privilege. Finally, horse meat is eaten at my home
in every way, except soup:
Small horse meat patties, Spanish style; horse meat stew; scalloped
horse meat; horse meat steak on the spit with a good pepper and vinegar
sauce; horses feet baked with bread crumbs; hashed horse tongue with
onions; horse meat ragout; smoked horse tongue, better than that of moose;
horse meat pie, like hare pie.
This animal is much better than moose, caribou and beaver.
MONTCALM.
i Lettres du Marquis de Montcalm au Chevalier de Levis, Quebec, 1894, pp. 88-89. xxxiv PUBLIC ARCHIVES
HOW THE SOLDIERS PREPARED HORSE MEAT
Quebec, December 16, 1757.1
(For you alone)
I reply by this, my dear Chevalier, to your epistle of the 10th. I read
with pleasure of your circumstances, and I see that your presence is as
useful in Montreal as mine is here. All is well in the matter of horse meat.
The Queen's Grenadiers wriggled a bit; but the Iron Hand, that is d'Hert,
wriggled the first corporal; and that is not even known. I must also tell
you that the Queen's soldiers who are in barracks, an advantage you do
not have in Montreal, are content. At night they put on the horse meat
to cook, skim it well, throwing away the first water, remove it, making
good soup with it in the morning in putting it in the pot with the beef,
eating the beef used in the soup in the morning, and the horse meat at
night in stew. The colony does likewise. But in Montreal, Beam is
among the inhabitants, with whom he lives and who show repugnance for
that food. In order to destroy it, it would be necessary for the general,
you, Messrs. Martel, Deschambault and all the people of means to be
willing to eat it; your servants would eat it and, from that it would become
the fashion among the people.
FAMINE AND HORSE MEAT
Quebec, May 19, 1758.2
Monseigneur,
There is nothing more sad and more afflicting than the present state
of this colony, after having passed part of the autumn and last winter with
a quarter of a pound of bread a day for each person, we have been reduced
for six weeks to two ounces, this country has subsisted up until the present
only by the wise and prudent economy of our intendant, but all the resources
are exhausted and we are on the eve of experiencing the most cruel famine
if the help that we expect of the goodness and liberality of our monarch
does not arrive in fifteen days at the latest.
Words fail me to describe to you our misery, certain kinds of animals
commence to get scarce; the butchers cannot furnish a quarter of the beef
necessary for the subsistence of the inhabitants of this town although they
charge an exorbitant price; without fowl, without vegetables, without
mutton, without veal we are on the verge of starvation.
To supplement the lack of bread, of beef and other foods necessary for
life, our intendant has had twelve to fifteen hundred horses bought which
he has had distributed to the poor of this town, at a price much less than
the price paid for them by the King.
He is at present distributing to these same poor people a quarter of a
pound of pork and half a pound of cod per day, but that cannot last long.
The workmen, artisans and labourers weakened by hunger can absolutely no longer work, they are so feeble that they can scarcely stand up.
(Signed) Daine. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 \
INFLATION AND RISE IN COST OF LIVING
Montreal, Nov. 5,1759.1
The rents in the two towns are at an exorbitant price as well as all
foods, for example, a pound of butter 6 livres and a dozen of eggs the same,
mutton 70 to 80 livres and the colonists are very unwilling to accept ordinance notes, a quire of paper 24 livres, shoes 30 livres, a pound of soap the
same and all cloth in proportion; next year it will be difficult to sow the
land because no ploughing has been done.
There are many means of extending charity and each can chose according to taste and inclination. The Superiors of St. Sulpice, the foreign
missions, the Jesuits and the abbe of Isle Dieu will be glad to receive alms
that anyone can give and will find ways of distributing them. Silk dresses
may be sent here to have ornaments made for them. At the seaports, at
Brest, Mr. Hocquart, at Bordeaux, Mr. Estebe, at La Rochelle, Mr. Goguet
will undertake to transmit cottons, cloth, pork, flour, brandy, wine and in
general anything that can be sent.
h.m. Bishop op Quebec
ACT RATIONING PURCHASES OF IMPORTED PROVISIONS
An Act to prevent the Monopoly of Dead fresh provisions imported into
this Province made and passed in Council at Halifax the 3? of
February, 1752.2
Whereas large Quantity's of Dead fresh Provisions are, in the Winter
season, imported from New England and other places, to this Settlement,
for sale, and whereas some evil minded persons have endeavoured to
engross great Quantity's, and sometimes the whole thereof in Order to Retail
the same again at unreasonable prices, to the great Detriment of the
Inhabitants, For Remedy whereof. It is by His excellency the Governor
with the Advice and Consent of His Majesty's Council of this Province
enacted, That from and after the Publication hereof all dead fresh Provisions, imported into this Settlement for sale shall upon the Arrival thereof
be carried to the Publick Market House there to be exposed to publick
sale, for the term of two Days, that the Inhabitants may thereby have
Opportunity to Supply themselves and their family's at the cheapest Rate,
And no such Provisions shall be exposed to Sale, bought or contracted for,
until it shall have been so brought to the Public Market house, And no
person or persons residing within this Settlement shall during the aforesaid
Term of two Days, buy, contract, or agree for, any larger Quantity of such
Provisions, than for the use of their familys and all and every person and
persons either by themselves or others, selling, buying contracting or
agreeing, for any Quantity of such Provisions otherwise than is above xxxvi PUBLIC ARCHIVES
mention'd at any time before, or During the said Term of two Days of their
being exposed to Sale at the Public Markett House, shall upon Conviction
before any one of His Majesty's Justices of the peace, by the Oaths of two
Witnesses, forfiet, incur the penalty of, and pay the sum of Ten Pounds,
Buyer and Seller Each, to be levied by Distress and Sale of the Offenders
Goods and Chatties, by Warrant under the hand and Seal of such Justice
of the Peace, One moiety thereof to the Informer and the other moiety to
the use of the poor of this Settlement, And for want of Sufficient Distress
the Offenders to Suffer one Month, Imprisonment. II.   EARLY   CONTROL  OF  PRICES  IN
CANADA
FIXING A MONETARY VALUE ON CERTAIN FOODS
8 November 1653
Sieur de Lauzon, Councillor of the King in his State and Privy Councils,
Governor, etc., Lieutenant-General for His Majesty in New France, extending from the St. Lawrence River.1
As there are divers commodities, either domestic or otherwise, of
which it is necessary to regulate the price in order that it be not abused:
We have Ordained and Ordain that henceforth each white porcelain bead
shall be worth two deniers [twelve deniers equalled one sou] and shall be
exchanged at this value among the French, the latter, however, will not
be constrained to accept them in payment at one time for a greater quantity
than to the sum of eight livres [a livre equalled twenty sous]; And as to
black porcelain beads, they shall be worth double and shall be accepted
at the said value; And the present Ordinance shall be proclaimed and posted
in the customary places in order that no person may claim ignorance thereof;
Ordained; Done at Fort St. Louis at Quebec this eighth of November, one
thousand six hundred and fifty-three; signed: de Lauzon and lower down
Monseigneur Durand; all with paraph.
Copy collated with the original proclaimed after High Mass and posted
on the doors of the town and of the church at Three Rivers, Sunday,
November the twenty-third, one thousand six hundred and fifty-three,
by me, Registrar in the jurisdiction of this said place, undersigned;
(Signed)    Ameau,
Registrar.
FIRST PRICE CEILING
15 November 1653
Sieur de Lauzon, Councillor of the King in his State and Privy Councils, Governor and Lieutenant-General for his Majesty in New France,
extending from the St. Lawrence River2.
In view of complaints made to Us by several inhabitants to whom
being due various considerable sums, where the . . . [effaced, illegible] . . .
payed to them in grain at eight livres the bushel or in peas at six livres;
even servants are paid in wheat and peas for their pay, and as they have
several necessities to buy either to clothe themselves or to establish themselves as inhabitants, are obliged to re-sell the wheat and the peas which
they have received in payment, and lose heavily thereby, there not being
anyone in the country willing to buy them from them at the prices they
had paid. Whereupon without authority, it is permitted to the inhabitants
and others to sell domestic commodities by mutual agreement, provided
that they maintain good relations with one another; but incase of payment
of debts or wages of servants the creditors will not henceforth be obliged
to take good genuine and merchantable wheat at a higher price than six
livres the bushel, Indian corn at one hundred sous, and peas at four livres xxxviii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
the bushel; Servants shall not be paid in peas, and in case that anyone
complains of a reduction in price of the said product, they shall state to
him that it will be supplied to him at the said price of four livres, one
hundred sous, and six francs in such quantity as he desires;
And the present Ordinance shall be proclaimed and posted in the
customary places so that no person may claim ignorance thereof; All this
provisionally and until such time as it be otherwise ordained; Ordained;
Done at Fort St. Louis at Quebec this fifteenth day of November, one
thousand six hundred and fifty-three, signed: de Lauzon, and lower down
by Monseigneur Durand,—Collated with the original, proclaimed at Three
Rivers, after High Mass and posted on the doors of the town and of the
church of this said place, Sunday the twenty-third day of November, one
thousand six hundred and fifty-three, by me, Registrar in this said jurisdiction, undersigned:
(Signed) Ameau,
FIXING RATE OF PROFITS AND APPOINTING THE
FIRST PRICE CONTROLLERS
Of the XXXth and last of June 1664|
The Council assembled, being present Monsieur the Governor,
Monsieur the Bishop, Messrs. de Villeray, de la Fierte, de Tilly and
Damours, the Attorney General of the King also present.
It is ordered that all persons, Merchants and others to whom Merchandise has arrived in the last two boats shall bring to the Council their
bills and invoices of the same tomorrow at eight o'clock in the morning on
pain of a fine. And however it is forbidden for the Captains and Masters
of the said vessels to unload or have unloaded any Merchandise without
having complied with the law. And the present published and posted
where necessary and drawn to the attention of the said Captains and
Masters in order that they may not be in ignorance of it.
The Council wishing to comply with the decree of the XVIIIth of
this month and to proceed with the setting of a Rate of prices on Merchandise, old as well as that which arrived this year, has ordered and orders
that this year the Merchants will be granted fifty-five per cent on their dry
goods, one hundred per cent on liquids that have the most value, And for
those the price of which does not exceed the sum of one hundred livres the
cask, one hundred and twenty per. cent, And to attend to the said Rate
are commissioned and appointed Sieurs de Villeray and Damours, Councillors, who will be guided for the rate by the cost price in France on the
invoices of the inhabitants and Merchants which will come on the merchandise from France and which will be the most reasonable buying price,
this to be done and judgement to be rendered accordingly.
PRICE FIXING OF MERCHANDISE AND ISSUING
BILLS OF SALE
Of the ninth of July 1664*
It being necessary to provide for the abuses which have until the
present been committed by the Merchants in the sale and retail of merchandise, It is ordered that Sieurs de la Fierte, de Tilly, and Damours, Councillors and Bourdon, Attorney General, Commissioners in this respect shall
i Judgements et Deliberations du Conseil Souverain, Vol. I, p. 222. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xxxix
go to the stores and shops of the Merchants to see, examine, and valuate,
cloths, print goods and linens, And having done this put on each one of
them a ticket with the said price, the same to be sealed and stamped with
the arms of Our Lord the King on the last yard, which the merchants must
show before selhng any, They shall keep an exact Journal of all the goods
with the prices they are sold at, whether for credit or cash, They shall keep
also a special book where they will put on each page the quantity of each
merchandise they have in stock, And according as they dispose of it
either retail or otherwise they will record underneath the nature of the
Merchandise by the article with the date in accordance with their Journal
the amount they have sold, the name of the buyer and the price, the said
book to be shown to the Council any time and whenever it may be judged
necessary, Also they shall give a bill according as they sell to each inhabitant
containing the nature and price of the goods they sell to them.
ORDER TO OBSERVE PRICE CEILINGS AND POSTING
OF PRICE RATES
Of the XXXth of July 1664'
It is ordered that there shall be only the price set by the Rate of prices
for goods coming from France which will be sold in the country by any
person under any pretext whatsoever, Violation of this is forbidden by
arbitrary fine, And for this purpose a copy will be delivered to each of the
Merchants of the Rate of prices that will have been set for them which they
shall be obliged to display in their stores and shops, And further, an Extract
shall be made of all the said price rates on each kind of goods separately
and which shall be posted in public places, so that no person may be in
ignorance thereof, And it is ordered that the said Merchants shall follow
the Rate of prices which will be given to them in particular, And in cases
in which it has not been sufficiently provided for they will have recourse
to the general rule, It is forbidden also for all pedlars to sell or have manufactured any overcoats, suits, socks, shirts, hats and other clothes nor sell
any of them excepting those declared by them in their invoices on pain of
confiscation and arbitrary fine, And the present shall be read, published
and posted etc.
FINE IMPOSED FOR FAILURE TO GIVE BILL OF
SALE PRICE
Of the nineteenth day of November 1664.2
The Council rendering judgment on the complaint of the syndic
[delegate of the people] that the Merchants do not observe in any manner
the Ordinances of this Council in the things therein contained, Requiring
that Sieur de la Mothe, Merchant be sentenced to a fine for having sold
to one named Rousseau, inhabitant of this country, some Unen or woollen
goods above the price rate which had been given to him by the Council
without having given him a bill of the price of the Merchandise that he
sold to him as it is stated in the said Ordinances. The Council before
rendering judgment orders that the said Rousseau shall present the said
Merchandise sold to him by the said LaMothe if they are still m existence,
And because the said LaMothe has failed to give a bill of the price of the
said Merchandise that he sold to the said Rousseau m accordance with and PUBLIC ARCHIVES
following the ordinances of this Council, has sentenced him to a fine of
one hundred Livres without prejudice to the deferred fine by the ordinance
of the eighth of November, the present month, the said fine of one hundred
Livres to be paid to the King.
FINE IMPOSED FOR NOT HAVING DECLARED GOODS
ON HAND
Of the 17th of December 1664^
Regarding that which has been said and remonstrated by the Attorney
General of the King that there have been two ordinances by which the
Merchants and other sellers who sell and retail Merchandise have been
ordered to make a declaration of their said Merchandise, which not having
been carried out by Sieurs Charron, La Garenne and Grignon, He requests
that the said Sieurs Charron, La Garenne and Grignon be sentenced each
one to a fine of five hundred livres. And as regards Sieur Cailteau he be
sentenced to revise his declaration and put in it all his Merchandise with
their prices in detail in accordance with the price rates. The Council
having seen the last ordinance dated the twenty-second of November of
this year posted the twenty-third of the said month and year has sentenced
and sentences the said Sieurs Charron, La Garenne and Grignon for not
having complied with the said ordinances each one to a fine of five hundred
livres that they have incurred, two-thirds of the said fine to be applicable
to the construction of a church in the lower town of Quebec and the other
third to the treasury of the King which they shall pay without delay into
the hands of the Registrar of the Council, and the said Cailteau is Requested
to revise his said declaration and put therein the number and quality of all
his Merchandise with their prices each one in detail according to the Rate
of prices within a week, on pain of a greater penalty, We Order Etc.
Legardeur de Tilly.
Peronne de Maze.
Damours.
CONVICTION FOR HAVING SOLD WINE ABOVE
CEILING PRICE
Of Wednesday twenty-second day of April 1665.
The Council assembled being present Messrs. de Tilly, Damours,
Denis and de Maze, Councillors, the Attorney General of the King also
present.2
On the complaint made by the syndic of the inhabitants that notwithstanding the ordinances and interdictions of this Council the innkeepers had not stopped selling wine retail higher than twenty sous the
. pot, Demanding that those who violate be sentenced to a fine, And having
been advised that Gabriel le Mieux and his wife had violated the said
ordinances has produced Pierre Creteil witness summoned to give truthful
evidence who after swearing said that during the three weeks before he
had sought wine by the pot at the said Lemieux place three or four times,
for which wine he had paid twenty-two sous the pot as they would not give
him it for less.    Reading being made Pierre Cretel has affirmed and Signed.
Having heard the Attorney General of the King, Thie Council seeing
the complaint of the Attorney Syndic of the inhabitants, the evidence
i Jugements et Deliberations du Conseil Souverain, Vol. I, pp. 305-6. REPORT FOR THE TEAR 1942
xli
hiswif
and se
e declarations made by Gabriel Lemieux and
,t twenty-two sous the pot retail has sentenced
pux and his wife to a fine of ten ecus payable
c and bis wife are forbidden to repeat the crime
nd the costs to the said Lemieux, We Order &c.
CONSULTATION OF THE PEOPLE IN THE FIXING
OF BREAD PRICES
Of Monday the eleventh day of May 1676 in the morning;
The Council assembled being present the Intendant, t
Villeray, de Tilly, Damours, Dupont, de Lotbiniere, de Pt
Vitray, Councillors, the Attorney General being present.
The court having seen its order of the fourteenth of January 1
directing what might be inserted into the Police Regulations conformi
to the orders given by the King to Sieur Duchesneau, Intendant of Jusl
police and finance of this country, contained in his commission signed
Louis, and lower down by Colbert, and sealed at the foot with the g]
seal of yellow wax given at the camp of Luting the fifth June, one thous
six hundred and seventy-five, registered in the Court the sixteenth Sept
ber following; Having heard the Attorney General in his conclusions,
Court, after having been shown the Council Registers containing
Orders and Ordinances of Police given at the time of Messrs. de M<
Tracy, Courcelle and Comte de Frontenac, Governors of this coun
and of Messrs. Talon and Boutroue, Intendants, has made the follov
Regulations to be executed provisionally until such time as it pleases
Majesty to confirm them.
its de
ad de
41. In the future if it is deemed expedient every year immediately
after the arrival of the first Ships coming from France, a rate will be set
for the price of every kind and quality of merchandise.
42. Each year two meetings of the General Police shall be held by the
said Lieutenant General, one on the fifteenth of November and the other
on the fifteenth of April, to which the principal inhabitants of this city will
be called, at which the price of bread will be fixed, and means will be
devised to increase and enrichen the Colony, and the Council will name two
Councillors to preside over them, if it sees fit, And that which is decided
at the said meetings will be reported to the said Council by the said Councillors or Lieutenant General to determine what will be put into effect.
Which regulations shall be carried out in their form and tenor notwith-
it is not ordered otherwise by His Majesty; Which shall be Published and
posted in this town and everywhere else necessary, and submitted to the
attention of the Attorney General, the Lieutenant Generals, and the
Attorneys of the King in Quebec and Three Rivers, and the Judge and
Public Prosecutor of Montreal, whom the Court orders to have published,
posted and executed in the places of their jurisdicition, and to give notice
during the month to the said Attorney General of the receiving and publishing of them, who will advise the Court, the Court moreover orders Mc.
DuChesneau. xlii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
PRICE CEILING ON BREAD, WINE AND BRANDY
Of the fifteenth of February 1677 in the morning^
The Court assembled being present the Intendant, Sieurs de Villery,
de Tilly, de Lotbiniere, Depeiras and de Vittray, Councillors and Dauteuil
the Attorney General.
The Court being informed of the result of the general meeting of the
inhabitants of this town held for the police in the Provostship office of this
town the fourteenth of January last and having been convocated by the
Lieutenant General in the said provostship, at which presided Sieurs de
Villeray and de Vittray, Councillors in the said Court delegated to this
duty, all in accordance with its order of the eleventh of the said month, the
result of which having been read, the said Lieutenant General having been
called and the same having been heard and his opinion listened to, And he
having withdrawn, the articles were brought under discussion, And the
conclusions of the Attorney General on the same having been heard. The
Court has ordered and orders that until a general test can be made, a loaf
of white bread weighing eleven ounces shall be sold at twenty deniers, And
brown bread two sols when the bushel of wheat sells from four livres to
four livres ten sols and more in proportion or less in proportion; that there
shall be but three bakers in this town, to whom will be given permission to
sell and retail bread provided that they always keep their shops supplied
with bread, on pain of being deprived of the said permission and an arbitrary
fine which they will remit to the registry of the said provostship; The said
bakers are enjoined to get their supplies of wheat from afar off, being
forbidden to buy them in Quebec and within six leagues all around on pain
of confiscation and fine. With regard to wine, it shall not be sold at a
higher price than sixteen sols the pot if it is not otherwise ordered after
the arrival of the ships that will come from Old France this present year.
And as to the other articles in the said report, decision will be made according to the merits of the case.
DuChesneau.
FIXING THE PRICE OF WHITE AND BLACK BREAD
Of the Eleventh of February 1686a.
The Council in conformance with the charge of the said Attorney-
General has ordered and orders that from the day of publication of the
present, white bread shall be sold and distributed by Bakers at twenty-one
deniers the pound, And consequently the loaf selling at one copper sol,
valued at sixteen deniers, shall weigh twelve ounces. And for public
convenience the said white loaf weighing three pounds shall be worth four'
copper sols; White-black bread sixteen deniers the pound; And when they
are asked to make black bread they will have to make it and sell it for
twelve deniers the pound. And to prevent abuses which might occur in
the selling, the said bakers are directed to mark on each loaf the number of
pounds it weighs. All under pain of confiscation and fine. And to help
the said Bakers to some extent the said Council has forbidden and forbids
all persons from making hard-tack save for their own use, nor to sell any,
under pain also of confiscation and arbitrary fine, And the present shall be
sent to the said Lieutenant General through the attention of the said
Attorney General to be read, published and posted in the usual places,
And held responsible for the execution of this present, so that no one may
be in ignorance of it.
  Rouer de Villeray. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xliii
PRICE CEILING ON WINE
In the name of the Magistrate of the Island of Montreal1.
In consideration of what has just been shown to us by the Pubiic
Prosecutor of this Bailiwick, that because of the Scarcity that there was on
this island last winter of all kinds of liquor when it was impossible to obtain
it elsewhere, it was tolerated for the urgent public necessity for persons to
sell and retail it at 25 and 30 sols the pot and brandy at 3 livres, But now
that several boats have arrived in this port which have brought a Considerable quantity of it in both kinds, the person and proprietors of the said
liquors would like to keep them at an excessive price to the prejudice of
the public good for Which it is necessary to bring in several Measures and
Regulations to prevent the said persons from taking advantage of past
sufferance, We Magistrate civil and criminal judge in the Island of Montreal
after having conferred with the persons we thought of and having communicated it to the most intelligent inhabitants, accepting the conclusions
of the said public prosecutor and since it is in the public interest Have
ordered that from this day the pot of wine shall only be Sold and distributed
in the Taverns and elsewhere by the pot and by the quart on the basis of
twenty-two sols, brandy on that of 50 sols the pot, very expressly prohibiting
tavern-keepers and others from selling or retailing by the pot and by the
quart the said liquors at a higher price than the said Rate under any pretext
whatsoever under pain to the offenders of a fine of twenty livres payable
immediately as a police offence and this on the report of two persons who
may complain of having bought it at a higher price, and in order that the
present regulation may become known to every one we enjoin that through
the diligence of the said public prosecutor it shall be read published and
posted forthwith in all the squares and crossroads of this Town so that
no one may be able to plead ignorance. Ordered & done and given at
Villemarie, The fifth day of May, one thousand, six hundred and eighty-
eight in the morning.
MlGEON DE BRANSSAT.
Bourgine.
Adhemar
Read, published and posted at the door of the church of this town as
well as on the post in the public place of this town, at the door of the public
building and on a post at the crossroad of (name omitted) street in order
that no one may remain in ignorance of it by me Bailiff of the bailiwick
of the said Montreal undersigned this day, Wednesday fifth day of May,
one thousand, six hundred and eighty-eight.
Gillet.
REGULATION FOR THE PRICE OF MEAT
March 24, 1692.2
On that which has been shown by the Attorney General of the King,
that it is proper to see if it is necessary to set the price of butcher meat
in order not to allow those who sell it to charge an Excessive price, as has
been done the last two years, asking that it should be provided for, And
that in accordance with the old Regulations that it should be forbidden to
innkeepers and hotel-keepers to supply themselves with it until after eight
o'clock has struck in order to allow the citizens and inhabitants ot this
town to get their supplies, And after having heard some of the principal
citizens and inhabitants who had been notified to be at the Council Chamber
with the substitute of the Attorney General carrying out the functions in Xliv PUBLIC ARCHIVES
the provostship of this town in the absence of the Lieutenant General of
the same, And they having withdrawn, And having heard the opinions of
the Attorney General, The Council has ordered and orders that the persons
who wish to keep butcher shops shall be obliged to make their declaration
of it to the Judge of Police eight days from the day of publication of the
present regulation, That they must have sufficient meat to supply the
public with it each week, And in order that the Judge of Police may know
whether there will be enough of it, the butchers will be obliged to declare
to him how many cattle each one of them can kill per week; That a pound
of meat can only be sold at five sols from Easter until the last of June,
And at four sols from the first of July until Lent; permission not being given
to sell it after the first of July except to those who commenced by Easter,
All on pain of confiscation and arbitrary fine. It is forbidden to kill calves
that are not at least a month old, and to all other persons of the town as
well as the country to bring meat for sale except after having offered it to
the butchers of the town, at a sol less than they would sell it retail according
to the rate above; making, however, the inhabitants show certificates from
their neighbours that their cattle have not been killed because of disease;
the aforesaid butchers taking meat from the said inhabitants shall be
obliged to pay them for it in cash, otherwise they [the inhabitants] are
permitted to expose it for sale on the market on Tuesdays and Saturdays
in Summer, and on Tuesdays and Fridays in Autumn when the weather is
cold; it is also forbidden for the said innkeepers and hotel-keepers to buy
on the market, meat, fowl, butter, eggs, and other things until after eight
o'clock has struck, on pain of confiscation and arbitrary fine; And the
present Regulation shall be published and posted in the usual places in
care of the said Attorney General, so that no one may be in ignorance
of it, And a copy of the same sent also in his care to his substitute in the
said Provostship to be Registered and Executed, Which substitute shall
Certify to the said Attorney General of his proceedings in fifteen days.
Bochart Champigny.
BONUS ON PRODUCTION OF FISH AND FISH OIL
An Act for granting a Bounty upon Fish and Oyl, and for laying a Duty
upon Spirituous Liquors as a Fund for the Payment thereof, and for
effectually securing the payment of the said Duty made and passed
in Council at Halifax the 29th. April 1751.1
Whereas the Prosperity of this Province greatly depends upon the
Success and Increase, of the Fishery for the Carrying on of which it is so
commodiously situated, and which was the Principal inducement to Great
Brittain to undertake, and Support the Settlement thereof.    In order,
therefore, to promote and incourage the same, and to render more effectual
the Attempts that have been, and that may be made, to carry it on with
Vigour.    It is by His Excellency the Governor with the Advice and Consent
of His Majestys Council of this Province Enacted.    That there shall be
paid out of the Publick Treasury of the Province, a Bounty of Six pence
P. Quintall for every Quintal of Fish salted and dry'd within this Province
fit for Exportation, also a Bounty of Twelve pence P Barrel for every barrel
of pickled Fish, caught and.first pickled within this Province also a Bounty
of Two shillings and six pence P Barrel, for every barrel of Whale, Seil,
or any kind of Fish Oyl made within this Province.
The said Bounty to be for the sole Benefit of the persons who shall
have caught the said Fish so dry'd, or pickled, or from which the said Oyl
» Nova Scotia Acts, Dec. 1749 to Sept. 1753, pp. 91-98. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xlv
was produced To be paid to such person or persons as they shall Appoint
to receive the same for them: upon the Shipping thereof for Exportation
out of the Province the Person receiving the said Bounty first making
Oath to the Quantity so Shipt: and that the said Fish was dry'd or first
pickled, within this Province, or that the Oyl was here made, and that the
Bounty has not already been paid thereon, nor any part thereof.
That publick notice be given of this Encouragement by His Excellency
the Governors Proclamation Promising the said Bounty
That as a Fund for the payment of the aforesaid Bounty a Duty of
Six pence P Gallon be laid to be paid on all Rum, and other distill'd/
Spirituous Liquors, sold by Retail, within this Province, (Viz*, in a smaller
Quantity than three Gallons, sold and delivered at one and the same time
mixt or unmixt
That for Effectually securing the payment of the said Duty, the Order
of the Governor and Council of Oct.r 11th. last past, relating to the selling
by retail, Rum or other Spirituous Liquors within this Settlement be construed and extended to the other Settlement in the Province, And further,
That all persons who are or shall be licenced, by His Excellency the Governor
within this Settlement, or by the Commanding Officer of His Majesty's
Troops in other Settlements and Garisons within this Province to keep
Publick Houses or to Retail Rum and other distill'd Spirituous Liquors,
shall become Bound Each with one Surety of known Residence and ability
in the Sum of Ten Pounds Sterling Conditioned That the Persons taking
Such licence shall deliver in, monthly, to shuch Person as shall, by His
Excellency, be Appointed to receive the same, a just Account, upon Oath,
of the Quantity of Rum and other distill'd Spirituous Liquors sold, during
the Month then last past, by them and any person or persons under them,
and Acting for them, and by their Orders, Viz*, in any Quantity less than
three Gallons, sold and delivered at one and the same time, mixt or unmixt
and shall at the same time, or within three days after, pay to the person
Appointed to receive the same, the Duty due thereon.
That, no persons who now are, or hereafter may be licenced to keep
publick houses, or to Retail Spirituous Liquours, shall for the future, pay
for the said Licences any other Sum than Two Shillings, to be paid to the
Clerk, for filling up the said Licence and Bond.
That the Regulations concerning the retailing Rum and other distilled
Spirituous Liquors, be construed to extend to all such Liquors, retailed on
Board any Vessel or Vessels in any of the Harbours of this Province—The
Masters of said Vessels to be Answerable for any Breach thereof, on board
their respective Vessels.
That the Conviction of all Breaches of these Regulations, and Orders,
shall upon Oath before the Governor and Council at this Settlement, and
before the Commanding Officer, for the time being at the other Settlements
or Garrisons in the Province.
That in case of failure of immediate payment of the penalty upon
Conviction Execution be levied upon the Goods and Chatties of the Offender
or his surety and the same (so far as shall be necessary for payment thereof
and Charges) to be sold at Publick Outcry by the Officer levying the said
Execution provided the same be not replevied within five Days.
That this order of the Governor and Council be in force for three Years
from the tenth Day of May next, and until the same be repealed by His
Majesty, or the legislative Authority of this Province.
That the person receiving the beforementioned Duty upon Rum &c.
shall pay the same Monthly, into the Public Treasury, deducting therefrom
so much as his Excellency shall think fit to be allow'd said person for
Collecting and keeping Account of the same. xlvi PUBLIC ARCHIVES
ACT GRANTING BOUNTY TO BREWER
An Act for granting to William Steele Esqr, a Bounty of 2s/6d P Barrel
for each Barrell of Malt Beer Brewed by him and Sold for 17s/6d
P Barrell.    Made and passed in Council at Halifax the 20th Febry
1752.1
Whereas William Steele Esqr laid before His Excellency and the
Council a memorial sitting forth the benifit that might arise to this Colony
by having a Quantity of Malt Beer Sufficient for the Consumption thereof,
brewed here at a reasonable Rate, as great Quantity's are daily imported
from the other Colonies.    Also that it might be a means in some measure
of putting a Stop to the pernicious practice in this Province of Drinking
Spirituous Liquors, And praying that some Encouragement might be given
him to enable him to carry on a Brewery of Malt Beer within this Settlement, which Memorial being taken into Consideration.    It was by His
Excellency the Governor with the Advice and Consent of His Majestys
Council of this Province Enacted That the sum of Two Shillings and Six
pence, be paid out of the Treasury of this Province to William Steele Esqr.
for every Barrell of Malt Beer by him brewed and Sold within this Province,
within one year from the Date hereof provided the same be not Sold by
him at more than Seventeen Shillings and Six pence P Barrell.
FORBIDDING THE EXPORT OF WHEAT
"By Chas. Lawrence Esq1. President of the Council, and Commander in
"Chief for the time being, of His Majesty's Province of Nova Scotia
"or Accadie, Lieutenant Governor of Annapolis Royal, and
"Lieutenant Colonel of One of His Majesty's Regiments of Foot.2
"A PROCLAMATION."
"Whereas it has been represented to me and his Majesty's Council,
that the Exportation of Corn from this Province, is not only of the Greatest
ill consequence to the Inhabitants thereof, but that such Corn is frequently
carried to Foreign Markets.
"I do hereby, and with the advice and consent of His Majesty's
Council, strictly forbid any masters of Vessels trading to this Province, to
Ship on board their vessels any Corn, without a Permission in writing
signed by myself, under the penalty of Fifty Pounds Sterling, and a Forfeiture of the Corn so shipped, One half to the Informer, the other to the
use and Support of His Majesty's Government in this Province, And I do
hereby require and enjoin all Officers Civil and Military, to use their
utmost Endeavours to prevent any Frauds that may be attempted contrary
to the Intent and Meaning of this Proclamation. And I do hereby impower
any of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace either upon Information or on
their own certain Knowledge, to seize such corn, and to levy the said
Penalty of Fifty Pounds, upon the goods & chatties of the Offender, by
Distress, unless the said offender shall give good and sufficient Security to
take his Trial before His Majesty's Council, and Comply with such Determination as shall be given according to the Tenor of this Proclamation." REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 xlyii
"Given at Halifax this 17th day of Septr. 1754 in the 28*h Year of
His Majesty's Reign.
"By Order of the
"Commander in Chief
(Signed)
"WlLm COTTERELL
"God Save the King.'
(Signed)
Jn°. Duport
Sec: Cone
(Signed)
Chas. Lawrence.
(Signed)
Chas. Lawrence.
PROCLAMATION FIXING THE PRICE OF MEAT AND BREAD
By His Excellency James Murray, &C1
\ We had every reason for hoping that the just and equitable price
which we had fixed on corn and flour for the relief of the inhabitants would
have put a check upon the vexations caused by certain bakers in selling
black bread, badly baked, at twenty sous a pound, and even more. The
same abuse has crept in, among the butchers who sell their meat at an
exorbitant price.
Having nothing so much at heart as to contribute, to the limit of our
power, to the relief of the people, and their being no better way than by
preventing monopolies, we have, for this purpose, fixed the price and
made the regulation which follows.
Bakers and butchers, who desire to sell to the public are not allowed
to do so without having a written permit from our secretary, on pain of
confiscation, of a hundred livres fine for the first offence, and of corporal
punishment in case of repetition.
Bakers and Butchers, who wish to sell must conform, under the same
penalties as those above mentioned, to the prices which follow:
Bakers are not permitted to sell flour bread except for ten sous a pound.
Semi-white for eight sous.
Brown bread at six sous. It must be of full weight, well baked, and
of good quality.
Butchers are not allowed to sell beef except at ten sous a pound.
Mutton and veal at twelve sous.
We enjoin all bakers and butchers to conform to the present regulation, as also persons of whatever quality and condition they may be, on
pain of confiscation and of one hundred livres fine for the first offence,
and of corporal punishment for a repetition thereof, one third of which
fine will be granted to the informer furnishing the proof.
Done at Quebec January, 15, 1760.
And sealed with the seal of our arms.
(aC°Py) H.T.CRAMAHE,
Secretary.
i Colonial Office, 5, Vol. 64, pp. 138-9. xlviii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
ORDINANCE REGULATING THE PRICE OF BREAD
An ORDINANCE, Relating to the Assize of Bread, and for ascertaining
the Standard of Weights and Measures in the Province of Quebec.1
Whereas great Frauds are daily committed in this Province, because
no Standards for Weights and Measures, or Assize of Bread, have hitherto
been established,
His Excellency, the Governor, therefore, by and with the Advice and
Consent of His Majesty's Council for the said Province, and by Virtue of
the Power and Authority to him given, by His Majesty's Letters Patent
under the Great Seal of Great-Britain, hath thought fit to Ordain and
Declare, and his said Excellency, by and with the Advice and Consent
aforesaid, Doth hereby Ordain and Declare, That from and after the Tenth
Day of October, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-four, all Weights
and Measures used in this Province, shall be according to the Standard of
the Exchequer of England;
And for preventing Frauds in the Assize of Bread, Be it Ordained and
Declared, That the Clerks of the Market be, and are hereby impowered
to visit every Bake-House, or the House of any Person selling Bread, and to
seize all such as shall be found under the Weights and Assize established
by this Ordinance, or under the Weights that may be from Time to Time
hereafter regulated and established, by any three of His Majesty's Justices
of the Peace, according to the true Intent and Meaning of this Ordinance,
viz.
Avoirdupoize.
When the Price of Wheaten Flour is at, or under       lb.       oz.
Fourteen Shillings the 112 lbs. Avoirdupoize,
The Sixpenny Loaf of the same shall weigh       4 0
Ditto Brown Loaf       6 0
And in that Proportion, less or more, when the Price of Wheaten Flour
is dearer or cheaper than the above Price of Fourteen Shillings per 112 lbs.
And it shall and may be lawful for said Clerks to stop and examine the
Bread that may be carried through the Streets, by Any Person or Persons,
either for immediate Sale, or the Supply of his or their Customers, and in
the like Manner to seize all such as shall be found under the Weight and
Assize; which Assize to be regulated by any three Justices of the Peace in
the Districts of Quebec and Montreal, on the first Monday in every Month,
and by them published.
And be it further Ordained and Declared, That every Baker within this
Province, shall, and are hereby required, to mark his Bread with the first
Letter of his Christian and Sur-name, which upon Failure thereof shall be
seized, and such Bread so seized shall be forfeited, and delivered to the
Overseers of the Poor of the Town where the Offence is committed, for the
Benefit of the Poor or Prisoners.
Provided always, That if any Person shall think himself agrieved by
such Seizure, he may apply for Redress to any of His Majesty's Justices
of the Peace for the District, who is hereby impowered to determine the
same, if Application be made within twelve Hours after the Seizure be made.
And be it further Ordained and Declared, That if any Person, making
use of Weights and Measures, or Selling Bread, shall refuse Admittance to
any of the said Clerks, declaring the Intent of their coming to discharge
the Duty of their Office, he shall for every such Refusal forfeit the Sum of
Twenty Shillings, to be recovered before any one of His Majesty's Justices
of the Peace.
1 Report of the Work of the Public Archives for the year ISIS, pp. 50-52. Given by His Excellency the Honorable James Murray, Esq.; Captain
General and Governor in Chief of the Province of Quebec, and Territories
thereon depending in America, Vice Admiral of the same Governor of the
Town of Quebec, Colonel-Commandant of the Second Battalion of the
Royal American Regiment, &c. &c. In Council, at Quebec, the 3d of
September, Anno, Domini, 1764, and in the Fourth Year of the Reign of
our Sovereign Lord George the III. by the Grace of God, of Great-
Britain, France and. Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c. &c.
By Order of His Excellency in Council,
J. Gray, D. Secry.
JA: MURRAY.
HOUSING PROBLEM AND BASIC PERIOD FOR RENTS
At a Council holden at Halifax
on the 17? April 1776.1
Present:
His Excellency the Governor
The Honourable Charles Morris        ]
Richard Bulkeley
Henry Newton        \ Counsellors.
Arthur Goold
John Butler J
The Governor laid before the Council a representation from General
Howe, setting forth the Exorbitant and high demands made for the hire
of Houses, and Buildings taken for the cover and reception of the "
Troops and the Inhabitants lately arriv'd for shelter in this Province, from
Boston proposing that Enquiry shou'd be made by proper persons of the
value at which Houses had been rented two months ago, and that double
such rent shall be allow'd to the possessors or proprietors. Also that the
Rent of all Buildings which have not hitherto been rented or hir'd shou'd
be Regulated and Moderated.
On which it was Resolv'd that M; Green, Mf Bridge, Justices of the
Peace, & Mf Allan, Merchant, together with such Regimental Quarter
Masters as shall be Appointed by the Commander in Chief of the Troops;
do immediately proceed to make enquiry as to the value of Rent, and Hire
of Houses and Buildings, Agreeable to the above requisition, and to report
thereon in Order that all demands of R'mt &! may thereby be Regulated.
CEILING PRICES FOR MEAT AND BUTTER
At a Council Holden at Halifax on
the 13th of August 1776.2
Resolv'd that a Proclamation be issued to reduce the price of Provisions
Viz' Beef etc. for the best peices not to exceed nine pence P Pound, and so
in proportion for peices of less Value, and that Butter shall not exceed
one shilling per pound.
iJFova Scotia, Minutes of Executive Council, 1776-79. Vol. 17, pp. 36-7.
* Ibid, p. 69.
B0613—D 1 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
ORDINANCE AGAINST EXPORTING IN ORDER TO REDUCE
COST OF LIVING
An Ordinance to prohibit, for a limited time, the exportation of wheat,
pease, oats, biscuit, flour, or meal of any kind; also of horned cattle:
and thereby to reduce the present high price of wheat and flour.1
Be it enacted and ordained by his excellency the governor, by and with
the consent of the legislative council of the province of Quebec, and by
the authority of the same it is hereby enacted and ordained.
Art. I
That no person or persons whosoever, after the publication of this
ordinance shall directly or indirectly export, carry, or convey, or cause to
be exported, carried, and conveyed out of, and from this province; or shall
load or lay on board any ship, vessel, or boat, in order to be carried, conveyed, and transported out of this province, or within this province, to
the several posts, fisheries, and indian countries below Quebec, any wheat,
pease, oats, biscuit, flour or meal of any kind; or horned cattle.
Art. II
Provided whensoever it may be, that his Majesty's service and the
public good shall require a quantity of all or any of the above-mentioned
articles of provision, or horned cattle, to be exported out of this province,
and transported to any other part of his majesty's dominions;—It shall be
lawful for his excellency the governor, or commander in chief for the time
being, with the advice and consent of the members of his majesty's council,
to grant and issue a licence and permit, under his hand and seal, to any of
his majesty's subjects, to export and take from this province, any of the
above-mentioned articles, therein, in such permit specifying the quantity
and quality of the several provisions, or horned cattle so to be exported,"
and for what service or purpose intended: provided the same can be done
without manifestly exposing this province to want; any thing above contained to the contrary notwithstanding.
Art. Ill
Provided also, that this ordinance or any thing herein contained, shall
not extend to prohibit the exportation or carrying out of this province, such
or so much of all or any of the several articles of provision above specified,
as shall be necessary to be carried in any ship or ships, or other vessel or
vessels, for their respective voyages, for the sustenance, diet, and support,
of the commanders, masters, mariners, passengers, and others, in the same
ships or vessels only; or from transporting and sending to the several fisheries
within this province, and the several posts and indian countries, such
provisions or horned cattle abovesaid, as may be necessary for support
of the same, the masters of such ships, boats and vessels, or the shippers
of the several provisions or horned cattle, or the owners thereof, first having
complied with the directions respecting such exportation as are hereafter
contained.
Art. IV
Be it also enacted and ordained, that all masters of vessels, merchants,
and their agents, or whosoever may have the direction of clearing from the
custom-house or ports within this province, any ship, vessel, or boat, to
depart from the said province, or from any of the ports within the said
' Report of the Work of the Public Archives, 1914-1915, pp. 100-3. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 li
province, to any of the fisheries and posts as abovesaid; shall before lading
on board any ship, vessel, or boat, any of the provisions aforesaid, or horned
cattle, to be transported as aforesaid, make an entry with the naval officer,
or his deputy, of the several quantities and qualities of all or any of the
provisions above specified, or horned cattle, which may be necessary, or
permitted to be laden on board, and transported out of this province, or
to the fisheries, posts, and indian countries as aforesaid. And before any
such ship, vessel, or boat, shall depart with, carry and transport any provisions or horned cattle as aforesaid, the master of such ship, vessel, or boat,
the shipper or owner of the provisions or cattle therein laden or to be laden,
shall obtain a clearance, licence, and permit, from the naval officer, or his
deputy, to take and transport the same.
And moreover that the said master, shipper, or owner, of any of the
several provisions or horned cattle as aforesaid, shall, before he or they may
be permitted to take and transport the same, make oath before the said
naval officer or his deputy (who are hereby authorized to administer the
same) that such provisions so laden or to be laden on board such ship,
vessel, or boat, are actually necessary for the respective voyage or voyages
of the said ship, or vessel, or that all and every such provisions or horned
cattle, so laden or to be laden on board any ship, vessel or boat, are for
the use of, and to be consumed at, the respective fishery or fisheries, or at
the several posts to which the same are destined within this province.
And the master, shipper, or owner of all and every such provisions or
horned cattle, so laden or to be laden on board any ship, vessel, or boat,
shall, before he or they may have and receive a clearance, licence, and
permit, from the naval officer or his deputy, to depart with the provisions
or horned cattle as aforesaid, enter into bond, with two good and sufficient
sureties, in the penal sum of one hundred pounds, to his majesty, his heirs
and successors, that no part of such provisions or horned cattle so laden
or to be laden on board such ship, vessel, or boat, shall be exported, taken
or carried in the said ship, vessel, or boat, to any other port or place than
such, as may be set down and specified in the clearance of such ship, vessel,
or boat, so granted, or to be granted by the naval officer or his deputy.
The said bond to be taken before, and delivered to, the said naval officer
or his deputy. Upon pain and penalty of one hundred pounds, to be levied
of the master of every ship, vessel, or boat, or the shipper or owner of such
provisions, or horned cattle, who may refuse or neglect to conform to, and
perform all and every the abovesaid articles and directions, according to
the true intent and meaning of this ordinance. And also upon forfeiture of
double the value of all the provisions and cattle which may be so laden
on board contrary to this ordinance as aforesaid.— And all and every
ship, vessel, and boat is hereby made liable to, and answerable for the above-
said penalties and forfeitures, so far as they may be of value to answer
the same, and may lawfully be taken, seized, and sold by judgment of law,
for and toward satisfying the penalties and forfeitures above-mentioned.
And the said naval officer or his deputy, for the entry, permit, oath, and
bond, as aforesaid, and also the clearance of the provisions or horned
cattle as aforesaid, and certificate to the collector or other of his majesty's
customs, as mentioned in the 7th article of this ordinance, shall take and
receive five shillings for the said business, and no more.
Art V.
That the naval officer or his deputy may at all times, by night or by
day, enter on board any ship, vessel or boat, and the same and every part
thereof to search and examine, and lawfully may seize and hold in his or
their custody, all and every ship, vessel or boat, on board of which may be Iii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
laden any provisions or horned cattle, contrary to this ordinance, and the
same retain, until judgment of law be made in the premises.
Provided always that the said naval officer, or his deputy, shall release
and give up all and every ship, vessel, or boat, which he may seize as aforesaid, upon the owner or master of such ship, vessel or boat, giving two good
and sufficient sureties to the said naval officer, or his deputy, to answer
the prosecution, hearing, and trial, to make good and perform the judgment
of law upon and against such master, owner, or shipper, for having acted
contrary, or neglected to comply with, and perform this ordinance.
Art. VI.
That all and every naval officer, his or their deputy or deputies, who
shall wilfully neglect or refuse to take the entry, oath, and security above-
mentioned, or who may grant any clearance of any ship, vessel, or boat,
before having taken such entry, oath, and security; or who shall neglect
or refuse to perform the several duties of him and them by this ordinance
required, shall be liable to, and have judgment against him or them for
the same penalties, and the value of all such forfeitures as by this ordinance
the master, shipper, or owner of any ship, vessel, or boat, or the provisions
or horned cattle therein laden, would be liable to, for a wilful neglect
or refusal to conform to this ordinance, or the particular duty necessary to
be performed as above-mentioned.
Art. VII.
That no collector of his majesty's customs, his deputy, or other of his
majesty's customs within this province, shall, during the continuance of
this ordinance, clear or suffer and permit any ship, vessel or boat to be
cleared, from any port or custom-house within this province, until after
the said collector, his deputy, or other custom-house officer, may have
received a clearance and certificate from the naval officer of this province,
or his deputy, that the master of such ship, vessel or boat, hath in all things
duly complied with, kept and obeyed this ordinance.
Art. VIII.
That all and every person acting contrary, or neglecting to conform,
to this ordinance and the penalties and forfeitures imposed as abovesaid,
shall and may be prosecuted, sued for, and recovered in any of his majesty's
courts of record in this province, according to the course and usage of such
courts, for the trial, hearing and judgment of causes. And the forfeitures
above-mentioned recovered, and divided, and paid, one moiety to the
receiver-general of the province, for the use of his majesty, and the other
moiety to the person who shall inform, sue and prosecute for the same.
Art. IX.
That this ordinance, and every article and clause herein contained,
shall be and remain in force, from the publication of the same, for and
during the space of two years, and unto the end of the sessions of the legislative council of this province, which will be held according to the statute,
in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-two.
Fred : Haldimand. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 Hii
ORDINANCE AGAINST EXPORTING GRAINS BECAUSE
OF BREAD SCARCITY
An Ordinance to prevent for a limited Time the Exportation of Biscuit,
Flour or Meal of any kind, also of Wheat, Pease, Barley, Rye and
Oats.1
Whereas, from the quantity of wheat and other grain in the Province,
a scarcity of bread, so necessary for the sustenance of the people, may be
apprehended, if the exportation of wheat, pease, barley, rye, oats, biscuit,
flour or meal, be not prevented for a limited time: Be it enacted by His
Excellency the Governor, by and with the consent of the Legislative Council
of this Province, and by the authority of the same it is hereby enacted
and ordained, that after the publication of this Ordinance no person or
persons whatsoever, shall directly, or indirectly, export, carry or convey,
or cause to be exported, carried or conveyed out of this Province, or shall
load on board of any ship, vessel or boat, in order to be carried, conveyed
and transported out of this Province, any wheat, pease, biscuit, barley,
rye, oats, flour or meal of any kind. Provided always that this Ordinance,
or any thing therein contained shall not extend to prohibit the exportation
or carrying out of this Province, such or so much of all or any of the several
articles of provision above specified, for the victualling of such ships and
vessels trading to and from this Province, as shall be necessary for the
support of the crew and passengers of the same, or for the support of any
horses, cattle, or other live stock on board such ship or vessel for their
respective voyages only, or to prevent, hinder or restrain the transporting
and sending to the several fisheries within this Province, or to the King's
posts, such provisions as may be necessary for the support of the same, the
masters of all such ships and vessels that pass sea-ward from the Port of
Quebec or the shippers of the several provisions, or the owners thereof,
having first complied with the directions respecting such exportation as
are hereinafter contained.
Be it enacted by the same authority, that all masters of vessels,
merchants or their agents, or whoever may have the direction of clearing
from the Custom-House or Ports within this Province any ship or vessel
to depart from the same, laden with such provisions as herein before specified, to any of the fisheries or fishing posts below Quebec and within the
Province or the posts as aforesaid, or shall have occasion to take in such
provisions for the use of the crew and passengers of any ship or vessel
trading to or from this Province, that such masters of ships or vessels, or
such merchants and others as aforesaid, shall before lading on board any
such ship or vessel any such provisions as aforesaid, make an entry with
the Naval Officer or his Deputy, of the several quantities and qualities of
the provisions above specified which may be necessary or permitted to be
laden on board, and that such master of such ship or vessel shall obtam
a clearance, Licence and permit from the Naval Officer or his Deputy to
take on board and transport the same.
Provided always and it is hereby enacted, that the masters of all
such ships and vessels shall previous to their obtaining such permit and
clearance, make oath before the Naval Officer or his Deputy (who are hereby
authorized to administer the same) that such provisions entered tor the
ship's use are bona fide for the use and support of the crew and passengers
of the same, and that for such provisions as may be shipped for the support
of the fisheries and fishing-posts dependant on this Province belowQuebec,
he the said master the owner or shipper shall enter into bond to Wis Majesty,
j \Ryporl on the Work of the Public Arc
A-im, pp. 243-5. liv PUBLIC ARCHIVES
his heirs and successors, with two good and sufficient sureties, in a penal
sum to the full amount of the value of such provisions as to be entered and
shipped, on condition that the whole shall be duly carried and conveyed
to the port or place specified in the entry and there landed, and that no
part thereof shall be exported or landed in any other port or place out of
the limits of this Province. And it is hereby ordained and declared, that a
service of process against such person or persons shall be liable to the
penalties and forfeitures secured by such bond, whether present or absent
shall be deemed good service, if left with, or notified to, all or any of the
persons so becoming security as aforesaid, and that it shall not be in any
respect necessary to proceed to a discussion of the person or persons
adjudged to pay such penalties or forfeitures, but that the persons so bound
as aforesaid, shall be immediately answerable for the same, any law, usage
or custom to the contrary notwithstanding.
And be it enacted by same authority, that whosoever shall contrary
to the true intent and meaning of this Act, ship or load or cause to be
shipped or loaden, on board of any ship, vessel or boat all or any of the
articles of provision herein before mentioned, without having previously
complied with the several clauses, terms and condition of this Ordinance
shall for every such offence be liable respectively to the penalty and forfeiture of the sum of one hundred pounds, besides the forfeiture of the
provisions so shipped or laden, and the ship, vessel or boat, in which such
provisions shall be shipped or laden as aforesaid, contrary to this Ordinance,
is hereby made liable and answerable ad valorem for the penalties hereby
imposed, and may be lawfully seized and sold for payment of the same,
and be it enacted by the same authority that the Naval Officer or his
Deputy shall have full power and authority to enter on board any ship
or vessel, and the same and every part thereof, to search and examine, and
after having with all diligence ascertained the quantity of provisions so
illegally laden and the same cause to be brought on shore, which he is hereby
authorized to do, lawfully may seize and hold in his or their custody every
ship or vessel on board of which may be laden any provisions contrary to
this Ordinance, and the same retain until judgment of law be made on the
premises. Provided always that the said Naval Officer, or his Deputy,
shall release and give up such ship or vessel so seized upon the Owner or
Master entering into bond with two good and sufficient sureties in a sum
adequate to the penalties and forfeitures hereby imposed to the said
Naval Officer or his Deputy, to answer the prosecution and to make good
the judgment of law against such Master, Owner or Snipper for having
acted contrary or neglected to comply with this Ordinance.
And be it enacted by the same authority, That the Naval Officer or
his Deputy or Deputies; who shall wilfully neglect or refuse to take the
entry, oath and security above-mentioned, or who may grant any clearance
of any ship or vessel, before having taken such entry, oath, and security,
or who shall neglect or refuse to perform the several duties by this Ordinance required, shall be liable to and have judgment against him or them
for the same penalties, and the value of all such forfeitures as by this
Ordinance the Master, Shipper or Owner of such ship or vessel, or the
provisions therein laden, would be liable to, for a wilful neglect or refusal
to conform to this Ordinance, or the particular duty necessary to be performed as above-mentioned.
Be it enacted by the same authority, That all and every person concerned acting contrary, or refusing or neglecting to conform to this Ordinance, and the penalties and forfeitures imposed as above, shall and may be
prosecuted, sued for and recovered in any of His Majesty'sCourts of record
in this province, according to the course and usage of such Courts, for the REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942" lv
trial, hearing and judgment of causes, and the forfeitures above-mentioned
being recovered, shall be divided and paid one moiety to the Receiver-
General of the province for the use of His Majesty, and the other moiety
to the person who shall inform, sue for, and prosecute the same.
And be it enacted by the same authority, That this Ordinance shall
be and remain in force, from the publication of the same, for and during
the space of one year with authority nevertheless to His Excellency the
Governor or Commander in Chief for the time being, by and with the
advice and consent of His Majesty's Council, at any time from and after
the fifteenth day of August next, if they shall think it expedient by proclamation under the Great Seal of the province, to take off the Embargo directed
by this Ordinance, on all or any part of such provisions as are therein
specified; and the same again in like manner by proclamation, to lay on or
continue, reviving the several causes and conditions of this Ordinance
thereby in whole or in part, any thing herein contained to the contrary
notwithstanding.
Dorchester.
FORBIDDING THE EXPORT OF WHEAT AND POTATOES
An Act to prohibit the exportation of Corn, Meal, Flour and Potatoes out
of the Province for a limited time.1
the 17th of February, 1817.
Whereas it is expedient under the present circumstances, owing to
the failure of the late Crops, to prohibit the exportation of any sort of Corn,
Meal or Flour, and other articles made thereof, and of Potatoes from any
part of this Province—
I. Be it therefore enacted by the President, Council and Assembly,
That from and after the passing of this Act, and until the end of four
months to be accounted from the same, it shall not be lawful for any person
or persons to export in any Ship, Vessel or Boat from any part of this
Province, the necessary Stores and Provisions for such Ship, Vessel or Boat
excepted, any Wheat, Rye, Barley, Oats or any Meal, Flour or Bread, or
Biscuit made thereof, or any Potatoes.
II. And be it further enacted, That if any person or persons shall
export or shall load or lay on board any Ship, Vessel or Boat with an intent
to export the same, any Corn or other of the articles aforesaid, the person
or persons so exporting or loading or laying on board with intent to export
the same, and each and every of them shall forfeit and pay the sum of one
hundred pounds to be recovered and applied in the same manner as is
provided in and by the third section of an Act made and passed in the
forty-seventh year of the Reign of his present Majesty, intituled "An Act
for raising a Revenue in this Province."
III. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for
the Treasurer of this Province and his Deputies or either of them, and they
are hereby authorized and required to seize and take any such Ship, Vessel
or Boat, and the said Corn or other articles aforesaid loaded and laid on
board as aforesaid, and to detain the same, and that information shall and
may be thereupon made by His Majesty's Attorney General in the Supreme
Court of this Province, and proceedings had to condemnation and sale
according to the course of the said Court, and upon such condemnation and
1 Acts of His Majesty's Province of New-Brunswick, 1817, pp. 5-6. lvi PUBLIC ARCHIVES
sale, the proceeds thereof shall be paid and applied as follows, that is to
say, one moiety thereof, after deducting the costs and charges of prosecution
to the officer who shall seize the same or to the person who shall have given
information in consequence of which such seizure shall have been made and
prosecuted as the Court before which such prosecution may be had shall
adjudge, and the other moiety to the Treasurer of the Province for the use
of the same.
IV. Provided also and be it further enacted, That it shall and may be
lawful for the Governor or Commander-in-Chief of this Province for the
time being, by and with the advice and consent of His Majesty's Council
at any time to suspend the operation of this Act by Proclamation under
his hand and seal for that purpose made and published. III. TREATMENT   OF   PRISONERS   DURING
THE WAR OF  1812
TREATY FOR THE EXCHANGE OF AMERICAN AND
CANADIAN  PRISONERS
Treaty1 for the release of Prisoners of War upon their Parole for their
eventual Exchange, concluded at Whitehall, U.S. 12th November 1812,
between Major General Dearborn Commander of the Forces of the United
States in the Northern Department and Robert McDonall Esq.r Captain
of the 8 th or King's Regiment of Infantry and Aid de Camp to the Governor
in Chief of the Canadas, duly authorized by His Excellency Lieutenant
General Sir George Prevost.
Article Is*
The American Prisoners of War at present in Canada are to be embarked
for Boston with as much Expedition as circumstances will admit, on their
Parole not to carry Arms or engage in any active hostility or perform any
Military Service whatever, until regularly exchanged. None of these
Troops are to be suffered to remain upon the Frontier, or with any Corps
Engaged on actual Service.
Article 2nd
Prisoners of War who may be prevented by sickness from returning to
their Country, will be sent when sufficiently recovered, by the Post of St.
John's, a receipt for the Men by name, being given by the Officer at the
advance Post who receives them.
Article 3rd
The Detatchment of Canadian Voyageurs, and all the British Prisoners of
War of whatever description, belonging to the British Forces in Canada,
are to be immediately sent upon their parole to the nearest advanced
Post towards St. John's, apprizing the Commandant of the circumstance,,
who will give a receipt for the same. They will of course be subject to,
the same restrictions as those mentioned in the Is* Article.
Article 4 th
Should the fortune of war hereafter place British Prisoners, whether Regulars or Militia, in the power of the American Government, they are immediately to be sent back to the nearest British Post, and an equal number of
American Prisoners are in consequence to be released and Exonerated from
their parole; As far as may be practicable, all exchanges to be kept distinct,
Troops of the Line for Regulars; embodied Militia for the Militia taken in
Arms; and other Corps according to their respective Engagements and
Organisation.
Article 5 th
In the Event of the Prisoners of War of either Country who are on parole,
being permitted to reside at their respective homes, the utmost precaution
to be taken by both Governments, in impressing upon their minds the
serious consequences which must result to them should they inconsider-
» Colonial Office, Q. Series, Vol. 119, pp. 105-8.
Ivii lviii PUBLIC ARCHIVES
ately engage in any Corps or Regiment, or perform any Military duty,
until it is officially announced to them, that they are regularly exchanged
and released from their parole, And in order than no mistake may arise
involving such serious consequences; whenever any men are proposed to
be exchanged, Correct authenticated Lists of the Individuals are to be
interchanged between the two Governments expressly mentioning the
name of each Soldier thus rendered eligible again to bear Arms in the
service of his Country.
Article 6 th
Should the British Government have omitted to take Lists of the Militia
released upon their parole at Detroit and Queenstown, the American
Government is to furnish as correct Lists as can be procured, in order to
simplify and facilitate their exchange, when circumstances render it
practicable.
Article 7 th
Such British Prisoners, as are, or may be taken in Upper Canada, are to be
sent to the nearest Military Post in that Country, instead of S*. John's.
(signed) H. Dearborn
Majr General
R*McDonall
Cap* King's R*
A.D.C. to the L* Gen1 Sir Geo. Prevost.
Head Quarters, Montreal
24th November 1812
Ratified
(signed) George Prevost
Commr of the Forces.
True Copy
Noah Freer
Military Secretary
REGULATIONS CONCERNING PRISONERS OF WAR ON
PAROLE
Office of the District Marshal of Massachusetts.1
United States of America.
District of Massachusetts ss.
Sir,
Having this day admitted you to remain a Prisoner of War to the
United States, on Parole in the Town of Cheshire, within the County of
Berkshire, I subjoin certain rules and regulations for your government
while detained, and which I expect you will conform to with great exactitude.
Th* Melville Deputy Marshal and Agent
Prisoners of War.
To Nathaniel Bell—Quarter Master
4th Reg! Lincoln Militia
a Prisoner of War to the United States, having given his word of honor
that he will not withdraw himself from the bounds prescribed to him, without first having obtained permission to that effect from this office; that he
iParolt of a British Prisoner, War of lSlt-H. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 Hx
will behave decently, and with due respect to the laws, and that he will
not during his continuance at Cheshire, either directly or indirectly carry
on a correspondence, either in writing or verbally, with any person whomsoever, but through the hands of me, the said agent, or such officer as may
be appointed for that purpose, in order that they may be read or approved
by me, or such officer as aforesaid. And the fourth article of the Cartel
established by the respective governments of the United States and his
Britannic Majesty, at Washington, on the twelfth day of May last past,
having authorized me, as agent under the same, to prescribe the limits
to which his Parole shall extend, the hours and other rules to be observed
by him, with power in case of wilful disobedience to commit to close custody
in Prison the delinquents—I do hereby assign to you the Town of Cheshire,
in the County of Berkshire, for your residence, where you are to repair
with the least possible delay, and on your arrival there, you will report
yourself to Capt. Daniel Brown who will aid you in procuring quarters.—
You will then have liberty to walk in the roads to the extremities of the
town, the limits of which will be designated to you by Capt. D. Brown—
to whom you will report yourself personally each Saturday, between the
hours of nine and twelve o'clock, A.M. at his house—but you are not to
go into any field or cross-road, or to be absent from your lodgings after
six o'clock in the afternoon, from the first day of October to the last day
of March, nor after eight, during the other months in the year; nor are you
to quit your lodgings in the morning before six o'clock. And I do require,
that all letters wrote or received by you, be sent for inspection to this
office, and also notify you that conversations on subjects of a public nature,
with citizens, are expressly forbidden.
•2 >3
*3 W
Office of the District Marshal of Massachusetts.
I DO hereby certify that the bearer Nath! Bell Q.M. 4th L.M. whose
signature is in the margin, is an English prisoner of War, residing under
my care at Cheshire, in the County of Berkshire, and that he is bound by
his parole of honor to the faithful observance of the above regulations.
Given under my hand this fifteenth day of November, A.D. 1814.
Th! Melville
Deputy Marshal and Agent
Prisoners of War.  APPENDIX
CALENDAR OF SERIES Q
A series of State Papers composed of the official correspondence of the governors, lieutenant-governors,
administrators and other officials of Quebec and Lower
and Upper Canada for the years 1760-1841.
(A continuation of the calendar published in the Report for 1941, in which will
be found a Foreword indicating the carious instalments of the calendar of this series
which appeared in the previous annual reports.)  SERIES Q
LOWER   CANADA
Scries Q. Vol. 267
PUBLIC OFFICES, 1839
Hudson's Bay Company 1839
J. H. Pelly [Governor] to Normanby.    Requests, on behalf of the M"01^
Company, a renewal of the lease on the King's Posts in Lower Canada. hoWlodSot.
Explains the nature and resources of this area and the need for protection of the Indians therein.    Would be glad to have a modified
form of lease. p. 3
Unsigned to Pelly. [Draft.] Acknowledges letter of 20 March April 22.
indicating the willingness of the Hudson's Bay Company to surrender 0MS
their present lease of the King's Posts for an exclusive right of hunting
and trading with the Indians. Although a compliance with this
request would not be inconsistent with Glenelg's assurance to the
Lower Canadian Assembly on their address of 1836, Normanby feels
that no final decision should be reached without a previous communication with Colborne. p. 6
Pelly to Normanby.    Transmits copy of a letter from Peter W. ^^,.gBa
i and Thomas Simpson enclosing a narrative of the latter; also House,
copy of a letter from F. P. Tracy. p. 8
Enclosed:
(1) Dease and Simpson to the H.B. Co. at London, Fort Confidence, Great Bear Lake, 15 September, 1838, describing an expedition
during the summer to the mouth of the Coppermine and along the
coast. p. 9
Sub-enclosure:
Narrative by Thomas Simpson of a journey on foot eastward
from the above expedition, to a point on the coast 68° 43' 39" North
106° 3' 0" West. p. 18
(2) F. P. Tracy [secretary of the Oregon Provisional Emigration
Society] to the principal officer of the H.B. Co. at Montreal, Lynn,
Massachusetts, 4 March, 1839. Describes a proposed migration to
the Oregon country, and offers to co-operate with the Company,    p. 27
Unsigned to J. Backhouse [Under Secretary, Foreign Office], {gg^ Dept. j
[Draft.] Transmits an extract from a letter from the Governor of
the H.B. Co. enclosing a communication from a person styling himself
"Secretary of the Oregon Provisional Emigration Society." Believes
this should have Palmerston's early attention. [For enclosure see
above.] P-29
Unsigned to Pelly.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 2 May Mavi?
with its enclosures.    The letter from Tracy has been referred to i0010™1 d**-'
Palmerston P-30 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 267
Pelly to Russell. Acknowledges Stephen's letter of 16 September
answering his of 20 March on the lease of the King's Posts, and its
enclosed despatch from Colborne of 22 July, with the report of the
Executive Council of Lower Canada. Asks whether the H.B. Co.
would accept the lease on terms given by Colborne. Quotes from his
previous letter and from the Council's report. Submits alternative
lease proposal. p. 31
Unsigned to Pelly. [Draft.] Acknowledges letter of 28 September. Recapitulates the alternative proposals. The Company's new
proposal departs so far from that of the Government that the Governor and his Executive Council will again have to be consulted.      p. 37
\ [Russell] to Thomson, No. 51.    [Draft.]    Transmits, with refer
ence to a correspondence on the lease of the King's Posts, copy of a
correspondence between the Hudson's Bay Company and the Department. Asks the Governor's opinion as to whether the offer of the
Company ought to be accepted. [For enclosures see above under
dates of 28 September and 8 October.] p. 40
Post Office j
Thomas Laurence [Assistant Secretary] to J. Stephen [Under
Secretary, CO.]. States that the bag of despatches accompanying
his letter of 31 December for H.M. Consul at New York was put
aboard the St. Andrew at Liverpool on 1 January. Transmits
master's receipt. p. 43
January 7,
Dead Let
Office.
January 9,
General Post
Office.
January 11,
General Post
Office.
Enclosed:
Receipt by W. C. Thompson, master of the St. Andrew.
p. 44
Inspector of dead letters to Stephen. Acknowledges Stephen's
reply to letter of 17 December. Repeats request for the report of
the Deputy Postmaster General of Quebec. p. 45
Laurence to Stephen. Acknowledges letter of 5 January. The
bag of despatches for H.M. Consul at New York was placed aboard
the Cambridge on 6 January.    Transmits master's receipt. p. 46
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by K. Burrley, master of the Cambridge.      p. 47
Lt.-Col. W. L. Maberly [Secretary] to Stephen. Transmits copy
of a letter from the postmaster at Liverpool, also a bag of despatches
addressed to H.M. Consul at New York which was salvaged from the
wrecked St. Andrew. p. 48
Enclosed:
W. Banning [postmaster at Liverpool] to Maberly, 10 January,
explaining the return, unopened, of the bag of despatches. The
Cambridge is repaired and sailed today. The Roscius sails on 13
January. p. 49
Maberly to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. Consul at New York which accompanied letter of 10 January Q. 267
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
was put aboard the President at Portsmouth on 11 January.    The       1839
master refused to sign for it. p. 51
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for Wry 21,
H.M. Consul at New York which accompanied letter of 18 January oJ&S.
was put aboard the Orpheus at Liverpool on 19 January.    Transmits
master's receipt. p. 52
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by D. J. Bailey, master of the Orpheus.
p. 53
H.M. Consul at New York which accompanied letter of 26 January Office
was put aboard the Great Western at Bristol on 28 January.   Transmits
master's receipt. p. 54
Receipt  signed  by James
Western.
commander  of  the Great
p. 55
George Welch to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches Februarys,
for H.M. Consul at New York which accompanied letter of 5 February office!*1 P°Bt
. was put aboard the Liverpool at Liverpool on 6 February.    Transmits
master's receipt. p. 56
Enclosed:
Receipts signed by R. T. Fayrer. p. 57
Maberly to  Stephen.   States that the bag of despatches and G*Safpost
letter accompanying the note of 9 February were delivered to Dr. Office.
Wood at Portsmouth on 11 February. p. 58
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for q^J^j.
H.M. Consul at New York accompanying letter of 18 February was offiS.
put aboard the Europe at Liverpool on 19 February.    Transmits
master's receipt. P- 59
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by A. C. Marshall.
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for ^^J-Post
H.M. Consul at New York accompanying letter of 28 February was Office.
put aboard the Sheffield at Liverpool on 1 March.    Transmits master's
receipt. P* "■*•
p. 60
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by F. P. Allen.
p. 62
Maberly to Stephen.    Requests instructions as to the disposal g**^
of a bag of despatches addressed to H.M. Consul at New York accom- office,
panying letter of 6 March, the vessel on which it was to have been
placed being unable to sail.    Transmits copy of letter from the
postmaster at Liverpool. P* "3 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 267
March 13,
General Post
Office.
W. Banning to Maberly, 7 March, reporting that the Columbus
has been "neaped". P- 64
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bags of
addressed to H.M. Consul at New York, accompanying letters of
6 and 11 March were put aboard the Columbus at Liverpool on 12
March. Transmits receipt of chief mate. Also transmits copy of
observations from the postmaster at Liverpool suggesting the advisability of sending despatches in time to reach the port the day before
that set for the packet's departure. p. 65
General Post
Enclosed:
(1) Receipt signed by James Blatch.
(2) Observations by W. Banning, 12 March.
p. 67
p. 66
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bags of despatches on the
Columbus have been transferred to the Sheridan, the former having
sprung a leak. Transmits master's receipt and a letter from the
postmaster at Liverpool. p. 68
Enclosed:
(1) Receipt signed by De Peyster, master of the Sheridan on
15 March. p. 70
(2) Banning to Maberly, 16 March, explaining transfer of mail
from Columbus to Sheridan. p. 69
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. Consul at New York accompanying letter of 22 March was put
aboard the Great Western at Bristol on 23 March. Transmits master's
receipt. p. 71
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by James Hosken.
p. 72
Maberly to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. Consul at New York accompanying letter of 30 March was put
aboard the United States at Liverpool on 31 March. Transmits
master's receipt. p. 73
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by N. H. Holany.
p. 74
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. agent for packets at New York accompanying letter of 6 April
was put aboard the South America at Liverpool on 8 April. Transmits
master's receipt. p. 75
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by W. C. Barstud.
.76 Q. 267
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Laurence to Stephen.    Acknowledges receipt of letter of 8 April       1839
on the proposed stay of the steam packets at Halifax.    Postmaster April ie,
General thinks seven days should normally be allowed for letters to office"1 Post
leave Halifax and replies to be returned.    Admiralty has been notified
of this opinion. p. 77
_    Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for Aprii22
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of goalpost
19 April was put aboard the Liverpool at Liverpool on 20 April.     ce'
Transmits master's receipt. p. 79
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by R. T. Fayrer.
p. 80
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for General p
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office*
29 April was put aboard the Harkaway at Liverpool on 30 April.
Transmits master's receipt. p. 81
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by John Y. Nicholson.
p. 82
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for May 21,
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied the letter office.
of 17 May has been put aboard the Great Western at Bristol.    Transmits receipt. p. 83
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by Thomas William Moore, commander.
p. 84
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for G^eJaiPost
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office.
12 June was put aboard  the  Liverpool at Liverpool on 13 June.
Transmits master's receipt. P- 85
Enclosed:
Receipt
by R. T.
p. 86
Laurence to Stephen.    Transmits copies of reports and enclosures g^j Post
from the Deputy Postmaster General of the Canadas on the evil of Office,
illegal transport of letters by steamboats in those provinces.    Asks
Government's advice on expediency of putting the law into effect to
prevent this. P- &'
Enclosed:
(1) T. A. Stayner to Maberly, Quebec Post Office, 7 August,
1837. Explains the increasing practice of private transportation of
letters by water routes in the Canadas, and its deleterious effect on
postal revenues and efficiency. Requests permission to put the law
into effect and to supplement land postal routes by water where
such can efficiently be arranged. P- °y 8 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 267
1839 (2) Stayner to Maberly, General Post Office, Quebec, 31 January,
1839, explaining his delay in answering the despatch of 5 October,
1837. Law officers of the Crown in the provinces have been greatly
distracted. Does not believe there can be any question about the
right of the Post Office to prosecute for illegal carriage of mails.
Explains the steps taken to complete arrangements with steamship
companies for the transport of mails. P- 96
Sub-enclosures:
(i) Stayner to Charles A. Hagerman [Attorney General of Upper
Canada], Quebec, 29 August, 1838, referring to him the legality of
prosecution for carriage of mails contrary to the terms of the Post
Office Consolidation Acts of 1 Victoria. p. 101
(ii) Hagerman to Stayner, Toronto, 7 September, 1838, acknowledging letter of 29 August, expressing the opinion that carriers can
be prosecuted for contravention of terms of the Post Office Consolidation Acts of 1 Victoria. Suggests that offenders be first warned.
Stayner in a postscript notes that he has given this warning more
than once without noticeable results. p. 103
(3) Stayner to Maberly, 18 April, 1839, acknowledging letter of
6 March directing him to send the opinion of the Attorney General
of Upper Canada to the Attorney General of Lower Canada and
requests his concurrence or dissent.    Encloses Ogden's reply,     p. 105
Sub-enclosure:
C. R. Ogden [Attorney General of Lower Canada] to Stayner,
Montreal, 17 April, 1839, stating his opinion that the provisions of
the Act are adequate to prohibit the illegal conveyance of mails
within the province. p. 106
June 27. [Normanby] to Colborne, No. 50.    [Draft.]    Transmits copies of
[Coiomai Dept.] & correSp0ndence on the illegal conveyance of mail in the Canadas.
Requests him to enter into communication with Stayner with a view
to taking what steps may be necessary to protect Post Office revenues.
Asks report of steps taken and reasons for taking them. [Enclosures
not at this place.] p. 107
General Post Laurence to Stephen.    Transmits copies of two letters from the
office. Deputy Postmaster  General of the  Canadas.    Stayner has been
instructed in case of future mail robberies by American brigands to
report it immediately to the Governor-in-Chief. p. 108
Enclosed:
(1) Stayner to Maberly, General Post Office, Quebec, 12 May,
1839, reporting a mail robbery east of Kingston on 25 April by armed
American brigands, and the efforts of W. H. Griffin [Surveyor of the
Post Office for Lower Canada] to have them brought to justice.
Arrangements are now in operation for the conveyance of mails by
water on Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence. p. 110
(2) Stayner to Maberly, 22 May, 1839, giving an account of the
continued but unsuccessful efforts of Griffin to secure the extradition
of mail robbers. Asks instructions as to the protection of the mails
below Kingston when navigation closes. p. 114 Q. 267
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Unsigned  to  Laurence.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges letter of 22       1839
June with its enclosures.    Colborne and Arthur will be instructed to June 29.
report their opinion.    Meanwhile Stayner should be guided by their [Colonial DePt-^
advice. p. 88
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches' for July s,
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office*1 Poat
5 July was put aboard the Great Western at Bristol on 6 July.    Transmits master's receipt. p. H8
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by James Hosken.
p. 119
[Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 28 June J«iy is.
3 that in case of armed robbery of the    oom
Unsigned to Laurence,
with its enclosures.    Sugge
mail in Upper Canada Stayner should first report it to the Lieutenant-
Governor of Upper Canada. p. 109
Laurence to Stephen.   States that the bag of despatches for juiy 13,
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office*1 Post
10 July was put aboard the British Queen at Portsmouth on 12 July.
Transmits master's receipt. p. 120
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by Richard Roberts.
p. 121
Maberly to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for ^™al2j,w
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office.
31 July was put aboard the Liverpool at Liverpool on 1 August.
Transmits master's receipt. p. 122
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by T. W. Moore.
p. 123
Maberly to Stephen.    States that three bags of despatches for Augustus,
Colborne, Arthur, and H.M. agent for packets at New York which gaicT  os
accompanied note of 23 August were delivered to Thomas Amiot
aboard the Great Western at Bristol on 24 August.    Transmits Amiot's
receipt. P- ^^4
Enclosed:
Amiot's receipt.
p. 125
Stephen to Maberly.    Transmits bag of despatches for H.M. ^g^ beptj
agent for packets at New York with instructions that it be placed
aboard the packet at Portsmouth, and requests the master's receipt.
Receipt  of  Richard  Roberts  commanding the  British Queen appended. P- 127
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for §£3^
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of office.
31 August was put aboard the British Queen at Portsmouth on 3
September.    Transmits  master's  receipt.    [Enclosure  not   at  this
place.] P- 126
60613—2 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 267
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of
6 September was put aboard the Cambridge at Liverpool on 7 September.    Transmits master's receipt. p. 128
October 21,
General Post
Office.
November 18,
General Post
Office.
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by G. D. Bailey.
p. 129
Maberly to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for the
Governor of Canada which accompanied the letter of 20 September
was delivered to Major G. D. Hall aboard the Liverpool at Liverpool
on 21 September.    Transmits receipt. p. 130
Enclosed:
Major G. D. Hall's receipt.
James Campbell to Stephen. States that the bag of c
for H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of
24 September was put aboard the Independence at Liverpool on 25
September.    Transmits master's receipt. p. 132
p. 131
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by E. Nye.
p. 132
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of
18 October was put aboard the Great Western at Bristol on 19 October.
Transmits master's receipt. p. 134
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by James Hosken.
p. 135
Stephen to Maberly. Transmits bag of despatches for H.M.
agent for packets at New York to be put aboard the packet due to
sail on 2 November from Portsmouth.
Postscript receipt signed by John Landegreve, agent for the
British Queen. p. 137
Laurence to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of
1 November was put aboard the British Queen at Portsmouth on
2 November. Transmits master's receipt. [Receipt not at this
place. See postscript to Stephen to Maberly. 1 November,
above.] p. 136
Maberly to Stephen. States that the bag of despatches for
H.M. agent at New York which accompanied letter of 15 November
was put aboard the Liverpool at Liverpool on 16 November. Transmits receipt. p. 138
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by Robert Cranford, officer in charge of letter
bags on the Liverpool. p. 139 Q. 267
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for       1839
ILM. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of December 9,
6 December was put aboard the England at Liverpool on 7 December. o£PlPo"t
Transmits master's receipt. p. 140
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by B. L. Waite.
p. 141
Laurence to Stephen.    States that the bag of despatches for December 26,
H.M. agent for packets at New York which accompanied letter of officTaPost
23 December was put aboard the Patrick Henry at Liverpool on
25 December.    Transmits master's receipt. p. 142
Enclosed:
Receipt signed by J. C. Delaus. p. 143
T. W. Moore, Packet Agent, New York
Thomas William Moore [H.M. agent for packets at New York] January 1,
to Stephen.    States that, following instructions, the despatches which HJtfa^mt
accompanied letter of 24 November, 1838 will be sent by special N^york'
messengers to Sir John Colborne at Montreal and to Sir George
Arthur at Toronto tomorrow morning. p. 145
Moore to Stephen.    Acknowledges letter of 30 November.   Bags January 7,
of despatches for Colborne and Arthur were forwarded by special   gents    ce'
messengers this morning.    They also took the despatches that came
in care of H.M. Consul here. p. 146
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards bag containing seven despatches January 7,
from Arthur, four from himself, one of which encloses a letter for NewYork.06'
Durham, and one parcel for Durham. p. 147
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards, according to Col. G. Couper's January 7,
instructions, a packet for Durham containing three parcels.    Also N^yo?®08*
sends a letter for Durham for forwarding. p. 148
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards bag containing despatches from januarj
Colborne, and also from R. I. Routh [Commissary General] to the Agent'B
Commissariat.    Forwarded despatches from Upper Canada on 13
January, but the bag expected will not likely arrive on time.       p. 149
Moore to Stephen.    States that a bag of despatches from Toronto JjggJ
was delayed at Queenston and arrived only yesterday.    Forwards it,
and another from Toronto, this morning, together with a letter from
J. Joseph,  Toronto.    Fears Colborne's despatches will not arrive
in time. P- 150
Moore to  Stephen,
despatches, also
Harvey.
Forwards today one bag of  Colborne's £^™£0mce
despatch from him and a despatch from
P151
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards three despatches from Arthur. i
Lord Alexander with despatches from Colborne will likely proceed
by the George Washington today. P- lbZ PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q- 267
Moore to Stephen. Forwards this day a despatch from Sir John
Harvey and private letters from Colborne. p. 154
Moore to Stephen. Forwards three bags of despatches and
five duplicate despatches from Arthur. Refers Stephen to Col.
G. Couper for an explanation of the reasons why Moore was selected
to receive and forward Canadian despatches. p. 153
Moore to Col. G. Couper [Military Secretary]. Describes
the difference of opinion between himself and H.M. Consul at New
York with reference to the responsibility for forwarding Canadian
despatches through New York. Recalls his long service. Postscript by Couper expressing Durham's satisfaction with Moore's
services. P- 155
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today two bags from Arthur,
one apparently containing books, the other despatches Nos. 16 to 33,
inclusive, also several duplicates from Arthur, and a despatch from
Harvey brought by messenger. p. 158
Moore to Stephe)
from Arthur.
Forwards today three bags and one parcel
p. 160
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today duplicates of despatches
Nos. 34 to 39, inclusive from Arthur. p. 161
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today from Arthur a bag said to
contain despatches Nos. 47, 48, and 49, and one private; also duplicates of Nos. 40, and 42 to 46, inclusive, together with a private one
from Hon. John Macaulay. p. 162
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today from Arthur a bag of
despatches said to contain Nos. 50 to 53, inclusive; also five duplicate
despatches. p. 163
Moore to Stephen. States that he forwarded a bag of despatches
and four duplicates from Arthur yesterday and a duplicate of No. 50
today. p. 165
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from
Colborne; another from Arthur and duplicates from Arthur.     p. 164
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a despatch from Harvey
marked immediate; four from Arthur and a bag from Colborne. p. 166
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today two bags of despatches and
certain duplicates from Arthur and one bag from Colborne.       p. 167
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a despatch from Harvey.
p. 169
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches and a
despatch from Arthur, together with certain duplicates. p. 170,
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today five bags of despatches
from Arthur, together with certain duplicates;   also two bags of Q- 2»7 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
despatches from Colborne in the care of Major C. F. Head.   He also
carries a box containing ordinances. p. 171
Moore   to
Stephen.    Forwards   today   two   despatches   from 1
Harvey brought by messenger.
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a be
Colborne. Also sends a letter for Major
forwarded.
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a be
Arthur.
p. 173 A
g of despatches from *
C.   F.   Head  to  be *
p. 174
g of despatches from J.
p. 175
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today one bag of despatches from ]
Colborne, three from Arthur, together with certain duplicates from '
Arthur and two despatches from Harvey. p. 176
Moore to Stephen.
Harvey.
Forwards today i
bag of despatches from ]
p. 178 "
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today five bags of despatches July 6,
from Arthur.    Two bags from Colborne have been given into the Agent'8 Offioe-
care of A. H. Armour who embarks today.    Despatches from the
Colonial Department which arrived on 30 June were immediately
forwarded by messengers. p. 180
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a bag of despatches from &^8 0ffice
Arthur, and a despatch from Harvey which missed the Liverpool, p. 181
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a despatch from Harvey Juiyjiy,
with a copy of Harvey's secretary's letter, a copy of Stephen's order A8ent'8I°ffice'-
for forwarding despatches, and a certificate of exchange rates.   Hopes
his bill of exchange of 18 July for £173.9.2 sterling may be approved, p. 182
Enclosed:
(1) T. W. Murray [Secretary to Harvey] to Moore, Fredericton,
8 July, enclosing Harvey's certificate of the delivery of despatches
by special messenger, but stating that Harvey was unaware that
authority had been given for such a method of delivery. Moore's
nephew has given in Moore's receipts for $841 for the expenses of five
special messengers. P- 184
Sub-enclosure:
Certificate by Harvey stating that the services mentioned in
Moore's account of 30 June were duly performed. p. 187
(2) Receipt by Moore for $841 advanced by Harvey in accordance with the accompanying account of Harvey with Moore for
delivery of despatches in the quarter ending 30 June, 1839. p. 186
(3) Stephen to Moore, 29 April. Asking that enclosed despatches
be delivered by special messengers. P- 188
(4) Certificate of exchange rates by Tooker, Mead & Co., dated
New York, 18 July, 1839. P- 189 1839
August 1,
Agent's Office
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q- 267
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today three bags of despatches
from Arthur and one made up by himself containing a packet and
three despatches from Arthur, a duplicate from Harvey, and a letter
from Stephen. P> 192
Moore to Stephen. Explains that by Harvey's direction he drew
on the Colonial Department for £172.9.2 to meet expenses incurred
in special delivery of New Brunswick despatches. p. 194
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from
Colborne which had been intended for the British Queen p. 196
, Unsigned to Moore.    [Draft.]    Regrets the precipitancy with
which Moore drew on the Colonial Department for expenses of
delivering despatches to New Brunswick by special messenger. The
draft will have to be protested and Harvey must be asked to meet
the charge. p. 190
Moore  to  Stephen,
borne.
Forwards  despatch,   private,   from   Col-
p. 197
fcXSafbept.] Stephen to Moore.    [Signed draft.]    States, with reference to
Moore's letter of 1 August, that the matter had already been dealt
with in Stephen's previous letter of 13 August. p. 195
AgraVso'ffice Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today two bags of despatches
from Colborne, two from Arthur, one despatch from Arthur containing the enclosures belonging to No. 176; and two despatches, one of
which is marked duplicate, from Harvey. p. 198
Agent's office. Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today three duplicate despatches
from Arthur. p. 199
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards
borne.
bag of despatches from Col-
p. 200
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a dispatch from Harvey, p. 201
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today two bags of despatches
from Colborne, one from Arthur, together with three duplicates from
Arthur, a letter from himself to Stephen, and one initialled G.M. p. 202
Moore to Stephen. Acknowledges letter of 13 August. Regrets
the inconvenience caused by following the suggestion of Harvey
that the cost of special messengers be borne by the Colonial Department, p. 204
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from
Colborne; one from Arthur, ten duplicates from Arthur; a despatch
from Harvey, and a despatch for Stephen from G.M. of
Toronto. p. 207
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from
Colborne, a separate despatch and a duplicate from Colborne; a
bag of despatches from Arthur and a despatch for Stephen from G.M.
p. 209 Q. 267
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a bag of despatches from       1839
Charles Poulett Thomson.    The Great Western arrived on 2 November November 7,
having taken just over fourteen days. p. 210        *
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from November u,
Thomson and one from Arthur; also a despatch from Thomson and Asent's0ffioe-
a letter from J. Joseph of Toronto. p. 211
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a bag of despatches from P*oetmbArJ'
each of the following: C. P. Thomson, Sir George Arthur, Lt.-Gen.   gentsUttloe-
Sir Richard D. Jackson;  also a despatch from Arthur and one from
J. Joseph of Toronto. p. 212
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards by the Cambridge despatches from December 2,
p. 213 1
j despatch from Jackson December 10,
Arthur listed marginally.
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today
[Administrator of Lower Canada in the absence of Thomson],   p. 214 i
Moore to Stephen. Forwards today a bag of despatches from December u,
each of the following: Thomson, Arthur and Jackson; also two des- A*ent'BOffico-
patches from J. Joseph. p. 215
Moore to Stephen.    Forwards today a bag of despatches from Agent^Qffice.
Thomson and four despatches from J. Joseph, of Toronto.    Also
transmits two copies of the President's message. p. 216
Extract from the Extra Sun of 26 December, 1839, containing the
message of President M. Van Buren to Congress. p. 217
Miscellaneous Offices
G. De B. Attwood to Glenelg.    Transmits application from the bTSbVa.,
bank's   directors   and   asks   an   early   appointment   for   a   deputa- London,
tion P-299
Enclosed:
Attwood to Glenelg, 17 January, 1839. Refers to a previous
letter of 2 June, 1837, requesting a Royal charter of incorporation and
Sir George Grey's reply of 10 June, 1837. Again urges such incorporation. P- 301
C. Claxton [of the Great Western Steamship Office] to Sir George January is
Grey.    States that sailing dates are advertised in the daily newspapers, g^gf?68    '
Grey will be informed of any alteration. P- 309
Charles Lechmere [Deputy Keeper] to Stephen.    Transmits, in gggSSt
accordance with Phillipps's instructions of 21 November, 1838, copies office.
of documents relating to the history of Georgia, 1735 to 1775, made
by C. W. Howard, agent for that state. P- 6l[)
.    Unsigned  to   Attwood.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges  letter   of   17^™
January.    Glenelg is willing to advise such incorporation if the form [cw—DwtJ
of charter can be made acceptable to Treasury and Board of lrade
Suggests that draft charter be presented. P- rfUU 16 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q- 267
1839 Sir George Grey [Under Secretary, C. O.] to Messrs. Hansard.
DowSn^st'     Refers to the unauthorized publication of Durham's Report.    Copies
owning   .     ^ ^e remainder of the appendix, except proof sheets, should not be
delivered without the Department's written order. p. 311
BankofBNA Attwood to Glenelg.    Quotes in full the letter of Major Thomas
Lomion. ' ' " Leigh Goldie [Civil Secretary] to the directors and manager of the
Bank of B.N.A., Montreal, 9 January, 1839. The directors are
preparing a draft charter as suggested in Grey's letter of 26 January.
Managers of the bank in Lower Canada have petitioned the Administrator against discrimination. p. 312
Bankofb.n.a., Attwood to Normanby.    States that a draft charter has now been
London. prepared and a copy sent to the Council Office.    Urges the need of
avoiding delay as explained in his previous letter of 19 February, p. 316
rcSoniai'Dept ] Unsigned to Baring. [Draft.] Transmits copy of a despatch,
No. 17 of 22 January, from Colborne on the Ordinance for incorporating the Bank of B.N.A., also the draft of a charter for that bank.
Normanby will instruct Colborne to accede to the request of the bank
for a delay in the repeal of the Ordinance, 1 Victoria, cap. 25, until the
Royal charter of incorporation is completed unless he will previously
have heard again from the Treasury. p. 318
G>S.t^estem Christopher Claxton to Normanby.    Requests payment of £50
BriSofhipCo" f°r having transported colonial despatches between New York and
Bristol. p. 321
WmSsL.}}        Unsigned to Claxton.      [Draft.]     States that any request for
remuneration for the transport of colonial despatches between New
and    Bristol    should    be    addressed    to    the    Postmaster
York
General.
Gr^TwStern Claxton to Stephen,
steamship Co.,  Western into dock.   Her
SSSl"8*"'   February, 1840.
p. 323
States that it is intended to put the Great
next probable date of sailing will be 15
p. 342
December 2
4 Whitehall
Place.
Col. William Rowan [Military Secretary] to the Under Secretary of
State for the Colonies. Transmits packets containing various acts,,
reports, and regulations, relating to the metropolitan police and the
constabulary of England and Ireland for use of the police recently
organized in Canada. p. 325
Index to correspondence of the Hudson's Bay Company; the
Post Office; H.M. Packet Agent at New York, and miscellaneous
offices, in Q. 267, with some indices repeated from Q. 266, pt. 2,
p- 356. p. 327
Series Q. Vol. 268, pt. 1
MISCELLANEOUS, 1839
T. Amiot [Clerk of the Crown in Chancery, L.C] to Lt.-Col.
C. Yorke. Draws attention to the rule which allows payment of
half salary to officers whose duties have ceased with the suspension
of the constitution of that province.    Mentions his services to the Q. 268, pt. 1 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 17
Government and the hardship that this loss would impose on him.       1839
Requests consideration.    [In French.] p. 8
Unsigned to Amiot.    [Draft.]    Declares that the Treasury has March 19.
authorized payment of half salary to officials during the suspension [ColonialDeptl
of the constitution of Lower Canada. p. 12
Amiot   to   Normanby.    Requests   extension   of   his    leave of April 2,
absence, p. 13 KbiSseU
Unsigned to Normanby.    [Draft.]    Grants extension of leave of
April 10.
[Colonial
absence until 1 July. p. 14 [C°loni(aDeP*i
Amiot to H. Labouchere [Under Secretary, CO.].    Requests that April 12,
the six months' arrears of his salary as clerk of the Crown in Chancery, puSe>,bRSseu
should be paid in England. p. 15 s<i-
[Labouchere] to Amiot.    Acknowledges receipt of letter of 12 [ojonki Dept j
April.    Regrets that there is no fund from which the arrears of salary
could be met in England. p. 16
Amiot to Labouchere.    Requests extension of his leave of absence, 3v%lh
until 1 September.    Offers to take charge of despatches when he piaee. urn
returns to Lower Canada. p. 70
Unsigned  to  Amiot.    [Draft.]    Grants  extension  of  leave  of [cKm Dept.]
absence and accepts offer to take charge of despatches. p. 71
W.  H.  Anderson to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State], ^^f*^
Transmits copy of a correspondence respecting the claim of his brother Tyne.
to the Queen's Plate, won at Quebec in 1838. p. 76
Enclosed:
(1) Anderson to Earl of Durham, Newcastle, 23 November,
1839. States the difficulties which his brother has met with. Requests to be informed as to the proper channel for the application. P- 78
(2) Durham to Anderson, Lambton Castle, 7 December, 1839.
Acknowledges receipt of letter. States that he has represented the
correctness of the claim to the Colonial Office. p. 79
Unsigned to A. Y. Spearman [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury]. D&tj^J^Dept.i
[Draft.]    States the circumstances under which the purse, won by
Anderson,   was  offered.    Requests  that  the  Treasury  will  make
provision  for  payment.    Orders  have  been  given  to  discontinue
this expense. P- °"
Unsigned to Anderson.    [Draft.]    States that application for gSJ3lJr1&tj
payment of the Queen's Plate should be made to the Government of
Lower Canada.    [See also Q. 269, pt. 1, p. 76: R. Harrison & Co.,
under date of 3 August.] P- 82
Anonymous [Sr. Mary] to Secretary of State, or Under Secretary. Sg*^.
Offers his services as an agent to spy out intrigues m British North
America. P' 18 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 268, pt. 1
1839 A. H. Armour to Under Secretary.    Reports that he is about to
Ootober 3,       return to Canada and offers to take charge of despatches. p. 72
London.
tc^oDn1ai1r>e t Unsigned   to   Armour.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges   letter   of   3
eP .j Qctoker    should Russell have despatches to transmit in Armour's
care, they will be placed in his hands at Bristol. p. 73
[ffiafbept.] Unsigned to C P. Thomson [Governor-in-Chief], No. 23.  [Draft.]
Requests that an inquiry be made respecting the whereabouts of
Rev. Auguste Vilain. A certificate should be sent if Vilain is
dead.' p. 74
Walton2, John Atkins & Son to Stephen.    Request that the Admiralty
should be notified that Hale has been appointed Receiver General.
State that they are Hale's agents. p. 75
DurtSm31, Memorial of Joseph Atkinson, late sergeant of the 49th Regiment,
praying for a grant of land or a pension. p. 83
(1) Recommendation of Atkinson, signed by Rev. G. M. Ross,
Rector of St. George's, Drummondville, 20 September, 1839.     p. 90
(2) Recommendation of Atkinson, signed by James Brady, J.P.,
Durham, Eastern Townships, 18 October, 1839. p. 90
(3) Col. W. Rowan [Military Secretary] to Atkinson, Montreal,
15 December. Regrets that Atkinson's memorial cannot be complied
with. p. 91
(4) G. J. Pennington [for the Secretary] to Atkinson, Treasury,
9 July, 1839. States that Atkinson should present his memorial to
the Colonial Department. p. 92
rcSioSafrjI't l Unsigned   to   C   P.   Thomson   [Governor   General].    [Draft.]
Orders that Atkinson be informed that, as his claim is founded on the
refusal of his commanding officer to grant his discharge, his complaint
should be made to the military authorities. p. 93
fi^Xh12' Mrs.  Martha Attrill to Sir George Grey [Under Secretary].
Road- Requests to be informed as to whether the lands owned by Lt. Pur-
chese could be made over to her, in payment of a debt. p. 4
Frt>ruary27. H. Labouchere [Under Secretary] to M. Attrill.    Acknowledges
oma   ept.] iefter 0f 12 February.    Existing regulations prevent the transfer of
land except by an individual who has resided on it for two years,   p. 6
NoDate [G. Auldjo].    Suggestions for the Legislative Union and Govern
ment of the Canadas.    (Signed X.) p. 17
June 8,
Education
G. E. Futvoye to Normanby.   Transmits a
Buller].
[for C.
p. 69 Q. 268, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
B
T. Blackwood to Lord Glenelg [Secretary of State].    Transmits a January u,
copy of a pamphlet which was printed for distribution and not for Montreal-
sale, dealing with the affairs of Canada.    Makes further suggestions.
Sends also an address by Rev. John Cook.    [Pamphlet not at this
place.] p. 95
Enclosed:
Address of the Rev. John Cook, D.D. [Moderator] to the Congregations of the Synod of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, in
connection with the Church of Scotland. Deals with the relation
between religion and politics, and urges that steps be taken to remove
ecclesiastical grievances. p. 99
[Normanby] to Lt.-Gen. Sir John Colborne [Governor-in-Chief], March 7.
No. 10.    [Draft.]   States that he has received a communication from [ColonialDeptl
Blackwood, and directs that thanks be conveyed to him. p. Ill
C. Buller to Stephen.    Requests to be informed as to the amount February 20,
of salary due to him as Chief Secretary to Lord Durham. p. 112 p§ceen quare
Stephen to Buller.    Informs Buller that he must settle the ^"^office
question of his salary with  Lord  Durham.    Offers to return his     oma
letter. p. 113
Lieut. John W. Baird to Glenelg.    Offers to carry despatches to APri
Canada.    States that he intends to sail on the Liverpool.
Bellfield House,
1 h .   uenneia no
p.  114 Kilmarnock.
Unsigned to Baird.    Requests him to call at the Colonial Office April 10.
prior to departure, in order to ascertain whether there are despatches iColoIual De^
to be carried to Canada. p. 115
W. Badgley [Secretary of the Montreal Constitutional Associa- April 12,
tion] to Marquis of Normanby [Secretary of State].    Transmits the Montreal,
draft of a bill for the legislative union of the Canadas, which he
prepared for the Constitutional Society and which has been approved
by that body. | P- H6
Enclosed:
(1) Abstract of Union Bill. P- H7
(2) Draft of Bill. P- 12»
Series Q. Vol. 268, pt. 2
MISCELLANEOUS, 1839
B—Continued
Continuation of Draft of Bill.    [See Q. 268, pt. 1, p. 126.]   p. 200
Baird to Normanby.    States that private affairs will detain him April
in England so that he will not be able to sail at the time statedintos
letter of 2 April.
p. 223 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 268, pt. 2
1839 P. Margaret Smith [per James Baird] to Stephen.    States that
wS-'officB*""*ke account f°r nve years subscription to the Morning Courier was
raw. ce'   presented by James Davies to the Colonial Office and refused until
it should be  countersigned.    Declares that the account bore his
signature.    Is prepared to send attested account. p. 239
Unsigned to -
Morning Courier had
should be made to the source from which such sub
paid hitherto.
Declares that no order for the
ed from the Colonial Office.    Application
ription has been
p. 240
July IS
2Hyd
Lt.-Col. H. W. Barnard to 	
remuneration   for    expenses   incurred
patches
     Requests £7
transmission    of   des-
p. 228
5 Unsigned to Barnard.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 12 July,
and states that this claim will be paid. p. 229
Memorial   of  Henry   Bayly   praying  for
Canada.
free   passage   to
.230
IPoKdiabcpt. Unsigned to Bayly.    .
his request for a free passage.
[Draft.]   Regrets inability to comply with
ige. p. 238
October 2
12 Gray's
Henry Batley to Under Secretary. Requests information as to
the addresses of A. K. Johnstone formerly of Montreal; Harper,
formerly of St. Kitts; and Watts, formerly of the consular service at
Pernambuco. p. 244
lrffiSter E- B6dard [Judge] to Lord Glenelg [Secretary of State].    [Pri-
Buiidings,        vate.]   States that the purpose for which he requested an interview
on on' was to express his desire to visit Europe as soon as the question of the
Lower Canada judges shall have been decided.    Requests a prompt
decision.    Asks pardon for any inadvertent neglect of regulations.
[In French.] p. 247
i6MluiohMter Bedard to Glenelg.    Defends his conduct as a judge, and that
Buildings,        of P. Panet, in refusing to sanction writs of habeas corpus in the case
of John Teed.    Discusses the question of the suspension of Lower
Canada judges.    [In French.]
Attached:
(1) P. Panet [Judge] to BSdard, Quebec, 5 December, 1838.
Empowers Bedard to act in his interest.    [In French.] p. 260
p. 248
(2) Law Intelligence.
November, 1838.
The Habeas Corpus case,  Quebec, 20
p. 262
15 Manchester
Buildings,
London.
Bedard to Glenelg.    Transmits printed copy of the report on the
case of John Teed.   This was omitted by accident.   [In French.] p. 316
Unsigned   to   Bedard.    [Draft.]    Requests   that   any   further
1 explanation which Bedard wishes to make, should be sent with the
least possible delay, in order that a decision can be made on the case
of the judges. p. 311 Q. 268, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Bedard to Grey. Acknowledges receipt of letter of 26 January, 18
and gives further explanations regarding the conduct of the Lower ifSP*!
Canada judges.    [In French.] D 317 BUiid£»
^ London.
Unsigned to Bedard. [Draft.] Transmits documents sent to Febmarj
Glenelg by Colborne, explaining the grounds upon which the Lower [Colomal
Canada judges were suspended. p. 325
Bedard to Grey. Acknowledges communication. Draws atten- Febmarj
tion to his change of address.    [In French.] p. 326 st.Bucld
Bedard to Normanby. Reviews the conduct of the Lower Februarj
Canada judges and defends their motives and decisions. [In piMeblu
French.] p. 327
Appendix.    [Continued in Q. 268, pt. 3, p. 391.] p. 376
Normanby to Bedard.    States that the papers before him have March21
vindicated the conduct of the Lower Canada judges, although he tColomaI
cannot agree with their interpretation of the law.    The judges will
receive full salary pending the final decision upon their case.     p. 313
Jane Bryan to Normanby. Requests that an enquiry be made ^"^j8*6
in Canada as to the whereabouts of her daughter Mary Dixon, or u ,n'
Dickson. p. 241
Unsigned to J. Bryan,
be made.
[Draft.]
States that an enquiry will f
p. 243 L
C. W. Burdett to Normanby.    Offers suggestions for the conduct gj
of war with the United States which he regards as inevitable.    Urges, c«ytan!
in particular, that freedom should be proclaimed for the negroes, who
should be armed. P- 224
bo.
Series Q. Vol. 268, pt. 3
MISCELLANEOUS, 1839
B—Continued
Continutation of Appendix, Bedard to Normanby, February 20.
[See Q. 268, pt. 2, p. 376.] P- 391
J. Buchanan [British Consul at New York] to J. Stephen [Under g£H£
Secretary,  CO.].    Acknowledges a despatch which has been for- NewYork.
warded to Colborne, via Kingston, in consequence of the rebels
assembling at Swanton. .   P- 41°
Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne Jg-gg,
and Arthur.    States that these have been forwarded. p. 4i» NewYork.
Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Lower and g-jgu.
Upper Canada.    States that these have been forwarded. p. 4^u NewYork. 22 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 268, pt. 3
1839 Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne
conlXte13,     anc*  Arthur-    States that they have been  forwarded.    Expresses
NewYori.      thanks for the return to the system whereby despatches are sent
through the Consulate.    Requests that this be continued.    States
that an outrage has been committed on the Vermont frontier,    p. 421
February 20, Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne
Nw'YOTk.      and Arthur.    States that these have been forwarded. p. 425
February 2i, Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne
NewYork.      and Arthur.    States that these have been forwarded. p. 426
February 26, Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne
NwTYwrk.      and Arthur.    States that these will be forwarded together with a
letter for Colborne. p. 427
Buchanan to Stephen.    Acknowledges despatches for Colborne
and Arthur.    States that these have been forwarded. p. 428
Buchanan to Stephen.   Acknowledges despatches for Colborne,
Arthur, and Harvey.    States that these have been forwarded,    p. 429
Aprill,
New York.
April 16,
Consulate,
New York.
[(Si
lw . Unsigned to Buchanan.    [Draft.]   States that the change in the
ep    system of conveying despatches was adopted at the request of Durham,
and was not intended to reflect upon Buchanan.   As Arthur has
made a similar request, despatches for the future will be transmitted
by Moore. p. 423
Buchanan to Stephen. Acknowledges despatches for Colborne,
Arthur, and Harvey.    States that these have been forwarded,    p. 430
Buchanan to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State]. Expresses
his views on Canadian affairs. States that if allowed leave of absence
he would bring important matters before the Colonial Office.      p. 431
May 7,
Consulate,
New York.
September 3(
Consulate,
New York.
Copy of a printed letter to the Earl of Durham, published
1838. p. 444
. Unsigned to Buchanan.    [Draft.]    Expresses thanks for letter
of 30 September. p. 460
Unsigned to Stephen. [Draft.] Complains that despatches from
the Colonial Office are no longer forwarded through the British
Consulate. p. 461
W. Chekley to Stephen. Reports that enquiries have been made
for his sister. Believes that it is possible that property has been left
to her in Canada. Enquiries as to the whereabouts of Sir John
Coffin. p. 468
John Christopher to Normanby. States that his connection with
overseas trade has given him considerable experience in colonial
matters. Urges, with respect to Jamaica, that an act should be
passed providing that a contumacious colony should be treated as a
foreign country for purposes of trade. p. 475 Q. 268, pt. 3
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
W. Copland, to W. Withers.    [See below, Q. :
Withers, under date of 1 March.]
pt. 2;   W.
Col. G. Couper to H. Labouchere [Under Secretary].    Transmits April 25,
a corrected account.    [Enclosure not at this place.]     j p. 473 cleveland Row-
Couper to Grey.    Explains items included under the heading April 26.
"Miscellaneous" in Lord Durham's accounts. p. 474
Cox & Co. to Grey.    Transmit receipt for expenses incurred by January 1,
Ensign W. H. F. Cavendish in bringing despatches to England,   p. 463 CraigsCourt'
Enclosed:
(1) Receipt, New York, 3 October, 1838.
p. 464
(2) Statement by Great Western Company, 35 Princess St.,
17 October, 1838. p. 465
Unsigned to Cox & Co.    [Draft.]   States that the expenses of January 17.
Cavendish will be paid.
p. 466 l
George Coventry to Glenelg.    Offers to  carry despatches to January 23,
lada. p>467 Lombards
E. Craggs to Marquis of Normanby [Secretary of State].   States March 19,
his services in Canada, and applies for a free passage.
p. 471 l
E. Craggs to Secretary of State.   States his services in Canada, ^s"8*1-
and requests payment. p. 478
Unsigned to Craggs.    [Draft.]    Refers Craggs to the Govenor August is.
General. p. 480 tcaoB,alDe,tJ
A. Delisser to Labouchere.    Transmits a correspondence respect- J^^p^
ing  his   claim   to   Bona venture   Island,   and  requests   compensa- Russeiisq.
tion. P- 497
Enclosed:
(1) Grey to Messrs. Delisser and Crawford, Downing St., 23
March, 1837. Requests that communications should be made in
writing. P- ^99
(2) Grey to Delisser, Downing St., 10 November, 1837. Requests that points to be raised should be communicated in writi?g-
[For further enclosures see Q. 242.] P- 5°1
Unsigned to A. Delisser.    [Draft.l   Acknowledges letter of 12 J»»&iDipt.i
June.    States that as the matter has already been decided by Glenelg,
Normanby declines to re-open it. P- 5Ud
Delisser to Labouchere.   Acknowledges letter of 20 June.   Denies {■£«£„»„,
that a final decision was given on his case. P- &u* Russeus,. PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 268, pt. 3
1839 Unsigned to Delisser.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 24 June.
fcV- id      Declares that the last letter of the correspondence with Grey had
ra ep J requested that if any legal points were raised by Delisser, they would
be considered by the law officers. As no answer had been made it
was considered that the case was closed. Should Delisser supply
them now, reference will be made. P- 507 .
July 12, Delisser to Labouchere.    Acknowledges letter of 5 July.    Raises
iSbifsqlace' points   of   law   in   connection   with   his   claim   to   Bonaventure
Island. P- 508
July 23. Unsigned to Delisser.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges letter of 12 July.
[Colonial Dept.) gtatgS tnat trie legal points submitted by Delisser are not such as
should be referred to the law officers. They should be determined
in the Canadian courts. p. 512
July 29, Delisser to Labouchere.    Acknowledges letter of 23 July.   States
Ru?seusqlaC6' his disappointment  and the hardship  wrought upon his family.
Requests that his case be reconsidered. p. 513
August 3. Unsigned to Delisser.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges letter of 29 July.
[Colonial Dept.] states that application for redress of any wrong of this nature should
be made to the local legislature. p. 519
August 12, Delisser   to   Labouchere.    Acknowledges  letter  of  3   August.
Rus°seusq.ace' Reiterates the legal question which he would like to have referred to
the law officers. States that an able legal functionary in Canada has
given his opinion that Delisser's case is strong. p. 521
Unsigned to Delisser. [Draft.] Acknowledges letter of 26
August. States that as Delisser has obtained a legal opinion in his
favour, Normanby will instruct the Governor to take the opinion of
the law officers in Canada. It will be necessary to submit the opinion
which Delisser has received. p. 527
o)Ul?stif2'dst ^' ^" Devereaux to Marquis of Normanby [Secretary of State.]
Portman°sq. " Offers his services in connection with Canadian affairs. p. 493
Enclosed:
Grey to Devereaux, 10 January, 1839. Declines Devereaux's
offer to be of service in Canada. p. 494
[CoSafDe t Unsigned to Devereaux.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 12
eP .j ^ugug^ states that Normanby has no need for his services.       p. 495
MA^tusst ^' Deykes to Lord Glenelg [Secretary of State].    Offers hill
Regents Park.'' services in connection with the case of the Canadian prisoners,    p. 486
maSJs'st Deykes to Glenelg.    States that his communication of 31 January,
Regent's Park!' has been sent to Lord John Russell. p. 488
Mary Dickson to Glenelg.    Wishes to be informed as to whether
p. 491
B
Mile End grants of land are given in Canada.
[CoEriaWt Unsigned to Mrs. Dickson.    [Draft.]    States that free grants of
s     " land are no longer made in North America. p. 492 Q. 268, pt. 3
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Sir John Doratt [Physician to Durham] to Grey. Requests to 1839
be informed as to whom he should apply for his salary as arranged by Februarys,
Lord Durham. p. 489 HoSl
Unsigned to Doratt.    [Draft.]    States that there is no informa- February 9.
tion respecting his appointment, in the Colonial Office.    One reference [Colonial Dept-1
has been found, but there is no mention of a salary. p. 490
A. G. Douglas to Grey. Acknowledges letter of 8 January. January 28,
Gives further explanation regarding his complaint against the Govern- LaButte-
ment. p. 482
Unsigned to Douglas.    [Draft.]   States that a Special Com- February 26.
mittee of the Assembly has investigated Douglas's claim.  Normanby [Colomal Dept-]
sees no reason to question the justice of the Committee's decision.
Redress for complaints against officers should be found at law.    p. 484
E
George E. Ellis to Stephen.    Transmits a list of papers relating April
to New England, previous to 1670.    Requests permission to copy
these. p. 530
Enclosed:
List.
.531
Memorial of John Findlater [Assistant Adjutant, Paymaster, A^t19-
and Quarter Master of the late Royal East Perth Militia] praying      ey'
for half pay or a grant of lands in Canada. p. 537
(1) Findlater to Secretary at War, Stanley, 31 July, 1839.
States his claims.      • P- 540
(2) Sulivan to Findlater, War Office, 8 August, 1839. States
that applications for land must be made to the Colonial Department. P- 544
(3) Certified Copies of testimonials as to the service of Find-
later. P- 546
Unsigned to  Findlater.  [Draft.]   Regrets that claims due in jggmbere.
England cannot be met by giving grants of land in Canada.     p. 5ol
W. Fitzpatrick to Normanby.    Transmits copy of a letter con- juiy 9
cerning Capt. John Fitzpatrick.    Requests that a search be made for
the registration of lands in Canada, owned by Fitzpatrick. p. 5d4
Enclosed:
L. Sulivan [Deputy Secretary at War] to W. Fitzpatrick, War
Office, 30 June, 1837. Gives a statement of the military services of
Capt. John Fitzpatrick. p- 0dD No date,
42 Faith St.,
Soho Sq.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 268, pt. 3
Fitzpatrick to Secretary of State. Requests information as to
the proper person, in Lower Canada, to whom application should be
made relative to land granted to Capt. John Fitzpatrick. p. 562
Unsigned  to   Fitzpatrick.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges  receipt   of
1 letter of 26 September, and states that application for information
regarding land owned by Capt. J. Fitzpatrick, should be made to the
Commissioners of Crown Lands or to the Surveyor General.      p. 563
M. A. Fox to Under Secretary. Requests information respecting
the death of Governor [sic] Gugy, at Quebec. p. 533
pecemberi8, Col. Hon. Charles Gore to Stephen.    [Private].    Requests, at
piacelte the direction of Lord John Russell, a copy of the Union Resolutions.
Intends to send them to the Chronicle. p. 572
GoX526' Earl of Gosford to Glenelg [Secretary of State].    Recommends
Judge E. Bedard. p. 565
nLime st. B- G- F- Gray t0 Normanby.    States that Brian O'Hara, who
has established a mercantile house in Puerto Rico, wishes to be
appointed consul at that place. p. 567
fciSoniai Dept.] Unsigned to Gray.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges letter of 10 July.
States that applications for appointment of consuls should be made
to the Foreign Office. p. 569
November 2i, Henry Grece to Normanby.    States that the Grenville Canal
eiga ' was made through his father's property and requests compensa
tion, p. 570
Series Q. Vol. 269, pt. 1
MISCELLANEOUS, 1839
H
James Hackett to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State]. Transmits papers showing his services to the Government. States his
failure as an agriculturalist. Requests an appointment, or that he be
recommended to Thomson for any suitable vacancy that may occur.
He is a Justice of the Peace, and has commanded a troop of volunteer
cavalry. p. 61
Enclosed:
Sir George Grey [Under Secretary] to Hackett, Downing St., 27
February, 1836. States that land cannot be given to Hackett on the
grounds of militia service, but furnishes him with a copy of a letter
from Lt.-Gen. Sir Benjamin D'Urban, relating Hackett's services in
British Guiana. p. 65
Sub-enclosure:
D'Urban to Hackett, Portsmouth, 10 November, 1833. p. 66 Q. 269, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Major G. D. Hall to Secretary of State.    Requests payment of       1839
his expenses from Bristol to London, as bearer of despatches from "f?'20A, t
Canada. p. 3     London      '
Unsigned to Hall.    [Draft.]   States that payment will be made May u.
on application to the senior clerk. p. 4 t001""*1 DePt-l
Hall to J. Stephen [Under Secretary of State]. Requests an September ie,
allowance for his passage to Canada to assume the duties of Military L club-
Secretary. p. 12
Unsigned to A. Y. Spearman [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury], September 19.
immediate.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Hall's letter of 16 September [Colomal Deptl
and requests that it should be complied with.    [Enclosure not at this
place.] p. 13
Hall to J. Stephen [Under Secretary]. Acknowledges receipt sep^beru,
of despatches which are to be taken to Canada. p. 50  '
George Hardy to Russell. Requests a copy of a Parliamentary November 19,
Report on Canada. p. 58 hJJSSE*
Unsigned to Hardy. [Draft.] States that the Parliamentary November26.
Reports can be purchased. p. 60    oom     ep
R. Harrison & Co. to Marquis of Normanby [Secretary of State]. [Augusts.]
Transmit certificate for the Queen's Plate of 50 guineas, won by Mr.
Anderson's   mare  in   1838,   at   Quebec.     [Enclosure   not   at  this
place.] p. 7
Unsigned to Durham.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of the certi- [cSSdi8beptj
ficate for the Queen's Plate, received from Harrison & Co.   Request
information regarding this prize.    [Enclosure not this place.] p. 8
R. Harrison & Co. to Normanby.   Transmit copy of a letter ^Jg8*21'
addressed to Normanby on 3 August, to which no reply has been
received.    State that they desire information as to where they should
apply for the money.    [See above.] P- 9
R. Harrison & Co. to Normanby.   Request reply to letter of A8^y*;Lane
3 August.    State that they had made application to the Master of
of the Horse who had referred them to Normanby.    [See also Q. 268,
p. 76, W. H. Anderson, under date of 9 December.] p. H
A. W. Hart to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State]. Recites November is,
the hardships to which his father, Benjamin Hart, is exposed on the
grounds that he is a Jew.    Requests that an enquiry should be made
as to why Hart has been refused advancement. P- 51
' [Russell] to C. P. Thomson [Governor in Chief], No. 42.   [graft.] g&Efo&j
Transmits copy of Hart's letter of 18 November, and requests Thomson's observations thereon.    [See above.] P- 0/
Unsigned to Hart. [Draft.] Acknowledges receipt of letter of
18 November, and states that it has been referred to the k0™"10^
General. p'
[Colonial Dept.] 28 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269, pt. 1
1839 Major C F. Head to Normanby [Secretary of State].    Requests
iifredhouse    payment of his expenses as bearer of despatches from Canada.     p. 5
Clapham.
juiy i. Unsigned to Head.   [Draft.]   States that payment will be made
[Colonial DePt.i Qn appijcation to the senior clerk. p. 6
Sept
Alfred House,
Claphi
lxr1' Head to Russell.    Transmits a letter dealing with emigration,
which was addressed to Normanby but which never reached its
destination. P- I4
Enclosed:
Head to Normanby, Clapham, 3 July. Suggests a scheme
whereby the Government would advance money for public works.
Those who undertake the work must bring out one emigrant family
for every £30 or £40 expended. p. 17
Unsigned to Head.    [Draft.] Acknowledges receipt of com
munication respecting emigration. p. 16
Remarks on the Frontier, to accompany a report and survey
made for Lt.-Gen. Sir John Colborne by Major C F. Head. This is a
series of observations upon the Eastern Townships. p. 31
[Colonial Dept.]
November 16,
Great Holwell,
Broomfield.
December 12,
Great Holwell,
Broomfield.
John Jefferys to Under Secretaries, Colonial Office. Wishes to
be informed as to whether the Laird of MacNab is in England.
States that MacNab had promised him assistance in procuring a
grant of Allumette Island. p. 70
Jdhn Jefferys to R. Vernon Smith [Under Secretary].
i grant of Allumette Island.
Applies for
Unsigned to Jefferys. [Draft.] States that Jefferys cannot
obtain a lease of Allumette Island under the Great Seal of
England. p. 72
James H. Kerr to Col. Charles Yorke. Solicits Yorke's assistance
to obtain compensation for his father, who is said to have been
unjustly deprived of office. Transmits papers dealing with this
case. p. 74
Enclosed:
(1) Petition of J. H. Kerr to the House of Commons, Quebec,
20 October, 1836. With appendix and supplement. [Note. This
petition could not be received by the House of Commons because it
had been printed.] Reviews his case and requests an investigation. p. 78
Appendices to enclosure:
(a) Petition of Kerr to the Treasury, London, 10 March, 1834,
praying for payment of £4088.18.1. in compensation for fees lost as
a result of the abolition of the prize court. p. 95 Q. 269, pt. 1 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
(b i) Aylmer to Kerr, 19 November, 1831. [Not transcribed.
See Q. 211, p. 425.]
(b ii) Kerr to Aylmer, 20 November, 1831. [Not transcribed.
Q. 211, p. 426.]
(b iii) Aylmer to Kerr, 21 November, 1831. [Not transcribed.
See Q. 211, p. 427.]
(c) Statement that B. A. C Gugy examined a witness without the
presence of a member of the committee, 16 March, 1831. p. 104
(d) Kerr to G. Elliot, M.P., Blenheim Place, Edinburgh, 16
October, 1834. Complains of the hardship from which he
suffers. p. 105
(e i) R. W. Hay to Kerr, Downing St., 13 November, 1834.
Advises that Kerr should resign his seat on the bench in order to avoid
steps for his removal. p. 109
(e ii) Extract from the speech of Spring Rice, 9 March, 1835.
[Not transcribed.]
(f) Receipt of 12 March, 1834.    [Not transcribed.]
(g) Dalhousie to Aberdeen, Dalhousie Castle, 13 January, 1835.
[Not transcribed.    See Q. 242, pt. 4, p. 1026.]
Supplements to enclosure:
(i) Kerr to Gosford, Quebec, 22 October, 1836. Expresses surprise that his salary was not paid to 22 February, 1836, when Bedard
succeeded him. p. 114
(ii) Certificate of Perrault and Burroughs, 15 November, 1836.
[Not transcribed.    See Q. 242, pt. 4, p. 874.]
(iii) S. Walcott [Civil Secretary] to J. Kerr, Quebec, 24 October,
1836. Acknowledges letter to Gosford, of 22 October, and states
that as Kerr's tenure of his offices ended on 2 April, 1835, and 24
September, 1834, his salaries could not be paid beyond those
dates. p. 117
(iv) Observations on the case of Kerr, Quebec, December,
1836. p- 118
Enclosures—Continued:
(2) A short view of the case of J. H. Kerr. [Not transcribed.
See Q. 258, p. 84.]
(3) Extract of a report of a Committee of the Whole Council,
27 March, 1839. Recommends that a pension should be granted to
Kerr, in compensation for his long services and for his deprivation of
office. P- 122
J. H. Kerr to Normanby.    Transmits copy of letter addressed to j'
Glenelg, respecting the compensation awarded to the Holland family
for the expropriation of the Chateau garden at Quebec.   States that
he is acting as agent in this matter. P- 124 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 269, pt. 1
J. H. Kerr to Glenelg, Quebec, 12 November, 1838.
that Miss S. Holland's claim should be paid.
Requests
p. 126
W. Lloyd to Glenelg. Transmits a minute of the points alluded
to in an interview of the previous day. Expresses willingness to
submit a few points relative to emigration. p. 130
Minute of interview.    Report on the state of feeling, defence,
and roads in Canada. p. 131
wary 26. Unsigned to Lloyd.   [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 3 January.
[Colonial Dept.]   „,.        ,       &    , . . .   J      ,  .L . J ,. ° ,. -, oo
Glenelg would be pleased to receive suggestions on emigration,    p. loo
i2PaJi^'   i J- Lock to H. Labouchere [Under Secretary].    Transmits petition
u Aioemarle       rf R   Alexander p> 137
(1) Certificate of Major T. Austin, 8 February, 1839, as to the
truth of Alexander's statements. p. 138
(2) Petition of R. Alexander, Eastern Townships, 31 January,
1839, praying for compensation for his property which was destroyed
by fire during his absence on service with the troops. p. 139
Unsigned to Lock. [Draft.] Transmits copy of Normanby's
despatch to Colborne, respecting the case of Alexander. p. 142
[Normanby] to Colborne, No. 29, 30 April, 1839. [Draft.]
States that as Alexander's loss was not occasioned by his military service, it is impossible to grant compensation to him. p. 143
Marchu R. C. MacDonald [Paymaster, 30th Regiment] to Normanby.
xcca i y.   Qgers yg Services to raise upward of 800 Highlanders in the maritime
colonies, who could be employed in the event of disturbance over the
boundary line.    States that these people are descended from those
who emigrated with his father.    Encloses testimonial. p. 172
Enclosed:
Certificate from Lieut.-Gen. Eyre |
1745.    Service of Capt. J. MacDonald.
, London, 18 February,
p. 176
September 16, Mrs. J. Mackay to Russell.    Requests support for her memorial
avan' to the Queen. p. 179 Q. 269, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1
Unsigned to Mrs. Mackay.    [Draft.]    States that permission to       1839
commute her pension can only be obtained from the Secretary at September 27.
War.    No particular advantage will be given to her for the acquisition lColomal Dept]
of lands in Canada. p. igQ
Count Mandelsloh to Glenelg.    States that no information has January 26,
been received as a result of the communication between Glenelg and M S""16186*st-
Lower Canada, respecting property left to Charles Maysenholder, a
native of Wurtemberg.    Transmits a new application to the Attorney
General of Lower Canada, and requests that steps be taken to obtain
the property for the rightful owners. p. 150
Unsigned to Mandelsloh.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges letter of 21 January 31.
January, and states that application has been forwarded. p. 153 [Colomal Dept-]
Count Mandelsloh to Lord John Russell.    Draws attention to September 27,
previous enquiry respecting property inherited by Charles Maysen- BerkLy'sq.
holder, and requests that an enquiry should be instituted. p. 181
D. C. McCarthy to H. Labouchere [Under Secretary].    Requests May 1, Cork,
to be informed as to whether a decision has been reached, respecting
the disposal of lands in British North America and the encouragement
of emigration. p. 177
Col. Sir Duncan McDougall to Glenelg.    Refers to the death of Jam
John Hale, Receiver General of Lower Canada, and to a letter from ciui*
Sir Ronald Ferguson to Glenelg, 1836.    States that he would not
wish to accept the office of Receiver General if the Government have
any intention of bestowing it on Hale's son. p. 154
Sir Frederick Stovin to [Normanby].    Forwards a letter from K°gda^u'b
McDougall, respecting the office of Receiver General of Lower Canada.
[For enclosure see above, p. 154.] p. 155
raary 3C
itedSe)
letter of 30 January, and states that the choice of a Receiver General
for Lower Canada, will rest with Glenelg's successor in office.     p. 158
McDougall to Normanby.    Reviews his claims to consideration f^fgjfi,)8,
for the appointment of Receiver General of Lower Canada.       p. 156
McDougall to Normanby.    Offers his gratuitous services to com- ^g^jJk
mand militia in British North America.    States his experience,   p. 178
McDougall to Russell. Transmits copy of a memorandum which ggfgjgf."
was presented to Normanby in March last, respecting the proposed
union of Upper and Lower Canada and the need of systematic emigration, together with a representation from the London Highland
Destitution Relief Committee. Draws attention to the saving of
expense for defence which could be effected by emigration.       p. 184
Enclosed:
(1) Representation of the Highland Destitution Relief Committee, presented 26 June, 1839.     Urges assisted emigration.     p. 188
(2) Resolution of the Highland Destitution Relief Committee,
respecting presentation of the above representation, 26 June,
1839. P- 197 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269, pt. 1
1839              (3) Memorandum of McDougall, objecting to the proposed
union of the Canadas. P- 198
oembersi. "        Unsigned to McDougall.    [Draft.] Acknowledges letter of 17
,WDept) December. P-207
5 Gould St
London.
L. Moffatt to Sir George Grey [Under Secretary].    States that he
incurred an expense of £10 as bearer of despatches. p. 148
rc'ffijDeti Unsigned to Moffatt.    [Draft.]    States that payment will be
ooiu     ep .j ma(je on application to the senior clerk. p. 149
November 27, Lieut.-Col. T.  Moody, R.E., to Russell.    Solicits a letter of
Po^wde^MMs,    introduction to C P. Thomson, for his son, Lieut. H. C B. Moody,
Essex.       '    wno is proceeding to Canada. p. 182
No date. Viscount Morpeth to Glenelg.    Transmits letter from E.  B.
Roche, M.P. for Cork Co. p. 146
E. B. Roche to Morpeth, December 29, 1838. States that Baron
Frattelin, chief witness against the Russian Consul at Boston, is a
swindler. p. 147
Februt.
3 Wardi
Commoni
Hugh Murray to Labouchere.    Transmits a paper expressing his
Doctors   views on the government of British America.    These have occurred^
to him in course of preparing an extensive work on that colony,    p. 159
Enclosed:
Paper by Murray. p. 160
O
Januarys. Rev. T. Osgood to Glenelg.    Transmits an appeal from the
cierkenweu. " Friendly Union of Montreal. Regrets that an unfavourable account
of the missions has been given by the late Lieutenant-Governor of
Upper Canada. States that the Indians have received great benefit
from preacher and teachers. Declares that he travelled to England
with the Canadian prisoners and requests permission to visit them in
Liverpool prison. Requests an interview with the Queen, whose
assistance would be most beneficial to his project respecting seamen
and emigrants. p. 210
Enclosed:
'An Affectionate Appeal to Christians and Philanthropists, on
behalf of Canada, by the agent of the Friendly Union of Montreal."
Requests assistance to establish a place of worship for seamen and
emigrants, and to found schools of industry for destitute children, p. 212
January u. Unsigned to Osgood.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges receipt of letter
Colonial Dept.] 0f 5 january.    Permission to visit Canadian prisoners in Liverpool
prison must be obtained from the Home Secretary.    Glenelg cannot
promise to obtain an interview with the Queen. p. 216 Q. 269, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Osgood to Labouchere.    States the object of his mission to       1839
Canada.    Wishes an interview in order to urge plans for emigration ni^^Son'st
of destitute persons to Canada.    Fears the loss of those colonies, cierkenweu. "
unless steps are taken.    Declares that the Clergy Reserve question
demands   serious   consideration.     Transmits   papers   relating   to
Canada. p. 217
Enclosed:
(1) Testimonial signed by prominent persons, respecting the
agency of Rev. T. Osgood, Montreal, 12 September, 1838. p. 219
(2) Testimonial from J. J. Gurney, of Earlham, Montreal, 15
November, 1838. p. 222
(3) Resolution of the Friendly Union, Montreal, 16 October,
1838.    Appoint Rev. T. Osgood as agent. p. 222
(4) Certificate of Rev. T. Raffles, D.D., Liverpool, 22 December,
1838. Documents have been shown to ministers of religion and persons
connected with the Canada trade. p. 223
(5) Testimonial from Rev. R. Alder, Secretary of the Weslyan
Missionary Society, 77 Hatton Gardens, 3 January, 1839. p. 224
(6) Memorandum of Rev. T. Osgood, respecting his mission,
London, 28 January, 1839. p. 224
(7) Claims of Canada on the benevolence of the parent country, p. 227
(8) Canada protected, and the destitute assisted, signed Philanthropist, London, 4 February, 1839. p. 230
[For further enclosures see Q. 269, pt. 2.]
Series Q. Vol. 269, pt. 2
MISCELLANEOUS, 1839
O—Continued
The enclosures to the letter from Rev. T. Osgood to Labouchere,
27 February, 1839, are continued in this volume:
(9) A Plan for the Establishment of the British and Foreign
Relief Union. P- 233
(10) Constitution, regulations, resolutions and aims of the
Friendly Union for the suppression of vice and the promotion of
useful knowledge. P- 237
(11) Petition of Rev. T. Osgood to the Queen, London, February,
1839. Praying for patronage and assistance to the Friendly
Union.
.246
Unsigned to Osgood.    [Draft.]    States that the petition to the Mar,
Queen has been presented and was graciously received. p. /4y PUBLIC ARCHIVES
1839
March 16,
17 Red Lion St.
Clerkenwell.
March 22,
17 Red Lion St.
Clerkenwell.
Q. 269, pt. 2
Osgood to Labouchere [Under Secretary]. Enquires as to
whether any answer has been received to his petition to the Queen.
' Requests an interview with Normanby. Desires the support of
gentlemen connected with the Colonial Department, to further his
plans for schools of industry, and for emigration. Transmits
papers. P« 250
Enclosed:
Petition to the Legislature on behalf of the destitute, London,
22 February, 1839. P- 251
Osgood to Stephen.    Expresses thanks to Normanby for present-
' ing his petition.   Desires an interview with Normanby and with the
Queen. p. 254
Sets forth his ideas upon education and
p. 256
,        Unsigned to Osgood.   [Draft.]   Acknowledges receipt of letter |
of 30 March.   Normanby regrets that there is no fund from which
support can be given to the Friendly Union of Montreal. p. 262
Osgood to Normanby.   Expresses thanks for services rendered
to him.   Requests that Normanby will ask the Queen for some token I
of benevolence to the seamen's chapel.    States that the Friendly
Union is in debt and will have to give up its school of industry, unless*
aid is obtained in England. p. 263
The Friendly Union.   Account of its founding and its aims.
Testimonials.    [See also Q. 269, pt. 1, p. 218.] p. 265
Sionial Dept ]        Unsigned to Osgood.   [Draft.]   States that Normanby cannot
advise the Queen to grant .an interview to Osgood.   No funds are
n Red Lion st Osgood to Normanby.
clerkenwell.   ' religion in Canada.
April 18,
17 Red Lion St.,
Clerkenwell.
available to grant aid.
p. 269
?7CRedLionst.;        Osgood to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State].   States that
cierkenweii. " he has had no answer to his petition to the Queen.    Requests Russell's^
assistance.    Offers his sympathy on the death of the Duke of
Bedford. p. 270
An Appeal on behalf of Canada.    [Same as documents in Q. 269,
pt. 1, with further testimonials which are copied at this place.]    p. 272
rcXntanbtti Unsigned to Osgood.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges receipt of letter
eP .j Q£ gg October, and refers to the decision given by Normanby, as stated
in a letter of 23 April.
p. 278
i70Rldbionst., Osgood to Russell.    Asks permission to show his subscription
cierkenweii.   j book to Russell and to the Queen. p. 279
SoTSafDep't.] Unsigned to Osgood.    [Draft.]    Regrets that there is no fund
from which a subscription could be given. Application to the Queen
should be made to General Sir Henry Wheatley, Keeper of the Privy
Purse. p. 280 , pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Rev. H. Parsons to Secretary of State. States that J. Webber, November 7,
formerly a private in the 64th Foot, had commuted his pension for a Brid^ater
grant of land in Quebec. Webber returned to England and wishes to somerset. '
obtain full title to this land, in order to sell it. p. 292
Unsigned to Parsons.    [Draft.]   States that the application of November 20.
Webber cannot be complied with, as it would interfere with the land [Colonlal Dept-'
regulations. p. 293
Joseph Plimsoll to [Secretary of State].    Requests promotion for August9,
his son, who is in the medical service of the navy.    Gives copies of lorSm^elt.,
testimonials as to Plimsoll's ability and services.    Rejoices that a Montreal
new order of laws has been established for Canada.    Urges that encouragement be given to Irish emigration to Canada. p. 284
William and Sarah
to Secretary of State.   Request that April:
taken to Canada by the Children's Friend Society and apprenticed to
Capt. Fitzgibbon. p. 282
Unsigned to Colborne, No. 36. [Draft.] Transmits copy of May is.
above letter of W. and S. Preece, and directs that an enquiry be [Coomal
made. p. 283
February 4,
1 Upper Spring
[Colonial Dept.]
N. C Radiger to Lord Glenelg [Secretary of State]. Transmits
copy of part of a letter received from Montreal, dated 10 January,
1839. The writer of this letter states the need of strong government.
He comments on the attitude taken by the Lower Canada judges, on
the question of habeas corpus. p. 295
Unsigned to Radiger. [Draft.] Acknowledges receipt of letter
of 4 February. p. 300
Baron Redhausen [Swedish and Norwegian Charge d'Affaires] to june20,
Sir George Grey [Under Secretary].    Requests letter of introduction « Hertford st.
to the Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland authorities,
for Dr. Stuewitz, professor of zoology at the University of Christiania,
who is proceeding to those colonies for scientific reasons. p. 305
Unsigned to F. Baring [Joint Secretary of the Treasury]. [Draft.] No date. ^^
Transmits copy of a correspondence respecting J. A. Roebuck's claim
for arrears of salary as agent for the Assembly of Lower Canada,
together with the draft of a despatch which Normanby proposes to
send to Colborne. Requests that this payment should be sanctioned
by the Treasury. P- 322
Enclosed:
(1) Colborne to Glenelg No. 34, 27 February, 1839. [Not
transcribed.    See Q. 257, p. 237.] P-320
(2) Unsigned to Colborne, No. 22. 18 December, [1838].
[Draft.] Requests a statement as to the reasons why Roebuck s
claim was not paid.
60613—31
p. 321 !6 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269, pt. 2
1839 (3) Unsigned to Colborne, [Colonial Dept.], April, 1839.   [Draft.]
Acknowledges Colborne's despatch No. 34, of 27 February, explaining
the circumstances under which Roebuck's claim was not paid. Gives
reasons why Roebuck should receive payment, and directs that an
appropriation should be made for this purpose. p. 323
fey 7. Unsigned to  Roebuck.    [Draft.]    States that Normanby has
Coiomai Dept.] recejve(j Colborne's report on the grounds upon which Roebuck's
salary was not paid. Reviews the case and declares that as Roebuck's
appointment expired on 21 March, 1836, there can be no claim extending beyond that date. p. 329
Jay 9, Roebuck to Normanby.    Reviews steps which have been taken
*Tay s with regard to his salary and requests to be informed of the objections
to his claim. p. 333
jay io, Roebuck to Normanby.    Acknowledges communications respect-
Sray'sinn. ^g ^-g c^auTl Reviews the history of his case and states that £400 of
his salary for 1835-36 remains unpaid. Points to his services in
1837-38 and the recognition which he received as agent for the
Assembly. Transmits papers and requests that they be returned
to him.    [Papers not at this place.] p. 336
cXn?ai De t ]        Unsigned   to   Roebuck.    [Draft.]    Transmits   a  memorandum
ep' respecting Roebuck's case and requests his observations thereon.
Returns enclosures to letter of 10 May. p. 344
Enclosed:
Memorandum.
p. 313
Roebuck to Normanby. Returns memorandum which he
declares to be a complete statement of the case. Requests a decision
thereon. p. 345
, Unsigned to Colborne, No. 43.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Col
borne's despatch No. 34, of 27 February, giving reasons why Roebuck's
salary had not been paid. States that while the ultimate decision
must rest with the Special Council, Roebuck has very strong claims
which should be met.   Transmits a memorandum on the case.    p. 326
Enclosed:
Memorandum.
p. 313
Unsigned to  Roebuck.    [Draft.]    States that  a  copy  of the
ept'] above memorandum has been sent to Colborne, who has been instructed  to   propose  the   payment   of  the   arrears   of   Roebuck's
salary. p. 348
Colborne to Normanby, No. 95.
p. 383.]
[Not transcribed.    See Q. 259,
p. 328
October 5,
Raymond
Buildings.
Roebuck to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State]. States that
he has received no answer to the request made to Colborne by Normanby, respecting the arrears of salary due to him. Requests that
Russell should give instructions to Colborne on this matter.       p. 350 Q. 269, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Roebuck to E. B. O'Callaghan.    Reviews the political situation       1839
in England and the prospects of the Government.    States that there October 30,
is a report that cholera has broken out.    Sends a short article from
the Dublin Review, on the Irish in America.    Declares that Nos. 87,
88, and 89 of the Vindicator have not been received.    Requests duplicates.    Will answer Mr. Louis's [Perrault] shortly. p. 358
[Roebuck] to O'Callaghan.    Transmits a report from the London October 30.
Dispatch, respecting a meeting held at Newcastle on Tyne.    Comments on the stand in support of Canada, that has been taken by
workmen at that place.    [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 354
Roebuck to R. Vernon Smith, M.P., [Under Secretary].    States Novembers.
that it would be necessary to examine the papers relating to his case,
before he could reply to Smith's enquiries.    His only request is that
Russell should follow the decision made by Normanby.    Refers to
the correspondence of May and June last. p. 349
Unsigned to Roebuck. [Draft.] States that no further steps November.u
can be taken regarding Roebuck's claim, as instructions have already ° oma ^
been issued to the Governor of Lower Canada. p. 352
Roebuck to Smith. Requests assistance to procure an interview December is
with Russell. p. 353 bSSSS
Major-Gen.   Sir  H.   Willoughby  Rooke   to   Under  Secretary. May21,
Requests that an extension of time be granted to his son, Charles Rooke, Brighton15'
who had obtained a certificate on retirement from the 79th Regiment.
Rooke has not been able to proceed to Canada owing to the death of
his wife and to family arrangements connected therewith. p. 301
Unsigned to Rooke. [Draft.] Grants a six months extension of {ggj^ De,
time to C. Rooke, as requested in letter of 21 May. States that this
extension cannot apply to Upper Canada or New Brunswick, where
the land regulations are governed by legislative enactment. Land is
available in Lower Canada, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Instructions will be issued when Rooke has selected the colony to which
he wishes to go. P- 303
Rooke to Under Secretary. Applies for a further extension of 0°**^^
six months time, in favour "of his son. P- 309 wight.
Unsigned to Rooke.    [Draft.]    Grants the extension requested in Ngj«*«|«;
Rooke's letter of 23 October.    States that no further extension can
be given.    Reminds Rooke that his son must notify the Colonial
Department as to which colony he wishes to settle in. p. 311
Patrick Russell to Marquis of Normanby [Secretary of State]. §g^U,
Requests a free grant of land in Lower Canada. '   »' ;
Unsigned to Russell,
e no longer given.
[Draft.]    States that free grants of land j
John Sharpies to Glenelg.    Urges that a bounty be paid on £»
colonial corn, in order to encourage the flow of capital and labour to
Canada. P" PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Unsigned to Sharpies
, of 5 January.
Q. 269, pt. 2
[Draft.]    Acknowledges receipt of letter
p. 370
cSSn23, Ralph Smith to H. Labouchere [Under Secretary].    Enquiries as
shimrMe,        to whether his previous applications are recorded in the Colonial
Ireland. Department.    Discusses need for emigration.    Intends to make a
new application. P- 371
Kfioniai De t Unsigned to Smith.    [Draft.]    States that previous communica-
tions from Smith are on record. Normanby will not depart from
Glenelg's decision regarding free grants of land. p. 374
qSebeoIj Memorial of W. Smith, late chairman of the Executive Council of
Lower Canada, respecting his deprivation from office and requesting
to be restored. p. 375
Enclosed:
Extract from a despatch to Gosford, 22 August, 1837.        p. 378
fcotonui De t Unsigned to Smith.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges receipt of memorial.
States that Normanby cannot take it into consideration until it has
been reported upon by Colborne. Smith is directed to furnish
Colborne with a copy. p. 379
st8M8tl0,,s Rev. A. J. Tancred, D.D., to Normanby.    States that he intends
Mount, Waisaii, to proceed to Canada in order to open a seminary and to give public
Staffordshire.    iectures.    Requests assistance. p. 396
raT^Mbeti        Unsigned to Tancred.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges receipt of letter
ep. oj ^ August.    Regrets that no assistance can be given to Tancred. p. 398
July 25,
Charmouth,
Dorset.
T. J. W. Tane to Normanby.
for himself and for his family.
Requests free passages to Canada,
p. 393
raSw'De t] Unsigned to Tane.    [Draft.]    States that there is no fund from
p ' which free passages could be provided for Tane and his family,    p. 395
Montreal. F* T- Tnomas to J- Stephen [Under Secretary], private.    Requests
the assistance of Stephen to procure an appointment in the Commissariat for G. W. Thomas, his son. p. 381
fcokniai De [Normanby] to Colborne, No. 56.    [Draft.]    Regrets that he is
eP .j ^9^ to futher the advancement of F. T. Thomas, or his son George
W. Thomas. p. 384
l^Montague . James Tullock to Normanby. Presses the claims of the Semin-
piacejBedford aire de Quebec and the Ursulines de Quebec, to be indemnified for
square. property which was confiscated by the Government of France,    p. 385
(colonial Dept.] Unsigned to F. Baring [Joint Secretary of the Treasury]. [Draft.]
Transmits copy of Tullock's letter and requests a report thereon, p. 392 Q. 269, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
W
John Walsh to Lord John Russell [Secretary of State].   Requests October u,
an appointment on the Canadian constabulary.
An~ .tsanysi
p. 427 Ireland
Unsigned to Walsh.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges receipt of letter of October 25.
11 October, and states that applications for appointments in the con- [Colonial DePt-l
stabulary should be made to the Canadian authorities. p. 429
John Williamson to Labouchere.    Requests information as to the March 4,
encouragement which will be given under the new system, to persons WlUiambrook-
of capital who emigrate to Lower Canada. p. 418
Unsigned to Williamson.    [Draft.]    Regrets that Williamson's March is.
enquiry cannot be answered. p. 420 [Coloniai Dept.]
James Wisconsin to Normanby.    States that there is a con- June 21,
spiracy to attack the British colonies in America, by a "gentle rush" |BUtom'
across the border.    Urges that the military forces be strengthened.
States that he is leaving for the American frontier. p. 421
W. Withers to Normanby.    Transmits copy of a letter from March 1, Holt.
Canada. p. 400
W. Copland to W. Withers, Niagara, 9 December, 1838. Gives
an account of events in Canada. p. 401
Major-Gen. George Wright, R.E., to Normanby.   States that he July 20,
is going to Canada and offers his services. p. 425 piaoe, ro°
..Pall Mall.
Unsigned to Wright.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges receipt of letter o July 25.
20 July.    States that Wright's services are not required. p. 426 [Colomal Dept-]
Petition of James Wright, formerly of the Royal African Corps, juiy25,
praying for permission to give up his land ticket of 1832, and to be sittingboume.
restored to his pension. P- 422
Unsigned to Wright.    [Draft.]    States that his location ticket of f^2.
1832 could not be honoured at this date.    Applications respecting
pensions must be made to the Secretary at War. p. 424       ^^
Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, on the proposed re-union January is.
of Upper and Lower Canada. P- 431
Series Q. Vol. 269A
DRAFTS OF DESPATCHES TO SIR JOHN COLBORNE,
NOVEMBER 1837 TO FEBRUARY 1839
With the exceptions calendared hereunder, the despatches in this
volume are to be found in the Calendar of Series G,Yo\s. 37-41. Report of the Public Archives of Canada for the years 1931 and W6<i.) lg37
Glenelg to Colborne, private.    Gives orders for the employment BSSSSSTstT
of volunteers in case of an emergency.    Stresses the caution witn
which such forces should be used. P- y 1837
December 6,
Downing St.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269A
Glenelg to Colborne, private. Transmits despatches, and
directs that they be forwarded to Gosford if he should still be in the
province. P- 12
Glenelg to Colborne, confidential.    Transmits a letter from James
Baker, H.M. Consul at Mobile, relative to the shipment of arms to I
Lower Canada.    [Letter not at this place.    See Q. 240, pt.  1, p.
100.] P- 15
Glenelg to Colborne, private. States that he has received, a
private letter from Gosford suggesting that individuals charged with
treason should be tried in Britain.    Objects to such a course.       p. 37
Glenelg to Colborne, confidential. Transmits copy of the opinion
of the law officers, on the proclamation of martial law. Draws
attention to the opinion that only necessity justifies resort to martial
law. Colborne's letter of 7 December, shows that he has taken this
stand.    [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 43
Glenelg to Colborne, private. Transmits the Act to make
Temporary Provision for the Government of Lower Canada. It
devolves upon Colborne to proclaim it. Trusts that he will be able
to transmit instructions regarding the Special Council by the same
ship. If delay occurs they will be sent by the next ship. [Act not at
this place.] p. 70
Glenelg to Colborne, No. 28. Transmits the Act for making
Temporary Provision for the Government of Lower Canada. Colborne is to proclaim this. Sends instructions regarding the Special
Council, which is to be constituted. Colborne is to propose the
continuance of acts which will expire on 1 May next. Political
prisoners who cannot be liberated should be held until the arrival of
Durham, unless they can be tried by the ordinary tribunals. A law
for the suspension of habeas corpus should be passed in order that
martial law may be revoked. A measure respecting repayment of
advances is to be proposed, but no law for appropriation of revenue
is to be recommended unless under urgent necessity. Appointments
to the Special Council are to be provisional, since Durham's judgment
must be unfettered. Form of appointment is to be decided by the
provincial law officers, but suggests use of the public seal. Suggests
that a code of rules should be adopted by the Special Council. Colborne is to be guided by restrictions imposed in Gosford's instructions.
Certain subjects have been placed beyond the cognizance of the
Special Council. Where a doubt appears, the opinion of the law
officers is to be taken.   [Act and instructions not at this place.]    p. 74
Glenelg to Colborne, private and confidential. States that the
question of the Caroline was omitted from despatch No. 31, on the
grounds that it was considered inadvisable to refer to it in a public
despatch. The subject has been referred to the law officers who have
found that the course taken was justifiable. Transmits copy of a
confidential despatch addressed to Arthur with respect to this opinion.
[Despatch not at this place.    See Q. 412A, p. 33.] p. 91
Glenelg to Colborne, private. Points out that certain passages
have been omitted in the publication of despatches from Canada.
Colborne is advised to adopt a similar course should he have occasion
to publish despatches in Canada. p. 97 Q. 269A
REPORT FOR THE YEAR l
Glenelg to Colborne, No. 48.    Transmits copy of a letter from       1838
Captain Bowen, respecting an injury sustained by his son,   who March is,
served as a volunteer.    Requests a report on this case.    [Letter not DowningSt-
at this place.] p 117
Glenelg to Colborne, private.    Acknowledges private and con- AprU23
fidential note of 17 March.    Assures Colborne that he will be pro- Downing st.
tected from prosecutions for acts done in the course of duty.       p. 136
Glenelg to Colborne.    Regrets that Colborne wishes to resign. July 7,
Arrangements to relieve him will be made as soon as possible.     p. 137 Downine St-
Series Q. Vol. 269B
DRAFTS OF DESPATCHES TO THE EARL OF DURHAM,
JANUARY 1838 TO MARCH 1839
With the exceptions calendared hereunder, the despatches in this
volume are to be found in the Calendar of /Series G, Vols. 38-41.
(Report of the Public Archives of Canada for the years 1931 and 1932.)
Glenelg to Earl of Durham [Governor-in-Chief and High Com- j^^g2^
missioner], No. 1. States that specific instructions cannot be given
until Durham is ready to proceed to Canada. Outlines policy.
Thinks that tranquillity will be restored before Durham reaches
Canada. The task will then be to restore order by constitutional
means. More extensive amendments to the constitution than those
recommended in 1835 will have to be sought. Durham is to conduct
an enquiry. Outlines a plan for the constitution of an advisory council
which is to be composed of members from Upper and Lower Canada.
This council should consider a means of regulating matters of common
interest. Constitutional- Act is to be studied. Other matters suggested as topics for discussion are: the expenses of civil government,
the system of land tenure in Lower Canada, and the constitution of a
court for the trial of appeals and impeachments. Suggestions are to
be sent home for the consideration of the British Government. Such
a council could only meet if tranquillity were restored. Provision is to
be made for election of some part of it. This council need not be
convoked should Durham think that the same results could be
obtained by other methods, which would be more pleasing to the
people.    His judgment must not be fettered. p. 2
Glenelg to Durham, No. 2.    Transmits copy of a letter from g^*^
Lord Hill recapitulating the force to be stationed in North America
and suggesting a method of distribution.    This has been approved
and instructions have issued.    [Letter not at this place.   See Q. 249,
pt. 2, p. 382.] P- 15
Glenelg to Durham, No. 3. Transmits copy of a report from J&SS'st
Capt. Charles Campbell, on the accommodation available m Quebec
and Montreal, and of a letter from the Treasury on this subject.
Draws attention to the suggestion that a member of Durham s suite
should be sent on in advance to make necessary preparation. [Letter
and report not at this place. See Q. 252, pt. 2, p. 185; Q. 254, pt. I,
p. 556.] P- 16 1838
March 13,
Downing St.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269B
Glenelg to Durham, No. 4. Transmits copy of a despatch from
Gosford, No. 70, of 12 July, with a memorial from Messrs. Bruce
Shillitoe, Mclntyre and Martin, praying for confirmation of title to
66,242 acres of land in Gaspe. Due to the disturbed conditions, the
instructions to Gosford were delayed. The matter is now referred to
Durham. Thinks that the memorialists acted in good faith. Draws
a distinction between contracts made between private persons and
those made with the Government. For this reason greater significance is attached to admitted irregularities in the land granting
department. Discusses these irregularities. Approves of the decision
made by Gosford, but as the memorialists have based their case on
questions of public interest, Durham is to review the case. [Despatch
and memorial not at this place.] p. 18
Glenelg to Durham, No.
establishment.
Requests a statement of Durham's
p. 25
Glenelg to Durham, No. 8. Transmits Durham's commissions
as Governor and Captain General for each of the provinces, and another commission as Governor General and High Commissioner.
Points to the departure in principle involved therein. Hitherto this
officer, while bearing the title of Governor General, has been in reality
only the Governor of Lower Canada. Inconvenience has been suffered
by leaving provinces destitute of the commission. Former commissions had superfluous wording which has been eliminated. Each
province now has its own commission. On arrival at Quebec, the
commission for Lower Canada will be deposited among the provincial
archives. The commission as Governor General is to be kept by
Durham and carried to each province. Durham is to reside chiefly
in Lower Canada. The functions of the Lieut.-Governor in each
province, will be suspended while Durham is in residence there. Cooperation is enjoined. Correspondence is to be conducted with
Lieut.-Governors for purposes of general interest, but is not to interfere with communications between those officers and the Colonial
Office. A copy of this despatch will be sent to each Lieut.-Governor.
[Commissions not at this place.] p. 27
Glenelg to Durham, No. 9. States that the Hastings will be
ready on the 9th or 10th instant. Requests to be informed as to the
date on which Durham would be ready to embark. p. 34
Glenelg to Durham, No. 11. Transmits two copies of rules and
regulations compiled in the Colonial Office. [Rules not at this
place.] p. 36
Glenelg to Durham, No. 22. Requests a report on the disputed
territory east of the Connecticut River, and along the 45th parallel.
This report which is for Palmerston, is to cover settlement and
cultivation. p. 61
Glenelg to Durham, No. 29. Reviews the provision made for
the support of a Protestant clergy, and the dispute between the
churches of England and Scotland. The matter is reviewed also in a
despatch to Gosford of 7 September. Clause 31 of 1 Victoria, cap. 9,
precludes legislation on this subject, but a study of the question is to
be made as part of the duty of the special mission. Encloses papers.
[Papers not at this place.] p. 69
V. Q- 269B REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Glenelg to Durham, confidential.    Transmits copy of a Foreign       1838
Office memorandum dealing with instances in which the Government ^Iay9.>
of the United States have pursued criminals on neutral territory.   owmngS•
[Memorandum not at this place.] p. 80
Glenelg to Durham, No. 37. Transmits copy of a petition from May 12,
Mrs. Sophia S. Holland, claiming compensation for land granted to DowningSt-
her grandfather, Major Holland, and resumed by the Government.
Durham is to enquire into this claim. Should it prove to be well
founded, he is to estimate the compensation due, and to suggest the
fund from which it should be paid. [Petition not at this place. See
Q. 255, pt. 1, p. 119.] p. 91
Glenelg to Durham, No. 38.    Requests a return of Indian pre- May u,
sents remaining in the store in Canada, which would be available DownmgSt-
for 1839. p. 92
Glenelg to Durham, No. 40.   Transmits copy of a letter from May 17,
S. Bailey and orders that an enquiry be made respecting T. Griffith, DownlnK st.
recently appointed Lieut.-Colonel of the 3rd Battalion, Lower Canada
Militia.    [Letter not at this place.   See Q. 254, pt. 1, p. 94.]       p. 95
Glenelg to Durham, No. 41.   Transmits copy of a letter from ^2h
the Agent General for Emigration recommending the re-establishment   owmng
of the tax imposed under the Provincial Act 6 Will. IV, cap. 13, and
appropriated to the relief of sick and indigent emigrants.   Believes
that Colborne will have seen to the renewal of this Act.    [Enclosure
not at this place.] p. 96
Glenelg to Durham, No. 43.    Transmits copy of an address from JJjJ^nh! st
the Upper Canada Assembly, praying for a legislative division of the
duties collected at Quebec.    Sends also copy of the reply which has
been returned.    Durham is to consider the matter and to report
thereon.    [Enclosures not at this place.] p. 98
Glenelg to Durham, No. 45.    Transmits copies of addresses from ^^gSt
the Assembly and the Legislative Council of Upper Canada respecting
the expediency of union with Lower Canada.    Sends also copy of
replies returned thereto.    The subject is to be considered by Durham.
[Enclosures not at this place.    See Q. 246, pt. 1, p. 37.] p. 101
Glenelg to Durham, No. 58.    Transmits copy of an address from June!^ gt
the House of Commons, praying for a return of all acts for the pre-   awning
servation of peace and for the trial of political offenders, and for the
names of all persons arrested.    [Address not at this place.]       p. 115
Glenelg to Durham, No. 59.    Orders the early disbandment of JgJ^,,
militia and volunteer corps. P- H°
Glenelg to Durham, No. 63. Acknowledges Durham's des- gj*^,
patches Nos. 1-4. Approves of Durham's proclamation on arrival.
Sees no reason to question appointments to the Executive Council.
Views with surprise and regret that in spite of the communication
from Lord Melbourne, Turton has been given a high official situation.
Feels confident that an explanation for this step will be received
shortly. P- 124
60613—*J PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269B
Glenelg to Durham. States that the Government is gratified
by Durham's conduct and the impression which he has made. Informs him that Ellenborough has moved for production of the formal
instructions. P- 129
Glenelg to Durham, No. 77. Transmits copy of a report of the
law officers on the case of Cadieu, an Indian, sentenced to death for
a murder committed in the Indian territories. This sentence is to be
commuted to transportation. p. 152
Glenelg to Durham, No. 78. Orders an inquiry and report on
the sum of £3969.13.10. which was issued to the Commissary
General, for secret service. If this charge should be met from the
colonial funds, it is to be immediately repaid into the Military
Chest. p. 153
Glenelg to Durham, No. 79. Acknowledges Colborne's despatch
No. 25, of 14 April, with a memorial from H. W. Ryland, praying for
the usual remuneration when passing the land petitions of militia
claimants. Notes that Ryland had voluntarily surrendered two-
thirds of his fees, in the cases of militia claimants. References of
petitions now pass through the president with the result that this
fee has been neglected. Cannot agree with Colborne that he should
be compensated from the Crown revenues. If these fees are justly
due, the Executive Council should devise means to protect Ryland's
interests.    The matter is referred to Durham. p. 154
Glenelg to Durham, No. 88. Transmits copy of a correspondence
with the Treasury respecting fees for the Vice-Admiralty Court at
Quebec. The Treasury is drawing up questions to be submitted to
the Judge of that Court. The Registrar is to be paid £250 stg. and
the Marshall £125 stg. for the eighteen months' period for which
there were no fees. When the new schedule of fees comes into operation, they will receive as salary £150, and £75 respectively. [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 167
Glenelg to Durham, No. 89. Transmits copy of the report of
the law officers on Durham's ordinance for providing for the security
of Lower Canada. That part which places restrictions on the eight
persons while in Bermuda is void, since the power of the Governor
and Council cannot extend beyond the province. Many persons of
high legal attainments are of opinion that the whole ordinance is
illegal, but the Government cannot agree with them. Objections
have been raised also to the restrictions against the return of the
exiles. Gives an account of the proceedings taken by the House of
Lords as a result of which it has been decided to disallow this ordinance.    [Report not at this place.    See Q. 252, pt. 1, p. 28.]    p. 171
Glenelg to Durham, No. 97. Transmits copy of a further correspondence with the British American Land Company respecting an
application that half of the purchase money should be employed to
assist emigration. [Correspondence not at this place. See Q. 246,
pt. 2,-p. 362.] p. 211
Glenelg to Durham, No. 102. Acknowledges Durham's despatch
No. 34, of 31 July. States that he has recommended the adoption of
Durham's proposals for an agreement with the British American Land
Company. Will inform him of the decision of the Treasury on this
matter. p. 218
V Q. 269B
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Glenelg to Durham.    Transmits duplicates of despatches Nos.       1838
118, 125, 126, 133, and 134, which could not have reached him before November 24,
leaving Quebec. p_ 282 UownmgSt-
Glenelg to Durham. Offers to transmit copies of despatches to November 28,
Colborne which have been written in reply to communications made DowningSt-
by Durham. p. 283
Glenelg to Durham. Acknowledges Durham's formal resignation December io,
which has been accepted. Expresses a desire to receive Durham's DowmngSt-
Report as soon as it can be completed. This report should form part
of Durham's plan for the future government of British North America.
In the meantime Durham should furnish information and suggestions
regarding the present state of this province. Regrets that Durham
should have disregarded the rule by which a Governor remains at his
post until he is relieved. p. 284
Glenelg   to   Durham.    Acknowledges   Durham's   letter   of 20 December 26,
December.    As his Report will be ready in so short a time, Glenelg DowmngSt-
will not anticipate it by requesting information on any subject unless
Durham should wish to make a communication. p. 286
Glenelg to Durham.    Acknowledges receipt of Durham's Report Februarys,
and expresses thanks for the care and attention which it reveals. Downinest-
This Report will receive grave attention.    No recommendation can
be made until the appendix is received.    Trusts that it may serve to
lay the foundation of a permanent settlement of the questions of
reference. p. 287
Glenelg to Durham. Acknowledges receipt of Appendix A to February 7,
Durham's Report. p. 288 Downin8St.
Glenelg to Durham. Requests detailed accounts and vouchers February 28,
for the expenses of his mission. [The same letter, signed by Nor- Downmsst-
manby, appears in Q. 269C, p. 64.] p. 289
Normanby to Durham. Transmits an address from the House March 8,
of Commons, praying for a return of all appointments made by Downinsst-
Durham in Canada. While the return could be compiled from the
despatches in the Colonial Office, it has been thought fit to afford
Durham an opportunity to make such explanations as he might wish,
and to provide further information as to the official instruments by
which these appointments were made. [Address not at this
place.] P-290
Series Q. Vol. 269C
DRAFTS OF DESPATCHES TO THE EARL OF DURHAM,
JANUARY 1838 TO MARCH 1839
With the exceptions calendared hereunder, the despatches in this
volume are to be found in the calendar of Series G, Vols. 42-45.
(Report of the Public Archives of Canada for 1932.)
Normanby to Durham. Acknowledges receipt of Appendix B to M-jja st
Durham's Report. P* PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 269C
Normanby to Colborne, No. 43. Acknowledges Colborne's
despatch No. 34, of 27 February, explaining the reasons for rejecting
J. A. Roebuck's claim for payment of arrears of salary. States that
while the ultimate decision must rest with the Special Council,
Roebuck has very strong claims to the salary which he earned in a
position that was recognized in England. Transmits memorandum
on the case. [Memorandum not at this place. See Q. 269, pt. 2,
p. 313.] p. HI
Normanby to Colborne, No. 58. Transmits copy of a correspondence with the ordinance respecting arms and accoutrements
required for use in Canada. Trusts that the orders which have been
issued will be found to be satisfactory. [Correspondence not at this
place.] P- 137
Normanby to Colborne. Introduces Capt. A. Mackenzie of the
21st Regt. and recites his claims to consideration in view of distinguished service. p. 146
Russell to Colborne, private. Expresses regret that the public
service is about to be deprived of Colborne's able co-operation and
assistance. Regards it as unreasonable to ask Colborne to retain
command of the forces. Feels sure that Thomson and Lt.-Gen. Sir
Richard Jackson will receive information and advice from Colborne.
p. 152
Russell to Thomson, No. 51. Transmits copy of a correspondence
with the Hudson's Bay Company, relating to the renewal of the lease
of the King's Post. Points out that the proposal which he has made
to the Company differs materially from the report made by the
Executive Council. Thomson is to study this question and report
. thereon, making such suggestions as may seem advisable. [Correspondence not at this place.] p. 280
Series O. Vol. 270, pt. 1
GOVERNOR C. P. THOMSON, LATER LORD SYDENHAM, 1840
Rt. Hon. C P. Thomson [Governor-in-Chief] to Lord John
Russell [Secretary of State], confidential. Transmits copy of an
address from the Assembly requesting information regarding Hunters'
Lodges, together with a copy of his answer thereto. Gives the
history of this address. States the necessity of curbing the ultra-
Tory party. p. 3
Enclosed:
(1) Address of Assembly.
(2) Reply to Address.
p. 6
p. 7
Thomson to Russell, confidential. States that although he
thinks that no border attack needs to be feared, he has taken every
precaution against such a contingency. Transmits copy of a despatch
from Lieut. J. T. W. Jones whom he had sent to tour the United States.
Declares that no such order, as that to which Jones refers, has been
issued.   Agrees with the opinions expressed by Jones. p. 10 Q.270, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Enclosed: I840
Lieut. J. T. W. Jones to T. W. C Murdock, [Chief Secretary],
Washington, 27 December, 1839. Report on feeling in the United
States. p 15
Thomson to Russell,  confidential.    [Duplicate.]    Transmits a January 17,
further letter from Lieut. Jones, who has returned to Toronto.    Re- Toronto-
ports the arrest of persons at Toronto who were distributing blank
commissions in the Patriot Army, signed by "General" Hardy and
countersigned by  Montgomery.   This step has caused no  excitement, p. 26
Enclosed:
Further report of Lieut. J. T. W. Jones respecting his mission to
the United States, Toronto, 15 January, 1840. " p. 30
Thomson to Russell, No. 26. Acknowledges Russell's despatch January is,
No. 22, of 18 October. Transmits copies of two reports of A. B. Toronto-
Hawke, Chief Emigrant Agent for Upper Canada, respecting emigrants sent out by Col. Wyndham. Points out that all but three
have left the province, which has derived no benefit from this emigration. Discusses the question of emigration and stresses the need for
a plan. p. 38
Enclosed:
(1) A. B. Hawke to T. W. 0. Murdock [Chief Secretary], Toronto,
31 December, 1840.    Report. p. 46
Sub-enclosures:
(i) John Brown to Hawke, Port Hope, 26 December, 1839.
States that he gave employment to thirty of the emigrants, at £5 a
month.    All but three have left for the United States. p. 51
(ii) A. McDonell to Hawke, Toronto, 17 December, 1839.
States that in his opinion very few of the emigrants have remained in
Canada. Points to the fact that even settlers of long standing have
left to secure work on the railways and canals in the United States
in order to get the money to pay for their land. Single men are
required as farm labourers. P- o2
(2) Memorandum of Hawke on the subject of locating emigrant
families on five acre lots, addressed to S. B. Harrison, Toronto, 9 July,
1839.    [Marked No. 1.] P- 54
Sub-enclosure:
Memorandum of Hawke, Toronto, 11 September, 1839, respecting
the abandonment of five acre lots which had been granted to settlers
in Sunnidale, and as to the possible extension of the system ot
grants. P-58
(3) Statement of the number of emigrants landed at Quebec,
1831-39, and of the expense of transporting, locating and employing
them.    Signed A. B. Hawke, 23 December, 1839.     [Marked No PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 270, pt. 1
Thomson to Russell, No. 27. Transmits a memorial from the
widow of a warrant officer in the navy, praying for the restoration of
her pension, which she lost on her re-marriage. p. 63
Enclosed:
Petition of Mrs. Elizabeth Walker.
p. 65
Thomson to Russell, No. 28. [Printed.] Transmits an address
from the Assembly, respecting the proposed union of the Canadas.
States that the recommendations made therein were discussed and
defeated by large majorities, but that it was held advisable to bring
them forward for consideration in this modified form. Thomson
favours adoption of the English language only, in matters of record.
Advises setting a qualification for members, and the introduction of
municipal institutions into Lower Canada. The seat of government
must be determined by circumstances. p. 69A
Enclosed:
Address of Assembly. [Printed.] [For the manuscript copy of
this address.    See Q. 269, pt. 2, p. 431.] p. 69A
Thomson to Russell, No. 29. Transmits a petition from the
trustees of the university proposed to be established at Kingston, in
connection with the Church of Scotland, praying to be designated as
Queen's College, and for the grant of a Royal charter. Urges that
this request be granted. p. 71
Enclosed:
Petition, Toronto, 21 January, 1840.
p. 75
Thomson to Russell, No. 30. Transmits a petition from Mrs.
Harriet Sewell, widow of the late Chief Justice J. Sewell, of Lower
Canada. p. 78
Petition of Mrs. Harriet Sewell, praying for a pension, Quebec,
6 January, 1839. p. 80
Sub-enclosure:
Duke of Kent to Sewell, Kensington Palace, 30 September,
1814. Comments on Sewell's plan for the proposed union of the
British American colonies. p. 84
Thomson to Russell, No. 31. Acknowledges Russell's despatch
No. 32, of 24 November. States that in his opinion A. W. Hart has
been under a misapprehension in complaining that Benjamin Hart,
his father, has been excluded from the Special Council on the ground
that he was a Jew. p. 86
Thomson to Russell, No. 32. Transmits copy of an address
from the Bishop and clergy of Toronto, together with a copy of the
answer returned thereto. p. 90 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Requests a settle-
p. 93
Q. 270, pt. 1
Enclosed:
(1) Address, Toronto, 30 December,
ment of the Clergy Reserves disputes.
(2) Reply of Thomson. States the need for concessions on all
sides.    Promises assistance towards effecting a settlement.       p. 96
Thomson to Russell, No. 33. States the circumstances under 3asait
which he advanced £2,000 in part liquidation of the claim of Duncan Tor01
McGregor for the loss of the Thames. p. 98
Thomson to Russell, No. 34.    Transmits copy of an address from janu*
the Assembly, together with copy of his answer thereto.    States that Tor01
he regards it as unadvisable to make any formal communications on
this matter, for fear of creating excitement. p. 106
Enclosed:
(1) Address of Assembly [13 December, 1839]. Requests to be
informed whether any despatches have been received on responsible
government, and of the opinion of the British Government thereon, p. 108
(2) Reply to address, 14 January, 1840. Regrets that he cannot
communicate any despatches on this subject. States that he has
been instructed to administer the government according to the well-
understood wishes of the people. p. 109
Thomson to Russell, confidential. Transmits draft of a bill for janm
the union of the Canadas, which was prepared under his direction by Toro
J. Stuart, Chief Justice of Lower Canada. States that explanatory
notes have been appended to such clauses as seem to require it.
Hopes that this may be of value in determining the measure to be
adopted. Discusses the bill under the following heads (1) declaration
of union; (2) Legislative Council; (3) Assembly; (4) language; (5)
laws of Upper and Lower Canada; (6) municipal institutions; (7)
revenue, debt and civil list; (8) powers of Governor and
Lt.-Governors. P- HI
Enclosed:
(1) Draft of Governor's Bill. P- 140
(2) Statement on revenue and expenditure.    [Printed.]      p. 135
Attached:
Extract from Captain J. W. Pringle's report on land tax, roads,
and municipal institutions.    [Printed.] P- 136
Schedule of Papers on Union:
(1) Thomson to Russell, confidential.    Toronto, 24 December,
1839. [Not transcribed.    See Q. 262, p. 141.] P- 132
(2) Thomson to  Russell,  confidential.    Toronto,  22 January,
1840. [Not transcribed.    See Q. 270, pt. 1, p. 3.] p. 1*2
(3) Draft of Governor's Bill. P- 140
(4) Draft of Bill laid before Parliament last session. [This draft
continues into Q. 270, pt. 2.] P- Z6<0 February 19.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 1
1840 Schedule of the representation of Upper Canada. p. 138
>ruaryii. Unsigned to Thomson.    [No. 76.]   [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thorn- ,
■loniai Dept.] g()n,g confidential despatch of 13 January, and approves of the answer I
given to the address from the Assembly on the subject of Hunters'
Lodges. P- 5
Unsigned to J. Backhouse [Under Secretary, Foreign Office].
1 "—>"<•' [jjraft.]   Transmits  copy  of  Thomson's  confidential  despatch  of
13 January, respecting steps taken to ascertain the truth of rumours
as to contemplated border aggressions.    [See above, p. 10.] p. 14
March 16. Unsigned to A. W. Hart. [Draft.]   Informs Hart of the report
[Colonial Dept.] made by Tllomson> respecting the case of Benjamin Hart. p. 89
March2o. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 88.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
[Coiomai Dept.] gon>g despatch of 17 January, and expresses satisfaction at the state of
American feeling as described in the report of Lieut. Jones.       p. 29
March23 Unsigned to Thomson, No. 89.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
oom     ept.] gon>g despatch No. 32, of 21 January.    Approves of the answer given
to the address from the Bishop and clergy of Toronto. p. 92
March 24. Unsigned toC.E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury].
[Coiomai Dept.] jp^^-j Transmits copy 0f Thomson's despatch, No. 33, of 21
January, and requests that this be laid before the Treasury. States
that he intends to approve of the action taken by Thomson, unless the
Treasury should be aware of any objection thereto. p. 101
rcoi°h-ai'D Unsigned to Thomson, No. 94.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
ep    son's despatch No. 29, of 20 January.    Accedes to the prayer of the
petition enclosed therein, and directs that the trustees should prepare
a draft charter and nominate an agent. p. 73
fcXniai'De t Unsigned to Thomson, No. 95.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
ep ' son's despatch No. 30, of 20 January, and states that a pension cannot
be granted to Mrs. Sewell. p. 79
[Colonial De t Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   108.    [Draft.]   States  that  the
eP. -preagurv have sanctioned the disbursement made by Thomson
towards liquidating the claim of D. McGregor, and will pay the
balance on receipt of proof as to the value of the Thames. Transmits
copies of correspondence with the Treasury. [Correspondence not at
this place.    Letter of 24 March, given above.] p. 103
[b^onfai De t ] Unsigned   to   Thomson,   No.   117.    [Draft.]   States  that  the
Treasury has decided that Mrs. Walker has no claim to be re-instated
on the pension list. p. 68
October 27. Unsigned to Lord Sydenham [C. P. Thomson], No. 248.    [Draft.]
[Coiomai Dept.] Referg t0 a despatch from Arthur respecting land grants, and to
Sydenham's despatch No. 26, of 18 January, on the same subject,
and directs that any gratuitous grants of land given to emigrants,
should be confined to 5 acres, unless local circumstances justify a more
liberal appropriation. p. 44 Q. 270, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Unsigned to Sydenham [Thomson], No. 253.    [Draft.]    States       1840
that proof has been received as to the value of the Thames.   The j&T1* nrf
Treasury has therefore sanctioned the payment of a further £2,000 to
D. McGregor.    Instructions will be issued to the Commissary General
to place this sum at Thomson's disposal. p. 105
Series Q. Vol. 270, pt. 2
GOVERNOR C. P. THOMSON, LATER LORD SYDENHAM, 1840
Continuation of draft of s
[See Q. 270, pt. 1, p. 236.]
Bill laid before Parliament last session,
p. 267
1840
January 22,
(5) Thomson to Russell, No. 28. Toronto, January 18, 1840.
[Not transcribed.    See Q. 270, pt. 1, p. 69A.] p. 300
(6) Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, on the proposed union
of the Canadas, January 13, 1840. [Not transcribed. See Q. 270,
pt. 1, p. 69A] p. 301
1839
Sir Richard D. Jackson [Commander of the Forces] to Russell. Decembers.
[Not transcribed.    See Q. 262.] p. 481
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 53.    [Draft.]   Directs that Thomson Decemberje.
should consult those on whose judgment he can rely, with respect to
the desire to exclude the Roman Catholic clergy from participation in
distribution of proceeds from the sale of the Clergy Reserves, and to
the commutation of tithes in Lower Canada. p. 515
Thomson to Russell, No. 35. Acknowledges Russell's private
letter of 4 December approving of action taken with regard to the
disputed territory. Transmits copy of a correspondence on this
question. p. 302
Enclosed:
(1) Sir John Harvey [Lieut.-Governor of New Brunswick] to
Thomson, FrederictoD, 28 December, 1839. No. 6, confidential.
Transmits copy of a confidential communication from G. W. Featherstonhaugh. States that all movements of troops will be suspended
until instructions are received from Thomson or from the Commander
of the Forces. Arrangements have been made to facilitate movements
of troops in any emergency. P- 304
Sub-enclosure:
Featherstonhaugh to Harvey, Washington, 12 December, 1839,
private. Outlines the course agreed upon between himself and Fox,
with respect to the disputed territory. Urges that movements of
troops should be suspended. P- 306
(2) Thomson to H. S. Fox [H.M. Minister at Washington],
Toronto, 15 January, 1840. Transmits copy of a correspondence
respecting the disputed territory. Requests to be informed as to
whether Featherstonhaugh has correctly understood Fox s views on
this matter.    [Sub-enclosures not at this place.] p. dll PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 2
1840 (3) Thomson to Harvey,  confidential.    Toronto,  15 January,
1840. Outlines course to be adopted with regard to the disputed
territory. P- 313
(4) Thomson to Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Jackson [Commander of
the Forces], Toronto, 15 January, 1840. Transmits copy of a despatch
to Russell. Sends also a despatch to Harvey [above, enclosure (3) ].
Requests Jackson to forward this to Harvey, if he approves of the
course outlined therein, or to give Harvey such instructions as may
seem better advised. Trusts that the opinion of Fox can be obtained
in about 10 days. p. 316
(5) Jackson to Thomson, Montreal, 19 January, 1840. States
that he has instructed Harvey to suspend movements of troops.
Transmits copy of a correspondence. p. 318
Sub-enclosures:
(i) Jackson to Harvey, Montreal, 13 January, 1840. Issues
instructions respecting movements of troops and occupation of the
Madawaska settlement. p. 319
(ii) Jackson to Harvey, Montreal, 19 January, 1840. Forwards
Thomson's despatch to Harvey, 15 January, 1840, and orders that no
further movements of troops shall take place without instructions
from Thomson. Transmits copies of a despatch to Russell, 16 [sic]
January, and of a letter to Fox, 19 January. States that Sir Colin
Campbell has been instructed to support Harvey in any emergency, p. 322
Enclosed in sub-enclosure:
(a) Jackson to Russell, Montreal, 19 January, 1840. Transmits
copies of letters to Fox and Thomson. p. 323
(b) Jackson to Fox, Montreal, 19 January, 1840. States that
he has ordered suspension of military movements in the disputed
territory. Transmits croquis of blockhouses erected and being
erected by the people of Maine, at the junction of the Fish and the
St. John rivers.    [Croquis not at this place.] p. 324
uary22, Thomson to Russell, No. 36.    [Printed.]    Stresses the necessity
of finding a solution to the problem of the Clergy Reserves. Transmits
copy of an Act of the Legislature and explains the principles upon
which it was founded. Reviews the history of the dispute over these
reserves. [This despatch, with its enclosures, published in Parliamentary Papers, Command No. 148. It has been collated with the
original and the necessary corrections have been made.] p. 327
Enclosed:
(1) Message from Thomson to Assembly of Upper Canada,
respecting the Clergy Reserves, Toronto, 6 January, 1840.
[Printed.] p. 330
(2) Draft of a Bill.    [Printed.] p. 330
(3) Bill as passed.    [Printed.] p. 332 Q. 270, pt. 2 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942 5
(4) Address from the Legislature of Upper Canada, to Thomson,       1840
21 January, 1840.    [Printed.]    Urges that the Clergy Reserve Bill
should  be  transmitted   to   England   for  the  approval  of Parliament, p. 333
(5) Thomson to the Legislature of Upper Canada. [Printed.]
Promises to transmit the Clergy Reserve Bill, without delay,    p. 333
Thomson to Russell, No. 37.    Discusses the need of an Imperial January 22,
act, in order to give effect to the Upper Canada bill respecting the Toronto
Clergy Reserves. p. 335
Thomson to [Russell], private.    Recommends that J. Stuart, January 23,
Chief Justice of Lower Canada, should be given some mark of dis- Toronto-
tinction.    Draws attention to the service performed by Stuart in
drafting the Act of Union. p. 338
Thomson to Russell, private.    Discusses the need of supple- January 24,
mentary legislation in connection with the Clergy Reserves Bill. Toronto-
Points out that no bill which should leave untouched the investments
in the English funds, would have a chance of success in Canada, p. 341
Thomson to Russell, No. 38.    Transmits an application from February 4,
A. B. Hawke, chief emigrant agent for Upper Canada, requesting Toronto-
remuneration for the agent for the distribution of relief to commuted
pensioners.    Explains the circumstances under which this agent was
appointed. p. 344
Enclosed:
Hawke to S. B. Harrison [Private Secretary], Toronto, 13 January,
1840. P- 348
Sub-enclosure:
A. McDonell to Hawke, House of Assembly, 7 January, 1840.
States that he has had to employ an agent to distribute relief to the
pensioners.    Requests an allowance for this individual. p. 349
Thomson to Russell, No. 39.    [Printed.]    Transmits copy of an Februarys,
address from the Bishop of Toronto to the clergy of the diocese, with Toronto-
reference to the Clergy Reserves legislation.    This address has appeared in the public prints.    Regrets the adoption of this course by
the Bishop, whose sentiments are not shared by the majority of the
communicants of that church. P- 351
Enclosed:
Address, Toronto, 15 January, 1840.    [Printed.] p. 351A
Sub-enclosure: Form of petition in behalf of the Colonial
Church.    [Printed.] P' 6bia
Thomson to Russell, No. 40.    Transmits a report from S. Derby- February 10,
shire, respecting the state of feeling in Maine. P- 000 Kv.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 270, pt. 2
Report of Derbyshire,
Maine, 12 December, 1839.
to Sir John Harvey, Portland,
p. 357
Thomson to Russell, No. 41. Corrects a statement made in his
despatch of 18 January, in which he had said that all but three of the
emigrants from Colonel Wyndham's estates had left the province.
This remark should only apply to the emigrants employed by J.
Brown. As the result of information received from C Rubridge, he I
has ordered further enquiries to be made on this subject. Sees no (:
grounds to change his views. p. 434
Thomson to Russell, No. 42. Transmits copy of a memorial
from T. Parke, M.P.P., respecting his claim for indemnification for
loss sustained in the erection of public buildings in Toronto. Explains
the circumstances of the case, and requests permission to cancel
Parke's bond. p. 437
Enclosed:
(1) Parke to Colborne, Toronto, 4 April, 1839. Memorial,   p. 449
(2) Report of Executive Council, Toronto, 17 May, 1839.    Rec
ommends that Parke should be paid £250.
p. 444
Thomson to Russell, No. 43. [Printed.] Transmits copy of his
speech on proroguing the Legislature of Upper Canada. Urges
establishment of the union of the Canadas, on the conditions which
have been accepted in both provinces. Stresses the need to confirm
the Bill respecting the Clergy Reserves. p. 462A
Enclosed:
Speech, 11 February, 1840.
[Printed.]
p. 463
Thomson to Russell, No. 44. Transmits copy of a letter from
Rev. Egerton Ryerson, respecting the financial position of the
Wesleyan Conference. Points out that if the Clergy Reserves Bill
should pass, the Wesleyans will be entitled to a share in the proceeds
of those Reserves. This sum will be paid to the Methodist Church of
Canada. Urges that the grant from Crown revenues should also be
paid to the Methodist Church of Canada, and that some portion of
it should be appropriated for the support of Upper Canada
Academy. p. 465
Enclosed:
1840.
E. Ryerson to Governor General, Toronto, 17 January,
p. 472
Thomson to Russell, No. 45. States that he has received two
despatches from H. S. Fox [H.M. Ministry at Washington] dated 26
January and 3 February, respectively. As Fox has transmitted
copies of these despatches to the Secretary of State for Foreign
Affairs, Thomson has not thought it necessary to send further copies.
Transmits copy of his letter to Harvey, instructing that officer not to
re-occupy the posts on the St. John, unless further action should be
taken by the Maine authorities. p. 479 . 270, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1
Enclosed:
Thomson to Harvey, Toronto, 14 February, 1840.
p. 483
Thomson to Russell, No. 46.    Transmits copy of an account of February 12,
a meeting held at Quebec, for the purpose of preparing an address Toronto-
against the union of the Canadas.    States that this step has been
taken under the leadership of John Neilson.    Discusses the personnel
of the anti-union party and denies that this party has any extensive
support among persons of influence. p. 485
Enclosed:
Report of meeting.
.490
Thomson to Russell, No. 47. Acknowledges Russell's despatch February 1;
No. 53, of 16 December. States that this despatch was written under Toronto-
the erroneous impression that the prevailing opinion in Canada is
that the proceeds of the sale of Clergy Reserves should be divided
among all Protestant ministers. Stresses the fact that, on the
contrary, the opinion is that these proceeds should be devoted to
education and general improvement and not to the support of the
ministers of any religion. Upholds the right of the Roman Catholics
of Upper Canada to share in any such arrangement. Draws a
distinction between Upper and Lower Canada, with respect to tithes
and to the Clergy Reserves. States that tithes are paid without a
murmur in Lower Canada. Doubts that tithes could be exacted in
Upper Canada. Urges that in Lower Canada, the division of the
proceeds of sales of Clergy Reserves should be confined to the Protestant denominations. p. 510
Thomson to Russell, No. 48.    Explains the circumstances under February 1;
which L. P. Sherwood was permitted to retire from the bench, with a Toronto-
pension of £666.13.4.    States that as a result of the vacancy thus
created, C A. Hagerman has been raised to the bench, W. H. Draper
has succeeded Hagerman, as Attorney General, and Robert Baldwin
has been made Solicitor General, in the room of Draper. p. 518
Unsigned to Thomson, separate.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thorn- Mareh20-E
son's despatch No. 39, of 5 February.    States that he had not expected
the Bishop of Toronto to adopt such a course.    Expresses satisfaction
that other members of the Church of England have accepted the bill as
a satisfactory solution of the problem of the Reserves. p. 354
Russell to Thomson, No. 90.    [Printed.]    Expresses approval of MarchM,^
the various steps taken by Thomson to adjust difficulties in the   ownmg
p. 463A
Unsigned to J. Backhouse [Under Secretary, Foreign Office]. »*£,*■ w
[Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 35, witn its
enclosures. P-6Zb
Unsigned to C E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury]. ^Xniafbept.]
Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 38, of 4 February, and
requests a decision on the application contained therein. p     ^>
Russell to Thomson, No. 91.
No. 46, of 12 February.
Acknowledges Thomson's il Dept.
56 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 2
1840 Unsigned to Thomson, No. 92.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
rcarioniai'De ti son's depatch, No. 43, of 11 February, and approves of speech enclosed
ep . tnerein p 454
Unsigned to J. Backhouse [Under Secretary, Foreign Office].
[Draft.] Requests copies of despatches from Fox to Thomson, dated
26 January and 3 February, respectively. p. 482
SoniaiDept] Unsigned to Trevelyan. [Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's
despatch No. 42, of 11 February, and recommends that permission be
given to cancel Parke's bond. p. 441
prii2. Unsigned to the Commissioners of Land and Emigration.   [Draft.]
loioniai Dept.] Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 41, of 10 February,   p. 436
prii io. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 102.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
;0iomai DePt.] gon,g degpatch No 48j of 13 February. States that he has recommended approval of the pension granted to Sherwood. Transmits
warrants for the appointments made as a result of Sherwood's retirement. Directs that the customary fees should be paid for these
warrants. p. 521
^lVfaiDe Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   104.    [Draft.]    States  that  the
| oma   ept.] rrreagury a&s consented to the cancellation of Parke's bond.       p. 443 I
prii is- Unsigned to Thomson, separate.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thorn- .
,ooma ept.] gon>g despatch No. 44, of 12 February. States that there is no
objection to the course recommended therein, but sanction will not
be given to these measures until the fate of the Clergy Reserves Bill
shall have been determined. p. 471
Gonial De t ] Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   130.    [Draft.]    States  that  the
ep. -preagury jlaye sanctioned the grant of an allowance to the person
employed by A. McDonell, as agent for distributing relief to the
commuted pensioners. p. 347
Series Q. Vol. 270, pt. 3
GOVERNOR C. P. THOMSON, LATER LORD SYDENHAM, 1840
;ebruaryi3, Thomson to Russell, separate.    States that Lieut. J. T. W. Jones
oronto. jlag Deen frequently employed in confidential missions.    Refers to
two reports made by that officer, which had been sent to Russell.
Urges that some mark of distinction be given to Jones, and that his
name should be mentioned for promotion. p. 525
;ebruaryi3, Thomson to Russell, confidential.    Refers to his despatch of
oronto. 22 January, and offers further observations upon the proposed act of
union. Discusses the following points (1) tenure of seats in the
Legislative Council (2) municipal institutions and by-laws (3) the
civil list (4) the importance of confining the power of introducing
money bills to the executive government. Enters into an exposition
of the difficulties which have been caused by the initiation of money
bills by private members. States that the budget and estimates
have been referred in the past to a finance committee to which no
member of the Government usually belongs. Expects great improvement will result from a provision which would invest the Government
with control over money matters. p. 528 Q. 270, pt. 3
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Thomson to Russell, No. 49.    Transmits copy of the Gazette,       1840
containing titles of the bills which have passed during the session of February 13,
the Upper Canada Legislature.    States that these bills will be sent       to'
home m the regular manner.    Explains the circumstances under which
he recommended the renewal of the law governing the rate of the
currency.    This renewal is for a period of two years, in order to allow
time to frame satisfactory legislation.    States that he will write later
with regard to bills which have been reserved. p. 536
Enclosed:
Upper Canada Gazette, 13 February, 1840.
p. 538
T. W. C Murdock [Chief Secretary] to J. Stephen [Under Secre- February u
tary].    Transmits a clause which may have been left out of the original Toronto-
bill sent home on 22 January, but wnich will be found in its proper
place in the duplicate which will be sent immediately. p. 563
Enclosed:
Clause for fixing places and times for holding parliament.
p. 564
Thomson to Russell, No. 50.    Transmits copy of a memorial Febr
from the trustees of Upper Canada Academy, praying for pecuniary
relief.    States that he has advanced £200 to that institution, and recommends that the prayer of this memorial be acceded to. p. 565
Enclosed:
Memorial of the trustees of Upper Canada Academy, Toronto,
27 January, 1840. p. 570
Thomson to Russell,.No. 51. Refers to the rule laid down by Febr
the Treasury, with reference to expenditures for barracks and for the
custody and maintenance of prisoners. Points out that of the sum
of £432.13.2., which was spent in connection with state prisoners,
£50.0.2\ was expended upon repairing casements and constructing a
ward in the district hospital. Requests authority to repay this sum to
the Military Chest, out of the casual and territorial revenue.     p. 575
Thomson to Russell, No. 52.    Transmits copy of a report of Fete
John  Macaulay,  Inspector General, respecting ports of entry in
Upper Canada.    Advocates the adoption of the remedy suggested
therein.    Upper.Canada should be divided into revenue districts, each
with its own custom house and customs administration. p. 579
Enclosed:
Report of J. Macaulay, Toronto, 5 February, 1840.
p. 583
Thomson to Russell, No. 53.    Transmits seven addresses which Feb™
were adopted by the Assembly during the last session, together with
a schedule thereof.    States that he will communicate later, with
regard to some of these addresses. P- 591
Enclosed:
(1) Schedule of addresses.
p. 592 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 3
(2) No. 1. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 8 February,
1840. Prays for the adoption of a scheme of emigration from Great
Britain and Ireland. Refers to the system adopted in 1820 and in
1825. Declares a willingness to concur in the disposal of waste lands
for this purpose. States that a feeling of confidence and security
prevails in the province. p. 605
(3) No. 2. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 24 December,
1839. Requests that the act prohibiting importation of tea from the
United States may be amended so as to permit such importation, on
payment of a duty. p. 612
(4) No. 3. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 4 January, 1840.
Complains that the effect of the Canada Trade Act is to give advantages to the growth of wheat in the United States which cannot be
realized in Canada. Requests an amendment of that Act. Prays
that Canadian wheat and flour should be admitted into Great Britain
on the same terms as that of Ireland or other integral parts of the
Empire, and that Parliament should amend Clause 46 of the Constitutional Act, so as to empower the local legislature to legislate
upon duties. p. 613
(5) No. 4. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 27 January,
1840. Prays for compensation for Christopher Leggo, of Brockville,
whose shop was forcibly entered and rifled by the Volunteers.     p. 620
(6) No. 5. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 4 February,
1840. Prays that Great Britain will indemnify those who suffered in
the insurrection. p. 624
(7) No. 6. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 5 February,
1840. Prays that the commuted pensioners should be restored to the
pension list. p. 629
(8) No. 7. Address of Assembly, Upper Canada, 25 January,
1840. Prays that the Royal consent shall not be withheld from the
act to empower the Government to acquire Welland Canal stock,
owned by private shareholders. p. 632
Papers relating to the foregoing addresses, of subsequent date,
found at this place:
(1) Thomson to Russell, No. 98, Montreal, 1 May, 1840. [Not
transcribed.    See Q. 272, p. 3.    Refers to Address No. 2.] p. 596
(2) No. 3. Russell to Lord Sydenham [C P. Thomson], No. 267,
Downing St., December, 1840. Transmits copy of a letter written
to R. Gillespie, by a Montreal correspondent, urging that Canada
wheat, flour, and other agricultural produce should be admitted
free into Britain. Requests that this letter should be taken into
consideration. p. 597
Enclosed:
R. Gillespie to Russell, York Place, 28 November, 1840. Transmits an extract from a letter received from Montreal. p. 598
*V REPORT FOR THE YEAR 19.
Montreal, 6 No
Q. 270, pt. 3
Sub-enclosure:
Extract of lettei
(3) No. 4. Sydenham to Russell, No. 220, Montreal, 21 Janu
1841. Urges that Canadian agricultural produce should be admi
into the United Kingdom free of duty. p.
(4) No. 5. Sydenham to Russell
1840. Transmits a memorial to the
Bathurst District, on the grain trade
to his despatch to Russell No. 267, s
posal to admit free importation of
will receive every consideration.
Thomson to Russell, No. 54.   Transmits a further report from i
A. B. Hawke, chief emigrant agent, respecting emigrants sent out a
from Colonel Wyndham's estates.    Draws attention to the fact that
only 52, or less than one-third, of these persons have gone to the
United States.    Regrets the mistake that was made in a previous
report on this subject. p. 634
Enclosed:
Hawke to T. W. C Murdock [Chief Secretary], Emigrant Office,
14 February, 1840.    Report. p. 636
Sub-enclosures:
(i) John Brown to Hawke, Port Hope,  11 February,  1840.
I Explains the circumstances under which he was convinced that all but
three of the emigrants had left for the United States. p. 638
(ii) C Rubidge [late agent for Colonel Wyndham] to [Hawke],
Toronto, 1 February, 1840. Transmits a list of emigrants, their ages
and place of abode. p. 640
Enclosed in sub-enclosure:
(a) List, 31 January, 1840.
p. 641
(b) Rubidge to Hawke, Woodlands, Otonabee, 10 January, 1840.
States that 131 emigrants remain near Cobourg, Port Hope, or in
Cavan, and that 52 have gone to the United States or left the district.
The heads of three families had been without work for a few days.
Care will be taken to avoid such a contingency in the future.     p. 648
Thomson to Russell, No. 55. Acknow
No. 41, of 25 November. Urges that the i
House, Toronto, should be purchased by the
be paid for out of the casual and territorial i
nue
Lussell's despatch i
j of Government
ment, and should
p. 649
Lower i
Thomson to Russell, No. 56. Reports his return
Canada. States that Sir George Arthur has resumed the government
of Upper Canada. Expresses confidence in the success of his policy
while adniinistering the government of that province, and his intention
to keep a close supervision over developments there. Stresses the
necessity of an early settlement with regard to the system of government for the Canadas. P- 653 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 270, pt. 3
1840
Montreal.
Thomson to Russell, No. 57.    Transmits a petition to the Queen,
which has been agreed to by a great majority of the persons of property
and station at Quebec.    States that he has discouraged tendencies to :
draw up petitions in favour of union, but has urged people to rely
upon the wisdom and justice of Parliament. p. 660
Enclosed:
Petition in favour of union, Quebec, 31 January, 1840.       p. 663
Thomson to Russell, No. 58. Acknowledges Russell's despatch
No. 37, of 15 November. Requests, at the instance of the Rev. W.
Anderson, that his salary as rector of William Henry may be continued
to 1 April. Points out that this salary has been voted by Parliament, p. 671
Thomson to Russell, No. 59. Refers to his confidential despatch
of 22 January, and states that the grand jury of Gaspe have protested
against the proposal to annex that district to New Brunswick. Declares that he regards this as proof that the inhabitants desire to
remain a part of Lower Canada. p. 674
Thomson to Russell, No. 60. Transmits copy of a petition from
Hugh Earl, late master and commander in the provincial navy,
soliciting renewal of the temporary half-pay which he received,
1813-1815. p. 677
Enclosed:
Petition of H. Earl, Kingston, 17 February, 1840.
p. 681
Thomson to Russell, No. 61. Transmits copy of a letter from
D. C Napier, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, respecting estimates
for that Department. States his conviction that the office of resident
interpreter at Caughnawaga should be continued for the present, p. 686
Enclosed:
Napier to T. W.  C Murdock [Chief Secretary],  Quebec, 24
February, 1840. p. 688
Sub-enclosure:
Estimate, Quebec, 18 February, 1840.
p. 690
Thomson to Russell, No. 62. Transmits copy of a despatch
from Sir Charles FitzRoy, Lieutenant-Governor of Prince Edward
Island, respecting the proposed annexation of the Magdalen Islands
to the government of Prince Edward Island. Agrees with the views
expressed by FitzRoy, and urges that these islands should be annexed
to Prince Edward Island. p. 692
Enclosed:
FitzRoy to Governor General, Government House, Prince
Edward Island, 24 December, 1839. p. 695 REPORT FOR THE YEA
Sub-
iclosurc
Extract of a letti
FitzRoy, 20 Septembi
accrue to the Magdalei
Island.
; Edward
p. 698
Thomson to Russell, No. 63. [Duplicate.] Transmits copy of a February v.
wrespondenee with Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Jackson, Commander of Momretli•
io Forces, and with Sir George Arthur, respecting the militia and
riunteers. Agrees with the view expressed by Arthur, that 87
[ficers and 1,777 non-commissioned officers and men should be
tained in Upper Canada; and with Jackson's view that 45 officers
nd 1,056 non-commissioned officers and men are required in Lower
|anada. States that he cannot recommend any greater reduction
[ the non-permanent force. Points out that Jackson has urged the
rmation of a militia force applicable to the protection of the whole
f British North America, and declares that he intends to work upon
plan to that effect. States that these troops have been engaged
>r two years. Requests that the necessary arms and supplies should
e sent without delay. p. 700
osed:
(1) Jackson to Governor General, Montreal, 25 February, 1840
Proposes that militia forces should be available for the defence of the
whole of British North America. Outlines militia needs of Lower
Canada. p. 705
Sub
Requisition   for   clothing,   etc
3of4t
, 20 Ja
sralry, and of provincial dragoons, for one year, shewing where
penditure varies for the second and following years. p. 720
(iv) Statement No. 3. Suggestions for the reduction of expenses
[ending a troop of provincial dragoons, and the result of this saving
tarried into effect in comparison with the regular forces. p. 721
(v) Explanatory remarks. P-723 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 3
1840 Thomson to Russell, No. 63£.    Refers to Colborne's despatch of
■
February.
Montreal.
1 August, and transmits a further communication from Major-Gen.
John Clitherow, requesting an extra allowance to officers who sat in
courts martial during the previous year. States that he cannot agree
with the request made therein. p. 727
Enclosed:
Clitherow    to    Chief    Secretary,    Montreal,    24    February,
1840. p. 728
March 26. Unsigned to Lord Fitzroy Somerset [Secretary at the Horse
[Colonial Dept.] Guardg]     [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's separate despatch,
of 13 February. p. 526
Apf 7. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 96.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
luaomai jjept.j gQn,g degpatch No> 5^ of 33 February.    Directs him to inform the
people of Gaspe" that in deference to their wishes, that district will
not be annexed to New Brunswick. p. 676
son's despatches Nos. 56 and 66, of 20 February and of 9 March
respectively. Expresses satisfaction with the work done by Thomson.
States that he is aware of the need for an early settlement with regard
to the system of government. Declares that he is anxious to receive
Thomson's report on emigration. p. 658
^oioitfai De t ]        Unsigned to Thomson, No. 98.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
eP . gon»g deSpatch No. 56, [57] of 21 February, and states that the petition
enclosed therein, has been laid before the Queen. p. 662
April 8. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 99.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
oom     ep . gon>g despatch No. 63|, of 29 February.    States that this subject has
been dealt with in his despatch of 10 February. p. 730
5 letter from General Lord Hill [Commander-in-Chief] respecting the
request that promotion should be given to Lieut. J. T. W. Jones.
[Enclosure not at this place.] p.527
A^rino^ ^ Unsigned to C E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury].
oon     eP .j |praft j   Transmits an extract from Thomson's despatch No. 48, of
13 February, and recommends that the retiring allowance mentioned
therein, should be granted to L. P. Sherwood. p. 523
ii Dept.
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 110. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thom-
1 son's despatch No. 62, of 28 February, and states that a clause has
been added to the Canada Act, to annex the Magdalen Islands to
Prince Edward Island. p. 694
April is. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 112.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
[Coioniai Dept.] gon>s despatch No. 58, of 22 February, and consents to the payment of
the Rev. W. Anderson's salary, on the stipulation that this will have
ceased on 1 April. p. 673 Q. 270, pt. 3 REPORT FOR THE YEAR. 1942
xt^   P^si§ned to Sir John Barrow [Second Secretary of the Admiralty].       it
[Draft.]    Transmits  copy  of Thomson's  despatch No.  60,  of  24 Apf »
February, and requests the decision of the Admiralty with reference
to the petition of H. Earl, enclosed therein. p. 679
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]   Transmits copy of Thomson's April 22.
despatch No. 50, of 14 February, and recommends that the Treasury [Colonial Dept-]
should    sanction    the    advance    made   to   the   Upper    Canada
Academy. p< 568
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's „
despatch No. 51, of 14 February, and recommends that the Treasury [dolonial D^^
should   sanction   the   repayment   of   £50.0.2| to the Military,
Chest. p. 577
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's April 22.
despatch No. 52, of 14 February, with its enclosure.    Recommends [Colonial DePt-'
that the Treasury should give favourable consideration to the improvements suggested therein. p. 581
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of a corre- April 30.
spondence respecting the furniture for Government House, Toronto, [Colonial
and requests the decision of the Treasury thereon.    [Enclosures not at
this place.    For Thomson to Russell, No. 55.    See above.]        p. 652 "
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 122. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thorn- May ic
son's despatch No. 63, of 29 February. Approves of the arrange- [Coloni
ments concerning troops, mentioned therein. Transmits copy of a
correspondence with the Treasury, respecting requisitions for those
troops, showing that the Ordnance has been requested to make the
necessary provision, without delay. [Enclosures not at this place.
See Q. 275, pt. 2, p. 327.] p. 703
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 124.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of May 12.
a letter from the Treasury, approving the grant of a retiring allowance [Colom     ep |
to L. P. Sherwood.    [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 524
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 125. [Draft.] States that tneJ§XJkiD t]
Treasury has sanctioned the advance which was made to the Upper ° * •
Canada Academy. P- 569
Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   129.    [Draft.]
Treasury have sanctioned the repayment of £50.0.2\, j
Thomson's despatch No. 51, of 14 February.
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 134.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of a m*^
letter from the Treasury in reply to the communication with respect
to improvement of the system of ports of entry.  [Enclosure not at this
place.] P-582
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 152. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thorn- Juneu^
son's despatches No. 53, of 15 February, transmitting addresses of
Assembly, and No. 98 of 1 May, containing a report on the secondol
these addresses. States that this report has been referred to tfce
Treasury. Requests that reports on the other addresses should be
sent as soon as p«°°^i° P* &
Dept.] 64 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 270, pt. 3
1840 Unsigned to commissioners for Colonial Land and Emigration.
fcdoniai De 11 [Draft-]    Transmits copy of the address from the Assembly of Upper
ep ' Canada, praying for the promotion of emigration.    Requests a report
upon means of complying with this request, without making a grant
from British funds. P- 595
rcobnWDe t Unsigned to Lord Sydenham [C. P. Thomson], No. 239.   [Draft.]
ep . gtateg tnat ^e Admjralty cannot consent to the renewal of the temporary half-pay, which was formerly granted to H. Earl. p. 680
Series O. Vol. 271; pt. 1
GOVERNOR C. P. THOMSON, LATER LORD SYDENHAM, 1840
foS3iiet] Unsigned to Thomson, No. 67.    States that he has directed
ep. ^e chjgf Justice of Upper Canada, to return to that colony, before
15 March. p. 209
February 6. Unsigned to Thomson, separate.    [Draft.]    Discusses the am-
[Coiomai Dept.] kigUity inherent in the agreement respecting the disputed territory.
Directs Thomson to attempt to obtain a more satisfactory arrangement. Suggests that after consultation, Thomson may be able to
judge how far it may be expedient to avoid pressing claims to occupy
those parts of the disputed territory which are not necessary for
security. Declares that Great Britain cannot permit continuous
encroachments upon her territory. p. 143
February^ Unsigned to Thomson, confidential.    [Draft.]    Relates to the
[Co omai ept.] gtep taken by the State of Maine, in an attempt to force the United
States to take action against British troops in the disputed territory.
Directs that these troops are not to be withdrawn from the Madawaska
settlement. Transmits extract of a private letter from Lord Seaton,
on this subject. [Enclosure not at this place. See Q. 277A, p.
31.] p. 146
February 13. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 78.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of a
o oma   ept.] jetter from the Treasury, respecting the method of issuing Thomson's
salary, and that of his staff.    [Letter not at this place.] p. 64
^fdEfrjept.] Unsigned to Thomson. [Draft.] Discusses the stand taken in
the United States and by Maine, with respect to the disputed territory.
Points to infractions of the agreement on the part of Maine. Directs
that a new agreement should be made under which, at least, the north
bank of the St. John will remain in British possession. The erection
of a blockhouse opposite the Fish River, is to be considered. In
order to avoid conflict, considerable latitude should be given to the
terms, "possession and jurisdiction." p. 150.
F?bruaryu. Unsigned to J. Backhouse [Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs].
ep ' Transmits copies of two despatches marked confidential and separate,
which have been addressed to Thomson, with respect to the disputed
territory and the agreement relating thereto.    [See above.]       p. 158
iCdo'SaiDe t]        Russell to Thomson, confidential, separate.    Transmits copy of
ep' a _ despatch which will be sent by Palmerston to Fox, respecting the
disputed territory.    Fox will receive a copy of Russell's confidential 5. 271, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
despatch to Thomson.    Fox and Harvey have been instructed to act       1840
with Thomson in this matter.    Harvey is to take directions from
Thomson. p j^g
Enclosed:
Unsigned to Harvey, separate [Colonial Dept.], 19 February,
1840. [Draft.] Instructs him to take directions from Thomson,
with respect to the disputed territory. p. 161
Thomson to Russell, No. 64. Refers to Glenelg's despatch of JJareh 2,
28 February, 1838, and transmits a further memorial of James Kerr, Montreal-
formerly judge at Quebec, praying to be allowed the whole of his
salary, from the date of his removal until the date upon which his
successor was appointed, 2 April, 1835 to 22 February, 1836. Supports Kerr's contention, on the ground that the rule which allows
only half salary to absent officers has never been enforced. Gives as
his opinion, that this rule should be made known to public officers
and should be enforced in future cases. p. 3
Enclosed:
Memorial of James Kerr, Quebec, 29 February, 1840.
p. 9
Thomson to Russell, No. 65.    Transmits copy of a letter from March ;
Lt.-Col.  Sir John Oldfield, Commanding Royal Engineer, with a Montrei
digest of receipts and returns of expenditure upon the Rideau Canal,
1838-1839. p. 13
Enclosed:
Oldfield to T.  W.  C  Murdock [Chief Secretary],  Montreal,
4 March, 1840. p. 15
Comparative statement of the establishment employed on the
Rideau Canal for the years 1838 and 1839. p. 16
Thomson to Russell, No. 66. States that while some division of Marcho.
opinion is manifest in Lower Canada, there is no reason to fear dis- on rea'
turbance. Discusses opposition to union on the part of the Roman
Catholic clergy. Declares that he has dealt in another despatch with
the question of extinction of seigniorial rights. Reports that he
intends to summon the Special Council, when he will propose ordinances for the improvement of the judicature, for establishing district
courts, for the erection of those courts and prisons, and for the creation
of township and parish government. States that he is considering the
question of a comprehensive system of education, upon which subject
he has received a report. P- 21
Thomson to Russell, confidential. Discusses the opposition to March^
the proposed union, which he attributes to the clergy and to the party
which constituted the majority in the last Assembly. Declares tnat
petitions in opposition to the union should not receive undue importance or be considered as opinion among the moderate and better informed persons of both races.    Is in favour of that measure.      p. £1 1840
March 11,
Montreal.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 271, pt. 1
Thomson to Russell, No. 67. Promises to write
dealing with the financial conditions of the provinces. Discusses the
public debt of the two provinces. Divides the subject under (1) debt
for general provincial expenditure, (2) public works, (3) advances to
private companies, (4) works for which the interest is levyable under
acts of the Legislature, by local taxation. Advocates that the debt
of the provinces should be united and charged upon the general revenue
of the united provinces. p. 39
Thomson to Russell, separate.    Represents the inconvenience^-
which is sustained by the fact that private letters to himself and to
his staff, have not been forwarded in the bag containing despatches
Offers to pay the customary postage. p. 46
Thomson to Russell, No. 68. [Printed.] Transmits an address
to the Queen, and copies of two addresses to himself, on the subject
of seigniorial rights in the city and island of Montreal. Declines to
re-open this much disputed question, but points out that a commission
of enquiry, of 1836, has shown that the seminary has an equitable
right to dues. States that he intends to propose an ordinance for the
extinction of these rights. p. 52
Enclosed:
(1) Address to the Queen, Montreal, February, 1840. [Printed.
Prays that the Royal assent shall be withheld from the ordinance to
extinguish seigniorial rights, on the grounds that the seminary is
not entitled to compensation. p. 52A
(2) Petition of the chairman and deputation in charge of the
accompanying petition [Enclosure 3], Montreal, 13 March, 1840
[Printed.] Represents that public opinion is in favour of the ordinance, which grants compensation to the seminary. p. 54
(3) Petition from Montreal, 3 February, 1840. [Printed.] Prays
that the projected arrangement between the Government and the
seminary, will be concluded. p. 54A
Thomson to Russell, No. 69. Refers to Russell's despatch No.
59, of 3 January, and states that Major G. D. Hall was gazetted as
military secretary and principal aide-de-camp. Declares that Hall
has received no allowances except forage for two horses. Points out
that this position was previously held by Col. G. Couper. Hall
has written to Couper to discover what allowances are attached to
the position. p. 57
Attached:
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 59 [Colonial Dept.]. 3 January,
1840. [Draft.] Requests information as to the position held by
Major G. D. Hall, and as to allowances drawn by him. p. 59
Thomson to Russell, No. 70. Acknowledges Russell's despatch
No. 55, of 26 December, and states that as Major R. H. Bonnycastle
has left Canada, he is unable to acquaint that officer with Russell's
determination. n. 60 Q. 271, pt. 1 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Thomson to Russell, No. 71.   Acknowledges Russell's despatch       1840
No. 78, of 13 February, respecting allowances to the Governor and ^BZOh16,'
his staff.    Comments on the action of R. I. Routh, Commissary Montreal-
General, in communicating with the Treasury, without waiting to
receive the information required. p. 62
Thomson to Russell, No. 72. Transmits copy of an address from March 17,
Stansted, Sherbrooke and Shefford, to Colonel R. Nickle, Command- Montreal-
ing on Particular Service, together with Nickle's reply thereto,    p. 66
Enclosed:
(1) Complimentary Address. p. 69
(2) Reply of Colonel Nickle, 5 March, 1840. p. 73
(3) J. Hackett, J.P., to T. W. C Murdock [Chief Secretary],
Hatley, 5 March, 1840. Transmits copy of the address to Nickle,
and of that officer's- reply. Requests that this tribute should be
forwarded to Her Majesty's Government. [Signed by members of
the deputation appointed to present the address.] p. 78
Thomson to Russell, No. 73. Acknowledges Russell's despatch March is,
No. 75, of 10 February, respecting the grant of an allowance of 10s. Montreal-
per day to officers who served on courts martial for the trial of political
prisoners. Refers to his despatch of 29 February, stating his views
on this question. Presumes that the allowance now granted is to be
paid from the Military Chest, which arrangement he feels to be just.
His objection had been directed against the proposal to meet this
charge from the funds of the province. p. 82
Thomson to Russell, No. 74.   Acknowledges Russell's despatch ffiiehj*>'
No. 71, of 4 February, and transmits copy of an instruction to T. A.    ontr   '
Stayner, Deputy Postmaster General, directing him to make arrangements for the daily transmission of mail between Quebec and Montreal,
by     steamboat.      This   arrangement   is   to   be  for the. summer
months. P- 86
Enclosed:
T. W. C Murdock to Stayner, Montreal, 6 March, 1840.    p. 89
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 71, and to Sir George Arthur,
[Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada], No. 63 [Colonial Dept.],
4 February, 1840. [Draft.] Transmits copy of a letter and report
from the Deputy Postmaster General at Quebec, respecting proceedings taken to prevent illicit conveyance of mails. Directs that
assistance should be given to Stayner, in his efforts to combat this
practice. [Enclosures not at this place. See Series G, Vol. 46,
p. 109.] P- 88
March 22,
Thomson to Russell, No. 75.    Refers to despatches of 24 January, Montreal.
23 and 28 February, and transmits an address to the Queen, from the
inhabitants of Gaspe, protesting against the proposed severance of
that district, from Lower Canada. P- y^ PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Enclosed:
Address.    [No date.]
Q. 271, pt. 1
p. 94
Address from the inhabitants of Gaspe, to Thomson, New
Carlisle, 12 December, 1839. Protesting against the proposed
severance of that district, from Lower Canada. p. 98
Thomson to Russell, No. 76. Refers to Normanby's despatch
No. 65, of 12 August last, and transmits copy of a letter from J. H.
Kerr, respecting land sought for by the heirs of the late Chief Justice
J. Sewell. Declares that this letter is unsatisfactory, and that Kerr
has been informed that the case cannot be recommended to
Russell. p. 103
Enclosed:
Kerr to T. W. C Murdock [Chief Secretary], Quebec, 20 March,
1840. Explains the circumstances under which Sewell did not take
advantage of the order for land, given to him in 1829. p. 105
Thomson to Russell, No. 77. Acknowledges Russell's despatch
of 27 December, enclosing a correspondence with the British American
Land Company, and requesting information respecting the position of
that Company and an opinion on the proposals and the course to be
adopted. Discusses these points and concludes that indulgence should
not be given to the Company. If they fail to accept the terms now
proposed, they should be compelled to fulfil the terms of their agreement, under threat of legal proceedings. Urges expedition in settling
the matter. p. 109
Thomson to Russell, No. 78.
regulations for the government of police
.s copies of reports and
p. 133
Thomson to Russell, confidential. Acknowledges Russell's con-
- fidential and separate despatches of 6 and 19 February. States that
he has been in consultation with Jackson, respecting the disputed
territory, and that no position will be abandoned unless a new arrangement with Maine should make this advisable. Transmits copy of a
despatch to Fox, directing him to obtain a new agreement with the
United States, which will remove the ambiguity prevailing respecting
the agreement now in force. Doubts the efficacy of an agreement
with, the United States. Discusses terms to be proposed, and measures
to be adopted if negotiations fail. Comments upon opinion in
Maine. p. 137
Enclosed:
Thomson to H. S. Fox [H.M. Minister at Washington], Montreal,
20 March, 1840. p. 164
Thomson to Russell, confidential. Transmits a memorandum
from Sir Richard Jackson, respecting the state of Montreal and its
immediate frontier, together with a map, which illustrates the observations contained therein. States that while it would be impossible for
him to comment upon the opinions with regard to military matters Q. 271, pt. 1
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
which are expressed by Jackson, he recommends the adoption of these       1840
proposals, m view of the care and attention which that officer has
devoted to the question, and the anxiety that he has evinced to avoid
unnecessary expenditure.    [Map not at this place.] p. 169
Enclosed:
Memorandum.
Sub-enclosure:
p. 171
Memoranda respecting the probable expense of defences for
Montreal and the frontier between the Richelieu and St. Lawrence
rivers. Lt.-Col Sir John Oldfield, Commanding Royal Engineers,
24 March, 1840. p. 186
Thomson to Russell, No. 79.    Acknowledges Russell's despatch March 31,
No. 79, of 17 February, respecting the Upper Canada Act to regulate MontreaL
Payment of Costs in Certain Cases.    This despatch has been sent to
the Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, in order to enable him to
comply with the instructions contained therein. p. 196
Thomson to Russell,  No. 80.    Transmits a petition from the April 4,
Roman Catholic clergy of Lower Canada, deprecating the union and Montreal-
praying for restitution of the constitution.    States that he does not
think that much weight should be attached to this address.    Requests
that it should be acknowledged, for some soreness has been felt with
regard to some addresses which have been unnoticed. p. 199
Enclosed:
Address, Montreal, 25 February, 1840.    [In French.] p. 202
Russell to Thomson,
. 658.]
No. 97.    [Not transcribed.
See Q. 270,\
p. 26 ]
Thomson to Russell, No. 81. Acknowledges Russell's despatch April 9,
No. 67, of 1 February. Reports that he has since learned that Montres
J. B. Robinson, Chief Justice, would not leave England till the middle
or end of April. Declares that considerable dissatisfaction has been
expressed at the long absence of Robinson, particularly in view of his
political activities in England. Requests that no further leave be
granted to him. Asks for instructions regarding payment of Robinson's emoluments, during this absence. . P- 206
Unsigned to Thomson, confidential. [Draft.] Acknowledges April9.
Thomson's confidential despatch of 9 March, and expresses satisfaction i°° om£
that moderate men are favourable to the proposed union. p. 38
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 103. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thorn- Apriin
son's despatch No. 64, of 2 March. Complies with his request that
Kerr should be allowed full salary from 2 April, 1835, to 22 February,
1836. Approves of Thomson's suggestion that notice should be
given regarding future observance of the rule governmg the salary ol
absent officers. P'
Thomson to Russell, No. 82. Applies for a lithographic press for Aprii^
'he use of the Board of Works, in Lower Canada. P- *w V
70 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 271, pt. 1
1840 Thomson to Russell, No. 83.    Refers to his confidential despatch
April 14. 0f 24 December last, in which he had suggested that the proclamation
on real. ^ umon should be left to the Governor. Points out the necessity for
continuing the suspension of the constitution of Lower Canada until
this proclamation is made. Explains circumstances under which he
has decided not to issue new writs of election for Upper Canada until
he has learned the fate of the Union Bill. p. 216
April 17. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 111.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thorn-;
[Colonial Dept.] gon,g geparate despatch of 12 March, and states that he has given
orders that private letters directed to Thomson and his suite are to
be forwarded in the official bag. p. 50
APrii2i, Russell to Thomson, No. 113.    Acknowledges Thomson's des-
Downngst.     patch Nq  75j m 22 March; and gtateg that the address from Gaspe,
has been laid before the Queen.   Points out that this matter has been
disposed of in his despatch of 7 April. p. 102
[Colonial Dept ] Unsigned to Thomson, No. 115.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom
son's confidential despatch of 25 March, and approves of the course
adopted in respect to the disputed territory. p. 163
Do^On^st. m Stephen [Under Secretary for the Colonies] to R. Byham
[Secretary to the Board of Ordnance]. Transmits Thomson's confidential despatch of 26 March, together with the memorandum on
Montreal and its immediate frontier. Requests that the plan outlined therein should be considered by the Ordnance, and states that
Russell is of opinion that a requisition should be made to Parliament
for £25,000 to carry out these works, if they should be approved.
Requests return of the documents. p. 187
gonial Dept ] m Stephen [Under Secretary] to Commissioners of Metropolitan
Police. Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 78, of 24 March,
and requests copies of reports mentioned therein. p. 135
Unsigned to Backhouse. [Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's
confidential despatch of 25 March, with reference to the disputed
territory. p. 162
l&flriu Dept.] Unsigned to Thomson, No. 120.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom
son's despatch No. 78, of 24 March, and transmits a package containing reports on metropolitan and rural police. [Reports not at this
place.] p. 136
[C^oniai Dept ] Unsigned to Lord Fitzroy Somerset [Secretary at the Horse
Guards]. Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 72, of 17
March, with its enclosures. p. 68
[Colonial Dept.
rnial Dept.]
Unsigned to Lt.-Col. W. L. Maberly [Secretary to the Post Office].
[Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 74, of 20
March, respecting steps taken to establish daily mail service between
Quebec and Montreal during the summer months. p. 91
Unsigned to C. E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary of the Treasury].
[Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch respecting the
allowances and travelling expenses of officers who served on courts Q. 271, pt. 1 REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
martial for the trial of political prisoners.   Requests to be informed      18-
as to whether, in view of the facts stated therein, it may not be right
to modify the instructions to pay these expenses from the colonial
funds. p. 84
Unsigned toC.E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary to the Treasury]. May 4.
[Draft.]    Requests that the  Treasury should instruct  Routh,  to [C°looiaI
communicate directly with the Governor General or through the
proper channel, with respect to allowances. p. 65
Byham to Stephen.    Acknowledges receipt of letter of 24 April. %$£„>
Discusses the general question of defence and points out the reasons
why Jackson's proposals cannot be accepted.    Return the despatch
and enclosures.
.189
deal-
Unsigned to Attorney General.    [Draft.]   Transmits papers
ing with the affairs of the British American Land Company,
requests opinion on legal points connected therewith.    [A similar
letter was addressed to the Solicitor General.] p. 119
Enclosed:
(1) Act for granting certain Powers to the British American
Land Company. [Printed.] [Agreements with the Company, not at
this place.] p. 124
(2) G. R. Robinson [Governor of the British American Land
Company] to Russell, 14 December, 1839. [Not transcribed. See
Q. 266, p. 67.] p. 130
(3) Russell to Thomson, 27 December, 1839, No. 56. [Not
transcribed.    See Q. 266, p. 80.] p. 132
(4) Thomson to Russell, 24 March, 1840. [See above, Q. 271,
pt. 1, p. 109.]
Attached:
Estate of the British American Land Company.
p. 77.]
[See Q. 266,
p. 131
Russell to Thomson, confidential. Acknowledges Thomson's i
confidential despatch of 26 March, and transmits copy of the letter
from Byham to Stephen, of 4 May. Requests that Jackson should
prepare a more specific and detailed report on defence, and that this
should be accompanied by a scientific report as to the amount of
engineering required and of the expense that would be entailed
such a measure.
.194
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 136.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thorn- f
son's despatch No. 82, of 12 April, and states that he has requested
the  Treasury  to   issue  the  necessary  orders  for  a  htnograpluc
press. P- 214
Russell to Thomson, No. 141.   Acknowledges Thomson's des- \
patch No. 80, of 4 April, enclosing a petition from the Roman Catnouc
clergy of Lower Canada. p' 72 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 271, pt. 1
1840 Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's
[CoLniai De t ] despatch No. 82, of 12 April, and requests that the Treasury will issue
ep . ^e necessary orders for a lithograph press for Lower Canada,     p. 212
Attached:
(1) Unsigned to Lord Sydenham [Thomson], No. 324 [Colonial
Dept.], 6 March, 1841. [Draft.] Transmits copy of a letter from the
Treasury, stating that the Comptroller of the Stationery Office had
been instructed to procure a lithographic press for Lower Canada.
[Letter not at this place.] p. 213
(2) Unsigned to Sydenham, No. 377 [Colonial Dept.], 15 May,
1841. [Draft.] States that the press was sent out on 10 August
last, and directs that the cost, £94.4.7, be repaid from the colonial
funds. p. 215
June is, Unsigned to Thomson, No. 154.    Transmits copy of a corre-
[ o omai Dept.] gp0ndence respecting the British American Land Company. States
that the Law Officers have reported that legal proceedings would
probably fail. Directs Thomson to take such steps as may be consistent with law. [Enclosures not at this place. See Q. 271, pt. 1,
p. 119; Q. 275, pt. 1, pp. 130, 133; Q. 276, pt. 1, pp. 130, 132.]     p. 122
July 3. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 173.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
icoiomai DePt.] gon,g despatcll No.  67, of 11  March.    Trusts that the promised
despatch upon the financial condition of the provinces will arrive
shortly. p. 45
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 174. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thomson's despatch No. 68, of 13 March, and states that the address contained therein has been laid before the Queen. States that he awaits
the arrival of the ordinance in question, with some anxiety. p. 56
Series Q. Vol. 271, pt. 2
GOVERNOR C. P. THOMSON, LATER LORD SYDENHAM, 1840
icXiaiDept.] Unsigned to Thomson, No.  65.    [Draft.]    Requests that the
report of the agent for emigrants at Quebec, shall be sent to England
prior to 1 January of each year. p. 298
[CoioXiDep't.]        Unsigned to Thomson, No. 77.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of a
 letter from the Treasury directing that pecuniary relief should be
substituted for the relief in kind which has been granted to military
pensioners in Lower Canada. Directs that these instructions should
be complied with.    [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 330
DCoioniai DePtj Unsigned to Thomson, No. 83.    [Draft.]    Requests to be in
formed as to the date of the appointment of Lt. Jeffrey Hale, as
Receiver General of Lower Canada. p. 391
Montreal. Thomson to Russell, No. 84.    Points out that Lower Canada
has borne the expense for the transmission of despatches which relate
to the general affairs of British North America, and requests authority
[Colonial Dept. Q. 271, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
to repay half of this expense from the Military Chest.   Urges that       1840
for the future only half this expense should be charged against Lower
Canada.
I Thomson to Russell, No. 85. Transmits a report from the April ie,
Deputy Postmaster General, respecting the transmission of mails Jfontreal-
from England to the British North American colonies. Discusses the
system in use at the present time and points to the hardships which
it entails upon the emigrant who cannot meet the heavy charges, and
to features which tend to the adoption of the United States post
office as a means of communication. Advocates the abandonment
of the present system and the immediate adoption of the uniform
rate of one shilling on every letter weighing not more than half an
ounce. p. 224
Enclosed:
(1) T. A. Stayner [Deputy Postmaster General] to T. W. C
Murdock [Chief Secretary], Montreal, 6 April, 1840. Transmits a
report, composed of copies or extracts of correspondence and reports,
respecting the need to improve postal communication with Great
Britain, together with circulars to postmasters. Outlines the steps
which he has taken to impress the authorities with the necessity for
such improvement. p. 237
Sub-enclosure:
Report, Montreal, 6 April, 1840.
(2) Stayner to Murdock, Montreal, 15 April, 1840. Transmits
copy of a letter from the commissioner of the British American Land
Company, complaining of the rate charged on letters from Great
Britain. Points out that similar complaints are made on all
sides. p. 292
Sub-enclosure:
John Fraser to Stayner, British American Land Company's
Office, Sherbrooke, 3 April, 1840. p. 294
Thomson to Russell, No. 86. [Printed.] Transmits copy of the A^ran,
report of A. C Buchanan, chief emigrant agent, and copy of a pro- on re
clamation modifying the regulations under which ships are compelled
to call at Grosse Isle. Points to an increase in emigration. Urges
greater protection for emigrants from frauds committed by captains
and persons connected with ships. Disagrees with Buchanan's views
on the emigrant tax. Stresses the necessity for a fund such as that
created by this tax. Suggests that the commissioners for land and
emigration should draw up a series of questions to which he could
give the requisite replies. P- ^07
Enclosed:
(1) Report of A. C. Buchanan, Chief Agent for Emigration,
12 January, 1839.    [Printed.] P- 308A
(2) Proclamation, laying down rules under which vessels must
call at the quarantine station at Grosse Isle, 16 April, 1840.
[Printed.] P- 616
60613—6 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 271, pt. 2
Thomson to Russell, No. 87.    Transmits copy of a letter from
Lt.-Col. Sir John Oldfield, Commanding Royal Engineer, respecting I
the need for additional officers for undertaking the necessary works I
contingent upon the union of the Canadas.    Requests that three '
officers should be sent immediately and that this number should be
increased if the establishment of districts, under the Union Act,
becomes immediately necessary. p. 316
Enclosed:
Oldfield to Major G. D. Hall [Military Secretary], Montreal,
18 April, 1840.    Transmits copy of a correspondence respecting the I
strength of the engineer establishment.   Points to some extra duties
performed.    Expresses a wish to give all assistance possible.    [Enclosure not at this place.] p. 321
Thomson to Russell, No. 88. Acknowledges Russell's despatch
No. 77, of 12 February, and expresses agreement with the decision to
grant pecuniary assistance, rather than relief in kind, to military
pensioners. States that he has communicated this decision to the
Commissary General, and transmits copies of papers received from
that officer, together with copy of a letter from Sir George Arthur^
Feels that the pensioners at Penetanguishene should be placed on the
same footing as other pensioners in Upper Canada, and that the
expense should be borne by the Military Chest. p. 327
Enclosed:
(1) Commissary General to Chief Secretary, Commissariat,
Montreal, 13 April, 1840. Transmits documents under the authority
of which assistance will be given to pensioners by a money grant
instead of in kind. p. 333
Sub-enclosures:
(i) General Order, Montreal, 4 April, 1840. p. 335
(ii) Questions to be answered by pensioners. p. 338
(iii) Forms to be filled out in connection with this change:    p. 339
Enclosed in sub-enclosure.
(a) List of pensioners. p. 339
(b) Certificate of title to pension. p. 340
(c) Declaration of applicant. p. 341
(d) Receipt for pay. p. 342
(2) Sir George Arthur [Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada]
to Thomson, Toronto, 14 April, 1840. Acknowledges communication
respecting commuted pensioners. Transmits copies of his despatch
to Russell, and of a report of A. B. Hawke, emigrant agent. States
that he had intended to apply for greater relief, but as the matter
has now been settled he refrained from doing so.    Hawke will be . 271, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
instructed to report upon places where Boards should be set up
Draws attention to the case of pensioners at Penetanguishene and to
the question of the source from which such relief should be paid.
Transmits copies of a requisition for payment for this relief, together
with the Inspector General's report thereon. [Arthur to Russell not
at this place.] p# 3^
Sub-enclosures:
(i) F. E. Knowles [Deputy Commissary General] to R. A.
Tucker [Provincial Secretary], Commissariat, Toronto, 11 December,
1839. Applies for payment of £498.1.2, being the expense of relief
to pensioners at Penetanguishene. p. 349
Enclosed in sub-enclosure:
Account of disbursements.
(ii) J. Macaulay [Inspector General] to Tucker. Explains the
circumstances under which a warrant for payment-of relief to pensioners at Penetanguishene cannot be claimed from the Government
of Upper Canada. p. 350
(iii) S. B. Harrison [Private Secretary] to A. B. Hawke [Emigrant
Agent], Toronto, 18 March, 1840. Transmits copy of Russell's
despatch, with respect to commuted pensioners. Requests a report
upon the necessary arrangements and as to instances in which the
allowance will have to be exceeded. p. 353
(iv) Hawke to Harrison, Emigrant Office, Toronto, 19 March,
1840. Reports on the necessary arrangements with regard to
commuted pensioners, and as to the amount of assistance required
in certain instances. p. 355
Thomson to Russell, No. 89.    Transmits statement of receipts A^m
on account of casual and territorial revenues, sales of Crown lands
and   from   licences   to   cut   timber,   for three months ending 31
March. p. 361
Enclosed:
(1) Statement of casual and territorial revenue, Lower Canada,
Quebec, 1 April, 1840. P- 363
(2) Statement of receipts for sale of Crown lands and from
licences to cut timber, Quebec, 1 April, 1840. P- 364
Thomson to Russell, No. 90. Reports that he has summoned AprfiM
the Special Council and has proposed continuation of ordinances
which otherwise would expire on 1 May next. Intends to propose
that other ordinances be made permanent, in accordance with instructions given in Russell's despatch No. 28, of 28 October. Intends
to refer other important questions, to the Council. Reports abatement of excitement in Lower Canada. Thinks that the party agitating against the union will not send an agent to England, at least mr
some time to come. 76 PUBLIC ARCHIVES Q. 271, pt. 2
1840 Thomson to Russell, No. 91.    Acknowledges Russell's despatch
Montreal ^o. 3> °* 23 January, and states that the estimate for the completion
of Capt. G. Phillpotts' survey of inland water communications, is
£371.18.9.   Phillpotts has been instructed to close his accounts as
soon as possible. P- 369
April 24, Thomson to Russell, No. 92.    Acknowledges Russell's despatch
Montreal. -^ gg^ Q£ j4 ]y[arcnj and transmits copy of a correspondence with the
Commander of the Forces respecting a volunteer corps at Quebec,
now disbanded. Explains the reason for delay in making a report on
this subject. States that he will attend to Russell's instructions with
reference to closing the accounts for extraordinary expenditure incurred during the insurrection. p. 373
Enclosed:
(1) Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Jackson [Commander of the Forces] to
Thomson, Montreal, 15 November, 1839. Points to the insufficiency
of the forces, and asks leave to enroll 400 volunteers, for general duty
in Quebec district. This force is to be engaged for five months.
Estimates the expense for such a corps, at £7,543.8.4. p. 378
(2) Thomson to Jackson. Montreal, 15 November, 1839. Sanctions the enrolment of a volunteer corps for five months. p. 380
April 25, Thomson   to  Russell,  No.   93.    Transmits  original  addresses
",ntrea'        received by him, in Upper Canada, together with copies of his replies
thereto. p. 381
Enclosed:
List of Addresses.    [Addresses not at this place.] p. 383
April 25, Thomson to Russell, confidential.   Protests against the proposal
to deprive Lincoln County of all but one representative, under the
union. Urges that two members be allowed to that county. . As an
additional member is to be given to Upper Canada, Niagara, rather
than Cornwall, should retain its representative. Urges, however,
that neither of these towns should be represented, but that the extra
member be given to Durham County, which could be divided into
two ridings. p. 385
Montreal Thomson to Russell, No. 94.    Reports that Jeffrey Hale's com
mission, as Receiver General, is dated 28 December, 1838.        p. 389
MontS Thomson to Russell, No. 95.    Transmits a petition from Mrs.
Lucy Rolette, praying for a pension on the grounds of the services of
her late husband, an officer in the provincial marine. Requests
the return of original documents transmitted therewith. [Documents
not at this place.] p. 392
Enclosed:
Petition of Mrs. Lucy Rolette, 11 April, 1840. p. 397
[CaiOTua Dept ] Thomson to Russell, No. 96.    Transmits a memorial from the
Board of Trade of Montreal, praying that this port should be made a
free warehousing port. p. 403 Q. 271, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 135.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thorn- Ma
son s despatch No. 85, of 16 April, and states that the representations [Co
contained therein, have been forwarded for the consideration of the
Treasury. p 234
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 138. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thorn- Ma
son s despatch No. 96, of 29 April, and states that the petition con- ICo
tained therein, has been referred to the Treasury. p. 405
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's May 27.
despatch No. 85, of 16 April, and requests that the Treasury should tColonial DePt-l
, ui iu ^.jjijli, aim lequesi-s tnax; tne ireasury snould
consideration to the representation respecting the
p. 233
Upper Ca
placed in
•chi
Unsigned to Colonial Land and Emigration Commissioners.
[Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 86, of 17 April,
together with Buchanan's report on emigration. Requests observations thereon. Draws attention to Thomson's request that a series
of questions on points of interest to emigrants should be framed and
sent to him for answer. Requests advice as to the manner in which
£1,500 could be expended to the best advantage on the emigrants'
agency. P- 303
Unsigned to Trevelyan. [Draft.] Transmits copy of Thomson's
despatch No. 92, of 24 April, with respect to the volunteer corps
raised at Quebec, and requests that this should be submitted to the
Treasury. P- 376
Unsigned   to   Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Transmits  copies  of  des-June3
patches from Thomson, No. 91, of 22 April, and from Arthur No. 22, icoiomai
of 22 April, respecting an estimate of £371.18.9, for Capt. O. Pnul-
potts' survey of internal water communications.    Recommends that
the Treasury should sanction this.    [Arthur's despatch not at this
place.] P-  371
give immediate
mails.
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 140. [Draft.] Acknowledges Thorn- May 28.
son's despatch No. 95, of 28 April, and transmits copy of a despatch [Colonial DePt-l
addressed to Colborne, stating with reference to an earlier petition
from Mrs. Rolette, that the Admiralty did not consider that she is
eligible for a pension. If Mrs. Rolette has not been informed of this
decision, she is to be notified that it represents the only answer that
can be given to her petition. p. 395
No. 59.
[Draft.]
p. 394
No. 142.
April.
Canada.
[Draft.]
Expresses 1
satisfaction
Iges Thom-
that excite-
p. 368
>No. 143.
[Draft.]
nd states t
Acknowle<
iges Thom-
Iresses from
;h the an
dWDeparta
ned thereto
tent.
, have been
p. 382 PUBLIC ARCHIVES
Q. 271, pt. 2
1840 Unsigned to R. Byham [Secretary to the Board of Ordnance].
fcofot'iai De t] [Draft.]    Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 87, of 18 April.
ep . a^ requests the decision of the Ordnance on the need to increase the
number of engineer officers in Canada. p. 319
fcoioniai d t ] Unsigned to Thomson, No. 148.    [Draft.]    Acknowledges Thom-
ep . gon,g confidentiai despatch of 25 April, and states that he has altered
the 15th and 17th clauses of the Union Act, so as to give two representatives to Lincoln County. p. 388
fcofoniai De t ]        Unsigned to C E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary to the Treasury].
ep . praft j    transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 84, of 15 April,
and requests the decision of the Treasury thereon. p. 222
rcofo^ai De t ] Unsigned to C E. Trevelyan [Assistant Secretary to the Treasury].
eP . rpj-afk-j Transmits copy of Thomson's despatch No. 88, of 20 April,
expressing concurrence with the regulations respecting commuted
pensioners, and urging that pensioners at Penetanguishine should be
put on the same footing as those in other parts of Upper Canada, the
expense being borne by the Military Chest. p. 331
roofonikiD t]        Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   150.    [Draft.]   States  that  the
"* • Treasury has decided to charge the expense of the volunteer corps at
Quebec, upon the vote for special services in Canada. p. 377
June 24. Unsigned to Thomson, No. 161.    [Draft.]    Transmits copy of a
[Coiomai Dept.] jetter from the Ordnance, stating the impossibility of sending more
officers to  Canada.    The  Ordnance  have  been informed  that if
fortifications are commenced next year, further assistance will be
requisite.    [Letter not at this place.    See Q. 276, pt. 1, p. 11.]     p. 320
Enclosed:
(1) Charles R. Fox [Surveyor General of the Ordnance] to Lt.-
Gen. Sir Frederick William Mulcaster [Inspector General of Fortifications, Ordnance Office], 3 March, 1840. Concurs in view taken
by Mulcaster, and states that it is impossible to increase the engineer
establishment in Canada. p. 323
(2) Minute of Inspector General of Fortifications, 25 February,
1840. p. 324
Jime27. Unsigned  to   Thomson,   No.   164.    [Draft.]    States  that  the
o om     ept.] Treasury have consented to repayment of half the expense borne by
Lower Canada for the transmission of despatches and that, for the
future, the like proportion is to be paid from the Military Chest.
Instructions have been issued to the Commissary General.        p. 223
rcoi^'im Unsigned to Thomson, No. 165.    [Draft.]   Acknowledges Thom-
ooma.i ep .j gon,g degpatch No. 86, of 17 April, and states that Buchanan's report
has been transmitted to the commissioners for land and emigration,
who have been requested to frame a series of questions on points of
interest to emigrants. Intends to propose that the Treasury should
sanction a payment of £1,500 for the service of the agency in Canada,
and has requested the commissioners to report as to the manner in
which this sum could be most profitably expended. p. 299 Q. 271, pt. 2
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1942
Unsigned to Trevelyan.    [Draft.]    Requests that the Treasury       1840
should sanction the grant of £1,500 for the emigrant service in ft^9-
Canada. 6 p- 305 [Colonial D<*
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 180. [Draft.] Transmits copy of July 12.
a letter from the Treasury, respecting the representation made in [Colonial DePt-'
Thomson's despatch No. 85, of 16 April. Directs Thomson 'to
appoint a commission to study the state of the post office in British
North America, its administration, remuneration of officers, rates of
postage, condition of the loads, and every other matter important
to a complete enquiry. The personnel of this commission should
include a member of the Post Office Department. Transmits copy
of a report upon the Metis road. Refers to this despatch No. 12, of
24 September last.    [Report not at this place.] p. 235
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 182.    [Draft.]   Transmits copy of a July 13.
letter from the commissioners for land and emigration, in reply to [Colonial Dept.]
the communication made to them, respecting emigration.    States
that no reply has been received from the Treasury, respecting the
proposed appropriation of £1,500.    [Letter not at this place.
Q. 272, pt. 1, p. 175.] p. 301
Unsigned to Thomson, No. 186.    [Draft.]   Transmits copv of a July 21.
letter from the Treasury consenting to an appropriation of £1,500 for [Coloni81 Dept-J
the emigrant agency in Canada.    [Letter not at this place.    See
Q. 275, pt. 2, p. 425.] p. 302
Unsigned  to  Lord  Sydenham  [Thomson],  No.  332.    [Draft.] Augusts
Acknowledges Thomson's despatch No.