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BC Historical Books

Twenty-first annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1923

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Array  THE LIBRARY
"•*
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Kb*
i   ■^
Miss E,S»Kitvg,
Miss N. Ry art ^v
^eacbcre from Ij3udouE«^
who \jovc exchanged with
Vancouver teachers for—
tt)e school ^year 19^5 ~^
ii BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES, 1923
EXECUTIVE BOARD, 1923
Chairman Dr. F. J. Nicholson
Chairman, School Management Committee Jas. Blackwood
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee A. L. McWilliams
Chairman, Finance Committee A. L. McWilliams
STANDING COMMITTEES
School Management Buildings and Grounds
Jas. Blackwood, Chairman A. L. McWilliams, Chairman
Mrs. D. Macaulay J. W. Prescott
Angus Maclnnis Mrs. F. E. Hopkins
Finance
A. L. McWilliams, Chairman
Dr. F. J. Nicholson Jas. Blackwood
The  Chairman  of the Board is  ex-officio  member of  all Committees.
ATTENDANCE OF TRUSTEES AT BOARD AND
COMMITTEE MEETINGS, 1923
Board    Management   Building1       Finance-
Number of meetings  27
Nicholson, Dr. F. J.  (Chair.) 27
Macaulay, Mrs. D  26
Hopkins, Mrs. F. E  20
Prescott, J. W  22
Blackwood, J  27
McWilliams, A. L  26
Maclnnis, A  25
imittee   <
oOmmittee   <
Committee
Tota
19
14
12
72
19
14
12
72
19
13
10
68
14
11
8
53
13
10
8
CO
19
14
12
72
19
14
12
71
18
13
10
66 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES, 1924
Retire December 31st, 1924
Mrs. F. E. Hopkins Dr. F. J. Nicholson J. W. Prescott
Retire December 31st, 1925
Mrs. D. Macaulay Jas. Blackwood A. L. McWilliams
Major M. J. Crehan
EXECUTIVE  BOARD
1924
Chairman.... - - A. L. McWilliams
Chairman, School Management Committee  Mrs. D. Macaulay
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee .- J. W. Prescott
Chairman, Finance Committee :  J. W. Prescott
STANDING COMMITTEES
School  Management Buildings and Grounds
Mrs. D. Macaulay, Chairman J. W. Prescott, Chairman
Jas. Blackwood Dr. F. J. Nicholson
Mrs. F. E. Hopkins Major M.  J.  Crehan
Finance
J. W. Prescott, Chairman
A. L. McWilliams Mrs. D. Macaulay
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE OF MEETINGS
Board Third Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Management Committee Second Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding Third Monday, at 8 p.m.
Finance Committee	
Thursday preceding Third Monday, after Building Committee Meeting
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the
School Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets;
and all correspondence to officials should be addressed to the same
building.
OFFICIALS
1924
Municipal Inspector of Schools J. S. Gordon, B.A.
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools    T. A. Brough, B.A.
Stenographers Miss W. P. Cairns, Miss L. Judge, Miss M. Gait
Secretary Major B. G. Wolfe-Merton, M.C.
Accountant H.  Rhodes
Assistant and Orders Clerk   ....P. H. North
Stenographers Mrs. M. I. Beaddie, Miss F. N. Maclean
Mimeograph  Miss M. F. St. John;
Telephone  Exchange   Miss  Helena Bolam
Building and Grounds Superintendent and Architect F. A. A. Barrs
Assistant and Costs Clerk E. F. Bullen
Stenographer  Miss R.  Seymour
Storekeeper F.  Colbourne NAMES OF TRUSTEES
SHOWING   YEARS   OF  SERVICE—FROM   1886  TO   1923,   INCLUSIVE
Names of Trustees
Years of Service
Angus, Mrs. E. A 1920—March, 1921
Baldwin, G. F  1887-1892
Banfield, J. J -.  1900-1903
Beckingsale, Dr. D. B  1886-1887
Black, Dr. J. E -  1918-1919
Blackwood, James     1920-1923
Breeze, J. D  1909-1911
Brown, William 1887-1892; 1898-1899
Browning, J. M.  1890-1891
Brydone-Jack, Dr. W. D.... 1895-1900; 1902-1903;
Charleson, D. B	
Clubb, Wm	
Collins, Henry    _	
Devine, John	
Donaldson, D	
Dougan, J. J 1904-1905;
Duke, Thomas 	
Dyke, George	
Eldridge, C. C	
Ferguson, J. B	
Flumerfelt, W. E	
Foreman, C. F	
Gordon, G. R 1893-1896;
Greggor, R. H	
Hall, Dr. T. P	
Harper, A. M ._	
Henderson, J. B	
Hope,  Charles 	
Hopkins, Mrs. F. E	
Johnson, A. G	
Lamb, T. A	
Lang, Dr. W. H	
Logan, J. J 1897;
Long, G. Roy  „ ♦....
McAllister, John	
Macaulay, Mrs. D	
Macgowan, A. H. B	
McGuigan, Dr. W. J 1887-1888;
Maclnnis, Angus	
McKechnie, Dr. W. B	
McKim, H. C. N   ....
908-1913
886-1887
904-1914
890-1893
887-1889
903-1904
907-1914
901-1914
910-1913
894-1898
905-1906
908-1913
895-1896
900-1902
918-1919
918-1919
915-1916
886-1887
907-1909
1923
887-1888
119-1
)16-1
)00-l
)20
)18
)01
)18
1894
919-1923
1896
897-1
")22-l
)04-l
)16-1
Ml-
)23
)06 Names of Trustees Years of Service
McLennan, R. P. -  1905-1907
McNaughton, Mrs. P  1912-1915
McTavish, Dr. F. C  1915
McWilliams, A. L -  1922-1923
Matheson, E. G., B.A.Sc  1921-1922
Mathews, Thomas     1917-1918
Moody, Mrs. I. H -  1916-1920
Murray, C. W - -1883-1892;  1894-1902
Nicholson, Dr. F. J -  1921-1923
Odium,  Victor    1906-1907
Prescott, J. W -  1919-1923
Ramsay, James   1898-1907
Reid, Mrs. C - -  1898-1899
Sangster, Charles  1915
Seymour, J. R  1914-1917
Simpson, J. H 1920; April, 1921
Springer, B -  1891-1892
Stewart, Allan C ?|f|  1914-1916
Templeton, William   1892-1897
Welsh, F. W  1914-1917
Whetham,  Charles  1889-1890
Wilson, G. 1  1887-1893 8
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 11th, 1923.
Ladies and Gentlemen:
In presenting my report as Chairman of the Vancouver Board
of School Trustees for the year 1923, I feel that I must first of all
compliment the members upon their exceptionally good attendance
at Board and Committee meetings. While it is not generally known
that many of these meetings demand four or five hours of your
time, yet this record is sufficient to demonstrate to the public the
unselfish and self-sacrificing interest displayed in your devotion to
the educational welfare of the school children of this city.
The co-operation of all the members has been noteworthy and
has for that reason accelerated the dispatch of such business as
has come before you, and has rendered my duties as Chairman a
pleasant and an easy task.
To survey the work of the past year shows it to be a repetition
of the history of several years back, namely, the difficulty of
finance and the inability to apply any constructive policy. The
defeat by the ratepayers of all money by-laws has rendered your
work more difficult, and has been the cause of unavoidable dissatisfaction and irritation amongst parents, teachers and pupils. It has
also undoubtedly lessened the educational and physical efficiency
of our system.
Whilst the over-crowding of our class-room accommodation
has not been materially aggravated during the past year, owing
to the fact that the school population has become practically stationary, yet a very serious state of affairs exists to-day in that
an increased attendance may have to be dealt with at any time. And
instead of being prepared to meet this increase, as should be the
policy of every School Board, we are face to face with the necessity
of being compelled to refuse the admission of new classes.
/T\1
The limit of temporary accommodation has been reached,
and I would urge the incoming trustees to maintain the policy
enunciated by this Board—that no more temporary, unsafe, insanitary, unsightly and cheap class-rooms be constructed upon
school grounds, already far too cramped.
It was very gratifying to notice, during the year, an increasing
and more intelligent interest being manifested by important bodies BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
in school affairs. Instead of criticizing School Board methods
blindly and unfairly, steps were taken to ascertain facts regarding
school affairs so that a just judgment might be arrived at.
The action of the Board of Trade in this connection was
most praiseworthy. You will remember that their Educational
Committee appointed a sub-committee, with Mr. J. N. Harvey as
convener, to make a survey of our school buildings. The report
that Mr. Harvey submitted, after careful investigation, must have
made clear to the very influential body which he represented the
urgent need there is for Vancouver to pay more attention to its
school property than it has been doing for some years past.
We were also pleased to grant the request of the Associated
Property Owners to have access to all our accounts. There is
every reason to believe that the more they know of them the more
charitable they will become in their judgments of School Board
financial methods.
We have always welcomed, and I trust the Vancouver School
Board will continue to welcome in future, all reasonable investigation of its doings: It will make for a better understanding of
school requirements; and this is badly needed.
Surprise has been expressed, in certain quarters, regarding
the greatly advanced costs of school supplies as compared with
the costs some years ago. The advance is entirely due to two
factors—a large increase in the cost of all articles used and a large
increase in school population, espsecially of students in more
expensive but more valuable courses for them. We would welcome
the most searching investigation of this expenditure by any outside
body that is interested in it and that is competent to make a proper
survey.
Probably one of the most useful and far-reaching accomplishments of the year has been the work performed by this Board,
acting in conjunction with various public-spirited citizens and
organizations, in educating the community and crystallizing public
opinion on the value of an educational survey. When this survey
is completed—and I have no doubt it will be begun in the very
near future—I am confident that most of the perplexing problems,
financial and otherwise, confronting school trustees, not only of
this city, but of the whole province, will be satisfactorily solved.
While our particular and peculiar duties are devoted principally to the interests of the schools of Vancouver, we must not
forget that our system is intimately bound up with that of the
whole province; and, by virtue of this relation, I would strongly -4M«fMN*^«Nil^
10
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
urge future Boards to co-operate to the fullest extent with the
British Columbia Association of School Trustees. And it is to be
noted that this Board has, for some years past, taken the broad
view and has displayed an increasing interest in provincial educational affairs.
The decision of this Board this year, and also the decision
of last year's Board, to acquire highly suitable school sites for
future extension in the eastern and western sections of the city,
at exceptionally low figures, is highly commendable; and your
foresight and business acumen will be duly appreciated by the
ratepayers of this city in the years to come.
Your policy too, inaugurated during the past year, to have
unused school sites converted into supervised playgrounds may
well be extended. The supervision of the Denman Street site has
proved very satisfactory.
It is a pity that more funds are not available at this time to
purchase sites when they can be obtained at bedrock prices, for
such investments would be the means of saving the city enormous
sums in the future.
I would commend to the incoming Board the very careful
consideration of the recent report on school sites compiled by Mr.
Brough, dealing with present areas available by tax sale or other
purchase, in the light of probable future developments and movements of population. This is a very carefully prepared, exhaustive
and comprehensive statement, the result of much study, and highly
creditable to its author.
While our school financing and housing problems have been
the most perplexing and discouraging of the year, yet it is gratifying to note advances in other departments.
It has been a source of much pleasure to see the marked
increase in attendance and in interest taken in the Junior High
School. As the public become better acquainted with the value and
the status of this department, it is certain that it will continue to
grow by leaps and bounds. In my opinion it will constitute the
most important link in our system for those pupils between the
ages of fourteen and sixteen, lt is essential that a separate building for this school be provided at the earliest opportunity.
Recent studies of industry, made in cities, easily justify compulsory education up to sixteen years of age; for industry and
business have almost no desirable openings for boys or girls under
the age of sixteen.   In cities, work is available for bovs and girls BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 11
under sixteen; but most of it is not desirable, being of the "blind
alley" type, which leads nowhere except into the ranks of unskilled
labor.
Another advance is to be noted in the establishment of
"Remedial Classes" under the able direction of Miss L. K. Cots-
worth. This is an important work in the development, mental and
physical, of our children; and I hope it will be extended to reach
all who require the instruction.
In referring to problems which must be seriously considered
by next year's Board, that which looms largest and is the most
important is the. necessity for extension of Technical Education.
At present much of the overcrowding at the University is due
to the presence there of many students unsuited for a higher
academic training. This is costing the Government and the people
a large sum of money annually; and in the course of time will be
the source of greater economic loss, both to the country and to the
students themselves.
The establishment of a modern Girls' Technical School, the
expansion of the Boys' Technical School and the further development of the Junior High School would undoubtedly divert much
of this material to Technical Education, reducing the cost to the
taxpayer and producing a larger number of skilled workers, which
it is in the interests of this province to produce. These skilled
graduates of our Technical schools would be trained along lines
best suited to the social, economic and industrial conditions peculiar
to this community, and would go out into the industrial world
commanding a high initial wage and the confidence of the employer.
I am one of the many who are convinced that the progress
and prosperity of British Columbia must proceed along industrial
lines, and therefore our labor must be educated and trained. To
this end also I would advocate that our Night School classes be
given every encouragement and be more widely advertised throughout the city.
To ensure the necessary expansion of Technical Education and
Night School work in our school system, it is most important to
secure the interest and co-operation of as great a number of citizens
as possible. During the past year you have taken a very important
step towards the securing of such interest and co-operation in the
creation of an Advisory Committee on Technical Education. The
members of this committee, representing the manufacturers, on the
one hand, and organized labor on the other, should do much in the
near future to popularize Technical Education in this city. 12
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Another problem, and one which is causing increasing difficulty, is that of obtaining qualified male teachers in sufficient
numbers. Some method must be devised whereby more men may
be attracted into and encouraged to remain in our service, particularly in the senior grades and in the High Schools.
There is one suggestion I would like to bring to the attention
of the incoming Board for their consideration and that relates to
the formation of co-operative committees, either in individual
schools or for the whole system, with a view to co-ordination and
the maintenance of harmony; to formulate a plan whereby a channel be provided for the effective expression of teacher public
opinion, in order that the schools, the teachers and the trustees
might profit thereby; and to combine the collective judgment of
teachers, supervisors and principals for the best interests of the
pupils.
During the past year several pieces of new legislation have
been introduced into the Public Schools Act, the most important,
so far as this Board is concerned, being the enactments relating
to the superannuation of teachers, the determination of sick leave
and the voting privileges of the chairman; all of which have materially aided the Board in difficult situations.
To the members of this Board the Provincial Legislature paid
a high compliment in making practically the same provision for
sick leave for all teachers in the province as Vancouver, with
Departmental approval, had been making for hers for some time.
The change made by the Department in the Public School
Course, making it for eight instead of seven years, as formerly,
without any appreciable additional work, should tend to greater
thoroughness in study. This is what we have desired for some
time; and we shall, therefore, follow with much interest the working out of this new regulation.
We were fortunate in having Inspector Gordon represent us
at the National Conference on Education and Citizenship held in
Toronto last April. His being there will bring us into closer touch
with the aims of the National Council of Education, and will enable
us to be of some assistance in the carrying out of the Council's
programme.
Subsequent events also prove that we did well to have him
remain for some time in the East to study educational conditions
there. His observations in other Canadian and American cities
and his interchange of ideas with leading educationists place him
in a position to speak with greater authority on many important
school problems that are sure to confront us from time to time. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 13
Those who heard his report on his observations in the East, after
his return, could not but feel that he had returned with quickened
enthusiasm, increased knowledge, a broader educational outlook
and renewed inspiration for his work as your chief executive
officer. Such a trip as you made it possible for him to take during
the year will prove of great value in the carrying on of school
work in this city. I would suggest that he be given an opportunity for such study and educational research more frequently.
In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity to thank the
individual members of the Board for their courteous consideration
of my chairmanship at all times, which has made the privilege an
enjoyable one for me, and to compliment them upon their businesslike and economical administration during a period of financial
stress when long hours were spent upon perplexing problems,
many of which would not have arisen had there been the stimulating incentive of a progressive or constructive programme.
I regret very much that Trustee Maclnnis has decided not to
offer himself for re-election. During his two years of service, we
have highly appreciated his ability and unfailing devotion to duty.
His sound judgment on all matters dealt with by the Board made
him a valuable and agreeable member.   We shall all miss him.
I also wish to express my appreciation of the attitude and of
the devotion to the duties of their offices shown by the Municipal
Inspector, Mr. J. S. Gordon; the Secretary, Major B. G. Wolfe-
Merton; Mr. F. A. A. Barrs, Building Superintendent, and Mr.
T. A. Brough, Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools; also to
our teaching corps for their hearty co-operation throughout the
year.
And, finally, we should all unite in expressing appreciation of
the courtesies and privileges extended to us by the Department
of Education at Victoria, with whom we have had the most happy
and cordial relations at all times.
Respectfully submitted,
F. J. NICHOLSON,
Chairman, School Board. 14
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C,
December 10th, 1923.
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:
I have much pleasure, in submitting the following report on
the work of the Management Committee for the year 1923:
The Work "Generally
In reviewing the work of the year, one is impressed by its
extent and pleased to recall how satisfactorily it has been done.
Nineteen meetings were held — twelve regular and seven special.
For these meetings the agenda were carefully prepared in advance
by the office staff and forwarded to all trustees. This had a
tendency to expedite business by giving members of the committee
an opportunity to think over in advance questions to be considered.
Another factor contributing greatly to the satisfactory transaction
of Management Committee business throughout the year was the
punctual and regular attendance not only of the members of the
committee but of all other members of the Board.
Personnel of Standing Committees
While much can be said in favour of having each standing
committee include only three members of the Board and Chairman
of the Board, there is a great advantage in having other members
attend. It ensures for them an understanding of the recommenda-
tions sent to the full Board for endorsation, and thus obviates the
necessity of further discussion in Board meetings.
©
Estimates
The first important work of the year was the preparation of
the committee's estimates. When we recall that these, totaling
$1,198,331, were completed on January 19th and called for no
alteration throughout the year, other than reductions by careful
management, we may be pardoned for congratulating ourselves on
work well done.
Reorganization for February
Besides preparing the estimates in January, your committee
completed all work connected with the reorganization of the schools
for February, when 739 Receiving Class pupils entered school for 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 15
the first time. This necessitated the opening of seven additional
class-rooms and appointing seven additional teachers, besides filling a number of vacancies that occurred at that time.
Reorganization for September
Although we made provision in the salary estimates for
twenty-eight additional teachers to be appointed for September,
we found, by making a careful survey of the school population in
June, that in all likelihood fewer additional teachers would be
needed. We accordingly appointed only five, but selected sixteen
alternates, from the hundreds of applicants, to fill further vacancies
that might occur or to have more additional teachers, if found
necessary on the reopening of schools.
When schools reopened it was found that more additional
teachers were not needed, though 1,265 Receiving pupils entered
then for the first time. This number was offset in a great measure
by the unusually large number matriculating from the high
schools, and by others, beyond the compulsory age, dropping out
of school.
. This careful reorganization of classes enabled us to carry on
with twenty-three fewer teachers than were provided for in the
year's estimates. A considerable saving of money was thus effected
and without impairing the schools' efficiency.
The wisdom of appointing all teachers for the opening of the
school-year in June, if possible, is apparent. It gives the Board
an early and, consequently, a better choice. It also leaves lighter
work for the committee during the holiday months. We found it
also very convenient to have a number of good alternate teachers
selected early. This obviated the necessity for special meetings
late in the holidays to fill unforeseen vacancies in the schools.
Eight of the alternates selected in June were needed.
Inspector Gordon's Eastern Trip
In February the Management Committee recommended that
Inspector Gordon represent the Board at the National Conference
on Education and Citizenship to be held in Toronto in April. They
also recommended that he take time, while in the East, to visit
various educational centres with a view to comparing local school
activities with the best to be seen elsewhere. These recommendations were later unanimously endorsed by the Board, and Mr.
Gordon spent nearly two months in observation and study of
school work in important Canadian and American cities. His
report,  submitted to trustees and all school workers at a mass 16
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
meeting in King Edward Auditorium on September 28th, indicated that he had made good use of his time while absent. Were
sufficient money available, some very important forward steps
might be made as a result of his observations in the cities visited.
Corrective Physical Exercises
Already we have taken one step in providing corrective
exercises to remedy physical defects in children. This, while costing comparatively little, will be a great gain, not only to the
individuals concerned, but also to the community, for it will make
for more efficient physical manhood and womanhood.
King Edward Cafeteria
Another important change brought about during the year was
in the management of the King Edward Cafeteria. After four
months' experimenting, we find that, under the direction of the
expert dietitian, appointed last July, the cafeteria is giving entire
satisfaction. More hygienic food is being served than formerly.
It is also being served in a more attractive manner and at prices
that encourage students to patronize the cafeteria. All this tends
to put the institution on a sound financial basis—not only paying
for food supplied, but for other outlays necessary to keeping it in
first-class condition.   This is as it should be.
Students Visiting Industrial Plants
For a number of years it has been my desire to have arrangements made whereby our students would be enabled to visit and
obtain first-hand knowledge of industries in which they may later
engage. During the past year a definite advance toward that goal
was made. In an interview granted.to Mr. Gordon and myself by
Mr. George Kidd, General Manager of the British Columbia
Electric Railway Company, some.time ago, we were promised his
kind co-operation in an endeavour to have certain students visit
the very interesting and extensive plant of his company. It is to
be hoped the incoming Board will take advantage of this opportunity.
More Practical Courses Needed
With ever increasing facilities for education, larger and larger
numbers of students have been entering high schools. The num-
bers dropping out of high school, however, in the first and second
years warrants one in questioning the wisdom of such students
entering in the first place. 'Personally, I am convinced that a
better course can' be offered them than that of the ordinarv High
School; and we must seek to make this clear to parents and pupils. 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 17
The educational work that this calls for should receive the support
of all school workers. Parent-Teacher Associations, Principals'
Associations and individual teachers working in conjunction with
our Municipal Inspector, and with the School Board's encouragement, may do much towards the proper educational guidance of
the young.
Junior High School
In our Junior High School, opened a year ago, a very important step was taken. I am pleased to report that the success
of its first year has led to a greater percentage of increase in its
enrolment than in any other school in our system. It is gratifying
also to be able to report that, notwithstanding the scarcity of
funds, we now have the school comfortably housed, well equipped
and well staffed. If the educational work, outlined above, for the
directing of children into courses of study more suitable for them
is carried out, our Junior High School work will rapidly increase,
fewer students will drop out of the ordinary high school, discouraged with a sense of failure, and better education will be
afforded many at a reduced cost.
Advisory Council of Teachers
I had hoped that, during the past year, an Advisory Council
of Teachers might have been created. It is possible, however,
that, in anticipation of the Provincial Educational Survey, asked
for, materializing at an. early date, it is better that we should not
make any radical change in school administration at the present
time.
Few Appeals to Committees
The comparatively small number of complaints made to the'
Committee during the year, now under review, speaks well for
pupils, parents, teachers and officials. In the few instances, in
which appeals on questions of school management were made to
the Committee, settlements were readily effected, and apparently
in a satisfactory way.
Public Interest in Schools
The general interest manifested in school administration problems throughout the year by various public organizations and by
public-spirited citizens was much appreciated by the Management
Committee. This interest has found expression in many ways—for
example, in the creation of an Advisory Council on Technical
Education. From this body of practical citizens we naturally look
for valuable assistance in the near future. 18
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Good Work of Officials
While appreciating the splendid assistance of each trustee in
the conducting of Management Committee business during the
year, I know you will agree that the efficiency and fidelity of our
officials did much to simplify our work. Agenda, carefully and
systematically prepared; correspondence, properly arranged; financial and educational data, always at hand when needed; committee
minutes, clear and accurate; and matters, referred for investigation
and report, always carefully attended to—these things we highly
appreciated. Reports, too, from Inspectors and heads of departments monthly indicated how faithfully the school workers, under
the general supervision of the Management Committee, were doing
their work. We feel that to all these not only the thanks of our
committee but the thanks of all trustees and all citizens are due.
Respectfully submitted,
JAS. BLACKWOOD,
Chairman, Management Committee.
DD
D BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 19
REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C,
| December 11th, 1923.
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:
Reporting on the progress of the work of the Building
Department of which I have been Chairman during the current
year, I purpose in such report to deal briefly with the work accomplished during 1923.
The Building Superintendent and Architect compiled the
estimates, amounting to $193,690.00; but, as the City Council could
not supply the Board with its full request, $93,690.00 was eliminated from these estimates, and consequently the amount of work
anticipated could not be undertaken. For years the Department
has submitted estimates covering a great deal of work, but on each
occasion the estimates have been reduced to a considerable extent;
consequently a large amount of repair work as outlined and proposed to be taken care of in the estimates, as originally submitted,
could not be undertaken through lack of funds. This continual
reduction of the estimates is prolonging and increasing the many
crying needs for repairs to buildings, and, to my mind, is poor
economy, and it is to be hoped that when the estimates for 1924
are compiled they will be left in their entirety, so that many of
these needed repairs may be taken care of during the coming
year.
However, the Department has taken care of the estimated
work, as well as many hundreds of repair jobs not shown on the
revised Repairs and Renewals list. These jobs come in continually,
ten to fifteen every day, which at the end of the year constitute an
immense amount of work aside from the general estimates.
In addition to the repair work, the Department has taken care
of all the heating and ventilating of all buildings, the plumbing
and sanitation in general; and, as our schools have been fairly
free from sickness, this speaks for the way in which this work has
been executed.
Our Building Superintendent and Architect has again requested that a sufficient amount be placed in the 1924 estimates for
fire protection equipment; and I, as Chairman of this Committee,
beg to recommend to the incoming Board the. advisability of
looking closely after this work, as, after all, we are responsible for 20 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
the citizens' children during the time they are on the Board's
premises. I would, therefore, respectfully recommend that the
sum of $12,000.00 be ear-marked for this purpose.
I would draw to the attention of the Board the advisability
of placing a fairly large sum of money in the estimates for the
repairs and increasing of plumbing at many of our schools, which
has become insufficient to take care of the increasing school population by reason of so many temporary schools being built at the
various centres without plumbing being increased. This is most
necessary, and I earnestly draw to your attention the advisability
of seriously considering my recommendation in this connection.
As you know, many of our schools were built years ago, and
the lighting which was installed has become somewhat obsolete
and not in accordance with the by-laws of the city. In order to
assure safety to pupils and service in the form of artificial light, I
would ask the Board also to be most careful in not reducing the
estimates in this regard. As custodians of the citizens' children,
we should, I feel sure, take every precaution to prevent fire and
provide them with proper and efficient light.
Owing to shortage of funds, our playgrounds have not received the attention they should have in the form of resurfacing
same. Erosion and inroads have been cut by reason of the heavy
storms, and in many cases have left the concrete and wooden sidewalks standing up above ground level. Our Architect and Building
Superintendent has recommended that these grounds be resurfaced
with screen cinders and shell ballast, which will form a crust not
so readily washed away by rain storms. This I would also recommend to the incoming Board, in order to avoid accidents to pupils
playing on the grounds. I fully appreciate that all the school
grounds could not be treated at one time; but it would be well that
the congested centres be attended to first, and this work extended
as time and funds will permit.
During the year there were six one-roomed buildings erected,
furnished and opened for grade school purposes. These were also
taken care of by the Department, and, while they are of the most
temporary character, they have provided class-room accommodation, and will probably continue to serve that purpose until funds
are available for the erection of permanent structures.
The Board decided they would extend Junior High School
education during the summer, and accordingly the Building
Department was called upon to provide the necessary quarters in
the form of class-rooms, science room, sewing laboratory, home
economics, and household mechanics.    These quarters were pro-
V BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 21
vided at the King Edward High School, the buildings being
erected by the Board's own men, and all equipment manufactured
by the Department's own labour, except the plumbing fixtures, gas
stoves, cooking ovens, and the like. Instructions for this work
were not given until the end of July, but the academic rooms in
connection with this class of education were ready for the opening
of school at the commencement of September, while the home
economics and science room came along close behind. This, I
think, speaks well for the efficiency of the Department. We took
the direct radiation out of the Cecil Rhodes School and placed a
portion of it in these buildings, providing same with steam from
the King Edward High School main steam plant, and, as a single
system, it is giving every satisfaction. This would indicate that
a considerable amount of money was expended in direct radiation
in the various schools at time of construction which was unnecessary when the buildings were also equipped at the time with an
induct and exhaust system as well.
Several large painting jobs were authorized during the February inspection. This work has been carried out, and, I believe,
fully appreciated by the occupants of the various schools where
the work was done; but it will be necessary to spend a considerable
amount of money on exterior painting of the Board's property so
as to preserve it against climatic conditions which so soon rot the
woodwork if paint is not consistently applied. This, however, will
be looked after in the estimates for 1924, and, in the interests of
the citizens, I would respectfully suggest that the Board, if possible, eliminate as little as they can of this nature of repairs.
At the Roberts School new furnaces will be necessary, the old
ones having become practically worn out and dangerous from a
fire standpoint. During my first year, I believe a recommendation
was made by the Building Superintendent and Architect that these
buildings, also the Seymour Schools, be treated the same as at the
Strathcona School in regard to heating and ventilating—that is, a
steam plant should be installed to take care of the buildings at each
centre. Steam plants, as you know, are more economically operated,
and heated air does not damage the building in the same way as
those treated by the old method of furnace and hot air. Our
Building Superintendent has pointed out that a building treated
by a furnace and induct system requires painting every three or
four years, while a steam plant heated building will go for at least
ten to twelve years. This goes to show that economy would be the
outcome of using modern methods as against the old system. This
we have proven beyond all doubt; and I think it would be well to
undertake this work at one, if not both centres during the coming
season, when such work can be carried out to advantage. 22
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Questions have been raised regarding the old Roberts classrooms being too large, and so constructed as to shut off a great
portion of the light. Our Architect has looked into this, and informs me that this can be remedied and the rooms made practically
the same size as ordinary class-rooms, with the full ratio of natural
light being admitted onto thq blackboards, thus bringing the
class-rooms up to modern standards, at the same time in no way
impairing fire protection or anything else. As complaints have
been raised by the teaching staff regarding the difficulty of teaching in so great an area, it is well worth the Board's consideration,
because it is not good business to pay teachers to teach in rooms
which are harmful to the children, and in which the teachers
cannot do themselves justice; and it would therefore be wise, in my
opinion, to have these changes made before relighting of the old
building is done. The cost of this work will not be so very excessive, and, as the building is likely to stand for many years, I
feel, as your retiring Chairman of the Building Committee, it is
my duty to lay this matter before you for your further consideration.
In closing my report, it is with pleasure I take the opportunity
of thanking the members of my committee, as well as all other
members of the Board, for their unfailing assistance and hearty
co-operation in the execution of the Committee's work during the
year. I also wish to thank Mr. Barrs, the Building Superintendent
and Architect, and his staff for the way in which they have always
endeavoured to supply information and wait upon urgent calls; I
also wish to extend to Mr. Gordon, Municipal Inspector, and Major
Wolfe-Merton, the Secretary, and the office staff my sincere thanks
for the faithful assistance they have always rendered this Committee and the Board as a whole.
I have the honour to remain,
Yours very truly,
a. l. McWilliams,
Chairman, Building Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
23
REPORT OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C,
January 21st, 1924.
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:
I beg to submit the following report on the Vancouver Schools
for the year 1923: i
School Population
As far as school population is concerned, the year has been
exceptional, and fortunately so. The increase has been the smallest
in the past eight years, being only 164 as compared with an average
increase of 900 per year from 1915 to 1922. This small increase,
too, was due to the fact that the maximum age for compulsory
attendance was raised a little over a year ago from fourteen to
fifteen years. Had his change not been made, the year would have
shown a decrease in attendance. As it was there was a decrease
in the lower grades, which was more than offset by increases in
the higher grades and in the high schools. 24
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Teaching Staff
Not only did the school population increase but little throughout the year, the teaching staff remained almost unchanged, particularly in the high schools and in the senior grades of the public
schools. This resulted in better teaching than there would have
been under different conditions. It also lightened the work of
administration considerably.
Examination Results
The results of the mid-year examinations indicated that good
work had been done. From the public schools, with an enrolment
of 16,257 in June, 722 entered high school on the recommendation
of principals and 352 by examination, making a total of 1,074, or
6.6% of the school enrolment. This was 186 more than for the
previous year.
A comparison of results in the different schools was interesting. The number of successful students varied from three to
thirteen per cent, of the school enrolment. Thinking this variation
might be accounted for mainly by the difference of intelligence of
pupils in different districts as indicated by scores made in January,
when standard intelligence tests were given to all children, I made
careful comparison between the results of the standard tests and
the results of the principals' estimates combined with the estimates
of the Departmental examiners. This study forced me to the conclusion that the scores made on the standard intelligence tests in
January were no indication whatever of the ability of pupils, as
judged either by their own teachers or by Departmental examiners.
For example, the school ranking lowest in the city on the standard
intelligence tests was not far behind the best school in the city,
judged by the entrance results; and the school ranking first on the
entrance returns ranked equal with two and below eight other
schools on the standard intelligence tests.
These discrepancies may be accounted for in different ways
by different individuals. One may say the standard intelligence
tests are unreliable; another may say they are reliable if properly
given; another may question the soundness of certain teachers'
judgments or the reliability of the examiners' findings. And,
doubtless, each is in a measure partly right. Knowing the students
of this city, however, as I do, and knowing their teachers, it seems
to me intelligence or ability to work, on the part of pupils, while
indispensible to success, is no guarantee of success if not coupled
with willingness and a strong desire to work. It is for the teacher
to stimulate, if not to create, that willingness and strong desire. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 25
The High School and Matriculation Examination results were
also very satisfactory, as shown in the following table:
Kntitled to
Wrote Passed Supplemental Failed
Province, including
Vancouver        1745      1028 or 58.9%      436 or 25%      281 or 16.2%
Province, not including
Vancouver        1400        778 or 55.6%      364 or 26%      258 or 18.4%
Vancouver          345        250 or 72.5%        72 or 20.9%     23 or   6.6%
School Organization
After the schools were organized in February, it was found
the 423 regular classes in the public schools had an average enrolment of only 39.75. The twenty-two special classes, including
two special opportunity classes, averaged only 15.95. During the
past school term the average size of public school classes has
remained unchanged. The high school classes are also of moderate
size, averaging about 33, with only a few enrolling over 40. With
such classes good work should be done.
s
Changed Grading of Public Schools
During the year the Education Department decided to extend
the public school course from seven to eight years. This step was
taken only after careful study of conditions. The judgment of
principals in this city was sought, and given only after careful
investigation in other provinces. This investigation showed that
we had long been trying to do work in seven years that other
provinces were taking eight years or more to do. It was also
common knowledge that we were only trying to do the work of the
public schools in seven years, for the average pupil required eight
years or more to do it well. We consequently favoured the
proposed change, and are hopeful that it will result in greater
thoroughness in public school work. This change will not materially extend the time spent by students in the public schools, as
some suppose.
Attendance at the National Conference on Education and
Citizenship
In April you made it possible for me to attend the National
Conference on Education and Citizenship in Toronto. This was a
great privilege. To meet with representatives of all classes from
all parts of Canada-, and to hear such men as Sir Henry Newbolt,
Sir Michael Sadler, Lord Robert Cecil, and others set forth the
highest educational ideals could not but send one back to work with
vision and greater confidence in the possibilities of education,
clearer vision and greater confidfience in the possibilities of educa- 26 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
tion. The key-note of the Conference was the brotherhood of man,
While the necessity of training for the making of a living was not
questioned, special emphasis was laid on the greater importance of
training for living a life as it should be lived. To this end the
value of history, biography, geography and literature as school
subjects was urged. The proper study of these will go far in
placing man in proper relations to his fellows, and nations in right
relations with nations.
Other School Systems
While in the East, I spent some weeks observing and studying
school work as carried on in other cities. For the most part, I
found it differing but little from our own. In many respects the
Vancouver schools compare favourably with the best I saw elsewhere. At present they are as well staffed, the classes are as small
or smaller than many, the hygienic conditions on the whole are
surpassed by few, and the class-room accommodation is better than
in many apparently more prosperous centres. When one recalls
that the Vancouver School Board has added only $91,000.00 to
the city's debt for schools during the past eight years, with an
increase of 6,464 in school population, while $1,707,460 have been
paid on Sinking Fund and Interest on earlier borrowings, and that
they have to-day a class-room of some kind for every class in the
city, he is justified in hoping that the time is not far distant when
our citizens will endorse a progressive permanent building programme.
In the matter of physical training, I found schools in several
eastern cities surpassing our own. They give more time to this
subject, and in many instances, particularly in platoon schools, the
work is taken by specialists. Our difficulty is to find time for more
drill and play than is now taken. Detroit has overcome this *bv
lengthening the school day to six hours. Had we other facilities
for play, as gymnasia or play sheds, we might manage to find the
necessary extra time.
Class-room Work in Vancouver Schools
Since returning from my trip east, I have spent a great deal
of time in our own schools, and have found the work of observation of more than usual interest. The general tone of the schools,
it appears to me, was never better. There is a spirit of earnestness on every hand that makes continually for ever improving
work. Never in the history of the Vancouver schools has there
been as wide-spread a desire on the part of teachers to better
qualify themselves for their teaching.   In the first school inspected last term, I found that 80% of the staff had taken certain professional studies during the holidays. The teachers' Community
Room, with its wide range of professional reading matter, is
extending its influence more and more. May I bespeak for it your
continued support.
Work of Inspector Brough and Supervisors
You have received throughout the year monthly reports from
Inspector Brough, from the members of the supervising staff and
from the heads of departments, in the ranks of which there has
been no break during the year. Their annual reports will also be
printed in your Annual Report, and will well repay careful reading.
Of the splendid work of these one cannot speak too highly. Their
loyalty and untiring devotion to duty has won for them the respect
and hearty co-operation of teachers and pupils and made their
tasks their pleasures.
Exchange Teachers
Your exchange teachers for the school year 1922-23 (Miss
J. E. R. Fisher, returning from Christchurch, N. Z.; Miss E. S.
Brinton and Miss I. J. Herd, from Glasgow, Scotland; Miss E. M.
Bigney and Miss G. D. Burris, from London, England) have again
taken up work with us, well pleased and satisfied with their experiences abroad. Miss D. G. Chandler, Miss Gertrude Brown and
Miss M. S. Hardwick, who are now teaching in England, in exchange for Miss N. Ryan, Miss E. S. King and Miss E. Chapman,
who are teaching here, all write speaking in high terms of their
opportunities and the way they are being treated in the Motherland. There can be little doubt that such exchanges are beneficial
and deserving of continued encouragement.
Losses During the year
During the year Mrs. E. B. Stewart-Neill, who had served
with ability and faithfulness in the Vancouver Schools for fifteen
years, was obliged to give up teaching on account of ill health.
It seems too bad that there is no adequate provisison made for a
retiring allowance in such cases.
In the death of Miss Grace C. MacLean the Board lost one
of its most conscientious and intelligent teachers. She was much
beloved by her pupils, and exerted a great influence for good over
them.    It will not be an easy matter to fill her place.
In closing this hurried retrospect, I wish Xo thank you for the
conditions under which I have worked for the past year.    You
jJ 28
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
have, individually and collectively, endeavoured to make these
ideal, and in a great measure you have succeeded. I have consequently enjoyed the work of the year, and look forward with
pleasure to the work that lies before us.
Respectfully submitted,
| J. S. GORDON,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
mm*
S. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
29
REPORT  OF THE  ASSISTANT  MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Sir: As in the past, most of my time during the year just
closed has been spent in the schools, observing the work being
done, endeavouring to estimate its value and to bring about as
great improvement as possible. I have given special attention to
recently appointed teachers. The great majority of these are doing
good average work; a few have proved themselves teachers of
more than ordinary ability; twenty per cent., perhaps, can scarcely
be said to have reached average standing; several of this last class
are likely to achieve success only after determined effort. 30 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The teacher is the strength of the school. The best of systems
will fail in the hands of a poor teacher. An outstanding teacher
will give a training worth while under even the faultiest system.
Such a teacher can with safety be permitted to try experiments,
with a view to improving in both methods and system.
For reasons easily understood, the Vancouver School Board
from time to time receives applications from teachers who have
attained a high standard of excellence in their work elsewhere.
The appointment of a teacher of this class to a school imparts a
stimulus fruitful of good results, and raises its entire tone. Applicants and their friends sometimes make the mistake of treating
the school system as an agency for providing positions, forgetting
that the schools exist primarily and all the time for the children,
that the interests of the children are paramount, and that they are
entitled to the best teaching and training the community can
furnish. The teacher of a class may represent one or two taxpayers ; the pupils of the same class may represent forty taxpayers.
The smallness of Canada's population, when we consider the position of our country and the immensity of its area, is a serious
weakness; lack of efficiency on the part of the next generation
would be a national calamity. Hence the insistent call for the
outstanding teacher.
But outstanding teachers to fill all vacancies can scarcely be
found. Next to these, therefore, the services of teachers of good
average ability, with years of experience, should be secured. Inexperienced teachers of only average ability attain efficiency at the
expense of parents and ratepayers, and, most of all, at the expense
of the pupils. Inexperienced teachers seeking appointment should
be young men and young women of more than ordinary promise.
And since strength and virility of intellect and character are
among the very chiefest elements of success, an adequate proportion of men teachers, not less than one in four, should be found on
every primary school staff. With regard to the presence of men
teachers in our primary schools, the Vancouver city staff is weak.
A remedy can be found; the difficulty is not insoluble.
In reviewing the work of the year, it is a pleasure to note how
many teachers there are who are not satisfied with their present
capability and attainment, but who are using vacations, and spare
hours and money, in pursuing the study of the various aspects and
problems of the great educatioal question, which presents itself at
a different angle to every successive generation. The pupils of
such teachers drink from living springs, not from stagnant pools.
In connection with this movement, the institution and upkeep
of  the  community  room  is  a  matter  of  thankfulness   and  con- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 31
gratulation. In this place are found the leading educational
magazines of the English-speaking world, and hundreds of volumes
voicing the best ideas of the most eminent and most successful
educationists of our time. The room and its contents are very
much in use by progressive teachers, the inexperienced, and also
those who have spent many years in the profession to which they
have devoted their lives. No money appropriated by the Board
earns higher interest than the sums voted to supplement the assessments levied by principals and teachers on themselves for the upkeep of the community room and teachers' library.
School and class-room libraries are also a necessity of modern
education. Happily, in many of our schools, a beginning has been
made in these directions, and the danger of pupils being intellectually starved, or, worse still, filled with the meat that poisons,
is in process of passing away. At the suggestion of the Board of
Trustees, a committee of principals has been co-operating with me
in looking into the question of supplementary reading matter for
the various grades. The committee has recommended that the
amount appropriated for school libraries be increased, and that
with his share of the appropriation each principal be empowered
to establish, subject to the approval of the Municipal Inspector,
one or more class-room libraries in his school. A five-foot shelf
of selected books in every class-room would be a great boon to
both teacher and pupil, and would be especially helpful to the
brighter boys and girls, who are able to overtake the assigned tasks
more quickly than others. The spare time of a bright pupil is
intellectual capital that should not be idle, or given up to more
than waste. It should be properly invested, and made to yield an
adequate return.
The Junior High School is meeting the needs of those pupils
of high school age who feel no drawing toward professional callings, but who show skill in handwork. These, after a year or
two's further schooling, should prove a valuable accession to the
industrial life of the community. As has been pointed out, steps
should be taken for the admission of this class of pupils to the
Junior High School immediately after they have completed the
work of the sixth grade, and Junior High Schools of other types
should be established for the training of pupils of other tastes
and aptitudes. That is, secondary education adapted to the various
needs of the city's boys and girls should begin two years earlier
than at present.
The high schools of the city are doing thoroughly good work,
although with the principals and teachers the opinion is general
that  the three-year period  is  all  too  short for the  satisfactory 32
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I*
preparation of candidates for entrance to normal school or
university. In the best high schools of Ontario this part of the
student's course covers four years, which permits the work to be
done without undue crowding. It must not be forgotten that,
outside of study, high school pupils should have duties in connection with the home. Many boys also have paper routes, and with
many girls and not a few boys music lessons and practice take up
considerable time.
Progressive teachers aim at constant improvement in management and method. A number of years ago the teachers of
French in the Britannia High School began an experiment with
the Direct Method. This method now prevails to a greater or
less extent in all our high schools, and with most satisfactory
results. Pupils are now trained not only to read and write French,
but also to carry on conversation in the foreign tongue. This is
highly important, as language is essentially something spoken,
and no one can be considered the master of a language unless he
speaks it. Nor should we ever forget that French is the mother
tongue of some thirty per cent, of the Canadian people, and that
our schools should do all that is possible to foster a spirit of unity
between the two great races of which our nation is composed.
Improvement is also noticeable in other departments of our high
school work.
Two main classes of boys are at present provided for in the
Technical School: first, those who upon completion of their
course will at once enter industrial life; secondly, those preparing
for the matriculation examination with a view to taking the applied
science course in the University. The matriculation pupils are
finding considerable difficulty in facing their examination after
three years' preparation, since along with their academic studies
they carry a good deal of purely technical work. It is highly
desirable, I think, that these boys be given four years in which to
prepare for matriculation, so that there need be no curtailment
of the time devoted to technical subjects in order to permit of
sufficient attention being given to the prescribed academic studies.
The need for a Girls' Technical School has from time to time
been mentioned. We have the nucleus for such a school in the
Home Economics department of the King Edward High School.
For a number of years an excellent preparation for scientific home-
making has been provided by the studies pursued here. But a
serious handicap is felt because of the fact that the University
so far has refused to admit the graduates of this department to
full matriculation standing, and thus discourages numbers of them
from taking a university course.    As a remedy I should suggest
/T\
Li ^v
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 33
the lengthening of the Home Economics course to four years, so
that the girls taking it may be prepared for the full matriculation
examination without dropping any of the technical subjects at
present prescribed. .
The work of the Special Classes merits the sympathy, encouragement and help of all who have the good of the community
at heart. Vancouver has reason to be proud of this department.
But there is serious need for an institution that would train the
Special Class graduates in simple trades, so that they might leave
school with assured prospects of earning a decent livelihood.
In recent years the physical side of education has been more
and more stressed in the public mind. No other form of physical
training has as great value as sport, if participation in games is
general, and not the part of a mere handful. Almost all of our
men teachers, and not a few of our women teachers, take a very
active interest in the sports of the pupils, and give ungrudgingly
of their time outside of school hours to their promotion. It is a
matter of congratulation with all the friends of our schools that
this year King Edward High School won the provincial high
school championship in Rugby, as Kitsilano High School did last
year, and that for two successive years Britannia High School has
held the championship in girls' hockey.
It is no little satisfaction to note that the University of British
Columbia has taken up the matter of special professional training
for candidates for high school teachers' certificates. The training
period will now last for a full school year, the candidates receiving
part of their course in the University, and part in the Normal
School, while their practice teaching will be carried on in the
King Edward High School. This additional and special training
should make for increased efficiency.
With the growth of the schools, the importance of relieving
the principal of every large school from the duty of full class-
teaching becomes more and more urgent in the interest of the
school as a whole. It is to be hoped that in the near future the
Board may be able to take this forward step.
The sincerest thanks of the citizens and boys and girls of the
present and of all future time are due the School Board of 1923
for the foresight they have shown in the acquisition of school
sites. Many more sites should be acquired without delay, owing
to the present low prices of real estate, and owing still more to the
compelling fact that even now, when the annual increase in population is comparatively slight, vacant blocks of land are rapidly
ceasing to be available. 1
34
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In closing, I beg to express my appreciation of the loyal cooperation of every branch of the service, and to tender my special
thanks to yourself and to the Board of School Trustees for sympathy and assistance in response to every suggestion made tending
to improvement and progress.
I have the honour to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
THOMAS A. BROUGH,
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
35
MEDICAL INSPECTION
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver,  B. C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit the report of the Medical Department for the year 1923.
The health of the children has been quite up to the average,
the only real epidemic being the one of measles now in progress.
During the Spring months there were a number of cases of smallpox. This outbreak did not reach the status of an epidemic, but
only went to show the value of, and to act as a stimulus to vaccination. 36 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In October an epidemic of diphtheria threatened in the
Beaconsfield district, but energetic measures, especially on the part
of the nursing staff, succeeded in locating several carriers of the
disease; upon the isolation of these the menace subsided.
I am glad to report that during the year we have found it
possible to co-operate more thoroughly with the City Health
Department. A number of conferences with the heads of that department have been held, and numerous changes in regulations
and their operation have been effected, to the benefit of the health
of our schools.
The usual routine work has been carried on, as shown by the
statistical report.
The organization of the new branch of Physical Instruction is
being evolved. Regular classes for remedial exercises are now
being held in eighteen of the schools—more schools being included
as others become established in the work. The interest and cooperation of the parents are elicited by inducing them to be
present, at the first session. The exercises are thus better understood and carried on at home. This is quite necessary if actual
physical improvements are to be made, as the energies of our
instructress, spread out over the whole city, must necessarily be
largely instructive. Attention for the present is being confined to
remedying deformities caused by poor posture, poor seating and
poor footwear. The matter of seating was mentioned in my report
of last year. The adjustable seats and desks have not been forthcoming; but we have been able to make temporary improvements
in individual class-rooms by exchanging seats to accommodate
children of various sizes.
The addition of the branch of Physical Instruction, the taking
over by this department of the files of medical cards, and the
gradual growth of our work, have resulted in a great increase in
the volume of clerical work of the department. The present
arrangement of our having half the time of a clerical assistant is
quite inadequate, as the work has never yet been overtaken.
.It is quite apparent that much of the time of the head nurse
must be spent at the schools, if contagious diseases are to be controlled and the general work supervised.
I am pleased that open-air play-rooms have been built where
they were so badly needed —at the Franklin and Beaconsfield
schools.
It seems useless to ask for great improvements involving
capital  expenditure,  such  as  new schools  to house classes now BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 37
occupying basements and attics; but two urgent needs are forced
upon our attention if we desire to make the best of the accommodation now afforded. The first is the cleaning of the walls in
a great many of the schools. This grime on the walls is insanitary,
interferes with the lighting, and surrounds the children, during the
most impressionable years, with low ideas of proper living.
In this region of dark winter days, a highly important
matter is the lighting, both natural and artificial.
In many of the class-rooms, especially those in the northern
aspect, the natural lighting during the darker days is practically
nil. This calls for almost continuous use of artificial light during
the winter. What, then, is the efficiency of this artificial lighting?
In about 90% of the class-rooms this is quite inadequate. In some
rooms only one lamp—and that in the middle of the room—is
supposed to light the blackboard as well as the children's books.
In some there are as many as nine outlets, but the light is inadequately diffused and the outlets improperly placed. I would
recommend that this whole lighting system be gone into with a
view of having sufficient light, properly diffused and equally distributed to all parts of the room, including the blackboards. Thus,
I am firmly convinced, we can save much of the appalling impairment of vision among our school children. This can actually be
shown in the greater number of cases of defective vision in classrooms poorly lighted.
I desire to thank the Board and the other officials for their
hearty co-operation and support.
I would also say, at the end of my first full year, that I have
found the work very pleasant and interesting.
The following is the medical statistical report for the year:
Number of pupils examined \  5,076
Number of pupils with vaccination marks  1,672
Defective Vision, R  143
Defective Vision, L  151
Eye-strain     2
Strabismus     35
Blepharitis   76
Conjunctivitis  9
Impaired Hearing, R  25
Impaired Hearing, L  26
Discharging Ears, R  3
Discharging Ears, L  5
Hardened Wax, R  15
Hardened Wax, L  15
Carious Permanent Teeth   795
Oral Sepsis  266 38 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Malocclusion  36
Mouth  Breathing   -  $2
Defective Nasal Breathing   29
Malformation of Palate  -?-  1
Enlarged  Tonsils  715
Adenoids  122
Goitre    162
Enlarged Cervical Glands  -  f 65
Anaemia      132
Nervous Affections     8
Cardiac Affections -  39
Pulmonary Affections—Bronchial  48
Other Tubercular Affections  | .-  3
Deformity of Spine—Postural  482
Deformity of Spine—Osseous   4
Deformity of Chest  .-.  52
Deformity of Extremities  -  24
Flat Feet \  269
-Nutrition—Fair    322
Nutrition—Poor -- 178
Enuresis  9
Hernia     73
Phimosis  46
Defective Speech     1
Skin Disease     69
Report of Clinic at School Board Office
Number attending     1,035
Number vaccinated     188
Number certificates of vaccination given  31
Number treatments given   206
Number referred to family doctor   Ill
Number excluded    63
Number readmitted  213
Number referred to V. G. H  24
Number referred to eye specialist    14
Number referred to Rotary Clinic  6
Number referred to skin specialist  1
Number teachers examined physically   21
Tuberculosis      1
Report of Infectious Diseases Occurring Among
School Children
Scarlet fever  173
Diphtheria  H6
Diphtheria carriers  12
Measles  1,067
Chicken-pox  248
Whooping-cough    _.. _ 151
Mumps    13
Smallpox   41
Respectfully submitted,
HAROLD WHITE,
School Medical Officer.
L BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
39
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSING STAFF
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
Dr. Harold White,
School Medical Officer,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I have much pleasure in submitting the report of
the school nursing staff for the year ending December 31st, 1923.
The general plan of work has remained unchanged, and the
regular service to the schools has- been maintained. There were
no additions to or changes in the personnel of the staff during the
year, nor was it found necessary to make any changes in the districts allotted to the nurses.
The plan put into operation late in 1921, by which the work
of physical inspection of all pupils above Grade 1 was taken over
by the school nurse, has worked well. The success which this
method has met with is due to the careful, painstaking work of
the nursing staff. There appears to be no reason why this plan
of work should not be continued.
The prevalence of contagious diseases in the city during the
year has added greatly to the work of the nursing staff. In May
smallpox broke out, and, for the first time in the history of the
nursing staff, it was found necessary to secure additional help, for
a short time, in order to deal with the situation satisfactorily.
I am pleased to report that our efforts were successful, and, though
thirty-eight cases occurred among school children, we feel that an
epidemic was averted.
During the autumn we have had diphtheria, scarlet fever and
measles to cope with. About the end of October, diphtheria
attacked a number of children in the Beaconsfield School; and,
though the usual precautions were taken at once, it was found
necessary later to take more urgent measures to overcome what
threatened to be a very serious outbreak. Cultures were taken
from every school child in the Beaconsfield district, whether at
school or at home; also from every teacher and janitor. All desks
were thoroughly washed with a disinfectant solution, also the
woodwork and floors. The tests made brought to light a number
of cases of diphtheria.   A number of cases known as "diphtheria 40 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
carriers" were also discovered. These were promptly isolated;
and, while a few subsequent cases occurred in the district, we feel
that the prompt measures taken effectually checked what would
otherwise have been a real epidemic. There were also a number
of cases in other schools, and similar precautions were taken;
though it was not considered necessary to take cultures from the
whole school, as in the case of Beaconsfield. A very close watch
was kept on all children, and cultures taken from all cases showing any indication of sore throat. A number of cases were located
in this way, and, by immediate isolation, the spread of the disease
was checked. I beg to refer you to the statistical report, which
shows, by the number of swabs taken, the amount of work done
in combating this disease.
Many of the cases of scarlet fever were of a mild type. A
number of children were found in school desquamating. In most
of these cases we found a history of a "cold," or bilious attack,
two or three weeks previously. These were, of course, a menace
to other children, and were immediately excluded. A number of
cases in the early stages of the disease were discovered in school
and were promptly dealt with. Constant vigilance on the part of
the nurses was required to keep the situation in hand. Every
precaution as to disinfection was, of course, taken.
Measles proved to be the most discouraging of all the infectious diseases dealt with during the year. In spite of the best
efforts of the staff, none of whom spared themselves in the least,
measles developed into a real epidemic during the latter part of
November and December. Every child who had not had the disease previously fell before it, and the school attendance was badly
affected.
Our work among the undernourished children has proceeded
along the lines reported previously. Milk was served in sixteen
schools. Our thanks are due to the Municipal Chapter of the
I.O.D.E., the Kiwanis Club, and the various Parent-Teacher Associations, for their help in supplying milk for needy children. I
wish to take this opportunity of expressing the appreciation which
the staff feels of the help given by the principals and teachers in
the milk service. Without their help, such a service would be
impossible. That the service has been of real benefit to the children
has been amply demonstrated.
Girls' Health Clubs were conducted in eight schools; 294 girls
enrolled and 140 were granted certificates. Trustee Mrs. Macaulay,
whose keen interest in this work has been so helpful, again offered
a prize to the Club showing the best attendance.    The prize, a BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 41
beautiful picture, was won by the Strathcona School Club. This
is the second time that this school has been successful in winning
the attendance prize. In my last year's report, the objections to
the conduct of this work in after-school classes were indicated,
namely, that the work could be given to only a limited number of
girls; that, often, those most in need of such instruction did not
attend; that all the usual difficulties attendant on after-school
classes were met with. The hope was expressed that arrangements would be made by which this work could be given to all
girls in the eighth grade, during school hours. I am pleased to
report that arrangements have been made with the Household
Economics department, and that this work will be taken over by
them in January, 1924. It is with considerable regret that the
nursing staff relinquish this work; but, having made the demonstration of its value, they are gratified to see it made possible for
all senior grade students.
For the first time, an exhibit prepared by this department
formed a part of the School Exhibit at the Vancouver Fair, held
in August. The exhibit consisted of posters illustrative of the
work of the department; also health posters, health books, a sand
table for health project made by the pupils in various schools and
by the members of the Girls' Health Clubs. Children were weighed
every afternoon, which proved most popular with both parents
and children. A "Bed-making Contest" and a "Bathing the Baby
Contest" were held every afternoon, in which the members of the
Girls' Health Clubs participated, and which created considerable
interest.   Two nurses were in attendance each day during the Fair.
In response to a request from the University of British
Columbia, we again gave lectures and field work to the students
taking the Public Health Nursing Course. As there were fifteen
students, and each was given two weeks' field work, we had students working in our schools, under the supervision of our staff
nurses, from January until Easter.
The co-operative method inaugurated last year between the
School Nursing Staff and the Dental Clinic has continued. Work
has gone exceedingly well, and the number of broken appointments has been greatly reduced.
Once more we wish to express our gratitude to the various
Social Service agencies of the city who have co-operated with us
in our work; to the Vancouver General Hospital, whose indoor
and outdoor service is always open for us for our needy children;
to the Rotary Club Camp, to which we were able to send so many
children, who were greatly benefited; to the Eye, Ear, Nose and 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Throat specialists of the city, through whose generosity forty-nine
children were fitted with glasses, who otherwise would be struggling with their school work, handicapped by defective vision.
The following is the statistical report:
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Report on Routine Inspection
of visits to schools   3,401
of classes inspected   2,858
of pupils inspected  117,531
of pupils excluded     1,353
of pupils readmitted     1,135
of pupils referred to S.M.O .-  937
of pupils referred to S.D.C ,  1,140
of pupils treated in School Clinic    14,624
notices sent to parents  15,476
swabs taken   	
swabs reported positive
or
of
of
of Health Clubs held
of conferences with parents   	
of home visits   	
of other visits	
of "meetings attended 	
of pupils referred to Rotary Clinic
of pupils referred to eye specialist
of pupils referred to V. G. H	
Vancouver General Hospital—
Nose and Throat Clinic   103
Skin  Clinic            9
Pedriatic Clinic    ..T     24
Orthopedic  Clinic       3
Psychopathic Clinic          3
Surgical Clinic       2
Received treatment for physical defects	
Received treatment from family doctor ."	
Received treatment from family dentist	
Received treatment from school dentist	
Received treatment from Vancouver General Hospital	
Received treatment from eye specialists  	
Pediculosis    _	
Impetigo   	
Ringworm	
Scabies	
Unclean 	
Conjunctivitis   	
Miscellaneous   	
2,783
78
96
1,123
5,192
253
129
21
60
144
4,265
783
2,394
886
161
34
186
460
100
189
68
16
3
Report on Physical Inspection
Number of inspections	
Number referred to S.M.O	
Number with vaccination marks ...
Number of notices sent to parents
13,040
2,185
5,783
2,039 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
43
Blepharitis    , -------  221
Conjunctivitis  16
Defective speech   56
Discharging Ears, R  14
Discharging Ears, L  13
Carious Permanent Teeth   . 2,857
Oral Sepsis  185
Malocclusion     230
Malnutrition  , ;  1,875
Ringworm    2
Scabies      15
Impetigo     17
Pediculosis     8
Eczema    1 _ '.  18
Other skin,diseases  44
Anaemia  3
Infectious Diseases
Found Found
Disease                                                   at Home       at School Total
Scarlet Fever          17                   19 36
Diphtheria             1                   10 11
Measles        295                   98 393
Mumps             8                     2 10
Tonsilitis              6                    23 29
Chicken-pox         73                   46 119
Whooping-cough            30                   32 62
Conjunctivitis           31                 148 179
The thanks of the nursing staff are gratefully extended to the
officials, principals and teachers for the co-operation and help
received during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
ELIZABETH G. BREEZE, R.N;,
Head Nurse.
kJ 44
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF PHYSICAL INSTRUCTRESS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 21st, 1923. §
Dr. H. White,
School Medical Officer,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—The following is the final report for the Autumn
term of cases in the Remedial Classes:
_ Per Flat   0    ..    .    Pos-   Pigeon Depressed Low     Infant   Club
School Cent.        Feet  scoliosis   ture   Chest    Sternum   Should Paral     Foot
Seymour     80% 3 5 33       	
Grandview     82% 5 .... 38        	
Roberts    84% 5 5 44                  2
Strathcona   86% 3 7 34         1       	
Dawson    90% 7 7 19       	
Central     76% 14 10 19         1       	
Mt. Pleasant   84% 14 4 38 ....         1       ....         2         1
Aberdeen     69% 12 .... 13         1       	
F. Nightingale.... 66% 25 4 49 1          1        ...          2
Beaconsfield      76% 9 2 17                 1
Hastings    75% 20 3 12         3     Def 2    	
Macdonald     62% 11 3 14 1          1        ....         1
S. Fraser    90% 9 2 17       ....         2         4       	
Alexandra     94% 11 3 6       	
Secord   83% 7 1 22       	
Nelson   84% 17 1 37       	
Dickens      77% 15 .... 18                 1
Livingstone    85% 16 3 11       ....         2       	
80%      210        57      441          8          9 4 9 1
Total    739
Respectfully submitted,
LENA K. COTSWORTH,
Physical Instructress. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
45
DENTAL DEPARTMENT
Vancouver, B. C,
January 10th, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I herewith beg to submit to you my annual report
for the Dental Department for 1923.
The staff of the Department consists of four doctors and two
dental attendants.
The number of children assigned to each doctor per day is
five, in addition to the emergency cases which come in for immediate treatment. The emergency cases handled during 1923
comprise 202 children. For the same year there have been 3,918
regular appointments. We completed 1,298 cases, an increase of
51 over the preceding year.   We handled 1,149 free patients and 46 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
"v
149 children, whom we class as pay patients, who paid a small fee
for the material used and the work done in their mouths.
The Department has been functioning most harmoniously for
the year. Very few complaints have come in from parents regarding the handling of children, with the exception of complaints
from the mothers of three extremely nervous children, who had
to be refused treatment.
The system of consolidating clinics under one clinic has
worked out most efficiently, with a saving of material used and a
tremendous saving in time, and I find it has not in any way inconvenienced the children coming to the clinic or going back to their
schools.
I recommended to the Board last Spring that the clinic be
continued during the month of July, with two doctors and one
attendant, on account of the heavy cases on hand to receive treatment. This was granted, and I am pleased to report that 90
additional cases have been completed by the two doctors who were
on duty during July, and it gave us a chance to clean up the
children who had been on the waiting list for some time. I would
again recommend to the Board that the same procedure be carried
out for the year 1924, with the privilege that, if the children do
not turn up for the July appointments, I be authorized to close
the clinic. We never seem to get to the end of them when we
return in September with three or four hundred cases from the
June session.
You will notice the large number of free cases who have come
to the clinic. These are all sent in by nurses and, I understand,
personally investigated by them.
In closing, I would like to extend my appreciation to the office
staff of the School Board, the principals, teachers, medical department and nursing staff for their help and co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
R. L. PALLEN,
School Dental Officer.
ten BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 47
PSYCHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I have much pleasure in presenting the report of
the Psychological Department for the year 1923.
The selection of pupils for the special classes for subnormal
children will be the first subject of this report, as it constitutes the
greater part of the department's work.
The selection of pupils has been carried on as heretofore.
First, an individual mental examination is given the child in the
school. If this test shows that he is seriously retarded in mental
development, arrangements are made for him to spend some days
at the Observation Class, where he is given standardized tests in
academic work and many tests to explore for special abilities,
as well as others, to corroborate or refute the finding of the
original test given in the school.
Miss Cantelon's visit to the home, arranging for the child to
attend the Observation Class, does much to gain the parents' cooperation ; and the information which she obtains during her visit
sometimes helps materially in understanding the child's case.
Parents are also encouraged to visit the clinic at least once during
the time the child spends there.
If the child's reactions at the clinic show him to be so seriously
retarded in mental development that he cannot profit by the work
of the regular grades he is placed in a special class, where his
progress is carefully watched. He is re-examined at least two
years in succession. If the ratio between actual age and mental
age remains fairly constant he may then be only examined once in
two years, as the individual examining is very heavy, and unnecessary testing is avoided whenever possible.
When the junior special classes were first formed it was felt
that they were more or less experimental. They have very conclusively proved that children needing special class methods can
be discovered early in their school career, and that they benefit
immeasurably through the individual methods and hand training
of the class.
mmmmW 48
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The opening of a fifth division at the Grenfell School was a
most important step toward differential education for the children
of that school. It made a junior special class possible, and so
reduced the size of the three divisions that are following the regular course of study that much individual work can be done and
considerable manual work added to the curriculum.
The social and school problems that are represented by the
children at the Juvenile Court are very serious ones. If the schools
are to increase their ability to counteract the forces which work
for delinquency, they will have to organize for community work.
This will make the school a neighbourhood centre, where activities
of a wholesome nature will compete with those detrimental to
young life, and where parents can find help and understanding in
their problems.
At the present time a survey of speech defects is under way.
The first step has been to ascertain the extent of the need for
speech-correction work. This will be followed by a gathering
together of information regarding work of this kind carried on in
other cities.
Miss Frith has been in charge of the Observation Class since
February, and has shown herself to be admirably suited to the
work.   Her report is enclosed.
Miss Cantelon has reported on her work in visiting the homes
and following up the pupils who have left school. The close link
which her work makes between the school and the home is of
great value in carrying on the work of this department and of the
Special Classes. The follow-up work of the children in industry
gives a glimpse of what might be done by an extensive vocational
guidance policy for normal children.
In closing, I wish to extend to you and to the Board my
appreciation of the support which you have given the department
during the year, and to all the school officials, principals and
teachers my sincere gratitude for the co-operation which has been
unfailingly extended.
Respectfully submitted,
RUBY A. KERR,
Director, Psychological Clinic.
-i— BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 49
OBSERVATION CLASS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
Miss Ruby Kerr,
Director, Psychological Clinic,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Miss Kerr:  .
I have much pleasure in submitting the report of the Observation Class for the past year.
During the year 96 pupils, 52 girls and 44 boys, have attended
the class, spending an average of two days with us.
Puzzles and games do much to arouse the interest of the pupil
and to gain his confidence on his arrival. At the same time they
give us an insight into his reactions. His ability to co-operate
with others, his perseverance and manner of overcoming difficulties
may all be observed when he is thus occupied.
Standardized tests show his scholastic attainment in arithmetic,
reading, spelling and language, and further tests are given to
ascertain his mechanical ability, his powers of memory, motor coordination, and attention, also his ability to follow directions.
When the Observation Class was not in session my time was
spent in the schools giving individual and group tests.
I wish to thank you most sincerely for making this my first
year in this work so interesting and pleasurable.
Yours respectfully,
L. E. FRITH,
Teacher, Observation Class.
n\
-J 50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SOCIAL SERVICE WORK
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
Miss Ruby Kerr,
Director, Psychological Clinic,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Miss Kerr:
I have much pleasure in submitting to you the report of the
Social Service Department for the year 1923.
During the year the work of the department has been carried
on with its two-fold programme—first, the work done in connection with the children of the schools, and then the follow-up work
for children who have left the Special Classes to enter industrial
life.
Many homes in all parts of the city are visited, and from these
homes (if homes some of them can be called) many very important facts are disclosed. In the study of these children in the
Psychological Department, the knowledge of their heredity and
environment is of vast importance. To know that a child lives
in two dark rooms of a basement, or in a filthy cabin, or in a
squalid shack on the alley, where the father has deserted his
family, all helps in the understanding of the child and his problems.
The visiting of the Social Service worker in many of these homes
forms the connecting: link between the school and the home, and
the parents in every case are very glad for any help and co-operation 'we can give them.
In the interest of the child the department is also brought into
contact with other agencies, such as Kindergarten, Children's Aid,
Community House, Juvenile Court, Salvation Army Home. The
Girls' Court at the Detention Home has been attended during; the
year; and, in several cases from our Special Classes brought before
the Judge, we were able to assist by securing jobs for these
children. ft.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 51
An interesting survey of the schools was made in connection
with children of defective speech. There were 107 children examined, and these children may be classified into three groups—those
who stutter very badly, those who have a slight hesitation, and
those who have defective speech as lisping, tongue-tied, etc. It
was very pathetic in many cases, where the children seem so bright
and attractive, to feel that they are thus so severely handicapped
for their future work. Since the School Board has been so generous in what they have already done for the handicapped child,
physical as well as mental, it would seem very fitting that they
should also undertake work for these children under a trained
Speech Teacher. When one sees the wonderful results being
accomplished in other cities along the lines of defective speech,
we hope that the time will not be far distant when our own handicapped children may be thus given a better chance for happiness
and a better opportunity for success.
During the month of December very interesting follow-up
work was done for all the children who have left our Special
Classes during the year. There were forty-four of these children,
and the information received concerning them was very interesting
and- encouraging indeed. Most of the boys and girls are in good
lines of trade and doing well. The wages paid in some cases were
very low, but when a boy is learning a good trade the parents are
not so anxious about the money; they feel that an apprenticeship
to a good trade means a great deal more to the boy than a few
extra dollars in a "blind alley" job. Several of the boys are taking
Night School classes. It is very interesting to note the various
lines of work that these Special Class children have taken up.
This year a number of our boys are learning the tinsmithing
business; one is learning the printing trade; one the shoe repair
business; another is in a brass factory; another in a tile company ;
two boys are in the lumber mills; one boy is doing well on a boat
running to Victoria; several are in stores, and some are on farms.
For the girls there is housework, sewing, looking after
children, clerking in stores, working in canneries, running machines in a garment factory. Many of these fifteen-year-old children are not ready to meet the problems of the industrial world, and
they shift around from job to job. For such as these, and for
many others, a Trade School is the real solution. To have a good
training in some line of work as tinsmithing, spending an apprenticeship under a special teacher, who has the time and patience
necessary for this class of child, might save many of these misfits
in industrial life.   We still look hopefully to the future when our 52 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Special Class pupils may be able to graduate to such a Trade
School.
The work of the department during the year has been full of
interest, and I wish to express to you and Miss Dauphinee my
thanks for your kindly interest and help.
Respectfully submitted,
JEAN M. CANTELON,
Social Service Worker.
□ □
□ SPECIAL CLASSES
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
In submitting the report of the Special Classes for the year
1923, I am glad to report progress in number of classes, number
of pupils, better results along academic lines, and certainly much
better work along industrial lines; and, in addition, the success of
pupils who have left school during the year to go to work, in holding their jobs, giving satisfaction to employers, and earning fair
wages, or learning a good trade.    (See Miss Cantelon's report.)
Vancouver has now twenty classes for subnormal children,
one new class being established during the year, at Grenfell School,
to take care of junior pupils. In these classes about three hundred
and fifty pupils have been given academic, manual, and physical
work suitable to their individual needs.
Academic Work.—In Arithmetic we have confined our work
chiefly to mechanical drill, combinations, tables, etc., by means of
the play instinct in games and the simple problems of store work.
Reading has improved greatly, as shown by standard tests
given three times during the year; due, probably, to increased
facilities for obtaining supplementary library books.
History has been taught in senior rooms by means of
biographical studies, as the pupils seem to gain more from the
study of great men and women of the world than from events of
History.
Geography is chiefly that of Vancouver and British Columbia,
and some Physical Geography.
Music is a subject that all our pupils enjoy. Good unison
songs are taught by rote, and musical games and folk-dancing are
greatly enjoyed. Here we find the great benefit of gramophones
purchased by nine of the classes, not only for the dancing, but for
instilling in the children an appreciation of good songs and rhythm,
and a desire to emulate good records and so to sing well.
*J /
54 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Manual Work.—Special Classes have two full-time manual
instructors; but, as it is our aim to have the boys spend half of
their time in this work, we could obtain better results with more
of this class of instruction. Most of the senior classes get two
half-days a week, while the junior classes get one or two hours.
The motor control thus developed and the self-confidence gained,
overcoming- to the greatest extent the habit of failure established
from early childhood, make this an invaluable department of
Special Class work. When a centre is established larger problems
can be undertaken, which will have a greater commercial value;
but I need only remind you, Sir, of the exhibit of work put on by
the Special Classes at the Vancouver Fair, in August of this year,
to point to the excellent results of this department, which were
seen and much appreciated by the many who exclaimed over the
furniture, toys, fancy work, etc., as well as the spiritual values
not seen except by those who work with these pupils from day
to day.
Manual work for the girls includes simple cooking and house-
cleaning and sewing, from the hemming of towels to clothing for
themselves or small brothers and sisters. Here we find the benefit
of sewing-machines, purchased by the classes, which all the older
girls are taught to use. The work is made as practical as possible,
so that the girls can use their knowledge of cooking at home, and
their knowledge of sewing in their own clothing when they have
left school. We are co-operating with some of the C.G.I.T. groups
of the churches, and some of our girls attend sewing clubs on
Saturday afternoons.
Both boys and girls are given instruction in basketry, bead-
work, toy-making, reed-work, knitting, painting, etc., and a. Work
Record is kept for each pupil, so that we may know just what he
or she has been able to accomplish during the year. We are considering the giving of a Roll of Honour for the best work in this
line, as with most of our pupils it is their one chance to excel.
Judged by commercial values it is often disappointing, for many
articles are made by each pupil of little value to any but them-'
selves; but gradually the training in motor control and tasteful
colouring begins to tell. The result is a sale of articles, not desired by the maker, by which we were enabled to return to the
Board one hundred and fifty dollars.
Physical Training.—Our aim for subnormal children in this
respect is threefold, viz., to develop motor control, poise and
obedience to command, all of which are necessary for his or her
success in after life, and to teach co-operation, alertness and en- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 55
durance.   Emphasis is laid on Drill and Games which will accomplish this end.
Three new teachers have been added to our staff this year,
and one has returned to us from' overseas.
Two classes have been moved from one school to another—
Henry Hudson senior class to Kitsilano and Laura Secord junior
class to Seymour. At the Teachers' Convention, held in the King
Edward High School in April, a demonstration of Special Class
work was given—on the Wednesday with Fairview junior class
under Miss Wilkinson, and on the Thursday with Central class
under my own care. An exhibit of work was also arranged and
lectures by Mrs. Hall and Miss Kerr.
Looking forward to development in this work, our greatest
need is for a centre or Trade School—a higher school for older
pupils, which will make them and their parents feel tjiat they have
been promoted; where advanced industrial or shop work can be
correlated with as much academic instruction as can be assimilated,
and where they can still have the careful individual treatment
characteristic of Special Class instruction. Our immediate need
is for a building of five or six rooms, equipped with motor-driven
machinery in the manual department for boys, and the same for
girls, as most of these pupils are employed in factories where this
type of machinery is used. The following should be provided:
A small suite to be used for decorating and as a motive for furniture-making, rug-making, cooking etc.; an academic room, sewing and hand-work room. With such a school we could keep the
boys and girls who are physically very mature, but mentally in
need of careful training and encouragement, at least two years
longer in school, and so send them out far better equipped for the
battle of life.
In conclusion, may I voice my appreciation of the kindness
and help given by all our co-workers in^the Teaching world, to the
University, Principals and Teachers, to the Office Staff, to Mr.
Brough and. yourself..
Respectfully submitted,
A. JOSEPHINE DAUPHINEE,
Supervisor of Special Classes. 56 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PHYSICAL TRAINING, CADET CORPS AND RIFLE TEAMS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I have much pleasure in presenting this report on subjects
in my department for the year ending December 31st, 1923:
Physical Training
From close observations at the beginning of the year—
January to June—it was found that teachers were still meeting
with difficulties in instructing pupils in some of the more specialized exercises set out in the tables of the present syllabus. Under
these conditions there was seemingly little or no progress being
made towards the best results for the physical benefit of the pupils.
In the latter part of the year, commencing September, a rearranged
schedule, eliminating nearly all exercises which for many reasons
were considered to be unsuited for the class-room, was prepared
and issued to all teachers of the staff, including substitutes. This
change did not forbid the use of the exercises which had been
deleted, as most of these are considered to be excellent from a
physical point of viw, but teachers were encouraged to use good
judgment and substitute very similar exercises of a lighter nature
when possible.
Another necessary change made was the regrading of all
tables of exercises in the syllabus, to extend over the eight-year
course, which became effective in September.
Practical lessons and other instructions given to teachers and
classes proved that there should be very little difficulty in teaching
the majority of exercises, even though the available space of the
school and class-room is very limited.
Evidently my efforts have been appreciated, as I am pleased
to state that during the period from September to December it was
very encouraging to observe the steady progress of this subject.
Possibly this was because, as anticipated, teachers are gradually BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 57
becoming better acquainted with the syllabus, assisted by advice
and encouragement which I endeavoured to give.
It was also very gratifying to observe that a majority of
teachers have exercised their classes in the open at all times when
weather permitted. This is a procedure that I have been requesting for years, as it must be agreed that it is as good for the teachers
as for the pupils.
Prize Awards
Prizes for class physical training, 1922-23, were awarded by
the local committee of the Strathcona Trust to the following
divisions of the Vancouver schools:
School Division        Teacher
King Edward High  No. 10   Lt. P. C. Tees
Dawson 	
Franklin  	
General Gordon
Hastings 	
Lord Roberts ...
23 Mrs. D. Johnston
3 Miss J. F. Parkes
1 Major H. B. Kinfe
6 Miss M. Taylor
6 Miss A. Bigney
In accordance with the conditions of the Trust, the full
amount of the award will be expended for a picture or some piece
of apparatus (suitably inscribed) for the room in which the prize
was won.
Cadet Corps
Satisfactory progress throughout the year has been made
by all corps of the School Cadet organization. Several changes
on the instructional staff were made during the latter part of the
year, in addition to the natural change in the personnel of each
unit. The complete organization as at December 31st was as
follows:
v
Organization and Establishment
No. 101st Schools Cadet Regiment, Vancouver, B. C, 1922-23
■ §- J|' Staff
Hon. Cadet Colonel, J. S. Gordon, B.A., Municipal Inspector
of Schools; Cadet Regimental Commander, Major A. C. Bundy,
C.S.C.I.; Cadet Regimental Adjutant, Capt. R. P. Steeves, C.S.C.I.;
Cadet Regimental Instructor of Musketry, Major H. B. King,
I. F. of C.; Cadet Regimental Instructor of Signaling, Major S-
M. Moodie, I. F. of C.; Cadet Regimental Medical Officer, Capt. J. 58
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Harold White, C.A.M.C.; Cadet Regimental Chaplain, Rev. A. H.
Sovereign, B.A., B.D.
No. 1 (High School) Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Major S. M. Moodie, I. F. of C.
Cadet Second in Command Major F. Fairey, I. F. of C.
Cadet Adjutant Lieut. L. W. Taylor, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co., K. E. H. School  Lieut. P. C. Tees  318
B Co, K. G. H. School  Major S. M. Moodie  209
C Co., Britannia High  School....Lieut. L. W. Taylor  201
D Co, Technical High School....Major F. Fairey  170
E Co, Technical High School....Major F. Fairey  155
High School Cadet Band Major A. C. Bundy     30
Total, all ranks.
1083
No. 2 Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Lieut. W. J. Nesbitt, C.S.C.I.
Cadet Battalion Adjutant Lieut. S. J. Bryant, C.S.C.I.
Instructors
Establishment
Corps
A Co, Chas. Dickens C. C ...Lieut. J. Dunbar   68
B Co, Simon Fraser C. C...... Mr. M. W. Mitchell  74
C Co, Model C. C Lieut. W. J. Nesbitt  133
D Co, Cecil Rhodes C. C Lieut. S. J. Bryant  64
E Co, Fairview C. C Lieut. S. J. Bryant...  101
F Co, Livingstone C. C .Lieut. F. C. Boyes  78
Total, all ranks  518
No. 3 Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Major H. B. King, I. F. of C.
Cadet Battalion Adjutant Lieut. R. Straight, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co, Tennyson C. C Lieut. R. Straight  107
B Co, Gen. Gordon C. C Major H. B. King..  100
C Co, Kitsilano C. C Lieut. T. W. Woodhead     84
D Co, Henry Hudson C.C Mr. E. S. Grant .    115
Total,  all  ranks.....  406 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 59
No. 4 Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Capt. D. P. McCallum, C.S.C.I.
Cadet Battalion Adjutant Lieut. J. R. Pollock, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment'
A Co, Dawson C. C ....Lieut. A. E. Shearman    94
B Co, Dawson C. C Mr. R. N. Stephens     50
C Co, Roberts C. C Capt. D. P. McCallum  225
D Co, Aberdeen C. C Mr. H. Martin     85
E Co, Central C. C Lieut. H. W. Gamey     45
Total, all ranks  499
No. 5 Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Lieut. H. B. Fitch, C.S.C.I.
Cadet Battalion Adjutant Lieut. F. A. Jewett, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co, Lord Nelson C.C Lieut. F. A. Jewett  119
B Co, Alexandra C. C Lieut. T. V. Clarke     85
C Co, Grandview C.C Mr. R. K. Cameron     57
D Co, Laura Secord C. C Lieut. J. M. Buckley     72
Total, all ranks  333
No. 6 Battalion
Cadet Battalion Commander Lieut. C. Logan, C.S.C.I.
Cadet Battalion Adjutant Lieut. F. C. Boyes, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co, Franklin C. C . Capt. R. P. Steeves    48
B Co, Hastings C. C Lieut. C. Logan      50
C Co, Macdonald C. C Lieut.' F. B. Sexsmith     51
D Co, Strathcona C. C Mr. J. E. Brown  120
Total, all ranks  269
Summary of Establishment
Staff     7
Instructors    :  26
Battalions   6
Corps     28
Bands  1 60
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Cadets (all ranks) 3108
Attached for Duty—
Captains          1
Lieutenants          1
1923—Total establishment of Regiment 3178
1922—Total establishment of Regiment 3129
Increase       49
Annual Inspections
The annual inspections of corps were conducted by the G.O.C.
and D.C.O, M.D. No. XL, between the dates of May 11th and June
8th. The results showing the standing of all corps in the province
were promulgated in a circular letter which is herewith given as
being of interest to all concerned in the general welfare of Cadet
units:
H   '     III     CADET CIRCULAR LETTER No. 32
p    ' ^f|fe| Headquarters, M.D. No. XI,
^^^^^^ Victoria, B. C, July 26th, 1923.
To the Cadet Instructor,
||§ No. 101st Cadet Corps,
Vancouver, B. C.
Major A. C. Bundy (for information).
Annual Inspections, 1923. In carrying out the annual inspections recently, I have considered and awarded points on the following :
Infantry Training  280
Physical Training  280
Musketry     100
Signalling; First Aid; Gymnastics  50
Per cent, of Strength on Parade to Roll Strength  100
Appearance; Steadiness; Ceremonial   40
Hours of Training Performed (Maximum)  100
(One point given for each hour of training.)
Care of Equipment and Stores  50
Total possible points    1000 "1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 61
The  following marks  have  been  awarded  to  corps  named
below:
North Ward School, Victoria  779
*King Edward High School, Vancouver  777
Technical High School, Vancouver, E Company  773
^General Gordon School, Vancouver  745
Technical High School, Vancouver, D Company  724
Central School, Victoria   716
Margaret Jenkins School, Victoria  700
Victoria High School, Victoria  683
Britannia High School, Vancouver  673
*Lord Tennyson School, Vancouver  668
King George High School, Vancouver  663
Mission Cadet Corps, Mission  662
T. J. Trapp Technical School, New Westminster  655
Victoria West School, Victoria  639
Quadra Street School, Victoria |  633
*Simon Fraser School, Vancouver  625
*Central School, Vancouver   616
Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, Vancouver  615
Duke of Connaught High School, New Westminster  614
Sir James Douglas School, Victoria  614
*Cecil Rhodes School, Vancouver  608
Central School, New Westminster  606
Henry Hudson School, Vancouver .'  600
Kitsilano School, Vancouver    598
Fairview School, Vancouver   597
Franklin School, Vancouver  592
George Jay School, Victoria  587
Lampson Street School, Esquimalt   584
Alexandra School, Vancouver    582
Model School, Vancouver  581
Livingstone School, Vancouver  \  579
Strathcona School, Vancouver   579
Enderby Cadet Corps, Enderby   570
Lord Nelson School, Vancouver   568
Hastings School, Vancouver   565
Grandview School, Vancouver   564
Lord Roberts School, Vancouver   563
Macdonald School, Vancouver   559
Chilliwack Cadet Corps, Chilliwack   557
Laura Secord School, Vancouver   556
6th Field Company, C. E., North Vancouver  556
Lord Selkirk School, South Vancouver  555
Aberdeen School, Vancouver  I 553 62
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Dawson School "A" Company, Vancouver  553
St. George's Industrial School, Lytton  545
Vernon Cadet Corps, Vernon  545
Charles Dickens School, Vancouver  545
Merritt Cadet Corps, Merritt  541
Richard McBride School, South Vancouver  540
Kaslo Cadet Corps, Kaslo   525
Penticton Cadet Corps, Penticton   515
Nelson Cadet Corps, Nelson   500
Dawson School "B" Company, Vancouver  425
South Park School, Victoria   365
Notes
1. The following corps were inspected, but do not enter into
competition with other High or Grade School corps:
University Military School, Victoria   795
Naval Brigade Cadets, Trail  755
Naval Brigade Cadets, Vancouver     600
Naval Brigade Cadets, Victoria  :  575
Naval Brigade Cadets, Port Haney  525
Naval Brigade Cadets, Kaslo     510
Band Company, Vancouver High School, Vancouver.
Band Company, No. 530, Westminster Cadet Battalion, New
Westminster.
2. The following corps have not been inspected:
Fraser Lake, B. C.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Courtenay, B. C. (Naval Cadets).
^^^^^^^   (Signed)     J. M. CUMMING, Captain,
District Cadet Officer, Military
^^^^|^^^^^^^' District No. XI, Victoria, B.C.
Prizes for cadet training were also awarded by the Strathcona
Trust to the instructors and corps marked *.
The cadet regimental cups were won by the same corps.
Syllabus of Cadet Training
Touching briefly on the subjects as now being taught to cadet
corps, it cannot but be of interest to observe that there is nothing
objectionable, and that each subject must be of benefit to the
cadet. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 63
Subjects
(a) Physical Training: The value of this is well known and requires no explanation.
(b) First Aid:    Same comment as above.
(c) Signalling and Methods of Communication: This subject is
of value to the cadet in connection with telegraphy, wireless,
etc.
(d) Musketry: To teach care and respect of firearms and possibly reduce accidents to a minimum, in addition to being a
clean sport.
(e) Ceremonial and Close Order Drill: Valuable for organization
and discipline.
Other subjects not being required are purely voluntary and
at discretion of instructor.
Signalling
In the early part' of the year, and in accordance with the syllabus of cadet training, a course of signalling and methods of
communication was granted by Headquarters. A considerable
number of cadets attended this course voluntarily in the afternoons
after school hours, and I am pleased to state that the following
passed the examinations and were awarded certificates of efficiency,
together with a bonus of $5.00 each:
Cadet Officers
2396 Cadet Adam 215 Blenheim Court
2399 Cadet Beeston ....1348 Haro Street
2401 Cadet Brett 1046 Fourteenth Ave. W.
2403 Cadet Burley 300 Dunsmuir Street
2404 Cadet Cashmore \ ..75 Eighth Ave. W.
2405 Cadet Chapman Lloyd Avenue, Capilano
2406 Cadet Crickmer 1306 Bidwell Street
2408 Cadet Dierks ...1926 Lakewood Drive
2409 Cadet Elstead 2730 Twenty-seventh Ave. E.
2410 Cadet Fugler 2618 Eighth Ave. W.
Cadet Non-Commissioned Officers
2423 Cadet McNairnie 1520 Fifth Ave. W.
2424 Cadet Maclennan 730 Broadway E.
2426 Cadet Patterson 1544 Union Street
2427 Cadet Pelkey.. 1605 Cotton Drive 64 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
2428 Cadet Robson 2065 Fifteenth Ave. W.
2429 Cadet Sanderson 1285 Eighth Ave. W.
2430 Cadet Scott Suite 1, 1241 Homer Street
2432 Cadet Sledding 2550 Macdonald Street
2434 Cadet Walker 112 Sixth Ave. W.
Cadet Officers
2411 Cadet Germley 1376 Burrard Street
2412 Cadet Graham 2566 Fourth Ave. W.
2413 Cadet Hamilton 2979 Fortieth Ave. W.
2414 Cadet Jage Suite 13, 1019 Bute Street
2416 Cadet King 1144 Jervis Street
2418 Cadet Lockwood 34 Thirteenth Ave. E.
2419 Cadet Manahan 54 Hastings Street W.
2420 Cadet Marston 1785 Fifteenth Ave. E.
2422 Cadet Muir 2761 Kitchener Street
Cadet Camp
On June 30th approximately 500 instructors and cadets proceeded to the camp arranged for at Sidney, Vancouver Island, and
returned on July 7th. All preparations and plans for the period
were carried out as well as was physically possible. I may add
that I believe general satisfaction was given by all officers in
charge, and that all instructors present participated to the best of
their ability to ensure success. The routine, while encamped,' consisted mostly of exercises, which cannot be taught during the
school term, such as cleanliness of camp (under the heading of
sanitation),  physical  training,  sports,  and  ceremonial  exercises.
There were also generous food supplies, good meals, good
sleeping accommodation, library, shower baths, medical inspection
and first aid, Divine service, concerts, addresses, etc, etc. From
my general observation, on behalf of the Board of Trustees,
parents and cadets, I concluded that all who took part must have
enjoyed the period from beginning to end. Great credit is due our
Regimental Chaplain, Rev. A. H. Sovereign, for his faithfulness
to duty. He participated in all activities and requirements where
possible, and was leader of all sports. On behalf of all concerned,
I wish to take this opportunity to extend sincere thanks for his
untiring efforts to make the outing the success it was.
Camp Sports
During the camp sports the cups donated by the I. F. of C.
were competed for. The High Schools Cup was won by the
Technical High School.    The individual cups were won by Cadets "1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
65
J. Sinclair and C. West of the same unit. The Grade Schools Cup
was won by the Lord Roberts Cadet Corps, and the individual cup
by Cadet R. Graham of the same corps.
Rifle Teams—No. 101st Schools Cadet Regiment
Results for Year 1922-23
In the High School Series it will be seen that in each of the
official shoots the team totals were very close, and in the aggregate a difference of only one point.
This was indeed a very close and interesting competition, with
the result that the King Edward High School team was awarded
the Crehan Shield and medals donated annually by Major M. J.
Crehan.
Team Totals—Possible Score, 2240
School
K.E.H.S.   ..
Team
No.   1st   2nd
3rd    4th    5th    6th    7th    8th
Aggte.
  1 278 280 279 278 280
Technical   H.S  1 280 280 279 279 280
K.E.H.S  2 276 275 275 277 273
K.G.H.S  1 254 257 262 266 262
Britannia  H.S  2 219 260 269 254 262
Technical   H.S  .2 275 278 276 275 278
Britannia H.S  2 219 260 269 254 262
Technical  H.S  3 276 274 t	
280
280 280
2235
280
279 277
2234
279
276 274
2205
269
277 (7 shoots)
1847
  (5 shoots')
1264
 (5 shoots)
1382
 (5*shoots)
1264
 (2 shoots)
550
In the Grade Schools Competition the first ten teams, in the
order shown, competed on a neutral range for the regimental cups,
etc, the Alexandra School team winning the match with a total
of 256 of a possible 280 points. This team gained the honour of
being the leader of the League for the year 1922-23, and the individuals were awarded the Tait medals, donated annually by Lieut.-
Col. J. S. Tait, of the 29th Battalion. xAlso as a result of this
competition other teams, including Alexandra, and in order of
aggregate scores, were awarded cups as follows: Alexandra,
Fairview, Model, Simon Fraser and Henry Hudson. The A. P.
Brown Challenge Shield is no longer open for competition, it
having been agreed to finally donate it to the Henry Hudson team
as being won outright on account of that team's winning it the
greatest number of times according to the inscriptions engraved
on the miniature shields. Had not this been agreed upon, it would
have remained for the year 1922-23 in the possession of the Alexandra team, making two successive years in which this team leads
the League. 66
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Grade Schools Corps
Team Totals—Possible Score, 2240
School
1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th       Aggte.
1. Fairview     255
2. Simon Fraser   256
3. Henry Hudson   256
4. Alexandra  249
5. Hastings     247
6. Franklin      200
7. Model    227
8. Cecil Rhodes     221
9. Roberts     195
10. Laura Secord   212
11. Macdonald      207
12. Kitsilano     250
13. Grandview     221
14. Nelson     246
15. Strathcona     147
16. Central  192
17. Livingstone      139
18. Gen. Gordon   225
19. Chas.  Dickens  ...... 182
20. Aberdeen  167
21. Dawson, A  239
22. Tennyson     188
23. Dawson,  B  195
273
271
253
261
269
268
278
2128
272
254
267
266
271
269
268
2123
256
271
256
260
272
266
270
2107
261
253
256
256
271
271
271
2088
267
263
261
266
261
246
248
2059
251
252
253
251
260
252
258
1977
245
247
235
243
238
237
243
1915
228
230
230
244
250
245
246
1894
208
215
256
245
242
251
255
1867
207
232
238
240
247
245
239
1860
228
237
237
254
235
226
217
1841
254
267
232
255
268
270 (7 shoots)
1816
212
254
230
217
234
239
205
1812
245
259
257
252
254
247 (7 shoots)
1760
121
138
196
247
238
230
219
1536
213
217
225
232
219
237 (7 shoots)
1535
114
184
186
207
190
187
226
1433
207
220
257
254
262
(6 shoots)
1425
166
168
220
174
205
181 (7 shoots)
1296
192
201
224
236
242
(6 sihoots)
1262
241
242
243
246
(5 shoots)
1211
204
221
228
213
(5 shoots)
1054
213
222
(3 shoots)
630
All annual reports on rifle practice of teams were forwarded
to Headquarters in time for the awards to individual members,
whose names and scores, together with the number of shoots, etc,
are herewith given. These cadets were all awarded prizes by the
Strathcona Trust. The first of each' three—thirty in all—were
also presented with a silver medal which is donated annually by
Mr. S. M. Scott.
1922-1923 Rifle Teams, 101st S. C. R.—Three Highest Individual
Aggregates—Winners of Strathcona Trust Prize Awards
School
Britannia H A.
Britannia H W,
Britannia H H.
Britannia H E.
Britannia H V.
Britannia H L.
K.E.H.S L.
K.E.H.S B.
K.E.H.S R.
K.E.H.S E.
Team
Name No.
Simpson   1
Ballantyne.... 1
Bowes  1
Cross  2
Shannon  2
Miller  2
McMaster  1
Colquette  1
McKichan  1
Thompson  2
Order
of
No. of
Aggte.
Possible
Merit
Shoots
Score
Aggte.
1
6
198
210
2
5
171
175
3
4
136
140
1
4
130
140
2
3
97
105
3
•>
O
97
105
1
8
280
280
2
8
280
280
3
8
280
280
1
8
279
280 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
67
School
K.E.H.S R.
K.E.H.S H.
K.G.H.S A.
K.G.H.S E.
K.G.H.S R.
Technical  H D.
Technical  H C.
Technical  H P.
Technical  H T.
Technical  H C.
Technical H A.
Aberdeen    H.
Aberdeen    M
Aberdeen    J.
Alexandra  E.
Alexandra  C.
Alexandra  R.
Cecil  Rhodes M
Cecil Rhodes E.
Cecil Rhodes C.
Central    J.
Central    A.
Central    G.
Chas. Dickens  B.
Chas. Dickens  H,
Chas.. Dickens  A.
Dawson  A T.
Dawson  A R.
Dawson  A C.
Dawson   B J.
Dawson   B D.
Dawson  B H.
Fairview  E.
Fairview   A.
Fairview  L.
Franklin    R.
Franklin    H
Franklin N.
Gen. Gordon  B.
Gen. Gordon  D.
Gen. Gordon  R.
Grandview    B.
Grandview    F.
Grandview    H
Hastings   W
Hastings    H,
Hastings   E.
Henry Hudson J.
Henry Hudson B.
Henry Hudson G.
Kitsilano  S.
Kitsilano G.
Kitsilano  H
Order
Team of
Name                   No. Merit
Hammond     2 2
Rae .-     2 3
Stout     1 1
Drurnmond....    1 2
Brown     1 3
R.  Blair     1 1
Chatwin...     1 2
L. Elliott     1 3
H. Kilgour....    2 1
N. Albright...    2 2
E. Bennett....    2 3
Barker  1
Sinclair   2
Fraser   3
Young   1
Parker     2
Dewar   3
cD. Collinge     1
Fuller   2
Teeple    3
Monahan     1
Roberts    2
Rose    3
Chalmers   1
Holliday  2
McLintock   3
Wilson   1
Small     2
Hoffman   3
Cottam   1
Grant     2
Cohen   3
Palister   1
Birch     2
Young   3
Matilda     1
Johnson   2
Peters     3
Keate     1
McGillivray   .2
Lee     3
Perry    1
Gordon   2
Brock   3
Marshall   1
Stubbins    2
Baker   3
Johnstone   1
Bray   2
Alston   3
Tingley   1
Shortt   2
Studebaker   3
No. of
Aggte.
Possible
Shoots
Score
Aggte.
8
279
280
8
278
280
7
225
245
6
207
210
5
165
185
8
279
280
8
279
280
8
279
280
5
175
175
5
173
175
5
173
175
6
174
210
6
165
210
6
159
210
8
274
280
8
263
280
8
259
280
8
254
280
8
247
280
8
241
280
7
200
245
6
166
210
6
156
210
6
182
210
5
137
175
6
114
210
5
155
175
5
153
175
5
133
175
3
86
105
3
85
105
3
84
105
8
276
280
8
271
280
8
265
280
8
259
280
.8 >
256
280
8
252
280
6
202
210
6
196
210
6
191
210
8
237
280
7
225
245
7
196
245
8
271
280
8
266
280
7
225
245
8
270
280
8
269
280
8
265
280
7
241
245
7
228
245
6
201
210 ^
68 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Laura Secord G. Dunn 	
Laura  Secord J. McNee 	
Laura Secord A. Higgins          3
Livingstone    T. Pinto 	
Livingstone    J. Bell   	
Livingstone    F. Payne       3
Macdonald    J. Dickson 	
Macdonald    T. Butterfield 	
Macdonald    W. Patterson 	
Model    H. Welsh 	
Model  A.  Morfltt 	
Model  E. Kissack	
Nelson  G.  Hughes   	
Nelson   A. Robb 	
Nelson  D.  Weaver 	
Roberts   E. Frank 	
Roberts    R.  Tardiff 	
Roberts    R.  Graham 	
Simon Fraser P. Williams 	
Simon Fraser A. Petrie	
Simon Fraser G. Perry          3
Strathcona  „ M. Oleswiski 	
Strathcona   N. Presacco  	
Strathcona  M.  Knickerbocker	
Tennyson R. Ellwyn 	
Tennyson    R. Hooper 	
Tennyson    G. Coombe   	
1
8
256
280
2
8
256
280
3
7
199
245
1
8
226
280
2
8
201
280
3
8
197
280
1
8
260
280
2
8
246
280
3
7
196
245
1
8
254
280
2
8
246
280
3
8
242
280
1
7
230
245
2
7
230
245
3
7
226
245
1
5
162
175
2
5
154
175
3
5
134
175
1
8
272
280
2
8
270
280
3
8
267
280
1
8
229
280
2
8
191
280
3
8
168
280
1
7
203
245
2
7
199
245
3
7
194
245
Realizing that my report is getting somewhat lengthy, I cannot here refrain from touching on the good services rendered by
Lieut. A. B. Maggs of the Technical High School. He had continuously given a great deal of his time to instruction in the care
and use of the rifle, the results of whicff have been shown on
several occasions, and, to say the least, his efforts have been
sincerely appreciated by all cadets whom he has instructed.
In the annual report of 1922, results of a team entered in the
C. R. L. were given. I am again pleased to receive and forward
the following communication from this officer:
Vancouver, B.C.,
i I December 15th, 1923.
Major A. C. Bundy,
O. C. No. 101st Schools Cadet Regiment,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour to submit the following report of the shooting done by the team representing the Cadet Corps of the Vancouver Technical School in the Miniature Series of the Canadian
Rifle League during the winter of 1923: BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 69
The first venture made by the Corps in this Dominion-wide
competition was in 1922, when—somewhat to our own surprise
we secured third place among 47 competing teams. This year,
shooting under conditions in some respects more difficult, we came
second among 54 competitors. The inference as to what the Technical team should do next year is obvious.
A word as to the character of this shooting may not be out
of place. It is done with the best .22 calibre rifles obtainable,
preferably the B. S. A.—four of which, thanks largely to your
good offices, we have now at our disposal. To secure 100% of
points, the shots must consistently strike a four-tenths inch circle
at a distance of twenty yards. It will be seen that this class of
shooting calls for the utmost steadiness and accuracy; and the fact
that the Technical team, composed mainly of inexperienced boys,
was able to average 97% in the four matches of the series shows
clearly that something was accomplished toward the cultivation of
these two essential qualities. If the power of quiet concentration
is admitted to be a valuable asset, then rifle-shooting is practical
education as well as fascinating sport.
It is to be regretted that there is no rifle range at the Technical
School. Through the courtesy of Major R. M. Blair, the Corps
shot last season on the range of the Seaforth Highlanders, where
the kind assistance of Sergt. T. Alexander as range officer was
always available and greatly appreciated. All shooting this season
will probably be done at the Drill Hall, which is nearer.
The strength of teams in the C. R. I. series varies from eight
to twelve, and the possible of points in the four matches ranges
from 3200 to 4800. The standing of the five leading teams for
1923 is as follows:
1—Colchester Academy, Truro   3902 (out of 4000)
2—Vancouver Technical School  4656
3—Peterboro Collegiate Institute  4636
4—Central High School, Calgary >. 4630
5_University of Toronto  -. 3081 (out of 3200)
The leading individual scorers of the Technical team, with
points scored out of a possible 400, are as follows:
P. L. Elliott  391
D. R. Blair   390
M. S. Hedley  388
W. S. Hudson :  388
R. McBean  387
J. C. Britton   384
ss. 70 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The above-named will receive Marksman's Badges, in addition
to special prizes, and the team a Special Certificate.
It may be mentioned that five of the six leaders listed above
are no longer at school, and several other goods marksmen also
have left, so that reliance will have to be placed this year on almost
entirely new material. I propose, nevertheless, to enter two teams
in the competition.
In concluding, I wish to express my appreciation of the great
interest you have taken, personally as well as officially, in this
department of Cadet Corps work.
Respectfully submitted,
(Signed)      A. B. MAGGS, Lieut,
Musketry Instructor, V. T. S. C. C.
Lieut. Maggs also prepared special conditions and target,
herewith submitted, for the annual competition of the Crehan
Shield. | IH I
These conditions were recently agreed upon at a conference
of the High School instructors:
101st Schools Cadet Regiment
Proposed Conditions, Crehan Shield Competition
Rifle and Equipment
Any .22 calibre rifle, with any sights, other than lens or telescopic ; any suitable sling.
Position
Prone; neither hand, wrist, nor forearm must be supported,
nor any rest for rifle used.
Distance
Twenty yards, measured from the edge of firing point nearest
target, and certified to by the instructor in charge.
Ammunition
As issued for the use of Cadet Corps.
Targets and Scoring
101st S. C. R. Target No. 2—"decimal" scoring, possible 100;
two shots to be fired at each of the five scoring bullseyes. Any
number of shots may be fired at the practice bullseye.   BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 75
Teams
Each team to consist of nine competitors, selected before the
match is fired; the highest eight scores made to count as the team
total in any particular match. No restriction is to be placed on the
transfer of a competitor from one team to another entered by the
same corps, except that no competitor may fire on more than one
team in any one monthly match.
General Regulations for 1924
1. The competition comprises four matches, one to be fired
in each month from January to April. Match may be fired at any
time during the month, returns to be made to the O. C. the regiment within five days following date of firing.
2. Plain targets for practice will be issued to meet the requirements of each competing corps.
3. Any number of teams may be entered from each competing corps.
4. Thirty-six numbered targets for each team entered,
stamped or signed by the O. C. the regiment, will be issued to each
corps for use in the monthly matches, and only such targets are
to be used in these matches. The match targets issued to each
corps will be numbered consecutively, and must be returned in the
same consecutive order as issued.
5. Score-sheets shall be filled out and returned with the targets after each match. The O. C. will check the same with the
targets, and, in any case of discrepancy between a target and the
score credited to it, his decision shall be final.
6. In case of a tie on the aggregate of the four matches between two or more teams representing different corps, suitable
arrangements shall be made for a shoot-off to decide the possession
of the trophy.
Annual Statement Cadet Fund—January to December, 1923
Jan.     1st—Balance in Bank $4,126.24
Sept.   4th—By Deposit of Cheque, Cadet Uniform Grant 3,559.16
Nov. 30th—To Interest         32.41
Dec.    6th—By Deposit of Cheque (Strathcona Trust)  .    88.00
lift: $7,805.81
Expenditure for year   2,737.69
Dec.   31st—Balance   $5,068.12
mgL 76
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In conclusion, I beg to thank you for your guidance and to
acknowledge the co-operation of the Board of School Trustees, the
Secretary, the principals and the teachers during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
■• J A. C. BUNDY,
Supervisor of Physical Training and Cadet Corps.
iHi BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 77
PRIMARY WORK
Vancouver, B. C,
December 28th, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
The following is a general report upon Primary Work for the
year 1923:
There are at present one hundred and ten primary classes in
the city.
Several new teachers were appointed during the year; and,
at the special meeting held for them, the methods of dealing with
the various school subjects were discussed. They were also visited
as frequently as possible, and assistance given them with the
general organization of work and the classification of their pupils.
Time-tables were prepared and much teaching done for them,
especially in reading, language, spelling and numbers. It has been
a pleasure to work with the majority of these teachers, as they
have shown themselves amenable to suggestions and have been
eager to make a success of their work. Many of the principals
arranged to give these new members of their staff an opportunity
of visiting some of our best teachers. The visiting teachers reported that they had been most kindly received, and that everything possible had been done to make their visit a profitable one.
I should like to urge that one or two of our class-rooms be used
for observation purposes, and that the teachers of the classes be
given a salary equal to that of the Mocjel School teachers.
At the general meetings of the First Grade teachers in September, reading and language were among the chief topics for
discussion. Developing appreciation of the content of the reading
lesson and of oral literature, as well as improvement of rate and
comprehension in reading, were especially considered. It was
explained that the rate of reading depends to a large extent upon
the width of the eye-sweep. Methods of training the children to
acquire a wide eye-sweep were discussed. Those especially mentioned were the giving of much easy reading material and requiring it to be rapidly read, and rapid drill with perceptive cards 78 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
containing phrases and short sentences. It was also shown that
habits of pointing, lip-movement and vocalization tend to retard
the rate and should be avoided. The most effective methods of
dealing with the New Canadian Primer was also discussed with
Grade 1-b teachers. It was suggested that the teachers begin, as
usual, to teach reading according to the course of study, using
action words and sentences for the first lessons, and arranging
others from conversations upon the children's interests and experiences. As the vocabulary of the primer was considered too
large for the content, it was decided to select as many words and
phrases as possible from the primer to use in these preliminary
lessons. This selection would eliminate much word-drill when
the children were ready to use the primer. We have proved later
by experiment that, of the available supplementary texts, the Winston and the Young and Field primers are best suited to accompany the Canadian Primer.
As a result of their experience last year, teachers of beginners
are now dealing with the new method of teaching reading with
increased skill. Many of them are using the sandtable, as well as
pictures, to make the reading lessons interesting. Teachers of
Grades Ta and ITb are making greater use of silent reading exercises. They have done more to correlate reading -with the
various school activities, particularly with the project, and the
children have made many interesting booklets. The booklets in
all grades are more attractive to the children, as teachers are now
able to print the reading matter with the printing sets that have,
been supplied to the schools. I have tried to help the teachers,
especially the newer ones, to develop expression in reading by
showing them that good natural expression is largely a result of
training in comprehension and appreciation. Young teachers are
inclined to give much model reading, and to imagine that expressive reading can be secured by imitation. They often have
much difficulty in questioning their pupils effectively upon the
matter of the reading lesson; and they do not always" know how
to make an emotional appeal to the children. The use of the new
supplementary and pleasure readers have done much to arouse
enthusiasm in reading. The stories and the illustrations in these
books are excellent, and the children read them with great interest. In one of the schools an extremely difficult group of second
grade pupils, who could scarcely be induced to read, were attracted
by these books, and in a short time they were reading eagerly in
all their spare moments. Teachers are constantly finding that
slow children will read these books with but little urging if a
proper selection has been made, and they feel that the money used
for these books has been well spent.    We should like to have a BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 79
larger variety.   Most of the pleasure readers have been purchased
either with library or concert funds.
Our course in handwork is a selective one, and the work done
in Grade I-b is usually well planned by the teachers; but the material selected for the next two grades is not always satisfactory.
It is too often limited to the project, and does not show sufficient
progression upon the work of Grade Tb. The handwork should
be in charge of a special supervisor.
Number has generally been more concretely presented this
year and games have been more commonly used to motivate the
drills. This subject is well taught by the majority of the teachers;
but there is a tendency on the part of some teachers to discard the
concrete work before it is thoroughly understood, and to give
formal drill before the children are ready for it. Children should
be given more practice in written work upon the blackboard to
develop speed, and it should always be done under supervision to
prevent the formation of bad habits.
The teachers are now having better success with the project
method. Possibly the one that has been most commonly used and
best understood is the Preparation for Winter. This has been
developed in various ways by means of sandtables, charts and
booklets. The farm, or market, was usually chosen for the sandtable work. Autumn fruits and vegetables were collected and
studied, and butter was made in several class-rooms. The children
brought farm or autumn pictures for charts, and made booklets
containing magazine cuttings and drawings to show how mother
prepares for winter. Each page of illustrations in the booklets
was usually accompanied by a short printed story obtained by
means of a group composition. This project involved reading,
language, nature, drawing and handwork. One of the teachers,
who selected a dolls* house as a group project to motivate handwork, interested her children to such an extent that twenty-seven
of them furnished individual houses at home. Seasonable projects
were also selected by most of the teachers, as Thanksgiving,
Christmas and Easter, and projects were used with some of the
readers as Dutch and Indian Life, and The Three Bears and The
Red Hen stories, etc.
In several schools children of exceptional ability have been
accelerated. We do not recommend this special promotion unless
the children are in good physical condition and are able to adapt
themselves with ease to the work of the next grade. 80 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I have to thank all inspectors, principals and teachers who
have helped to make a success of the work of the Primary Department.
Respectfully submitted,
EMILY J. TREMBATH,
Supervisor of Primary Work.
DD
□
-v. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 81
MANUAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to report for the Manual Training Department another
year's progress.
The maximum attendance was 3,406 in October. This sets
a new high mark, and the average attendance is also particularly
gratifying, the lowest being 93.9% and the highest 96.5, in spite
of the prevalence of measles in certain districts.
The increased attendance in the eastern schools of the city
necessitated the engagement of Mr. F. H. Barger for five half-
days in each week to take charge of the Beaconsfield Centre. In
October two classes were added to the Simon Fraser Centre, which
is now full. There are yet a few Seventh Grade classes not provided for, but they are so scattered that it is difficult to combine
them with classes in existing centres. It will therefore be necessary to build another centre in the Macdonald or Grandview district.
I trust the claims of the Kitsilano High School for a manual
training course will be favourably considered this year, particularly as accommodation could there be found for two or three
classes from the Bayview and General Gordon districts, where
there is increasing population.
Early in the year a Provincial Bird House Competition was
participated in by eight centres: Gordon (C. Crabb, teacher),
Simon Fraser (W.Wilson), Mount Pleasant (A. W. Jones), Model
(F. J. Harris), Seymour (C. H. Kitchen), Hudson (N. H. Gardner), Tennyson (A. Williams) and Alexandra (A. Campbell).
The Lieutenant-Governor's Cup was won by the General
Gordon Centre, with a total of 521 points out of 600. One gold
medal for individual excellence was won by T. Dill, of the General
Gordon Centre, and two silver medals by boys of the same centre;
two silver medals were won by Simon Fraser boys and one silver 82
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
medal by Alexandra Centre. Over four hundred bird houses were
made during the competition, and most of these were placed during spring and summer.
During the last month I have taken a survey of the models
made in all the centres, and found that, upon the whole, there was
excellent work being done; that of Alexandra Centre, under the
care of Mr. A. Campbell, being the best in style, variety and finish.
May I, in conclusion, emphasize the fact that the majority of
our manual training rooms are in basements, and are consequently
darker and lower in ceiling than ordinary class-rooms. They
should therefore be cleaned and kalsomined oftener—once a year
is none too often. I trust provision will be made by the Building
Committee for this is next year's estimates.
Faithfully yours,
;g. S. NORTHROP,
Principal, Manual Training Schools.
^£*i^^S
9fe
«5» BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
83
HOME ECONOMICS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 21st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit the following report of the Home Economics
Department for the year 1923. The number of classes and of
pupils is as follows:
Grades
Grade  Vl-a	
Grade VH-b and a...
No. of
Classes
. 50
. 60
No. of
Pupils    Home Kconomics Subjects
957
855
Time per Week
Elementary clothing. 60 to 115 min.
Housewifery,   elementary.
foods and clothing.
120 min.
Grade VHI-b and a.. 48
Junior High     4
High   Schools  34
General   Course	
Special   Course     3
Total 119
973    Grade   Vll-a   continued—
personal   hygiene   andl65 min.
care of infants.
69    Continuation   of  elementary course in foods and
clothing;   more     cookingl2^ hours,
in  home  quantity;   physiology and hygiene.
734    Clothing in three schools.80 to 120 min.
     Foods    and    clothing    in
one school.    •
94    Science — psysiology;
chemistry;   nutrition.
Art — Applied   design.
Practical—cookery;    sewing; millinery; dressmak- g to 8 hours.
ing;  home nursing.
The    remainder    of    the
school  time is   taken up
with   English,   mathematics and foreign language.
3682
To teach the above work there is a staff of fifty in Grade VI,
teaching one-half day per week, with Miss M. G. McEwen as
supervisor.    There are  eleven teachers  of Home Economics in 84 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Grades VII and VIII, two teachers in the Junior High School and
five in the higfh schools.
Home Economics is holding its own in fitting itself into the
school programme in a way to make it of practical value in education. This is a difficult mattetr, because some leaders in the
educational field can see value only in subjects that, rightly or
wrongly, have become time honoured, and every student, no matter
what her interests and capacity, must measure up to the one
standard or be found "wanting." This often prevents the expansion of work in subjects which have been forced into the schools
because of changed conditions in the work of to-day. This is one
reason Home Economics in British Columbia has not advanced
beyond its elementary stages. If an educational survey becomes a
fact in this province, some of the injustice growing out of the
above may be remedied.
So far as the work in the Vancouver schools is concerned, it
is encouraging to be able to report some advancement in all grades.
It is impossible to put in much new work; but the established
courses are now more clearly defined, and the teaching in many
instances is improving.
The School Board, in spite of the shortage of funds, has made
many repairs in the centres. This cannot help but improve the
efficiency, and is of the utmost importance in teaching a subject
which aims at raising the standards of living in the community.
HI"    pf1       -   ■ GRADE VI-A
The course established in 1922 has been followed; but it has
been possible to include two new problems and some supplementary work because many of the teachers are becoming more
proficient. I am glad to report that Miss McEwen was induced to
remain as supervisor of this grade, because good work can not be
done if the supervisor is changed every year.
Miss McEwen's report is attached, and, therefore, my report
upon her work is shortened; but I once again wish to point out
that the teachers of any subject on the school programme should
be adequately trained to teach it before they are put in charge of
classes. This lack of training and the fact that about half the
teachers in sewing are replaced by new ones each year is a constant drain on the general efficiency, and this condition is an
injustice to the children.
Very little has been done in the establishment of suitable
handwork courses in Grades  IV, V and Vl-b during this year. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 85
Until such is an accomplished fact, it will be impossible to include
as much advanced work in the higher grades as might otherwise
be possible.
Grades VII and VIII
The policy of combining part classes, in order that each pupil
may cover her entire course, is still most satisfacttory. Many
principals so carefully organize their classes in September that the
classes are of a suitable size, and few changes take place during
the entire year in the upper grades. Home Economics work is
most successful under these conditions.
A decided improvement took place when it was arranged that
all Grade VIII pupils attend Home Economics lessons in the forenoon and Grade VII pupils in the afternoon. The course of each
grade can be clearly defined, and there is no loss of time.
Not only are the lessons, as given before September of this
year in foods, cookery, and sewing, as comprehensive and well
taught as formerly, but we have been able to include forty three-
quarter hour lessons in Home Sanitation, Personal Hygiene and
First Aid, and intend taking over from the nursing staff the work
of the "Little Mothers" classes, which has been carried on so
successfully for some years. The nursing staff regret losing this
interesting work, but in this way it will become part of the course
for all Vancouver girls instead of for only the comparative few
who might elect it for after school classes. The Nursing staff will
co-operate with the Home Economics staff in making these lessons
successful.
In three schools there are six Grade VIII classes which do
not go in the morning, and these pupils get lessons only in foods
and clothing.
Some classes have been able to include some very interesting
visits to commercial plants, and we appreciate the courtesy extended in all cases. Usually the class-room work is simply continued by the teacher in the factory.
Teachers' meetings have been held at least twice a month all
year, and in some cases once a week. This is necessary at this
time in order to re-establish systematic work of a proper standard
throughout the city.
I am glad to report only one change in the teaching staff.
One new teacher for half time was added as the number of classes
had increased. 86 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Junior High School
The work of this school has increased, owing to the establishment of the second year work for twenty and the coming in
of fifty new students. The classes, therefore, outgrew the hospitality of the King Edward High School and are now established
in their own centre, much to the satisfaction of the teachers and
the taught. Nothing is more inspiring to a Home Economics
worker in any sphere than environment which lends itself to
efficiency with the least expenditure of time and energy.
Now that the classes are well established, the next business
is to deepen and broaden the work itself so that all students may
get the maximum benefit for the time and energy expended. These
classes have also made some visits to commercial plants.
One new Home Economics teacher was added to this staff in
September. The next step to be hoped for is the establishment
of a Technical School for girls, not only for the benefit of the
girls of the Junior High School who wish to avail themselves of
a more extended course than that offered at present, but also for the
training of all girls of the city who prefer technical courses rather
than those provided in the academic high schools.
High Schools—General and Commercial Course Students
The work in this course has not been extended during the
year; but some good work has been done by the teachers, in conference, in regard to the course of study. It was subjected to
careful scrutiny in order to see that the time given to it was being
used in the best interests of the students. The time devoted to
Home Economics in the general and commercial courses is by no
means adequate, nor is the work broad enough, when it is considered that most of these girls will eventually become home-
makers, and a woman's ideals are largely formed during- the higrh
school period. Therefore the responsibility of using wisely the
time at present devoted to it was felt by every one.
There should be a second year's work added at Kitsilano High
School to bring it up to the other schools.
There was one change on the staff during- the year.
King Edward High School—Home Economics Course
The interest in this course is still well sustained. Pupils would
like to enter; parents would like to have them do so; Parent-
Teachers and other organizations support the course; but it still
labours under the disadvantage of not complying with the ma- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES • 87
triculation requirements of the University of British Columbia.
Some concessions have been made during the year; but, until a
girls' work in Home Economics is given the credit accorded to
other subjects, the numbers of students entering will be small and
the profession of home-making will be lightly esteemed.
King Edward High School—Cafeteria
A most decided advance was made when the Board decided to
engage a trained dietitian, Miss Esther Kinney, to take charge of
the cafeteria and to become a member of the Home Economics
Department. This was done in September, and, while all we hope
for has by no means been accomplished, the change has been for
good and is working out most satisfactorily for all concerned.
Exhibitions and Luncheons
Before closing, I wish to call attention to the many exhibits
held during the year, all of which show the work is improving as
well as the interest of teachers and students. No public function
is ever held in the centres merely as a "show," but it is usually the
end of some project for educational advancement.
A commencement has also been made in trying to get more
co-operation between the school and the home. Meetings have
been' held for mothers in the centres; and, better perhaps, one
teacher is making visits directly to some of her parents to consult
with them as to the functioning of her work. Such painstaking
effort will meet with its reward.
Thanking you, the office staff, and the School Board, as well
as the principals and teachers, for co-operation and help, I am,
Yours respectfully,
ELIZABETH BERRY,
Supervisor, Home Economics. r
88 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SEWING IN THE GRADES
Vancouver, B. C,
December 21st, 1923.
Miss E. Berry,
Supervisor, Home Economics Department,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Madam:
The following is the report on the work in clothing of the
Grade VI classes, in the Vancouver Public Schools for the year
1923: |§! | §
During the school term ending in June, 1,027 girls, under the
care of 54 teachers, received instruction in the subject. Since the
grading of the classes, in September, sewing has been taught in
50 classes to 957 girls.
The time given to sewing varies from two and three-quarter
hours a week to two hours every two weeks. It is needless to say
that, owing to this, there will be considerable difference in the
work accomplished in different classes. May I recommend that,
when it can be conveniently arranged, a lesson in sewing be given
every week instead of one every two weeks.
In September, eleven teachers, with no experience in teaching
sewing, were placed in charge of Grade VI classes. For the benefit
of these teachers, and for any others who wished to attend, a
series of four meetings was held in October. These meetings will
be continued in January.
For a class of girls in Grenfell School who have not reached
Grade VI standing a special course in sewing is being planned.
Respectfully submitted,
MARY G. McEWEN,
Supervisor of Sewing, "1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 89
SCHOOL SPORTS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 29th, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the
Vancouver Public Schools' Athletic Association for the year 1923:
In January the Inter-Municipal Public Schools' Football
League caught the attention of the association, and the team
representing the public schools of Vancouver City gave a good
account of itself. This team worked its way into the final of the
league; but the day on which this game was to have been played
turned out very wet and stormy, and, through a misunderstanding,
several of the players did not turn out. The result was that New
Westminster won the trophy donated by the Kelly Douglas Company. It speaks volumes for the Vancouver boys that, with several
players absent, the score against them was only one goal.
At a general meeting of the association, held in March, the
programme for the spring was drawn up. It was decided to carry
on, as in former years, with senior boys' baseball, junior boys'
baseball and girls' baseball. Three leagues were formed and were
well supported by the public schools. The honours of the Senior
Boys' League went to the Henry Hudson School, while the Dawson
School claimed the honours in the Junior League. The Nightingale School was successful in winning the championship in the
Girls' League.
In September another general meeting of the association was
called for the purpose of organizing for autumn. Four leagues
were created, and schedules were arranged for senior boys' football, junior boys' football, boys' basketball and girls' basketball.
The weather for these sports was all that could be desired; but,
unfortunately, sickness prevented the completion of the senior
boys' football. In the Junior League the Model School won the
David Spencer Cup, without having a loss registered against it.
The Boys' Basketball Trophy was won by the Dawson School, but
the girls' championship is still undecided. 90
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The past year has been the most successful one in the history
of school sports, and, on behalf of the association, I desire to express its hearty appreciation and gratitude to you and the trustees
for your hearty co-operation and support throughout the year.
Respectfully submitted,
W. J. NESBITT,
President. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
91
DRAWING
Vancouver, B. C,
December 27th, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit my report on drawing for the year 1923.
The past year has witnessed no sudden advance in any one of
the branches of the subject, excepting, perhaps, lettering; but
there has been a steady growth along the other branches to a
better average. This rise in the standard of the average has come
from below rather than from above; that is to say, it denotes an
increased teaching ability on the part of the weaker teachers
rather than further advance on the part of the better teachers.
This is explained by the fact that the weaker teachers are
getting most of the supervision, while the better teachers go without. This is not a satisfactory state of affairs, and is the result of
supervising the subject without help.
I would again strongly recommend the appointment of help
in the supervision of drawing and design; and feel sure that, were
the ratio between supervisor and supervised teachers in regard to
drawing and design to be compared to the same ratio in other
supervised subjects, the injustice done to the subject of drawing
and its supervisor would be apparent.
In this respect I am glad to note. Sir, that you have but recently recommended that such help be given. Such help would
be of great value at the present time in forging a much-needed
link between drawing and design and handwork in the first four
grades.
It is a sad comment that at the present time handwork should
be considered highly beneficial in the First Grade, lie dormant
throughout most of the succeeding grades until wakened again in
the Fifth Grade. If it is considered good in the First and Fifth
grades, why not in the intervening grades also ? Here, I think, is
where the suggested help should come in, and it may be briefly
recommended on three points:    Firstly, as a means of repairing
c
r- f
92
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
this break in the handwork chain; secondly, as providing the
necessary relationship between drawing, design and handwork;
thirdly, as giving relief to the supervisor of drawing, so that he
might devote more time to further improving the work of the
better teachers, who, when all is said and done, play a very important part in steadying and influencing the younger and less
mature teacher for better craftsmanship.
The advance in lettering ability, already alluded to, is resultant from the lettering charts which I prepared, and which were
printed by the Board for distribution throughout the schools. In
all the classes and schools where these charts are being conscientiously and intelligently used a marked improvement in neatness, spacing and lettering ability is evident, and this improvement
is noted also in other subjects and activities where lettering plays
a part. The teachers and pupils are alike enthusiastic in regard to
the subject, and I anticipate still better results in the next five-year
cycle.
Special lessons were given to the teachers of the city in the
above subject, and these were attended by over 300 teachers.
A set of 300 reproductions, in colour, of world-famous pictures
have been framed, distributed into six sets of fifty each, and hung
in the six high schools within the last few months. These sets
are so framed and hung that the sets may be changed from time
to time, and the intention-is to circulate them around the different
high schools every two months.
The exhibition of drawing and design, representative of all
grades and including the high schools, was again a feature of the
schools' exhibit at the Vancouver Exhibition in Hastings Park,
where it excited much favourable comment. Part of the exhibit
went later to the New Westminster Exhibition at the request of
the exhibition authorities, who awarded a money prize for its
merit, such money being used later towards the purchase of a
lantern for the Art Department.
The Saturday morning classes for talented elementary and
high school pupils continue to prove popular and beneficial, much
good work resulting from them.
Respectfully submitted,
§ CHARLES H. SCOTT,
Supervisor of Drawing. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 93
ATTENDANCE REPORT
Vancouver, B. C,
I December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour to submit the annual report of the
Attendance Department for the year 1923.
During the year 7,030 cases were investigated, as follows:
January, 613; February, 749; March, 725; April, 561; May, 689;
June, 588; September, 709; October, 762; November, 920; December, 714. Of the above number, 5,893 were from the following
schools:
Aberdeen   196
Alexandra     168
Bayview      1
Beaconsfield     101
Cecil Rhodes  ".  271
Central   311
Charles Dickens   138
Dawson    445
Fairview     228
Florence  Nightingale  197
Franklin     110
General Gordon   17
Grandview      169
Hastings     102
Henry Hudson  a  297
Kitsilano     55
Laura Secord   15
Livingstone   68
Nelson     155
Roberts     211
Macdonald     205
Model   243
Mount Pleasant    267
Seymour  867
Simon Fraser   128 94
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Strathcona        685
Tennyson     243
5,893
Special visits       381
From all other sources    756
Total    7,030
The visits of a special nature took up considerable time. In
many cases parents had to be visited during the evening, before
satisfactory results could be obtained, thus obviating the necessity
for legal action, although during the year it was found necessary
to issue twenty-nine letters of warning to parents who refused to
comply with our requests to have their children attend school more
regularly.
During the year 245 cases of truancy were dealt with, and 246
cases of an infectious nature were referred to the School Medical
Officer.
The prevalence of infectious disease, particularly measles,
during the latter part of the year has had a marked effect in lowering the attendance.
During the year the Child Welfare Association was successful
in having the City Council pass a by-law regulating the sale of
newspapers, etc, on the streets by juveniles. The by-law has been
a great help in preventing boys from absenting themselves from
the schools for the purpose of selling newspapers. It is now compulsory for an individual to have a badge or pennant before any
street trading is permitted.
The Juvenile Court has been attended regularly during the
year.
In conclusion, permit me to thank the school principals,
teachers and various officers of the Board who have co-operated
with us and assisted us in our work.
Respectfully submitted,
N. JENSEN,
Chief Attendance Officer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
95
MUSIC REPORT
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit my report on music for the year 1923.
The regular class-room work has been carried on as usual;
but there have been so many new developments, that much extra
time has been given.
Last May choirs from the following nine schools entered the
Day School Competition held at the British Columbia Music
Festival:
School
Teacher
Principal
Florence Nightingale
Miss E. L. Roberts
0. J. Thomas
Henry Hudson
Miss E. S. Snider
F. C. Wilson
Dawson
Miss N. Bain
J. R. Pollock
Simon Fraser
Miss B. A. Chadwick
E. Caspell
Grenfell
Mrs. J. M. H. Harding
Mrs. J. M. H. Harding
Laura Secord
Miss E. M. McManus
W. G. Ramage
Aberdeen
H. Martin
R. Sparling
Franklin
Miss M. Capon
R. P. Steeves
Nelson
Miss W. Neate
F. A. Jewett
Sufficient praise cannot be given the teachers who so kindly
undertook to conduct these children's choirs. Credit is also due
the principals, who encouraged their teachers and pupils to enter
the competition.
The Florence Nightingale School (teacher, Miss Roberts) won
the shield, with a total of 191 marks out of a possible 200.
The Festival adjudicators, Mr. Granville Bantock and Mr.
Plunket Greene, of England, remarked, as did many visitors, on
the high scores made by all the choirs, also on the excellent behaviour of the children.
In June we sent out to each grade a series of questions in
practical musical knowledge. The pupils showed a keen interest
in this work.    The written tests, too, were very satisfactory, and 96
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
the best papers were sent to the Vancouver Exhibition held in
August. The results, I am sure, have added fresh impulse and a
better understanding by the teacher of what is expected.
The King Edward High School Glee Club has a very large
membership, and continues to do good work.
The King George High, Technical, Franklin, Florence Nightingale and Dawson schools now have orchestras.
Once a week several of our schools have a Music Appreciation Period. As this phase of the work becomes better understood,
the teacher will see its cultural importance and the pupil increasingly have the advantage of studying the lives and compositions
of the composers of all nations.
In conclusion, it is such a pleasure to add that my work this
year has had the hearty co-operation of the entire staff, and particularly helpful has been the kindly interest shown by you, Sir,
on many occasions.
Respectfully submitted,
H - I F. W. DYKE,'
Supervisor of Music.
v4T>
<f9r\
m  98 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MUSIC REPORT
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
F. W. Dyke, Esq,
Supervisor of Music,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
The following is my report on the music of Grade I-b to IV-a,
inclusive, for the year 1923:
I visited the 212 class-rooms in this department as frequently
as possible.
During the past year the teachers have, without exception,
worked faithfully.
The sight reading, especially in Grade IV, has become very
creditable. Improvement has been made in ear tests. The essentials of good class singing are now in most cases recognized by
the pupils themselves.
The detailed syllabus of each grade's work, which I planned
last year, has, without curbing the individuality of the teacher,
proven of great value.
Music appreciation, as well as rhythmic work, is being taken
up more and more in the lower grades.
The majority of the teachers now mark "Music" on the
children's monthly reports.
I wish to thank you, Mr. Dyke, for your kindness at all times,
also the teachers and principals for their co-operation.
Yours respectfully,
CLARA CHADWICK,
Assistant Supervisor of Music. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
99
NIGHT SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I   submit  herewith   a   report  of  the  Department   of   Night
Schools for the year ending December 31st, 1923:
Attendance
Term, January 1-March 31: Term, October 1, December 31:
Initial enrollment   1,090       Initial enrollment   1,020
Final enrollment     1,019        Final enrollment     1,253
Attendance Analysis
Music—Advanced	
Music—Orchestral   	
Music—Elementary   	
Drawing and Painting 	
Life Drawing 	
Drawing—Elementary    ...
Show Card Writing	
French   	
Continuation 1 	
Continuation 2 	
English for Foreigners ...
Drafting 	
Wireless Telegraphy 	
Ignition  1  	
Ignition  2	
Electrical Engineering 3
Electrical Engineering 2
Electrical Engineering 1
Carpentry   	
Machine Shop	
Plumbing  _	
Sheet Metal Work	
Machine Drawing  ...
Engineering   	
Printing	
Mathematics    	
Initial
Final
Class
Student
Enrollment
Enrollment
Hours
Hours
67
78
16.5
876
42
44
15
447
21
23
48
494
23
23
40
586
15
16
44
486
33
44
60
1,070
26
32
46
474
6
14
44
400
23
37
44
1,292
31
45
46
1,546
17
28
46
1,086
10
17
44
620
10
16
46
570
38
x     26
44
1,370
24
19
30
522
12
17
22
348
25
29
22
570
52
63
42
1,118
9
11
44
438
28
28
90
1,264
5
15
46
450
16
29
88
1,025
12
19
60
762
16
16
46
572
25
27
66
946
12
16
44
604 100 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Elocution      28
Accounting    35
Millinery    _  32
Dressmaking  45
English and Arithmetic   33
China Painting    13
Cabinet Making   12
Bookkeeping 1   58
Bookkeeping 2  _  20
Typewriting     59
Shorthand 1   33
Shorthand 2   32
Cookery  14
35
22
358
36
44
1,546
33
46
624
46
90
1,828
38
90
1,486
23
44
507
16
46
415
70
90
2,552
20
44
774
90
90
2,960
26
44
1,096
49
84
1,698
30
38
500
Totals           1,020        1,253        1,992.5 36,392
New Classes
At the beginning of the Fall Session new courses were offered
in the following, and for each course an expert instructor was
engaged: Laundry Work, Wood Carving, Commercial Law,
Modelling in Clay and Plasticine, Etching, and China Painting.
With the exception of the course in China Painting, practically no
enquiries were received and these classes were not opened. For a
similar reason the classes in Chemistry, Navigation, Mathematics
for Engineers, and English for East Indians were discontinued.
General Observations
1. For several years there has been an agitation among many
Vancouver citizens for the establishment of an Art School, and
yet, when courses in such work are offered, it is a remarkable fact
that very few show any interest. For the course in Etching
not a single enquiry was received, and for the course in Modelling
in Clay and Plasticine there were but two. The course in Life
Drawing, conducted by one of our best artists, drew only 16 students, and the average attendance in the class is less than 50%.
2. Again, there is not the interest manifested in Technical
Education that one would expect in a city the size of Vancouver.
The course in Chemistry did not draw a single student; and the
courses in Advanced Mechanical and Steam Engineering, Mathematics for Engineers, Navigation and Theory and Drawing for
Carpenters and Woodworkers had to be discontinued because of
the very small attendance.
3. For several years certain courses in our evening classes
have attracted large numbers of students. They are as follows:
Typewriting, Shorthand, Bookkeeping, Electrical Engineering,
Dressmaking, Millinery, and Automobile Igrnition.   These classes BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
101
have large attendances again this year, and the average in each is
high. The raising or lowering of the fees for these popular courses
seem to have little effect on the attendance from year to vear.
Yours respectfully,
W. K. BEECH,
Director of Night Schools.
DD
□ 102
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT  AND   AVERAGE  ATTENDANCE   FOR   1923
January     1
February    1
March _ ____  1
April...  1
May  1
June  1
September  1
October    1
November   1
December   1
Average
Enrolment Attendance
8,930 17,685.40
9,740 17,656.31
9,600 18,047.42
9,400 18,134.36
9,300 17,817.65
8,776 17,701.06
9,402 18,174.50
9,649 18,174.74
9,416 17,581.16
8,518 16,580.75
Percentage
93.42
89.44
91.16
93.47
92.31
94.27
93.67
92.49
90.54
89.53
Enrolment for the month of October for each year since 1910:
Year Enrolment
1910_     9,942
1911. i,    11,385
1912..     12,393
1913.    12,990
1914    13,313
1915...   13,183
1916   13,805
Year Enrolment
1917  15,069
1918  15,849
1919 -- 16,955
1920   17,933
1921  19,053
1922 - 19,485
1923  19,649
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver staff in December for each year since  1916:
Men
December, 1916...     85
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
     89
     91
 S   112
   108
   120
1922...   128
December, 1923  134
Special Instructors employed by the Board, 1923:
Instructors of Manual Training  	
Instructors of Domestic Science  	
Music Instructors...	
Cadet, Physical Drill and Musketry Instructor	
Instructresses in Physical Drill	
Supervisor of Primary Work.	
Supervisor of Special Classes   	
Social Service Worker	
Psychologist. .  	
Supervisor of Drawing :  	
Supervisor of Manual Training 	
Supervisor of Sewing 	
Supervisor of Domestic Science 	
Teachers in Night School Classes  	
Women
254
297
335
344
356
390
407
412
Total
339
386
426
456
464
510
535
546
Special Officers Employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools 	
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools	
Director of Night Schools  	
Medical Health Officer	
Dentists _„	
Nurses._	
Attendance Officers.
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of Certificates, December 31st, 1923:
University Graduates in Arts and Science	
Academic Certificate 	
First-Class Certificate 	
Second-Class Certificate	
Third-Class Certificate.	
Commercial Specialist 	
Commercial Assistant 	
Drawing Specialist	
Temporary	
Technical	
20
16
2
1
2
37
1
1
1
1
4
10
S
155
16
144
208
3
2
1
2
7
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j 104
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
fe
LIST OF TEACHERS
Appointed Prior to January 1st, 1922
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment
Name
Certificate
Date of Appointment
Abercrombie, Mildred _	
Abercrombie, W. T	
Adam, Jessie W      	
Allen, Maude A	
Allen, Muriel E |	
Amos, Maude A	
Anderson, Margaret C  	
Anderson, Mary K B.A .....August,   1908,   and   August,
Annand, Margaret A 1st. .September,
Anstie, Jane K... 1st August,
Armstrong, Mary D 2nd...—'—.. September,
Armstrong, W. G M.A August,
.2nd September,
.B.A.. !.. January,
.1st  November,
.1st February,
.2nd September,
.2nd August,
.2nd...   January,
.1st August,
.2nd   September,
.2nd August,
1st February,
2nd September,
2nd .April,
Bain, Nellie	
Baird, Marion L	
Balkwill, Alice M	
Bampton, Louise _	
Barker, Amy	
Baron, Mrs. Edith	
Barnard, Mrs. Ethyl M 2nd   April,
Beat tie, Hester E M.A    August,
Beech, W. K M.A., B. Paed. August,
Bell, Edna B   M.A August,
Bell, W. S ...B.A October,
Bennett, Illma L ;..2nd   October,
Berry, Edith L 2nd ..November,
Bettes, Freda G 2nd February,
Betts, Doris J 2nd February,
Bigney, Anna L— 1st August,
Bigney, Elizabeth M   1st January,
Bissett, Vera M 2nd December,
Blair, Elizabeth J 1st August,
Bodie, Isabel A B.A August,
Boldrick, Helena E 1st February,
Bollert, Lillian G B.A _ January,
Bolton, Dorothea B B.A February,
Bolton, Grace A ...B.A February,
Bossons, Ellen 2nd April,
Bower, Mabel  .2nd August,
Boyer, Ethel M _ 2nd August,
Boyes, F. C 1st August,
Bradbury.. Mrs. Dorothy. 2nd February
Bragg, T. G...._  B.Sc ....September,
Brennan, Alyce H 1st —.- September,
Bridgman, Clara M  Commercial _. ...August,
Brinton. Efiie S _ 1st ,.... August,
Brock, Lucy A. M 2nd t September,
Brown, Gertrude... 1st January,
Brown, Harriet W  _ 2nd August,
Brown, J. Elmer  B.A August,
Brown, W. H. 2nd January,   1898;   October,
Browne, Laurie B. W. M.A   August,
Bruce, Graham v. 1st, Commercial August,
Brundrett, Lyla 1 2nd February,
Brunton, Lulu 2nd August,
Bryant, S. J... 1st November,
Bryant, Winnifred. 2nd February,
Buchanan, Christina Academic _ August,
Buckerfield, Katherine E 2nd February
Buckley, John M 1st... September,
Burr is, Grace D M.A August,
Busby, Grace E 2nd February,
Cahill. Hattie M..
Cain, Florence M.
-1st September,
■2nd September..
919
918
919
917
921
912
921
912
918
906
921
913
908
919
911
917
920
918
918
912
912
909
919
918
918
921
919
909
913
916
911
914
920
916
919
914
920
914
917
914
918
920
921
913
913
920
914
912
912
915
914
914
917
908
912
920
915
917
921
917
921
912
921 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
105
N
ame
Certificate
Date of Appointment
Cairns, Kate	
Cairns, Laura	
Cairns, Mabel..
Calbick, Isabel C
Caldwell. Sada St.
Cameron, C. Alice.
Cameron. Margare
Cameron, May...
Campbell, Jessie L
Campbell. Lila C.
Capon
lain*
M. B.
:nd
1st
B.A..
M.A.
B.A..
2nd._
Isi
1st
January,
.January,
August,
August,
September,
August,
February,
November,
October,
February,
September,
February.
1st August,
1st January
 January,
March,
   .1 anuary,
   January,
zno
xna.
B.A.
2nd February,
Maud... ..1st....
Carruthers, Birtha M  .B.A..
Caspell, Edmund     	
Cattell, Dorothy..
Cattell, Margaret..
Chadwick, Beatrice A  i.U	
Chandler, Dorothy G.
Chapin, Florence B	
Chappell. Kate L.
Chasteney, Kathleen N  ..2nd .
Chippendale, Thomas.- Manuai
Chodat, Henri.. ..M.A	
Christie, Isabell S  ...2nd	
Chute, C. ('  .._ 1st     ..August,
Clark, Angus    1st. August,
Clark. G. W; ..M.A January
Clarke, T. V. -1st August,
Close, Florence .1. 1st August,
Close, L. Laurina     1st August,
Code, Lome B B.Sc.     August,
Cole, Josephine A  1st April,
T
raining.
February
September.
S ptember,
January.
Collier, Lucy E. M.._
Connor, C. F. 	
Cook, Eva	
Coombs, Mrs. Florence A.
Corbett, Jennie N	
Cork ii in. C. H. 	
Coughlih, Marjorie I	
Coultir   Beatrice M. 	
Cowan, E. Mabel	
Cowan, Susie I    	
Cowie, Margaret C	
Cox, Bessie W 	
Crake, Edith F..„
Creelman, Amelia	
Creelman. Jean	
Cronkhite, A. M	
Crowe, C. B.Crowe, Eunice I.	
tiaF.
M.
C.
Elliott,
Le
wis A..
Elliott,
Kf
tthleen
Elliott,
M
argaret
Elmsly
, A<
A.
ia B...
Evans,
a.
Evans,
C.
K.
Evans,
i-;i
■aimr
Evans,
Ne
Hie 1).
.tna  February,
.M.A., B.D..„ September,
.1st. January,
.B.A January,
.2nd September,
.B.A „ January,
.2nd January,
.2nd  February,
.2nd August,
.2nd August,
.2nd  November,
.1st. September,
.2nd September,
B.A August,
.2nd  September,
.B.A October,
.B.A August,
.2nd September,
.B.Sc September,
.1st August^
.2nd September,
.B.A.._ August,
B.A.._    August,
..2nd v February
..2nd > January.
..2nd. April
..2nd  February,
..2nd ..September.
..1st February,
darling, Gordon.
Davidson, Lucre
Davis, Sarah J...
Dewis, Martha I
Dobson, F. H...
Domoney, Violet
[)onaghy, Florence I._
Dorer. Mabel I	
Dorman, Marietta A.
Downs, Gertrude M...
Duffus, Catherine M..
Duke, Alma M  ...2nd  September,
Dunbar, John  B.A  August,
Dunmore. Mary H.  2nd     October,
Dunning, J. T.  M.A August,
1910
1918
1914
1917
1917
1909
1920
1920
1902
1919
1918
1918
1899
1904
1911
1921
1914
1917
1921
1921
1912
1918
1919
1909
1902
1918
1917
1912
1912
1910
1911
1920
1917
1910
1909
1921
1919
1920
1920
1911
1908
1914
1921
1919
1910
1919
1911
1913
1920
1921
1910
1919
1911
1907
1918
1917
1921
1917
1921
1918
1920
1912
1917
1906
^cchnical September, 1921
1st September, 1921
2nd March,
.1st November,
.M.A  ...August,
1st  November,
.1st August,
.2nd -.August,
1908
1900
1917
1907
1907
1914 106
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
Evans, W E.
Certificate
 B.A..
Date of Appointment
 September, 1918
airey, Francis  Manual Training.   January,     1912
allows. Marjorie H Academic September, 1919
allows, Muriel P  2nd _.— August,       1914
aunt, Edith 1st - ....August,        1913
ee, Wilfrid J M.A August,        1912
erguson, Mary J  B.A  August.        1912
ergusson, G. A B.A— — August,        1913
indlay, Mar ;orie L 1st —- - September, 1921
isher, Jessie E. R. -  i 2nd ....January,      1908
itch, H. B M.A., B.Sc ...August,        1912
etcher, Elizabeth E 2nd August,        1893
lett, Wm M.A January,      1912
ord  Luvia  2nd January,      1912
orster, Clara C 2nd September, 1921
ountain, Sarah A B.A—  September, 1917
rame, Emma M 1st August,        1909
raser, Annie E. M.A....   August,       1917
raser, John... Technical September, 1921
rith, Elsie._ 2nd January,      1906
Fisl
Fl
Gait, Isabel C.._	
Gamble, Ellen E 	
Gamey, H. T. 	
Gamey, H. W	
Gordon, J 	
Gosse, Sarah G	
Gourlie, Wm. G	
Graham, Christina M	
Graham, Rita R.._	
Grant, E. S	
Grant, Fanny I 	
Grant, Rena V. A 	
Grant, Wm. E  .... ..B.A
Grantham, Vera C 2nd.
2nd September,
2nd.. February,
1st   — April,
1st - January,
M.A September,
2nd...    October,
B.A  August,
2nd September,
2nd   ..February,
B.A  ...May,
2nd    December,
B.A  ....September,
September,
February,
Greggor, Agnes A.  B.A  February,
Grenfell, Mary E ...B.A  August,
Gross, Alice S B.A  February,
Guest, Mrs. W. E.  2nd   January,
1919
1919
1918
1918
1920
1920
1907
1920
1919
1920
1907
1920
1918
1920
1918
1909
1920
1920
Hall, J. H B. Litt August,
Hall, Unina F Art September,
Harding, Mrs. J. M. H... 2nd January,
Hard wick, Margaret S  Academic October,
Harvie, Janie A 2nd   August,
Haughton, Agnes  1st... August,
Havil:ind, Ida 1 3rd November,
Hemsworth, E. A.._ 1st August,
Henderson, Rachel C  1st September,
Henderson, Winnifred C— 2nd... September,
Herd, Alice B. G 2nd February,
Herd, Henry D.  Academic January,
Herd, Isabella J 2nd September,
Herd, Mary B. F 2nd February,
Hewton, Ina E 2nd February,
Hewton, Sara._ 2nd 1898-1900; August,
Hillis, Beryl A..  2nd _.._ January,
Holden, Catherina J 2nd January,
Honey man, Helen M.  2nd    November
Hood, Lily H _   : 2nd February,'
Hooper, Myra C  2nd August,
Horner, Bertha M.    Temporary  September,
Hotchkiss, A. D... ..M.A September,
1911
Houston, Mrs. S. E	
Houston, W. I       	
Howard, Phoebe M
Howard, F. Mabel S	
Howell, Lucy MacL	
Hudson, Lucy M	
Huggard, Mrs. A. C.  lst..
Hughes, Annie. 1st..
Hughes, Gladys T   lst.
Hunter, Ellen C  ..B.A
December,  1
.3r<
1st.... August,
2nd January,
Academic October,
M.A January,
:iiil
.September,
.January,
.January,
.February,
.April,
)21
)13
m
)17
)12
316
)10
)20
)20
)17
H6
)19
)21
)18
)08
J21
)18
H9
919
317
)\7
)19
)21
)16
)16
H6
)15
920
)06
)12
)21
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1920 /
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
107
Name Certificate Date of Appointment
Inkman, Lilias I. A 2nd February,    1921
Innes, Mary W. E 1st September, 1921
Jackman, D. S : M.A September, 1918
Jamieson, Annie B B.A January,      1907
Jewett, F. Arnold B.A August,        1909
Johnson, Emily May ► 2nd October,      1912
Johnston. Bessie.. 1st March, 1891
Johnston, Mrs. Dorothy 1st... April, 1917
Johnston, D. B _ B.A January,      1902
Johnston, Mrs. Mabel C 2nd 1901-1903; January,      1916
Johnston, Margaret L 2nd September, 1918
Johnston, Marion F   2nd February,    1920
Johnstone, Marion B 2nd 1891-1911;   August,        1914
Jones, Grace F 1st... September, 1913
Jones, Harry A Manual Training _ August,        1917
Jones, Mary Commercial Assistant September, 1916
Jopling, Mary A 1st January,      1921
Judge, S. P Art... August,        1917
Jukes, Marian E 2nd March, 1911
Keith, Mrs. Lillian A 1st February,    1919
Kelly, Bertha M 2nd January,      1914
Kersey, Robert R. : M.A September, 1921
King, H. B - B.A January,      1904
Kion, Gertrude A. Academic September, 1921
Laird, Edna J 1st 1906-1908; 1909-1911; January,
Lamb, El vie D _ B.A. February,
Laursen, Lili J 1st. .' August,
Lawrence, Frederick J 1st August,
Lawrence, Ida V 2nd February,
Lawrence, Olive B 1st February,
Leach, Mrs. Jean P ...1st February, 1900; April,
Leah, Constance M 1st , September,
Ledingham, Helen I.. 2nd September,
Leith, Mrs. T Academic 1896-1902;    January,
Lewis, Alice M. 2nd. August,
Lewis, Vera M Academic.—.. August,
Lister, J. George Manual Training October,
Litch, Annie M 2nd February,
Little, D. C B.A January,
Logan, Clement 1st January,
Loggie, Annie M 1st - January,
Louden, Helen E. 1st. February,
Lusk, Marion L  2nd December,
 M.A August,
 M.A August,
 1st September,
 2nd January,
 2nd September,
 2nd September,
Maxwell, Mary E.  1st August,
Mayers, F. J B.A. November,
Maynard, Catherine E. B.A February,
Maynard, Margaret B.A February,
Meadows, Stanley D B.A.. August, 1911; January.
Mellish, Winnifred E   1st - January,
Maggs, A. B	
Marr, John	
Marriage, F. T	
Marshall, Elsie M	
Martyn, Anna L...	
Matheson, E. Corinne.
Messinger, Clarence R..
Middlemiss, Edith	
Millar, Eva	
Miller, S. L	
Milley, Myrtle E	
Mills, Sadie 	
Mitchell, M. W	
Moodie, S. F. M	
Moody, Margaret H..
Moore, Isabel. 	
Morris, Verna E	
Morrison, A. B.___	
Moscrop, Ethel..	
Munro, Elizabeth	
Murphy, Eva B	
Murray, Christine T..
B.A August,
2nd  January,
2nd September,
B.A August,
1st February,
1st October,
1st September,
B.A August,
B.A August,
2nd September,
B.A January,
B.A - January,
1st September,
2nd January,
1st January,
.1st August,
1913
1920
1905
1910
1921
1921
1914
1918
1921
1914
1905
1916
1903
1920
1906
1917
1911
1921
1921
1910
1917
1918
1913
1920
1913
1908
1907
1920
1918
1914 '
1917
1909
1916
1920
1913
1919
1912
1918
1914
1909
1921
1921
1921
1919
1915
1913
1913 108
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
McAdam, Guy J 	
McAlpine, Sara	
McArthur, Helen M	
MacBeth, Mary S	
Macaulay, Vida I 	
McCallum, Daisy J	
McCarthy, Mrs. Nina L	
McCartney, Verna A 	
McCreery, Paul L	
McCrimmon, Mrs. Constance
McCusker, Dorothy V
Certificate
Date of Appointment
MacDiarmid, Katie B.A.
MacDonald, Christina	
McDonald, Edna C	
McDonald, Gertrude E..„
MacDonald, H. Lucretia.
McFarland, Cora H	
.M.A   August,
.2nd  -.-   ..August,
2nd — September,
.2nd.. :,-.   September,
.B.A   February,
.2nd     September,
.2nd.... January,
.2nd   February,
.B.A  August,
.2nd..   February,
.2nd — February,
.January,
Macfarlane, Rachel M   1st.
McGillivray, Marjorie R.
McGown, Jessie H	
Maclntyre, Beatrice A	
MacKay, Geo	
McKay, Minna G	
McKay, M. Helen.
.2nd -.-- .February,
.2nd   ..August,
.1st January,
.1st September,
.B.A January,
.1894-1909;    February,
.2nd   September,
.2nd September,
.1st  August,
M.A.....   August,
2nd March,   1891;   August,
.2nd November,
McKay, Sadie E   2nd January,
McKee, George E ..B.A May,
MacKenzie, Christina A   1st   October,
MacKenzie, G. W B.A September,
Grace.- „ 1st  Augast,
Mary E... B.A August,   1908;   September,
Olive B 2nd _ September,
Rowan W 1st September,
Wine wood F _ B.A  ..August,
Catherine P  Academic _ ...September,
Mary..     ..  : 2nd ....January,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKinnon
McKinnon,
McLean, Adelaide M 2nd October,
McLean, D. R...  2nd   ..September,
Maclean, Grace C 3rd  September,
McLeish, Kathleen 1st   March,
McLeish, W. Y  B. Sc... September,
Macleod, Hazel E  ...B.A _. January,
McLeod, Margaret A   2nd February,
McManus, Edith M  2nd September,
McManus, Glenna H ....2nd   _   January,
MacMillan, Mary R 2nd  .-.August,
McNeely, Hanna E M.A. September,
McNeil, Hazel 1st   January,
McNiven, Catherine B.A August, 1914; September,^
McNiven, Margaret ... B.A __ ...January,
Macpherson, Annie 2nd.. September,
Macpherson, Mary ...: 2nd _ August,
MacQueen, Emma H.. .B.A ..September,
McQueen, Kate H.. B.A _ January,
McTavish, Janet L. E— Academic January,
McWilliams, Jean ..2nd February,
Nea
Neil
Neill, Muriel Stewart
Nesbitt. William J	
Nicholson, Eleanor B
Noble,- Alice L	
Noble, Mary K	
Noble, Maybelle C.._
Northrop. H	
Nowlan, Lena M.
Winifred.- 2nd February,
Mrs. E. B. Stewart 1st August,
 - 2nd   August,
 - 1st August,
 2nd September,
 1st ....February,
 - 2nd..    September,
 - - 2nd February,
 B.A January,
 B.A  January,
1911
1900
1919
1921
1918
1917
1920
1917
1916
1921
1921
1912
1911
1906
1913
1910
1911
1916
1921
1920
1912
1911
1912
1917
1920
1905
1916
1918
1908
1918
1918
1921
1912
1921
1897
1916
1915
1919
1913
1920
1912
1921
1919
1919
1915
1917
1918
1919
1915
1920
1915
1921
1911
1917
1919
1921
1908
1915
1913
1920
1920
1921
1918
1920
1921
O'Connell, Lillian M 2nd January, 1921
O'Neil, Margaret A 1st September, 1919
Ogilvie, David M.A     August, 1915
Olding, Elizabeth.- 2nd January, 1902
Ormond, Agnes 2nd September, 1921
Painter, Emily. 2nd _ January, 1909
Palmer, May L 2nd .January, 1921 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
109
Name
Certificate
Date of Appointment
Parker, Ernest W  Manual Training August,        1911
Parkes, Jessie F. B 2nd September, 1918
Patrick, Georgia H. .   3rd February,    1917
Patrick, Grace A  .2nd January,      1916
Patterson, Jean 1st January,      1907
Pattison, Thomas  M.A September, 1921
Pearson, Ethel M 2nd   January,      1911
Perkins, Alice G .1st  __ September, 1912
Perkins, Ella D B.A..  August, 1905; April, 1911
Pollock, James R 1st.. August,        1910
Potter, Agnes... 2nd... September, 1921
Potter, Elsie.. .... 2nd ./. December,   1920
Pullen, Mabel F 2nd. January,       1921
Purdie. A. J. Grosvenor B.A August,        1912
Putnam, Walter.     B.Sc , _ August,        1917
Pye, Annetta E.  :   2nd   February,    1920
Pyke, Agnes M    2nd... May, 1920
Quigley, Mrs. Edith K 2nd.
.January,      1920
Ramage, Wm. G B.A - August, 1912
Rand, William L  B.A August, 1914
Reid, Annie M  _. 2nd _ .December, 1917
Reid, Elmtr W _ B.A _ January, 1916
Reveley, Ethel H   2nd  _ October, 1912
Rines, Alfred... —   ....1st August, 1908
Roberts, T. H..   B.A August, 1910
Robertson, Hugh M B.A.... September, 1921
Rollston, Eva J B.A    February, 1920
Ross, A. W M.A January, 1909
Ross, Carrie E.
.2nd.. ...September, 1920
February, 1912
January, 1911
August, 1911
January, 1918
January, 1917
September, 1920
September, 1919
Ross, Ellen D 1st
Ross, Lillian A   ....2nd
Ross, Lillian M...  1st..
Rowan, Bessie E   2nd
Roy, Elsie _  2nd
Roy, Henrietta „ 1st..
Roy, Jessie... 1st..
Russell, Mrs. Agnes G 2nd.. September, 1920
Russell, Isabel R... 2nd 1 January,      1918
Salter, Mildred E 2nd. January,      1910
Sanders, Bernice C. A .* 2nd  January,      1917
Sanderson, J. R M.A., Ph.D August,        1914
Saunders, M. B  Academic August,        1906
Scott, Irene M.. ._ 2nd September. 1918
Sewell  Eunice A.._. _ ...1st     September   1921
Shaneman, Mrs. Isobel D B.A January,      1920
Sharman, Isabelle...   2nd November, 1920
Shearman, A. E  ...1st... January,      1916
Sheepy, Janet    2nd..   August,        1911
Sherman, R. S   - —1st February,    1903
Shine, Mrs. Alice G.. _ 2nd.. April, 1903
Shook, Edith L 2nd __ September, 1921
Shore, Alma M  „ _ 2nd .\   .....February,    1921
Simpson, Eleanor M 2nd  August,        1917
Simpson, Jean B  2nd February,    1918
Sinclair, Annie M    M.A.. September, 1911
Sinclair, J. G ...Academic August 1910
Sinclair, Madge P  2nd... _ August,        1910
Skelding, Cecil H 1st September, 1921
Smith, Annie M       .B.A September, 1921
Smith, Lillian L.___.  B.A— September, 1920
Snider, Emma S    2nd  1904-1939;    August,        1912
Sparling, R.. ....1st......Aug.,    1891;    Aug.,    1893;August,        1900
Spencer  Agnes   1st     August,        1912
Spouse, Mrs. Margaret 1st .■    September, 1921
Stables, Nellie T _ 2nd. February,    1912
Steeves, R. P   1st January       1913
Stephens, Emma L.. _lst  January,      1910
Sterns, Clara M.__. B.A August,        1911
Stevens, Gladys E     1st August,        1914
Stonehouse, Gladys M 2nd  September, 1920
Straight, R _   ..1st— August,        1907
' 110
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
Stuart, Dorothy L	
Stuart, James A	
Suggitt, Maizie A.	
Suter, R. W 	
Sutherland, Alexander	
Sutherland, Evelina J. M.
Sutherland, Jeanne H.	
Certificate
Date of Appointment
Tait, Albert B..__
Tait, Edythe C....
Tanner, Rebecca-
Taylor, Edna M..
..1st .. ..September, 1921
..B.A — January,      1913
B.A ..February,    1918
..B.A., B.Sc..... _ October,       1902
.M.A ...August,        1916
..Academic September, 1920
.2nd.— September, 1920
M.A  August,
.2nd January
-2nd _ ..August,
B.A... _.   ....October.
Taylor
Grs
ice
A.    — Academic August.
Taylor, Helen M ,.	
Taylor, L. W......	
Taylor, Marguaretta M. S	
Taylor, Minnie 	
Templer, Mrs. Jean _	
Tees, Percy C 	
Thomas, Owen J _ ...B.A
Thompson, Edith E..„ ...2nd
2nd    ...September,
B.A „.    August,
2nd   ..September,
1st....  August,
1st.   August,
B.A  ..September.
August,
October,
Thompson, Nora K Academic February,
Tom, Gregory H  1st 1891-1911; August,
Townsend, Agnes M.. ...2nd _ February,
Truswell. Mary 1st..   August,
Tucker, Julia E _ ...1st  ...January,
T
ticker,
w
inured
M.
Turner, Janet C.
.2nd October,
1st   February,
Vining, A. W  M.A., Dr. Univ. of Paris August,
Warne, Feme - Academic August,
Warner, Gertrude   lst._ .... .February,
Warner, Mabel A .2nd August,
Weismiller, Ethel M 2nd ....... April,
Whelan, A. E. Lyle    Commercial Specialist— February,
White, Edward M B.Sc   September,
Whit worth, Marjorie 2nd ...January,
Wickett, Evelyn  B.A  January,
Wilkinson, Amie F 1st August,
Williams, Florence E 2nd September,
Williams, Maude A : 1st   November,
Williamson, Jessie E. M 2nd _. August,
Wilson, F. C _ B.A..* January,
Wilson, Janet.. 2nd March,
Wilson, M. Rosalind '.   1st   ...January,
Wood, Berton J. ..B.A.. B.Sc .....October,
Woodhead, Thomas W.i Academic August,
1915
1920
1900
1917
1910
1920
1913
1921
1914
1911
1921
1911
1917
1918
1915
1918
1899
1913
1917
1914
1917
1917
1914
1912
1920
1921
1921
1917
1907
1917
1920
1918
1914
1908
1916
1913
1906
1908
Yeo, Emsley .
Young, G. P..
B.A September, 1921
1st January,      1913
DOMESTIC SCIENCE
Allen, Mabel D	
Bell, Adna M-
Berry, Elizabeth...
Canty, Sara W.„.
Dickinson, Bessie S.
Lee, Phyllis J....
Malcolm, Etta...
Murray, Donna...
McEwen, Agnes E...
Rhoads, Etta Ii.
.September, 1919
.August, 1912
.August, 1905
.September, 1921
.September, 1920
-September, 1921
-September, 1921
.September, 1920
.February, 1917
.August,       1917
MANUAL TRAINING
Cameron, C. A.
Campbell, A.	
Cantell, A....
Crabb, Charles.
Cross, N. Y.
Gardner. N. H..
 September,
...September,
...January, 1910;September,
 February,
.October, 1915; August,
...January,
1918
1918
1919
1920
1917
1908 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
111
Harris, F. J October,      1917
Hill, William A • September, 1910
Jones, A. W   August,        1917
Kitchen, Charles H..._ ...October,      1921
Michelmore, A. J September, 1918
McAdam, Josiah W January,      1912
McCallum, D. P.... August,        1913
McKeown, William A _.   ..August,        1908
Northrop, S   __ ...August,        1903
Templer, F. W    ...August,        1913
Tingley, A. P August,        1914
Williams, A August,        1914
Wilson, Wm.-.—     September, 1918
Woodcock, William K September, 1921
SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS
Bundy, A. C    Physical Culture, Cadets and Musketry
Cantelon, Jean M  Social Service Worker
Chadwick,   Clara...  Assistant   Supervisor   of   Music
Cots worth,  Lena K Physical  Culture
Dauphinee, A. Josephine...   Supervisor of Special Classes
Dyke.   F.  W Supervisor  of  Music
Kerr.   Ruby  A — Psychologist
Trembath, Emily J Supervisor of Primary Work
Scott,  Charles  H  Supervisor of  Drawing
SCHOOL MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF
Pallen, R. L., D.M.D School Dentist
Loveridge, W. A., D.D.S   Assistant School Dentist
Bezeau, F. J., D.D.S.   Assistant School Dentist
Sproule, W. K., D.M.D. Assistant School Dentist
Breeze,  Elizabeth G Head Nurse
Bellamy,   Mrs.   D... _ Nurse
Campbell, Mary P  ; .. — ....Nurse
Crujckshank, Mamie K Nurse
Jukes, Harriet.. - - Nurse
McLellan.  Aletha - - Nurse
Schultz, Mrs. M. D   — ' ...Nurse
Smith, Isabell - Nurse
Stevens.   Vera B..  - Nurse
Alderson,   Mrs.   G.   C ._ - ., Dental Attendant
Worley,  Mrs.  A   Dental Attendant
ATTENDANCE OFFICERS
Jensen,   N - Chief Attendance Officer
Mulholland, A. S Assistant Attendance Officer
Borland, A - Assistant Attendance Officer
DD
D
H 112
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
LIST OF TEACHERS
Appointed or Reappointed in 1922
Nan
ie
C
eruncate
Date of Appointment
1.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
2s!
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
SO.
31.
82.
S3.
84.
^5.
86.
87.
S8.
S9.
40.
41.
42.
4S.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
5S.
54.
55.
50.
Adams, Dorothy I.
Alexander, Wilhelmina O.
B.A   September,
2nd September,
Baird, Margaret I. 2nd      September,
Baynes, Thomas S 1st. February,
Beaton, Sylvia 1 si    September,
Bell, Margaret S   2nd...     February,
Bennett, F. N.  B.A., B.Sc..„ September,
Brenchley, Dorothy A. B  B.A.      Septemlx r
Bricknell. Ada  Temporary      September,
Brown, L. B  B.Sc January,
Brundrett, Mary E.._ 2nd January,
Buckerfield, Jessie M 2nd September,
Bun n, Beth M.  2nd September,
Carscadden, Ruth A.  2nd September,
Carson, Miriam B.  B.A February,
Caspell, Edmund V.._ 1st...- ..September,
Clarke, N. M 1st  ...September,
Clement, Elsie B. B.A _... ..September,
Clogg, Alice E Temporary.- September,
Coombs, Marjorie L 1st September,
Cornell, Dorothy E  2nd     April,
Cox, Stafford A B.A  ..May,
Curtis, Isobel 2nd September,
Davis, Ivy G 2nd September,
Dixon, Caroline 2nd  April,
Doriot, Yvonne  _     Modern Language Specialist September,
Duke. Edna L. 2nd September,
Edwards, Sadie  B.A.
Fournier, Eugenie !•.._ B.A.
February,
January,
Gerhart, Annie E lst..
Gow, Lillian H  2nd.
.September,
.September,
Hardwick, Dorothy W. G   2nd.
Harper, Kathleen E  1st.
Hazlitt   Nellie M   2nd.
Healy, Agnes ('. ..B.A.
Heaslip, Leonard W. B.A.
H« rd, Elizabeth B. G.  1st
Hewett, Glenna M. M..
Hobson, Lillian 15.
Howey, Elsie M. _
Hurst, Flora E.._
Jameson, Doris	
Johnston, Henrietta E..
Knowlton, Kathleen 15.
Langridge, Marion H.	
Lineham, Helen M.
Livingstone, Edward K.
Lockhart, William L.._
Martin, Harold.-
Matheson, Marjorie C...
Matheson, Mary E..„
Mason, Carol
Moore, Ellen V.
Morgan, William...	
Munro, Muriel R...
McAfee, Irene	
2nd.
B.A.
2nd.
lst...
. Temporary.
.1st	
 ~~*tZJL.z£z.   1st    zl.	
1st.
1st.
..Academic...
Is
t
B.
A
2n
d
2nd
IS
B.
A
B.
A
B.
A
.Ssptember,
.September,
.May,
.January,
.May,
.September,
.January,
.January,
.September,
.Ssptember,
.September,
.September,
.September,
.September,
.September,
..May,
...September,
...September,
...January,
..September,
..February,
...September,
...September,
...January,
...September,
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
.922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
922
.922
922 ■
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
113
Name
Certificate
Date of Appointment
57. MacBeth, Jessie A B.A  January,      1922
58. McClay, Adeline F. 1st September, 1922
59. Macdonald, Genevieve M  2nd   April, 1922
60. McDonald, Greta V...      2nd  September, 1922
61. McDowall, Jessie B.A September, 1922
62. McKee, Greta Hope  B.A ..September, 1922
63. McKenzie. Leila M... .1st September, 1922
64. McLean, Erma V...      2nd   ....-February,    1922
65. McLeod, Mrs. Alice C 2nd September, 1922
66. Nicholson, Angus A 1st September, 1922
67. Northrop, Harold B.A... 1920-1921;   September, 1922
68. Partington, Margery E 1st February,    1922
69. Penny, Isabella M Temporary September, 1922
70.    Read, Marion G.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
.Temporary February,    1922
Sibley, Harbel M	
Sillers, Myrtle A. E...
Simpson, Margaret S.
Smith, Ella M	
Smith, Zella B 	
Standen, Alice E ...
Stewart, Isabel P	
Stirk, Louie	
1st .  September, 1922
.B.A February,    1922
1st..... January,      1922
.2nd September, 1922
.1st September, 1922
1st _ September, 1922
1st September, 1922
.B.A January,      1922
Ware, Deighton R.
Wiegand, Elsa M...
White, Vera V	
.1st — September, 1922
.2nd February,    1922
1st September, 1922
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
1.
2.
DOMESTIC SCIENCE
Black, Rae M January,      1922
Duncan, Victoria M   September, 1922
Grant, Mary ... January,      1922
Maynard, Margaret E 1918-1921; September, 1922
McKenzie, Doris H January,      1922
Pope, Marion A. B   _ ..September, 1922
Smith, Isabel C September, 1922
MANUAL TRAINING
Wishart, A | * September, 1922
SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS
McEwen,   Mary   G   Supervisor   of   Sewing
Wright,   Hilda  M._._ _ Physical Instructress
SCHOOL MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF
White,   J.   Harold,   M.D... School   Medical   Officer
Shields, Dorothea M. ^ Nurse
LIST OF TEACHERS APPOINTED OR REAPPOINTED
IN 1923
Name Certificate                                          Date of Appointment
1. Abercrombie, C. W ..B.A... September. 1923
2. Adam, Mary ._..__ 2nd .December,   1923
3. Agnew, A. Marjorie B.A  May,   June,   1923
4. Ballard, Edna F i B.A    February.    1923
5. Barr, Ruth R ...1st-   ..  September, 1923
6. Batt, Mrs. Geraldine T. P 2nd January,      1923
7. Bird, Edna D... 1st   November, 1923 114
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23!
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
80.
31.
32.
33.
84.
35.
S6.
37.
38.
89.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
i
.)
CO
>')■>
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
Date of Appointment
M.
K.
.B.A.  January,
.B.A  September,
B.Sc September,
.1st September,
Black, W. G
Brown, Mrs.
Cameron. R.
Clague, J. E.
Clarke, Mary A  ..lst._ ...September,
Clarke, Margaret I B.A  February,
Col man, Mary E  2nd September,
Conlan. Margaret I  2nd September,
Curtis, Dorothy H 1st. .' September,
Doyle, Gertrude I _ Temp   1st.  April,
Dunbar, Violet E M.A January,
Elliott, Maxine P 1st. September,
Elsey, Gertrude E  2nd September,
Fee, Edna M 2nd  April to June,
Ferrier, Mary 1 2nd September,
Frith, Joscelyne S        B.A....  January,
Hadden.. A. T  B.A  January,
Harrison, Ruth._ ..B.A.  September,
Heaslip, Leonard W. B.A.       September,
Herd, J. F  B.A  September,
Hill-Tout, J. E  1st September,
Hopper, Dorothy A B.A  February,
Hurst, A. M..__ B.A February,
Johnson, Sophie E  ..2nd May, June,
Johnston, Eleanor 1 1st September,
Johnston, R. M   1st September
Kelman, Mildred A  B.A £ January,
Kemp, Gwendolyn M.  B.A January,
Mair, Lillian J 1st. February,
Metz, Cora I        . B.A.         February,
Miller, Isobel S.._ ..B.A.._ February,
Morrison, Patricia 2nd.- September,
Munro, Mary B.A. _ January,
MacBeth, Jessie A. B.A _ January,
McConnell, Hazel E M.A September,
Ozburn, Olive E 2nd September,
I
ears
'edlow
ranees
W..
2nd.
Gladys L. J B.A.
.February,
.June,
Plant, Phyllis L.._ ..2nd.. ...February,
Pye, Dora E. G B.A September,
Reycraft. Helen K ..1st September,
Robson, Gwendolyn B.A..„ February,
Robson, W. M 1st September,
Sexsmith. F. B  • B.A _ September,
Singer, Dorothy O 2nd September,
Smith, J. Estelle._ ..ft 1st..  March   to   June,
Smithson, Marguerite L.
Stephens, R. N...
Thomson, Winnifred G..
Thorburn, Marjorie M.
Tisdall, Margaret B.Williamson, Marguerita
Wray, Dorothy G	
M.
2nd September,
B.A  September,
2nd February,
1st September,
1st September,
1st..  September,
 September,
!ml
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
192S
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
192&
1923
1923
1923
1923
DOMESTIC SCIENCE
Anderson, Jessie J.
Campbell, Helen L..
Greggs, Edna M.
\ V nmdl, Irene B	
Barger, F
Lowe, F..
Olivcr. Mrs. L. I
.September. 1923
.September, 1923
October,      1923
.September, 1923
MANUAL TRAINING
.October,      1923
.September, 1923
SCHOOL MEDICAL STAFF
.January,
1923 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
115
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Salary Schedule
PUBLIC SCHOOL SALARIES
Vancouver, B.C., 1923.
Grades
Year
CD
CD
s
o
bo
crl   _i
Uj "i—i
P   S
CQ   e.
o
c3
+-> CD rn
CO rn c"
© 2 ®
£ C tO
g CD ?_,
72
i-H
a
•r-(
i  o
CD C
O-rH
Principals
w
03 £
So
(72 02
xn
CD o
rH Jg
First $1,320
Second     1,380
Third..     1,440
Fourth      1,500
Fifth    1,560
Sixth 1    1,620
Seventh    1,680
Eighth....    1,740
Ninth    1.800
Tenth.-	
$1,140 $1,620
1,200 1,760
1,260 1,900
1,320 2,040
1,380 2,180
1,440 2,320
1,500      	
1,560	
1,620      	
1,680      	
$1,200 $1,800       $1,400 $2,520
1,260 1,920          2,520 2,640
1,320 2,040          2,640 2,760
1,380 2,760          2,760 2,880
1,440 2,280          2,880 3,000
1,500       *2,400         3,12
1,560       _.  3,240
1,620  3,360
1,680
1,860 (head nurse)
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020 for the first year,
and $1,080 for the second year of successful teaching; men teachers with First Class Certificates,
if employed, will be paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the first and second years of satisfactory
service.
(*)    For teachers holding First Class or Academic Certificates.
Salary Schedule
HIGH SCHOOL SALARIES
Assistants
Year                                                Men Women
First $2,030 $1,750
Second ..   2,170 1,890
Third...    2,310 2,030
Fourth      2,450 2,170
Fifth .                          2,590 2.310
Sixth    2,730 2,450
Seventh    2,870 2,590
Eighth    3,010 2,730
Manual
Domestic
Training
Science
Principals
$1,750
$1,470
$3,300
1,890
1,610
3,440
2,030
1,750
3,580
» 2,170
1,890
3,720
2,310
2,030
3,860
2,450
2,170
4,000
2 590
2,310
2,730
One tenth of the annual salary is paid at the close of each teaching month. No schedule
increase will go into effect without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector of
Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the schedule by special
resolution of the Board.
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the Board up to 10 teaching days (five for each term)
in cases of illness of teachers; also for 3 days in cases of bereavement in a teacher's family and
for compulsory quarantine.
Teachers may accumulate 50 per cent, of the days allowed them each year for sick leave,
but not used, up to thirty teaching days; and extended sick leave for all or part of the accumulated
period will be allowed them in case of serious illness. 116
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Vancouver, B.C., 1924.
Salary Schedule
PUBLIC SCHOOL SALARIES
Grades
Principals
Year.
es
CD
First.-    $1,320
Second.-    1,380
Third    1,440
Fourth    1,500
Fifth   .-.   1,560
Sixth    1,620
Seventh      1,680
Eighth    1,740
Ninth     1,800
Tenth.—	
bo
s *«
$1,140 $1,620
1,200 1,760
1,260 1,900
1,320 2,040
1,380 2,180
1,440 2,320
1,500
1,560 	
1,620	
1,680       .....
pi
O   W rH
gcBS £es          d_g
O    Q    r3 .H^                                  QQ
flffi?i r>PL|                    MM
$1,200 $1,800        $2,400
1,260 1,920          2,520
1,320 2,040          2,640
1,380 2,160          2,760
1,440 2,280          2,880
1,500 *2,400
1,560
1,620	
1,680 —
1,960 (head nurse)
02
CD o
bo o
rllj
rl'Jl
$2,520
2,640
2,760
2,880
3,000
3,120
3,240
3,360
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020 for the first year
and $1,080 for the second year of successful teaching; men teachers with First Class Certificates,
without experience, if employed, will be paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the first and
second years of satisfactory service.
(*)    For teachers holding First Class or Academic Certificates.
Salary Schedule
HIGH SCHOOL SALARIES
Assistants
Year                                                             Men Women
First.- $2,030 $1,750
Second     2,170 1,890
Third    2,310 2,030
Fourth    2,450 2,170
Fifth    2,590 2,310
Sixth    2,730 2,450
Seventh    2,870 2,590
Eighth    3,010 2,730
Manual
Training
Domestic
Science
Principals
$1,750
$1,470
$3,300
1,890
1,610
3,440
2,030
1,750
3,580
2,170
1,890
3,720
2,310
2,030
3,860
2,450
2,170
4,000
2,590
2,310
2,730
One-tenth of the annual salary is paid at the close of each teaching month. No schedule
increase will go into effect without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector
of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the schedule by special
resolution of the Board.
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the Board up to 10 teaching days (five for each term)
in cases of illness of teachers; also for 3 days in cases of bereavement in a teacher's family and
for compulsory quarantine.
Teachers may accumulate 50 per cent, of the days allowed them each year for sick leave,
but not used, up to thirty teaching days; and extended sick leave for all or part of the accumulated
period will be allowed them in case of serious illness. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
117
Vancouver, B. C,
1st March, 1924.
The Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B. C.
Mr.  Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:
1. I have the honour to hand you herewith financial and
statistical statements for the year ending- 31st December, 1923.
2. (a) The approval of School By-law No. 1562 for
$25,000.00 by the ratepayers, made the net sum of $24,509.18 available, after paying expenses in connection with the By-law, for the
purchase of school sites in the Grandview District.
(b) The following sites were purchased, and it is interesting
to compare the amount at which the City values the property with
the actual cost of same, as follows:—
Actual
Cost
Block 8, D.L. 264-A ....$10,500.00
Block 141 (S. y2), D.L. 264-A     6,024.20
Block 79, D.L. 264-A     5,830.00
City
Valuation
$17,000.00
9,700.00
18,500.00 118
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
(c) In addition to school sites purchased in Grandview, as
stated in the preceding paragraph, Block 4, South Half Section
33, H.T.S., was purchased, by arrangement with the City Council,
for the sum of $7,600.00, and is valued by the City at $9,000.00.
(d) It is a pity that the Trustees cannot avail themselves of
the present favorable time for a more extensive purchase of
school   sites.
(e) Nine   (9)   temporary  classrooms were erected and   the
necessary furniture and equipment for same purchased.    Six (6)
of these rooms were in connection with the Junior High School,-
and were of a   more substantial construction than the ordinary
temporary classroom.
3. Revenue expenditure for 1923 shows an increase of
$32,442.15 compared with 1922. This amount is more than covered by the natural increase in teachers' salaries, and educational
salaries other than teachers, amounting to $34,370.92.
I have the honour to be,
Sirs and Mesdames,
Your obedient servant,
B. G. WOLFE-MERTON,
Secretary BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
119
STOCK STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING
31st DECEMBER, 1923
School Supplies
Stock on hand 31st December, 1922 $11,512.16
Purchased during 1923  18,225.62
$29,737.78
Issued during 1923   18,465.14
Stock on hand 31st December, 1923 $11,272.64
Janitors' Supplies
Stock on hand 31st December, 1922 $ 1,793.26
Purchased during 1923  10,362.33
$12,155.59
Issued during 1923   10,809.18
Stock on hand 31st December, 1923 $ 1,346.41
Repairs and Renewals
Stock on hand 31st December, 1922 $ 1,432.07
Purchased during 1923      7,144.24
I $ 8,576.31
Issued during 1923  1    6,448.78
Stock on hand 31st December, 1923 $ 2,127.53 120 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EXPENDITURE ON REVENUE ACCOUNT TO
31st DECEMBER, 1923
Salaries, Schools—
nr*
Teachers  ......$957,028.48
Teachers' Substitutes. __    10,129.50
|      |     I   $967,157.98
Supervisors I      24,350.00
Manual Training Teachers        47,233.00
Domestic Science Teachers. 2      23,023.40
1,061,764.38
Janitors...     77,643.68
Janitors' Extras       4,727.73
  82,371.41
Auditor   |    700.00
Salaries—
Municipal Inspector and
Assistants   $    8,700.00
Assistant Municipal Inspector .....        3,600.00
  $ 12,300.00
Secretary and Assistants  11,306.25
Building Supt. and Assistants...   9,000.00
Medical Department  18,420.50
Dental Department  8,080.00
Attendance Officers   4,920.00
Storekeeper  1,860.00
Chauffeurs      3,120.00
Telephone Operator    757.75
■ft        .§ $     69,764.50
Supplies, General School—
Schools __         58,494.47
Domestic Science            1,363.90
Manual Training           3,103.87
Medical Department          1,626.76
Dental Department  825.94
65,414.94
Carried Forward..  .  $1,280,015.23 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
121
Brought Forward     $1,280,015.23
Miscellaneous—
Janitors     11,
Fuel  25,
Electric Light, Power and Gas  10,
Water...   2,
Insurance...   2,
Advertising	
Printing   	
Telephone  I 2,
Auto Experse  ._..  4,
Scavenging	
Car Fares    2,
Office Expense   4,
Renting and Leasing    11,
Contingent     1,
Repairs and Renewals  108,
Legal Fees, Solicitors    1,
232.73
386.95
618.54
331.05
061.90
199.06
630.70
761.55
940.71
428.00
074.50
587.87
374.50
383.71
934.89
587.35
190,534.01
Less  sundry  credits  and  non-resident
pupils' fees  	
Special Revenue
New School Sites  $ 20,041.61
New School Buildings     21,736.73
Furniture and Equipment..    21,132.25
Sinking Fund and Interest.
$1,470,549.24
10,027.58
$1,460,521.66
62,910.59
$1,523,432.25
213,784.72
$1,737,216.97
I certify that the above statement is in accordance with the
City Hall Books, as well as the School Board Records.
JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A.,
Auditor.
F. J. NICHOLSON, Chairman. fgj
B. G. WOLFE-MERTON, Secretary.
Vancouver, B.C., 21st February, 1924. 122
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1923
By proceeds of By-law No. 1562....$25,000.00
Less Sundry Legal Fees, etc., re
passing   By-law   and   Sale   of
Bonds        490.82
J   $24,509.18
To purchase of Lots 1 to 22 inclusive, Block 8,
D.L. 264-A   $10,500.00
To purchase of Lots 17 to 32 inclusive, Block
141, D.L. 264-A        6,024.20
To purchase of Block 79, D.L. 264-A  5,830.00
Balance carried forward     --£,154.98
$24,509.18 $24,509.18
Credit Balance Carried Forward        $ 2,154.98
To the Chairman and Member,
Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B.C.
I have examined the attached statement with the Books
and Disbursement Vouchers relating thereto, and certify the
Statement is correctly drawn up so as to set forth the Board of
School Trustees' Expenditure on Capital Account for the year
1923, as disclosed by the records presented for my inspection.
I have received all the information and explanations I have
required.
Yours faithfully,
L
Vancouver, B.C.,
February 21st, 1924
JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A.,
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■Paul 130 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
INDEX.
Attendance:— Page.
Average (School)   102
Attendance of Trustees at Meetings  4
Board of School Trustees:—
List of, 1886-1923  6
List of, Year 1923  4
List of, Year 1924  5
Capital Expenditure for the year 1923  122
Chairman's Address   8
Committees (Standing):—
Year 1923   4
Year 1924   5
Dental Staff   Ill
Enrolment:—
Year, 1923  102
Years 1912 to 1923 in October  102
Light, Power, Gas, Water, Fuel, Analysis for 1923  128
Medical Staff   Ill
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees  5
Officials, 1924  5 and 111
Principals, names and Telephone Numbers  103
Reports:—
Attendance   93
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools  29
Auditor  120 and 121
Building Committee   19
Dental Department  I  45
Drawing    91
Home Economics Department  83
Management Committee   14
Manual Training Department  81
Medical Inspection   35
Municipal Inspector of Schools   23
Music   95
Night Schools   99
Nursing Staff   39 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
131
Page.
Observation Class    49
Physical Instruction—Remedial Classes  44
Physical Training:, Cadets and Rifle Teams  56
Primary Work   77
Psychological Department  47
School Sports   89
Secretary     117
Sewing*   88
Social Service Work  50
Special Classes   53
Revenue Account, 1923   120
Revenue Expenditure, Analyzed, for 1914 to 1923  124
Revenue Expenditure, Analyzed, for 1923  129
Revenue Expenditure, Showing Cost per Capita  126
Salary Schedule, 1923   115
Salary Schedule, 1924   116
Schools—Name, Location, Number of Divisions  103
Stock Statement   119
Supervisors and Special Instructors, List of  Ill
Teachers;—
Their Certificates and Dates of Appointment  104
Number Each Year Since 1916  102
Number of Special Teachers and Officers  102
Number Holding Different Grades of Certificates  102
Domestic Science and Manual Training   110
Appointed in 1922   112
Appointed in 1923  113
Value of School Property \  123
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
Trustees    2
Teachers from Other Parts of the Empire  3
Gordon, J. S  23
Brough, T. A  29
White, Dr. Harold   35
Pallen, Dr. R. L. ,  45
Wolfe-Merton, Major B. G  117 I
McBEATH  SPEDDING   LIMITED
PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS
569 Howe Street        Vancouver, B.C.
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