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Behring Sea arbitration. Papers relating to the proceedings of the tribunal of arbitration, constituted… Bering Sea Tribunal of Arbitration 1893

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Array UNITED STATES.    No. 11 (1893).
BEHRING   SEA  ARBITRATION.
PAPERS
RELA'CING TO THE
PROCEEDINGS  OF THE TRIBUNAL OF ARBITRATION
MI
i ■ s
CONSTITUTED  UNDER
ARTICLE I OE THE TREATY CONCLUDED AT WASHINGTON*
ON THE 29th EEBRUARY, 1892, BETWEEN HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY
AND THE UNITED STATES OE AMERICA..
"Presented to both Houses of Parliament %y Command of Her Majesty.
September 1893.
LONDON:
PRINTED FOR HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OPi'lCB
BY HARRISON AND SONS, ST. MARTIN'S LANE,   .
PRINTERS  IN  ORDINARY TO   HER  MAJESTY.
And to be purchased, either directly or through »ny Bookseller, from
GYRE and  SPOTTISWOODE,  East  Harping Street, Flbet Strum,  E.C ,
32, Abingdon Street, Westminster, S.W.;   or
JOHN MENZIES & Co.,  12, Hanovfr Street, Edinburgh, and
90, West Nile  Street,  Glasgow;  or
HODGES, FIGGIS, & Co., Limited, 104. Grafton Street, Dublin.
85 TABLE OF CONTENTS.
No.
Name.
Date.
Subject.
Page
1
To Mr. Tupper
..             . •
Feb.   17, 1893
Instructs him   to proceed  to  Paris, and to
attend first meeting of Tribunal    .
1
2
,'              9>
17,
Mr.   Maxwell   and  Mr.  Froude   have   been
appointed to assist him ..             ...
2
3
Mr. Tupper ..
22,
Baron de Courcel suggests that Tribunal should
(Telegraphic)
adjourn till 6th April   ..              ..             ..
2
4
To Mr. Tupper
• •            • •
(Telegraphic)
22,
Approves course proposed in No. 3..             ..
3
5
Mr. Tupper ..
• *            • •
21,
Reports arrival in Paris   ..             ..
3
6
,»       v       *•
|>V?J      ~?~jk
21,
Secrecy agreement should not be  prolonged
beyond 23rd February    .
3
7
The Marquis of Du
fferin               ..
22,
Appointment  of Mr.   Williams  as  Associate
Counsel of United States              ..
4
8
Mr. Tupper ..
.
23,
Tribunal adjourned to 23rd March.    Decision
(Telegraphic)
to maintain secrecy until next meeting
4
9
The Marquis of Du
fferin
24,
Report of   proceedings   at   first   meeting  of
Tribunal          .             ..             ..             ..
■ 4
10
Mr. Tupper  ..
• *                         •
23,
United States' Government objected to adjournment beyond 23rd March             ..             ..
5
11
»        >>       »•
..
24,
Incloses Protocol No. 1                    ..            ..
5
12
u        >>        ..
24,
Reports proceedings at first meeting                ,.
7
13
»       >>       ..
% m
25,
English translation of first Protocol..            ..
7
14
9*              J)              »•
25,
Purposes to return to London         ..             ..
9
15
To Mr. Tupper
• •                         • •
Mar.    1,
Approves his proceedings ..             ..             ..
9
16
Mr. Tupper   ..
• »                          • •
3,
Proposed arrangements respecting his staff in
Paris              ..
9
17
To Mr. Tupper
• •                         • •
*,
Approves   bis  recommendations   in   No.   16.
Mr. Fairholmeand Mr. Anderson will be sent,
if their presence is required
10
18
Mr. Tupper  ..
• •                       a •
19,
Reports arrival of British staff in Paris
10
19
t>       »        • •
• •                       • -
23,
Tribunal has adjourned  till 4th April.    All
(Telegraphic)
proceedings to be public               ..
10
20
»       tt        •.
• •            • >
25,
Mr. Elliott's Report. Has asked Mr. Foster to
prod uce it                      ..             ..              ..
10
SJ
To Mr. Tupper
• •            • •
28,
Mr. Piggott will proceed to Paris   ..
11
22
Mr. Tupper  ..
• •            • *
28,
Correspondence respecting the admission of the
Supplemen ary Report of the British Com
missioner...
11
23
,,               »J                • •
• •            • •
28,
Mr. Foster announces that he will  move for
rpjeetion of certain claims for damages specified in British Counter-Case       ..
14
24
To Mr. Tupper
• •            • •
Apr.   3,
Approves action reported in No. 22..
14
25
Mr. Tupper  ..
• •            • *
5,
Tribunal    has   directed    that   Mr.   Elliott's
Report should  be regarded as  before  the
Arbitrators.    Question of claims in Counter-
Case reserved for consideration. Mr. Phelps
proposed rejection of Supplementary Report
of British Commissioners.    Arrangementfor
shorthand reports         ..              ..            ..
15
26
»»        „        . •
* *             • •
6,
Supplementary    Report   of   British   Commis
sioners.    Argument continued    ..            ..
15
27
,*        »»        • •
• •             •»
7,
Same argument continued..            ..            ..
15
28
>>       »»        • •
• •             • •
9,
Ditto                 ..             ..            H              ,
16
29
»       ,»       • •
• •             * ■
11.
Shorthand Reports.    Mr. Foster proposes to
terminate the arrangement           ..
16
30
)>       ,,        • .
• •            •.
12,
Supplementary   Report   of   British   Commis
sioners, and claims in British Counter-Case.
Decision of Tribunal
17
81
!>                J,                ••
• •             • •
12,
Shorthand Reports.    Proposes to proceed with
them on behalf of Her Majesty's Government
19
32
99               1,                . .
* •             • •
13,
Opening  of case for the  United  States  by
Mr. Carter
19
33
To Mr. Tupper
• • *         • •
15,
Shorihand Reports. Approves proposed course
20
34
Mr. Tupper   .,
• *             * •
14,
Continuation of Mr. Carter's speech ■
20
35
»       »       • •
• •             •«
16,
Ditto                 ..            ..
20
36
,,       ,»        • •
• •            * •
18,
Incloses Protocol No. 2   ..
21
37
»>       »»        • •
♦ •             • ■
18,
Shorthand Reports.     Mr. Foster's statement,
explaining his reasons for withdrawing from
the arrangement           ..             ..             mf
25
[691] TABLE OP CONTENTS.
Ill
No.
38
3.9
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
60
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
Name.
Mr. Tu
pper
»>
,9
9, 9,
99 9>
9, 99
99
99
To Mr. Tupper
Mr. Tupper  ..
To Mr. Tupper
To Colonial Office
Mr. Tupper  ..
(Telegraphic)
66
,9
,»
67
9»
99
68
99
99
69
99
19
70
99
99
Date.
Apr. 20, 1893
21,
24,
25,
May    2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
8,
8,
10,
11,
11,
15,
23,
24,
25,
26,
29,
30,
31,
31,
31,
June    I,
2
3,
To Mr. Tupper
Mr. Tupper  ..
3,
6,
7,
9,
13,
14,
15,
16,
16,
20,
21,
20,
22,
22,
23,
23,
27,
27,
28,
29,
Subject.
Continuation of Mr. Carter's speech
Ditto .. ..
Ditto.. .. .. ..
Adjournment till 2nd May, owing to illness of
Lord Hannen
Incloses Protocols Nos. 3, 4, and 5 ..
Continuation of Mr. Carter's speech
Commencement of Mr. Coudert's speech
Continuation of Mr. Coudert's speech
Incloses Protocols Nos. 6, 7, 8, and 9
Mr. Elliott's Report.    Incloses copies
Continuation.of Mr. Coudert's speech
Conclusion of Mr. Coudert*s speech
Opening o' the argument for Great Britain by
the Attorney-General     . ..
Incloses Protocols Nos. 10, 11,12, 13, and 14
Continuation of the Attorney-General's speech
Incloses Protocols Nos. 15, 16, 17, and 18     ..
Continuation of the Attorney-G •
Ditto ..
Ditto ..
It must be left for him to decide in consultation
. with Counsel   whether any claim for compensation shall be pressed
Continuation of the Attorney-General's speech
Arrangement concluded with Russia as regards
regulation of sealing off Russian coasts and
islands .. .. .. ..
Claim for compensation.    Instructions sent to
Mr. Tupper (see No. 57)
Continuation of the Attorney-General's speech
Conclusion of the Attorney-General's speech.
He was followed by Sir R. Webster ..
Continuation of Sir R. Webster's speech
Shorthand   Reports.    Further correspondence
with Mr. Foster ..
Correspondence with Mr. Foster on the question
of the ownership of sealing-vessels
Incloses Protocols Nos. 19, 20, a 1, 22, and 23
Continuation of Sir R. Webster's speech
M. Gram's statement as to the rules concerning
territorial waters in  Sweden and Norway.
Continuation of Sir R. Webster's speech
Conclusion of Sir R. Webster's speech.    Mr.
Robinson followed him .. ..
Conclusion of Mr. Robinson's argument.    A
statement of the Regulations required presented by Mr. Foster.    Commencement of
speech  by  the  Attorney-General   on   the
question of Regulations.. ..
Continuation of the Attorney-General's speech
Ditto.    He was followed by Sir R. Webster ..
Continuation of Sir R. Webster's speech
Ditto .. .. .. ..
Mr. GofTs Report from Pribyloff Islands.  Mr.
Foster-has no copies, and does not consider
that he is bound to produce it     .. ||
Continuation of Sir R. Webster's speech
Sir R. Webster concluded his speech, and submitted a draft Scheme of Regulations.    Mr.
Tupper read a document setting forth the
findings of fact with regard to the seizures.
Mr. Robinson commenced his speech
Incloses Protocols Nos. 24,25,26,27,23,and29
Has dispensed with services of Mr. Macoun and
Mr. Box • •
Correspondence respecting Russian seizures of
British sealers has been  handed in to the
Tribunal.      Mr.   Robinson   continued   his
speech
Commencement of Mr. Phelps' speech
Urges necessity for immediate return of the
Attorney-General to Paris
' Satisfaction at report of Mr. Box's services   .
Continuation of Mr. Phelps' speech .
Ditto .. .. • •
Ditto .. •. • • ..
Page
26
26
26
26
27
32
32
32
33
37
37
37
38
38
42
42
45
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
47
48
48
49
50
54
54
55
56
56
57
57
58
58
59
59
62
66
67
67
68
68
68
6;
69
■:■■ i.i S
Vi IT
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
No.
Name.
Date.
Subject.
Page
87
Mr. Tupper   ..            ,,             ..
July    3, 1898:
ContinuJrtion of Mr. Phelps' speech
69
88
4,
Ditto ..             ..               .             • •             ..
69
89
5,
Ditto ..            ..            ..             «>            *.
70
90
5,
incloses. Protocols Nos. 30 to 39
70
91
"',
Continuation of Mr. Phelps' speech                 ..
84
92
99               99               • •                         * •                         • •
11,
Mr.   Phelps concluded   his speech,   and the
public sittings of the Tribunal were brought
to a close
84
93
18,
Incloses Protocols Nos. 40 and 42 to 47        ..
84
94
25,
Incloses Protocol No. 41                  ..
89
95
25,
Onlv Mr. Maxwell and Mr. Pope remain in Paris
94
S6
Aug.   4,
Incloses Protocols Nos. 48 to 53    ...           ..
94
97
99               »                • «                         ■ "                         • •
12,
Testimony given by the Arbitrators to the utility
of the Shorthand Reports             ..
98
98
15,
Incloses the decision of the Arbitrators
101
99
1.               ,9               • •                         » •                         • •
15,
Acknowledges the services rendered by. British
Counsel and staff         ..             •.
101
100
,,               ,,                . .                         . .                         • .
15,
Leaves   Paris to-day.   Mr. Maxwell remains
for a few days
102
101
To Marquis of Dufferin and others
29,
Instructions to convey -to foreign Governments
the Queen's acknowledgments of the services
rendered by the Arbitrators named by them
102
102
To Marquis of Dufferin               ..
29,
Instructions to thank the President of   the
French    Republic    and    M.    Develle   for
hospitality shown to the gentlemen engaged
in the Arbitration        ..             ..             ..
103
103
To Mr. Tupper           ..           ..
29,
Conveys the Queen's appr /val of his services.
Acknowledgments to  the  other  gentlemen
employed
103
104
To   Lord    Hannen   and   Sir   J.
Thompson
"29,
Conveys the Queen's approval of their services
104
105
To Sir  C.   Russell  and Sir'   R.
29,
Conveys the thanks of. Her Majesty's Govern
Webster
ments for their services                ..
104
106
To Sir G, Baden-Powell
29,
Offers thanks of Her  Majesty's Government
for his services             ..             ....
¥f#
107
Lord Hannen
Sept.   6,
Expresses gratitude for acknowledgment of his
■services         ..             ..
T06
108
Sir C. Russell              ..           ..
8,
Expresses gratitude for the acknowledgement
of his services, and for the assistance rendered
to him in his work        ..
105 BEHRING  SEA  ARBITRATION.
Papers relating to the Proceedings of the Tribunal of Arbitration
constituted under Article I of the Treaty concluded at
Washington on the 29th February, 1892, between Her
Britannic Majesty and the United States of America.
No. l.
KrJ^ The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, February 17, 1893.
THE first meeting of the Tribunal in the Behring Sea Arbitration having been fixed
for the 23rd instant, I have to request you to proceed to Paris to attend it.
Her Majesty's Attorney-General, Sir Eichard Webster, Q.C., and Mr. C. Eobin-
son, Q.C., of Canada, will also attend the meeting as Counsel on behalf of Her Majesty's
Government, and will be ready to give you their advice and support.
'It will probably be convenient that you should be in Paris two or three days
previous to that date in order to enter into informal communications with the United,
States' Agent, or with the gentleman whom he may have delegated to represent him,
for the purpose of arranging the course of procedure to be adopted before the Tribunal.
Tou are aware, from the correspondence which has already been forwarded to you,
that it has been agreed by the Governments of Her Britannic Majesty and the United
States that the first meeting of the Tribunal shall be attended by one Arbitrator on the
part of Great Britain, one on the part of the United States, and one of the three
Arbitrators selected by the foreign Governments.
At this first meeting the Agent of the United States will apply for an adjournment
of the Tribunal to the 23rd March, to which date the presentation of the printed
Argument would thereby be postponed, and you are authorized to concur in the
application.
It has further been agreed that all matters other than that of this adjournment, and
such action as may be deemed by the Arbitrators present as necessary for the organization of the Tribunal, shall be postponed to the full meeting on the 23rd March,
.    Amongst the subjects which may be classed in the category of those to be discussed
at the first meeting are the following :—
Wjfi- 1. The question whether the proceedings before the Tribunal shall be kept secret,
until its close, and whether such secrecy shall apply to the Case, Counter-Case, and
Argument presented on either side.
The matter seems to Her Majesty's Government to be one for the decision of the
Arbitrators. It would probably be found convenient for them tbat the discussions
should be considered as confidential while they are proceeding. There does not appear
to be the same objection to the publication of the Cases, Counter-Cases, and Arguments,
nor of the Eeports of the Behring Sea Commissioners, respecting which latter the Treaty
only stipulates that they shall not be made public until they shall have been submitted
16913        ?i B H
8 riMMifik
2
to the Arbitrators.   But in respect to these documents also, Her Majesty's Government
are willing to follow the course which may appear most convenient to the Arbitrators.
2. The question of the appointment of a Secretary or of Joint-Secretaries to the
Tribunal.
As the French Government will provide the place of meeting, and as the French
Arbitrator has consented to attend the first sitting, he will no doubt be designated by
the Arbitrators as President of the Tribunal, and he wif'probably have proposals to
make as to the choice of a Secretary or Secretaries, and as to the arrangements for
clerical assistance and the printing of the Protocols.
As soon as the business connected with the first meeting is completed you will be
at liberty to return to London, in order to proceed with the preparation of the printed
Argument.
I have to request you to furnish me with Eeports of each meeting of the Tribunal,
both on the first occasion and subsequently when the full meetings take place, in a
numbered series of despatches according to the forms in use in this Office.
You will refer to me, by telegraph, for instructions on any doubtful points which
may call for immediate decision.
I am, &c.
(Signed) ECSEBEBY.
No. 2.
•■;■
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, February 17, 1893.
WITH reference to my preceding despatch of this day's date, I have to inform you
that I have appointed Mr. E. P. Maxwell of this Office, and Mr. Ashley Froude,
C.M.G., late Secretary of the Behring Sea Commission, to assist you in your work as
British Agent in the Behring Sea Arbitration.
These gentlemen will accompany you to Paris for the first meeting of the
Tribunal on the 23rd instant, and for the subsequent meetings which will commence
on the 23rd proximo.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 3.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 22.)
(Telegraphic.) Paris, February 22, 1893.
BEHEING SEA Arbitration.
The meeting of the Tribunal is fixed for 11 o'clock on Thursday morning.
Baron de Courcel has suggested to the United States' Acting Agent and myself
that the adjournment shall extend to the 6th April instead of to the 23rd March, and
that on 30th March the printed arguments shall be handed in to the Arbitrators.
The proposed adjournment would defer the second meeting till after Holy Week,
and would enable the Tribunal to consider the argument without further adjournment,
which would be necessary for that purpose were 23rd March to be date of the second
meeting.
The United States' Acting Agent is telegraphing to his Government for instructions.
Sir Eichard Webster and Mr. Eobinson approve, subject to the views of Her
Majesty's Attorney-General, who has not yet arrived here.
Does the proposal meet with your Lordship's approval ? No. 4
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
(Td^S£hic-) i i    * Fom> °#ce> «*«^ 22,1893.
1HE course proposed by Baron de Courcel seems to be convenient.   I approve
the arrangement as stated in your telegram of to-day.
No. 5.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 23.)'
My Lord, par^ February 21, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship's despatches
of the 17th instant, containing instructions for my guidance at the first meeting of the
Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal, and informing me that Mr. E. P. Maxwell and
Mr. Ashley Eroude would accompany me to Paris.
I have the honour to inform your Lordship that, in accordance with your
instructions, I left London yesterday, and arrived here the same evening, accompanied
by the above-mentioned gentlemen and my Private Secretary, Mr. J. Pope.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 6.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 23.)
My Lord, Paris, February 21, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to inform your Lordship that I called this morning at Her
Majesty's Embassy, accompanied by Mr. Maxwell, Mr. Eroude, and my Secretary,
Mr. Pope, and saw Mr. Austin Lee, from whom I obtained much useful information
in connection with the meeting of the Tribunal of Arbitration.
Einding that Mr. William "Williams, the Junior Counsel for the United States,
was staying at the H6tel Continental, I called upon him, and learned that he had been
delegated to represent Mr. Poster, the Agent of the United States, pending the latter
gentleman's arrival in Paris.
We then bv arrangement made several official visits together, and endeavoured to
v O G ^
see Baron de Courcel, in order to make an appointment for the meeting of the Tribunal
on Thursday.
Having failed to find his Excellency at home, we have made an appointment to
Call on him together to-morrow morning, at 10 o'clock.
Lord Hannen and Mr. Justice Harlan have expressed their willingness to meet at
any hour which may be agreeable to Baron de Courcel.
I am of opinion, if your Lordship should see no objection, that the agreement as
to the secrecy of the Cases and Counter-Cases should not be prolonged beyond the
23rd instant; but that in regard to this question, as well as to that of opening the
proceedings of the Tribunal to the public, it would be advisable to defer to whatever
opinion the Arbitrators may express on the subject.
Mr. Williams has intimated to me that his Government desired the publication
of the Cases and Counter-Cases, and he considered that the agreement as to secrecy
would terminate on the 23rd instant.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE. ■»;■■
No. 7.
t>
The Marquis of Dufferin to the E'arl of Rosebery.-—(Received February 23.)
My Lord, Paris, February 22, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit herewith copy of a letter which I have received
from the Minister of the United States in Paris, informing me that Mr. William
Williams, Associate Counsel of the United States before the Tribunal of Arbitration
convened to decide the questions of fur-seals, has been designated to act as Special
Agent of the United States at the meeting of the Tribunal to be held on the
23rd instant.
I have, &c.
(Signed) DUEEEELN and AVA.
Inclosure in No. 7.
..Ǥ< Mr* Coolidge to the Marquis of Dufferin.
My Lord, Paris, February 21, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to inform your Excellency that Mr. William Williams,
Associate Counsel of the United States before the Tribunal of Arbitration convened to
decide the question of fur-seals, has been designated to act as Special Agent of the
United States at the meeting of the Tribunal on the 23rd instant.
I have, &c.
(Signed) J. JEEEEESON COOLIDGE.
No. 8.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 23.)
(Telegraphic.) Paris, February 23, 1893, 6 P.m.
THE Tribunal has decided to adjourn until the 23rd March, the further
adjournment referred to in my telegram of yesterday not having been agreed to
by the Government of the United States.
With regard to the publication of the Cases and Counter-Cases, the Tribunal
decided that the matter did not come under their consideration; and I understand that
it is the intention of the United States' Government to publish these documents.
No. 9.
The Marquis of Dufferin to the Earl of Rosebery,—(Received February 25.)
My Lord, Paris, February 24,1893.
THE Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal held its first meeting yesterday at the
Ministry of Eoreign Affairs. It was attended by Baron de Courcel, the Erench Arbitrator (who was requested by his colleagues to act as President for the occasion), by
Lord Hannen, the British Arbitrator, and Mr. Justice Harlan, the United States'
Arbitrator, as well as by the Honourable C. H. Tupper, the British Agent, and
Mr. W. Williams, acting as Agent for the United States in the place of Mr. Eoster,
who has not yet arrived. No Counsel were present on behalf of the United States, but Sir Charles Eussell
and Sir Eichard Webster attended as Counsel on behalf of Great Britain
?nJ.1tb?n?f0po?,al ?? ihc Unite(1 States' A?tinS &&<&*" supported by the British
Agept, the Tribunal adjourned till the 23rd March, and it was agreed that pending a
decision to be taken by the full Tribunal, the proceedings should be kept secret
I took the opportunity of a ball at the Elys6e in the evening to present Lord
Hannen and Mr. Tupper to the President of the Bepublic.
I have, &c,
(Signed) DUEFEEIN and AVA.
No. 10.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 27.)
.My Lord, Paris, February 23, 1893.
f AETEE a conversation yesterday with Baron de Courcel and Mr. Williams, the
Acting Agent for the United States, I had the honour to inform your Lordship
by telegraph that a suggestion had been made by the former to the effect that the
Tribunal of Arbitration should be adjourned till the 6th April, and the presentation of
the printed arguments postponed till the 30th March.
I duly received your Lordship's telegram of yesterday, informing me that you
approved of this proposal.
Mr. Williams, however, stated to me this morning that his Government had
instructed him to object to the proposed postponement beyond the 23rd March, though,
he added, it was probable that after the meeting on that date an adjournment might
be desirable for a few days.
No allusion was therefore made to the question of an extended adjournment at
the meeting of the Tribunal to-day.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 11.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Mosebery.—(Received February 27.)
My Lord, Paris, February 24,1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit herewith to your Lordship a copy of the Protocol
of the first meeting of the Behring Sea Tribunal of Arbitration, which was held
at 11 o'clock yesterday morning at the Erench Ministry of Eoreign Affairs.
This Protocol, which is drawn up in the Erench language, was finally approved
Caad signed by the three Arbitrators at an informal meeting held this morning,
and attended by the Agents of the two Governments in accordance with the request of
the Tribunal. .      ,
An English version of the Protocol has been prepared, and will be signed
to-morrow by Mr. Williams and myself.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
m Inclosure in No. 11.
Protocoles des Seances du Tribunal d'Arbitrage, constitue en vertu de_ la Convention du
29 Fevrier, 1892, signe'e a Washington entr£ le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis^eb de Sa
Majeste Britannique.
Protocole I.—Seance du 23 Fevrier, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a Paris dans l'H6tel du Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres
de France.
Les Arbitres presents etaient:—
L'Honorable John M. Harlan, Juge de la Cour Supreme des Etats-Unis, un des
Arbitres designes par les Etats-Unis;
Son Excellence le Baron Alphonse de Courcel, Senateur, Arbitre d&ignd par la
France;
Le Tres Honorable Lord Hannen, Pair d'Angleterre, siegant a la Cour Supreme
d'Appel, un des Arbitres d6sign6s par la Grande-Bretagne;
Lesquels se sont assures que leurs pouvoirs respectifs etaient en bonne et valable
forme.
M. le Baron de Courcel est invite" par ses collegues a prendre place au fauteuil de
la Presidence pour la presente seance.
Assistent a la stance:—
M. William Williams, en quality d'Agent Special et Conseil Adjoint pour les
Etats-Unis, et
L'Honorable Charles H. Tupper, en quality d'Agent de Sa Majeste Britannique.
MM. Williams et Tupper ont depose sur le bureau du Tribunal Arbitral les
Commissions qui les aecr^ditent devant le Tribunal.
Assistent £galement a la seance, en qualite de Conseils du Gouvernement
Britannique:—
Sir Charles Eussell, Conseil de la Eeine, Membre du Parlement, Attorney-
G&ie'ral de Sa Majeste Britannique;
Sir Eichard Webster, Conseil de la Eeine, Membre du Parlement;
M. Christopher Eobinson, Conseil de la Eeine.
Le President a invite M. Henry Feer, ancien Consul-General de France, a rC*diger le
Protocole de la seance, avec le concours de MM. Williams et Tupper.
M. Williams, agissant au nom du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis, demande que
le Tribunal s'ajourne au 23 Mars.
M. Tupper, au nom du Gouvernement Britannique, appuie la demande de
M. Williams.
Sir Charles Eussell, Principal Conseil de la Grande-Bretagne, declare que les
Conseils, quoique informes d'avance de la demande qui devait etre presentee, ont
tenu, par d6terence pour le Tribunal Arbitral, a se presenter a cette premiere seance.
Le Tribunal Arbitral, faisant droit a la demande, qui lui est adressee au nom
des deux parties, decide de s'ajourner au 23 Mars.
La question de la publication des Memoires et Contre-Memoires ayant 6te posee,
les Arbitres declarent qu'elle n'est pas de leur competence.    • ' fy
Quant a la publication du Protocole de la presente seance, les Arbitres presents ne
se trouvant pas en nombre suffisant pour prendre une decision de nature a lier poUr
l'avenir le Tribunal Arbitral, declarent que jusqu'a nouvel ordre le Protocole de la
seance du 23 Fevrier demeurera secret.
Le Tribunal Arbitral s'ajourne au 23 Mars.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 23 Fervrier, 1893, et ont signe":
Le President ..        ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent Special des Etats-Unis .. WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne .. CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire..        ..       ..       ..    H. FEEE.
[For translation, see Inclosure in No. 13.] No. 12.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery .—(Received February 2*1.)
in
Paris, February 24,1893.
yesterday's meeting of the
my immediately preceding
the following account
ii
stated that the object
commencing the proceedings if
My Lord,
TO supplement the report of the proceedings of
Tribunal, contained in the Protocol which is inclosed
despatch, I have the honour to futrnish your Lordship witl
of what took place.
Baron de Courcel, having taken the CJhair as President
of  the Tribunal was to consider the propriety of
neither of the Agents'had any objection.
If there were any objection or any proposal to make, such as the question of an
adjournment, it should come from the Agents of the parties, and now was the time it
should be made,
Mr. Williams thereupon made his proposal for an adjournment {ill the 23rd
March, to-which I assented, and to which the Tribunal agreed.
^Sif Charles Eussell then addressed the Tribunal as recorded in the ProtocoL
The President next requested the Agents to inform their respective Governments,
and to cause the four Arbitrators who were not present to be advised, of the decision
of the Tribunal in regard to the adjournment. He added that the Arbitrators present
did not feel able, in the absence of their colleagues, to arrange for the appointment of
a Secretary or Secretaries, but that for the purposes of the present meeting the Protocol
would be prepared by M. Peer, formerly in the Erench Consular Service, with the
assistance or.the Agents of both parties.
The Protocols, he said, would be drawn up in Erench and English, Erench being
the language .of the country in which the Tribunal was assembled, and English that
of the two nations who were interested in the Arbitration.
Mr.. Williams then stated that the documents in the Case had up to the present
been kept secret, in accordance with an Agreement between the two Governments,
but that as neither party saw any reason for further extending the injunction of
secrecy, he proposed that the Cases and Counter-Cases should become public property
forthwith unless the Arbitrators saw any objection.
The President inquired whether I agreed to this proposal, and I replied in the
affirmative.
The President, after consultation with his colleagues, then announced that the
publicity of the Cases, Counter-Cases, and Arguments was not a question on which
the Tribunal had to enter. The Agents on either side should act in regard to it in
whatever- way they might judge to be the best.
As to the proceedings before the Tribunal, he stated that they belonged to the
Tribunal itself, and that the Arbitrators present had no right to give them to the
public. They must be kept secret until the next meeting, when the full Tribunal
would decide as to the proper course to be pursued.
I have, &c. Q?
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 13.
MK Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 27.)
Mv Lord Paris, February 25, 1893.
WITH reference to my first' despatch of yesterday, I have the honour to transmit
to your Lordship a copy of tfie English version of the Protocol of the first meeting of
the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal. E»Uw      I      ■ •    ,
This document has been certified as an accurate translation of the Erench original
by Mr. Williams and myself, in accordance with the request of the Arbitrators. _
The original documents, as signed in both languages, remain for the present in the
custody of Baron de Courcel's Secretary.
(Signed)      '   CHAELES H. TUPPEE. ■Me
8
Inclosure in No. 13.
Protocols of the Meetings of the Tribunal of Arbitration constituted under the Convention
of February 29, 1892, signed at Washington between the Governments of the United
States and Her Britannic Majesty.
£$ e Protocol I.—Meeting of February 23, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at Paris at the French Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
'H  The Arbitrators present were :—
The Honourable John M. Harlan, Justice of the Supreme Court of the United
States, one of the Arbitrators named by the United States ;
His Excellency Baron Alphonse de Courcel, Senator, the Arbitrator named by
France;
The Eight Honourable Lord Hannen, Lord of Appeal, one of the Arbitrators
named by Great Britain;
Who, having assured themselves that their respective powers were in good and
valid form,
Baron de Courcel was invited by his colleagues to take the chair as President for
the present meeting.
There were present at the meeting:—
Mr. William Williams, as Special Agent and Associate Counsel of the United
States;
The Honourable Charles H. Tupper, as Agent of Her Britannic Majesty.
Messrs. Williams and Tupper laid before the Tribunal of Arbitration the Commissions empowering them to act before the Tribunal.
There were also present at the meeting, as Counsel for Her Britannic Majesty's
Government:-*
Sir Charles Eussell, Q.C., M.P., Her Britannic Majesty's Attorney-General;
Sir Eichard Webster, Q.C., M.P., and
Mr. Christopher Eobinson, Q.C.
The President invited M. Henri Feer, formerly a Consul-General of France, to
draw up the Protocol of this meeting, with the assistance of Messrs. Williams and
Tupper.
Mr. Williams, acting for the Government of the United States, asked that the
Tribunal adjourn till the 23rd March.
Mr. Tupper, in the name of the British Government, supported the request
of Mr. Williams.
Sir Charles Eussell, the leading Counsel for Great Britain, stated that the Counsel,
though previously aware of the request which would be made, thought it right to attend
the first meeting out of respect for the Tribunal of Arbitration.
The Tribunal of Arbitration acceded to the request made in the name of the
two parties, and agreed to adjourn to the 23rd March.
The question of the publication of the Cases and Counter-Cases having been
mentioned, the Arbitrators stated that it was not a subject for their consideration.
In regard to the publication of the Protocol of this meeting, the Arbitrators present,
finding themselves in insufficient number to give a decision which would bind the
Tribunal of Arbitration for the future, announced that the Protocol of the meeting
of the 23rd February should -be kept secret until further orders.
The Tribunal of Arbitration adjourned till the 23rd March.
So done in Paris, the 23rd February, 1893, and have signed:
The President ..         ALPH. DE COUECEL.
The Special Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        ..
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cuntnghame,
WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
H. FEEE.
'}
Co-Secretaries.
iiam^* No. 14.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received February 27.)
My ^01^A,rx,  ..     , ■ i% Paris, February 25, 1893.
£ i V .- 5°^0U? to lnform y°ur ^rd^ip that, the business connected with
the nrst meeting of the Behring Sea Tribunal of Arbitration bavins- been completed
this afternoon, I purpose leaving Paris to-morrow on my return to London, accompanied
by the gentlemen attached to the staff of the Agency.
(Signed)
I have, &c.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE
No. 15.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir> I Foreign Office, March 1,1893.
I HAVE received your despatch of the 24th ultimo, giving an account of what
tookjjlace at the first meeting in Paris of the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
Tour proceedings on that occasion are approved by Her Majesty's Government.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEET.
181
No. 16.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 3.)
Foreign Office, March 3,1893.
My Lord,
DUBING my recent visit to Paris occasion was taken to arrange for the
accommodation of the British Staff required for the presentation of the Case before
the Tribunal of Arbitration.
In addition to the four gentlemen engaged as Counsel, viz., the Attorney-General,
Sir E. Webster, Mr. C. Eobinson, and Mr. Box, I respectfully suggest that the
following should be attached to the Staff of the Agency:—Dr. G. M. Dawson,
Mr. E. P. Maxwell, and Mr. G. F. Fairholme, of the Foreign Office; Mr. J. Anderson,
of the Colonial Office jj Mr. Ashley Eroude; Mr. J. Pope, my Private Secretary;
Mr. J. M. Macoun, Secretary to Dr. Dawson; and Mr. Charles Eussell, the solicitor
engaged in the case.
I have ventured to include the name of Dr. Dawson, as he is an officer in
the service of the Canadian Government, and perhaps the only officer at the disposal
of Her Majesty's Government who can be said to be conversant with the life and
habits of the fur-seal. His presence at Paris I believe to be necessary, and I do not
contemplate objection being taken on the part of the United States to our availing
ourselves of his knowledge.
I do not propose, unless otherwise instructed by your Lordship, or unless occasion
should arise after consultation with Counsel, to ask Sir G. Baden-Powell to attend.
In my opinion, his presence with Dr. Dawson might make it appear that the
British Commissioners, who were appointed to make an impartial examination into
seal life, were actively engaged in pressing the British Case before the Tribunal.
This I do not think desirable.
I learn that neither of the United States' Commissioners will be in Paris, though
other officers of the United States familiar with seal life will be there.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
[691J
C 10
No. 17.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, March 8, 1893.
IN reply to your despatch of the 3rd instant, I have to inform you that
I approve your recommendation that, in addition to the four gentlemen employed as
Counsel, the following gentlemen should be attached to the Staff of the Agency for
the presentation of the British Case before the Behring Sea Tribunal of Arbitration,
viz., Dr. G. M. Dawson, Mr. E. P. Maxwell, Mr. Ashley Froude, Mr. J. Pope,
Mr J. M. Macoun, and Mr. Charles Eussell.
With regard to your suggestion that Mr. G. F. Fairholme, of this Office, should
also be included as a member of the Staff, I shall be happy to comply with it should
you find, after your arrival in Paris, that his presence would be desirable for the
purpose of examining any further Eussian documents that may be produced on the
part of the United States.
It has also been arranged, after consultation with the Colonial Office, that
Mr. J. Anderson, of that Department, shall be detached for such time as you may
consider that he can be usefully employed.
In conclusion, I concur with you in the opinion that, for the reasons stated by
you, it will be unnecessary that Sir G. Baden-Powell should be asked to attend in
Paris, unless circumstances should make his presence expedient hereafter.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 18.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 21.)
My Lord, Paris, March 19, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to report that I left London on the 17th instant, and arrived
here on that day, accompanied by Mr. M. Box, Mr. E. P. Maxwell, and. my Private
Secretary, Mr. J. Pope.
Her Majesty's Attorney-General, Sir E. Webster, Mr. C. Eobinson, Dr. G. M.
Dawson, Mr. A. Froude, Mr. C. Eussell, and Mr. J. M. Macoun arrived in Paris last
night.
(Signed)
I have, &c.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 19.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 23, 6'45 P.M.)
(Telegraphic.) Paris, March 23, 1893, 6-10 p.m.
THE Tribunal has adjourned till 4th April.   It was decided that all proceedings
should be public forthwith.
No. 20,
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 27.)
My ^md' -n t       f! • Paris> March 25> 1893.
11 will be withm your Lordship's recollection that on the 10th February last a
Notice was addressed, at my request, by Sir Julian Pauncefote to the Agent for the
United States for copies of certain documents quoted in the United States' Counter-
Case.
Among these documents the Eeport of Mr. H. W. Elliott for the year 1890 was
included. If ;
11
Mr. Foster informed me, in his note of the 16th February, that the Government
of the United States did not feel that they were bound by the Treaty to furnish a copy
of the Eeport, and that he was therefore unable to comply with my request.
The matter appeared to me of so great importance, in consequence of the statements contained in the Eeport and of the prominent position occupied by Mr. Elliott
on the question of seal life,* that, after consultation with Her Majesty's Attorney-
General and the other Counsel engaged in the case, I addressed a letter to Mr. Foster,
a copy of which is inclosed herewith, pressing for the production of the Eeport.
I have not yet received any reply to this letter.
Should Mr. Foster's answer not prove satisfactory, I propose to instruct Counsel
to apply to the Tribunal to orderlthe document to be produced.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Inclosure in No. 20.
Mr. Tupper to Mr. Foster.
Sir, Paris, March 23, 1893.
IN reference to your letter of the 16th February, 1893, in reply to my request for
the production of the Eeport of Mr. H. W. Elliott, presented pursuant to Act of
Congress, I desire to give you notice that the Government of Her Britannic Majesty
will insist on their right to its production.
While desirous to avoid, as far as possible, contention on such matters before the
Tribunal, I think it fair to give you notice that unless the Eeport, or a copy thereof,
be produced, our Counsel will, on the 4th April, apply to the Tribunal to order its
production.
In the event of your not having the Eeport, or a copy, in Paris, I give you this
early intimation in order that you may communicate-with the proper Department
in Washington.
I am, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 21.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, March 28, 1893.
I UNDEESTAND that, in consequence of the great mass of material which
requires to be dealt with in the pleadings before the Tribunal of Arbitration, ■ the
Attorney-General and Sir E. Webster are desirous of having the services of Mr. F.
T. Piggott, of the Middle Temple, who has already rendered considerable assistance in
the preparation of the Argument presented on behalf of Her Majesty's Government.
I have therefore arranged with the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's
Treasury that Mr. Piggott should proceed forthwith to Paris.
Mr. Piggott's position will be that of Secretary to the Attorney-General, from
whom he will receive instructions as to the duties on which he shall be employed.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 22.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 29.)
My Lord, Paris, March 28, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit, for your Lordship's information, the accompanying copies of a correspondence which has passed between the United States' Agent
* See British Argument, pp. 147 et seq.
[691]
C 2
m 12
'.'
and myself on the occasion of my having forwarded to the Arbitrators and to him
copies of the Supplementary Eeport of the British Commissioners.*
Finding that Mr. Foster has communicated to the Arbitrators a copy of his note
to me protesting against the admission of the document, I have forwarded to them a
copy of my reply i
I have. &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
m
:
Inclosure 1 in No. 22.
Mr. Tupper to the Behring Sea Arbitrators and Mr. Foster.
THE  Undersigned, Agent of Her Britannic Majesty, appointed to attend the
Tribunal of Arbitration, has the honour to transmit herewith to
copies, in duplicate, of the " Supplementary Eeport of the British Commissioners
appointed to inquire into Seal Life in Behring Sea," referred to on p. 166 d of the
Counter-Case presented on behalf of the Government of Her Britannic Majesty.
Duplicate copies of this document have been forwarded to the Agent of the
United States [each of the Arbitrators].
The Undersigned has the honour to renew to the assurance, &c.
Paris, March 25,1893.
\'r '" ; Inclosure 2 in No. 22.
!"".""    r~-: ■ n 2dr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
THE Undersigned, Agent of the United States before the Tribunal of Arbitration
convened in accordance with the provisions of the Treaty between the United States
and Great Britain of the 29th February, 1892, has the honour to acknowledge the
receipt, at 4'45 p.m. on yesterday (Sunday), the 26th instant, from the Hon. Charles H.
Tupper, Her Britannic Majesty's Agent, of a note, dated the 25th instant, stating
that he transmits with said note copies, in duplicate, of the " Supplementary Eeport
of the British Commissioners appointed to inquire into Seal Life in Behring Sea," and
also stating that duplicate copies of the same document have been forwarded to each
of the Arbitrators; and, further, to say that, in the envelope containing said note were
found two unbound printed documents.
The Undersigned cannot refrain from expressing his surprise that Her Majesty's
Agent has conceived himself authorized to lay a paper, presumably bearing on the
merits of the controversy between the Governments of the United States and Great
Britain, before the members of the Tribunal, at a time and in a manner not allowed by
the Treaty.
If the documents referred to may be thus submitted, the Undersigned is unable
to perceive that Her Majesty's Agent may not submit to the Tribunal, at his pleasure,
at any time, any paper containing evidence or other matter bearing upon the merits
of the controversy. He herewith returns the documents referred to without exami-
nation, and begs to apprise Her Majesty's Agent that he will immediately address the
Arbitrators, protesting against the course Her Majesty's Agent has taken, and
requesting them to disregard the document.
He further gives notice to Her Majesty's Agent that the Tribunal of Arbitration
will be moved, at its next session, that the document referred to be dismissed from
attention, and returned to Her Majesty's Agent.
The Undersigned, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTEE.
Paris, March 26, 1893.
each
* Copies of this Report, with other papers laid before the Tribunal, will be deposited in the Library of
House of Parliament, 13
Inclosure 3 in No. 22.
Mr. Tupper to Mr. Foster.
THE Undersigned, Agent of Her Britannic Majesty appointed to attend the
Tribunal of Arbitration convened under the provisions of the Treaty concluded at
Washington on the 29th February, 1892, has the honour to acknowledge the receipt of
the Hon. John W. Foster's communication of this day's -date, and, in reply thereto,
desires to state that it is the view of Her Majesty's Government that the mode of
procedure contemplated by the Treaty has not been accurately followed.
While all the material bearing on the whole subject-matter in dispute intended to
be used by either party was to be submitted to the other party, that part of such
material which bore only on the question of Eegulations—and particularly the Eeport
or Eeports, joint or several, of the Commissioners of the two countries—should have
been, it is believed, kept distinct from that part which bore on the questions of right,
and that the latter should alone, in the fiffst instance, have been submitted to the
Arbitrators, the former, namely, that part relating to Eegulations, only when the
contingency therefor arose, or, in other words, when the determination of the questions of exclusive right had been arrived at.
It was upon this principle that the original Case of Great Britain was framed,
and this course would have been followed but for the objections raised by the United
States, as stated in Mr. Foster's letter to Mr. Herbert of the 27th September, 1892.
In deference to those representations, and in order to facilitate the progress of the
Arbitration, Her Majesty's Government, while maintaining the justice of their contention, furnished to the Government of the United States and to the Arbitrators the
separate Eeport of the British Commissioners and its Appendices, reserving at the
same time their rights, as stated in Lord Eosebery's despatch to Mr. Herbert of the
13th October, 1892.
The Government of the United States, in presenting to the Arbitrators with their
original Case the separate Eeport of the United States' Commissioners, had, in the
opinion of Her Majesty's Government, departed from the mode of procedure contemplated by the Treaty. It was in pursuance of the understanding contained in the
correspondence above referred to that Her Majesty's Government furnished to the
Agent of tho United States and to the Arbitrators the Supplementary Eeport of the
British Commissioners which was referred to on p. 166 d of the British Counter-Case.
At the proper time Her Majesty's Government will submit to the Arbitrators
that they are entitled to use this Supplementary Eeport, and they are quite willing
that copies should remain in the hands of the Eepresentatives of the United States
without prejudice to any objection they may desire to raise.
The Government of Her Britannic Majesty believe that the Arbitrators will
desire to have at their disposal any trustworthy information which may assist them
upon the questions referred to them for decision.
If, as the Undersigned understands, a communication on this subject has been
addressed by Mr. Foster to the Arbitrators, Her Majesty's Government will forward
to them a copy of Mr. Foster's note of the 27th instant, and of this reply thereto.
The Undersigned, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Paris, March 27, 1893.
II
H
Inclosure 4 in No. 22.
Mr. Tupper to the Behring Sed ArhiiratofS.
THE Undersigned, Agent of  Her Britannic Majesty appointed to attend the
Tribunal of Arbitration, has the honour to inclose, for the information of ,
a copy of a note which he has addressed to the Agent of the United States in reply to
a protest received from him against the presentation of the Supplementary Report of
the British Behring Sea Commissioners which was forwarded to
on the 25th instant.
The Undersigned has the honour to renew to the
assurance, &c.
Paris, March 27, 1893.
"i ' dun    'liiiWMii 14
No. 23.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received March 30.)
My Lord, Paris, March 28, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship a copy of a note I have received
this day from the Agent of the United States, informing me that a motion will be
made on behalf of the United States' Government at the meeting of the Tribunal on
the 4th proximo for tho rejection of certain claims for damages specified in the
Counter-Case of Her Majesty's Government.
I have acknowledged, the receipt of Mr. Foster's communication.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Inclosure in No. 23.
Mr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
THE Undersigned, Agent of the United States before the Tribunal of Arbitration
convened at Paris, has the honour to give notice to the Agent of Her Britannic
Majesty, that, at the next meeting of the Tribunal of Arbitration, a motion will be
made on the part of the United States to dismiss from the Arbitration so much of the
demand of the Government of Great Britain as relates to the sum stated upon p. 315
of the Counter-Case of said Government to have been incurred on account of expenses
in connection with proceedings before the Supreme Court of the United States;
And also to dismiss from said Arbitration the claim and request of the same
Government, mentioned in said p. 315, that the Arbitrators find what catch or catches
might have been taken by pelagic sealers in Behring Sea without undue diminution
of the herd during the pendency of the Arbitration;
And also to dismiss from the Arbitration the claim of the same Government,
mentioned on the same page, 315, to show payments by it to Canadian owners of
sealing-schooners;
And that all proofs or evidences relating to the foregoing claims or matters, or
either of them, be stricken from the British Counter-Case, and, in particular, those
found on pp. 215 to 229, inclusive, of vol. ii of Appendix to said Counter-Case.
The ground of the foregoing motion or motions is that the claims and matters
aforesaid are, and each of them is, presented for the first time in the Counter-Case of
the Government of Great Britain, and that they are not, nor is either of them,
pertinent or relevant by way of reply to the Case of the United States, or to anything
contained therein, except so far as the same may tend to support claims for damages
distinctly made in the original Case of the Government of Great Britain, and that, so
far as they come under that head, the matters are irregular as being cumulative only.
The Undersigned, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTEE.
Paris, March 28,1893.
No. 24.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, April 3, 1893.
I HAVE received your despatch of the 28th ultimo, inclosing correspondence which has passed between the United States' Agent and yourself, on the
occasion of your having forwarded to him and to the Arbitrators, copies of the Supplementary Eeport of the British Commissioners.
The action taken by you in this matter is approved by Her Majesty's Government.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY. No. 2
o.
Mr. T
'upper to the Earl of Rosebery.— (Received April 7.)
My Lord, n   .     .   ., „ „orto
t TTA-tn? +i_ i, , Pans, April o, 1893.
rv^hL^ iln if   r°^ t0 rep0? t0 your LordshiP> that at the meeting of the
Tribunal held yesterday the proceedings were opened by an application made by the
rtS^T  fnT, ' t? w™?f of Her Ma3esty's Government, for the production of
the Eeport by Mr. H. W. Elliott, on seal life.
,,     Sir ^<^rd Webster supported the application, and was followed on the side of
the United States by Mr. Phelps and Mr. Carter.
The Eepresentatiyes of the United States denied that Her Majesty's Government
were entitled under the Treaty to any order by the Tribunal for the production of the
document^ a matter of right; but, they stated, they were willing to waive their ri°-ht
ot objection, and to furnish a copy for such use, as evidence, as the Tribunal
might allow
The Tribunal finally directed that the document should be regarded as before tho
Tribunal, to be made such use of as the Tribunal should see fit.
_ The question of the rejection of certain claims for damages, put forward in the
British Counter-Case, referred to in my despatch of the 28th ultimo, was then raised
by the United States' Eepresentatives, and the Tribunal decided that the matter should
stand over for future consideration.
Mr. Phelps then proceeded to propose the rejection of the Supplementary Eeport
of the British Commissioners in accordance with Mr. Foster's notice, of'which I
forwarded a copy to your Lordship in my despatch of the 28th ultimo. The argument
of the United States' Counsel on this point had not concluded when the Tribunal
adjourned.
I have the honour to transmit to your Lordship herewith a rough proof of the
transcript of the short-hand notes of the proceedings, of which the above is a brief
summary.*
It has been arranged that these rough proofs, which are to be furnished on the
morning after each meeting to both sides, as well as to the Tribunal, shall be corrected
and issued in a final shape at the close of each week's proceedings.
It is believed that when the printers have had more experience, fewer errors will
be found than in the document forwarded herewith, and steps have been taken to
overcome the difficulties which are inevitable on the first occasion of a paper of this
nature, being produced under great pressure, and in a foreign language.
C 113.VG   &C
(Signed)      '   CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 26.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 8.)
My Lord, Paris, April 6 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal held yesterday, the argument of the United
States against the admission of the Supplementary Eeport of the British Commissioners
was continued by Mr. Phelps.
The Attorney-General replied on behalf of Great Britain, and had not finished his
speech when the Tribunal rose.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 27.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 8.)
My Lord, Paris, April 7, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, the discussion with regard to the
admission of the Supplementary Eeport of the British Commissioners was continued
by Sir Charles Eussell, who, at the close of his speech, was complimented by the
President on the lucid manner in which he had stated his argument.
* Full sets of the corrected short-hand notes, which cover in all 2,336 pages (folio) of print, will be
deposited in the Library of each House of Parliament, 16
Mr. Carter followed on the part of the United States, and had not concluded when
the hour of adjournment arrived.
The discussion of this question will, in all probability, be terminated at tho
meeting to-morrow,
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
R ',.
';■{{ I.
No. 28.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 11.)
My Lord, Paris, April 9, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal on the 7th instant, Mr. Carter concluded his
argument with regard to the admission of the Supplementary Eeport of the British
Commissioners, and after a discussion between Counsel on both sides as to the bearing
of certain portions of the diplomatic correspondence on the interpretation of the
Treaty, the Tribunal adjourned till Wednesday next, the 12th instant.
The President stated that the Arbitrators would hold a private meeting oc
Tuesday.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
i1
RI;
No. 29.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 13.)
My Lord,
Paris, April 11, 1893.
SHOETLY after my arrival here Mr. Foster assented to a tentative arrangement
rriyg
3'tin
that the proceedings before the Tribunal should be reported by a London firm of
short-hand writers employed by both parties, and that printed copies of the transcript
should be supplied on the morning after each meeting to each party and to the
members of the Tribunal.
Your Lordship has been supplied with rough proofs of these reports, and notwithstanding the printer's errors, inevitable under the circumstances, it was considered by
the British Counsel and myself that these proofs, which have shown considerable
improvement since the beginning, were not wholly unsatisfactory.
The arrangement was made with the approval of the Tribunal, and the President
stated, at a recent meeting, that the reports furnished had been found useful by the
Arbitrators.
Mr. Foster, however, in a letter of wnich I have the honour to inclose a copy, has
expressed his dissatisfaction at the working of the arrangement, and suggests that it
should be terminated.
I have, after consultation with Counsel, addressed to Mr. Foster the reply, of
which a copy is inclosed, and I trust that your Lordship will approve my action
in the matter.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Inclosure 1 in No. 29.
Mr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
Dear Mr. Tupper, pflr^ Aprii 10> 1893
I EEGEET to have to inform you that the experience of the past week in the
effort to produce a daily verbatim report of the proceedings of the Tribunal of
Arbitration has not proved satisfactory. The main object had in. view, namely, to lay
before the Arbitrators the arguments of Counsel early on the day following their
delivery, has in great measure failed. The Counsel of the United States find the
reports of their arguments, as printed, so far from correct as to make it in great
measure useless, and the burden imposed upon them of revision is an intolerable tax
upon their time, and this of itself is a sufficient reason to make it desirable that the
present arrangement be abandoned. 17
Up to the present writing we have not received from your side the first reading
of the unrevised proof of either the first or any other succeeding day. After it is
received we shall have numerous corrections of our own to make before it goes to the
Pua6^- I 1S therefore Plain that the revised proof will not be ready to lay before
the Arbitrators until they have considered in secret session, and possibly decided the
motion upon which the arguments have been made.
I do not wish to impute neglect or inefficiency to any one. I merely state that
the system which we attempted with some misgivings has proved entirely unsatisfactory, and should be abandoned. I have, therefore, to propose that we at once give
notice to the firm of short-hand reporters and the printers that the effort at further
joint reporting come to an end • that we perfect and print the proceedings of the past
week; that we settle with the short-hand firm and printers on mutually satisfactory
terms; and that any further reporting will be left to each Agent to be done in such
manner as he shall see fit for the convenience of the respective Counsel.
Very truly, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTEE.
,•
Inclosure 2 in No. 29.
Mr. Tupper to Mr. Foster.
Dear Mr. Foster, Perm, April 11, 1893.
I BEG to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th April.
I regret the determination you have reached respecting the daily reports of the
Arbitration proceedings.    I trust you will give this subject reconsideration.
I am glad to observe that you make no complaint regarding the actual short-hand
writing. Messrs. Cherer, Bennet, and Co.'s reporting is, I believe, considered as
perfect as it is possible to procure anywhere. Their transcripts, I am informed, are
invariably used in all the English Law Courts. The correct printing of these
transcripts is, therefore, alone concerned.
In my opinion, considering the difference of language and the very great pressure
of time, the work already done does Messrs. Chamerot et Cie. credit.
These gentlemen cannot yet be said to have had a fair trial. From the marked
improvement shown in each succeeding day, I am led to hope that in a very few days
the reports will be quite satisfactory.
7 Touching the burden of the correction of proof, up to the present time it has not
been found necessary to ask the British Counsel to revise their speeches at all. The
corrections, which are principally typographical and grammatical, have been readily
made by one of our staff who heard the argument.
If'this work becomes too heavy to be executed in the short time available, the
object in view would be well worth the expense of employing a special reader.
The British Government attach great importance to an accurate verbatim record
of the actual arguments used, and, in view or their value to the Tribunal and
their obvious utility, I trust you may yet see your way to continue the present
arrangement.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
pi
ail
No. 30.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 13.)
My Lord Paris, April 12, IMS.   ■
I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that at the meeting of the
Tribunal this morning the President announced the decisions of the Arbitrators on
the questions of the admission of the Supplementary Report of the British Commissioners and of the consideration of the proposal of the United States that certain
claims put forward in the Counter-Case of Great Britain should be struck out.
I have the honour to inclose copies of these decisions as delivered by the
President in French.   An English translation was afterwards read by him.
Your Lordship will observe that with regard to the Supplementary Eeport of the
British Commissioners, the Tribunal has decided that it-shall not be admitted for
[691] v
ii
!lf 1
:
18
the present.   Full liberty is, however, reserved to the Eepresentatives of Great Britain
to make use of the document in oral argument should they see fit to do so.
The question of the admissibility of the Appendices to the Supplementary Eeport
is reserved for further examination without prejudice to the rights of the parties to
discuss the matter and to refer to the documents in the course of oral argument.
With regard to the proposal of the United States to strike out certain claims
included in the British Counter-Case, the Tribunal has decided to postpone the
consideration of the question until such time as it may see fit.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 30.
Decision of Tribunal.
LE Tribunal decide de ne pas recevoir, quant a present, le document intitule:
| Eapport Suppl£mentaire des Commissaires de la Grande-Bretagne dans la Mer de
Behring," date du 31 Janvier, 1893, et signe de George Baden-Powell et George M.
Dawson, lequel a £te remis aux Arbitres individuellement par l'Agent de la Grande-
Bretagne le 25 Mars, 1893, et contient une critique des moyens de preuve produits
dans les pieces et documents pre)c£demment remis aux Arbitres, ou une argumentation
portant sur les dits moyens de preuve. Toute liberte demeure neanmoins reserved aux
Eepresentants de la partie interessee de s'approprier le dit document, date du
31 Janvier, 1893, pour l'incorporer a leur plaidoirie, s'ils le jugent convenable. La
question de l'admissibilite des pieces, ru de quelqu'une d'entre elles, formant Annexes
au dit document du 31 Janvier, 1^93, est reservee a, un examen ulterieur, sans
prejudice du droit pour les Eepresentants des deux parties de discuter la question dont
il s'agit, ainsi que le contenu des dites Annexes au cours de leurs plaidoiries.
(Translation.)
IT is ordered that the document entitled a " Supplementary Eeport of the British
Behring Sea Commissioners," dated the 31st January, 1893, and signed by George
Baden-Powell and George M. Dawson, and delivered to the individual Arbitrators by
the Agent of Her Britannic Majesty on the 25th day of March, 1893, and which
contains a criticism of, or argument upon, the evidence in the documents and papers
previously delivered to the Arbitrators, be not now received, with liberty, however, to
Counsel to adopt such document, dated the 31st January, 1893, as part of their oral
argument, if they deem proper. The question as to the admissibility of the documents,
or any of them, constituting the Appendices attached to the said document of
the 31st January, 1893, is reserved for further consideration, without prejudice of the
right of Counsel, on either side, to discuss that question, or the contents of the
Appendices, in the course of the oral argument.
Inclosure 2 in No. 30.
Decision of Tribunal.
LE Tribunal decide qu'il differera, jusqu'a tel moment qui sera par lui ulterieure-
ment indiqu£, d'entendre plaider ou de prendre en consideration la motion presentee
le 4 Avril, 1893, par les Etats-Unis d'Amerique, tendant a la radiation de certains
passages faisant partie du Contre-M6moire et des moyens de preuve du Gouvernement
de la Grande-Bretagne.
(Translation.)
IT is ordered that the argument and consideration of the motion made by the
United States of America on the 4th day of April, 1893, to strike out certain parts
of the Counter-Case and proofs of the Government of Great Britain, be postponed
until such time as may be hereafter indicated by the Tribunal.
«»»*« 19
No. 31.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 14.)
My Lord, Paris, April 12, 1893.
WITH reference to my despatch of yesterday, I have the honour to'transmit
to your Lordship a copy of a letter from Mr. Foster, informing me that he adheres
to his proposal for the abandonment of the joint shorthand reports of the proceedings
before the Tribunal.
_  It appears very desirable that full reports of the speeches on both sides should
exist.
I therefore propose, after consultation with Counsel, to continue to employ the
shorthand writers and printers on behalf of Her Majesty's Government, and to supply
the members of the Tribunal with copies as usual.
, In forwarding these copies to the Arbitrators I shall explain to them that the
United States' Agent has withdraAvn from the arrangement, that the speeches of the
British Counsel will be revised by the British Agent, and that in order as far as
possible to insure the accuracy of the reports of the speeches of the United States'
Counsel, they will be carefully read over against the original notes in shorthand.
I trust your Lordship will approve of my action in this matter.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Inclosure in No. 31.
Mr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
Dear Mr. Tupper, Paris, April 12, 1893.
YOUE letter of the llth instant respecting the shorthand reports has been
received and duly considered.
After again submitting the subject to the Counsel of the United States and
taking their views thereon, I regret to say that I am constrained to adhere to the
proposal contained in my letter of the 10th instant.
Very truly,
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTEE.
No. 32,
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 14.)
My Lord, Paris, April 13,1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, the President opened the sitting by announcing
the decisions of the Tribunal on the two questions which were brought before it last
week. I have already forwarded copies of these decisions to your Lordship in my
despatch of yesterday.*
In accordance with the arrangement agreed upon between the Counsel on both
sides, which was explained to the Tribunal by Sir Charles Eussell, as reported at p. 195
of the shorthand notes, Mr. Carter proceeded to open the case on behalf of the United
States' Government.
He commenced by stating that he would lay before the Tribunal a sketch of the
controversy from the beginning, before entering upon a discussion of the particular
questions which bad arisen.
Mr. Carter had brought his exhaustive summary of the various steps of the
controversy down to the negotiations in January 1890, when the hour of adjournment
arrived.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE. II
20
I;
No. 33.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, April 15, 1893.
I HAVE received your despatches of the llth and 12th instant, relative to
the proposal made by Mr. Foster that the arrangement for joint shorthand reports of
the proceedings before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal shall be abandoned.
In reply, I have to express to you my approval of the view you have taken of this
matter, and of the course you propose to pursue in continuing to employ the shorthand
writers and printers on behalf of Her Majesty's Government.
I shall be glad to receive from you an estimate of the cost of the staff of reporters,
and of printing the reports.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 34.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 15.)
My Lord, Paris, April 14, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr. Carter continued his preliminary sketch of the
various steps in the negotiations, and brought this part of his address to a conclusion
shortly before the hour of adjournment arrived.
While generally confining himself to a recital or summary of the   various
documents, he made some remarks and   criticisms   on   the
in some of the more important despatches.
Having   concluded   his   preliminary   sketch,   Mr.
address the Tribunal on the law which
and was only able to make slight progress
the Tribunal adjourned.
arguments
contained
sketch,
should
this
in
Carter   then   proceeded   to
it   in   its   deliberations,
branch of his subject before
govern
I have,
(Signed)
&c.
CHAELES
H. TUPPEE,
No. 35.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 17.)
My Lord, Paris, April 16, 1893.
AT the meeting of the 14th instant, Mr. Carter continued his observations on the
law which should govern the Tribunal in its.decision. The knowledge of this law was,
he said, to be derived from the actual practice and usages of nations and from the law
of nature, which latter he argued was best illustrated by municipal law.
Having concluded this portion of his address, he entered upon the consideration
of the rights claimed by Eussia over the regions about Behring Sea, and the rights
which the United States might have derived from the Act of Cession of the territory
of Alaska.
The general purport of his argument was that Eussia was intent on securing to
her own subjects the valuable fur-seal industry, and that by the Ukase of 1821,-she
did not claim the waters of those regions as mare clausum, but merely enacted a
protective regulation for the purpose of preserving that industry.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE. 21
No. 36.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 20.)
My Lord, Paris, April IS, 18M.
k ,_J „Mf;-^ the n?nour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
of the first two meetings of the Arbitration Tribunal.
A copy of the first Protocol has already been forwarded to your Lordship in my
despatch of the 24th February, but the original and the official printed copies
have only been issued this day.
Some delay has occurred in the completion of these documents, owing to
deficiencies m the organization of the Secretariat of the Tribunal.
The remaining Protocols will, however, be issued very shortly.
I have retained the two original signed Protocols, of which the copies are
transmitted herewith.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure in No. 36.
Protocole No. 2.—Seance du Jeudi, 23 Mars, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a Paris, comme il avait 6te convenu, dans l'H6tel du
Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres de France.
Etaient presents les sept membres du Tribunal Arbitral:
L'Honorable John M. Harlan, Juge de la Cour Supreme des Etats-Unis,
Et l'Honorable John T. Morgan, Senateur des Etats-Unis, Arbitres designes par
les Etats-Unis;
Son Excellence le Baron Alphonse de Courcel, Senateur Francais, Arbitre design^
par la France;
Le Tres Honorable Lord Hannen, Pair d'Angleterre, siegeant a la Cour Supreme
d'Appel,
Et Sir John Thompson, Ministre de la Justice du Dominion de Canada, Arbitres
designes par la Grande-Bretagne;
Son Excellence le Marquis Emilio Visconti Venosta, Senateur Italien, Arbitre
designe par l'ltalie,
Et son Excellence M. Gregers Gram, Arbitre designe par la Suede et Norvege.
L'Honorable John W. Foster et l'Honorable Charles H. Tupper, Ministre de la
Marine et des Pecheries du Dominion de Canada, assistent a la seance comme Agents
des Gouvernements des Etats-Unis et de la Grande-Bretagne.
Les membres du Tribunal Arbitral s'assurent que leurs pouvoirs respectifs sont en
bonne et valable forme.
Lord Hannen, I'un des Arbitres designes par la Grande-Bretagne, se leve pour
proposer que M. le Baron de Courcel, Arbitre design^ par la France, soit pri6 par ses
collegues de prendre la Presidence du Tribunal.
L'Honorable J. Harlan, l'un des Arbitre3 designes par les Etats-Unis, appuie la
proposition de Lord Hannen.
Les autres membres du Tribunal Arbitral ayant acquiesce a la proposition, M. le
Baron de Courcel prend place au fauteuil de la Presidence et prononce les paroles
suivantes:
Messieurs, , .
Vous me faites benelicier de l'usage courtois qui, dans les reunions dun caractereinternational,
attribue au Reprisentant du pays on elles siegent la Presidence de leurs travaux. Je vous en
remercie pour mon pays et pour moi-meme. t
Lorsque les Gouvernements de la Grande-Bretagne et des Etats-Unis dAmerique ont decide
de terminer par les voies amiables d'un arbitrage le litige dej'a ancien des pecheries de Behring, et
lorsqn'ils ont choisi Paris pour siege du Tribunal Arbitral institue" en vertu de leurs accords, ite ont
fait a la France et a sa capitale un honneur insigne. J'ose dire que l'une et l'autre en 4taient
dignes. u
SI":
22
Nulle part assurement vous ne sauriez trouver 1'atmosphere d'un plus sincere, d'une plus
chaleureuse sympathie pour l'oeuvre grande et bonne que vous etes charges de poursuivre. A
travers les chocs et les epreuves qu'inflige irjivitablement a tous les hommes la dure realite des
choses, la France est demeuree une nation obstinement idealiste; toute conception genereuse la touche
et l'entraine; elle est passionnee pour la cause du progres dans l'humanite. Or quel but plus ideal
quel progres plus noble et plus digne de recherche que la disparition graduelle des recours a la
force brutale entre les peuples de la terre? La procedure arbitrale y-vise, et chaque arbitrage
nouveau nous en rapproche, en fournissant une preuve de plus de la possibility materielle de ce
qui, hier encore, n'apparaissait que comme un r§ve.
II y a quel'ques annees, les Arbitres convoques a Geneve, par l'autorite pacifique d'une. sentence
que deux fieres et puissantes nations s'etaient engages d'avance a accepter, mettaient heureuse-
ment fin a une discussion qui semblait n'avoir d'autre issue possible que la guerre. L'arbitrage de
l'Alabama fait epoque dans l'histoire des relations internationales: on peut dire qu'il a rajeuni
l'antique droit des gens, et qu'il iui a ouvert une ere nouvelle, avec la perspective d'une action
indefiniment bienfaisante. Les deux nations qui se sont soumises au verdict de Geneve, malgre"
des sacrifices qui, dans les premiers moments, ont pu couter a l'une et a "l'autre, ne se sont pas
repenties a la longue de leur appel a la force purement morale, puisqu'elles-memes le renouvellent
anjourd'hui, d'un commun accord, dans dss circonstances analogues.
Le proces qui va se plaider devant vous n'est point de ceux, il.est vrai, qui, selon l'apparence,
pouvaient dechainer le redoutable fleau de la guerre. Mais, en dehors de cette extremity fatale,
coinbien de maux ne causent point aux peuples un refroidissement- durable et la persistence de
sentiments amers! Ooft&iie les individus, les nations se doivent la charite ; et Jorsque, cedant aux
conseils de l'orgueil, elles manquent a la loi providentielle, elles se condamnent elles-m6m.es a bien
des souffrances. Si les conciliations de l'arbitrage n'avaient d'autre effet que de les preserver de
ce peril, elles feraient encore aux peuples un bien incalculable, et serviraient tres utilement la
fraternity humaine.
Votre presence dans cette salle, Messieurs, est le plus eloquent temoignage du prix qui
s'attache a la decision attendue de vous. L'Angleterre, de tout temps si fecondc en eminents
jurisconsultes, les Etats-Unis, le Canada, qui continuent a leur tour, dans le nouveau monde, une
tradition dont l'origine atavique doit etre cherche'e peut-etre sur notre vieux sol Normand, ont
depute ici des personnages dont la science et la rare perspicacity ont 6t6 eprouv^es dans les
hautes et les plus dedicates fonctions de la magistrature., ou dans les discussion d'assemblees
politiques renommees pour leur prudence. A cote d'eux, je vois singer un homme d'Etat,
sage heritier de l'illustre Cavour, et dont la diplomatic Europeenne, aux conseils de laquelle
il manque n'a pa3 cesse de regretter la retraite premature^ et volontaire. Un autre de nos
collegues, venu du Nord Scandinave, et que sa reputation a devanc^ ici, occupait naguere dans sa
patrie, 1'un des postes les plus eleves que puisse conferer la juste confiance du Souverain de deux
Royauines jumeaux, egalement jaloux de leur individuahte.
A votre barre se pr^sentent, au nom des deux Grandes Puissances qui vous ont remis le
reglement de leur cause, des hommes politiques de premier ordre. L'un d'eux di?igeait hier U s
relations internationales de la grande Republique AmeVicaine.
lis sont assistes de Conseils habitues a briller au premier rang, tantot au barreau, tantot dans
le Goxxvernement de leur pays, et que l'admiration de leurs concitoyens, de chaque cote" de l'Atlan-
tique, salue du titre de princes de l'eloquence.
C'es't un honneur qui suffit a illudirer une existence entiere que d'etre appele" a singer pres de
pareils hommes. La responsabilite' de les presider serait bien efirayante, si ceiw. de leurs collegues
qu'ils ont charge" de cette tache ne devait compter sur leur indulgent et infajllible appui.
Puisse la Divine Providence, de qui relevent toutes les actions des hommes, nous donner la
force et nous inspirer la sagesse necessaire pour accomplir notre diflScile mission, et pour marquer
ainsi une 6tape vers la realisation de la parole pleine de consolation et d'espoir de Celui qui a dit:
" Bienheureux les pacifiques, car la terre leur appartiendra."
Messieurs, je crois etre l'mterprete de votre pensee a tous en vous proposant d'interrompre ici
notre seance, afinde porter a M. le President de la Republique Francaise, avec l'hommage de nos
respects, l'expression de notre gratitude pour Thospitalite que nous recevons de la France.
Rii
:Sar la proposition ;du President, M. A. Imbert, Ministre Plenipotentiaire de
France, est designe comme Secretaii e du Tribunal Arbitral. M. le Baron de Courcel
ialvitc eusuite les Arbitres Anglais et Ameri'eains a designer, pour chacune des deux
nationalites, un Secretaire qui serait adjoint au Secretaire du Tribunal. 11 est convenu
que cette designation aura lieu a la prochaine seance.
Le Tribunal fixe les jours et heures de ses seances.
Conformement aux stipulations du Traite de Washington du 29 Fevrier, 1S92
les Agents des Gouvernements des Etats-Unis et de la Grande-Bretagne deposent
devant le Tribunal les Arguments imprimis de leurs Gouvernements respectifs.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis ayant signale que, par suite d'une erreur accidentelle
commise a l'impression, il existait une omission dans les citations jointes en appendice
a l'Argument des Etats-Unis, autorisation lui a ete donnee de diposer ulterieurement
comme annexe a l'Argument, un supplement contenant les citations omises, sous-
reserve du 4»oit pour le Gouverament Britannique de pjjesenter une Teplique a ces
citations, s'il le jugeait opportun.
55^af-^
—>l 23
Les Agents des deux Gouvernements ont annonce qu'ils avaient pris, de commun
TriWl arFan^ments   P°ur   **•   stenographier1 chaque join les  debars   du
r1nrniIr1ltfl0d^i^qUe [e ?u}lic ™™ admis aux 9MMl sur la presentation de cartes
nominatives delivrees par le Secretaire du Tribunal.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 23 Mars, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President .. '     ..        .. ALPH. DE COUEOEL.
ii Agent des Etats-Unis      ..        .. JOHN W. FOSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .. CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire   A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 2.—Meeting of Thursday, March 23, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at Paris, as had been agreed, at the French Ministry for
Foreign Affairs.
There were present the seven members of the Tribunal of Arbitration:
The Honourable John M. Harlan, Justice of the Supreme Court of the United
States,
And the Honourable John T. Morgan, Senator of the United States, the Arbitrators named by the United States;
His Excellency the Baron Alphonse de Courcel, Senator of France, the Arbitrator
named by France;
The Eight Honourable Lord Hannen, Lord of Appeal,
And Sir John Thompson, Minister of Justice for the Dominion of Canada, the
Arbitrators named by Great Britain;
His Excellency the Marquis E. Visconti Venosta, Senator of Italy, the Arbitrator
named by Italy ;
And his Excellency M. Gregers Gram, the Arbitrator named by Sweden and
Norway;
The Honourable John W. Foster and the Honourable Charles H. Tupper, Minister
of Marine and Fisheries for the Dominion of Canada, were present at the meeting as
Agents for the Governments of the United States and Great Britain.
The members of the Tribunal of Arbitration assured themselves that their
respective powers were in due and valid form.
Lord Hannen, one of the Arbitrators named by Great Britain, rose to propose
that his Excellency the Baron de Courcel, the Arbitrator named by France, should be
requested by his colleagues to assume the Presidency of the Tribunal.
The Honourable John M. Harlan, one of the Arbitrators named by the United
States, supported the proposal of Lord Hannen.
The other members of the Tribunal of Arbitration having agreed to the proposal,
Baron de Courcel took the chair as President, and delivered the following address;
Gentlemen,
You have been pleased to exercise in my favour that courteous usage which, in proceedings
of an international character, confers the Presidency upon the Representative of the cotuj^iy xn
which the meeting is held.
The Governments of Great Britain and the United States of America have determined to end
the long-standing dispute concerning the Behring fisheries by a friendly arbitration, and in
choosing Paris for the seat of it, they have paid a distinguished compliment to France and to her
capital city.
I venture to say that both are worthy of it.
Nowhere, be sure, would you have foimd yourselves surrounded by a more sinoere and warm
sympathy with the great and good work which you are charged to carry out. Through all the
shocks and trials which the hard necessity of events inflicts upon mankind, France has remained
steadfast to ideals. Every generous conception moves and captivates her. She has a passion for
the cause of human progress. And what aim can be more ideal, what progress more noble and
Worthy of attainment than the gradual disappearance from among the people of the earth of a
recourse to brute force,
If
ii 24
I M
This is the aim of procedure by arbitration, and each new recourse to it brings us nearer t
that end, by furnishing another proof of the actual possibility of that which, even yesterday
seemed but a dream.
Some years ago, by the peaceful authority of a decision which two proud and powerful nations
had previously agreed to accept, the Arbitrators assembled at Geneva put a happy end to a
dispute which it seemed at one time could only terminate in war.
The Geneva Arbitration was an epoch in international relations. It may be said to have
revived the old law of nations, and opened to it a new era with a boundless prospect of beneficent consequences.
The two nations which submitted to the Geneva verdict, in spite of the sacrifices which at
first it seemed to involve, have evidently not in the long run repented of their appeal to moral
force, for to-day they renew that appeal by common consent, in analogous circumstances. It is
true that the cause that is to be pleaded before us is not one which apparently would let loose the
scourge of war; but, short of war, how many evils are caused to nations by lasting coldness and
by the persistence of bitter sentiments. Like individuals, nations owe a duty to charity, and
when yielding to pride they fail to obey the laws of Providence, they inflict upon themselves
many sufferings.
If arbitrations had no other effect than to preserve them from this peril, they would be an
incalculable blessing and service to the brotherhood of humanity.
Your presence in this room, Gentlemen, is the most eloquent evidence of the value which
attaches to your expected decision.
England, from all time so rich in eminent jurists, America and Canada, who hand down in
their turn, and in a new world, a tradition whose ancestral origin may, perhaps, be sought in our
old Norman soil, have delegated men whose knowledge and rare penetration have been applied in
the highest and most delicate functions in the magistracy or in the discussions of political assemblies whose prudence was renowned.
Beside them I see a politician, a wise heir of the illustrious Cavour, whose premature and
voluntary retreat from European diplomacy has been the subject of deep regret.
Another of our colleagues from North Scandinavia, whose reputation has preceded him, has
occupied one of the highest positions which could be conferred upon him by the just confidence of
the Sovereign of two Twin Kingdoms, each equally jealous of its individuality.
At your bar, to represent the two great Powers who have confided their cause to you, appear
politicians of the first order. One of them only lately guided the foreign relations of the great
American Republic. They are assisted by Counsel accustomed to occupy the front rank, either at
the bar, or in the government of their country, and whom the admiration of their countrymen on
each side of the Atlantic hails as princes of eloquence.
It is an honour sufficient to dignify an entire life to be asked to sit with men like these, and
the responsibility of presiding among them would be overwhelming if he whom his colleagues
have charged with this duty could not count on their unvarying and indulgent support.
May Divine Providence, on whom depends all human action, give us the strength and inspire
us with the wisdom necessary to fulfil our difficult mission, and thus to advance a stage nearer to
the realization of the words of consolation and hope of Him who has said, | Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shaU inherit the earth."
Gentlemen, I trust that I represent your wishes in proposing to you to break up our present
meeting, in order to convey our respects to the President of the French Republic, together with
an expression of our gratitude for the hospitality which we are receiving from France.
On the proposal of the President, M. A. Imbert, a Minister Plenipotentiary of
France, was named Secretary to the Tribunal of Arbitration. Baron de Courcel then
invited the English and American Arbitrators to name, for their respective nationalities,
a Secretary to be associated with the Secretary of the Tribunal. It was agreed that
this appointment should be made at the next meeting.
The Tribunal fixed the days and hours of its meetings.
In conformity with the stipulations of the Treaty of Washington of the 29th
February, 1892, the Agents of the Governments of the United States and Great
Britain laid before the Tribunal the printed Arguments of their respective Governments.
The Agent of the United States having intimated that, owing to an oversight in
printing, there was an omission in the appendices of authorities cited in the Argument
of the United States, he was authorized to present at a later date, as an appendice to
the Argument, a supplement containing the citations omitted, with the reserve of the
right, on the part of the British Government, to present a reply to the citations, should
they deem it to be necessary.
The Agents of the respective Governments stated that they had agreed to arrange
for taking shorthand reports of the daily proceedings.
It was announced that the proceedings were now public, and admission to the"
discussions would be upon the presentation of cards of admission to be issued by the
Secretary of the Tribunal. 25
The Tribunal of Arbitration adjourned till the 4th April next
Done at Paris, the 23rd March, 1893/and signed:
The President  ALPH. DE~ COUECEL.
Ilie Agent for the United States.. JOHN W. FOSTER
The Agent for Great Britain       .. CHAELES H. TUPPEE
The Secretary          A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchaud, 1 ri   „
H. Cunynghame, J C°-Secr Varies.
No. 37.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 20.)
M^ L™*> A Paris, April 18, 1893.
W11H reterence to your Lordship's despatch of the loth instant and previous
correspondence, I have the honour to transmit to your Lordship a copy of a statement
handed to me to-day by Mr. Foster, containing an explanation of his reasons for
withdrawing from the arrangement for a joint shorthand report of tbe proceedings
before the Tribunal.
Mr. Foster said that his motives in declining, on the part of the United States, to
be a party to the arrangement any longer, had been misrepresented in the London
press, and that he had therefore laid this statement before the Members of the
Tribunal.
(Signed)
I have, &c.
CHAELES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure in No. 37.
Statement by Mr. Foster. ;.;
IN view of certain misleading statements in the London newspapers, the Agent of
the United States desires to inform the Arbitrators of the reasons given by him to tho
British Agent for his action in withdrawing from the joint arrangement for a daily
shorthand report of the proceedings of the Tribunal. Under date of the 10th instant,
he informed the British Agent, in view of the experience then had, th&t the main
object of the arrangement, namely, to lay before the Arbitrators the argument of
Counsel early on the dav following their delivery, had failed; that the Counsel of the
United States had found the reports of the Arguments, as printed, so far from correct
as to make them in great measure useless, and that the burden imposed on them of
revision was an intolerable tax upon their time. The report of the first week's
argument (April 4 th to 7th) had not been revised and put into intelligible shape
before the motion upon which they had been made had been definitely decided by the
Tribunal; and they have not, in fact, Up to this date been laid before the Tribunal.
As no change in the existing arrangements was proposed by the British Agent,
the Agent and Counsel of the United States felt it their duty to withdraw therefrom.
The question of expense did not enter into the consideration of the subject.
April 18, 1893.
[691]
E 26
No. 38,
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received April 21.)
My 3|ord, Paris, April 20, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr, Carter continued his argument on the
question of the alleged property interest of the United States in the fur-seals.,
His remarks were in the main directed to an examination of the question as to
what constitutes property, and what are the rights and responsibilities of those in whom
the property is vested. He had not concluded this portion of his argument when the
Tribunal adjourned.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPER.
No. 39.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.-^ (Received April 22.)
My fjord, Paris, April 21, 1893.
AT yesterday's meeting, Mr. Carter continued his argument on the alleged
property right of the United States in the fur-seals. He proceeded to apply the
principles of property which he had enumerated on the previous day to the case
of the seals, and for this purpose entered at some length into the question of
their habits, their management by the United States on the islands, and their
capture both on land and by pelagic sealing.
He criticised the Report of the British Commissoners at some length, and claimed
that owing to its biassed character, the opinions expressed by them should be discarded
by 'the Tribunal.
He had not concluded this portion of his argument when the Tribunal adjourned.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 40.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 1.)
My Lord, Paris, April 24, 1893.
AT the meeting of the 21st instant, Mr. Carter continued his argument on the
claim of the United States to property in the fur-seals.
He concluded the first head of this subject, which deals with the claim to property
in the animals themselves, and then proceeded to argue that the United States had
also a property interest in, and right of protection of, the industry carried on at the
Seal Islands.
He had not finished his observations on this point when the Tribunal rose.
I I-have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 41.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—{Received May 1.)
My Lord, par^ April 2^ 1893.
I EEGEET to inform your Lordship that, owing to an attack of influenza, Lord
Hannen was unable to attend the Tribunal of Arbitration to-day. 2T
dat^^i^^ ■**" k °f °^i0n thafc ^ 11 * ™«e to resume I i
shouh? Xn™erff<?? mecid?d b{Tthe P^sident, Baron de Courcel, that the Tribunal
hZL^SuS Un*a.Trda7' the,2ncI Ma*' ^ which (tate I is Wed that Lord
Hannen will be sufficiently recovered to resume his attendance at the meetings.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPEE,
No. 42.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 3.)
My Lord, PariS} May 2> 1393.
\ ^AY^ t1^ honous to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
JNos. 3, 4, and 5 of the proceedings before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TtTPPEE.
Incisure 1 in No. 42.
Protocole No. 3.—Seance du Mardi, 4 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heares 45^ tou» ks Arbitres &imt presents.
Le President annonce que k Tribunal a decide la nomination de M. A BaiHy-
Blanchard et de M. Cunynghame,, e$m<me Secretaires du Tribunal, conjointement avec
M. A. Imbert.
Et 4galement eelle de M. le Chevafee Bajnotti, de M. Henri Feer, efcide M. le
Vicomte de Mannevil'lfe, comme' Secretaires Adjoints.
Le Rre'sidmt annonce que le Tribunal esit pret a entendre toute motion que portrait
pf*3sentej l'une ou. Faaitre des patties.
Sir Charles Russell prend la parole et terndane sa plaidoirie en presentant la motion
s#vante :*•—
" Que l'Agent des Etats-Uiftis soit invite a p-roduire l'original ou- toe copie certiflee
du Rapport fait par Henry W. Elliott au sujet des phoques a fourrure ©onfiormement 'a-
l'Acte du Congres de 1890."
Sir Richard Webster parle dans le meme sens.
L'Honorable E. J. Phelps replique et presente la reponse Sudtant© a la motion :—
" Le Giomvernemient des Etats-Unis se refuse a adrriettre qpte le Gouvernement de
Sa Majesfce Britannique soit autorise- en droit, d'apres les dispositions du Traite, a
obtefflpf'ctoi Tribanal un ordre pour la production du document vM par la motion de
Sir Charles Bussed
" Toutefois, le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis est dispose^ en ce qui le concerne, a
ne pas user du droit qu'il aurait d'elever cette objection et a fournir a l'Agent du
Gouvernement de Sa Majeste-une eopiedu document en question, a telles fins de preuve
que le Tribunal jugera a propos d'autoriser.
" Neanmoins, cette facon de proceder n'implique pas, de la part du Gouvernement
des Etats-Unis, l'acquiescement a ce qra'aracKne- «ias) deux parties, a ce moment ou a
toute autre epoque de la procedure, ait le droit de presenter aucun autre moyen de
preuve, quel qu'il soit, sur un sujet quclconque se rattaeha^t ^.la controversy
" Le meme Gouvernement stipule en outre que, s'il est fait un usage quelconque
du document auquel se rapporte cette motion, comme moyen de preuve, chacune des
deux parties aura usa daroit egal a Ihatfiliser 'en tous les points qu'il contient."
Mr. Carter s'exprime ensudte dans le meme sens*
Le Tribunal suspend alorS sa s^ancex-
A la reprise de la seance, le President Md&ve ce «p*i J$wfc :—
" Le Tribunal ordonne que le susdit document sera consider^ dtfmine1 ^tant- devant
le Tribunal pour qu'il en soit fait tel usage que le Tribunal jugera convenable.
[691J E 2 28,
Ii
L'Agent des Etats-Unis donne alors lecture des motions suivantes :—
" 1. L'Agent des Etats-Unis desire appeler l'attention du Tribunal d'Arbitrage
sur le fait que l'Agent de Sa Majeste Britannique a porte a sa connaissance, par une
lettre en date du 25 Mars dernier, qu'il avait envoye a chacun des membres du
Tribunal des copies en duplicata d'un 'Eapport Supplementaire des Commissaires
Britanniques designes pour faire une enquete sur les phoques de la Mer de Behring.'
| L'Agent des Etats-Unis, en raison de cette information, demande a l'honorable
Tribunal que le document dont il s'agit ne soit pas pris en consideration et qu'il soit
retourne' a l'Agent de Sa Majeste, par le motif qu'il est presente a un moment et dans
une forme que n'autorise pas le Traite.
" 2. L'Agent des Etats-Unis demande a l'honorable Tribunal d'exclure de 1'Arbitrage ce qui, dans la demande du Gouvernement de la Grande-Bretagne, a trait a, la
S3nime mentionnC'e a la page 315 du Contre-Memoire du dit Gouvernement, comme
ayant ete depensee pour frais occasionnes par la procedure devant la Cour Supreme
des Etats-Unis;
1 Et d'exclure aussi de PArbitrage la reclamation et requete du m^me Gouvernement qui figurent a la dite page 315, tendant a ce que les Arbitres 6tablissent quelle
prise ou quelles prises auraient pu etre effectuees par les chasseurs pelagiques dans la
Mer de Behring sans indue diminution du troupeau de phoques pendant la duree de cet
Arbitrage;
" Et, de plus, d'exclure de l'Arbitrage la reclamation du meme Gouvernement,
mentionnee a ladite page 315, en vue d'etre autorise- a £tablir les payements faits par
lui aux proprie*taires Canadiens de batiments employes a la chasse des phoques ;
" Et que toutes preuves ou tous temoignages ayant trait aux susdites reclamations
ou questions, ou a l'une d'elles, soient rayes du Contre-Memoire Britannique, et, en
particulier, les preuves ou temoignages se trouvant aux pages.215 a 229 inclusive-
ment du Tome ii de l'Appendice audit Contre-Memoire.
1 Le fondement de la motion ou des motions qui precedent est que les reclamations et questions susmentionnees sont, ensemble ou chacune d'elles en particulier,
presentees pour la premiere fois dans le Contre-Memoire du Gouvernement de la
Grande-Bretagne et qu'aucune d'elles, ensemble ou en particulier, ne se rapporte, ni
ne se refere, par voie de replique, soit au Memoire des Etats-Unis, soit a quoi que ce
soit qu'il contienne, si ce n'est en ce qu'elles tendent a soutenir des reclamations en
dommages-interets presentees expressement dans le Memoire original du Gouvernement de la Grande-Bretagne, et que, en tant qu'elles tombent sous cette definition,
lesdites demandes sont irregulieres comme faisant double emploi."
Le President ayant fait observer qu'il conviendrait d'examiner separement les
motions et de renvoyer a une penode^ ulterieure de la procedure la discussion de la
seconde motion presentee au nom des Etats-Unis,
L'Honorable E. J. Phelps developpe devant le Tribunal les arguments a l'appui
de la premiere motion, celle qui est relative au Eapport Supplementaire des Commissaires Britanniques.
A 4 heures, la stance est lev6e et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 4 Avril, 1893, et ont signe \
Le President I     ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire  A.. TMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol Nd. 34—Meeting of Tuesday, April 4,1893.
At ll*45 the Tribunal assembled, all the Arbitrators being present.
The President announced that the Tribunal had decided to appoint Mr. A. Bailly-
Blanchard and Mr. Cunynghame as co-Secretaries with M. Imbert.
Also, M. le Chevalier Bajnotti, M. Henri Feer, and M. le Vicomte de Mahneville
as Assistant Secretaries. 29.
be
its
ne President announced that the Tribunal was ready to hear any motion by either
of the parties. J J olu"Vi
Sir Charles Russell then spoke, and at the close of his speech he submitted the
following motion:—
" That the Agent of the United States be called upon to produce the original or a
certified copy of the Eeport made by Henry W. Elliott on the subject of fur-seals
pursuant to Act of Congress of 1890."
Sir Richard Webster supported the motion.
The Honourable E. J. Phelps replied and submitted the following answer to the
motion:— °
"The United States' Government denies that Her Britannic Majesty's Government is entitled, under the provisions of the Treaty, to any order bv the Tribunal for
the production of the document specified in the motion, as a matter of right.
' The United States' Government, however, is willing to waive (so far as it is
concerned) its right of objection, and to furnish to the Agent of Her Majesty's
Government a copy of the document referred to, for such use as evidence as the
Tribunal may deem proper to allow.
Not conceding, however, in so doing, that either party at this or any subsequent
stage of the proceedings has a right to introduce any further evidence whatever, upon
any subject whatever, connected with the controversy.
"And further stipulating that if the document referred to in this motion shall
used in evidence at all, it shall be open to the use of both parties' equally in all
points."
Mr. James C. Carter followed in support of the answer.
The Court adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, the President said:—
" The Tribunal directs that the above-named document be regarded as before the
Tribunal to be made such use of as the Tribunal thinks fit."
The Agent for the United States then read the following motions:—
"1. The Agent of the United States desires to bring to the attention of the
Tribunal of Arbitration the fact that he has been informed by the Agent of Her
Britannic Majesty, in a note dated the k5th ultimo, that he has sent to each of the
members of the Tribunal copies in duplicate of a ' Supplementary Eeport of the British'
Commissioners appointed to inquire into seal life in Behring Sea.'
" The Agent of the United States, in view of this information, moves this
honourable Tribunal that the document referred to be dismissed from consideration
and be returned to Her Majesty's Agent, on the ground that it is submitted at a time
and in a manner not allowed by the Treaty.
" 2. The Agent of the United States moves this honourable Tribunal to dismiss
from the Arbitration so much of the demand of the Government of Great Britain as
relates to the sum stated upon p. 315 of the Counter-Case of the said Government to
have been incurred on account of expenses in connection with proceedings before the
Supreme Court of the United States ;
i And, also, to dismiss from the Arbitration the claim and request of the same
Government, mentioned on said p. 315, that the Arbitrators find what catch or catches
might have been taken by pelagic sealers in Behring Sea without undue diminution of
the seal herd during the pendency of this Arbitration ;
| And, further, to dismiss from the Arbitration the claim of the same Government, mentioned on the said p. 315, to show payments by it to the Canadian owners
of sealing-vessels;
" And that all proofs or evidence relating to the foregoing claims or matters, or
either of them, be stricken from the British Counter-Case, and in particular those
found on pp. 215 to 229 inclusive, of Vol. ii of the Appendix to said Counter-Case.
" The ground of the foregoing motion or motions is that the claims and matters
aforesaid are, and each of them is, presented for the first time in the Counter-Case of
the Government of Great Britain, and that they are not, nor is either of them,
pertinent or relevant by way of reply to the Case of the United States or to anything
contained therein, except so far as the same may tend to support claims for damages
distinctly made in the original Case of the Government of Great Britain, and that so
far as they come under that head the matters are irregular as being cumulative only."
The President having remarked that the motions should be considered separately,
and that the discussion upon the second motion brought forward by the United States,
should be postponed to a subsequent period of the proceedings, the Honourable E. J.
•t#*i**H;p.. i 30
*;«
Phelps addife&sed the Court in support of the first motion relative to the Supplementary
Eeport of the British Commissioners.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 1V30.
Done at Paris, the 4th April, 1893, and signed :
The President
ALPH. DE COUECEL,
The Agent for the United States ..    JOHH W. FOSTER.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..        ..
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBERT.
Translation, certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. BAiLiY-RiiAffCHAKD
H.  CUNYNGHAMB,
"}
Co-Secretaries.
.!
tt ':
i vi ;
r
Inclosure 2 in No. 42.
Protocole No. 4.—Seancedu Mereredi, 5 Avril, 1893,
LE Tribunal s'esi oakmi a 11 heures 45, tous les membres etant preseaisi./
L'Honorable E. J. Phelps continue et achkve son argumentation de la veille.
Mr. James C. Carter declare qu'il n'a aucune observation a aj ouster.-1
Sir Charles Russell s'oppose a la motion en discussion, en se fondant sur les
arguments suivants:—
| Que le Rapport Supplementaire. des Commissaires Britanniqiaes, en date du
31 Janvier, 1893, n'est presente qu'en ce qui concerne la question des Reglements, et
que, d'apres les dispositions du Traite d'Arbitrage du 29 Fevrier, 1892, e'est avec^son
qu'il est ainsi soumis au Tribunal^ lequel aura a l'examiner a ce poin/t de v«e, au cas ou
il- seiait appele a decider, en vertu de l'Article 7, la qtnestion de savoir s'il y a lieu de
faire des Reglements communs, et, dans 1'affirmative, quels! <devraient etre eeg Regle-
menta?? •
Le Tribunal suspend alors sa>&eance>
A la reprise* Sir Charles Russell continue.son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemaia, a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 5 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHAEliES H. TUPPF1R.
A. IMBEET.
„fT [English version.} ^fa
Protocol No. 4.—Meeting of Wednesday, April 5, 1893.
At.jQ'45 a.m. the Tribunal assembled, all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable E. J. Phelps continued his speech of the previous day and
concluded his argument.
Mr. James C. Carter announced that he had no additional remarks to offer!
Sir Charles Russell opposed the motion under discussion on the folTowina
grounds:—
"That the Supplementary Report of the British Commissioners, dated the
31st January, 1893, is presented solely with reference to the question of Regulations-,,
aikd, under the provisions of the Treaty of Arbitration of the 29th February, 1892, is
properly presented to the Tribunal, and so should be considered by them in the event
of their being calledj upon to determine, pursuant to Article 7, wha€*+if amy,,
concurrent Regulations are necessary."
The Tribunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument. 31
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11'30
So done at Paris, the 5th April, 1893, anff signed:
The President
3?he Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER,
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A.   BAILLY-BliANCHARD,
H.  CUNYNGHAME,
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 3 in No. 42.
Protocole No. 5.—-Seance du Jeudi, 6 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a midi et demi, tous les Arbitres e'tant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend et ach&ve son discours d.e la veille.
Sir Richard  Webster declare  qu'il n'a rien   a   ajouter   aux   observations   do
Sir Charles Russell.
Mr. James C. Carter prend la parole pour soutenir la motion presentee au nom de3
Etats-Unis.
A 1 heure et demie le Tribunal suspend sa seance.
A la reprise, Mr. James C. Carter continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures la stance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain, a 11 heures
et demie.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 6 Avril, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     .T"      ..    JOHN'W: FOSTERS
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire ..        ..        ..    A. IMBERT.
[English version.] ?,H
Protocol No. 5.—Meeting of Thursday, ^lpn7-6,-1893.'
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his speech of the previous day and concluded his
argument.
Sir Richard  Webster said that he had nothing to add to Sir Charles Russell s
remarks.
Mr. James C.  Carter replied in support of the motion made on behalf of the
United States. . .   ■-:.. ——
~~At*T30 the^nbunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, Mr. James C. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11-30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 6th April, 1893, and signed:
The President ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
The Agent for the United States ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
The Agent for Great Britain        ..    CJjJARLES H. TUPPER.:'
The Secretary ..        ..        ..    A. IMBERT.   ,
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, \ Co_Secretaries.
H> CtTNYNGHAME, J
mataani
U Pi
1
il
1 -i:   .
!| j
32
No. 43.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 4.)
My Lord, Paris, May 3, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, Mr. Carter continued his argument,
claiming for the United States the right to employ force upon the high seas for the
defence of its property interest in the ,fur-seals and in the industry of the seal islands.
Having brought his observations on this point to a close, Mr. Carter proceeded to
discuss the question of regulations.
This course was followed in accordance with an arrangement arrived at by
the Counsel on both sides, whereby each party should be at liberty to present its arguments on the legal questions and .regulations separately.
A discussion arose on this question, which your Lordship will find reported on
pp. 525-528 ot the shorthand notes.
Mr. Carter maintained that the regulations to be made by the Tribunal should
not be confined to Behring Sea, but should extend outside that area wherever necessity
required them.
The United States, he said, had no regulations to propose save one, namely, the
total prohibition of the killing of all seals anywhere on the high seas. After a detailed
criticism of the scheme of regulations proposed by the British Commissioners,
Mr. Carter brought his long speech to a conclusion shortly before the hour of adjournment.
Mr. Coudert is to follow Mr. Carter on behalf of the United States at the next
meeting.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 44.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 5
■)
My Lord, Paris, May 4, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr. Coudert opened his speech, on behalf of the
United States, which he said would be mainly devoted to a statement of the facts
on which the argument of Mr. Carter depended. But before proceeding to a recital
of these facts, he wished to add something to what had been stated by Mr. Carter in
regard to the "self-defence" of the sealing industry.
His opening observations were therefore directed to this question, and he had not
concluded this portion of his subject when the Tribunal adjourned.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 45.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 6.)
My I***. Paris, May 5, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr. Coudert continued his speech, and after some
observations on the issues before the Tribunal proceeded to a detailed examination
of the facts connected with seal life, which he had not concluded when the hour of
adjournment arrived.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER. 33
No. 46.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 8.)
t ttavv u,   x. ii. . Paris, May 6,1893.
ivr     a w o      *«   t?™     transmit for your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
JNos. b, 7, 8, and 9 of the proceedings before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 46.
Protocole No. 6.—Seance du Vendredi, 7 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 40, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
VHonorable E. J. Phelps appelle l'attention du Tribunal sur certaines erreurs dans
le compte rendu stenographique.
Le President fait observer que les seuls comptes rendus officiels garantis par
l'autorite* du Tribunal sont les Protocoles; la responsabilite des notes des stenographes
incombe exclusivement aux Agents des deux Gouvernements.
Mr. James C. Carter reprend alors son argumentation pour les Etats-Unis.
Le Tribunal suspend sa seance a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. Carter continue et achkve sa plaidoirie.
Les Conseils des deux parties echangent alors, avec l'autorisation du President,
quelques explications complementaires sur des points se rattachant aux plaidoiries qui
viennent d'avoir lieu.
VHonorable E. J. Phelps ayant demande ensuite que Ton proc^dat a l'examen
de la seconde motion, le Tribunal declare qu'il fera connaitre ses intentions a ce sujet
dans la prochaine seance.
A 3 heures 50 la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne a Mardi pour une
reunion privee, la seance publique etant remise au Mercredi, 12 Avril, 1893.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 7 Avril, 1893, et ont signe":
Le President ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     .. ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne    ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
P
Le Secretaire..
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 6.—Meeting of Friday, April 7, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*40 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable E.J. Phelps called the attention of the Tribunal to certain errors
in the shorthand notes.
The President stated that the only official Minutes which were specially under the
authority of the Tribunal were the Protocols; the responsibility of the shorthand notes
rested exclusively with the Agents of the two Governments.
Mr. James C. Carter then continued his argument on behalf of the United States.
At 1'30 the Tribunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, Mr. Carter continued and concluded his argument.
The Counsel on both sides then exchanged, with the sanction of the President,
some supplementary explanations on points relevant to the arguments which had
previously taken place.
The Honourable E. J. Phelps having afterwards applied to have the second motion
considered, the Tribunal declared that it would announce its intentions on this subject
at the next meeting.
[691] *
i-**!--.***** 34
At 3-50 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to Tuesday for a private meeting, the public
meeting being postponed to Wednesday, the 12th April, 1893.
Done at Paris, the 7th April,. 1893, and signed :
The President
The Agent for the United States.
The Agent for Great Britain
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
The Secretary        A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H.  OUNYNGHAME,
'}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 2 in Ni). 46.
t&>
Protocole No. 7.—Seance du Mercredi, 12 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 40, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Le President donne lecture d'une decision du Tribunal ayant trait au " Rapport
Supplementaire des Commissaires de la Grande-Bretagne dans la Mer de Behring,"
Rapport date du 31 Janvier, 1893, et dont I'admissibilite a fait 1'objet de la discussion
qui a occupe" les pr£c6dentes seances.
Les termes de cette decision sont les suivants :—
| Le Tribunal decide de ne pas recevoir, quant a present, le document intitule:
' Rapport Supplementaire des Commissaires de la Grande-Bretagne dans la Mer de
Behring,' date du 31 Janvier, 1893, et sign£ de George Baden-Powell et George
M. Dawson, lequel a 6te remis aux Arbitres individuellement par l'Agent de la Grande-
Bretagne, le 25 Mars, 1893, et contient une critique des moyens de preuve produits
dans les pieces et documents pr6c6demment remis aux Arbitres, ou une argumentation
portant sur lesdits moyens de preuve.
" Toute liberte demeure n6anmoins r^servee aux repr^sentants de la partie
interessee de s'approprier ledit document, date du 31 Janvier, 1893, pour l'incorporer
a leurs plaidoiries, s'ils le jugent convenable.
"La question de I'admissibilite des pieces ou de quelques-unes d'entre elles
formant annexes audit document du 31 Janvier, 1893, est reservee a un examen
ulterieur, sans prejudice du droit pour les repr^sentants des deux parties de discuter la
question dont s'agit, ainsi que le contenu desdites annexes, au cours de leurs
plaidoiries."
Le President donne ensuite lecture d'une deuxieme decision du Tribunal. Cette
decision, qui se rapporte h, la demande presentee par l'Honorable E. J. Phelps, a la fin
de la preceaente seance, relativement a l'examen de la seconde motion des Etats-Unis,
est concue en ces termes :—
"Le Tribunal decide qu'il differera, jusqu'a tel moment qui sera par lui
ulterieurement indiqu6, d'entendre plaider et de prendre en consideration la motion
presentee, le 4 Avril, 1893, par les Etats-Unis d'Amerique, tendant a la radiation de
certains passages faisant partie du Contre-Memoire et des moyens de preuve du
Gouvernement de la Grande-Bretagne."
Le President exprime le desir du Tribunal de ne pas s'attarder a des discussions de
procedure et d'aborder le plus promptement possible le fond de la question.
II invite, en consequence, les Conseils a entrer immediatement en matiere.
Sir Charles Russell fait connaltre l'ordre dans lequel il a 6te convenu que les
Conseils pr£senteraient leur argumentation et ses indications sont confirmees par
Mr. James C. Carter.
Le President declare que le Tribunal agr6era la maniere de proceder arretee entre
les Conseils, mais il demande a ceux-ci de vouloir bien, autant que possible, dans leur
argumentation, traiter s£parement la discussion des points de droit et celle des
Ruements eventuels a in tervenir.
Mr, James C. Carter, apres avoir remercie' la France de son accueil hospitalier,
commence son plaidoyer pour les Etats-Unis.
Le Tribunal suspend sa stance h 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. James C. Carter continue son exposed 35
hem-el 30.hGUreS I S<W "* ^ et le Tribnnal s'aJourne au lendemain, a  11
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 12 Avril, 1893, et ont signS:
Le President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 7.—Meeting of Wednesday, April 12,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-40 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The President then read the decision of the Tribunal with reference to the
| Supplementary Report of the British Behring Sea Commissioners," dated the 31st
January, 1893, the admissibility of which was the subject of the debates which took
place at the previous meetings.
The terms of the decision are as follows:—
" It is ordered that the document entitled a ' Supplementary Report of the British
Behring Sea Commissioners,' dated the 31st January, 1893, and signed by George
Baden-Powell and George M. Dawson, and delivered to the individual Arbitrators by
the Agent of Her Britannic Majesty on the 25th day of March, 1893, and which
contains a criticism of, or argument upon, the evidence in the documents and papers
previously delivered to the Arbitrators, be not now received, with liberty, however,
reserved to Counsel to adopt such document, dated the 31st January, 1893, as part of
their oral argument, if they deem proper.
"The question as to the admissibility of the documents, or any of them,
constituting the Appendices attached to said document of the 31st January, 1893, is
reserved for further consideration, without prejudice to the right of Counsel on either
side to discuss that question, or the contents of the Appendices, in the course of the
oral argument."
The President then read a second decision of the Tribunal. This decision which
relates to the application of the Honourable E. J*. Phelps, presented at the close of the
preceding meeting, and having reference to the consideration of the second motion of
the United States, is worded in these terms :—
"It is ordered that the Argument and consideration of the motion made by the
United States of America on the 4th April, 1893, to strike out certain parts of the
Counter-Case and proofs of the Government of Great Britain, be postponed until such
time as may be hereafter indicated by the Tribunal."
The President then expressed the desire of the Tribunal not to spend time in
discussions on procedure, but to enter as soon as possible upon the main question.
He accordingly invited the Counsel to address themselves immediately to the
matter at issue.
Sir Charles Russell indicateek-the order in which it had been agreed the Counsel
would present their arguments, and his statement was confirmed by Mr. James C. Carter.
The President declared that the Tribunal would approve of the mode of proceeding
agreed upon by the Counsel, but he requested them to be kind enough, as far as
•possible, inH&e arrangement of their arguments, to keep separate the discussion on the
matters relating to right, and those relating to the Regulations which might eventually
be proposed. .
Mr. James C. Carter, after thanking-France for her hospitable reception, began his
argument in behalf of the United States.
At 1*30 the Tribunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling Mr. James C. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11-30
Done at Paris, the 12th April, 1893, and signed:
The President       ..        ..        ..
The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchaed, "1 Co.Secretaries,
H.  CUNYNGHAME, J
ALPH.
JOHN
CHARLES H
A. IMBERT.
DE COURCEL.
W. FOSTER.
TUPPER.
[691]
F 2
5** ^-—"j--—— ■-rj~~^—r—       ~~Z~~~J~~   -"-
M
■11
36
Inclosure 3 in No. 46.
Protocole No. 8;—Seance du Jeudi, 13 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 40, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. James C. Carter reprend son argumentation.
A 1 heure 30 la seance est suspendue.
A la reprise, Mr. James C. Carter continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures, la seance   est   levee et  le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 13 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne    ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 8.—Meeting of Thursday, April, 13, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*40 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present
Mr. James C. Carter resumed his argument.
At 1'3Q the Tribunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, Mr. James C. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 13th April, 1893, and signed:
The President       ..        ,.        ..,
I The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H.   CUNYNGHAME,
•}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 4 in No. 46.
Protocole No. 9.—Se'ance du Vendredi, 14 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 40, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. James C, Carter reprend son argumentation.
Le Tribunal suspend sa seance a 1 heure.
A la reprise, Mr. James C. Carter continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance est levee a 4 heures et le Tribunal s'ajourne  au Mardi, 18 Avril,
a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 14 Avril, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President..        ..        ....    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretange   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 9.—Meeting of Friday, April 14,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-40 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. James C. Carter resumed his argument.
At 1 o'clock the Tribunal adjourned for a short time.
On reassembling, Mr. James C. Carter continued his argument.
1
Ki:'
ass
mtm 37
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to Tuesday, the 18th April, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 14th April, 1893, and signed:
The President       ..        ..        .. ALPH. DE COURCEL.
The Agent for the United States.. JOHN W. FOSTER.
m-1---1 "    a      "        .. CHARLES H. TUPPER.
.. A. IMBERT.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. BatltiY-Blanchard.
H. Ctjnynghame,
Co-Secretaries.
No. 47.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 12.)
My Lord, *, Paris, May 8,1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit herewith to your Lordship copies of the Report
for 1890,* on the condition of the fur-seal fisheries on the Pribyloff Islands, by
Mr. Henry W. Elliott.
Your Lordship will remember that this Report was produced by the United States
Government on the application made by the British Counsel at the meeting of the
Tribunal on the 23rd March. The conditions under which it was presented by the
United States are set out on pp. 36 and 37, Part I, of the shorthand notes.
The document was furnished in the form of a type-written copy, and some delay
has necessarily taken place in having it printed.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 48.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—{Received May 9.)
My Lord, Paris, May 8, 1893.
ON the 5th instant, Mr. Coudert continued his observations on the causes of the
decrease in the number of seals resorting to the Pribyloff Islands, urging that the
facts conclusively proved this decrease to be due to pelagic sealing, and that it was in
no way attributable to the method of taking the seals on the breeding islands.
Mr. Coudert expects to finish his argument at the next meeting of the Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES TUPPER.
No. 49.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 12.)
My Lord, Paris, May 10, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr. Coudert continued his argument against pelagic
sealing, and, after a short reference to the question of damages, concluded his speech
shortly before the hour of adjournment.
Sir Charles RusseU will open the argument on behalf of Great Britain at the
meeting of to-day.
I have, &c.
(In the absence of Mr. Tupper),	
(Signed) R. P. MAXWELL.
Copiea of this Report will be deposited in the Library of each Hot.se of Parliament. "1
I
38
No. 50.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 12.)
My Lord, Paris, May 11, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, the Attorney-General opened the argument for Great
Britain with a summary of the position taken up by Her Majesty's Government.
He called attention to the various changes of front on the part of the United
States which had taken place since the beginning of the diplomatic correspondence
and to the novel propositions of law propounded by the Uniiea States' Counsel.
Sir Charles then proceeded to deal generally with the arguments in the speeches
of Mr. Carter and Mr. Coudert, more especially with the attacks made upon the
British Commissioners and upon pelagic sealing.
He had not concluded his preliminary statement when the Tribunal rose.
Sir Charles' opening speech was listened to with. great interest by the largest
audience of the public which has been present since the commencement of the sittings.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.'
No. 51.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 12.)
My Lord, Paris, May 11,1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship, herewith, copies of the official
Protocols of the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal, Nos. 10, 11,12, 13, and 14.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 51.
Protocole No. 10.—Seance du Mardi, 18 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Le President, a l'ouverture de la seance, se referant a quelques paroles qu'il avait
prononcees a la fin de la seance precedente, declare que si, dans le cours des plaidoiries,
les Arbitres sont amenes a presenter des observations ou a adresser des questions
aux Conseils, ces observations ou ces questions ne. doivent pas etre considerees
comme exprimant une opinion de la part de l'Arbitre qui les formule, et encore moins
comme engageant le pays auquel il appartienfc. Elles sont simplement, pour le
Tribunal, un moyen d'obtenir, des represehtants des parties, un eclaircissement plus
complet des points en discussion.
Sur l'invitation du President, Mr. James C. Carter continue alors son plaiioyer.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. Carter reprend son argumentation.-
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain, a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 18 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire..       ..
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT. 39
[English version.]
Protocol No. 10.—Meeting of Tuesday, April 18,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The President, at the opening of the meeting, referring to a few remarks which he
had made at the end of the preceding sitting, announced that, if in the course of the
arguments, the Arbitrators were lead to make observations or to address questions to
Counsel, these observations or questions must not be considered as expres&ing any
opinion on the part of the Arbitrator who makes them, and still less as binding the
country to which he belongs. They are simply, so far as the Tribunal'is concerned,
the means of obtaining from the representatives of the parties a more complete elucidation of the points under discussion.
Upon the invitation of the President, Mr. James C. Carter then continued his
argument.
At 1*30 p.m. the Tribunal took a recess.
On the reassembling of the Tribunal, Mr. Carter resumed his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 18th April, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States   .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
11
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 2 in No. 51.
Protocole No. 11.—Seance du Mercredi, 19 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. James C. Carter reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heures 30.
•^M la reprise, Mr. Carter continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures, la seance est levee   et   le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 19 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 11.—Meeting of Wednesday, April 19,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present
Mr. James C. Carter resumed his argument.
At 1'30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On the reassembling, Mr. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned till the next day, at 11'30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 19th April, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Co-Secretaries.
\i\tt
if 40
Inclosure 3 in No. 51.
I ft;..
IS
I Id.
Protocole No. 12.—Seance du Jeudi, 20 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Agent des Etate-Units fait remettre au Tribunal un recueil de "Citations
empruntees a des ouvrages de Jurisconsuites et d'Economistes comme Appendices a
l'Argument des Etats-Unis."
§3     Mr. James C. Carter reprend son argumentation de la veille.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. Carter continue son plaidoyer.
A 4 heures la seance est levee   et  le  Tribunal s'ajourne   au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 20 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 12.—Meeting of Thursday, April 20, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m , all the Arbitrators being present.
The Agent for the United States caused to be delivered to the Tribunal a collection
of I Citations from the writings of Jurists and Economists as an Appendix to the
Argument of the United States."
Mr. James C. Carter resumed his argument of the preceding day.
At 1-30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling Mr. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11-30 A.M.
Done at Paris, the 20th April, 1893, and signed*:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER,
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 4 in No. 51.
Protocole No. 13.—Seance du Vendredi, 21 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. James C. Carter reprend sa plaidoirie.
A 1 heure 30 la seance est suspendue.
A la reprise Mr. Carter continue son argumentation.
La seance est levee a 4 heures.
Le Tribunal s'ajourne au Mardi, 25 Avril, a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 21 Avril, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ..        I
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT. 41
[English version.]
Protocol No. 13.—Meeting of Friday, April 21, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. James C. Carter resumed his argument.
At 1-30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling Mr. Carter continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned till Tuesday, the 25th April, at 11*30 a.m
Done at Paris, the 21st April, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States '.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,"!
H. Cunynghame, j
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 5 in No. 51.
Protocole No. 14.—Se'ance du Mardi, 25 Avril, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents, a
1'exception de Lord Hannen, retenu chez lui pour cause de maladie.
Sir Richard Webster se leve pour declarer que toute decision du Tribunal en vue
d'une suspension tie ses travaux, pendant le temps necessaire pour assurer le complet
retahlissement de Lord Hannen, serait conforme aux desirs des Conseils du Gouvernement Britannique.
L'Honorable E. J. Phelps s'exprime dans le meme sens, au nom des Conseils du
Gouvernement des Etats-Unis.
Le President fait alors connaltre que le Tribunal a decide de s'ajourner jusqu'au
Mardi, 2 Mai, a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 25 Avril, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President..         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 14.—Meeting of Tuesday, April 25, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present with the
exception of Lord Hannen, confined to his house by illness.
Sir Richard Webster rose and stated that any decision of the Tribunal as to a
suspension of its labours during the time necessary to insure the complete recovery of
Lord Hannen, would be in accordance with the wishes of the Counsel of the British
Government.
The Honourable E. J. Phelps expressed himself to the same effect in the name of
the Counsel of the Government of the United States.
The President then announced that the Tribunal had decided to adjourn until
Tuesday, the 2nd May , at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 25th April, 1893, and signed: S3E§1
The President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
The Agent for the United States ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
CHARLES H. TUPPER,
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
i
■;;:
Co-Secretaries.
[691]
G
2M WW
42
No. 52.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 17.)
My Lord,
Paris, May 15, 1893.
ON the llth instant the Attorney-General, after a further comment on the
references made by the United States to the Report of the British Commissioners,
discussed at some length the history of the seizures of British vessels in Behring Sea by
the United States' Government, the grounds on which the vessels had been condemned,
and the consequent liability of the United States in the event of the Arbitrators
deciding that the seizures were not justifiable.
The Argument was continued on the following day, special reference being made to
the Revised^Statutes of the United States dealing with the territory of Alaska, and to
the proceedings in the United States' District Court at Sitka in the case of the schooner
I Thornton."
Sir Charles Russell went on to show that in the Case presented on behalf of the
United States, great stress had been laid upon the jurisdiction over the waters of
Behring Sea alleged to have been exercised by Russia for the protection of the seal
fisheries, and that it was not until the delivery of the Counter-Case and Argument that
this portion of the Case was declared to be of minor importance.
The Attorney-General further pointed out that now that the part of the United
States' Case containing the erroneous translations of the Russian documents had been
withdrawn no proof remained of any exercise of these rights of j urisdiction by Russia.
The Argument on this question had not concluded when the Tribunal adjourned;
I have, &c.   **•
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.';
No. 53.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 26.)
My Lord, Paris, May^ 23, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
Nos. 15 to 18 of the proceedings-before-the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
■'.*," *?* * • "[ have &c.
(Signed)        '  CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 53.
Protocole No. 15.—Seance du Mardi, 2 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. James C. Carter reprend et ach&ve son argumentation sur les points de droit.
Au moment oil il passe a l'examen de la question des Reglements, Sir Charles Russell
fait observer que les Conseils de la Grande-Bretagne separeront absolument dans la
discussion les questions de droit de celles qui concernent la reglementation.
Le President rappelle que le Tribunal a decide, sans prejuger aucune question de
droit, de laisser aux Conseils des deux parties, qui se sont mis d'accord a ce sujet,
liberte entiere de disposer leurs plaidoiries de la facon qui leur convenait, tout en
traitant autant que possible separement les questions de droit et celle des Reglements,
et prend acte de ce que les deux parties ont decide de deferer a cette demande.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. Carter acteve sa plaidoirie.
A 3 heures 30, la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 2 Mai, 1893,'et ont signe :
Le President ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Jgtats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN. W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..     CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
Jill 4$
[English version.]
Protocole No. 1^.—Meeting of Tuesday, May 2, 1893.
} THE Tribunal assembled at ,11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. James C. Carter resumed.and concluded his argument on the matters relating
to right.    As he was proceeding to deal with the question of Regulations, Sir Charles
Russell observed that the Counsel of Great Britain would in the discussion keep
absolutely separate matters relating to right, and those relating to Regulations.
The President recalled the fact that the -Tribunal haaOde*cided, without prejudging
the question of right, to give to Counsel on each side, who had agreed upon this point,
full liberty to arrange their arguments in such manner as they thought most convenient,
but always, as far as possible, so as to keep the questions of right distinct from the
Regulations, and added that the Tribunal took note that both parties had decided to
defer to this desire..
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess,
On reassembling Mr. Carter finished his argument.
At 3-30 p^m. the Tribunal adjourned till the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 2nd May, 1893, and .signed:
The President
The Agenifor the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, \ n  l .
tt   /-UT.TT.../.TT. -...-», r ^o-oecretartes.
H. Cunynghame,
1
III
it
Inclosure 2 in No. 53.
Protocole No. 16.—Seance du Mercredi, 3 Mai, 1893,
LE Tribunal s'est re-ani a 11 heures 80, tons les Arbiires etant presents.
L'Honorable John W, Foster annonce qu'il. sera tr&s pBOChainement en mesure de
faire distribuer aux membres du ^Tribuhal le compte rendu stenographique, revu et
corrige, de l'argumentation qii'a terminee la veille Mr. James C. Carters
Sur l'invitafcion du President, Mr. Frederick R. Coudert commence alors sa plaidoirie.
.La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la rieprise-, Mr. Coudert continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures, la seance est. levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 3, Mai, 1893, et ont signe
Le President
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire"
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocole No- 16.—Meeting of Wednesday, May 3, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable John W. Foster announced that in a very short time he expected
to be able to deliver to the members of the Tribunal, a shorthand report revised and
corrected, of Mr. James C. Carter's argument as concluded the previous day.
Upon the invitation of the -President, Mr. Frederick R. Coudert then began his
argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a-recess.
On reassembling Mr. Coudert continued his argument.
'[691] ** l ■ !.f
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next flay at 11*30 a.m
Done at Paris, the 3rd May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..        ..        .
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, h Co_8ecretari
H. Cunynghame, j uo *ecreta' *
es.
Inclosure 3 in No. 53.
Protocole No. 17.-—Seance du Jeudi, 4 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. Frederick R. Coudert reprend sa plaidoirie de la veille..
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Mr. Coudert continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures, la  seance est   levee  et   le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 4 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocole No. 17.—Meeting of Thursday, May 4s, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. Frederick R. Coudert resumed his argument of the preceding day.
At 1'30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling Mr. Coudert continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 4th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        ..        ..
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
1
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 4 in No. 53.
Protocole No. 18.—Seance du Vendredi, 5 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. Frederick R. Coudert reprend son argumentation.
A 1 heure 30 la seance est suspendue.
A la reprise, Mr. Coudert continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures, la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 9 Mai, a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 5 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER
Le Secretaire
A. IMBERT. 45
[English version.]
Protocole No. 18.—Meeting of Friday, May 5,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. Frederick R. Coudert resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling Mr. Coudert continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 9th May, at 11*30 A.M
Done at Paris, the 5th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
'}
Co-Secretaries.
No. 54.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 26.)
My Lord, Paris, May 24,1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument on the
5th question of Article VI of the Treaty.
He contended that this question might be interpreted as referring to an exclusive
right to take fur-seals in Behring Sea, but assumed for-the purpose-of argument that
the wider meaning attached to it by the United States was correct. This interpretation
is, as your Lordship is aware, the assertion of -a right of property in the seal-herd, and
the sealing industry.
Sir Charles proceeded to reply generally to Mr. Carter's arguments on this head,
and entered into the questions of the alleged domestic character of the seals, the intermingling of the so-called herds, the length of their stay on the islands, and the
possibility of identification.
He then commenced an examination of the propositions of law put forward by
Mr. Carter in this connection, and had not concluded this portion of his subject when
the Tribunal rose.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 55.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 26.)
My LOrd, Paris, May 25,1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Charles Russell proceeded with his examinations
of the legal propositions put forward by Mr. Carter, and dealt with the various
.authorities cited in the printed Argument of the United States, which, he argued,
entirely supported the British contention with regard to the question of property in the
fur-seals.
He supplemented these authorities by citing those quoted in the British Counter-
Case and Argument, and, after alluding to the French laws on the subject of property
in animals, concluded his observations for the day with an explanation of the bearings
of natural and moral law on the principles of international jurisprudence.
I have, &c.
(Signed)
CHARLES H. TUPPER. 46
]$o. 56.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery—(Received May 27.)
My Lord, Par-is, May 26, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Charles Russell, after briefly/supplementing his
remarks of the preceding day, proceeded to a detailed examination of the printed
argument by Mr. Phelps, ^hich appears on pp. 130-179 of the Argument of the
United States. Your Lordship will remember that the subject dealt with therein is
the claim of the United States to an interest, an industry, and a commerce in the
produce of the seal-herd and to a right of protecting the same, irrespective of any
distinct right of property in the seals.
Sir Charles had not concluded his criticism on Mr. Phelps' argument when the
Tribunal rose for the day.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
ml
No. 57.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
(Telegraphic.) Foreign Office, May 29, 1893.
IN view of what has passed in the arguments before the Tribunal respecting the
effect .of the modus vivendi of last year, I think it must be left entirely to your
discretion to decide, in consultation with Counsel, whether any claim for compensation
under Article V of the Treaty of the 18th April, 1892, shall be pressed on behalf of
Her Majesty's Government..
No. 58.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received May 31.)
My Lord, Paris, May 30,1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal on the 26th instant, Sir Charles Russell continued
-his examination of the illustrations and cases cited by Mr. Phelps in the printed
Argument of the United States, and was dealing with the analogies sought to be drawn
from legislation in British Colonies- and various foreign countries in regard to seal
fisheries, when the Tribunal adjourned for the day.
I have, &c.
(Signed)
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 59.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.      P-".**fl
(TelegraphicV^'i Foreign Office, May 31, 1893.
YOU may authorize Counsel to state to the Tribunal that an arrangement has
been concluded with the Russian Government for the prohibition of sealing within a
i zone of 10 miles from the Russian coasts in Behring Sea and other parts of the North
Pacific Ocean, and of 30 miles round the Commander Islands and Robben Island; this
arrangement^ be a provisional one for the present year, and without prejudice to the
-rights or position of either Power. The correspondence will be laid before Parliament
forthwith. It may also be stated that, although no official reply has been received on
the subject of the seizures made by Russian cruizers last year* it is understood that
these are justified on the ground that the vessels were seized for acts just committed in
Ttussian territorial waters. Sir,
47
No. 60.
Foreign Office to Colonial Office.
T A1, i.     J.JT.    XT.   -n,    „„ Foreign Office, May 31,1893.
, , I AM„ J.rected V thf Earl of Bosebery to forward, for the information of the
Marquis of Ripon, a paraphrase of a telegram* which has been addressed to the British
Agent for the Behring Sea Arbitration in regard to the possible claim of Her Majesty's
?£r?mM Joo comPeilsatlon under Article V of the Treaty of Washington of the
18th April, 1892. J &
„ T,TJa* Art;icle provides that if the decision of the Arbitrators should affirm the right
ot British sealers to take seals in Behring Sea within the bounds claimed by the United
States, then compensation should be made by the United States to Great Britain (for
the use of her subjects) for abstaining from the exercise of that right during the pendency
of the Arbitration upon the basis of such a regulated and limited catch or catches as,
m the opinion of the Arbitrators, might have been taken without an undue nmitation
of the seal herds. Further, the amount awarded, if any, shall be such as under all the
circumstances is just and equitable.
As a matter of fact, however, it has been found that while the United States,
under the modus vivendi of last year, were restricted to a catch of 7,500, the pelagic
catch, although the sealing vessels kept outside the prohibited limits, was larger than
in previous years. This fact has been strongly brought forward by the United
States' Counsel before the Tribunal.
It is not probable that, under such circumstances, the Arbitrators would consider
that the British sealers were, under any circumstances, entitled to Compensation for a
loss of catch during 1892, and it is possible that the British Case might be prejudiced
by the claim being urged.
V O G
This view of the case was represented by Sir R. Webster, who was in England for
two days on the 29th and 30th instant, and Lord Rosebery thought it was better at
once to inform Mr. Tupper that the question whether the claim should be advanced
must be left to his discretion in consultation with the British Counsel.
His Lordship has no doubt that Lord Ripon will concur in that view.
(Signed)
I am, &c.
T. H. SANDERSON.
-No. 61.:
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 1.)
My Lord, Paris, May 31, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Charles Russell proceeded with his examination
of the analogies sought to be drawn by the United States from colonial and foreign
regulations in regard to seal fisheries. He then dealt with the United States' contentions that not only seal fisheries but also other fisheries, more especially those of pearl,
coral, and herring, arc protected by extra-territorial laws of other nations. He passed
on to the consideration of the St. Helena Act, and certain cases quoted by the United
States bearing on extra-territorial jurisdiction, and had just concluded this portion of
his argument when the Tribunal adjourned.    Sir Charles expects to finish his speech
this morning.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER;
No. 62.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery—(Received June 2.)
M   Lord Paris, June 1, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Charles Russell, having conceded his examination of the various authorities cited by the United States, proceeded to sum up the
various points in his argument, and to lay before the Tribunal the findings wh^ch he
asked for in regard to the questions of fact involved m the claim for damages put
forward in the British Case.
* No. 57. 48
He stated that Great Britain would not ask from the Tribunal any finding for
damages under Article 5 of the modus vivendi of 1892, and Mr. Phelps admitted that
the United States had on their side abandoned any claims under this head.
Sir Charles then re-stated to the Tribunal the replies which Great Britain contends
should be given to the five questions of Article VI of the Treaty, as set forth at
pp. 26 and 63 of the British Argument, and after explaining that his argument had
been only directed to the question of legal right, as distinct from regulations, concluded
his speech with an eloquent appeal to the Tribunal for an award in conformity with
the principles of law which would be a victory for peace.
Sir Charles, whose concluding words were listened to with deep interest by a
large audience, was thanked by the President for the vigour and incisiveness of his
argument.
Sir Richard Webster then opened his speech, and addressed himself to an
examination of the first four questions of Article VI of the Treaty, which he had not
concluded when the Tribunal adjourned.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 63.
i
ills1
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 3.)
My Lord, Paris, June 2, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument with
regard to the first four questions under Article VI of the Treaty, and discussed the
interpretation of the expressions " North-west Coast of America " and " Pacific Ocean,"
as illustrating the Treaties of 1824 and 1825 between Russia and the United States
and Russia and Great Britain respectively.
Sir Richard had substantially concluded this part of his argument when the
Tribunal adjourned for the day.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 64.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 5.)
My Lord, Paris, June 3, 1893.
WITH  reference to my despatch of the 18th April, I have the honour to
transmit to your Lordship copies of further correspondence which I have had with
General Foster respecting the shorthand nctes of the proceedings before the Tribunal
.of Arbitration.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 64.
hi;
Mr. Tupper to Mr. Foster.
Dear5 Mr. Foster, Paris, May 16, 1893.
HAVING reference to your recent request for copies of the daily report of Sir
Charles Russell's argument, as well as of the revised proof of it, when ready, it occurs
to me that the experience gained by us both since the date of our correspondence on
the subject of the shorthand notes, may enable us to resume the arrangement originally
contemplated, whereby the expense of the work would fall equally upon the United
States and Great Britain. It this is possible, I shall of course be happy to supply you
with complete copies of all the shorthand notes, and will see that they are regularly
supplied in future.
I laid upon your desk to-day three copies of the printed Report of Mr. Elliott.
Mr. Stanley-Brown has also asked for and received a copy, and Mr. Williams, one of
the Counsel for the United States, has expressed a desire for further copies.
I take it that the printing in the case of Mr. Elliott's Report may be fairly 49
^^^^i^J^T6 J 8haU be slad to -^ ^ * «*»
revisedby to. g°°d ^^^ t0 SUPply US ^ C°pieS of Mr' Carier'8 argument as
W?fl^t/t We r6CUJ2 t^0*1*11^ as a Joint charge, we shall be happy to
bear half of the expense of the taking and printing of Mr. Cartels argument.
If, however, you do not feel inclined to bear half of the cost of the printing with
• ed y°U C°PleS       the Eep0rt ^ Sir Charles E,usse11'8 argument when
Yours, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 2 in No. 64.
Mr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
Dear Mr. Tupper, PariS) May j r> 1893#
ACKNOWLEDGING the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant, I beg to
remind you that you have misapprehended the purport of my conversation to which
you refer. Its object was to ascertain what further number of copies of Mr. Carter's
argument you desired, and I incidentally inquired whether you would deliver to us
Sir Charles Russell's argument by means of the daily reports or in the revised form.
I expressly disavowed making any request on the subject.
I regret to have to say, in response to your suggestion, that the events since our
last correspondence on the subject have not lead to any change of view on the part of
the Representatives of the United States as to the practicability of the daily shorthand
reports. Our Counsel regard them in the manner reproduced in the morning- after
eaeh session, so far as they are concerned, as entirely unsatisfactory, and as not
serving any useful purpose.
I am sorry not to be able to concur in your proposition respecting the printing and
.distribution of the Elliott Report. The United States does not propose to make it
evidence in its behalf. It has been printed by the British Government without the
knowledge or approval of the Representatives of the United States. If it is introduced as evidence by the British Government, and thereby made a part of its Case,
it would seem to be a fair claim on the part of the United States to be supplied with
the same number of copies of it as have been heretofore furnished of the other printed
documentary evidence accompanying the Case and Counter-Case of Great Britain.
I hold myself ready to furnish you with such additional number of copies of
Mr. Carter's argument as you may desire.
I am, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTER.
No. 65.
.Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 5.)
My Lord Paris, June 3, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to inclose, for your Lordship's information, copies of a letter
which, with the approval of Counsel, I addressed to Mr. Foster, and of his reply
with regard to the question of the ownership of sealing vessels engaged in the
Behring Sea fishery
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 65„
Mr. Tupper to Mr. Foster.
Dear Mr. Foster, Paris* May 26,1893.
REFERRING to the suggestion advanced on p. 130 of the United States' Counter-
Case that some of the vessels for the seizure of which damages are claimed by
Her Majesty's Government, were owned by citizens of the United States, and to the
promise made to the Tribunal by the Attorney-General on the llth May that, if
[691] H m
50
possible, the Arbitrators should not be troubled with the consideration of Jhe subject^
I now write to inquire whether we can agree upon the facts in dispute in ordeEtthat
the Attomey-General'ssuggestion should be made effective. >a^
As regards Mr. Franks, I have not as yet complete evidence.
As regards Mr. Boscowitz, this gentleman denies that he m the owner of_ the
vessels, and further denies that he is an American citizen. And as at present advised,
I shall have to ask the Tribunal^p to hold, unless of course it is possible, as I hope it
may be, for me to come to an arrangement with you upon this matter.
Your suggestion being first made in yourFCounter-Case, it was not possible to
produce in Court evidence on the point in the ordinary way, but Mr. Boscowitz happens
at the present-foment to be in Paris, and I would suggest that a fair way of eliciting-
the actual facts would be, that we should examine, and that you should cross-examine,
Mr. Boscowitz in the presence of a shorthand writer. His evidence might then be
laid before the Arbitrators as material for a decision if this should be thought necessary
by either side.
I am, &c.
(Signed) CARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 2 in No. 65.
avx ^r' P°s^er t° Mr. Tupper.
■Dear Mr. Tupper, ' Paris, May 27,1893.
I HAVE the honourrte acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the
26th instant, in which you inform me^tfeat a Mr. Boscowitz " happens^at the present
moment to be in Paris," and, in view of certain prooJ^Mdfue^a in behalf of the United
•tStates respecting him, you suggest'that he be examined and cross-examined here for
the purpose of:«nbmittmg his evidence to the Arbitrators 'as material for a decision on
.their part.
An examination of theiTreaty under which the pending Arbitration is constituted
must:satisfy^you that I have no,power or authority to accede to your .reddest.    The
manneii"liin which evidence is to be submitted to 'the Arbitrators is precisely fixed by
-iheiterms of the^Treaty, and -no opportunity or method for such submission is therein
^ffercted to either party except through 'it& respective Case and Counter-Case.
Besides,,4t would hardly seem reasonable to allow one party, after the Case,
Counter-Case, and printed Argument had been sulftftifted and while the oral argument
was^Jas&piBogress and,near Jits close,'to examine an impoftanfrvfttness on its-Ijehalf, when
the witnesses ,of the Jother party, whose 'testimony might be material to refute his
statements, were 6,000 miles away, and who could not -be reached in time to submit
their testimony to the Tribunal.
Referring to ypar.inquiry as to whether we can agree upon the facts in «Kspute ins
order that the suggestion of Sir Charles Russell might be made effective,.I .have
pleasure in saying that I am prepared to concur with you in any- statement of facts
proper to be considered by the Tribunal and warranted by the evidence now legitimately
-before that Body.
fl closing I beg to remind you that the suggestion ". . . . that some of the
vessels |or the seizure of which damages were Claimed by Her Majesty's Government
were owned by citizens of the United States,'' was not for, the .first time advanced
by the United States in the Counter-Case, as-will'be seen :by reference to the Case of
the'JMited States, Appendix, vol. II, p. 505.
I am, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTER.
-&0.-66.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 5.)
My Lord, pari9} June 3,?1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocol's
Nos, 19 to 231 of the proceedings'before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES B. TUPPER.. 5t
Inclosure 1 in No. 66.
Protocole No. 1^—Se'ance du Mardi, $ Mai, 1893.'
\f ^J"^ slest^un^H heures-30, tous les-Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. FrederickR. CoM^reprend son argumentation.
A 1 heure 30 la seance est .suspendue..
A la reprise, Afr. Coudtert acheve sa plaJdeirie.
VHonorable Edward J. Phelps se leve pour annoneer au TMbunaIravant que les*
Umseils de la Grande-Bretagne commencent leur augumentation, que, dans sa replique, i1
sappuiera sur toutes les cations et propositions contenues^ dans l'Argument des-
Etats-Unis, de la page 130 a la page 190.
Le President donne acte a l'Honorable Edward J Phelps de oette declaration.
A 4  heures  la  seance est levee  et le  Tribunal s'aifeurne  au lendemain a
11 heures 30. "
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 9 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President ALPH. DE GOUR©EL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
JJ Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARGES H. TWPPER»
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
■$$£ [English Version.]
Protocol No. 19.—Meeting of Tuesdays May 9, 1893. ^ !
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. Frederick R. Coudert resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Mr. Coudert concluded his argument.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps rose to inform the Tribunal, before the Counsel
of Great Britain commenced their argument, that in his reply he would rely upon all
the authorities and points referred to between pages 130 and 190 of the printed
Argument of the United States.
The President said that the,'tribunal would take note of the Honourable Edward J.
Phelps* declaration.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m^
Done at Paris, the 9th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        »•
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES S. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT..
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,! Co.8ecretarieSm
H. Cunynghame, J
Inclosure 2 in No. 66.
Protocole No. 20.—Seance du Mercredi, 10 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s-'est jreuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arhi*res etant presents.
Urgent des Etats-Unis fait distribuer aux membres du Tribunal le compte rendu
stenoo-raphique, ravu et corrige, de 1'argumentation de i% Jam:m C. Cwm>. .
steno|rapmque,ati^ ^ Pr^identj Sir Charles Russell commence sa plaidoirie-pour la
Grande-Bretagne.
La seance esWs^ndue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue son argumentation.
[691] 52
A 4 heures, la seance est levee et le  Tribunal   s'ajourne   au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 10 Mai, 1893, et ont signe: !$3$§m
Le President ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis.. ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne  ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire ..
, A., IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 20.—Meeting of Wednesday, May 10, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Agent of the United States caused to be delivered to the members of
the Tribunal a shorthand report, revised and corrected,  of Mr. James C.  Carter's
argument.
Upon the invitation of the President, Sir Charles Russell began his argument for
Great Britain.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument
At 4 p.m., the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 10th May, 1893, and signed.
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Brilain
The Secretary..
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
'}
Co-Secretaries,
Inclosure 3 in No. 66.
Protocole No. 21.—Seance du Jeudi, 11 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend son argumentation et annonce qu'il presentera, a une
date ulterieure, au nom du Gouvernement de la Grande-Bretagne, une liste des questions
de fait sur lesquelles il demande au Tribunal de se prononcer,  en  execution de
l'Article VIII du Traite d'Arbitrage.
Le President fait remarquer que le Tribunal reserve son appreciation de ces
questions, tout en laissant a Sir Charles Russell pleine liberte de traiter le sujet de la
maniere qui lui conviendra.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 11 Mai, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
< 1
II
[English version.]
Protocol No. 21.—Meeting of Thursday, May 11, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 A.M., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell, in continuing his argument, announced that on a future day
he would submit on the part of Great Britain a list of the findings of facts, which the
Tribunal was requested to make under Article VIII of the Treaty of Arbitration. 53
with Ml Hbeltt W^frf ^-S"*6 IP?**00* WOuld be considered by the Tribunal
™*ifi-wS ™Z^i *uru to deal w[th the matter as he tho^ht proper-
On reassembling Sir Charles Russell continued his argument
the Tribunal adjourned at 4 p.m. till 11-30 the next day
Done at Paris, the llth May, 1893, and signed :
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, "1
H. Cunynghame, j
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 4 in No. 66.
Protocole No. 22.—Seance du Vendredi, 12 Mat, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.' "
A la reprise Sir Charles Russell continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 16 Mai,
a, 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 12 Mai, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ..        ..    JOHN W. FOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT;
[English version.]
Protocol No. 22.—Meeting of Friday, May 12, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argament. . g^
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 16th May, at 11*30 a.m
Done at Paris, the 12th May, 1893, and signed :
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        ..        ..
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,!
H. Cunynghame, j
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 5 in No. 66.
Proctocole No. 23— Seance du Mardi, 16 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30. ™aT,4.0f;™
Ala reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue son argumentation. J '
SF"**^
54
A   4   hemes   la seance est   levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au  lendemain
11 heitries 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 16 Mai, 1893, et ont sign.e:
Le President
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire ..
ALPH. DE COURCEL:
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Isi
[English* version.]
Protocol No. 23.—Meeting of Tuesday, May 16, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned till 11*30 a.m. the next day.
Done at Paris, the 16th IVlay, 1893, and, signed :
The President        ..        ..        . •
<yj$    The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        ..       V.n,     ••
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. FOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
'}
Co-Secretaries.
]§
g-a< "    No. 67.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.'—(Received June 8.)
My Lord, Paris, June 6, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal held on the 2nd instant, Sir R. Webster, after
referring to the question of the limits of territorial waters, went on to show how little
value had been attached to the fur-seal fisheries at the time of the purchase of Alaska
by the United States.
He was proceeding with the discussion of the 5th question of Article VI of the
Treaty, when Mr. Justice Harlan stated that, before this portion -of the argument was
commenced, he would be glad to see the draft " Projet" which Mr. George Canning
inclosed in his letter to Mr. Stratford Canning of the 8th December, 1824. This
document, as your Lordship will remember, was not included among the correspondence
printed in Volume II of the Appendix to the British Case, for the reason that no
trace of it could be discovered, and a statement to this effect was made to the
Tribunal bv Sir R, Webster.
v
Sir Richard then reviewed at some length the various contentions by which the
Government of the United States'have endeavoured to establish their claim to
property or a property interest in the fur-seals frequenting the Pribyloff Islands.
He had not concluded his remarks on this subject when the Tribunal adjourned
until this morning
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 68.
Mr/Tupper to thh Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 8.)
My Lord,
AT yesterday's meeting of the Tribunal,
statement as to the special rules concerning te^tffirial! waters which were necessitated
by the natural conditions of Sweden and Norway;
Paris; June 7, 18M
M. Gram opened the sitting with a 55
.n.d?l!?PlT?d that ?e ^rds,0f those ™™^eB had been from time immemorial
considered as inner waters," and that this principle had been always maintained even
as against foreign sub]ects. The 3-mile limit had never been recognized by either
country nor had they concluded or acceded to any Treaty consecratin? that rule.
. A JtL con?lu810.n of M. Gram's remarks the President, while begging both
parti^ to bear in mind the explanation they had just heard, wished to Itate very
3distanctly that the question of the definition of territorial waters was not before the
foTsibunal.
*<>•£ Sir Richard Webster then continued his argument on the question of property in
hthe seals and the-sealing industry, and criticized in detail the positions maintained by
*the United States' Counsel
In the course of some observations directed to prove the intermingling of the
seals m Behring Sea, Sir Richard read a passage from the Supplementary Report of the
jBritisih Commissioners.    This drew forth a protest from Mr. Phelps as to the usewhich
bwas being made of the document quoted, and after some discussion freported on
/.pp.. 1366-71 of   the shorthand notes), it was arranged that the matter should be
jreferred to at a later stage, when the question of Regulations was argued.
I beg to call your Lordship's special attention to a statement made by Mr. Phelps
nifasrepdrted at p. 14C2 of the notes) in the course of a discussion in regard to Prize
difioiirtelMtiated by Senator Morgan.   Mr. Phelps' words were as follows :—
II conceive that no question whatever in regard to the validity of the seizui*es,
and no question whatever in respect of the right of the United States to seize any
vessel hereafter, is submitted under this Treaty to the Tribunal so far as I am
concerned."
slfrsthis statement accurately represents the position of the United States, it is
difficult to understand how it can be reconciled with the circumstances which led to
ithis Arbitration.
de-Sir Richard Webster had not concluded his argument at the close of the day's
;*|OTtoceedings.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
il
No. 69.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 9.)
My Lord, Paris, June 8, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, Sir Richard Webster continued his
argument, and commenced by referring to the remark made by Mr. Phelps, to which
I called your Lordship's attention in my immediately preceding despatch, asserting
that no question tin respect to the validity of British vessels was submitted to the
Tribunal.
After showing that the attitude thus assumed by Mr. Phelps was inconsistent with
the suggestions made in the Case and Counter-Case of the United States respecting
the proposed findings of the Tribunal, Sir Richard passed on to his main argument,
which he shortly afterwards concluded with some telling references to the rights of all
nations to participate in ocean fisheries.
On the conclusion of his speech, Sir Richard Webster was compb'mented by the
'President on the substantial and useful observations with which he had supplemented
the argument of the Attorney-General. Baron de Courcel added an expression of ,h#5
admiration for the manner in which the Attorney-General of yesterday and to-day.had
worked together, and remarked on the enviable condition of a country wherejparty
spirit admitted of such brotherly association when the national interest] was at stake.
'Mr. Robinson followed Sir Richard Webster. He dealt generally with the various
questions of right which are at issue, and, after referring to the interpretation to be
placed upon the terms " Pacific Ocean " and " North-West Coast," touched on the alleged
domestic nature of the seals, and the claims founded by the United States on this con
tention. He concluded the proceedings for the day with an able and humorous
criticism on the assumption by the United States of the position of Trustees of the
industry.
Mr. Robinson expects to conclude his speech to-day.
I have, &c
(Signed)
CHARLES H. TUPPER. ^»-
it
56
No. 70.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery,—(Received June 10.)
My Lord, Paris, June 9, 1893.
AT the meeting of yesterday, Mr, Robinson continued his argument on the
property claim alleged by the United States, and while contending that the cruelty of
the methods had no bearing on the question of right, he briefly discussed the charges
of this nature preferred against pelagic sealers. He quoted from the Report of
Mr. Palmer, to show that whatever barbarity thei e might be in the methods of killing
seals at sea, the manner in which the seals were driven and killed upon the islands
was more barbarous than pelagic sealing.
At the close of Mr. Robinson's argument, Mr. Foster laid before the Tribunal
a statement of the regulations which the Government of the United States submitted
were necessary in the event of the questions described in Article VI of the Treaty
being decided in such a manner that the concurrence of Great Britain should be
necessary to the establishment of such regulations.
This statement appears at pp. 1476 and 1477 of the shorthand notes, and, as your
Lordship will observe, it amounts to a demand by the United States for the total
suppression of pelagic sealing in the North Pacific Ocean.
In the afternoon, the Attorney-General addressed the Tribunal on the principles
which, in bis opinion, should be borne in mind by the Tribunal when approaching the
question of regulations.
He first dealt with the area over which the jurisdiction of the Tribunal extended.
From the general language of the Treaty, he argued, that while it might be said that
their jurisdiction extended to all the resorts of the fur-seal outside the territorial
limits of either Power, from the diplomatic correspondence previous to the Treaty of
Arbitration, it clearly appeared that all that was in the mind of the framers of that
Treaty as the area in dispute was the eastern portion of Behring Sea.
Sir Charles Russell next proceeded to show that pelagic sealing had, at the worst,
played but a secondary part in the diminution of the seal herd, and he was discussing
this question when the Tribunal adjourned.
I have, &c.
;   :
(Signed)
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
mm
No. 71.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 14.)
My Lord, paris, June 13, 1893.
AT the meeting of the 9th instant, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument to
show that the decrease of the seals upon the Pribyloff Islands could not have been
altogether due to pelagic sealing, but was mainly attributable to the methods
employed on the breeding islands.
Sir Charles Russell then discussed the relative value of the sealing industries at
sea and on the islands, the common interest in sealing, and the other considerations to
which he claimed attention should be given in framing Regulations for the proper
protection and preservation of the fur-seal.
The Attorney-General deferred to the next meeting of the Tribunal a consideration
of the actual Regulations proposed by the Governments of Great Britain and the
United States respectively.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
»»■ 57
N<
72.
Mr
j Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 15.)
MyLA°£d'    i.    i    , L Pari., Jime 14,1893.
Al yesterday s meeting, the Attorney-General continued his argument on the
question of Regulations. He criticized in strong terms the proposal put forward
by the United States, as reported on p. 1476 of the shorthand notes, for a total
suppression of pelagic sealing from Behring Strait down to the 35th parallel of
north latitude, east of the 180th meridian. He characterized this proposal as
involving a wider; more reckless, andjmore unfounded assertion of jurisdiction than the
Russian claims under the Ukases of 1799 and 1821.
■ He then explained the nature of the Regulations suggested by Great Britain,
which are founded upon those put forward in the Report of the British Commissioners.
Sir Charles proceeded to refer to the recent agreement with Russia for a modus
vivendi in regard to the seal fisheries. He asserted that on the part of Russja there
had been no claim to property in the seals or the sealing industry, that a zone of 30
miles was considered sufficient for the protection of female seals, and that no seizures
were asserted to be lawful but those of vessels whose boats had been fishing in
territorial waters.
Some discussion arose as to the propriety of the reference to this subject, in regard
to which I beg to call your Lordship's attention to pp. 1566-1570 and 1571-1585 of
the shorthand notes.
The Attorney-General concluded his speech just before the midday adjournment,
and was followed by Sir R. Webster when the Tribunal reassembled. Having referred,
to the question oE the agreement with Russia, Sir Richard passed on to a consideration
of the area over which the Regulations should extend, maintaining that it should be
confined to Behring Sea.
He had just explained the arrangement he intended to follow in his detailed
argument on seal life when the hour of adjournment arrived.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 73.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery—(Received June 16.)
My lord Paris> June 15'1893'
AT yesterday's meeting of the Tribunal, Sir Richard Webster proceeded with his
examination of the evidence on the various points enumerated by him at the dose
of his speech on the previous day, with the object of justifying the Regulations
^i&^Stotk^ fe ^hard alluded to Mr. Elhott,• W «*~
proceeding to read an extract from an official United States pubicatmn to show tiie
confident reposed in him at the time of his selection as United States Agent in 1890,
when the Counsel for the United States objected.
It was subsequently arranged between Counsel that no criticisms on Mr. Elliott
should[be^made by either side other than could be gathered from the face of the Report
itSelYour Lordship will find an account of this incident at pp. 1622-24 of the short-
hand notes. , . , , __
' Sir Richard Webster will continue his argument to-morrow.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
[691J 58
No. 74.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 17.)
My Lord, Paris, June 16,1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, Sir Richard Webster continued his
argument in support of the Regulations suggested by Great Britain, and examined in
detail the evidence on both sides regarding various points connected with seal life.
Sir Richard expects to conclude his speech at the meeting of to-day.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 75.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 19.)
My Lord, Paris, June 16, 1893.
AT the bottom of p. 343 of the Case presented on behalf of the United States,
a quotation is made from a Report of Mr. Goff, who was Treasury Agent on the
Pribyloff Islands in 1889.
The document from which this extract is taken is not included among the evidence
presented by the United States, nor does it appear in the Report of Mr. Goff, which
was produced by the Agent for the United States in compliance with the notice
addressed to him by me on the 3rd October, 1892.
The Report of Mr. Goff produced refers to one of a Mr. Manchester. Desiring,
if possible, to have all official Reports touching seal life before the Tribunal, I made a
verbal request to the Agent for the United States for a copy of the documents in
question.
A copy of the communication which I have received from Mr. Foster in reply
is inclosed herewith, for your Lordship's information. It appears from this letter that
Mr. Foster has no copy of the Reports in his possession in Paris, but that had this
been the case, he was of opinion that, under the terms of the Treaty, he was not bound
to comply with my request.
I do not think it will be deemed necessary for Counsel to call the attention of the
Tribunal to this incident, but I may observe to your Lordship that the course adopted
by the Agent for the United States does not indicate a desire on his part to lay before
the Tribunal all the information respecting seal life which is in the possession of the
United States' Government.
I have, &c.
(Signed) GHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure in No. 75.
Mr. Foster to Mr. Tupper.
Dear Mr. Tupper, Agency of the United States, Paris, June 15, 1893.
REFERRING to your verbal request for copies of the Reports of AcentsT
Manchester and Goff, I have to state that upon examination I find that we have
already furnished you with the Goff Report cited in our Case (p. 153). The second
reference in the Report of the United States' Commissioners (p. 343) appears to be
another Report than the one furnished you.
In a search through the published Reports of the United States' Treasury Department in my possession, neither the Manchester nor second Goff Reports are found. It
would therefore be necessary to apply to the Secretary of the Treasury for copies,
should it be decided to accede to your request.
But, in consultation with the Counsel for my Government, it is not deemed proper
by them that the terms of the Treaty as to evidence should be departed from at this
late day in the proceedings, especially as neither of the Reports in question have been
cited in either the Case or Counter-Case of the United States.
Very truly, &c.
(Signed) JOHN W. FOSTER. 59
No. 76.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.-(Received June 21.)
at+Lo mo„i'„     £ i-i    m -1       , ,  , Paris, June 20, 1893.
continued hi™? °f ^ ^f^f1 ^ 0n the 16th insta^ Sir Richard Webster
™S SP™\™ ^e subject of Regulations, and his argument was directed to
Sn,SSn^ ft SreaSe °^Served in seal life was due *n a lajSe measure to
the insufficiency of breeding males on the Pribyloff Islands, brought about by the
system of killing on land practised under the control of the United States.
Sir Richard was unable to conclude his speech before the hour of adjournment.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
pp
No. 77.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 22.)
My Lord, * Parts June 21 1893
SIR RICHARD WEBSTER, before the Tribunal yesterday, continued his
argument with regard to the scarcity of male seals on the breeding-grounds, and
dwelt upon the injurious effect of the system of driving, as practised on the islands.
He concluded by submitting to the Tribunal a draft Scheme of Regulations
proposed by Great Britain.
I have the honour to inclose a separate copy of this document.
A   discussion   arose   on   these   proposals, which   will  be found  reported  at
1779-1796 of the shorthand notes.
At the conclusion of Sir Richard's speech I read to the Tribunal the document,
of which a copy is inclosed, setting forth the findings of fact with regard to the
seizures of British vessels, which both parties were prepared to agree to.
Your Lordship will remember that, as reported on p. 1209 of the notes of the
proceedings of the 30th day, the Attorney-General submitted to the Tribunal a
suggestion on the part of Great Britain as to what these findings of fact should be.
An alternative proposal was subsequently put forward on behalf of the United States,
as reported at p. 1477 of the proceedings of the 35th day.
A conference was shortly afterwards held between the Agent and Counsel of both
parties, at which the terms of the findings to be suggested to the Tribunal were agreed
upon.
At this conference, it was understood that there was no intention on the part of the
United States to place obstacles in the way of further consideration of the amount of
our claim for damages and the ownership of the vessels seized, and that while these
subjects would not be pressed upon the Tribunal, our rights should not be in any way
prejudiced.
A short discussion arose on this paper, which is reported at pp. 1799-1802 of
the notes.
Mr. Robinson then continued the discussion on Regulations on behalf of Great
Britain.   He had not concluded his speech at the close of the day's proceedings.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 77.
Regulations.
ALL vessels engaging in pelagic sealing shall be required to obtain licences at
one or other of the following ports :—Victoria, in the Province of British Columbia;
Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia; Port Townsend, in Washington
Territory in the United States; San Francisco, in the State of California in the
United States.
2. Such licences shall only be granted to sailing-vessels. ,,. ,   ^     &J
3. A zone of 20 miles around the Pribyloff Islands shall be established, within
which no seal hunting shall be permitted at any time. _;
[691] l J 60
4. A close season from the 15th September until the 1st July shall be established,
during which no pelagic sealing shall be permitted in Behring Sea.
5. No rifles or nets shall be used in pelagic sealing.
6. All sealing vessels shall be required to carry a distinguishing flag.
7. The masters in charge of sealing vessels shall keep accurate logs as to the times
and places of sealing, the number and sex of the seals captured, and shall enter an
abstract thereof in their official logs.
8. Licences shall be subject to forfeiture for breach of above Regulations.
Inclosure 2 in No. 77.
Findings of Fact proposed by the Agent of Great Britain and agreed to as proved by the
Agent for the United States, and submitted to the Tribunal of Arbitration for its
consideration.
THAT the several searches and seizures, whether of ships or goods, and the
several arrests of masters and crews, respectively mentioned in the Schedule to the
British Case, pp. 1 to 60, inclusive, were made by the authority of the United States'
Government. "The questions as to the value of the said vessels or their contents, or
either of them, and the question as to whether the vessels mentioned in the Schedule
to the British Case, or any of them, were wholly or in part the actual property of
citizens of the United States, have been withdrawn from and have not been considered
by the Tribunal, it being understood that it is open to the United States to raise these
questions, or any of them, if they think fit, in any future negotiations as to the liability
of the United States' Government to pay the amounts mentioned in the Schedule to
the British Case.
2. That the seizures aforesaid, with the exception of the " Pathfinder," seized at
Neah Bay, were made in Behring Sea at the distances from shore mentioned in the
Schedule annexed hereto, marked (C).
3. That the said several searches and seizures of vessels were made by public
armed vessels of the United States, the commanders of which had, at the several times
when they were made, from the Executive Department of the Government of the
United States, instructions, a copy of one of which is annexed hereto, marked (A),
and that the others were, in all substantial respects, the same ; that in all the instances
in which proceedings were had in the District Courts of the United States resulting in
condemnation, such proceedings were begun by the filing of libels, a copy of one of
which is annexed hereto, marked (B), and that the libels in the other proceedings were
in all substantial respects the same; that the alleged acts or offences for which said
several searches and seizures were made were in each case done or committed in Behring
Sea, at the distances from shore aforesaid; and that in each case in which sentence of
condemnation was passed, except in those cases when the vessels were released after
condemnation, the seizure was adopted by the Government of the United States; and
in those cases in which the vessels were released, the seizure was made by the authority
of the United States. That the said fines and imprisonments were for alleged breaches
of the municipal laws of the United States, which alleged breaches were wholly
committed in Behring Sea, at the distances aforesaid from the shore.
4. That the several orders mentioned in the Schedule annexed hereto, and
marked (0), warning vessels to leave or not to enter Behring Sea, were made by public
armed vessels of the United States, the commanders of which had, at the several times
when they were given, like instructions as mentioned in Finding 3 above proposed,
and that the vessels so warned were engaged in sealing or prosecuting voyages for that
purpose, and that such action was adopted by the Government of the United States.
5. That the District Courts of the United States in which any proceedings were
had or taken for the purpose of condemning any vessel seized, as mentioned in the
Schedule to the Case of Great Britain, pp. 1 to 60, inclusive, had all the jurisdiction
and powers of Courts of Admiralty, including the prize jurisdiction, but that in each
case the sentence pronounced by the Court was based upon the grounds set forth in
the libel. 61
Annex (A).
(See British Counter-Case, Appendix, Vol. I, p. 72.)
gir Treasury Department, Office of the Secretary,
"RfvfWr.*™  +«  ~n       i       i ■, i, Washington, April 21, 1886.
WhTTttS\ H I vi ' Und.er y°Ur command> to the Seal Islandsf&c, you are
SecJhfr, fq^Tfr^ ?°QTI *° enforce **" law contained in the provisions ol
S3*^^ ? ^ StateS ReVised Statutes' and directed t0 seize a11 vessels,
ana arrest and deliver to the proper authorities any or all persons whom vou may detect
violating the law referred to, after due notice shall have been given.     "
*ou will also seize any liquors or fire-arms attempted to be introduced into the
country without proper permit, under the provisions of Section 1,955 of the Revised
Statutes, and the Proclamation of the President, dated the 4th February, 1870.
Respectfully yours,
r,   i •   ,«-   .   „ C. S. Fairchild,
Captain M. A. Healy, Acfing Secretaryt
Commanding Revenue-steamer " Bear,"
San Francisco, California.
■I
Annex (B).
(See British Case, Appendix, Vol. Ill, " United States No. 2,1890," p. 65.)
In the District Court of the United States for the District of Alaska.
August Special Term, 1886.
-To the Honourable Lafayette Dawson,
Judge of said District Court:
The libel of information of M. D. Ball, Attorney for the United States for the
district of Alaska, who prosecutes on behalf of said United States, and being
present here in Court in his proper person, in the name and on behalf of the said
United States, against the schooner " Thornton," her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo and
furniture, and against all persons intervening for their interest therein, in a case of
forfeiture, alleges and informs as follows :—
That Charles A. Abbey, an officer in the Revenue Marine Service of the United
States, and on special duty in the waters of the district of Alaska, heretofore, to wit,
on the 1st day of August, 1886, within the limits of Alaska territory, and in the waters
thereof, and within the civil and judicial district of Alaska, to wit, within the waters
. of that portion of Behring Sea belonging to the said district, on waters navigable from
the sea by vessels of 10 or more tons burden, seized the ship or vessel, commonly called
a schooner, the "Thornton," her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo, and furniture, being the
property of some person or persons to the said Attorney unknown, as forfeited to the
United States, for .the following causes:—
That the said vessel or schooner was found engaged in killing fur-seal within the
limits of Alaska Territory, and in the waters thereof, in violation of Section 1,956 of
the Revised Statutes of the United States.
And the said Attorney saith that all and singular premises are and were true, and
within the Admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of this Court, and that by reason thereof,
and by force of the Statutes of the United States in such cases made and provided,
the afore-mentioned and described schooner or vessel, being a vessel of over 20 tons
burden, her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo, and furniture became and forfeited to
the'use of the said United States, and that said schooner is now within the district
aforesaid.
Wherefore, the said Attorney prays that the usual process and monition ot this
honourable Court issue in this behalf, and that all persons interested in the before-
mentioned and described schooner or vessel may be cited in general and special to
answer the premises, and all due proceedings being had, that the said schooner or vessel,
her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo, and furniture may, for the case aforesaid, and others
i:W ^r" ifcMM-i-fc-r'W'-K 62
Hi
appearing, be condemned by the definite sentence and decree of this honourable
Court, as forfeited to the use of the said United States in such cases made and
provided.
(Signed) M.I). BALL,
United States' District Attorney for the District of Alaska.
Annex (C).
The following Table shows the names of the British sealing-vessels seized or
warned by United States' revenue cruizers, 1886-90, and the approximate distance
from land when seized. The distances 'assigned in the cases of the "Carolena,"
"Thornton," and "Onward," are on the authority of U.S. Naval Commander Abbey
(see 50th Cong., 2nd Sess., Senate Ex. Doc. No. 106, pp. 20, 40, 50). The distances
assigned in the cases of the "Anna Beck," "W. P. Sayward," "Dolphin," and "Grace,"
are on the authority of Captain Shepard, " U.S.R.N. (Blue Book), United States, No. 3
(1890)," pp. 80-82. See Appendix, vol. in. Neah Bay is in the State of Washington,
and the " Pathfinder was seized there on charges made against her in Behring Sea in
the previous year.   She was released two days later:—
Name of Vessel.
Date of Seizure.
Approximate Distance from Land
when seized.
United States' Vessel
making Seizure.
Carolena     ..           ..
August   1, 1886 ..
75 miles             ..            ..           ..
Corwin.
Thornton    ..            ..
1,
fv/j,                                    ..                         ..                          ..
>)
Onward      ,.
2
110      ,,                        . .                  . .                  . .
Favourite    ..            ..
3,
Warned by "Corwen" in about the
same position as " Onward."
Anna Beck ..            ..
July        2,1887..
66 miles              ..            ..             ..
Rush.
W. P. Sayward         ..
9,
Ov       jj                          •«                   • •                   « *
5)
Dolphin
12,
40    „
Grace         ..            ..
17,
9fi
Alfred Adams
August 10,          ..
62
Ada
25,
15    „                  .               ..             ..
Bear.
Triumph     ..            ..
4,
Warned   by " Rush" not   to   enter
Behring Sea.
Juanita      ..           ..
July     81, 1889 ..
66 miles
Rush.
Pathfinder ..
29,
50    „
Triumph     ..           ..
11,
Ordered out of Behring Sea by " Rush."
(?) As to  position   when   warned.
35 miles
Black Diamond
11,
66 miles
Lily
August   6,           ..
Ordered out of Behring Sea by " Rush."
Ariel           .,            ..
July      30,
S5                                 5)                                 »
Kate
August 13,           ,.
5>                                   >>                                    )>
Minnie        ..            ..
July      15,
65 miles             ..            ,.            ..
Pathfinder ..
March  27,
Seized in Neah Bay          ..
Corwin.
No. 78.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—'(Received June 23.)
My Lord, Paris, June 20, 1898.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
Nos. 24-29 of the proceedings before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in No. 78.
Protocole No. 24.—Seance du Mercredi, 17 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend son argumentation.
A 1 heure 30 la stance est1 suspendue. 63
A la reprise, Sin Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie
Ml&K £•££«,' heMeS 4° et le M™*'■■*«■* i«r«*« Mardi,
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 17 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President                      ..        ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L Agent desi Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. EOSTER.
t   d?    A . la Grande-Bretagne    ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 24.—Meeting of Wednesday, May 17, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 3*40 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 23rd May, 1893, at
11*30 A.M.
Done at Paris, the 17th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, \ rl    ,
H. Cunynghame, > ^-Secretaries.
1
Inclosure 2 in No. 78.
Protocole No. 25.—Seance du Mardi, Mai 23,1893.
LE Tribunal s'est r&ini a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et  le Tribunal   s'ajourne   au  lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 23 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..        ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
.    L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. EOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H, TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 25.—Meeting of Tuesday, May 23, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
•■ii,i»ilW*»ti«A«"«..V :-   ; ■»k^
Hi
r
61
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11*30 a.m
Done at Paris, the 23rd May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H, Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
'}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 3 in No. 78.
Protocole No. 26.—Se'ance du Mercredi, 21 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est r6uni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend son argumentation.
La stance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la stance est levee et   le   Tribunal   s'ajourne   au   lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 24 Mai, 1893, et ont signe*:
Le President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        .. JOHN W. EOSTER,
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .. CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire   A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 26.—Meeting of Wednesday, May 24, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 A.M., all the Arbitrators being present
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the.Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11-30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 24th May, 1893, and signed :
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
}
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 4 in No. 78.
Protocole No. 27.—Seance du Jeudi, 25 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend sa plaidoirie.
La stance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell poursuit son argumentation.
A 4 heures la stance est levee et le Tribunal   s'ajourne au   lendemain
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 25 Mai, 1893, et ont signe*:
Le President  ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        .. JOHN W. EOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .. CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire   A. IMBERT. 65
[English version.]
Protocole No. 27.—Meeting of Thursday, May 25, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 25th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .'
The Agent for "Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed)       A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 5 in No. 78.
Protocole No. 28.—Seance du Vendredi, 26 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 30 Mai,
a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 26 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..        ..        ..
L'Aorent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocole No. 28.—Meeting of Friday, May 26,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1-30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, May 30, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 26th May, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN. W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed)       A. Bailly-Blanchard,!
H. Cunynghame, J
Co-Secretaries.
[691] If
\H
I1
ms
IK:
66
Inclosure 6 in No. Tfe.
Protocole No. 29.—Seance du Mardi, 30 Mai, 1893^
LE Tribunal s'est reuni k 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Cbarles Russell reprend son argumentation.
A 1 heure 30 la seance est suspendue.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance  est  levee  a  4   heures,   et le  Tribunal  s'ajourne   au   lendemain   a
J1 heures 30.
A-insi fait a Paris, le 30 Mai,. 1393, et ont signe :
Le President.."      ..        M     ••    ALPH DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     .. ..    JOHN W. EOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..     CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocole No. 29.—Meeting of Tuesday, May 30, 1893.
The Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal, took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 30th May, 1893, and signed :
The President
The Asrent for the United States   .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary .
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed)       A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL,
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Co-Secretaries.
No. 79.
-
.Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 23.)
My Lord, Paris, June 22, 1893.
THE argument on the British side in the Behring Sea Arbitration having now
concluded, I have deemed it my duty to consider whether some reduction cannot be
made in the Staff of this Agency in accordance with what I know to be your Lordship's
wish, that expense should, as far as possible, be spared.
With this object I h&ye already dispensed with the services of Mr. J. M. Macoun,
whose assistance I consider to be no longer necessary, and I have thought it right to
inform Mr. Box, the Junior Counsel, that, as the oral argument of the British Counsel
has terminated, he can now be relieved of his duties here.
I have great pleasure in expressing to your Lordship my appreciation of the
ability and assiduity displayed by Mr. Box in: the course of the preparation of the
Counter-Case and written Argument of Great Britain, and of the valuable assistance
he has rendered during the oral arguments of Counsel befone)the Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPER. 67
No. 80.
Mr. Tapper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 23.)
My Lord, .
to MhZSS^ yeSteraa/S P™eedi»^ir meZTwl^LT^elin
rPnnS a"ihTi,T' n C?rr.esPondence J«st laid before Parliament containing the
leport of the Russian Commission respecting the seizures of British vessels off the
Sp^o^il    Vs' * ?! T Proceedi*S to «*d ^om this paper when the United
States Counsel objected to Us reception if put forward as evidence.    Some discussion,
ensued on this  subject   and   the President, after consultation with his colleagues,,
announced that the Tribunal would hear the document, but would reserve to themsdves
to consider whether it should be received as evidence or not.
1 oSu^^nS^rUp(f read extracts f™ M. Chichkine's note to Sir R. Morier of
the 29th May (10th June), 1893, showing the readiness of the Russian Government to
proceed to the assessment of an indemnity to be paid to the owners of the two British
vessels which were seized without proof of having fished in Russian territorial waters.
Mr. Robinson then continued his speech.
He argued at some length to prove that the area over which any Regulations to
be made by the Tribunal should extend ought to be confined to Behring Sea, and had
just concluded his address when the Tribunal adjourned for the day.
Mr Phelps is to commence his reply on behalf of the United States at to-day's
meeting.
I have, &c.
(Signed)        CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 81.
M;r. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 24.)
My Lord, Paris, June 23, 1893..
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, Mr. Phelps commenced his reply on
behalf of the United States by defining what he maintained had been the position of
his Government throughout the controversy, namely, that the actual facts of seal life
and the preservation of the species were the main objects of the Arbitration, andthat
all questions "as to jurisdiction over Behring Sea and the title thereto derived by the
United States from Russia were merely secondary considerations,.
He attributed the firm attitude taken up by Mr. Blaine on the jurisdictional
claim to the fact that he had been drawn away from the main subject of the controversy by the adroitness of the arguments put forward by Lord Salisbury.
Mr. Phelps then dwelt at some length on the negotiations for a close season which
took place in 1888 between Lord Salisbury and himself, and maintained that a distinct
agreement had then been arrived at, which, owing to the objections of Canada, had
been subsequently renounced.
He next proceeded to criticise the attitude of Great Britain in the controversy,
maintaining that, while at first she had been willing to join in Regulations necessary
for the preservation of the seals, her present position was merely that of the champion
OT "QPlfl^'lC S6H.llIl*-1(,
He concluded his remarks for the day by a definition of the principles of international law, which he considered should guide the decision of the Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
[691]
K 2
^•"•jfisiU— :'h**-*i*4"1: 68
No. 82.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 24.)
My Lord, Paris, June 23, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to call your Lordship's attention to the necessity which, in
my opinion, exists for the presence of Her Majesty's Attorney-General here.
I am convinced after most careful observation that it is very desirable for him to
be in Court during the reply of Mr. Phelps, and particularly when that gentleman
deals with the subject of Regulations. It is improbable that Mr. Phelps will speak
beyond Eriday next, and he resumes his argument on Tuesday.
Sir Richard Webster, who proceeded to London to-day, will, I feel sure, confirm
me in the opinion I have expressed.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 83.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, June 27, 1893.
I HA YE received your despatch of the 22nd instant, reporting that the
services of Mr. J. M. Macoun have been dispensed with, and that you have also
informed Mr. Box that he is no longer required to remain in Paris.
Whilst approving your action as above stated, I have to express to you my
satisfaction at your report of the valuable assistance rendered by Mr. Box in connec
tion with the Behring Sea Arbitration.
I am, &c.
(Signed) ROSEBERY.
No. 84.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 28.)
My Lord, Paris, June 27, 1893.
AT the meeting of the 23rd instant Mr. Phelps continued his argument, and,
after dealing with the principles of international law, which, he held, should guide
the decision of the Tribunal, proceeded to consider at length the question .of property
in the seals.
He had not concluded this portion of his speech at the end of the day's pro
ceedings
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 85.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received June 29.)
My Lord, Paris, June 28, 1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, Mr. Phelps continued his speech, and,
in connection with the United States' claim to property in the seals, dealt with the
question of the intermingling of the Russian and American herds. 69
coucSLx™rL?oVt ^:tsied the ^ ^«the ^ p ~
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 86.
Mr,
Tupper to the Earl of Rosebevy.—(R.ceived June 30.)
7 ™d' -dt^t- f| . Pom, June 29.1893.
i M.K. PHELPS continued, before the Tribunal yesterday, his argument dealing
with the property interest in the sealing industry claimed bv the United States as a
nation.
[ . He examined at length the instances quoted in the United States' Case of regular
tions in various countries for the protection of pearl, coral, and oyster fisheries outside
territorial limits, and was considering the existing laws regulating seal fisheries in
different parts of the world when the Tribunal adjourned.
[ have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 87.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 4.)
My Lord, Paris, July 3,1893.
AT the meeting of the Tribunal, held on the 29th June, Mr. Phelps continued his
argument to show that the territorial rights of a nation were capable of extension for
the purpose of protecting marine property.
He endeavoured to justify the statement in the United States' Argument, that
Russia had asserted and exercised such extra-territorial jurisdiction, from the correspondence recently presented to Parliament on the subject of the seizures of British
sealing-vessels by that Government in 1892.
Mr. Phelps further instanced the legislation enforced by the Government of
Sweden and Norway for the protection of their fisheries.
The Tribunal having decided not to sit on the 30th June, it was arranged that
Mr. Phelps should resume his argument this morning.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 88.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 5.)
My Lord, Paris, July 4, 1893.
MR.' PHELPS resumed yesterday his argument by dealing with the first four
questions under Article VI of the Treaty relating to the jurisdiction of Russia over
Behring Sea, and the interpretation of the Treaties of 1824 and 1825.
He examined the language of the Treaty of 1824 between Russia and the
United States, and endeavoured to show that Behring Sea was not included in the
phrase I Pacific Ocean," as used in the first Article. KM RBI
He criticized at some length the list of maps annexed to the Counter-Case of
Great Britain, and maintained that the weight of the geographical evidence supported
his interpretation of the Treaty.
i**<ii!"ryii'iift^'*'i7''l**''i'iW Kfll'ii
HN
'if
HI
■a'-:
70
Mr.  Phelps had concluded his examination of the Treaty of 1824 when the
Tribunal rose for the day, and will proceed this morning to deal with the British Treaty
with Russia of 1825.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 89.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 6.)
My Lord, Paris, July 5, 1893.
MR. PHELPS continued, at the meeting of the Tribunal yesterday, his argument
on the first four questions of Article VI of the Treaty of Arbitration.
He discussed the language of the Treaty of 1825 between Great Britain and
Russia, and the negotiations which led up to it, his object being to show that Behring
Sea was not understood by either party to be included in the phrase Pacific Ocean.
Having concluded his examination of the Treaties of 1824 and 1825, Mr. Phelps
took leave of this part of his subject by referring the Tribunal to the answers to the
our questions of Article VI, suggested at p. 24 of the United States' Counter-
*&&v
first four questior
Case.
He then dealt with the assertion of Great Britain, that the subject under discussion
involved the question of the freedom of the sea, and had only time to make short
progress in this portion of his argument before the adjournment.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
No. 90.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.— (Received July 7.)
My Lord, Paris, July 5, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
Nos. 30 to 39 of the proceedings of the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, <fec
(Signed) CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Inclosure 1 in -No. 90.
Protocole No. 30.—Seance du Mercredi, 31 Mai, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell, au cours de sa plaidoirie, ptesente au Tribunal le document
suivant:—I
| Le Gouvernement do la Grande-Bretagne, ayant soumis aux Arbitres certains
points de fait eompris dans les reclamations de dommages-interets presentees dans
l'Annexe au Memoire Britannique, pages 1 a 60 inclusivement, prie le Tribunal de
decider comme suit a ce sujet:—
11. Que les diverses visites  et saisies de navires  ou  de marchandises et les
differentes arrestations de capitaines et d'equipages, mentionnes respectivement dans"
ladite Annexe, ont ete faites par autorite du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis;
" »'. Qu'elles ont ete effectuees dans des eaux non territoriales;
'* 3. Que les diverses visites, saisies, condamnations et confiscation de navires ou
de marchandises, les differentes arrestations et amendes, et les divers emprisonnements
ont ete motives par de pretendues violations des lois nationales des Etats-Unis,
lesquelles pretendues violations avaient toutes ete commises en haute mer, en dehors
des eaux territoriales des Etats-Unis;
"4. Que les differents ordres mentionnes dans ladite Annexe, enjoignant a certains
navires d'avoir a s'abstenir de poursuivre leurs voyages, ont ete donnes en haute mer 71
en dehors des eaux territoriales en vprtn A* va ,*~ -i- j    ^ ^
Uni. * en elation des lois SStato itM^^*"^' *" JN*
D. yue lesdites Tisjtes, saisies, condamnations, confiscations amende.  nW M
THb^i^i^tint^nrrr I t^^sr^ mm »
application de VArticle V de la Convention on dSlS 1 AvriU89t ^
t TL."<m°rM< E- J- PMf declare que les Etats-TJnis ne sonmettront, de leur cote,
au Tribunal aucune conclusion tendant a des dommases-interets en Tert.ii et ™'
application de l'Article V de la OonTention ou du modus rilTdTlS ArriT 1892  P
Sir Charles Russell acheve ensuite son argumentation.
Sir Richard Webster commence alors sa plaidoirie pour la Grande-Bretagne
La seance est su-peadue a I heure 30. °
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance est leve^ a  i  heures,  et le   Tribunal   s'ajourne   au lendemain I
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 31 Mai, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. SO.—Meeting of Wednesday, May 31, 1893.
THE Tribunal assCnSbled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell, in continuation of his argument, presented to the Tribunal the
following paper:—
" The British Government having submitted to the Arbitrators certain questions
of fact as involved in the claims for damage set forth in the Schedule to the British
Case, pages 1 to 60 inclusive, ask for the following findings thereon, namely:—
" 1. That the several searches and seizures, whether of ships or goods, and the
several arrests of masters and Crews, respectively mentioned in the said Schedule, were
made by the authority of the United States' Government.
" 2. That they were made in non-territorial waters.
" 3. That the several searches, seizures, condemnations and confiscations, whether
of ships or goods, and the several arrests, fines and imprisonments, were for alleged
breaches of municipal laws of the United States, which alleged breaches were wholly
committed on the high seas outside the territorial waters of the United States.
" 4. That the several orders, mentioned in the said Schedule, whereby ships were
prevented from pursuing their voyages, were given on the high seas outside territorial
waters, under the authority of the United States' Government and in execution of the
municipal laws of the United States, and
"5. That the said several searches, seizures, condemnations, confiscations, fines,
imprisonments, and orders were not made, imposed or given under any claim or
assertion of right or jurisdiction except such as is submitted cothe^decision of the
Arbitrators by the questions in Article VI of the Treaty of Arbitration."
Sir Charles Russell further announced that Great Britain would not ask "the
Tribunal for any finding for damages upon and under Article V of the Convention or.
modus vivendi of the 18th April, 1892. «t'G*&F& u
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps announced that the United States would not; on
its behalf, ask the Tribunal for any finding for damages upon and under Article V of
the Convention or modus vivendi of the 18th April, 1892.
•&*r Charles Russell then concluded his argument. ,,.,„„„     1 ^ I .
Sir Richard Webster then commenced his argument Oil behalt ot Great Britain.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess. 7A
On reassembling Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned till the next day, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 31st May, 1893, and signed:
The President         ALPH. DE COURCEL.
The Agent for the United States ..    JOHN W. EOSTER.
The Agent for Great Britain       ..     CHARLES H. TUPPER.
The Secretary         A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 2 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 31.—Seance du Jeudi, ler Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reum a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster poursuit son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance  est   levee , et   le. Tribunal   s'ajourne au lendemain
11 heures 30.
Ainsi. fait a Paris, le ler Juin, 1893, et ont signe
Le President. . ..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
■
[English version.]
Protocol No. 31.—Meeting of Thursday, June 1, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 1st June, 1893, and signed:
Ite The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 3 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 32.—Seance du Vendredi, 2 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster reprend son argumentation..
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 6 Juin, a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 2 Juin, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. EOSTER
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBERT. 73
[English version.]
Protocol No. 32.—Meeting of Friday, June 2,-1893.
^TIib^ffmMed at.U'30' a11 the A^trators being present
Sir Richard Webster resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess
On reassembling  Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 6th June, i
Done at Paris, the 2nd June, 1893, and signed
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame.
at 11*30 a.m.
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Co-Secretaries.
donne
Inclosure 4 in No. 90.
Protocole No. S3.—Seance du Mardi, G Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Son Excellence M.   Gram, Arbitre designe par la  Suede et la Norvege,
lecture de la declaration suivante :—
" Le premier volume de l'Appendice au Memoire des Etats-Unis donne le texte de
la loi et des reglements concernant la protection des baleines sur la c6te de Einmark.
" J'avais l'intention d'expliquer ulterieurement a mes collegues ces lois et reglements en indiquant les circonstances naturclles qui ont oblige la Norvege et la Suede
a. adopter une legislation speciale pour les eanx territoriales, et d'exprimer en meme
temps mon opinion sur la question de savoir si cette legislation et les questions aux-
qtielles elle se rapporte peuvent etre considers comme ayant quelque portee a l'egard
des questions actuellement debattues.
" Comme, toutefois, on a fait allusion, a plusieurs reprises, pendant les dernieres
seances, a la legislation Norvegienne sur la niatiere, j'estime qu'il yaurait presentement
inter&t a donner un bref expose des traits les plus saillants de cette legislation.
" Le caractere particulier de la Loi Norvegienne citee par les Conseils des Etats-
Unis consiste dans la determination d'une saison fermee pour la peche de la baleine.
Quant a ses prescriptions au sujet des eaux interieures et territoriales, elles ne sont, en
somme, que l'application a un cas special des principes generaux etablis par la legislation Norvegienne en ce qui concerne les golfes et les eaux baignant les c6tes. Un
coup d'oeil sur la carte suffira pour montrer le grand nombre de ces golfes—ou | fjords "
et leur importance pour les habitants de la Norvege. Certains de ces fjords ont une
etendue considerable, penetrent tres avant a l'interieur du pays et ont une tres large
embouchure. lis ont ete, toutefois, depuis un temps immemorial, considers comme
des  eaux interieures, et ce principe a toujours ete maintenu, meme a regard des.
etran°*ers«
"II y a plus dc vingt ans, un Gouvernement etranger se plaignit de ce qu'on eut
empeche un navire de sa nationalite de pecher dans un des plus grands fjords du nord
de la Norvege. Les operations de peche qui ont lieu dans ces parages pendant les
ciuatre premiers mois de l'annee sont d'une tres grande importance pour le pays : une
trentaine de mille personnes s'y reunissent chaque annee, du Nord et du Sud, pour
gainer leur vie. Le Gouvernement soumet a son inspection Jes operations de peche
dans les eaux du fjord, abrite par une rangee d'iles contre la violence de la mer.
L'apparition dans ces eaux d'un navire etranger emettant la pretention de prendre
parti cette peche etait un fait sans precedent, et, clans la corrcspondance diplomatique
echangee a ce sujet, le Gouvernement Norvegien insist a energiquement sur le droit
exclusif qu'avaient ses sujets, par suite d'un usage immemorial, de pratiquer cette
11 "La Suede et la Norvege n'ont. d'ailleurs, jamais reconnu la distance de 3 milles
comme formant la delimitation de leurs eaux territoriales Jamais ces deux nays
n'ont conclu aucune Convention ni adhere a aucun Traite consacrant cette regie.
[691]
L
:*U*.-»iiM:',.»ii':".;^-»- ■ i
81;;
74
Leurs lois nationales ont generalement fixe la limite a 1 mille geographique ou h
un quinzieme de degre de latitude, soit 4 milles marins. lis n'ont jamais admis
aucune limite inferieure. En fait, relativement a la question des droits de peche, si
importants pour l'un et l'autre des deux Royaumes-Unis, lesdites limites ont sembie,
dans beaucoup de cas, encore trop restreintes. Quant a cette question et a celles qui
s'y rattachent, je desire me reporter aux communications faites paries membres Norve-
giens et Suedois, au cours des seances de l'lnstitut de Droit International, en 1891 et
1892. Je tiens aussi, en ce qui touche le sujet que je viens de traiter sommairement,
a me referer aux comptes rendus des travaux de la Conference de La Haye en 1882
('Nouveau Recueil General de Martens, IP serie, vol. ix'), ou se trouvent exposees les
raisons pour lesquelles la Suede et la Norvege n'ont pasadhere au Traite de La Haye."
Le President prie les Conseils des deux parties d'avoir ptesentes a l'esprit les
observations de son Excellence M. Gram, au cas oh ils auraient a citer l'exemple
des eaux de la Norvege; mais il croit devoir rappeler que la question de la definition
des eaux territoriales n'est pas soumise aux Arbitres et qu'il n'est pas dans les intentions du Tribunal d'exprimer une opinion en ce qui concerne cette definition.
Sir Richard Webster reprend alors son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures, la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 6 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire ..        ..
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 33.—Meeting of Tuesday, June 6,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
His Excellency M. Gram, the Arbitrator designated by Sweden and Norway, read
the following statement:—
I The Appendix, vol. I, to the United States' Case, gives the text of the Laws and
Regulations relating to the protection of whales on the coast of Einnmarken. It was
my intention later on to explain to my colleagues these Laws and Regulations, in
supplying some information about the natural conditions of Norway and Sweden which
have necessitated the establishment of special rules concerning the territorial waters,
and to state at the same time my opinion as to whether those rules and their subject-
matter may be considered as having any bearing on the present case. As, however, in
the latest sittings reference has repeatedly been made to the Norwegian legislation
concerning this matter, I think it might be of some use at the present juncture to give
a very brief relation of the leading features of those rules.
"The peculiarity of the Norwegian Law quoted by the Counsel for the United
States, consists in its providing for a close season for the whaling. As to its stipulations about inner and territorial waters, such stipulations are simply applications to a
special case of the general principles laid down in the Norwegian legislation concerning
the gulfs and the waters washing the coasts. A glance on the map will be sufficient
to show the great number of gulfs or fiords, and their importance for the inhabitants
of Norway. Some of these fiords have a considerable development, stretching themselves far into the country and being at their mouth very wide. Nevertheless they
have been from time immemorial considered as inner waters, and this principle has
always been maintained, even as against foreign subjects.
"More than twenty years ago, a foreign Government once complained that a
vessel of their nationality had been prevented from fishing in one of the largest fiords
of Norway, in the northern part of the country. The fishing carried on in that neighbourhood during the first four months of every year is of extraordinary importance to
the country, some 30,000 people gathering there from south and north, in order to earn
their living. A Government inspection controls the fishing going on in the waters of
the fiord, sheltered by a range of islands against the violence of the sea. The appearance
in these waters of a foreign vessel pretending to take its share of the fishing, was an
unheard-of occurrence, and in the ensuing diplomatic correspondence the exclusive
S^K 75
right of Norwegian subjects to this industry was energetically insisted upon as founded
m immemorial practice.
"Besides, Norway and Sweden have never recognized the 3-mile limit as the
confines of their territorial waters. They have neither concluded nor acceded to any
Treaty consecrating that rule. By their municipal laws the limit has generally been
fixed at 1 geographical mile, or one-fifteenth part of a degree of latitude, or 4 marine
miles; no narrower limit having ever been adopted. In fact, in regard to this
question of the fishing rights, so important to both of the United Kingdoms, the said
limits have in many.instances been found to be even too narrow, As to this question
and others therewith connected, I beg to refer to the communications presented by the
Norwegian and Swedish members in the sittings of the [ Institut de Droit International'
in 1891 and 1892. I wish also to refer, concerning the subject which I have now very
briefly treated, to the proceedings of the Conference of the Hague in 1882 | Martens'
Nouveau Recueil General, II6 serie, vol. ix '), containing the reasons why Sweden and
Norway have not adhered to the Treaty of the Hague."
The President requested that Counsel on both sides would bear in. mind the observations of his Excellency M. Gram, in case they found it necessary to cite the example
of the waters of Norway, but thought it his duty to remind them that the question of
the definition of territorial waters was not submitted to the Arbitrators and that it was
not the intention of the Tribunal to express any opinion with respect to that definition.
Sir Richard Webster then resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at P^ris, the 6th June, 1893, and signed:
The President ..
The Agent for the United States   .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..        ..        .
ALPH. DE COURCEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H.  CUNYGHAME,
}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 5 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 34.—Seance du Mercredi, 7 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster reprend et termine son argumentation.
M. Christopher Robinson commence ensuite son plaidoyer.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, M. Robinson continue son argumentation. #   |
A 4 heures ia seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemam a 11 heures.
Ainsi fait a ^™*^™\ f ^^ I.    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    ST^/™'P1?R
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire
A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 34.-Meeting of Wednesday, June 1, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster resumed and concluded his argument.
Mr Christopher Robinson then began his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess. ,
On reassembling, Mr. Robinson continued his argument. | |
[691]
HH
1
,i*t^A**4"i*il~'~,l,*
.''jl ?!
76
At 4 "p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11 o'clock.
Done at Paris, the 7th June, 1893, and signed .
The President  ALPH. DE COURCEL
The Agent for the United States ..    JOHN W. EOSTER.
The Agent for Great Britain        ..    CHARLES H. TUPPER.
The Secretary  A. IMBERT.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A, Bailly-Blanciiard, \ Co_8ecretaries.
H. Cunynghame, J
Inclosure 6 in No. 90.
Protocole No.
35.
■Seance du Jeudi, 8 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni cu Chambre du Conseil, a 11 heures, tous les Arbitres
etant presents.
La seance publique a commence a midi.
Mr. Christopher Rjbinson continue et acheve son argumentation.
L'Agent des .'Etats-Unis donne alors lecture de la declaration suivante:—
G r
" Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis,—pour le cas ou la solution donnee par le Haut
Tribunal a certaines questions indiquees dans l'Article VII du Traite comme etant les
' questions ci-dessus relatives a la juridiction exclusive des Etats-Unis' serait, ainsi qu'il
est enonce dans ledit Article VII, ' telles que le concours de la Grande-Bretagne soit
necessaire a l'institution de Reglements en vue de la protection efficace et de la
conservation des phoques a fourrure habitant ou frequentant habituellement la Mer de
Behring,'—expose .que les Reglements suivants sont necessaires et devraient s'appliquer
aux eaux dont il sera fait mention a cet effet ci-apres:
" Premierement.—Aucun citoyen ou.sujet des Etats-Unis ou de la Grande-Bretagne
ne pourra, de quelque facon que ce soit, tuer, capturer, ou poursuivre sur aucun point
de la mer, dans les homes et limites ci-api*es marquees pour la mise en vigueur du
present Reglements aucun des animaux commun6ment appetes ' phoques a fourrure.'
" Deuxiemement.—Le Regleraent qui precede s'appliquera et s'etendra k toutes les
eaux de l'Ocean Pacifique Septentrional ou de la Mer de Behring, au nord du
35e paralieie de latitude nord, et a l'est du 180e meridien de longitude ouest
de Greenwich, en dehors des limites de la juridiction des nations ci-dessus
mentionnees. Toutefois, il ne s'appliquera pas a la poursuite et a la capture
desdits phoques par les Indiens residant sur les c6tes des territoires de la Grande-
Bretagne ou des fitats-Unis, pour leur usage personnel, au moyen de harpons, dans des
pirogues ou embarcations non pontees, non embarquees sur d'autres navires ou
detaohees de ceux-ci, manceuvrees uniquement a la pagaie, et qui ne soient pas montees
par plus de deux hommes chacune, de la fawn anciennement pratiquee par ces
Indiens.
" Troisiemement.—Tout vaisseau, navire, bateau ou autre embarcation (en dehors
des pirogues ou embarcations mentionnees et decrites dans le paragraphe precedent),
appartenant aux citoyens ou sujets de l'une ou l'autre des nations susdites, qui serait
trouve detruisant, poursuivant ou capturant lesdits phoques, ou engage dans un
voyage ayant ce but, dans les eaux ci-dessus deiimitees et decrites, pourra, avec ses
agres, apparaux, materiel, provisions et toutes les peaux de phoques qui se trouveraient
a bord, etre capture et saisis comme prise par tout navire arme pour le service public
de l'une ou Tautre des susdites nations ; et dans le cas d'une telle capture, il pourra
etre amene dans tout port de la nation a laquelle appartiendrait le navire capteur et
etre condamne en suite d'une procedure devant tout Tribunal ayant juridiclion
competente, laquelle procedure sera conduite, autant que faire se pourra, con-
formement aux usages et a la pratique des Cours d'Amiraute siegeanfc comme
Tribunaux de Prises."
L'Agent des Etats-Unis donne e^alement lecture de la proposition suivante :■—
" Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis propose de substituer aux conclusions de fait
ptesentees par le Gouvernement de la Grande-Bretagne les conclusions suivantes.
Dire:
" 1. Que les diverses visites et saisies de navires ou de marchandises et les differentes
arrestations de capitaines et d'equipages, mentionnees respectivement dans ladite Annexe
ont ete faites par autorite du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis. Sur la question de savoir
quels navires et combien parmi les navires mentionnes dans cette Annexe etaient en s;vH;:?2-S;:K;?:Ks;.;;;:;;;.i;.^^
77
ml
al
s
tout ou en partie la propnete do sujets Britanniques, et quels navires et combien parn
ces navires etaient en tout ou en partie la propria* de citoyens Americans, le Triton*
ne se prononce pas II ne determine pas non plus la valeur de ces navires ou de leur
cargaisons, ensemble ou separement.
"2. Que les susdites saisies ont ete faites en mer a plus de 10 milles de toute
cote.
"3. Que lesdites visites et saisies de navires ont ete faites par des navires arn^s
pour le service public des Etats-Unis, dont les Commandants avait recu, toutes les fois
qu'elles ont eu lieu, du Pouvoir Executif du Gouvernement des'Etats-Unis, des
instructions dont un exemplaire est reproduit en copie ci-api-es (Annexe A), les autres
exemplaires desdites instructions etant conformes a ce modele sur tous 'les points
essentiels ; que dans toutes les occasions ou des poursuites entamees devant les Cours de
aisics ont ete accomplis ou commis en mer a, plus de 10 milles de toute c6te; et que,
lans tous les cas ou une cmdamnation a ete prononcee, excepte dans les cas oil le
Sc
dans tous Jes cas ou une cmdamnation a 6te prononcee, exceptt
navire a ete relache apres condamnation, la prise a ete approuvee par le Gouvernement
des Etats-Unis; que les amendes et emprisonnements susdits ont ete prononces a
raisons d'inf factions aux lois nationales des Etats-Unis, infractions toutes commises en
mer a plus de 10 milles de toute c6te.
" 4. Que les diflerents ordres, mentionnes dans ladite Annexe, enjoignant a certains
navires de quitter la Mer de Behring, ont ete donncs par des navires armes pour le
service public des Etats-Unis, dont les Commandants avaient, toutes les fois qu'ils
donnaient ces ordres, des instructions conformes a cclles mentionnees ci-dessus sous
lc No. 3, et que les navires qui ont retm ces sommations etaient occupes a la chasse
des phoques ou faisaient route pour entreprendre cette chasse.
" 5. Que lesdites visites, saisies, condamnations, confiscations, amendes, n'ont ete
operees ou imposees; que lesdits emprisonnements et ordres n'ont ete infliges et
donnes en vertu d'aucune pretention ou affirmation de droit ou de juridiction, autres
que celles qui sont soumises a la decision des Arbitres par les questions posees dans
l'Article VI du Traite d'Arbitrage.
" 6. Que les Cours de District des Etats-Unis devant lesquelles des poursuites ont
ete entamees ou suivies pour obtenir des condamnations contre les navires saisis dont il
est fait mention dans l'Annexe au Memoire de la Grande-Bretagne, pages 1 a 60
inclusivement, avaient tous droits de juridiction et pouvoirs appartenant au Corns
d'Amiraute, y eompris la juridiction de Tribunaux de Prises."
Annexe (A).
(Voir: Contre-Memoire Anglais, Appendice, vol. I, p. 72.)
/T-™^«ni'nn "i Vepartement du Tresor, Cabinet du Secretaire,
(traduction.; i> Washington, le 21 Avril, 1886.
OOMME suite a une lettre du Departement, en date de ce jour, vous enjoignant de vous
diriffei avec le vapeur du service des.Pouan^" Bear,': place.sous votre commandement, vers les
fles aux Phoques, vous etes par les presentes invest! de tous les pouvoirs n^cessanes pour assurer
lWcutiofde la Loi dont les termes sont contenus dans k Section IjM des Statuts Revises des
tftats Urns et ordre vous est donne de saisir tout navne, et_ d'arrSter et hvrer aux au ortes
Smpetentes tout individu ou toutes personnes que vons trouvenez agissant en violation de la Loi
Sentionnee, apres fun ^S^^ I Ml ■
le palTan^n^^ ^ *S St^S fel I ** 1
Proclamation du President en date du 4 Fevrier, 1870.
Respectueusement a vous,
(Sign^) C. S. FAIRCH1LD.
Secretaire par interim*
AU C^tatue™p£r du service dee D.uanee "Bear," « Sau-Frauoieco (Californie). I **
If
1 [Jil
m n
; -d .j. ■
llM"
m-'.:-
7,8
Annexe (B).
. (Voir: Memoire de la Grande-Bretagne, Appendice, vol. Ill, Etats-Unis, No, 2, 1890, p. 65.)
Devant la Cour de District des Etats-Unis pour le District d'Alaska.
Session (Special Term) dAout 1886.
A l'Honorable Lafayette Dawson, Juge de ladite Cour de District.
Le r^quisitoire a fin d'information par lequel M. D. Ball, Attorney des Etats-Unis pour le
district d'Alaska, poursuivant au nom des Etats-Unis et present ici devant la Cour, en ea personne,
comme Representant des Etats-Unis et en leur nom, contre la goelette " Thornton," ses agres,
apparaux, embarcations, cargaisons et materiel et contre toutes personnes intervenant comme
ayant des int^rets engages dans ce navire, en poursuite a fin de confiscation, pr^sente les
allegations et declarations suivantes:
Que Charles A. Abbey, officier du service des Douanes Maritimes des Etats-Unis, charge" d'une
mission speciale dans les eaux du district d'Alaska, anterieurement au present jour, a savoir le
ler Aout, 1886, dans les limites du territoire d'Alaska et dans ses eaux, et dans les limites du
district civil et judiciaire d'Alaska, a savoir dans l'etendue des eaux de cette partie de la Mer de
Behring qui appartient au dit district, dans des eaux navigahles pour des navires venant de la
haute mer et jaugeant 10 tonneaux ou au-dessus, a saisi le vaisseau ou navire communement
denomme goelette, le " Thornton," ses agres, apparaux, embarcations, cargaison et materiel,
lesquels etaient la propriety d'une ou de plusieurs personnes inconnues dudit Attorney, et les a
confisques au profit des Etats-Unis pour les causes ci-apres:
Que ledit navire ou goelette a ete trouve se livrant a la destruction des phoques a fourrure,
dans les limites du territoire d'Alaska et de ses eaux, en violation des dispositions de la Section 1956
des Statuts Revises des Etats-Unis.
Et ledit Attorney declare que toutes les propositions ci-dessus enoncees et chacune d'elles
sont et etaient vraies, et qu'elles tombent sous la juridiction maritime et dAmiraute de cette Cour,
et que, pour cette raison, et en execution des Statuts des Etats-Unis etablis et edictes pour de tels
cas, le navire ou la goelette mentionnee et decrite ci-dessus, jaugeant plus de 20 tonneaux, ses
agres, apparaux, embarcations, cargaison et materiel ont ete et sont confisques au profit des Etats-
Unis, et que ladite goelette se trouve maintenant dans le district susdit.
Ce pourquoi ledit Attorney demande que l'honorable Cour de Justice procede et avise comme
d'usage en cette affaire, et que toutes personnes ayant un interet dans ladite goelette ou navire
soient cities par voie d'assignation g&nerale ou speciale, afin de repondre aux propositions
susenoncees, et que, a la suite de la procedure a ce necessaire, ledit navire ou goelette, ses agres,
apparaux, embarcations, cargaison et materiel, soient condamnes pour ladite cause ou toute autre
qu'il apparaitrait juste, par arret formel et decret de cette honorable Cour, et confisques au profit
desdits Etats-Unis, selon la forme des Statuts desdits Etats-Unis, etablis et edictes pour de tels cas
(Signe)   ^      M. D. BALL,
Attorney des Etats-Unis pour le District d'Alaska.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell commence sa plaidoirie, pour le Gouvernement de
la Grande-Bretagne, sur la question des Eeglements prevus par l'Article VII du Traite
d'Arbitrage.
La seance est levee a 4 heures, et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain. a,
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 8 Juin, 1893, ayant signe :
Le President  ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis    ,.        ..    JOHN W. POSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne .,    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocole No. 35.—Meeting of Thursday, June 8, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled in the Council Chamber at 11 o'clock, all the Arbitrators
being present.
The public sitting commenced at noon.
Mr. Qkristopher Robvnson con tinned-and finished his address.
The United States' Agent then read the following statement :—
"The Government of th&JJniied. Sta,tfis, in the event that the determination of
the High Tribunal of certain questions described in the Vllth Article of the Treaty as 79
'^J^^S^m^ ^.^T6 i™sM™ rf the United States' should,
SC^^f GiS?J?th-Aptlclej ClTe the subJect m such a condition that the
Sr^c^S^ ? 1S n+?cessa7 t0 the establishment of Eegulations for the
propei  protection and preservation of the fur seal in, or habituallv resorting to
shtiSlxten HH thaVheif0U0W^ re^lati°nS are -cessary anl St^me
should extend over the waters hereinafter in that behalf mentioned.
Mrstly.—No citizen or subject of the United States or Great Britain shall in any
manner kill, capture, or pursue anywhere upon the seas, within the limits and
boundaries next hereinafter prescribed for the operation of this Eegulation, any of the
animals commonly called fur seals. *
« Secondly.— The foregoing regulation shall apply to and extend over all those
waters outside the jurisdictional limits of the above-mentioned nations of the North
Pacific Ocean or Behring Sea, which, are north of the 35th parallel of north
latitude, and east of the 180th meridian of longitude west from Greenwich. Provided,
however, that it shall not apply to such pursuit and capture of said seals as may be
carried on by Indians dwelling on the coasts of the territory, either of Great Britain
or the United States, for their own personal use, with spears, in open canoes or boats
not transported by, or used in connection with other vessels, and propelled wholly by
.paddles, and manned by not more than two men each, in the way anciently practised
by such Indians.
Thirdly.—Any ship, vessel, boat, or other craft (other than the canoes or boats
mentioned and described, in the last foregoing paragraph) belonging to the citizens or
subjects of either of the nations aforesaid, which may be found actually engaged in the
killing, pursuit, or capture of said seals, or prosecuting a voyage for that purpose,
within the waters above bounded and described, may, with her tackle, apparel,
furniture, provisions, and any seal-skins on board, be captured and made prize of by
any public armed vessel of either of the nations aforesaid; and, in case of any such
capture may be taken into.any port of the nation to which the capturing vessel belongs,
and be condemned by proceedings in any Court of competent jurisdiction, which
proceedings shall be conducted, so far as may be, in accordance with the course and
practice of Courts of Admiralty when sitting as Prize Courts."
The Agent of the United States also read the following statement:
" Substitute proposed by the Government of the United States for findings of facts
submitted by the Government of Great Britain:—
" 1. That the several searches and seizures, whether of ships or goods, and the
several arrests of masters and crews, respectively mentioned in the said Schedule, were
made by the authority of the United States' Government. Which, and how many of
the vessels mentioned in said Schedule were in whole, or in part, the actual property
of British subjects, and which and how many where in whole, or in part, the actual
property of American subjects, is a fact not passed upon by this Tribunal. Nor is the
value of said vessels or contents, or either of them, determined.
" 2. That the seizures aforesaid were made upon the sea more than 10 miles from
any shore.
"3. That the said several searches and seizures of vessels were made by public
armed vessels of the United States, the Commanders of which had, the several times
when they were made, from the Executive Department of the Government of the
United States, instructions, a copy of one of which is annexed hereto, marked * A,'
and that the others were, in all substantial respects, the same; that in all the instances
in which proceedings were had in the District Courts of the United States resulting in
condemnation, such proceedings were begun by the filing of libels, a copy of one of
which is annexed hereto, marked ' B,' and that the libels in the other proceedings were,
in all substantial respects, the same ; that the alleged acts or offences for which said
several searches and seizures were made, were, in each case, done or committed upon
the seas more than 10 miles from any shore ; and that in each case m which sentence
of condemnation was had, except in those cases when the vessel was released after
condemnation, the capture was adopted by the Government of the United States.
That the said fines and imprisonments were for alleged breaches of the municipal laws
of the United States, which alleged breaches were wholly committed upon the seas
more than 10 miles from any shore. .,„,,, • i  ±  -i
«4 That the several orders mentioned in said Schedule warning vessels to leave
Behring Sea were made by public armed vessels of the United States the Commanders
of which had at the several times when they were given, like instructions as mentioned
in finding 3, above proposed, and that the vessels so warned were engaged ... din,,;
or prosecuting voyages for that purpose.
'&"bv
:»JiUUl*tf>»^M->^ — : 80
"5. That the said several searches, seizures, condemnations, confiscations, fines,
imprisonments, and orders were not made, imposed, or given under any claim or
assertion of right or jurisdiction, except such as is submitted to the decision of the
Arbitrators by the questions in Article VI of the Treaty of Arbitration.
"6. That the District Courts of the United States in which any proceedings wc,
had or taken for the purpose of condemning any vessel seized as mentioned in the
Schedule to the Case of Great Britain, pp. 1 to 60, inclusive, had all the jurisdiction
and power of Courts of Admiralty, including the prize jurisdiction."
Annexe (A).
(See British Counter-Case, Appendix, vol. I, p. 72.)
Treasury Department, Office of the Secretary,
Sir, Washington, April 21, 1886.
Referring to Department letter of this date, directing you to proceed with the revenue-
steamer 1 Bear," under your command, to the Seal Islands, &c, you are hereby clothed with full
power to enforce the Law contained in the provisions of Section 1956 of the United States'
Revised Statutes, and directed to seize all vessels and arrest and deliver to the proper authorities
any or all persons whom you may detect violating the Law referred to, after due notice shall have
been given.
You will also seize any liquors or fire-arms attempted to be introduced into the country
without proper permit, under the provisions of Section 1955 of the Revised Statutes, and the
Proclamation of the President, dated the 4th February, 1870.
Respectfully yours,
(Signed) C. S. FAIRCHILD.
Acting Secretary.
Captain M. A. Healy,
Commanding Revenue-steamer " Bear," San-Francisco, California.
Annexe (B).
(See British Case, Appendix, vol. Ill, U.S. No. 2, 1890, p. 65.)
In the District Court of the United States for the District of Alaska.
August Special Term, 1886.
To the Honorable Lafayette Dawson, Judge of said District Court.
The libel of information of M. D. Ball, Attorney for the United States for the District of
Alaska, who prosecutes on behalf of said United States, and being present here in Court in his
proper person, in the name and on behalf of the said United States, against the schooner
I Thornton," her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo, and furniture, and against all persons intervenina-
for their interest therein, in a cause of forfeiture, alleges and informs as follows:
That Charles A. Abbey, an officer in the Revenue Marine Service of the United States, and
on special duty in the waters of the District of Alaska, heretofore, to wit, on the 1st day of August,
1886, within the limits of Alaska territory, and in the waters thereof, and within the civil and
judicial District of Alaska, to wit, within the waters of that portion of Behring Sea belonging to
the said District, on waters navigable from the sea by vessel of 10 or more tons burden, seized
the ship or vessel commonly called a schooner, the " Thornton," her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo,
and furniture, being the property of some person or persons to the said Attorney unknown, as
forfeited to the United States, for the following causes:
That the said vessel or schooner was found engaged in killing fur seal within the limits of
Alaska territory, and in the waters thereof, in violation of Section 1953 of the Revised Statutes
of the United States.
And the said Attorney saith that all and singular the premises are and were true, and within
the Admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of this Court, and that by reason thereof, and by force of
the Statutes of the United States in such cases made and provided, the afore-mentioned and
described schooner or vessel, being a vessel of over 20 tons burden, her tackle, apparel, boats,
cargo, and furniture, became and are forfeited to the use of the said United States, and
that said schooner is now within the district aforesaid.
Wherefore the said Attorney prays the usual process and monition of this honourable Court
issue in this behalf, and that all persons interested in the before-mentioned and described schooner
or vessel may be cited in general and special to answer the premises, and all due proceedings
being had, that the said schooner or vessel, her tackle, apparel, boats, cargo, and furniture may
for the cause aforesaid, and others appearing, be condemned by the definite sentence and decree 81
rfS-SiZwtlS0^ TT tftlll ^ T °f the said Med Ste^> according to the form
ol the btatute ot the said United States m such cases made and provided.
(Signed) M. D. BALL,
United States' District Attorney for the District of Alaska,
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling Sir Charles Russell began his argument on behalf of the Government ot Great Britain on the question of Eegulations as contemplated by Article VII
of tho Treaty of Arbitration.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 8th June, 1893, and signed:
The President        ALPH DE COUECEL.
The Agent for the United States..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary       A. IMBEET
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed)       A. Baillt-Blanohard,
H. Cunynghame,
}
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 7 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 36.—Se'ance du Vendredi, 9 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend son argumentation de la veille.
La seance est suspendue a I heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Charles Russell continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance est levee a 4 heures et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 13 Juin, a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 9 Juin', 1893, et ont signe :
Le President
L'Agent des Etats-Urfis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.    tif
[English version.]
Protocol No. 36.—Meeting of Friday, June 9, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed his argument of the'previous day.
At 1-30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Charles Russell continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 13th June, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at ^^W^ 1893, and signed : ^ ^^
^ KS^flu.U^BW-..    ^L^S^U?PEE
The Agent for Great Britain        ..    CHAELES H. » I»
The Secretary'
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Sio-ned) A. BAitLT-BrJANChard,
H. Cunynghame,
Co-Secretaries.
[691]
M 82
■&
Inclosure 8 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 37.—Se'ance du Mardi, 13 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni all heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Charles Russell reprend et acheve son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster commence sa plaidoirie pour la Grande-Bretagne
sur la question des Eeglements.
A  4 heures la seance-est   levee   et   le  Tribunal   s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 13 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President. .■       ..       ...        ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne    ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire .. *      ..        ..    A. IMBEET.
[English version/]
Protocol No. 37.—Meeting of Tuesday, June 13, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all ttie Arbitrators beiag present.
Sir Charles Russell resumed and concluded his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess. »-
On reassembling, Sir Richard  Webster began his argument on behalf Of Great
Britain on the question of Eegulations.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at 11*30 a.m.
* Jfone at Paris, the 13th June, 1893, and signed : •
The President
The Agent for the United States  ..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary "       ..        ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
{Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H» Cunynghame,
I
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 9 in No. 90,
Protocole No. 38.—Se'ance du Mercredi, 14 Juin, 1893.
M
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 14 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBEET.
M 83
[English version.]
Protocol No. 38.—Meeting of Wednesday, June 14,1893.
™ Tfb?Iiil ^mbled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 13th June, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,"!
H. Cunynghame, J
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. FOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 10 in No. 90.
Protocole No. 39.—Se'ance du Jeudi, 15 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a II heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 15 Juin, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 39.—Meeting of Thursday, June 15,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster resumed his argument.
At 1 30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reasembling, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 15th June, 1893, and signed:
The President ..        ..        •
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary        	
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,! Co.8ecretaries,
H. Cunynghame,        J
[691]
M 2 84
No. 91.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 8.)
My Lord, Paris, July 7,1893.
ME. PHELPS, in continuing his argument on the 5th instant, dealt with the
question of the extent of the freedom of the sea. He then passed on to consider the
facts to which the abstract rules propounded by him were to be applied. After a
reference to the value of the sealing industry he proceeded to attack pelagic sealing,
and for that purpose entered into an examination of the evidence submitted by both
sides.
He first referred to the question of the number of female seals killed at sea, and
did not finish his observations on this subject until yesterday.
He next discussed the evidence respecting the dead pups found on the islands,
and concluded the day's proceedings with a reference to the criticisms made on the
British side with regard to the management of the sealing industry on the islands by
the United States' authorities.
Mr. Phelps announced that he hoped to be able to finish his speech to-day.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPER.
KM"
No. 92.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 12.)
My Lord, Paris, July 11,1893.
IN his speech on the 7th instant Mr. Phelps concluded his argument against
pelagic sealing, and after the luncheon interval proceeded to deal with the question of
Eegulations.
His remarks on this subject were directed to prove the inadequacy of the
measures proposed on the British side to preserve the seals from extermination.
He was unable to close his address before tho hour of adjournment, and it was
arranged that the Tribunal should sit at 2 o'clock on the following day to enable
him to conclude.
On the 8th instant Mr. Phelps finished his speech, and after an expression of
thanks on both sides to the President and other Arbitrators, the public sittings of the
Tribunal were brought to a close.
I have, &c.
(In the absence of Mr. Tupper),
(Signed) E. P. MAXWELL.
St
No. 93.
' Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 19.)
My Lord, Paris, July 18, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocols
of the proceedings before the Tribunal of Arbitration, Nos. 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46,
and 47.
Owing to the necessity of making some alterations in the text, the 41st Protocol
has not yet been issued.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE. 85
Inclosure 1 in No. 93.
Protocole No. 40.—Se'ance du Vendredi, 16 Juin, 1893.      f
Jl RMwlIt 11 ^ I h6UreS't0US leS Arbitres etant presents.
b?r tac/wrd ITe6^er reprend son argumentation.
.La seance est suspendue a 1 heure
A la reprise Sir Richard Webster continue sa plaidoirie.
temu^iroT Jj "r        ' ^ 3 "SSSSH /e Pr<rident annonce 1ue> Pendant ™*«K»
Puis le Tribunai s'ajourne jusqu>au Mardi> 20 |g| k 1 heureg
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 16 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     . j
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 40.—Meeting of Friday, June 16,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11 o'clock, all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
The President, in adjourning, announced that during the temporary absence of
Mr. Cunynghame, the Tribunal authorized Mr. Henry Hannen, Barrister-at-Law, to
perform his duties.
At 3*30 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, 20th June, at 11-30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 16th June, 1893, and signed:
The President       ..        ..        ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
The Agent for the United States..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
The Agent for Great Britain      ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blancuard
H. Cunynghame,
'"I Co.
A. IMBEET.
Secretaries.
Inclosure 2 in No. 93.
Protocole No. 42.—Seance du Mercredi, 21 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster presente et propose de lire au Tribunal certains documents
qui viennent d'etre distribues au Parlement Britannique et qui contiennent une
correspondance entre la Grande-Bretagne et la Eussie au sujet des saisies de navires
Anglais par les croiseurs Eusses dans la Mer de Behrmg.
Mr. Carter s'oppose a ce que ces documents soient considers comme ayant ete
deposes devant le Tribunal. .,      ,     ,   .    ,
Apres avoir consulte ses collegues, le President declare que le Tribunal autorise la
lecture de ses pieces, mais en se reservant de decider ulteneurement si elles seront
admises ou non comme moyen de preuve.
Sir Richard Webster lit alors un extrait des documents en question.
Mr. Christopher Robinson reprend ensuite son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30. - • j • •
A la reprise, Mr, Robinson continue et acheve sa plaidoirie.
-! *«»**•*»*-.*»■*-«*•**■• 86
A 3 heures 50 la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 21 Juin, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         .. ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        .. JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne    .. CHAELES H. TLTJPPEE.
Le Secretaire   A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 42.—Meeting of Wednesday, June 21, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster produced, and proposed to read to the Tribunal certain documents recently presented to the Parliament of Great Britain containing correspondence
between Great Britain and Eussia on the subject of the seizure of British vessels by
Eussian cruizers in the Behring Sea.
Mr. Carter objected to these documents being regarded as before the Tribunal.
The President, after consultation with his colleagues, announced that the Tribunal
would permit the documents to be read, but reserved to itself for further consideration
the question of their admissibility as evidence.
Sir Richard Webster then read an extract from the documents in question.
Mr. Christopher Robinson then resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took-a recess.
On reassembling, Mr. Robinson continued and concluded his argument.
At 3*50 p.m., the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 1P30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 21st June, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain .,
The Secretary       • -•        ..       ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, Co-Secretary.
Henry A. Hannen, Acting Co-Secretary.
Inclosure 3 in No. 93.
Protocole No. 43.—Seance du Jeudi, 22 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps commence sa plaidoirie pour les Etats-Unis.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edvjard J. Phelps continue son argumentation.
La seance est levee a, 4 heures,   et  le   Tribunal  s'ajourne   au  lendemain
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 22 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHAS. H. TUPPEE.   m
Le Secretaire  A. IMBEET.
a
[English version.]
Protocol No. 43.—Meeting of Thursday, June 22,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps began his argument on behalf of the United
States.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess* ■Jv$&fflR$.\$/i
87
At 4 p.m the lribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a m.
Done at Pans, the 22nd June, 1893, and signed I
Tb! AreSiffnt ISIIfl     '• ALPH- DE COUECEL.
lhe Agent for the United States.. JOHN W POSTEE
The Agent for Great Britain      .. CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
•lne Secretary         A> IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, Co-Secretary.
Henry A. Hannen, Acting Co-Secretary.
Inclosure 4 in No. 93.
Protocole No. ^.—Se'ance du Vendredi, 23 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend son argumentation.
. La seance est suspendue a, 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne jusqu'au Mardi, 27 Juin, h
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 23 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE,
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 44.—Meeting of Friday, June 23,1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Tuesday, the 27th June, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 23rd June, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States   .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary f.
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, Co-Secretary.
Henry A. Hannen, Acting Co-Secretary.
Inclosure 5 in No. 93.
Protocole No. ^.-Seance du Mardi, 27 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 beures 30, S|§« tot *****
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend sa plaidome.
ftS^wStt Bdw^lfhelps poursuit son argumentation. 88
A   4 heures la seance   est.levee   et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain  h
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 27 Juin, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         .. ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     .,        .. JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .. CHAELES H. TUPPER.
Le Secretaire   A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 45.—Meeting of Tuesday, June 27, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m , all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 27th June, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States ..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..        ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPER.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. BAiLLr-BLANCHARD, Co-Secretary.
Henry A. Hannen, Acting Co-Secretary.
Inclosure 6 in No. 93.
Protocole No. 46.—Se'ance du Mercredi, 28 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Mr. H.  Cunynghame reprend ses  fonctions   de Co-Secretaire, qui avaient 6t$
exercees provisoirement par Mr. Henry Hannen.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue sa plaidoirie. j^
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps poursuit son argumentation.
La seance est levee   a   4 heures   et   le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 28 Juin, 1893, et ont signe :
Le President         ..    ALPH. DE COURCEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        ..    JOHN W. POSTEE.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le Secretaire  A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 46.—Meeting of Wednesday, June 28, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
Mr. H. Cunynghame resumed his duties of Co-Secretary, which had been fulfilled
temporarily by Mr. Henry Hannen.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On realsembling, the Honourable Edward J> Phelps continued his argument, tip' S353S3«JfSS35SSS32**lS!5*3
§1 89
At 4 p.m the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Pans, the 28th June, 1893, and signed
The President ..        M
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate
(Signed)
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
A. Bailly-Blanchard,"! n   «
H. Cunynghame, ^-Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 7 in No. 93.
Protocole No. 47.—Se'ance du Jeudi, 29 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au Lundi, 3 Juillet, a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 29 Juin, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPER. 1
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 47.—Meeting of Thursday, June 29, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned until Monday, the 3rd July, at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 29th June, 1893, and signed:
The President ..        «.
The Agent for the United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, 1
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
H. Cunynghame,
Co-Secretaries.
No. 94.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 26.)
M   Lord, Paris> MV 23>1893*
I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship copies of the official Protocol
No. 41 of the proceedings before the Behring Sea Tribunal of Arbitration.
I have, &c,
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Inclosure in No. 94.
Protocole No. 41.—Se'ance du Mardi, 20 Juin, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
Sir Richard Webster continue son argumentation. .„..,, ,
L'Agent de Sa Majeste Britannique depose devant le Tribunal, au nom de son
Gouvernement, un projet de Reglements dont le teste suit:-
[691] 90
" Reglements.
" 1. Tout b&timent employd a la chasse des phoques en mer devra se pourvoir de
licences a l'un des ports indiques ci-dessous:—
" Victoria, dans la Province.de la Colombie Britannique;
" Vancouver, dans la Province de la. Colombie Britannique;
" Port Townsend, dans le Territoire de Washington, Etats-Unis •
" San-Prancisco, dans l'Etat de Californie, Etats-Unis.
1 2. Ces licences ne seront accordees qu'a des batimentsra voiles.
13. II sera etabli autour des Iles Pribiloff une zone de 20 milles a l'interieur de
laquelle la chasse des phoques sera interdite en toute saison.
"4. II y aura, du 15 Septembre au ler Juillet, une saison de cl6ture, pendant
laquelle la chasse des phoques ne sera point permise dans la Mer de Behring.
15. II ne pourra etre fait usage ni de carabines ni de filets pour la chasse des
phoques en mer.
16. Tout b&timent employe k la chasse des phoques devra porter' un pavilion
distinctif.
17. Les patrons des batiments employes a la chasse des phoques devront tenir un
journal ou ils reieveront avec soin les epoques et les emplacements de la chasse, le
hombre et le sexe des phoques captures; ils devront tenir un journal ou ils reieveront
avec soin les epoques et les emplacements de la chasse, le nombre. et le sexe des
phoques captures j ils devront faire figurer un' extrait dudit journal clans leur journal
de bord.
" 8. Les licences tomberont en decheance en cas d'infraction auxdits Eeglements,"
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, Wm Richard Webster reprend et acheve sa plaidoirie.
L'Agent de Sa Majeste Britannique depose alors devant le Tribunal le document
ci-dessous, qu'il presente, d'accord avec l'Agent des Etats-Unis, pour etre substitue aux
documents soumis anterieurement au Tribunal relatiyement aux Conclusions de fait:—
'* Conclusions de fait proposees par V Agent de la Grande-Bretagne, acceptees par l'Agent des
Etats-Unis, qui en admet Vexactitude, et soumises a Vexamen du Tribunal d'Arbitrage.
11| Que les diverses visites et saisies de navires ou de marchandises et les
differentes arrestations de patrons et d'equipages, mentionnees respectivement dans
l'Annexe au Memoire Britannique, pages 1 a, 60 inclusivement, ont ete faites par
autorite du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis. Les questions se rapportant a la valeur
desdits navires ou de leur contenu, ensemble ou separement, et la question de savoir si
les navires designes dans l'Annexe au Memoire Britannique, ou certains d'entre eux,
etaient, en totalite ou en partie, la propriete de citoyens des Etats-Unis, ont ete
retirees et n'ont pas ete l'objet de l'examen du Tribunal, sous cette reserve que les
Etats-Unis garde le droit de soulever ces questions ou quelqu'une d'entre elles, s'ils le
jugent a propos, dans toute negeciation ulterieure pouvant engager la responsabilite du
Gouvernement des Etats-Unis, en ce qui touche le payement des sommes mentionnees
dansTAnnexe au Memoire Britannique.
12. Que les susdites saisies, sauf en ce qui concerne le " Pathfinder,''1 saisi "a
Neah Bay, ont ete effectuees dans la Mer- de Behring, aux distances de la c6te
mentionnees au Tableau ci-annexe, sous la lettre (C).
13. Que lesdites visites et saisies de navires ont ete faites par- des navires armes
pour le service public des Etats-Unis, dont les Commandants avaient recu, toutes les
fois qu'elles ont eu lieu, du Pouvoir Executif du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis, des
instructions dont un exemplaire est reproduit en copie ci-apr6s (Annexe A), les autres
exemplaires desdites instructions etant conformes a ce mocieie sur tous les points
essentiels; que, dans toutes les occasions ou des poursuites entamees devant les Cours
de District des Etats-Unis ont ete suivies de condamnations, ces poursuites ont debute
par le d6p6t d'un acte d'accusation, dont une copie est annexee ci-dessous (Annexe B),
les actes d'accusation deposes dans les autres procedures etant semblables a ce modele,
en tous points essentiels • que les actes ou delits, alleges comme motifs de ces visites
et saisies, ont ete accompli ou commis dans la Mer de Behring, aux distances de la
c6te ci-dessus indiquees; et que dans tous les cas ou une condamnation a ete prononcee
excepte ceux ou les navires ont ete relaches apres condamnation, la saisie b ete
approuvee par le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis; et que, dans les cas ou les navires ont
j»Ste relaches, la saisie avait ete opetee par autorite du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
que les amendes et emprisonnements susdits ont ete prononces a raispn d'infraction^ •ing
91
^^Sfe^^^^^ toute* commises d*ns la Mer de Behi
aux aistances cle la c6te ci-dessus indiquees.
enioi™?T J.f.'Jferents ordres mentionnes dans l'Annexe ci-jointe sous la lettre (C),
oTe^onr,^ , naVlr *S de qU]tter k Mer de Behri»S ™ de ™ Pas 7 entrer
Comrnnnd^^ J * de8,na™81 arl^s pour le service public des Etats-Unis, dont les
ooSniS anient toutes les fois qu'ils ont donne ces ordres, des instructions
fSl I' **?tl0nnee/ llNfso™ le No. 3, et que les navires qui ont recu
^!^ 3 +1 l6taien! °CCmp(5s h la chasse des Pho<lues on faisaient route pour entre-
mentLT^Uvlt     quecette ^on de P™ceder a ete sanctionnee par le Gouverne-
£ '?' ^Ue leS C™rs de District des Etats-Unis devant lesqueUes des poursuites ont
et6 entamees ou suivies pour obtenir des condamnations contre les navires saisis dont il
est fait mention dans 1 Annexe au Memoire de la Grande-Bretagne, pages 1 a 60
lnciusivement, avaient tous droits de juridiction et pouvoirs appartenant aux Cours
d Amiraute, y eompris la juridiction de Tribunaux de Prises, mais que, dans chaque cas
particulier, la sentence prononcee par la Cour s'appuyait sur les causes mentionnees
dans 1 acte d'accusation."
Annexes (A) et (B). ;
(Pour le texte de ces Annexes, voir le Protocole 35, Annexes (A) et (B) aux Conclusions de
fait prdsentdes par l'Agent des Etats-Unis.)
Annexe (C).
La Table ci-dessous contient les noms des navires Britanniques employes a la chasse des
phoq-tfes, qui ont dte saisis ou avertis par les croiseurs du service des Douanes des Etats-Unis, de
1886 a 1890, et la distance approximative de la terre ou ces saisies ont eu lieu, Ces distances sont
indiqudes, en ce qui concerne les navires " Carolena," " Thornton," et " Onward," d'apres le
tdmoigriage du Commandant Abbey, de la Marine des Etats-Unis. (Voir 50e Congres; 2e Session;,
Sehat; Documents Executifs, No. 106, pp. 20,30, et 40.) Elles sont indiqudes, en ce qui concerne les
navires "AnnaBeck," " \Y. P. Sayward," " Dolphin," et "Grace," d'apres le tdmoignage du Capi-
taine Shepard, de la Marine du Trdsor des Etats-Unis. (Livre Blue, Etats-Unis, No. 2, 1890,
pp. 80-82.   Voir Appendice au Mdmoire Britannique, vol. hi.)
Nom du Navire.
Carolena
Thornton
Onward
Favourite
Anna Beck
"W. P. Seyward
Dolphin
Grace ..
Alfred Adams
Ada
Triumph
Juanita
Pathfinder
ftd*H°ph
Black Diamond
Ariel   ..
Kate    ..
Minnie..
Pathfinder
Date de la Saisie.
ler Aout, 1886
ler Aout, 1886
2 Aout, 1886
2 Aout, 1886
•.2 Juillet, 1887
9 Juillet, 1887
12 Juillet, 1887
1*7 Juillet, 1887
10 AoCit, 1887
25 Aout, 1887
4 Aout, 1887
31 Juillet, 1889
29 Juillet, 1889
11 Juillet, 1889
11 Juillet, 1889
6 Aout; 1889
30 Juillet, 1889
13 Aout, 1889
15 Juillet, 1889
27 Mars, 1890
Distance approximative de Terre au moment
de la Saisie.
75 milles      ..            .. • • • •           • •
70     „         ..           .. .. ••
115     „         ..            .. •. ••           ••
Averti par le " Corwin," a peu pres dans la meine
position que le " Onward."
66 milles      ..           .. • • • •
59     „          ..            •• •• ••            ••
40     „ ..
96     „          ..            •♦ •• ••             •'
62     „
15     „          ..             •• •• ••             '
Averti par le " Rush " de ne pas entrer dans la Mer
de Behring.
66 milles      •.            .. • • • •            • '
KQ n| # 9 . « .i
Averti'par le'"Rush" d'avoir a quitter la Mer de
Behring.—Position au moment de l'avertissement: (?)
35 milles      .. • • • • • • • *
66 .. •• • • ** "
Averti"par le "Bush" d'avoir a quitter la Mer de
Behring. .      ',    .,     ,
Averti par le"Rush" d'avoir a quitter la Mer de
Behring.
65 milles      .. •♦
Saisi dans la Baie de Neah.**
Navire   des
Etats-Uuis
qui a fait la
Saisie.
Corwin.
Idem.
Idem.
Bush.
Idem.
Idem.
Idem.
Idem.
Bear.
Rush.
Idem.
Idem.
Idem.
Idem.
Corwin.
[691] 92
Mr. Christopher Robinson commence ensuite son argumentation sur la question des
Reglements.
La  seance   est   levee a  4 heures et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a
11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 20 Juin, 1892, et ont signe:
Le President         .. ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis     ..        .. JOHN W. EOSTER.
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne   .. CHARLES H. TUPPER,
Le Secretaire   A. IMBERT.
[English version.]
Protocol Not 41.—Meeting of Tuesday, June 20, 1893,
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m.j all the Arbitrators being present.
Sir Richard Webster continued his argument.
The Agent of Her Britannic Majesty laid before the Tribunal a scheme of Regulations worded as follows :—
f Regulations.
" 1. All vessels engaging in pelagic sealing shall be required to obtain licences at
one or other of the following ports:—
" Victoria, in the Province of British Columbia.
" Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia. P*
I Port Townsend, in "Washington Territory, in the United States.
" San "Francisco, in the State of California, in the United States.
" 2. Such licences shall only be granted to sailing-vessels.
13. A zone of 20 miles around the Pribyloff Islands shall be established, within
Which no seal hunting shall be permitted at any time.
" 4. A close season, from the 15th September to the 1st July, shall be established,
during which no pelagic sealing shall be permitted in Behring Sea.
" 5. No rifles or nets shall be used in pelagic sealing.
" 6. All sealing-vessels shall be required to carry a distinguishing flag.
" 7. The masters in charge of sealing-vessels shall keep accurate logs as to the
times and places of sealing, the number and sex of the seals captured, and shall enter
an abstract thereof in their official logs.
" 8. Licences shall be subject to forfeiture for breach of above Regulations.
At 1*30, the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, Sir Richard Webster resumed and concluded his argument.
The Agent of Her Britannic Majesty then presented to the Tribunal the following
paper, which -by agreement with the Agent of the United States, was submitted as a
substitute for the papers heretofore presented as to Eindings of fact:—
** Findings of fact proposed by the Agent of Great Britain, and agreed to as proved by the
Agent for the United States, and submitted to the Tribunal of Arbitration for its consideration.
"1. That the several searches and seizures, whether of ships or goods, and the
several arrests of masters and crews, respectively mentioned in the Schedule to the
British Case, p. 1 to 60 inclusive, were made by the authority of the United States'
Government. The questions as to the value of the said vessels or their contents
or either of them, and the question as to whether the vessels mentioned in the Schedule
to the British Case, or any of them, were wholly or in part the actual property of
citizens of the United States, have been withdrawn from, and have not been considered
by, the Tribunal, it being understood that it is open to the United States to raise
these questions or any of them, if they think fit, in any future negotiations as to the
liability of the United States' Government to pay the amounts mentioned-in the
Schedule to the British Case.
M 2. That the seizures aforesaid, with the exception of the •' Pathfinder," seized at
Neah Bay, were made in Behring Sea at the distances from shore mentioned in the
Schedule annexed hereto, marked (C). «
" 3; That the said several searches and seizures of vessels were made by public
armed vessels of the United States, the Commanders of which had, at the several times
when they were made, from the Executive Department of the  Government of the 93
United States, instructions, a copy of one of which is annexed hereto, marked
(A),and that the others ■ were in all substantial respects the same: that in all
the instances m which proceedings were had in the District Courts of the United States
resulting in condemnation, such proceedings were begun by the filing of libels, a copy
of one of which is annexed hereto, marked (B) and that the libels in the other
proceedings were m aU Substantial.respects the same : that the alleged acts or offences
tor which said several searches and seizures were made were in each case done or committed m Behring Sea at the distance from shore aforesaid : and that in each case in
which sentence of condemnation was passed, except in those cases when the vessels
were released after condemnation, the seizure was adopted by the Government of the
United States : and in those cases in which the vessels were released, the seizure was
made by the authority of the United States. That the said fines and imprisonments
were lor alleged breaches of the municipal laws of the United States, Which alleged
breaches were wholly committed in Behring Sea at the distances from the shore aforesaid.
" 4. That the several orders mentioned in the Schedule annexed hereto, and marked
(C), warning vessels to leave or not to enter Behring Sea, were made by public armed
vessels of the United States, the Commanders of which had, at the several times when
they were given, like instructions as mentioned in Einding 3, above proposed, and that
the vessels so warned were engaged in sealing or prosecuting voyages for that purpose,
and that such action was adopted by the Government of the United States.
" 5. That the District Courts of the United States in which any proceedings werg
had or taken for the purpose of condemning any vessel seized as mentioned in the
Schedule to the Case" oil Great Britain, pp. 1 to 60 inclusive, had all the jurisdiction and
powers of Courts of Admiralty, including the Prize Jurisdiction; but that in each
case the sentence pronounced by the Court was based upon the grounds set forth in the
libel." .'.   .
Annexes (A) and (B).
(For the text of these Annexes, see Protocol 35, Annexes (A) and (B) to the Findings of fact
submitted by the" Agent of the United States.)
-Annex (C).
The following ^Table show's the names of the British sealing-vessels seized or warned by
United States revenue oraizers, 1886-90, and the approximate distance from land when seized.
The distances assigned in the cases of the "Carolena," "Thornton" and "Onward are on the
authority of United States' Naval Commander .Abbey. (See 50th Congress, 2nd Session, Senate
Executive Documents, No. 106, pp. 20, 30, and 40.) The distances assigned m the cases of the
"Anna Beck" «W. ft SayWard/' "Dolphin," and "Grace "are on the authority o£ Captain
Sh^ak Sdted/tates' Royal Marine. (Blue Book, United States, No. 2, 1890, pp. 80, 82.- See
Appendix, vol. hi.)  . ■•(!£,
Name of Vessel.
Date of Seizure.
Carolena
Thornton
Onward
Favourite
Anna Beck
W. P. Sayward
Dolphin
Grace ..
Alfred Adams
Ada    ..
Triumph
Juanita..
•Pathfinder
Triumph
Black Diamond
Lily ••
Ariel •.
Kate • *
Minnie..
Pathfinder
• Neah Bay is
her in Behring Sea
August 1, 1886
August 1, 1886
August 2, 1886
August 2, 1886
July 2, 1887
July 9, 1887
July 12, 1887
-{filly-17, 1887 -
August 10, 1887
August 25, 1887
August 4, 1887
July 31, 1889
July 29, 1889
July 11. 1889
July 11, 1889
August 6, 1889
July 30, 1889
August 13, 1889
"July 15, 1889
March 27, 1890
Approximate distance from Land when seized.
75 miles
70 „
115 „
Warned by "Corwin" in about  same position
"Onward,"
66 miles        .. • • • *    .       ' *
59 „
40 „
96 „
62    „
15 •• *• * * " *
Warned by " Rush " not to enter Behring Sea.
66 miles       ..
Ordered out o'f Behring Sea by "Rush, (?)   As
position when warned.
■ "35 miles        .. • • • ■
66 . • •• * * * *
Ordered out of Behring Sea by " Rush.'
Ditto.     r
* 65 miles*      .. ••
Seized in Neah Bay*
United States'
Vessel making
Seizure.
as
to
Corwin;
Corwin.
Corwin.
Rush.
Rush.
Rush.
Rush.
Hush.
Bear.
rRuslir'
-Rifeh^
Rush.
Rush.
Rush.
Rush.
Corwin.
in the State of Washington, and the " Pathfinder" was seized there on charges made against
in the previous year.   She was released two days later. 94
Mr. Christopher Robms&n then began his argument on $he question of RegulatiiaaS
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day, at-11*30 A.M.
Done at Paris, the 20th June, 1893, and signed :
The President
The Agent for the United States..
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary       .,        ..        ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTER.
CHARLES H. TUPPEE*
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Balllt-Blanchard, Co-Sechtury.
Henry A. Hannen, Acting Co*Secretary.
No. 95.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received July 26.)
My Lord, Paris, July 25, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to report that on the close of the United States' argument
on the 8th instant, I took immediate steps for dispensing with the services of as many
as possible of the staff employed here during this Arbitration.
Mr. Piggott and Mr. Eroude accordingly left on the 9th instant.
In consequence, however, of the necessity of having in readiness further
information on certain points connected with seal-life, I deemed It adiasable to retain
Dr. Dawson's services for a. short period longer. I also thought it best that
Mr. Charles Russell should remain for the purpose of assisting Dr. Dawson, and of
finishing the revision of the shorthand notes.
Dr. Dawson having completed his work left here on the 21st instant, and
Mr. Eussell took his departure on the following day.
The only members of the staff now remaining here are Mr. Maxwell and
Mr. Pope.
I have, &c,
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 96.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received August 5.)
My Lord, Paris, August 4, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to transmit copies of the official Protocols Nos. 48, 49; 50,
51, 52, and 53, recording the proceedings before the Behring Sea Arbitration Tribunal.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPIE^
Inclosure 1 in No. 96.
Protocole No. 48.—Se'ance du Lundi, 3 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30.
A, la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait 4 Paris, le 3 Juillet, 1893, etionfr signe"
Le President..        ..        ..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JpHN W. EOSTMT1
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET. 95
[English version.]
Protocol No. 48.—Meeting of Monday, July 3, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paigs, the 3rd July, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .'
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary 	
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. POSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate;
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchaed
H. Cunynghame,
i
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 2 in No. 96.
Protocole No. 49.—Se'ance du Mardi, 4 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni at 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres 6tant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend son argumentation.
La seance est suspendue a, 1 heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue sa plaidoirie.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 4 Juillet, 1893, et ont signe":
Le President..
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
ftfi
[English version.]
Protocol No. 49.—Meeting of Tuesday, July 4, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 4th July, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the. United States
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Batlly-Blanchakd, "1
H. Cunynghame,
ALPH. DE COUECEL,
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Co-Secretaries.
Inclosure 3 in No. 96.
Protocole No. CO.—Se'ance du Mereredi, 5 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres 6tant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30. +„+•
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps poursuit son argumentation. V i
1ft
96
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 5 Juillet, 1893, et ont signe1
Le President..        -.        ..        ,.
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la, Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN "W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H, TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 50.—Meeting of Wednesday, July 5, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess"."
On reassembling, the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument,
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 5th July, 1893, and signed:
The President .,
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
Co-Secretaries*
Inclosure 4 in No. 96.
Protocole No. 51.—Se'ance du Jeudi, 6 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a. 11 heures 30, tous les Arbitres etant presents,
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend sa plaidoirie.
La seance est suspendue a T heure 30.
A la reprise, l'Honorable Edward J. Phelps continue son argumentation.
A 4 heures la seance est levee et le Tribunal s'ajourne au lendemain a 11 heures 30.
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 6 Juillet, 1893, et ont signe
Le President..        ..        ,,
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne
Le Secretaire ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHABLESLp. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 51.—Meeting of Thursday. July 6, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11-30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At 1*30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 11*30 a.m.
Done at Paris, the 6th July, 1893, and signed:
The President
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard,
H. Cunynghame,
}
Co-Secretaries. 97
Inclosure 5 in No. 96.
Protocole No. M.-Se'ance du Vendredi, 7 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a. 11 Iiphtpq *^n f™10 i„„ a vi      ,L
L'Honorable aJrJn ?'tous les A^kes etant presents.
a, aonoraote Udward J Phelps reprend son argumentation
La seance est suspendue a 1 heure 30
A la reprise WWaWj £<*W J. i>^Zps continue sa plaidoirie.
l'apret-midi ^^ '* ^ et le TriWl s'a30urne ** lendem^ a 2 heures de
Ainsi fait a Paris, le 7 Juillet, 1893, et ont signe*
Le President ..        ..    ALPH. DE COUECEL.
L Agent des Etats-Ums     .. ..    JOHN W. EOSTEE
LAgent dela Grande-Bretagne    ..    CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
Le becretaire ..        ..        ..    A. IMBEET
[English version.]
Protocol No. 52.—Meeting of Friday, July 7, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 11*30 a.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps resumed his argument.
At l-30 the Tribunal took a recess.
On reassembling, the Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued his argument.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned to the next day at 2 p.m.
Done at Paris, the 7th July, 1893, and signed :
The President
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
The Agent for the United States  ..    JOHN W. EOSTEE.
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate :
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard, 1 r   ^ .
. Cunynghame, )
Inclosure 6 in No. 96.
Protocole No. 53.—Se'ance du Samedi, 8 Juillet, 1893.
LE Tribunal s'est reuni a 2 heures, tous les Arbitres etant presents.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps reprend et acheve sa plaidoirie.
Sir Charles Russell, au nom de ses collegues, remercie les membres du Tribunal
de la bienveillante attention avec laquelle ils ont suivi ces longs debats. II remercie
e^alement le Secretaire, les Co-Secretaires, et Secretaires-Adjoints du Tribunal, ainsi
que les Secretaires particuliers des Arbitres de leur obligeant et utile concours.
L'Honorable Edward J. Phelps s'associe aux paroles de Sir Charles Eussell, au nom
des Conseils du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis. II se fait l'interprete de tous ses
collegues en rendant hommage a la competence et a la courtoisie avec lesquelles le
President a dirige les discussions et renouvelle l'expression de leur gratitude pour
l'hospitalite de la Erance. 9BBl ,,,.,, ,
Le President annonce alors que le Tribunal va prendre 1 aiiaire en deiib6r6.
Sir Charles Russell et VHonorable Edward J. Phelps temoignent le desir qu'au cas
oii le Tribunal, durant ses deliberations, croirait devoir s'adresser aux Conseils pour
obtenir d'eux quelque edaircissement, la demande et la reponse aient lieu par ecrit.
I Le President repond que le Tribunal tiendra compte de ce desir dans la mesure-
du possible, sans renoncer toutefois au droit que lui donne le Traite de requerir toutes
informations orales, ecrites ou imprimees qu'il jugera-utile. m   #
L'Agent de Sa Majeste Britannique fait connaitre qu'il restera a Pans, ainsi que=
l'Agent des Etats-Unis, a la disposition du Tribunal.
A 4 heures la seance est levee.
[691] U 98
Ainsi fait a. Paris, le 8 Juillet, 1893, et ont signe:
Le President. .
L'Agent des Etats-Unis
L'Agent de la Grande-Bretagne    ..
Le Secretaire
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
[English version.]
Protocol No. 53.—Meeting of Saturday, July 8, 1893.
THE Tribunal assembled at 2 p.m., all the Arbitrators being present.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps continued and concluded his argument.
Sir Charles Russell, in the name of his colleagues, thanked the members of the
Tribunal for the kind attention with which they had followed the lengthy debates.
He also thanked the Secretary, Co-Secretaries, and Assistant Secretaries of the Tribunal,
as well as the Private Secretaries of the Arbitrators, for their obliging and useful
assistance.
The Honourable Edward J. Phelps indorsed the remarks of Sir Charles Eussell in the
name of Counsel for the Government of the United States. He referred, on behalf
of all his colleagues, to the ability and courtesy with which the President had directed
the discussions, and he renewed the expression of their gratitude for the hospitality of
Prance.
The President thereupon announced that the Tribunal would take the case under
consideration.
Sir Charles Russell and the Honourable JEJdward J. Phelps expressed their desire
that in case the Tribunal, during its deliberations, should find it necessary to obtain
from Counsel any further information, the request for such information and the
answer thereto should be in writing.
The President replied that the Tribunal would take note of the request as far as
possible, without however surrendering the right given it by the Treaty of requiring
all such information, whether oral, written, or printed, as it might deem useful.
The Agent of Her Britannic Majesty announced that the Agent of the United
States and he would remain in Paris at the disposition of the Tribunal.
At 4 p.m. the Tribunal adjourned.
Done at Paris, the 8th July, 1893, and signed:
The President ..
The Agent for the United States .
The Agent for Great Britain
The Secretary ..        ..
ALPH. DE COUECEL.
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
A. IMBEET.
Translation certified to be accurate:
(Signed) A. Bailly-Blanchard
H. Cunynghame,
1
Co-Secretaries.
No. 97.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received August 14.)
{Extract.) Paris, August 12, 1893.
WITH reference to your Lordship's despatch of the 15th April last and
previous correspondence, I have the honour to transmit herewith a copy of a letter
which I addressed to Baron de Courcel on the subject of the withdrawal of the United
States' Agent from the joint arrangement for preparing and printing short-hand notes
of the proceedings before the Tribunal.
I communicated a copy of this letter to Mr. Eoster.
It appeared to me that, as these reports had been of obvious utility to the
Arbitrators, the cost of their production might fairly be included among the'expenses
which, under Article XII of the Treaty of Arbitration, are to be shared in equal 99
inclosed) settmg forth Ms reasons for dissenting from my viem on tte subject    ^
from CUL 0trlr„ri-T?di ™\l ha™ the honout to dolose an ortraet
a=££& gg* SSL4te ^^-^M^S
KeresTu&TS.eS C°mPetent t0 ™* by "^ -d * W« "'
Inclosure 1 in No. 97.
Mr. Tupper to Baron de Courcel.
Dear Baron de Courcel, pariS} August g, 1693.
YOU will remember that shortly after the commencement of the proceedings
before the Tribunal the United States' Government withdrew from the joint arrangement for preparing and printing shOrt-hand notes of the oral arguments.
The correspondence which passed on this subject between the United States'
Agent and myself, and a statement showing General Eoster's reasons for withdrawing
were laid before the Tribunal, and will be found on pp. 507 and 508 of Part III of the
Reports of Proceedings.
Since the withdrawal of the United States' Government, which was finally
announced on the 12th April, the reports have been continued under the supervision of
the British staff, and at the sole expense of Her Majesty's Government.
In recommending this course to Lord Eosebery I was to a large extent influenced
by the consideration that verbatim reports of the daily proceedings would be not only
convenient, but necessary, for the members of the Tribunal. Erom some expressions
used by yourself at the meeting of the 7th April (see Eeport of Proceedings, Part I,
p. 148), I feel sure that you have appreciated their usefulness, and the constant
reference which has been made to them by the other Arbitrators confirms my opinion
as to their general utility to the Tribunal.
Under the circumstances, I venture to suggest through you that the Arbitrators
should consider whether the cost of preparing these reports might not be fairly
included as one of the expenses of the Tribunal. The Xlllth Article of the Treaty
requires the Arbitrators "to keep an accurate record of their proceedings, and to
employ the necessary officers to assist them," and in Article XII it is stated that after
the payment by each Government of remuneration to their respective Agents and
Counsel, and of the cost of preparing and submitting their several Cases, | All other
expenses connected with the Arbitration shall be defrayed by the two Governments in
equal moieties." W&M    * i -l 1       M
In case this su^estion should meet with the approval of the Arbitrators, it would
of course be understood that Her Majesty's Government would bear their share of the
expenses incurred by the United States in producing the reports | the speeches of
their Counsel which they have presented to-the Tribunal, m addition to those supplied
by the British side. , .    ,_ , „      , ,
I regret that I have been unable, as shown m the correspondence referred to
above to come to any agreement with the United States' Agent on the subject, and
this must be my excuse for troubling you with this referer
I have forwarded a copy of this letter to Mr. Eoster
I am, &c
ence.
(Signed)
CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
[691] 100
Inclosure 2 in No. 97.
Mr. Foster to Baron de Courcel.
Dear Sir, Paris, August 9, 1893.
I HAVE received from the Honourable C. H. Tupper, Agent of the British
Government, a copy of a communication dated the 8th instant, and addressed by him
to you, containing a request respecting the expenses incurred by him in preparing a
report of the oral argument of Counsel before the Tribunal. This communication
compels me to address you on the subject.
The suggestion of the Agent of the British Government seems to be that the
Arbitrators should in some manner, directly or indirectly, by their own action, impose
upon the Government of the United States a part of the expense incurred by him in
printing a report of the proceedings before the Tribunal, including the arguments of
Counsel. This seems to me to be very extraordinary, and I can in no manner
assent to it.
If the expense had been incurred in pursuance of some agreement between
the parties, there would have been no occasion to trouble the Tribunal with any
suggestion concerning its payment. If it had been incurred in pursuance of some
direction or authority of the Tribunal, it would be very proper for that body to
consider how it should be defrayed.
But it has been incurred in neither of these modes. This report has been made
solely under the authority of the Agent of Great Britain without my authority or
consent. It has never been subjected to any revision by me or any one under my
authority, has never been furnished to me or to the Counsel of the United States, and
is, so far as it has been made known to me by the use made of it in argument by the
Counsel for the British Government, erroneous and imperfect. I cannot therefore
consent to its adoption as a report of the proceedings of, and arguments before, the
Tribunal.
I was not unwilling at the outset of the sessions that a joint arrangement should be
made, whereby an accurate report of the proceedings of, and arguments before, the
Tribunal should be furnished for the use of the Arbitrators and Counsel, as well as for
the purposes of a permanent record. Jt is not necessary here to enter upon any
statement of the circumstances which led to a failure to make such an arrangement. It
is enough to say that to call upon the United States to contribute to the expense incurred
would imply that the Agent of Great Britain had the right, after failing to secure the
assent of the United States to the plan of reporting proposed by him, to proceed ajid
execute that plan without the assent of the United States, and without any supervision
on its part, and that the United States was bound to contribute to the
although it had received no copies of the full report.
It seems to me quite unnecessary to dwell upon the incorrectness of such
position.
expense
a
I am, &c.
(Signed)
JOHN W. EOSTEE.
Inclosure 3 in No. 97.
Baron de Courcel to Mr. Tupper.
(Extract.) Paris, August 11,1893,
DUEING a private meeting held by the members of the ^ibunal of Arbitration
I submitted to my colleagues the note which you were so kind as to address to me
concerning the short-hand reports of the Tribunal's proceedings and the mode of
defraying the expense necessary for getting up those reports.
My colleagues concurred with me that those reports had been practically very
useful to all of us, and had helped us in our work, and that we were under real
obligations to all the persons who had taken the trouble to prepare such reports. As
to the question of the cost thereby incurred, the Arbitrators did not deem themselves
competent to examine by whom, and in what manner, it ought to be met. 101
No. 98.
Mr. Tapper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received August 16.)
T trAin? +1,   t- ■    , Paris, Auqust 15, 1893.
Sp« JJh^T fAvw t0 ^ansflllt t0 7™r Lordship the decision of the Behring
Si, i^TVt initiators whlcl1 has been Slivered to me this day in accordant
With Article XI of the Treaty of the 29th Eebruary, 1892*
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 99.
Mr. Tapper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received August 16.)
^y Lord, PariS} August 15j 1893j
THE final duty now devolves upon me as Her Majesty's Agent to record an
official acknowledgment of the services of those gentlemen with whom I have been
associated.
_ I esteem it a privilege to testify to the great value of the assistance which I have
derived from the support and counsel of Sir Charles Bussed whose masterly argument
will ever remain a monument of learning and forensic skill. His conduct of the case
of the Government of the Queen left nothing to be desired.
The Attorney-General was ably supported by Sir Eichard "Webster. I may be
permitted to indorse the sentiments so happily expressed by the President of the
Tribunal at the close of Sir Eichard's argument.
| Sir Eichard," said Baron de Courcel, " we thank you for the very substantial
and useful observations with which you have supplemented the argument of Sir Charles
Eussell. We knew how much we were indebted to you already for the elaborate
study you have made of this case on behalf of Great Britain, and I, for one, have very
much admired the unrestrtfeted and friendly co-operation of yesterday's Attorney-
General with to-day's Attorney-General. The country is indeed to be envied where
party spirit admits of such brotherly association when the national interest is at
stake."
Mr. Oteit^opher Eobinson assisted in a signal manner, and fully justified his
special nomination by the Government of Canada.
Although I propose in this despatch to confine my observations chiefly to those
who attended the Arbitration proceedings at Paris, I wish to refer to the late Honour*!
able "W. H. Cross, one of the Counsel originally employed on behalf of Her Majesty's
Government. His u&ti&ely death is deeply to be deplored. Mr, Cross' ability I fully
recognized and appreciated, while his genial disposition had .endeared him to all his
associates.
I have already alluded to the services of Mr. M. H. Box, and I have only to add
that those of Mr. E. T. Piggott were equally valuable.
Sir George Baden-Powell and Dr. G. M. Dawson have been constantly consulted,
and their advice has been of great value.
Dr. Dawson attended at Paris. It gives me pleasure to bear witness to his
indefatigable industry, which was coupled with a complete mastery of the subject of
seal life.
Mr. Maxwell, as Secretary of my Staff, made himself exceedingly useful in every
way, and I gratefully acknowledge his kindly and ready assistance. His intimate
acquaintance with the Erench language has been most convenient to me, as well as to
the public advantage.
Mr. Charles Russell's services have.also been of great benefit. • In addition to the
important work which came regularly under his attention as solicitor, he, with the
assistance of Mr. Piggott, undertook the laborious task of revising and superintending
the printing of the stenographic notes of the proceedings before the Tribunal.
Mr. Anderson, of the Colonial Office, who, as your Lordship is aware, was conversant with all the facts of this case, rendered material aid.
I   have   also   to   commend the  diligence   and   zeal evinced by Mr.  Ashley
* For copy of the decision inclosed in this despatch see "United States No. 10 (1893).''
[691]
P 2
3S*fSfK45«-f's ^ >- *~ 102
Eroude, C.M.G., Mr. Joseph Pope, and Mr. James Macoun, and to express my
appreciation of the readiness with which these gentlemen have at all times striven to
facilitate the business of the Agency. In fact, the members of the General Staff
have vied with one another in their endeavour to promote the common cause.
The services rendered by Mr. G. E. Eairholme, of the Eoreign Office, in the matter
of the Eussian translations, call for special mention. I may also refer to the excellent
work done by him, as well as by Mr. H. Earnall and Mr. E. A. Crowe, as Erench
translators generally, which has evoked from the President of the Tribunal an expression of admiration.
In thus acknowledging the valuable aid which I have received from those more
immediately connected with the Arbitration at Paris, I am not unmindful of the fact
that there are others, whether serving under your Lordship or the Secretary of State
for the Colonies, or in the employ of the Canadian Government, whose assistance in
the laborious work of the preparation of this case merits recognition.
As Minister of Marine and Fisheries of Canada, it will be my pleasure and my
duty to represent to his Excellency the Govern or-General with more particularity my
sense of the important services which have been rendered by officers of the Canadian
Civil Service, whose names do not appear in this despatch. In the meantime, I
content myself with this general allusion.
I cannot, however, close these observations without expressing to your Lordship
my warm appreciation of the advantage which I have derived from association with
Sir Thomas Sanderson, of whose knowledge and experience I have fully availed myself
at every stage of the case. Indeed, I find a difficulty adequately to express my
gratitude to him for the readiness he has ever shown to assist me in the performance of
those honourable duties with which I have been charged.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 100.
Mr. Tupper to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received August 16.)
My Lord, Paris, August 15, 1893.
I HAVE the honour to report that the decision of the Tribunal having been
delivered to me, I propose to leave Paris this day, and to sail for Canada on the 17th
instant.
I have asked Mr. Maxwell to remain here for a few days to wind up the business
of this Agency.
I have, &c.
(Signed) CHAELES H. TUPPEE.
No. 101.
The Earl of Rosebery to the Marquis of Dufferin.*
My Lord, Foreign Office, August 29, 1893.
THE Arbitrators appointed under the Treaty of Washington of the 29th Eebruary,
1892, for the examination of the various questions that had arisen in connection with
the fur-seal fishing industry in parts of Behring Sea and the North Pacific Ocean, have
pronounced and published their Award on the 15th instant.
I have now received the Queen's commands to request that your Excellency will
convey to the^ President of the Erench Eepublic Her Majesty's acknowledgments of
the great ability and unremitting attention displayed during the prolonged proceedings
of the Tribunal by Baron de Courcel, the eminent Statesman nominated by the
President as one of the Arbitrators on the Tribunal.
The examination of the voluminous documents laid before them, and the difficulties
surrounding the questions on which they were occupied, have imposed on each one of
the Arbitrators a considerable sacrifice of time and personal convenience and a large
amount of personal labour.
• Similar despatches were addressed to Her Majesty's Representatives at Rome, Stockholm, and Washington. 103
of He/EL^/r Wil]i mhT\ t0 tlie PreskIe]lt of the Erench Eepublic the hope
thefvahfnh ! I ^ ^acknowledgements may be conveyed to Baron de Courcel for
tne valuable services which he has rendered on this occasion.
(Signed)
I am, &c.
EOSEBEET.
No. 102.
The Earl of Rosebery to the Marquis of Dufferin.
My Lord, Foreign Office, August 29, 1&9S.
«. -o aaaition to the obligations conferred on this country by the President of
a i -"iT? EePubllc m the selection of an eminent Statesman to act as one of the
Arbitrators on the Behring Sea Seal Eisheries question, the President and the
government of the Erench Eepublic have shown a marked courtesy and magnificent
hospitality to the members of the Tribunal and to the British and American gentlemen
who have been engaged in the proceedings before it.
I request that you will take a fitting opportunity of conveying to the President
and to M. Develle the best acknowledgments of Her Majesty's Government for the
attention and kindness shown to the British members of the Court of Arbitration
during the prolonged period over which its sittings have extended. The reception
accorded to these gentlemen has been mentioned by them with the warmest expressions
of gratitude, and has been a cause of sincere gratification to the Queen and her
Government as an evidence of cordiality, no less than of the generosity with which
the Erench nation always treats its guests.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 103.
The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Tupper.
Sir, Foreign Office, August 29,1893.
I HAVE to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 15th instant, inclosing the Award delivered on that day by the Behring Sea Tribunal of Arbitration, and
of your further despatch of the same date, in which you call attention to the services
of the several gentlemen associated with you in the proceedings before the Tribunal.
I have received the Queen's commands to signify to you, and to those who have
worked with you, Her Majesty's gracious approval of the zeal and ability with which
you have maintained the interests of this country and of Her Majesty's subjects in the
important matters which were submitted for decision.
I have conveyed to the Attorney-General and to Sir Eichard Webster the cordial
acknowledgments of Her Majesty's Government for the manner in which they have
presented the Case of Her Majesty's Government before the Tribunal, and I must
request you to offer the same acknowledgments on their behalf to Mr. 0. Eobinson, Q.C.,
of the Canadian Bar.
I note with entire sympathy and agreement the tribute which you pay to the
ability of the late Mr. W. H. Cross, whose premature death was a subject of deep
I have to request that you will assure Dr. Dawson of the great value attached by
Her Mai-sty's Government to the assistance which he has rendered throughout the
Arbitration and their appreciation of the learning, ability, and patient industry which
he has shown in collecting and placing at the disposal of those charged with the
-conduct of the British Case the information required for the elucidation of the various,
questions of geography and natural history involved in the argument.
I shall offer a similar acknowledgment to Sir G. Baden-Powell.
:?«li!«Wi*rt*''M'-t*>'"—- i 104
It has afforded me sincere gratification to read the testimony .you bear to the
efficient aid received by you from the other gentlemen employed at Paris, and to the
assistance which has been rendered to you by various members of this Department.
I am, &c.
:-m (Signed) EOSEBEEY.
I
IIP
No. 104.
The Earl of Rosebery to Lord Hannen.*
My Lord, Foreign Office, August 29, 1893.
THE labours of the Tribunal of Arbitration appointed under the Treaty of
Washington of the 29th Eebruary, 1892, having been now closed, and their Award
delivered on the 15th instant, I have received the Queen's commands to convey to you
Her Majesty/s acknowledgments for youtr services as one of the Arbitrators, and her
appreciation of the zeal and 4MBty you have shown in that office.
Her Majesty recognizes that your duties, involving as they have done the closest
attention during a prolonged period of time, were undertaken at considerable personal
^convenience and from a strong sense of public duty.
I have pleasure in asking you to accept also the sincere thanks of Her Majesty.
Government for the valuable services you have rendered to the country on this important occasion.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
No. 105.
The Earl of Rosebery to Sir C. Russell.f
Sir, Foreign Office, August 29, 1893.
THE proceedings of the Behring Sea Arbitration having now been concluded, and
the Award havrrrg been <Mive*red by the Arbitrators, I have much pleasure-in offering
to you the sincere thanks of Her Majesty's Government for the eminent services you
have rendered in connection with the Arbitration, and in assuring you how greatly they
appreciate the patience and industry shown in the preparation of the pleadings, and
the signal ability with which the British Case has been argued by you as Her Majesty's
Counsel before the Tribunal,
I am, &c.
(Signed)
EOSEBEEY.
No. 106.
The Earl of Rosebery to Sir G. Baden-Powell.
Sir, Foreign Office, August 29,1893.
THE proceedings of the Behring Sea Arbitration having now been concluded, and
the Award having been Slivered, I have much pleasure in offerisg to f@a the best
tteamks of Her Majesty's Government for the valuable assistance which you have
r&adered (JttijSng the preparation of the pleadings, by placing at the disposal of those
charged with the conduct of the British Case your exceptional and extensive knowledge
of the habits of the fur-seal, and of the various questions connected with the seal
fishery.
Her Majesty's Government afe fully sensible of the zealfanci public spiritwirfdlai:
you have shown in the discharge of this task, which was voluntarily undertaken by
you, and of the amount of labour which it has entailed.
I am, &c.
(Signed) EOSEBEEY.
Also -to Sir J. Tfedin-p&ms
f Also to Sir R. Weteter. 105
No. 107.
Lord Hannen to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received September 8.)
My Lord, 49, Lancaster Gate, London, September 6, 1893.
I AM honoured by your Lordship's letter of the 29th ultimo, in which you inform
me that you have received the Queen's commands to convey to me Her Majesty's
acknowledgments for my services as one of the Arbitrators under the Treaty of the
29th Eebruary, 1892. I desire to express my respectful gratitude for the gracious
terms of approval with which those acknowledgments are accompanied. They will
remain for me a source of legitimate pride to the end of my life. It is also a subject
of great satisfaction to me that my services have been deemed worthy of the thanks of
Her Majesty's Government. I trust that the labours I have been engaged in will
prove beneficial, not only to this country on the present occasion, but to the interests
of peace throughout the world.
I have, &c.
(Signed) HANNEN.
No. 108.
Sir C. Russell to the Earl of Rosebery.—(Received September 8.)
My Lord, Lincoln's Inn, London, September 8, 1893.
I BEG to acknowledge your Lordship's favour of the 28th ultimo, in which you
are good enough to convey to me the thanks of Her Majesty's Government for my
services in the Behring Sea Arbitration. I thank your Lordship; but I should like to
be permitted to say how much the Counsel representing the interests of Great Britain
were indebted to the gentlemen connected with the Eoreign Office for most valuable
help in their labours. I refer, I need scarcely say, in an especial manner to Sir Thomas
' Sanderson, whose wise counsel and criticism in the preparation of the Case, Counter-
Case, and Argument we valued highly; but I refer also to the unremitting help and
attention of Mr. E. P. Maxwell and of Mr. Ashley Eroude.
I have, &c.
(Signed) C. EUSSELL.  % Mi
M9'
ill:
Ul b; SH-36! G73 t&1
60^%HUX

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